The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01285

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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sDILT H1W8PAFIE
TO:
PHILADELPHIA
ONI WAY...... $141.00
ROUND TW......$271.45
PanamaAtnsrtcati

Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
rWENTY-SEVEN'fH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY. NOVEMBER I, 1951
Tank-Led Red Attack Brings
Reply From UN Planes,

1 Dead, 14 Hurt
In RP's Holiday
r ATOMS AND NEONS Smoke from an atomic explosion Is plainly visible beyond the garish
^ sky-line of Las Vegas. Nev., as the latest Atomic Energy Commission test bomb was detonated
at the Frenchman's Flat proving ground. Minutes after the smoke was seen, the shock wave
rattled and broke windows In Las Vegas.
One dead and it least 14 In-
jured as a result of*ccldents was
the tragic toil of the two-day In-
dependence Day celebration In
Panam City.
The dead man was Jos Anto-
nio Orael. a Panama police me-
chanic, whose motorcycle skid-
ded out of control, somersaulted
and landed on top of him on the
Ro Abajo roac* Saturday night.
Three of the 14 in Santo Tomas
Hospital were critically injured
when ihey were knocked sprawl-
ing by a bi.s at the entrance to
Pueblo Nuevo Nine more were
run over by cars. Four are chil-
dren.
Two of tne drivers fled from
the scene of the accident after
running down their victims.
Bullfighter Rubn D. Rivera
suffered a bialr, concussion when
he was knocked over by a bull at
the San Francisco bull ring.
A young would-be bullfighter
was gored in thigh at an im-
provised bull ring at West 17th
Street, opposite the Central Fire
Station.
A fire, which caused some da-
mage to a small rum factory on
Avenue "A,' also was listed
among the Independence Day ac-
cidents.
Firemen, who put out the blaze
before It could reach a number
of alcohol containers, had one of
their number slightly injured.
All the accidents reported oc-
curred witnln the area of the
city.
Reports fioin Coion. where a
big celebration is taking place
today, and from other part of
the country were not available
this morning.
Pickets Picketed As Showdown
Vote Nears On Dock Strike

(TTPJ^- I presli
Rival waterfront leaders expect- j Longshoremen's Association AFL
td more violence today at a | whose effort to end the
showdown vote by rebel steve- strike have failed
NEW TURK, Nov.
Big 3, Russia
Prepare Rival
Peace Plans
PARK. Nov. s (Uj>) The
Big-Three Foreign Ministers
're "in complete agree-
8TH ARMY HQ., Korea, Nov. 5 (UP) United Na-
tions planes, artillery and troops today smashed at Com-
munist forces on the western front in retaliation for the
strongest tank-led Red attock in recent months yesterday.
United Nations Shooting Stars, Mustangs, Corsairs
and Skyraiders teamed with United Nations artillery in
bombarding Red troops entrenched on two hills west of
Yongchen.
United Nations infantry then stormed the Red posi-
tions, where they were last reported "heavily engaged with
the enemy."
ment" today on a Western "peace I Previously the Reds had forced I bombers destroyed 325 Red sun
SJlTSV0.! Pentatln to the, Unlte0"; Nations units from two ply trucks out of 1,400 attacked
sixth United Nations General As- key hills west of Yonchpn, but last night
sembly, which opens tomorrow.
A U.N. spokesman said Latin
American members nations have
asked for a brief postponement
of the opening of the General
Assembly owning to a lack of
agreement among them on the
choice of a candidate for Assem-
bly president.
The spokesman. said the re-
the Allied troops later recaptur-
ed the. lost ground.
On the eastern front United
Nations forces pushed their
deepest spearhead in North Ko-
rea still further up the coast.
They gained more than 2,000
yards northwest of Kansong. and
seized a hill south of Kosong. 48
miles north of the 38th parallel.
On the central front United
quest was rejected by Nawollah i Nations troops repulsed a light
Enteaam. outgoing Assembly pre- communist attack southeast of
sident.
Rsala ia to fee prepar-
ing a rival "world peace plan"
far presentation to the Assem-
bly tomorrow
It is understood that the West-
ern plan, drafted fey UJB. Secre-
tary of State Dean Acheson, cen-
ters on these mam points.
1. A final peace in Korea.
1 A new otttXrJor world dia-
dres who started the .W).-
000.000 wildcat dock strike- 22
days ago.
Strike leader John Sampson
assigned 130 pickets to duty in
front of a school near the
waterfront where a ballot box
was set up on the petition of
43 members of his own local
Joseph P. Ryan "Lifetime"
repeatedly,
ww ovjtstraged by Sampson's
newest nsbve, Ryan said:
"TMfc^wlll mean picketing
of pickafR aad makes as much
sense a*the rest of the stop-
page."
RyanjMdtd that members of
Local 71k hat petitioned for the
*r#ee
WATCHING AN A-BOMB Troops of the 11th Airborne Division, their awe obvious on their
faces, watch a test A-bomb detonation at the Atomic Energy Commission's Nevada proving
ground. These troops were the first to be used in conjunction with an atomic explotlon.
MEN AND MUSHROOM Watching the atomic cloud mush-
room fcnto the skies over Nevada are men of the 11th Air-
borne Division, the first troops to participate in an ato-
mic teat. The bomb was detonated at the Atomic Energy
Commissions proving ground.

'Panama' Sails From Cristobal

*a.v mornlnc from Cr baL, the "TffV
W4to 75 passenger, aboard. 'Line ship will disembark.
"T'
uta
11th Atomic
Explosion
Set Off
LAS VEGAS, Nov. 5 4TJP)
The 11th atomic explosion in
the United States was set off
at Frenchman's Flat today.
It was the fifth of the pre-
sent atomic test series, and was
apparently a medium-size atom
bomb dropped from a Superfort
at 8:30 a. m, local time.
There was the usual bkfeW-
lng flash, followed by the mush-
room cloud.
Official observers included at
least two doeen generals, in-
cluding Oen. Curtis Lemrv.
chief of Strategic Air Command.
Informed sources revealed
yesterday that "guinea pig'' ani-
mals tethered from 3.000 to 6,000
feet from the ''ground zero"
bullseye beneath Thursday's Ust
explosiona medium-sized A-
bomb touched off tome 1.200
feet in the airan rvived the
blast with nothing more than a
slight and momentary daze from
the shock.
.. sb*ej>, the animals aard
Ue test, were protected fey
cover however The survive*
*!;* W** l etfeets.
M feur dog left in the
open Were killed.
Some 1500 troops actually
'c o'rt hi the tests, but wax*
W r>rr as close to the
blast point at the animals.
Capf. Nelp's Body
To Be Sent To US
A requiem mass for Capt. Louis
Nelp. in, who died Friday as a
result of a gunshot wound, was
held this morning at the Fort
Clayton Chapel. The body will
be sent to Peru, Indian*,, his
hometown, by MATS tomorrow.
His widow, Mrs. Kathleen
Nelp and their three children.
Judith, 4. Oeffery. 3 and Kath-
leen. 10 months, will accompany
the body.
Oapt. Nelp was Adjutant of
the 7481st (Signal at Fort Clay-
ton. He died at 11:45 a.m. Fri-
day in the Signal Headquarters
Building at Fort Clayton.
He was alone In the arms room
when the shot was fired. The
Army said his death was acci-
dental .
He was 37 vears old He arriv-
ed on the Isthmus In Oct 1949.
Capt. Nelp served in Norman-
dy. Central Europe, northern
France and the Rhineland dur-
ing World War II. He was active
In soldier athletics, and was well-
known on the Pacific side.
Besides his wife and three
children, he is survived bv his
mother and father. Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Nelp. II. and a sister, Mrs.
Harold Repass, all of Peru. In-
diana.
Churchill's Economic
Program Approved
LONDON, Nov. 5 (UPThe
new British Cabinet today ap-
proved Winston Churchill's pro-
tram for economic recovery at
ome. and his hopes for ending
the cold war program will be
laid before Parliament and the
world tomorrow in the tradi-
tional "King's speech."
* leaders within the
gnored the rank-and-
e to return to their
electiotrseeause Sampson and
other
local
filers'
jobs.
S*
ILA
petit
tlon,
and
force
4. An expression of wUlingntf*
to meet with the Soviets again
in an effort fo reach agreement
that could end the cold war.
A Soviet bloc sourca said So-
viet Foreign Minister Andrei
Vishlnsky. now. 8. hoped to pull
off a diplomatic coud before he
retires, possible next year His
plsn would concern these seven
points:
council
mv
Sight Restored,
Meat Ration
Shocks Woman
IFSWICH, England Nov. 5
(UW Mrs. Marjory Lath,
42, ah* had been blind for
eight yeara, cooked her flrvi
meal yesterday after a eor-
nea-grafting operation restor-
ed her sight-
"I had a shock when I saw
' the meat ration
looked," ah* commented.
. charged that of 43
feers who signed a
asking for the elec-
were stooges of Ryan
tha. others signed under
m duress."
Ryan ^countered that the
uncil called the election he-
Sampson and other lead-
Local 791. sparkplue- of
the strike, had refused "legitim-
ate*' appeals of their own local
members for a showdown on
the back-to-work proposal.
Ryan declined to predict how
the vote would turn out, saving
only that "if the strikers would
withdraw those foreign charac-
ters from the piers, there'd be
few pickets" and the strike
"which is ruining this port
would be over."
Sampson, however, said that
"bushels of strikers would be
oustldenot. inside-the hall"
where the yttte is scheduled for
2 p. m. EST.
The turnout for the schedul-
ed vote should provide a re-
liable gauge of sentiment of at
least one segment of strikers
after three weeks of idleness, the
longest longshoremen's walkout
In the history of New York har-
bor.
The strike feeean Oct. 15 with
stevedores rebelling against an
agreement Rvsn negotiated
with -4he American Shioping
Association and which was rati-
fied by union members. The
strikers Remanded that the
agreement be renegotiated and
insisted the ratification vote
was fraudulent.
House Investigates
' ***or Practices
Of H-Bomb Project
AUOUSTA. Oa, Nov. 5 (UP)
A House Labor Subcommittee
will begin hearings here todav
on charges of 'gross waste and
labor reaketeerlns" at the bil-
Hon-doJhrr Savannah River H-
Bomb preieet.
The five-man committee,
headed by Rep, Orsham A. Bar-
den (D-N. C). will Investigate
labor Dractices at the vast plant
that the Du Pont Co. is building
for the government.
There have been numerous
charges of widespread loafing
amona: the 20.000 worker* now
on hand nd one complaint that
uron tnt1M ed aa high as $108.
1. The Korean war.
2. Banning ot atomic weapons.
3. Unification of Germany.
4. Disarmament to be carried
out In stages
, 5. A peace settlement with Jap-
an including Russian and Red
China participation.
6. Prohibition of war propa-
ganda.
7. A five-power peace pact
among the Big Three Western
power? Russian and Commun-
ist China. ^
Kumsong.
United Nations
fighters and
Elmer Middlebrook's
Body Being Shipped
To UiJiopetowB
ujfcjtlsey elections in Arrangement* are being: made
leading to unification, or the shipment of thebody of
Hoover Sees Need
For Cov't Spending
'WotcMoa' Aoency
WASHINGTON. Nov. 5 (UP>
Former President Herbert
Hoover said todav that Congress
needs a new "watchdog" group,
In addition to its reeular com-
mittees, to ride herd on mount-
ing federal spending.
In a letter to Sen. Henrv
Cabot Lodge-Jr.. (R-Mass.). Mr.
Hoover said that a new screen-
ing agency for congressional ap-
propriations la "essential" now
that the annual total of money
bills runs into many billions.
Elmer L. Middlebrook, Canal
Zone police traffic officer, to his
hometown in Thomaston, Con-
necticut.
Middlebrook drowned Friday
morning in tre Gstun spillway
when he fe:l from a ledge where
he had been fishing.
Funeral services were held
Sunday afternoon at. the Church
of Our Saviour Cristobal.
The body was recovered Sat-
urday morning by diver ,Carl
Sparke in 30 feet of water, about
100 feet away from the spot
where he dltanDeared after being
swept away by the heavy current
in the Chagres River.
Middlebrook was employed asa
policeman in Cristobal since Oc-
tober 1945 following his release
from the Navy at Coco Solo,
where he served as Chief Phar-
macist Mate for three years.
He began life career in the Ca-
nal Zone Baseball League while
he was In the Nary.
Middlebrook. who was 28, was
a good swimmer Onlookers said
he kept af'oat for five minutes
or more while other fishermen
attempted a rsdje.
A fishing companion of his;
Armv Sgt. Mike Barzowski of the
Atlantic Senior's Provost Marshal
Office, dived !n to save Mlddel-
brook but wa; unable to reach
him before he went down.
Mldcilebrook is survived by his
widow, Mrs. Marlon E Middle-
brook of Margarita: a daughter,
Patricia, aged eight a son. Mi-
chael D agen one and his moth-
er who resides in Thomaston,
Conn.
Mrs. Mid diet- rook and the chil-!
dren will accompany the body to
the States
The heaviest Communist traf-
fic was along the western rout*
from Manchuria through Pyong-
yang to the front.
In the air yesterday United
States Sabres and Thunderjeta
shot down two Mlgs and proba-
bly damaged two more without
loss to themselves.
A shooting Star and a Mustang
were lost to Red ground Are.
At the Panmunjom armistice
conference the United Nations
negotiators today gave up the
hunt fo ra compromise ceasefire
line and proposed instead that
the opposhltlon armies merely
stop fighting wherever they may
be when a Korean armistice is
signed.
h This surprise new proposal an-
rently means that the United
:^^fts?.sSgse
heaatem gateway on thete-
vaeion route to Seoul.
However, there is nothing, to
stop United Nations forces trying
to capture Kaesong before a
ceaseflresis signed.
The Communists presumably
will reply to this new proposal
when the PanmunJoQ talks re-
sume tomorrow.
Army Private Kisses;
Girl Charges Battery
An Army private was fined $20
this mornlns in the Balboa Ma-
gistrate's Courc on a charge of
battery.
Entering tne home of a friend
In Coeoli, Pvt Ashley Edward
Brown kissed Aura Maria Delga-
do, who Is employed as a domes-
tic there.
The 23-year-old enlisted man
had engaged lr> a discussion with
the girl (whom he knew from
previous occasions) about her
former boy friend, before kissing
her.
When he k'ased her she ran
downstairs ard ran to the near-
by police station.
Also on tls morning's calen-
dar were four vagrants. Andrs
Mrquez 10-year-old Panama-
nian, and a habitual offender,.
was sentenced to ten days in jail
for loiterinc in the Ancn Sani-
tary office.
Vicente Martines, a 39-year-old
Panamanian a:.d Ouali Mussa. a
32-year-old Frencuman were
each fined tl'1 tor loitering in
La Boca buildings.
And on a similar charge. An-
tonio Gonaaier. a 32-year-o4d
Salvadorean was fined $5.
Frankie, Ava Get Cop Convoy
If Public Safety Threatened
PHU ADH.U HIA. Nov. 5 (UP) station where -Sinatra and
Crooner Frnk Sinstra and his Gardner took a train to
bride-torbe Kisclou Ava Gard- York.
ner were inl'irmed today they
would get a police escort for
their expected redding here neat
week only If 'he public safety
director hiriself orders it.
Polite officials said that no pa-
Miss
New
They had not been assigned to
the job bv their superiors.
Doyle and Hanlon talked to
Mannie Sacks an RCA-Vlctor
vice president who with Isaac
Levy, columpia Broadcasting
trotinen or detectives would be System director., accompanied
assigned to escort the couple hi the couole o their whirlwind
the city without a direct order visit to City Halt,
from Public Safety Director Sa-
muel Rosenberg
The police statement was
made by Aul&tsnt Police Super-
intendent Rici ard Dovle and De-
tective Capt. John Hanlon dur-
ing a police inve*tlgation Into the
presence of twe detectives who
escorted th couple at City Hall
Saturday wrier they applied for
a marriage license.
The Investigation was ordered
by Rosenberg a hen ne returned
from Wash.n: ton Is it nleht and
learned that l:,e detectives had
escorted the ccnpl* through Cltv
Hall
Sacks told the police officials
that the two detectives, who had
escorted Siratra on previous vis-
its to the city were in a Cltv
Hall corridor when the couple
arrived.
Sacks said Sinatra greeted the
detectives and uked them direc-
tions to the cr.ambrrs of Judge
Charles Keiin where the marri-
age license wa* filled out He said
the detectives agrted to show
them the *> aad then just
"trailed along Sacks emphatic-
ally denied thM an; "tips" were
the operators of a seldom-usec
elevator who whisked the coupl
five floors to the street level
while reporters tried to follow
them.
The crooner and the actresa
were expected to be married
sometime next week at the Oer-
mantown home of Lew. a long-
time friend of Sinatra. Tha
singer said in Hew York, how-
ever, that the aate of the wed-
dlne Has n it vet oecn decided.
Although Lew would not con-
firm the wedding would be held
at his home, hi* wife admitted
today that ner living room was
"all upset" b\ cleaners She re-
fused Dhotcigisphers permission
to take pictures of her home be-
cause "the c.ande.ier is down,
the rugs are up and everything
Is a sham oles **
Mrs Levy did aay she thought
that since Sinatra sang at her
daughter's engagement partv
last vear. it as "onlv fair' that
and than to tht railroad passed out to tha detectives or aba sine at ok en ling



.
page two
+Jt PANAMA AMERICAN AH INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, INI
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
O* Mr NO UllMt fffj PANAMA AMtRICAH MM. *C
Fou-mo .v MUOk ouNilviiL m issa
HANMOeie ania*. ioito
t? M lilil f O o 1S4. PAHAMA. O >
Tiliphoni Panama no 4-O740 LiniS>
CULI Aoh.hi. MKAMmieAN. PAMAMA
LQN Of'ICk It 17 CINTIAI AVtNUf SSTWttN lTM AND lltN fTMltTf
.OAIION RlmllINTATlvn. JOSHUA B KW1RI. INC
48 Mapi.on AVI 'NiW tom. '> N. V
LMAl Mil
____________ I ITO t *.*0
____________ O I OO
____________ 0 M OO
MONTH IN OVANCI_
M II MONTHS. IN AOVAN
O NI VIA IN AOVAN
Walter Winchell
In New York
.'IAN ABOUT TOWN
Mrs. Elliot Roosevelt' recent groom (Dr. Rex Rom) will
urge with Merle Oberon abroad... The Jock McLean set buzzes
oout a splituation, court-bound... Mexico City's top feud Is
. etween Nancy Oakes and Madcap Merry Fahrneyover man-
ealing... Vivien Leigh's lovely daughter Suzanne and Joel Tu-
ren (an American sailor) are biasing... The Jack Bennys
aughter Joan and 01 Vic Damone have agreed they're Too
..oung... The playright Arthur Millers have the heartache, too.
x-drama critic Howard Barnes Is on the ailing list... Arline
. adge's castles-ln-the-alr are being built by Weetcheater home-
". jllder E. 81ms... 67th Street art dealers are warning clients
ujout 49 counterfeit British masters floating around town...
-hen there's the one about the darling little Colored girl who
: sked her mother where She came from. Mother, of course,
- ouldn't tell her The Storkto she said El Morocco.
The Washington Wire: Judge J. Hauserman of Liberty, Ohio.
I ruted the richest man In the US. (via Philippine gold), is the
-if Coin back of Taft... The income tax mess will be the OOP's
. ..-ump ace. The first scandal in which the Truman crowd can
-i damaged...The chain-reaction If Ike rung for Prez: Gen.
. awton Collins takes over SHAPE and Oen. Ridgway succeeds
mollina.. The son of a famed Sen. is lifting eyebrows by being
'-.en lots with a famed ex-State Dept. whoops... Prettiest fem-
"ne in Congress these days la Vera Buchanan, widow of the late
-Cong. Buchanan of Penn... Mr. Justice Douglas Is one Amer-
-~i2an sympathetic to some of Iran's alms,
r
Those Wintrop Rockefeller-Joan Blondell items arc bunk.
' x-husband M. Todd remains head man... City Hallers say the
Larry Gross clam-up was engineered by a lawyer last-initial "B"
I ..New York's better boltes are paying J2.J0 per lb. for choice
-tieaki... RKO exec. Ralph Winters and Penny Edwards may
ismmit merger... Wm. Stevens, heir to the ballpark hot dog
"\ ept., is trying to get the concession on post-deb Alyce Stone...
-'-'he Beekman Tower eltUens reveal that Pattl Page's real uh-
Mimhnev is Martin Mills, scion to the publishing mint... Champ
ZTugar Ray says he can't figure out where his t-year-old son
rets that violence. "Must come from his mother"... Sign In
he Singapore powder room: "The Walls Have Ears and They
.lay Be Tour Husband's."
m
Gov. Dewey is pressing the probe against F. Costello. His
idea report they will nail him down... They claim new evld-
.nee will Involve a famed Hoc al lawyer, a noted doctor and
! Ids family... This underco.e.- rleuthlnj Is expected to be com-
pleted in the Spring when they rill oisplay their fireworks...
! 3ne of the rockets: That Costello's money is not in the U. S.
. a* --------------
' Producer Jean Darymple and Col. Philip DeWitt Oinder will
. O* married Thursday in Danbury, Conn. She met him in Berlin
Sit 8ept. when she went over there to do public relations for
l Eerlln Arts Festival. .
Lepke s wiCo;v Ccatrloe u.eUy re-married a loiiR-tlmr pal
two ye.rs ago..; Carle&a Carpenter's- fritjiiitftbusl-
here are mixed with pleasure. Her name is Raff Bal-
ard, currently at the Blue Angel.... Mrs. Charlea Edison has a
:erk>us eye condition... Doris Harris. English tutor at Puerto
Jico Univ., is honeymooning with I.. Victor, photo editor of the
U. I. Press... Mrs. Gil Lamb pooh-poohs the divorce rumors...
Aillle. Platt, the Saks Sth lovely, and adman M. Raymond will
lend... Insiders say the real reason Don Mead's riding license
was rejected had nothing to do with bis track conduct... Mme.
Jolie Gabor's estranged husband Suddenly reappeared after 4
years and took up residence in her swank apt. They don't talk.
Her many admirers are frusstrayted. Teddible for cocktall-party-
inriters!
The colyum' Confederate spies report that Franchot Tone
ran into a contretemps (a N. Y. Times word meaning "Oh,
; No???") when he made a voluntary personal appearance with
ais wife, Barbara Pay ton (in Atlanta last week), with her film,
"Drums in the Deep South"... Interviewing a beauty contestant
. on stage, he asked her name and was informed: "The name is
| Neal and, oddly enough, my father's name is Tom Neal!"... It
| broke up the packed theater, but, as usual, Franchot made a
, quick recovery.
Editor and Publisher disclosed that The Dally Workers pub-
lishers changed their name from Freedom of the Press, Die. to
Publishers New Press, Inc. You mean even they couldn't stum-
mick that lie???... Advertest Research's latest survey: "In JJ49
television ranked 2nd behind newspapers as a major source of
. news in teevy homes. Today It ranks Srd behind newspapers
and radio"... Brownouts may toon,return. Power companies will
; be forced to conserveunless the serious metal shortage la re-
, lieved Texas tycoon Ed Semels, who squires Barbara Benson
Of Sammy Kaye's startles Colony waiters with 150 tips... Bras,
; girdles and panties (Oooh, weteesed!) made of 14-karat gold
cloth are now on sale in various Madison Ave. shoppee. The
; latter sell at $75 per pr.
---------- .**
Jsan Peters, the cinemadonna, got a fabulous emerald ring
1 surrounded by baguettes from an admirer whose Initials are
Howard Hughes Kathy Barry, the L. B. Mayer discovery who
never made a flicker (at MOM), makes her local debut Nov.
11th at the Latin Q... The Sonny Kings (he's the song star)
. grill multiply in Dec... Tennlstar Tom Chambers is making it
t habit with Dorothy Fox in Olrltown... The Social Register
getting strong. Nancy Talbert, who expects to present her
' tennis star husband with an heir any moment, is still working
I at Bon wit's... A new sleeping drug, Dormiaon (developed by
Beherlng Labs.) should be nectar for the Insomnia Bet. Safer
San others (is the claim) and No Hang-O... Prince Philip's
vortte remark to his Princess: "You look arnaahlnf, daallng,
' aimpleh smashing!"
Overheard on Route 17. Irate factor-trailer operator to
J erratic woman driver: "Who gotcha ver license, lady? General
A Vaughan?"...a aapsietyite Wall Streeter is sweatiitg-hoping
1 his lady friend (Involved In the Morettl murder ease) won't
. forget the pledge among sinners. His wife ain't that bVoadmlnd-
ad... George Churchill and Peggy Watts do their romancing at
. Manny Wolf's Bab, Button is going to be Nick Kenny's new
eempetitjon. Planning a book of her poems... Doris Lilly, au-
J her of "How to Meet a Millionaire," la practically broke, poor
thing Artie Shaw Is now Involved In a terrific feed with
Doria Dowling's sister Connie. Mebbe they should kiss and call
. each other Dowllng. (Ohhh, awlrightttt!).
Eat, drink too much?
Here are the facts on pleasant
Eno relief for overindulgence
Labor News
And
Comment
'* ua.if Hum XCMI
(nd many Dim, bowtl due
fitks hdl Hilpt mmxni*.
sad rwcort as arid alalia
Ov*rindulg*nct uiuallv Hum iitm
"l aba, and man
.*
spniirn sod aad rotara aa aciaValkaiaM
mima in ma gaMrk tract. AND it SO*
SB a muid Uxatjv*, gmly KunuUtmg th*
Itiwrilinrj nrnrtam at th* uuMtuw. It
'**wkJ**, a th* iniattin*, tht liquid
sad laerltaw th sssHe ewe
matter, and ialh w.y allow* (anil*, at
?vaaiaciooof'trnbow*!.
NaaHy saajiana, at aatna dm at athar,
orvnadulga* at Wiak a* (a*L $m aW*'*
aad natal nss......HlySt"awajtIt
**a." Rasp Bb* mmj sssatam. mimj
ttliaf.Atal
TAKt GOOD-TASTING ENO
;
By Victor Riettl
NEW YORK Less than 10
blocks from the long conference
room in which Phil Murray sat
with us, jos bin ni y parrying the
most embarrassing queries the
newsmen could whip out, there
aged a civil war inside labor
the kind of struggle for po-
wer and control over working-
men which the CIO chief wants
this week to banish from our
cities for all time.
Some hours earlier, the re-
laxed leader had talked with
his vice-presidents about a for-
mula to end labor's civil wars
the bitter ones which rile
the public, slash union pres-
tige and rip millions out of
the pockets of employers caught
in the middle.
This kind of war was swirling
all about the city on the wa-
terfront, for example, where a
billion dollars worth of hot car-
go cooled on docks paralyzed
oy struggle within one AFL
union.
uptown, a half mile from
where the CIO chlejt were
preparing for their annual
convention, the newest of
CIO unions iooj preparmo
for their annual convention,
the newest of CIO unions
iras preparing to wipe tele-
vision broadcasts off mil-
lions of screens and si-
lence two radio networks
because of a feud with an-
other union.
Though Phil Murray .knew
little of what his baby interna-
tional union was doing, high in
the tower headquarters of the
broadcasting networks, this bat-
tle had all the makings of the
kind of squabble the CIO Pre-
sident loathes.
Let's look into it, for no-
where is the "]uri'.dlctipl"
labor feud more colorfully or
dramatically explained:
The new magic of television
requires an electronic camera,
outmoding the old mechanical
one which flashes the tradition-
al movie one screen in your
neighborhood theatre, or pic-
tures of your kids on your own
8mm screen at home.
When these TV machines
were moved Into the broadcast-
ing studios, every union in the
field grabbed for them, al
though camera work has been
in the stage Hands Union Ju-
risdiction sine Pearl White be-
pan hanglm off cllfts to the
tune of nickelodeon pianos.
At Dumont. the AFL Stage
Hands (IATSB) run the electro-
nic comers. At Columbia
Broadcasting, it's trie technic-
ians belonging to the AFL elec-
trical brotherhoods. At the Na-
tional Broadcasting and Ame-
remlcan Broadcasting Compan-
ies, it's the ClO't swaddling
union, the National Assn. of
Broadcasting Engineers and
Technicians. \
But, at the studios of these
two sprawling networks, every-
thing in front of the cameras
Is handled by the Stage Hands.
Now here* why labor rela-
tions men get ulcere without
honor and fade away unsung:
in the pri few weeks, the
CIO radio engineers' union has
been presirr NBC and ABS
for a new contract. Carefully
read. It says that there should
be only one bkr union in every
broadcasting stutMo except
for the actors and musicians.
A Judicious exception, consld-
ertr- Jimmie Petrillo's lack of
enthusiasm for turning music-
ians over to any other union.
// the chains don't sign
this contract, thai there
will be silence and dark-
nest on the radios and TV
sets tuned to these stations
in all big cltlet nation-
al strikt, say the CIO broad-
casting engineers.
Now we turn to the radio
and TV networks' aspirin de-
oartments. There's a well-worn
trail to the executive chambers.
Why?
Because, should the broad-
er-ting chains sign with the
CIO engineers, the other unions
win strike.
There'll be silence and dark-
ness in either event.
Furthermore, vlrtuslly all TV
Is speeding towards the day
when 95 per cent of it will be
film broadcasts.
And, since these films
will be produced in Holly-
wood, where the Ath
Stage Hands (and not the
CIO engineers) control the
technicians, and since the
Stage Hartds say that any
chain which sffi with CIO
fust won't get TV film
you know why radio labor
relations men convulse re-
gularly on the hour. ^
Sounds humorous. But it can
cost millions. And gripe tht
listening and viewing public.
8o Phil Murray wants to end
all this, for the good of the
community as well as labor.
He wants this to be one of his
great contributions to hie na-
tion and his movement.
Ha l* beset by similar civil
wars inside his own CIO in-
cluding one battle where three
CIO unions fought for control
over one plant and all three
lost because none of them could
et a majority of the workers
3 vote for It
(Copyright 1161. Poet-Han
Syndicate. Inc.)
.
'
They Dream of Home
. i


Life
By BOB
NEW YORK. The other day I crawled out
ti the sack to congratulate myself on being a
i.*-eller in the greatest city In the greatest
country In the world, and suddenly decided It
v.ould be more cleslraLle to be straaocd in Pa-
tagonia with a broken back.
We don't need the A-bomb to tear up the
town. We can do It more simply in our own
time.
On the record that day there was no milk in
the house and a milkstrlke going that put milk
in the same black-market category of wartime
beef.
People who don't get into fashionable restaur-
antes twice a year were- calling up the tony
hash-houeea to y-AL t.ni* was a spare pint of
the white fluid Abaft, so that baby eould feed,
and people who never get to fashionable rest-
aurants at all were flocking to the country with
an eye on hijacking heifer.
Well, Scotch is getting scarcer and scarcer,
and scarcer, and will momentarily be vastly
more expensive, and I note that this desperate
state of affairs has not been leavened by the
fact that the docking strike caused return-ship-
ments of that lovely beverage back to Scot-
land.
They couldn't move it off the docks; they
shipped it home again, alas, and when it re-
turns it wears a new price tag.
That was the day when a man who needed a
haircut couldn't get a haircut, because the bar-
bers were striking, too.
The land of mllk-and-honey was In a flop.
I dln't check with the bees, but assume that
if there were no milk, the chances are the
honey was on strike, too.
There was a great big hassel in progress over
the rude reception of Miss Josephine Baker In
the Stork Club, where she seemed not to be
entirely welcome as a member of the Negro
race.
That was also the day they couldn't move
the ambulances destined for Korea, because of
the dock tie-up but in New York It didn't seem
as Important as snobbery In the Stork.
Lines
RUARK
The traffic was snarled up everywhere, of
course, and the illegal parkers were being abet-
ted by the double and triple parkers.
The buses piled up, and pulled out of line,
and the taxi drivers cursed everything and each
other. .
A new 15 percent boost in the rent is about
to become reality.
We have had no transportation lay offs lately,
apart from the docking strife, but this seems
a likely time for Mr. Michael Quill to rear his
head.
That and a water shortage would be all ttlat
Is necessary to make New York the asphalt Jun-
gle it occasionally becomes, through the con-
trlvanees of.clvUliaHon;., j ,, ..iuA
The city as we know It has become prostrate
before the whims of 1U own organization. It la
a sprawling baby that, can be rendered helpless
by a momentary Interruption in the rhythm of
its daily life interruptions that more and
more frequently are used to prove political and
economic points by organizers.
This is a fine town, New York. It has nearly
everything to make a man happy In his habit-
at, from wonderful restaurants to the beet
theater to Central Park, from the Brooklyn
Dodgers to the Met.
But damme, sir, it seems more and more we
try to spoil it as a home town for human*.
If the last week was an example of civilized
living, I personally wish to go back to the farm,
where you can reach out and drain a gill of
milk off a handy cow; where you can fabricate
your owd'booze from a backyard still; where
nobody Is overly concerned about who Is treat-
ed handsomely or other wise In a gin mill.
I can use a locate that can get ambulance*
sent to fighting troops abroad; a place where
an unobtainable haircut is not so necessary that
a pot and a pair of scissors won't solve the
problem until the chair I* free In the local
nlppery.
Autumn in New York la supposed to be a
great adventure. This fall so far It has seemed
to be more of an experiment Into the despera*
tion department of overcomplicated civilization.
Ehnpire Builder
By JOSEPH
ALSOP
WASHINGTON. The five and dime brands
of the Influence game continues to engage the
delighted, exclusive attention of the press, the
public and the Congress.
What is surprising is, simply, that anyone
should be surprised by the dlsclosurs that the
Lltholold Corporation hired the well-connected
political law firm of Boyle and Slsklnd, with
results favorable to Itself. .
Hiring political lawyers does not constitute
bribery and fraud.
Neitner does the careful cultivation of use-
fully placed officials and law-makers.
Neither does contributing to political cam-
paigns on a large scale.
In many sectors of American business, these
are, in fact, customary activities, having exactly
the same purpose as the Lltholold retainer to
Bill Boyle's law firm.
For some great respectable corporations gov-
ernmenatl decisions are of extra-special import-
ance. And certain of these corporations even
organize themselves to carry on their business-
political activities systematically, continuously
and with maximum productivity.
Among such corporations, perhaps the most
successful, is Pan American World Airways,
where political operations are as efficient as
its sir operations.
Like most of the large corporate dabblers in
Solitics, Pan American bets on both colors, or,
i other words, has close links with both parties.
The Pan American apostle to the Republicans
is the former Connecticut national committees
man and former vice-chairman and Eastern
treasurer of the Republican National Committee,
Sam Pryor.
Pry or s title is vice president and assistant to
the president. Juan Trippe, butJils clever way
with politician* earns him a higher salary than
Pan American prealdent Trippe himself.
To be cultivated by Pryor U a certificate of
political Importance for both Republicans and
Democrats, and many possess this certificate.
The Pan American board has always included
the names of politically active Republican busi-
nessmen, Including David Slnton Injalls, cousin
and manager of Senator Robert A. Taft.
And the Republican Senator from Pan Amer-
ican, as he U called la the lobbies, u Owen
\
Brewster of Maine, one of Senator Taft's chief
lieutenants on the Senate floor.
As the public record shows, Brewster 1* so
friendly to Pan American that he acted as the
company's plenipotentiary in the big Transcon-
tinental and Western Airlines case, carrying on
crucial negotiations with TWA's controlling
stockholder, Howard Hughes.
Hughes later charged that the Senator had
received manv special favors from the company.
Brewster replied by telf-rlghteously demanding
an Investigation by the Justice Department.
As it happened, the Attorney General on the
Democratic side of the street at that moment
was Tom C. Clark.
In course of his dizzying ascent from oil lob-
byist before the Texas legislature to Justice of
the Supreme Court, Clark had also become an
eminent Pan American friend and member of
the Pryor circle. The Justice Department did
not grant Senator Brewster's request to be In-
vestigated.
Among Senate Democrats, the moat conspic-
uous Pan American friend is Pat McCarran of
Nevada, wnose son-in-law, Edwin Parry Hay,
used to work for the company.
McCarran sponsored the statute establishing
the Civil Aeronautics Board, which regulates
Pan American.
And he and Senator Brewster set a praise-
worthy pattern of bi-partisan cooperation, when
they Jointly led the fight for Juan Trippe's pro-
ject to put all of America's International avia-
tion in the hands of a "chosen instrument.
A* Washington counsel, Pan American has
also long employed the former Democratic fin-
ance chairman and ex-Secretary of Defense,
Louis Johnson.
Unlike Boyle when be became national chair-
man. Johnson did not lormally separate himself
from his firm while be was working on the De-
mocratic National Committee.
The separation occurred when he became De-
fense Secretary, but Steptoe b Johnson retained
the Pan American account, and Johnson la now
back at the old stand, running Steptoe s John-
son, and getting hi* Pan American fees again.
Finally, the Pan American apostle to the De-
mocrat* Is J. Carroll Cone, an almost too fam-
iliar figure in the Capitol lobbies.

a H M.M
MERRY-00-ROUND
Sy Omw flatlCN
Drew Peorton says: Vivid Mr. Churchill will b* more dif-
ficult than drab Mr. Atrlte; U.S. diplomats remember
how British policies became American policies; Chur-
chill foresaw the Cold War.
WASHINGTON. Even while Princes* Elisabeth and her
consort were in Washington, U. S. diplomats were appraising
the cold realities of the British elections.
And they were wondering whether the dynamic, dramatu
Mr. Churchill wasn't going to be a lot more difficult'W work
v.-lth than drab, pedestrian Clement Attle.
Three weeks before the elections, the State Department got
an inkling of this In the form of a confidential cahle from the
American Embassy In London that Churchill planned a grand-
standing meeting between himself, Stalin and Truman.
Since Truman will not go to Europe and Stalin will not
come to Washington, such a move would play right into the
hands of the Moscow propaganda machine wrich claim* we
are the war-mongers and won't even discuss peace.
Furthermore, State Department officials recall vividly though
{ileaaantly those dramatic days when the bealippered Winston
ralpsed through the upper halls of the White House, his crim-
son and gold kimono flapping round hi* half-naked torio, keep-
ing Harry Hopkins up until 3 am., and finally pushing British
policy across on the reluctant Roosevelt In various part* of the
world.
Today, American policies have largely become British po-
liciesin Greece, Turkey, Western Europe, Japan and China
But In those days, British policies usually became American
policies, thanks to the tireless, persuasive, masterful man In
the red and fold kimono, who would not aleen until he had
persuaded U. 6. leader* to yield.
A lot of memories come crowding back to the diplomats
who attended those meetings, vivid memories of a vivid per-
sonality who dominated whatever meeting he attended and
usually shaped the world the way he wanted it. Here are sotne
of them.
. Churchill at Casablanca. Here Winston put across two
tilinga: The Italian campaign through the "Soft underbelly Of
the Axis," which did not prove to be soft and which many UJS.
strategists felt was a mistake; Second, a pledge from FDR that
the Mediterranean theatre would be British-dominated. This
meant American communications even between our own per-
sonnel had to be sent over British radio; that all transporta-
tion wm okayed by the British, that all political decisions were
British, that a British general superseded Oen. Mark Clark in
Italy.
It also meantr-after the warthat the U.S.A. supplied the
tank*, the lend-lease, the UNRRA supplies In Oreos, while
Churchill fixed pollfiy.
Churchill on Greece. Shortsighted ChurchUlian policy in
Greece can best be nimmariied In hi* own words, a telegram
^nurchill sent to Oen. Ronald M. Scobie, British commander in
Athens:
"Do not hesitate to act as If you were in a conquered oity.
You should not hesitate to open fire on any armed male In
the Oreek capital who assail* the authority of the British. Keep
and dominate, Athens."
British highhandedness in Greece, taken without consult-
ing the U.S.A., finally forced London to dump the entire prob-
lem in our lap. We have been both paying the bill and fining
policy since. Before, we merely paid the bill.
British In Egypt. The one-aided result* of the ChurchlU-
FDR political deal for the Mediterranean were inadvertently
summarized by U.S. Near Eastern commander, Oen. Benny Giles,
at a press conference In Cairo.
"Gentlemen." he said, "I have noticed that you have been
writing political news. You are war correspondent*. YOu era
part of the u. s. Army and you will write nothing critical of
British policy in the Middle East."
i Churchill on China. Meeting with Chiang Kai-shek and
FDR in Cairo in 1843, Churchill flatly opposed and Allied cam-
paign over the Burma Road.
T- This we* what Chiang wanted meet. Buy- OHissahlhV i
it, argued for a campaign to retake Britain's old
Singapore and the Malaya.
At this Chiang started to pack up, threatened to go home.
To assuage him, FDR proposed the British give up Hong Kong,
making it an international port under the United Nation*.
Churchill'* reply: "I did not become Prime Mlnlater to
liquidate the British Empire."
Chiang returned to China empty-handed, and It was this
failure to get political support not pro-Communl*t advice by
George Marshallwhich really started the downfall of the na-
tionalists.
Churchill at Ottawa. On* of the constant battle* be-
tween the U.S. military and Churchill all during the war wae
the Far Eaat.
Oeneral Marshall, then Chief of Staff, wanted real aupport
lor Chiang, not make-believe warfare.
At Ottawa he was so impatient that there was almost an
open break wiht British Chief of staff Sir Alan Brook*. It was
aiter this row that Churchill proposed Marshall take over the
European Allied command.
This would get him out of Washington where he had the
power to allocate troops to either theatre; put him in Europe
where he would become absorbed with European problem*.
At Ottawa, Churchill put likeable, handsome Lord Mount-
batten, a cousin of King George, in command in Burma-India.
But the British remained In control and no serious large-seale
campaign ever got started.
The critics who now damn Marshall for Communism in
China forget hi* consistent urging of aid to Chiang.
The British, who refused even the political sop of Hong
Kong, thus encouraging Communism, later have wanted to re-
cognise Communist China, and have used Hong Kong to ship
supplies td the Communists.
Churchill on Second Front Wisest policy Churchill ever
argued during the war yean was at Teheran regarding the
Second Front. : ,.. _
However, he was a couple of years late. Early In IMS, .S.
military leaders actually started planning a ejoet-oharmei^Oper-
ation from England Into France. But ChurcWU idetrackel It
to the o-caued underbelly of the Axis, which turned into
long, drawn-out month* of fighting.
At Casablanca, the 2nd front came up again. Churchill de-
creed: "I will not squander the seed of the British Empire"
Having In mind the inevitable loss of BrltUh youth, Churc-
hill then laid down a flat ultimatum that in any cross-Chaa-
operatlon, Britain would supply 35 per cent of
the UnlteJBtates 75 per cent.
nel
an, Britain would supply 26 per cent of the troops,
.States 76 per cent.
This stopped U.S. military planners cold. At that timo -the
spring of 1948they did not have the required troops in
En,They had been **nt to North Afrtea and the "ieft un4*-
b* Bix month* later, at Teheran. Churchill argued for a con-
tinued 2nd front through the soft underbellynamely, Greece,
^'"^^dillSdtf^ torca, the Chann.1. aimed it
*'JthYt Chu?chTnh.d in mind was keeping RuMleo troop.
6Ut jgitHihafSe^S^nffffl Smfin was Uitery
strategy and winning the war more quickly.
So they ruled out the long transportation haul through the
Mediterranean to the Balkans, votd with Stalin for the short-
er, quicker Jab at Germany via England.
Military they were right. Shortly thereafter the war was
W0BBut the Cold War, which Churchill foresaw, ha* been drag-
cing on ever since. .
(Copyright, 1951. By'Tne Ban Syndicate. .)
Samuel Smug!
i
Samuel Snag ***< **
If you ere he. yea would be tool
*asa can always rind goed buys.
His secret Is to advert!**!
w
(




'


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5. 151

.
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

PAGE TBREI

Solid Fight Coming For Taft
If Ike Announces Candidature
A. Taft is riding a high tide toward the 1952 Re-
publican Presidential nomination but is in for the bat-
tle of his life if Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower decides
to oppose him.
The extent of the Taft boom and Eisenhower s
latent prospects were brought out in a nationwide
United Press poll of some of the top officials in the
Republican hierarchygovernors, state committee
chairmen and national committeemen and commit-
teewomen.
The poll brought answers
from all the 48 states except
Virginia, and from Hawaii.
Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands,
and Alaska.
The officials were asked to
state. In view of Tafts avowed
candidacy:
. 1) Whether they would sup-
port him.'
2) Whether they would aban-
. don. Taft and jumo on the
Elsenhower bandwagon if the
general breaks his silence and
announces he.will run.
3) Whether they would sup-
port' General Douglas MacAr-
thur, should he Join the race.
/ The answers turned uo strong
support for Taft, particularly
k In the Midwest, the Deep South.
and a few Rocky Mountain
states.
But they also showed Eisen-
l hower has great undercover
strength which could burgeon
into a boom and bring deser-
tions from the Taft camp If the
general will only say he Is a
candidate.
Elsenhower has powerful flg-
? ures working for him. among
them Oov. Thomas E. Dewey of
New York and Sen. James H.
, Duff of Pennsylvania who are
out to beat Taft and nominate
the general at the convention
t next July.
Duff expects to see Eisen-
hower hereand posslblv to try
to get a definite answer from
him.
Duff will then take off for
Texas in a drive to draw the
Lone Star state's Republican
leaders Into the pro-Ike fold.
As of now. Texas GOP leaders
are said to be split pro-Taft
and pro-Eisenhower.
There was scarcely any senti-
ment In the United Press poll
for MacArthur. He was regard-
ed tm a "great and fine man but
not as a presidential contender
at the moment.
The poll tended to show that
If Elsenhower runs, the Taft
KmUMi with'the'general In at least to
states and Alaska and Puerto
Rico where there Is a sharp dlvl-
v sloti of sentiment.
These states are Alabama.
* California, where Gov. Earl
Warren undoubtedly will be the
favorite son candidate but
where there is Eisenhower senti-
t. ment; Georgia, Kansas, Elsen-
hower's home state; Minnesota
where favorite son Harold E.
stassne's status may be chal-
lenged; Nebraska, Nevada. North
Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania.
South Dakota, Texas. Washlng-
, ton where the pro-Elsenhower
Gov. Thomas E. Dewey of New
York wields considerable ln-
( fluence; West Virginia, Wyom-
ing and Wisconsin.
Assuming the leaders polled
know whereof they speak Taft
now has an edge In 14 states
although In some there are fac-
tors which put them among the
"battleground" states.
The 14 states are. Arkansas.
Idaho. Illinois. Indiana. Iowa
where Gov. William 8. Beardsley
Is keplng an "open mind" to-
ward both Taft and Elsenhower:
Maine, Mississippi. Montana,
North Dakota, Ohio. South
Carolina, Tennessee, Wyoming
and Utah. In Utah, young Re-
r
{
V
\
I
I
publicans are reported to be
firmly pro-Ehenhower.
Elsenhower was given an edge
in New York and Pennsylvania
which, together, had 166 votes
In the OOP national conven-
tion at Philadelphia In 1948.
Among the "on the fence"
states were:
Arizona, which Is said to lean
to Taft; California, which will
wait to see what Gov. Earl War-
ren does; Colorado, Connecti-
cut, which is said to lean to
Eisenhower; Delaware which is
said to be antl-Taft; Florida,
Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland,
Massachusetts, Michigan, Min-
nesota, which may or may not
be pro-Stassen; Missouri, New
Hampshire which Is said to be
antl-Taft but has made no
Eisenhower commitments; New
Jersey, where Gov. Alfred E.
Driscoll, a favorite son, holds
sway; Nevada, New Mexico,
North Carolina; Oklahoma,
Rhode Island, Texas, where
Sen. Duff hopes to buUd up
Elsenhower support; Vermont,
and Washington.
Flo Brallen Insists
She Will Not Resign
4s Veen's Secretary
WASHINGTON. Nov. 5 (UP)
Mrs. Flo Bratten. who admit-
ted Interceding with the RFC
on behalf of a $1,100,000 loan
for a Florida luxury hotel, said
today she has no Intention of
resigning as secretary to Vice
President Alben W. Barkley.
Mrs. Bratten also said she has
heard nothing from Barkley to
indicate any change In her
status. Barkley said some two
weeks ago that he had not de-
cided whether to fire her and
did not Intend to "make any
hasty Judgment."
,
MM. Bttitten an* Ctiatrtes E.
Shaver,'former counsel for the
Senate Small Business Commit-
tee, acknowledged that they
interceded with the Reconstruc-
tion Finance Corp. last year for
.a $1.100.000 loan to Min-
neapolis contractor 8am Fleish-
er for construction of a swank
Miami Beach hotel.
The loan was approved three
days after they visited RFC of-
ficials. The project later was
dropped, however, and the mo-
ney never was paid out. Mrs.
Rratten denied using any "In-
fluence." Shaver resigned his
committee post after the trans-
action was diclosed.
Mrs. Bratten. secretary to
Barkley for 26 years, has return-
ed to her desk In the Vice Pres-
ident's office after a Kentucky
vacation. Her trip was Inter-
rupted when she was called
back here for questioning by
chief counsel Francis D. Flana-
gan of the Senate's Permanent
Investigating Committee.
She said she has not heard
from Barkley since a confer-
ence with him about two weeks
ago. She also said the Senate
Committee has not questioned
her since her talk with Flanagan
and that she has not been ask-
ed to testify further.
Piper's
Passion
Puds
The famuos
Tlvoli baths,
piped direct
from warm
sulphur springs,
have been
providing
therapeutic
baths
for Romans
for 2000 years.
But they never
look so good as
when Luisa
Arneghl, 19, a
frequent visitor
to Tlvoli, gets
under for a
shower. (NEA-
Acme photo
by Staff
Photographer
Albert BlasetU.)

English Yachtsmen Set Out
To Find Capt. Kidd's Gold

GOSPORT,, England, Nov. 5
(UP) A sleek former racing
schooner, flying the skull and
crossbones from her mainmast,
today sailed out of Gosport har-
bor for the pirate-Infested wa-
ters of the South China Seas In
search of Captain Kidd's treas-
ure.
Aboard were 13 bronzed men
in their twenties, Intend on
bringing back to England the fa-
bulous treasure Kidd was never
able to retrieve before his execu-
tion In London early In the 18th
century.
They have photostatic copies
of hidden charts allegedly left
by Kidd showing where the
treasure estimated at $3,360-
Beware of Finding
Oil, Geologist Warns
, BLOOMNGTON, IrM., Nov.-8
(UP) If you're itching to go
"wildcatting" for oil, give It up
unless you can afford It 'finan-
cially, a geologist says.
"Wildcatting for oil costs too
much, too often results m Ory
holes and pays off too little even
if oil Is struck,' according to Dal-
las Flandt, Jr., of the Indiana
Geological Suivey
"The oil business Is so highly
speculative that more people
probably have lost money In it
than have made It."
10 States Boost Taxes
On Alcoholic Drinks
CHICAGO (UP) Ten states
raised or extended alcoholic
beverage taxes this year, ac-
cording to the Federation of
Tax Administrators.
Two others Georgia and
South Carolinacut their liquor
taxes, but only after adopting
three per cent general sales
taxes.
States which raised or ex-
taxes on at least some alco-
holic beverages were Arkansas.
New* Mexico, West Virginia,
Washington, Rhode Island, Ne-
braska, Oklahoma, Pennsylva-
nia, Massachusetts and Texas.
__________________
000 at present prices is hidden
in a cave on an island about 200
miles south of Slam.
"From Singapore we have al-
ready had news that Chinese
pirates in those waters are
watching for us, and intend to
get on our track when we are
searching for the treasure," said
27-year-old Maurice Taylor, who
organized the expedition.
"But If we are not Interrupted
1 think we shall unearth the
treasure and be back again In
about six months."
The skull and crossbones, blue
on a white background Instead
of the old pirate white on a
black background, flew from the
mainmast of the 130-foot schoo-
ner Lammoma once famous
as an English racing schooner,
and now newly Bermuda rigged
for easier handling.
Widow Finds II Fun
To Run Newspaper
CAMDEN.Tenn. Nov. 5 (UP)
Mrs. Hobart Bradley was happy
when her husband told her she
could go into business for herself.
She's always thought of a lit-
tle tea room
That wasn't what her husband
figured. He said she could buy
the weekly nev. sp&per. the Chro-
nicle.
That was 'i:< years ago. She
bought It anil has had a big time
running it eve/ since.
She tells her readers whose eat
had kittens, who visited whom,
and all the local news so vital to
a small weekly paper.
Now she puts In 18 hours a day,
at the newspaper and at the in-
surance agency she has run since
her husband's death three years
ago.
The Chronicle has six employes
and three are women.
It's almost a hen party every
Thursday night when the paper
goes to press b-.t they get it out.
The chances are the paper will
stay in the family. A daughter,
Netta, Is studying Journalism and
wants fo work on the Chronicle.
CIA.
DULCIDIO GONZALEZ
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Knowledge Sought
Of Star Closest
To Solar System
MT. HAMILTON, Calif., NOV.
5 (UP)Observations that will
bring new knowledge of the star
closest to the solar system have
been reported by a University of
California astronomer now visit-
ing in Australia.
The report was made by Dr.
Gerald E. Kron. associate as-
tronomer at the University's Lick
Observatory. Kron, on a year's
leave for study in Australia,
made thre observations at the
Commonwealth Observatory at
Mt. Stromlo, near Canberra, in
collaboration with S.C.B. Gas-
colgne. of that observatory.
The observations were made of
the star, Prxima Centaur!, by
means of photoelectric devices.
Prxima is one of the smallest
and faintest stars known. It can
be seen only with a fairly large
telescope, and then only because
it Is so nearby.
Prxima Centauri is very close
interim of stellar distance four
light years (24,000,000,000,000
miles.) It Is about one-tenth the
diameter of the sun. roughly the
size of the planet Jupiter. Its low
surface temperature in ordinary
light also contributes to its" dim-
ness.
Kron Said the brightness of
Prxima is so great in Infrared
light, that if one had vision in
the infrared equivalent to our
actual vision, a keen-eyed ob-
server would be able to see the
star without a telescope.
Astronomers here said Kron's
results will give the first reliable
values for the apparent bright-
ness and. temperature. Earlier
values, they said, were very
crude. The results also will make
possible better calculations of
the distance of the star.
Prxima is in the far southern
sky and never rises above the
horizon In California; therefore
it can be observed only from the
southern hemisphere.
New Parly Chairman
Has Good Record
By DBEW PEARSON
WASHINGTON, Nov. 5 If
Frank McKlnney lives up to his
record in the Army, he will be a
good Democratic National Chair-
man. ,.
Toward the end of the war, the
late President Roosevelt appoint-
ed Bob Hlnck'cy. now vice pres-
ident of the American Broad-
casting Company, in charge of
Army cofttfact Tenegotlation.
telling him he could have anyone
he desired, to help.
Hln^kley AsKM both the Treas-
ury and tne Federal Reserve
Board for recommendations as
to good men to handle this tough
Job of deciding whether compa-
nies had overcharged the gov-
ernment on war contracts, and
both put Frank McKinney at the
top of their list.
However, the Army at first re-
fused to release him. McKinney,
they said, wa too Important In
the fiscal department of the
Army.
So Hincklev had to go to Sec-
retary of War Patterson and
threaten to tuse the matter up
with the White House.
Finally McKinney was releas-
ed and did an A-l Job of review-
ing and scaling down war con-
tracts.
Pacific District's
'Seoul University'
Opening Tomorrow
Course leaders for the Pacific
District University of Scouting
have been selected it was an-
nounced by Coionel M. S. Shore,
District Leadership Training
Chairman. ,
The Pacific District University
of Scouting will start at 7:30
p.m. tOmorrov In the Scout Of-
fice in the Balboa Elementary
School, Colonel Shoie stated.
A Cub Leader a Course for Den
Mothers, Cubmasters and their
assistants WtL be under the di-
rection of Clarence R. Taht,
Council Executive Board mem-
The training of Scoutmasters
and assistants will be directed
by Russell M Jones, Pacific Dis-
trict Commissioner and Director
of Camp E Volcn.
Col. M. a Shore will be in
charge of the Training course for
Unit CominiT.teemen, while
Charles F. Ebner. Jr., District Ad-
vancement Chairman, will be in
charge of the Exploring course.
All training courses are open to
any person who is Interested in
any phase of the Boy Scouts of
America, Col. Shore said, and
credit for all courses wlllbe giv-
en on the Three-Year Training
Program of the Boy Scouts of
America. *
Similar; eounes will start in
the Atlantic District at 7:30 p.m..
Wednesday, in the Troop 0 Scout
Shack on Colon Beach.
The Boy Scouts of America is a
Red Feathei Agency._____
Argentine Women
Vote Separately
BUEN08 AIRES. Nov. 5 (UP)
Voting for th3 first time. Argen-
tine women will have their own
polling booths and vote counters
:n the presidential election Nov.
11. Men will count the men's
votes, women will count the
women will count the women's
votes.
"DOWN. RIP!"Not "Ger-
nimo," but "Arf, Arf," is the
Jump cry of "Ripcord," mascot
of the Second Air Rescue Squad-'
ron in Okinawa. "Ripcord,"'
seen as he braces his large legs
Just before landing, was trained
to accompany buddies who 'chute
to the aid of downed airmen.
Thoughts
MONDAY
Only take heed to thyself,
and keep thy soul diligently,
lest thou forget the things
which thine eyes have seen,
and lest they depart from
thy heart all the days of thy
life: but teach them thy sons
and thy sons' sonsDeut. 4:9.
oOo
NEVER let man imagine that
he can pursue a good end by evil
means, without sinning against
his own soul! Any other issue
on himself is certain.
Southey.
TUESDAY
And when they had ordained
them elders in every church,
and had prayed with fasting,
they commended them to the
Lord, on whom they believed.
Acts 14:23.
OOo
A MAN'S religion consists, not
of the many things he is In doubt
of and tries to believe, but of the
few he is assured of and has no
need of effort for believing.
Carlyle.
WEDNESDAY
My glory was fresh in me,
and my bow was renewed in my
hand.Job 29:20.
oOo
THE shortest way to arrive at
glory should be to do that for
conscience which we do for
glory.
Montaigne.
THURSDAY
For from the least of them
even unto the greatest of them
every one is given to covetous-
ness; and from the prophet
even unto the priest every one
dealeth falsely .Jeremiah 6:13.
oOo
COVETOUSNESS. like Jealousy,
when it has once taken root,
never leaves a man but with his
Ufe.
Thomas Hughes.
FRIDAY
For he flattereth himself In
his own eyes, until his iniq-
uity be found to be hateful.
Psalms 30:2.
AN egoist will always speak of
himself, either In praise or in
censure, but a modest man ever
shuns making himself the sub-
ject of his conversation.
La Brnyere.
SATURDAY
Wherefore God also hath
hiffhly exalted him. and given
him a name which Is above
every name.Philipians 2:9.
oOo
THE name of Christthe one
great word well worth all lan-
guages In earth or heaven.
B Bailey.
SUNDAY
And Jesus looked round a-
bout, and saith unto his dis-
ciples How hardly shall they
that have riches enter into
the kingdom of God!Mark
10:23.
oOo
TO purchase Heaven has
gold the power?
Can gold remove the mortal
hour? ., ...
In life can love be bought with
*old? V
Are friendship's pleasures to be
Mldf .
Noall that's worth a wisha
thought.
Fair virtue gives unbrlded. un-
bought.
Cease then on trash they hopes
to bind,
Let nobler views engage thy
mind.
Dr. Johnson.
Fire Alarm Boxes
Not Too Popular
SA NDIEGO (UP) Perhaps
people are Just too lazy to
break the glass.
City Manager Campbell re-
ported to the city cour. V that
the public uses the telephone
in at least 11 per ceni of Ins-
tances to report fires.
Of the remaining calls. Ctyp-
bell said, more persons go In
person to fire stations to re-
port fires than use lire alarm
i boxes.
Three Groups Of
Congressmen Will
Tour Latin America
WASHINGTON, Nov. 5 (USISi
Members cf three committees
of the U.S. House of Represen-
tatives will Sjon begin extensive
tours of Central and South Am-
erica and Caribbean Countries,
In order to survey commerce and
Industry ano to become better
acquainted w.th the people of
l. ,i America
The Committees are the House
Interstate and Foreign Com-
merce Committee, the banking
tnd currency committee and the
Foreign Affair; committee. In
pfldition Senator Pat McCarran,
chairman of the senate Judiciary
f.ommittee. ''ill start a month-
long tour of South America with
nis wile snovlly after the com-
mittee members depart.
Twenty of tne 29-member
House Interstate and Foreign
Alger Hiss Disbarred
In Massachusetts
BOSTON, N<,\. 5 i UP) Con-
victed perjurer Alger Hiss, for-
mer State Department aide, was
disbarred today from practicing
law In Massachusetts.
Hiss, now serving a five-year-
Federal penitentiary sentence,
[has 20 days in which to appeal
i to the full bench of the Massa-
chusetts Supreme Court. He al-
ready has been disbarred in
New York.___________________.
Commerce Committee will make
a. clockwise tour down the East
Coast and up ihe West Coast In
an Air Force Constellation from
Nov. 10 to Dc. 7 to study the
economic situation In each of the
I Latin American countries In the
I ilght of the ltglslatlve program
I of the next session of Congress
which opens In January.
The world produces nearly
2,000,000,000 pounds of tea an-
nually.
Top Day in the neigh-
borhood, that's me!
We have the new
RCA VICTOR
RADIO CONSOLE
EASY CREDIT TERMS
Nipper knows: An RCA VICTOR RADIO makes the best
. Christmas present in the world!
PANAMA RADIO CORPORATION
29 Central Avenue Telfonos: 2-3364, 2-256
TAHITI IS
LAY AWAY YOUR OIFT TODAY.
PAY AS LITTLE AS $5.00 A MONTH.
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Avoid the rush Dm your Xmas Dallar NOW.



>?*'?-


fAGE rom
TOE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEW8PAF1
- ------
f, / .
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1951
>Cargo and FreightShips and PlanesArrivals and Departures
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great While Fleet
New Orleans Service
HORIZONTAL
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. Fiador Knot ...............................Not. 10
-S.S. Qui-qufv..................................Not. 13
S.S. Chiriqui ...................................Not. II
I Mandilas K.trni-r.irH CMIIeil and Central Can)
iHKI> -.inn.- iu \> lock Los Anele, San itiimn Seattle
Occasional Selllni" to Saw Orleans and Mobile
iih. Measaeri in this service ara limited lo melte easeeniers)
.reoueei trelahl Satrlne rom Crtatabal In West Caast Central America
Cristobal to New Orleans via
lela. Honduras
Sails from
Cristbal
S.S. Chiriqui
Not. 20
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 121 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON 20
4 Title
5 Exclamation
Sweet
secretion
7 Period of time
(ab.)
E LET US GET YOU
: THERE IN A HURRY
By arranging- your rompite trip
by the most efficient route possible
Accredited
Travel
Agents
V
OYD IROTHUS. IMC.
De Lesseps Park
Tel. 2-2008. 2-2009
Members
IATA
ASTA
1,6 Depicted
actress
10 Continued
story
llBreakf.rtfe^Ap"roach
3 Individual 9 Inherent
14 Demesne io Soak, up
..5552 "Dove's call
"SHSfi"1 ,2 Meadows
,,^UatT IS Symbol for
7 Seed container nton
Answer to Previous Puzzie
;il(-4':4UWMllJ'J'lli< t .;
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18 Prohibit
19 Narrow inlet
20 Thoroughfare
(ab.)
21 Versus (ab.)
22 Age
25 Honey-maker
137 Measure of
area
28 Musical note
29 Ream (ab.)
30 Pronoun
' 31 Legal point
32 Japanese
I outcast
33 Myself
! 33 Railroad (ab.)
37 Fruit drink
30 Western state
44 Bustle
43 Oriental porgy
46 Mongoloid
47 Ribbed fabric
48 She it a-----
performer
30 aerify
32 Group of
players
S3 Fold
VERTICAL
1 Indicate
2 Angered
3 Sloth
23 Uncommon
24 Provide with
weapons
25 Color
2 Direction
31 Edit
33 Zealous
34 Entanglei
38 Stout cord
38 "Emerald Isle'
38 Entry in a
ledger
40 Blue Ridge
river
41 Near
42 Stringed
instrument
43 Black Earth
city
44 Operatic solo
49 Babylonian
deity
51 Symbol for
tro
Shipping & Airline News
Russian Press Admits
Housing Shortage Bad
at LONDON Nov. 5 lUPI
As the severe Russian winter
Jlraws near. Soviet authorities
are showing increased anxiety
over the housing situation In
many cities of the USSR, the
Soviet press has disclosed.
The population of Leningrad
jfftr example, seems to be fa-
cing a grim winter. At a meet-
ing of the city party organi-
zation reported in Pravda, So-1
vlet Communist Party news-]
paper. It was stated that thi3'
gr's progress in house repairs
house-building "does not
itee the fulfillment o
'established program.",
fany houses In Leningrad
without gas and the pianj
the repair and installation j
heating is also lagging he-
ld, the report indicated,
"tvestla, the government |
(spaper, revealed that eight
irs after the liberation from
German occupation. Smoi-
lk and other towns of the
le region are far from be-
ine: reconstructed.
' .Smolensk Is stated to be suf-
fering from an acute housing
'shortage due to systematic
,no)Mulflllment of building
ivestia blamed the ministry
housing for the "unsatis-
factory" tempo of the recon-
struction of Smolensk and 14
other Russian towns of the- re-
gion.
In Kuybishev on the Volga,
too, the building organizations
"are lagging; behind with their
housing programs," Trud, the
newspaper of the Soviet trade
unions reported.
'Poor biu'ding" is also reported
by Trud from Pskov, a pro-
vincial center near the former
Estonian frontier.'
Housing shortage and "slow
building" in Minsk, the capital
of the republic of Byelorussia
and an important industrial
center, were the subject of an
article in Izvestia.
The newspaper criticized the
system of building small hous-
es containing only a few a-
partments and said that many
houses built recently in Minsk
remained without water and
other amenities because they
were built in unsuitable sites
and did not fit with the city'a
plans.
The seriousness of the hous-
ing problem was reflected in
an editorial in Izvestia, which
mentioned building organisa-
tions guilty of poor planning.
waste and bad organization of
work.
Summer Camp Routine In Home
Gets Results. Mother Discovers
.'. ;MEMPHIS, Tenn Nov. 5 Mrs. T. M. Deaton says It's no
trouble to raise children if you
]run your home like s> summer
scamp, even to blowing reveille
Jon a bugle
Mrs. Deaton finds the bugle
Jgets her three sons out of bed on
Jthe double and busy making
Mheir own beds, just as they
.would have to do at camp.
The Deatons even stage an oc-
casional stunt night, which
helps bring the family closer to
ether.
\ Mrs. Deaton got the idea from
#her oldest son. nine-year-old
JNorman. He came back from
^summer camp full of stories a-
bout his experiences. Norman
Jfnjoyed it so that Mrs. Deaton
MTled out the camp routine at I
Jhome. All three boys agree that!
?camplne out at home is tops.
[ Mrs. Deaton feels that child-
jren shouldn't leave toys and
fclothes scattered about for sonie-
tpne else to pick up. She built up
fat pride in orderliness by giving
each boy a large toy box and a
closet with his name on it.
Mrs. Deaton added that the
mother and father have to set a
?good example and not leave
heir things scattered about.
f The Deatons seldom worry -
bout their boys playing in the
Jtrtreet or swimming In a nearby
creek. They made their home so
attractive that all the nelghbor-
hood boys and girls come around
to play.
Toe attic has become a boys'
club room, headquarters for the
Jjlying Saucer Club. The baae-
fment is a chemistry laboratory.
?The backyard belongs to the
a#Ba9 fry outright.
The boys built a barbecue pit
ana liJ.ea up a horseshoe game,
badminton court and ping pong
table. Mrs. Deaton said It creat-
ed a feeling of ownership that
extends to keeping the house in
order.
Several other mothers gave
their views on child raising to
Rotarlana here
Mrs. A. R. Hargett teacher and
mother of two children, felt that
many teachers and parents are
falling down on the Job.
'We have smothered our child-
ren with care given them
more than enough material
things," Mrs. Hargett said.
Yet, she felt too many parents
and teachers have failed to de-
velop the child's initiative and
responsibility.
Mrs. Hargett said that if a
child falls to measure- up. the
parents, teachers and commun-
ity are to blame.
Youth learns by Imitating, said
Mrs. Hargett. and youth is quick
to learn.
Never Say Die
MINNEAPOLIS. Anderson has enrolled in a course
entitled "Ufe begins at 86" at the
YMCA. He is 82.
ii i
Constellation Making
Survey, Check-Trip
Wednesday to Los Angeles
A Constellation is making its
maiden flight Wednesday from
Panama to Guatemala City and
thence to Los Angeles as a fore-
runner to inauguration of ser-
vice over Pan American World
Airways' new route December 3.
The Initial trip by the triple-
tailed Clipper over the 3.142-
mile route is serving as both the
survey flight required by the
United States Civil Aeronautics
Administration and as a check
trip for Pan American crews.
When service begins next
month, it will offer the first
nonstop flights between Cali-
fornia and Guatemala and be-
tween Guatemala and Panama.
It also will be the first time
Constellations have operated in
Central America.
An all-star crew is manning
the survey flight, which leaves
Miami Tuesday at 10 a. m. and
arrives at 2:30 p. m. at Pana-
ma's Tocumen International
Airport, where it is remaining
overnight.
In command is Capt. Lewis C.
Lindsey, chief pilot of PAA's
Latin American Division. Five
other top-ranking first pilots
are alternating at the controls
on different legs of the flight.
The Clipper is leaving Pana-
ma at 5:45 a. m. Wednesday
reaching Guatemala City 8:09
a. m. An hour later it is taking
off for the 2.100-mile nonstop
jump to the United States Paci-
fic Coast, arriving at Los An-
geles International Airport at
3:38 p. m.
Plane and crew arc remain-
ing in Los Angeles through
Thursday while the pilots are
checked out on alternate land-
ing fields in the Los Angeles
area and on air traffic pro-
cedures.
They are leaving Los Angeles
Friday for Guatemala and Pa-
nama, where they will remain
overnight, returning to Miami
the next morning.
In addition to Capt. Lindsey.
the crew includes Capt. David
G. Desmond., sector chief nilot
at Miami and Panama: Capt.
Robert L. Gibson, check pilot;
Capt. Roy E. Keeler. third-rank-
ing of all Pan American pilots
In seniority; Capt. Alfred F.
Dreyer. a 20-year veteran with
PAA, and Capt. Lawrence M.
Holloway. who has been flying
Clippers for 10 years.
Also aboard will be Capt. Oli-
ver J. Studeman, operations
manager of PAA's Latin Ameri-
can Division.
ACOB
CANASTA
*4
How To Hold
FALSE TEETH
Mora Firmly in Place
Do your falM leelh annoy and em-
barran by tupping, dropping or wob-
bling when you eat. laugh or talk? Just
sprlngje a little rAS*TETTH on your
plates. This alkali** (non-acid) powder
holds falsa teath more firmly and more
comfortably. No gummy, gooey, pasty
taste or feeling Does not sour. Checks
"plate odor" (denture breath). Get FAS-
TEETH today at any drug (tore.
Salvage Alcoholics
US Industry Urged
CHICAGO. Nov. (UP) A
Yale research associate says man-
power shortages may compel in-
dustry to recognize the import-
ance of salvaging alcoholics.
Robert Straus, associate in ap-
plied physiology at the Yale cen-
ter of alcohol studies, voiced the
hope at a meeting of the Ameri-
can Sociological Society.
Straus predicted that problem
drinking would increase with de-
fense production.
"When plants are short-hand-
ed and the pressure for produc-
tion Is great, there Is bound to be
an increase in the tension and
responsibility under which indi-
viduals work." he said.
"Since alcohql Is frequently
used by the problem drinker in
order to obtain pseudo-relief
from feelings of tension and an-
xiety, increasing pressure may
well contribute to an Increase in
drinking."
Furthermore, he said, industry
will be forced to hire so-called
marginal workers, including ma-
ny problem drinkers.
"The manpower crisis of 1851
may well prove to be a turning
point with respect to a general
recognition of the problem drink-
er on the part of Industry at
large." Straus said.
In the past, he said. Industrial-
ists have dodged the issue by de-
nying that any of their employ-
es were alcoholics.
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
In our last article we discussed
twip of the various ways you
might play the very same cards.
Today we continue the discus-
sion.
Your side has melded Joker-
A-A-A-A, Joker K-K-K and
Q-Q-Q. You hold K-K. Q. 3, 2
(the three being black, of
course), and you draw an ace
from the stock. What should you
do?
The answer may depend on the
number of cards in your part-
ner's hand, or on the way the
melding has gone. If he has Tery
cards, you tend to meld out. If
he has a large number of cards,
you tend to play on. Somewhere
between these extremes you ask
for permission to meld out.
For example, assume that you
made the initial meld with Jok-
er-A-A and Joker-K-K. Your
partner, at his next turn, added
two aces, a king, and three
queens. He then discarded and
was left with only five cards.
This type of meld asks you to
meld out as quickly as you can.
If your partner were Interested
in fighting for the pack he would
meld nothing. If he were inter-
ested in making one canasta but
then staying in the game, he
would meld the two aces but
nothing else. In this situation,
therefore, you meld out at once.
To take the other extreme,
suppose that you have made the
initial meld as in the last case
but that your partner then pick-
ed up a large discard pile. He
proceeded to meld the queens
(which gave him the pile) and
to add two aces and a king to
your melds. He then discards,
and is left with more than twen-
ty cards. You don't dream of
meld out in this situation.
It can't be denied that you will
have some trouble finding safe
discards. Your black three is safe
for the first play. At your next
turn, you may have to discard
the deuce. Your pgartner cannot
be kept out for Tery long since
he has room in his hand for
practically all the pairs in the
deck.
The odds are tremendous that
he can pick up the pile before
you have to give It away, and
there Is a chance that you will
Set the pile yourself sooner or
ster, In which case you and your
partner will have a field day.
It is especially Important to
play on If the opponents need
120 points and have not yet
melded. They are going to have
trouble finding an initial meld
since they are nearly aceless and
Jokerlees.
Take the same Initial meld for
your side and suppose that your
partner picks up a very small
pile. He melds the queens, adds
two aces and a king, and then is
left with only seven or eight
cards. Now you're not sure
whether to fight for the pile or
meld out as quickly. You there-
fore ask for permission to meld
out. and his answer gives you the
dug
MORE DEADLY THAN TRE 1

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FRECKLES AND HIS FRIEND
On Your Way, Bud
BT MERRILL KLOSSE8.
REMCrASnt.,
THIS IS
war; iu_
SHOW YDU
WHO TS
TH8 Mosr
TWIRP
PATtS/
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Me,
DON .
JUAN.'
HERB'S WHERi I START POTnNaV
MOSWD MORION IN HIS PLACE------
SECOND puce/
I DONTkNOW
WHICH LOOKS
BLANKER'
Your R^ce or.
Wtwirp
ALLEY OOP
.
Fooiy Has Ideas
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JNEvBt HAVE BEEN
. rWNOW, RX)ZyX0 COMPLETHy
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DON'T BE
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iteujn'you.lao,
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UH6NERO
HE'S CROSS AND \ AW.WHAT'S
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SEE HE GETS / WOULD
TMROWEDOUTf / PROBABLY
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IIDOTS AND HER K I'D DIES

Right Answer

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' BT EDGAR MARTf*

CAPTAIN EASE
Change of Heart
X UCSLTJ) TURNEA
OKAV. T THIS WHARF BELONGS TO *V
WE'LL, I FATHER. B OAKES. HI5
MOVE VSOiOONER I DUE TO TIE in
WHEREVER T7 HERE AMY MOjMEttr'
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NOT AMY MORE. THE . NOWAWAOtSCrWHIBRPDRTHE
^^raL\T0UW*T5- M-MAYBE YW (AN
neenavfurr 1WJVE YOUR SlOOF TO THE CTTIBpI
USED 8YTHS
FISHERIES
AROUND HB?E,
SIDE OP THE WHARF.
i KLjHP
VIC fUNT
Big Honor Coming Up
MX MICHAEL OTOALLEl
LISTEN!, 5P*vnev. JUST
KEEP TOSSIN THOSB
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SPORX vou
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WAS fO TOUflMlTMB SrtADTUV\ Af*7>OU
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THE WORD 16 THAT
TH6 MISSOS HAS
SOT THE SIGHTS
OriVoUTOSOTD
\NOKr IN A____.
LfMiMDRV.'gEFORfi
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6TEAM,6riCF A
few Cloves
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A FEW DAYS
irJ THAT KIN.O .
of pressure-
cooker ano
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I^LlRE SAIL4J
Kf OUA
calm
"DAY."
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X>M TAKING AtO ^
AlR-CONDlTlOMED
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STATISTICIAN!
GO SACk TO
YOUR 30K6
eOOKS AND
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Atp66V Jiees
AgOUT THAT.'
nn?
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ife-
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fv\A WOULD BECOME
A BLUS OfJ THAT STUFF.'
WE'RHLUCKV TH' DOOR-
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VvB CAM UDC3E HER
WITH THIS-.'
/QiAD
m
AMD SOUR HpME-
.ADE-RADO SET/ WHY,
WH6N SHE SETS THOSE ,
EARPHOWES ON vOO HAVE
TO YELL *DUR HEAD
OFF AROUND HERE.'
, SHE CAN'T HEAR TH"
DOORBsEUL.TH'
TELEPHONE,
TH' FIRE
ENGINES.
TH-------
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BORN THIRTY YEARS TOO
-w*T^^g^4






I *
MONDAY, NOVEMBER I, 1151
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDE "DENT DAILT NEWSPAPER

Pacific Society
<
Bo. n, &/L. 0.1 &&~ 352t
I i 'T
' ABRE' -FERRY MARRIAGE IB ANNOUNCED
At a double ring wedding ceremony, performed bj eandle-
ilght belore u altar flanked by basket* I *>ud hydraagea.
aid white cMdel.br. twined with Pina coral *f L~ .J***'
November 2nd t G.mboa Union Church, Mis. Emily Jane
Abray. daughter of Mr. and Mra, Eart W. Abray of Everett,
Massachusetts, became the bride of Roy* W. Ferry, on of Mr.
L. W. Ferry of Wellsboro, Pennsylvania.
The Reverend Raymond Gray officiated at fee ceremony.
The bride wore ballerina-length gown of pink lace over
taffeta with long sleeves of lace eomlngto point, otm: her
hand* a fitted bodice of nylon marquisette with "P^
neckline and a bouffant skirt. Her Tell of Illusion fell from
a tor. ofplnk tuUe embroidered with white seed pearls. She
carried an old fashioned bouquet.
Mrs^Adele Walbridge was the
matron of honor. She wore a
frown of aquamarine organs,
over taffeta with scalloped ny-
lon marquisette bodice of match-
ing color, a headdress of aqua-
marine tulle and carried a bou-
quet of pink carnations and ba-
by's breath.
The best man was Richard Mc-
A reception was held following
the ceremony m the church par-
An aunt of the bride. Mrs. C.
E. Sullenger of Osceola, Arkan-
sas was present at the wedding
ceremony. ..
The bride Is a graduate of the
Whldden Memorial Hospital of
Everett, Massachusetts and Is at
present on the nursing stair at
Gorgas Hospital.
The groom is a graduate of
Wellsboro High School ta Wells-
boro Pennsylvania and came to
the Isthmus to serve his appren-
ticeship. He is now emoloyed
with the Building Division.
For her going away ensemble
the bride wore an aquamarine
gabardine suit with brown and
white accessories an dan orchid
corsaRC. On their return the
young couple will be at home to
their friends at quarters 1581-A
in Balboa.
*
l
*
*
.
t
I

Roblnson-Brentner
RrHal Partey Entertained
at Dinner
'Miss Bobble Ann Robinson, Mr.
Lowel MHler Brentner and their
bridal attendants were honored
following their wedding rehears-
al at a dinner Saturday evening
given by Miss Robinson's parents.
Major Barrett to Speak
at Balboa Woman's Club Meeting
At the regular meeting of the
Balboa Woman's Club at 9:00
ttoVSMrs. Albert E. Robinson -I Major-Gordon^ Barrett, who
bert E. Robinson, mother of the
bride elect, Mrs. Eric Llndberg,
mother of the groom, Mrs. Ralph
Curias, Mrs. R. B. Ely. Mrs.
William Bartholomew, Mrs. Jack
Johnson, Mrs. Shirley Dorrfto,
Mrs. Barbara Dennison, Mrs.
Anne Rathgaber, Mrs. June
8troop,Mrs. Lois Alexander. Mrs.
Edna Bain, Mrs. Katie Melan-
son. Mrs. Joyce May, Miss Gin-
ger Coffy, Miss Margie Rathga-
ber. Miss Margie Farrell, Miss
Colla Goodln, Miss Jeannlne
Dorgan. Miss Bea Reyes and
Miss Sue Hutchlngs.
Mrs. McHugh Honored
at No-Host Luncheon
Mrs. James McHugh. of An-
cn, who with her husband Is
leaving in the near future to
make their home in New Jersey,
was the guest of honor Sunday
at a farewell no-host luncheon
given by her co-workers of the
Gorgas Hospital In the Fern
Room of Hotel Tivoli.
Those attending were Mrs.
June Hopkins, Mrs. Lilah Ber-
nett. Mrs. Alice Sulsman, Mrs.
Margaret Yerkes. Miss Mara Sal-
cedo, Mrs. O. M. Swing, Mrs.
Vivian Stutzman. Mrs. Gladys
Baldwin. Mrs. Helen Rovlcs,
Miss Helen Mllloy, Mrs. Cora
Oliver, Mrs. Ruth Flshbough,
Mrs. Beverly Dllfer. Mrs. Virgi-
nia Stich. Mrs. Edith Nason and
Mrs. Mildred Cllsbee.
eluded "Man hi the Moon" ice
cream molds.
Those attending the party
were Jcnet and That) Francis,
Brian and Ron Keeney, George
and Willie Nordstrom, Claudia
Doyle and Steven Douty. The
mothers df the youngsters were
also among those present.
Mrs. Wilson Gueat of Honor
at Farewell Luncheon Saturday
Mrs. Woodrow Wilson of Las
Cumbres, who with her husband
and family Is leaving November
10 for the United States to make
their home In Corpus Chrlstl,
Texas, was the guest of honor at
a luncheon given by her sister,
Mrs. Frank C. Cralg and assist-
ed by Mrs. George W. Mulllns,
Jr., In the Balboa Dining Room
of Hotel El Panama on Saturday.
Attending with the honored
guest were Mrs. James McKa-
mey. Mrs. Purdy Mosher, Mrs.
George Yates, Mrs. Murry BOip-
oer. Mrs. John J. Connard, Mrs.
George W. Mulllns, Sr., Mrs.
Fred Wells. Mrs. Lornal Stempel,
Mrs. George Fitsgerald, Mrs.
Victor Melant. Mrs. Oswald Ma-
duro. Mrs. William Schmidt,
Mrs. Albert flermanny and Mrs.
James E. Cole.
a^aV ^B^afl m
Ik] it 'v ivl^v^m L % A'- I
SW ^B fl H 1 1 .^jfl^ Er
B'i
lAJumen'i
WJ.
MISS GRACIELA CAMPAGNANI, right, was selected Coffee
Queen at the Atlas Garden Salui-ay n..,iit after eliminating
a number of other charming contenders. With the queen
are Wilfred Esklldsen, and at left, last year's Coffee Queen,
Miss Emita Arosemena.
of Gamboa..
The guests included Mr. and
Mrs. Eric Llndberg, Mr. and
Mrs. E. O. Stroop. Jr.,' with
Shayne. Miss Barbara Curies.
Miss Barbara Ely. Miss Barbara
Krueger, Mr. Kenneth. Pitman
and Mr. WUllam H. Clark. Jr.
All friends of Miss Robinson
and Mr. Brentner and of their
parents are invited to attend the
wedding ceremony this evening
at I:f at the Fort Amador Cha-
A shower In honor of Miss Bob-
ble Ann Robinson, whose. mar-
rlage to Mr. Lowel Miller Brent-
ner will take place this evening
at 8:00 at the Chapel at Fort
Amador, was given Sunday after-
noon by her bridal attendants
Miss Barbara Curies. Miss Bar-
bara Ely and Miss Barbara Krue-
ger at the Curies home ht Bal-
The table was covered with a
lace cloth set at either end with
silver candlesticks and white
takers and with a centerpiece of
Coalnort baskets of flowers sur-
rounded by individual china
flowers. ,y ,
G'^ts were presented to the
bride to be In a pink and blue to-
verted umbrella. ,
The guests present were Miss
Bobbie Ann Robinson, Mrs. Al-
has recently replaced Major
Tucker as Regional Director of
the Salvation Army, will speak
on "Schools For the Blind In Pa-
nama."
Miss Anelle DeCastro. teacher
of Braille in the school and a
member of the club, will talk of
her work In the school and will
bring exhibits of handiwork done
there.'
u
Once Again
Santa" Says...
EASY
for quick and neat
washings.
Your "first lady" will be
glad to get a washing
machine for Xraas!
Yours with $50.00
CLCB ... $6.25
EUROPEA
FURNITURE STORE
Central Ato. at E. list ft.
S-1IM, J-1UJ
Commander and Mr*-. Brown
Announce Arrival of Son .
Commander and Mrs. Edward
B. Brown of Fort Clayton, an-
nounca the arrival of a baby boy,
Donasl Edward, weigh? seven
pounds flye ounces, at the Fort
Clayton Hospital on Thursday,
November 1.
Commander Brown Is stationed
with the 0.8. Coast and Geode-
tic Survey in connection with the
Inter-American Geodetic Survey.
He is the son of Mrs. E. B.
Brown of Manning. South Caro-
lina. The maternal grandmother
is Mrs. Lula Dudley, of Washing-
ton, D.C. .
Mr. Bauman Returns
from Florida
Mr. A. I. Bauman of Gamboa,
returned Thursday from a brief
trip to Miami, Florida. Mr. Bau-
man is President of the Panama
Martin Club and while In Miami
was the guest of the Miami Beach
"Rod and Reel, Club" where he
spoke on ''Fishing in Panama."
Kathy Ann Warren
is Two Tears Old
Misa Kathy Ann Warren,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. "Bill"
Warren, celebrated her second
birthday with a Hallowe'en par-
ty at her home on October 27.
with her brother Dave and eleven
of her little friends. The Hallow-
e'en motif was carried out in the
decorations and favors and to-
pen Women Will Meet Tuesday
The monthly business meeting
of the Canal Zone Branch of the
National League of American
Pen Womin will be held at 7:00
p.m. Tuesday in the Little Gal-
lery of the Hotel Tivoli.
Nary Wives Club to Sponsor
Charity Bake Sale, Bridge Party
The Navy Wives Club Charity
bake-sale and bridge party on
November at 1:30 p.m. at the
Army-Navy Club at Fort Amador,
will feature the raffling of an
original water color painting by
"Julie" Halloran Malone.
The door prizes donated by
well-known merchants of Pana-
ma will be an added highlight of
the afternoon. .
The club offers an annual
"bake sale" to raise money for
the needy of the area.
There will be a di'-Dlay table
this year to sell products from
the Home for the Blind rn Pan-
ama City.
Mrs. Theodore Aldous, the
chairman for the party, assures
those who have not as yet bought
their tickets that there will be
tickets on sale at the door.
Elks Sponsor Movie Night
Tuesday night is "movie night"
at the Elks Club in Balboa. Mov-
ies start at 7:00 p.m. and are
open to all Elks and their guests
and friends.
Bridge Tournament
To Be Held This Evening
evening in the Card Rm Qf the
Hotel Tivoli at seven o'clock. New
members and visitors are wel-
come.
Winter Collins Family
Names Daughter 'MarcU*
Mr. and Mrs. J. Winter D.
Collins of Rodman have chosen
the name Marcia Courtney Col-
lins for their second daughter.
Young Marcia was born Oct. 4
at Gorgas Hospultal.
Dope Pushers Face
30 Year Stretches
WASHINGTON; NOV. 5 (UP)
President Truman signed a law
fixing severe penalties for illegal
.roties peddlers
Immediately after the Presi-
dent affixed his signature to the
law, Harry J nsllnger, chief of
the Narcotics Bureau, announc-
el that by midnight tonight "a
few persons" who are engaged in
this "criminal trade" will be ar-
rested.
The new law fixes a maximum
penalty of SO years to prison for
third offenders and rules that
"repeaters" must serve their full
sentences without the benefit of
a parole.
Today is
tmA0OUr1Q*Tt*EI Y~r IMy -flliMllf-^ POST-TENS. TW. d
ach eposnful of any of the 7
differenteiiiale-eervmg eorosJe
{not, nourishing canal rat
ach ember of the family.
-Post-TFNS
By GAY PAULEY
United Press Staff
Correspondent
NEW YORK (UP.) You've
heard of abstract art. Now pre-
pare for abstract fashion.
The new approach to design-
tog is the idea of Fran Whitney,
a milliner once associated with
the Metropolitan Museum of Art,
who has just produced a new line
of "abstract" bridal head-dress
for Edward Berger, Inc.
Miss Whitney said her bridal
headgear is more of a suggestion
than the real thing, giving the
silhouette of a hat but without
"the weight or bulk" of one.
She does her abstractions with
wire but without the usual cross-
| piece, or stiffening from front to
back which gives shape to most
other bridal head-dress.
Materials, however, are tradi-
tional velvet, seed pearls, lace
and tulle. One wire outline to
pink velvet is shaped like a bon-
net. Another, designed to be set
on the back of the head and
above a chignon, suggests a
church window to which r. tra-
ditional veil Is attached.
"In a way I do in fashion what
an abstract painter does in art,"
Miss Whitney said. "I Just hint
at the. way something looks,
without working out every de-
tail."
The June bride can go modern
In her head-dress if she wants,
but for the rest of her wedding
costume she clings to the tra-
ditional. Murray Hamburger, a
leading brida] gown manufactur-
er, said.
White continues the favorite
color for formal weddings, al-
though a bride can have ice pink.
Ice blue, or even grey or pale
yellow If she wants.
Bridal dress houses feature
more of the full-length gowns
than the ballerina length for
spring and summer, although
Hamburger said there was a
erowlng demand for the shorter
drefses In cottons never In
satin.
As for cut. this year's owns
vary little from other seasons,
except for a little more bareness
at the top.
"The severe, monastic look has
?one from most dreses," Ham-
burger said, "except those to be
worn In a very ritualistic cere-
monv."
SCHOLL'S SERVICES
Panama No 58 Justo Arosemena Ave.
Foot Treatments, Corns, Callouses, Ingrown Toe Nails,
Areb Supports. REDUCING Treatments. Massages,
Slenderising Machines, Turkish Baths Male and female
operators. Por information call: 3-2217 Panama.
818 SJ; 28 p.m.

Faltering Philip!
Philip's Ufe to filled with bruises.
Well-worn step and rugs he uses
Repairs would leave bis home Uke nr
P A. Classifieds, fust the right clue!
This King of all
Couch Mixtures comes
From Blizzardly
Cold Canada
Tho King ot oil cough medidnos
Buclclov's CANADIOL Mixture
has boon used for years In ovor 70%
of Canada's homes. Fost working
frlpto octing Buckley's Conodlol Mix-
ture quickly loosens and raises phlegm
lodged In fht tubas clears air pas-
sages scothos rasped row tissues.
one or two sips ond worst coughing
sposm ceases. You gat results fost.
You feel tha effect of Bueklay's Ins-
tan fly.
Compounded from rar. Cenodion
Pina Bolsam ond othar soothing h.al-
ing ingredients Buckley's CANADIOL
Mixture Is different from onything
you ovar tried do get o bottle of this
qreot Canodian cough medicine to-
day at any good drug store.
----
YOU MUST GET READY FOR
CHRISTMAS IN TIME
Be practical! Your wife and children will be deliahted if you give them new
Furniture for the Home!
We sell only First Qualirv Merchandise
EASY WASHERS 25 & 60 cycles SERV EL REFRIGERATORS 25 cycles
SIMMONS MATTRESSES and SPRINGS Genuine PHILIPPINE BAMBOO.
If vou belong to the Armed Forces or If vou have a steady Job come to our
Store and you may choose your wn credit terms
ElDiablq
The Store Where You will Find the Largest Assortment of Glass and Linoleum.
86 CENTRAL AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-2465
"Leaders in the Furniture business since 1909"
Ruth Millett Says:
The dining room-less house
has done more to hurt family
living than anything that has
happened to houses in the last
quarter of a century.
The combined living-dining
room forested on us women by
modern architects Just doesn't
work out If there are more than
two in a family.
Without a dining room the av-
erage family can take their
choicethree times a daybe-
tween eating in the living room
o rin the kitchen.
Neither is conductive to long,
leisurely meals, where a family
discussion, if it gets interesting
enough, can be continued long
after a meal Is finished, without
being broken into by the neces-
sity for clearing the table in a
hurry to get the Impromptu din-
ing room back to Its original
function as a kitchen or a living
room.
The big old-fashioned dining
room, with its table all set up,
made It east to ask unexpected
guests to sit down with the fam-
ily. It just meant adding more
plates. Whereas, in the modern
dining room-less house It often
means a major operation.
Furthermore, the dining room
was conducive to getting the ta-
ble set ahead of a meal, a great
help to the married housewife
in avoiding the last minute rush
at the dinner hour.
And there was something sort
of calm and peaceful about mov-
ing into a different room at
mealtime. You dined in a dining
room.
As for Its being waste space, as
so many modern architects con-
tend, it just wasn't.
Mama used that big dining
room table for cutting and sew-
ing. The kids used it for study-
ing, and for plavlng cards.
Neighbors enjoyed it for coffee
sessions..
It was almost as important to
family living as the living room
and it never should have gone
out of style.
If you cared to you could prob-
ably trace a lot of the poor table
manners among modern children
to the fact that they've never bad
the opportunity of dining lei-
surely in a dining room.
T
,>|ouW*A!fc,l
Mount Hood. Oregon. Is the
most frequently climbed snow-
peak in America, according to
the Encyclopedia Brltannlca.
Imported
Canned Hams
pek ,
DREWS
KKAKIS &
ATALANTA BRAND
are offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Colon
OOME DELIVERY
Automatic Whirlpool anea
clothes in billowy haa pa ...
euB-freah, a any weather!
No mora laundry lagging,
dotbeeUne clutching, r
rimtvi reewvreir mm*
SmaaHi Drying Drum ban-
dice clothe* with val vat;
touch. OaiaaUlda Lemji
givaa ocean-breeze freah.'
nee*. Ckcla-Flaw Action.
Oab-WMHjieM
Umwt rUKIT.
^Sylvania
Vi Espaa N. 1TL 3-Cttt
Mftn0l#lftt8f COCK-
foil rlnfav fraternal m ...
H m Atractiva 14k yaitow
loW Uttlup U are or tap
"/awty" SM valve. m
VvCa/a fa/tKch
\



vmum
P^P
mm
IB SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDIMMDENT DAIL? NEWSPAPER
MONDAT. NOVEMBER 5, 1881
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds i
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SiCRVICE
S. 4 Tivoll Ara
hon* I-IISI
KlOSKO OE LESSEPS
f.Huf it l.aut|M
MORRISON'S
No. 4 Pencth .f Ju\j Ava.
Pliant 1-I4I
BOTICA .Rl.TON
14.45 Ml*n*>s Av.
Mane SS-Celaa
SALON DK BELLEZA AMERICANO
i*, a waat ink sartt
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
N*. ST H S\rtH-r>r,*mt
N*. 12.171 Central AvrCalaa.
Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additional
word.
ss
FOR SALE
Household
BfcsSS
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SALE G. M. 25 cycle refrl-
gerotcr. Hallicrafter SX 28 radio.
8 mm. comer. Sunbeom ccttee
rnoker, kitchen toble and stcols,
dishes, child's table ond choirs.
Baboo 2-2901.
FOR SALEOn occount ot voyoge
li\ ngrccm set. diningrocm set. bed-
room, piano ond kitchen set olso
-ifice equipments Almost new Via
Jorros 131. Tel. 3-3553. From
41 o. in. unti. 4 p. m.
FOR SALEGas stove. Modern Moid.
t&ir burners. Gcod condition, S35-
00. No. 17. I Oth street. Son
Francisco, ofternocn.
FOR SALEBargAin. Modern maho-
gany Guatemalan love seat ond
choir, with green nylon webbing; | -
small table, large cerner table K
large coffee toble. 124-B. Al-
brock. Tel. 86-4249.
eQft SALE:Mahogany furniture &
yenetion blinds. Phone Balboa
I 3425. _____j
FOR SALE:Brond new Bendix Eco- |
Jomat automatic washer. List
$300.00, sell for $200.00. Bingo
rire. Call 2224, Albrook Field.
FOR SALE. Complete household
furniture including solid mahoga-,
'. 3y diningroom set, mople twin'
beds complete with springs, mat-
Jjesses and pillows, mople chests(
*jf drawers, mahogany chests,
camphor "chests. Chino closet, side-
bZprd. 2 Costa Rican type children's
saddles, typewriters, bookcase and
Tibrory of "5 new clothbound Eng-
lish dtectiv-story books. Coll
'fbnoma 2-3069 after 4:00 p. m.
FOR SALE:1948 Pontiac convert-
ible. hydrAmatic. radio, $1,000.-
00. dut/ poid. 2-6319.
FOR SALE:1951 FORD V-l Cus-
tom Ot Lux. 2-Door. Radie, S)las-
fic scat covers ana only 10,000
miles. II you arc looking for an
Imoit now car. this is it. Only
$1.650.00. Sao Jock Kr.r at
SMOOT & PAREDES.
FOR SALE:--1936 Chrysler Sedon
SI50 00 Good condition, new
paint, buttery, etc. Flione 6-198.
17 I-A. Gomboa.
MISCELLANEOUS
RESORTS
Rearmament Slows As Europeans
Nurture Their Welfare States
Uranium Bar
Was Souvenir
For A Worker
Do roo ho. Annkmp areMemr Williams Santa Cloro Beach Cottages.
Writ. Alcoholics AnanymoiM
oi 2031 Ancon. C. Z.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Two bedrooms. Frlgidalres, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
FOR SALE:AKC registered cocker
puppies. I male. 1 female, excel-
lent pedigree. 516-D, Curundu
Hgts, phone 83-4109.
FO RSALE: Winter genuine fur
coats. $50.00 each. Come early
and gjt one. Caso Amtricona. be-
tween 6 and 7th St. Bolivar Ave.
Phcne 157, Colon.
FOR SALE:One ton International
truck with stoke body in very
good condition Ci. Alforo S. A.,
Peru Avenue No. 28.
FOR SALEPedigreed great Dane
pups, AKC registered sire is
35" high, best protection. 2-3198,
Culebro road, 324, Ancon.
SALE: 1951 4-Door Stylme
De Luxe, radio. SI,700.00. 4.-
000 miles. Ft. Davis. Phone 87-1
449.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
[ Phillips. Octorulde cottages, Sonto
Clero. Box 435 Balboa. Phone
Ponomo 3-1877. C/istobol 3-1673
Gromllch's Sonto Cloro beoch-
cofraoes. Electric lea boxes, gas
stovAi. moderate rates. Phono 6-
441 or 4-567.
Houses ON BEACH Santa Clara.
Phone SHRAPNIL Balboa 2120,
or see coretaker there.
LESSONS
We teoch all- types of Bollroom
Dancing from 12 years to 75.
Why miss the fun? Bo|boo YMCA,
Hornett & Dunn.
FOR SALE:1946 BUICK ROAD-
MASTIR 4-Door Sedan new
grey paint, all new tiros, plastic
aaat cavers and radio. This cor
is clean inside ond outside. For
SI.000.00 it's the BEST BUY IN
PANAMA today! Come in ond
see Jock Kerr ot SMOOT ft- PA-
REDES ond drive this bargain
owoy!
FOR SALE1950 Buick -^2"door
Sedanette. Duty paid. 4.000
miles, like new. Call 83-4138.
After 4 p. m. House 2229-E. Cu-
rundu.
WANTED: Clean soft rags. Job
Dept. Panemo American.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
AGAIN:At only $3.25 squore
, Jeter, for sole unsurpassable lot
list GOLF HEIGHTS, measures 2.-
000 square meters. SOTILLO Y
IA. No. 1. Central Ave.
Memphis Negro Dr.
Bucks Boss Crump
For Education Post
: MEMPHIS, Tenn.. Nov. 5 (UP>
A Negro candidate for the
Leoving Ponomo Soon. Will socrifice
1950 Chevrolet, 4-door for $1,-
350 cosh. For information call
Ponomo 3-4436.
Oklahoma (op Steals
32 Silver Dollars
From Supermarket
OKLAHOivIA CITY, Nov. 5 (UP)
An Oklahon.a. City policeman,
charged with burglarizing a su-
permarket here yesterday of 32
silver dollars, was freed on $2,500
bond today while his two con-
vii-i -a 'compiler:, languished In
the county Jail.
The suspended patrolman,
Wayne Henry Johnson. 32, plead-
ed innocent el his arraignment
before Peaj#j Justice OUa James
loard of Education here has His two companions, Bill Oene
stirred some Interest In a dull,
off-year election by opposing
the E. H. iBossi Cromp organ-
isation.
Dr. J. E. Walker, the only in-
dependent candidate facing the
administration forces, is waging
Vigorous campaign for the city
education post although the
Crump party generally piles up
buge majorities.
One of Walker'a campaign
planks calls for inter-racial co-
operation and understanding.
His supporters are emphasizing
that nearly 40 per cent of the
school population is Negro and
more than 40 per cent of the
teachers are Negroes.
There are 106.210 voters re-
gistered for the Nov. 8 election,
gtnd of these, 19,326 are Negroes.
Price Control Stays
rill '53, DiSalle Says
ROCHESTER. NY. Nov. 5
. Di Salle said today that prices l" PlA Xea,s oi law
probably will be controlled until I forcement work
1853.
Dean, 26, -xnC Louis Daws Phil-
lips. 32, ent.red similar pleas but
were unable to raise their bonds,
set at $9,000 eavh.
Both Phillip and Dean have
'one police records Dean was
beaten by police and hospital-
ized a few months ago after he
was captured near a burglarized
filling station '.n Ok'uhoma City.
Police said Dean tried to shoot
an arresting officer after he was
captured but his gun failed to
go off. Ofilcr-rs later found a
shell In the chamber of Dean's
gun had mlsflied.
Johnson, ar Air Force veteran
of five yare, was caught hiding
In the back of the supermarket
Friday a few minutes after po-
lice captured Dean and Phillips.
Police suid 42 silver dollars
were missing from the store's
cash register e.nd that 32 of them
were found op Johnson, who was
still wearing Yiu poilce uniform.
Johnson was arrested by a fel-
low officer. Lt Waiter Turner.
Police Chief L J. Hllbert called
Johnson's arrest "the most em-
barrassing vr.i ever to happen
en-
Dl Salle told members of the
Bty club that by 1S53. produc-
tion should be large enough to
meet both civilian and military
needs and do away with the need
for orice controls.
MPhe biggest danger from infla-
tion still is ahead, he said.
w *
'om arrow
SSftrciaf
BUSINESS MAN'S
LUNCH 75
Potage Creole or
Tomato Juice Cocktail
Hashed Beef an Toast
Whipped Potstoes Vegetable
Salad Dessert
Hot Rolls it Butter
Coffee Tea Beer
Johnson, married and father
of two children blamed money
troubles fot hir plight. He said
he needed some "easy money" to
pull himself out of debt.
Johnson joined he force in
1947. He was suspended from
duty Oct. 1 j for falling to report
to work and had been restored
to duty onlv Tnursday.
WANTED:December 1st furnish-
ed studio or one bedroom apart-
ment in Baila Visto for American
bachelor. Call Panama 3-3347.
80 Army Art Contest
Winners Announced
A jury o professional artists!
picked the finalists of the All-!
Army art contest In Washington
recently, ana he 80 entries se-
lected will be put on display in
Washington in the near future, i
In the posters category, first |
prize was awarded to Sergeant
First Class Leopold Baritz. Fort
Monmouth for bis entry captlon-
ed: "Men Are SilentSomeone
Talked"; Pri/ate Joe 8. Brock,
Camp Roberts, placed
FOR RENT
Apartment,
ALHAMMA APARTMENTS
Modern turnishad-unfurnishad aport
manf. Contact office No. 6061, 10th
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386. Co-
lon.
FOR RENT:Modern apartment on
48th. Street. Bella Vista, 2 bed-
rooms, dining-livingroom, kitchen
ond service. Inquire ot rJo. 17,
47th. Street.
DON'T STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL..
VERTAGREEN
3-VVay Plant Food
it cheaper than water
foi It
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
278 Central Ave. .Tel. 3-0140
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
i m Mediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
n 22 E. 28th St
FOR RENT
Rooms
ROOMS AVAILAILI Light, caol
entirely nrnovatad anal trail fur-
nished. Rotas reasonable. Bache-
lors only. Inquire at The Ame-
rican Club racing Da Lessees
Park.
-r
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hetel El Panasoi
Has for Sale Stocks
Preferred or Common of
Panam Forest Products
and Nat. Abattoir
Tels.: 3-4718. 3-1660
FOR RENT: Furnished bedroom.
Baila Visto, privte bath ond en-
trance. 45 dollars. Tel. 3-1648.
second :_-.
wlthhis "Talk Can Kill" while FR RENT:Nicely furnished room,
Private Firet Class Robert Miller,
Fort Jay, took third prize for "Si-
lence Means Security."
Private Miller won first and
second prizes in the cartoon cat-
egory, also. Tnlrd winner was
Corporal Kan B. Leabo, who is
stationed in Hawaii.
"Textile Design," In the textile
category, won for Sergeant First
Class Francis O Hockaflay, Fort
Bennltig first place while Master
Sergeant Russell Broner, United
States Army Alaska and Sergeant
Charles E. Gaines, Camp McCoy,
took second and third place re-
spectively.
First Prize and "Best of Show"
winner In the Painting Group
went to Prlvat Paui Calle, Fort
Dlx. Private First Class James H.
Malone, Fort Jackson, and Ser-
geant John R Leone, Fort Jay,
placed second and third.
In the flith categorydraw-
ingsCorporal Kenneth E. Crook
of Fort Lee, Sergeant Charles E.
Uaines. Camp McCoy, and WAC
Corporal draco M. Stanley, Fort
Belvolr were awarded first, sec-
ond and third prizes.
board if desired. Bs-lla Vista, 46th
Street 18-A upstairs. Phone office
hours 2-1693 or 3-1789.
Car Bums Killing 2
After Bus Collision
"Join us for Cocktails
from 4 to 6 p.m.
MANHATTANS ^ _
MARTINIS 25 r
DAIQUIRIS ^/
baPPETiZBRS -On The flouac
Sherwin Williams
Paints o,fr yu
TOPS IN TASTEFUL
COLORS I
I YOUR PATTERN ... the
1 RIGHT pattern for every
painting purpose wait-
ing for you right her* In
our stores. Select from an
-rtensive stock TODAY.
Pedro Miguel Council
Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
The regular monthly meeting
of the Pedro Mltruel Civic Coun-
cil will be held this evening at
7:30 in the Movie Hall on Prado
Street.
Open dis-u.sMons will be held
on subject., of particular inter-
est. In addition, a nominating
committee wil' be appointed to
secure candidates for the com-
ing election of new officers to
serve the Council In 1952. Eight
Senior and foui Junior council-
men and councllwomen are to
be elected < addition to the May-
or, a Secretary and a Treasurer,
for a term of one year.
A report wtli be made of the
activities of Hie Council for the
past year, showing the accom-
plishments for the betterment of
the community.
Prefers Graveyard *
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (UP) Lee
Wilson. 30, (tot so angry when he
was asked to move that he push-
ed over seven tombstones. Wilson
lives In a cabin In a cemetery. He
paid a $50 fine for malicious
mischief.
FOR SALE:
BIRMINGHAM. Ala.. Nov. 5.
iUPiA car caught fire when
It collided with a loaded Grey-
hound bus near here today and
Its two occupants were burned
beyond recognition, authorities
reported.
Two occupants of the bus
were hospitalized and several
others received minor Injuries,
it was reported.
The bus, traveling to Birm-
ingham from Tennessee points
on U. S. Hlfthwav 11 collided
with the car 14 miles north of
here at about 4 a. m. fCST), it
was reported.
Authorities said the two per-
sons In the car were so badly
burned that lt was Impossible
to tell whether either was a
man or woman.
J. E. Bullard. 44, of Memphis,
the bus driver, was hospitalized
here with a broken leg. and one
passenger, Mrs. Onyx Hollls, of
Birmingham, was hospitalized
with head Injuries.
Physicians said she possibly
received a fractured skull.
Bullard was said to have been
driving for Greyhound Lines for
28 years.
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM-Bl-II.T
Slipcover Reupholitery
VISIT OUR SHOW-ROOM)
a i birlo Har*
J. r. da la Oau 77 (Aalomoblle How)
Free Estimates Plckap Delivery
Tel, 3-442 CM a.m. la T:M SJk
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
TRAVPL J-ffty f
18 Tiveli Ave. ran. 2-240S
Col. Robert Christie
Goes To Ft. Knox, Ky.
Col. Rob-rt H. Christie. U. S.
Army. Assistant Staff Secretary
of Headquarters Caribbean Com-
mand, has received orders from
the Department of the Army
transferring bint to the Armored
Center, Port Knox Ky^ Col.
Christie will leave the Isthmus
t an early date accompanied by
his family.
Col. Christie came to Carib-
bean Command from Washing-
ton where he served as an Ex-
ecutive Officer of the Manage-
ment Staff Division, The Adju-
tant Oeneral j Office In the Pen-
tagon. He arnved In the Canal
Zone on March 28, 1840.
His Old II
orlh Ave. Tel. 2-M18
'a. 3 Martin Sosa St.
Tel. 3-1424
ACCORDION
Seanddlli 128 Bayoa
Fot In to'in it ion Call
BAMBRRIA ITALIA
No. 81 IS West St.
Phone 2-3178 Panam.
Town
BOSTON, iUP) Ray O'Con-
nor, retired New England Tele-
phone and Telegraph Co. execu-
tive, was born In Watertown.
Wls.. moved to Watertown. NY.,
and then to Watertown, Mass.
For
AUTOMOBILE
INSURANCE
SCI
tOYD 1R0TH*> **
1*8 lessees Park
Tej.: 2-2888) Z-288S
Protectors (?)
Of The People
By UNITED PRESS
Two officers of the law are In
trouble with the law today In two
cities miles apart.
One of them will go free, but
the other faces a stiff prison
term.
Thirty-two-year-old patrolman
Wayne Henr Johnson sobbed In
his Jail ceil hi Oklahoma City:
"I hope peopie realize all police-
men aren't fixe this." He says he
wishes he had been shot by the
officer who caught him burglar-
izing t- supermarket.
The othiT policeman is 23-
year-old rookie Raymond Blrzln-
skl of suburban Highland Park,
Detroit. Ke, toe got Involved In
a robberyhut he says he
thought it wss part of a plice
department test He says he be-
lieved that tnree fellow patrol-
menwho took him along on a
warehouse burglary during his
first night on the beatwere try-
ing to test his honesty. Blrkinskl
will not be protccuted because he
refused to shata the loot.
Stassen May Throw
Support To Ike,
Rejects COP's Taft
WASHINGTON, Nov. 5 (UP).
Harold B, 8tassen today
came out against Sen. Robert
A. Taft for the GOP president-
ial nomination and hinted 'ie
might support Gen. Dwlgbt D.
Elsenhower if "certain ques-
tions" are answered to his sa-
tisfaction.
"I have made? up my hind
not to support Taft," the Univ-
ersity of Pennsylvania Pres-
ident said In an Interview on
the National Broadcast, r.g
Company television program,
Meet tne Press."
"The majority of the people
do not approve of the foreign
policy either of President Tru-
man or of Senator Taft," he
declared.

General Kiel Leaves
For Week in Salvador
Brig. Gen. BmU C. Kiel left
Albrook Field this mornlna for
an official visit to the U.S. Air
Force Mission at Ban Salvador.
Gen. Kiel, who is the Com-
manding General of the Carib-
bean Air Command will return to
the Isthmus In one week.
TULSA, OUa., Nov. S (UP)A
former atomic energy employe,
arrested by the FBI because he
brought a four-pound chunk of
radioactive uranium home with
him. said today he "merely want-
ed lt for a souvenir."
The suspect, Robert Sheldon
Mathews, 21, was arrested by FBI
agents who found a cylindrical
bar of uranium about four inches
ions in his no me in Rand Springs,
a Tulsa suburb.
The FBI said Mathews quit his
lob last wees at the Hsnford.
Wash, atonu> works, to answer a
reserve cali in the Army. Mat-
hews holds a reserve commission
as a seconi lieutenant.
The FBI said the youthful Mat-
hews was employed by the Han-
ford plant last June following his
graauaticn from Texas A. and M.
College with a degree in chem-
ical engineering.
Mathews was free en 81.888
bond today following his ar-
raignment on charges of ille-
gal possession of uranium, a
violatlen of the Atomic Ener-
gy Act.
Mathews admitted taking the
metal, usea in the manufacture
of atomic weapons, but Insisted
he hadn't done anything wrong.
"I merely wanted a souvenir,"
he said repeatedly. "The Atomic
Energy Commission is making a
mountain out of a molehill on
this."
Meanwhile, a University of Ok-
lahoma physics professor, Dr.
William Schriever, said at Nor-
man that tre uranium metal
would "defiivtely be radioac-
tive," but "not dangerous nor
particularly valuable."
Mathews talked freely with re-
porters early today then clam-
med up later, stating he had been
Instructed by the FBI "not to say
anything.'' H<- refused to say
where he got the uranium or
what job he had at the atomic
plant.
7 Negroes Crashed
To Deafh As Auto
Plunges Into (reek
TUSCALCOSA Ala..N ov. 5
(UP)Se veil Negroes were
crushed to degth yesterday when
their car missed a bridge at the
bottom of a long hill and plung-
ed across a creek Into the oppo-
site bank. ,
-
A passerby who discovered the
wreckage said the two-door sedan
was telescoped Into the embank-
ment, and its victims, including
five women, were trapped inside.
Vester Traveek. a Berry, Ala.,
farmer, said he came upon the
wreckage beside U.8. 43 about 15
miles north of here 'on the Fay-
ette County lire about 7:30 a.m.,
apparently a short time after the
accident occuned.
By LYLE C. WILSON
PARIS, Nov. 6.(UP)The biggest ruckus
in Europe right now is a battle between rearma-
ment and the welfare state.
British and French statesmen and some others
are sayingtake it easy, you will wreck ouV stand-
ard of living if you proceed with rearmament too
fast. /
Gen. Dwlght D. Eisenhower Is
stuck with a question which he
doubtless will discuss during his
quickie trip to the United States.
It is: Whether Europe should
move fast to maintain social
and economic gains financed In
large part by Marshall Plan aid?
Or, shall Europe follow Ike's
advice to move fast for rearma-
ment even if living standards
and welfare state Ideals are
shaken in the process?
The military takes a dim
view of welfare states as op-
posed to fighting power.
Ike counsels Europe to hurry.
Field Marshal Sir William
Slim, chief of the British Im-
perial General Staff, Is a hur-
ry-up fellow himself.
The other day he had a look
at British troops on German
maneuvers.
"The welfare state may have
many advantages," said Sir
William In faint praise, "but
it has a lot ef things that are
not good for a soldier. The
modern youth isn't trained to
loek after himself."
Maintenance of social and
economic gains means taking; a
chance that the Soviet Union
will not soon strike at Europe.
Ike is against taking chances.
He has been telling Europeans
that the whole rearmament ef-
fort must be chalked down as a
failure if the Weit drags Its
heels.
The British Labor govern-
ment which was voted out of
office by a small margin last
month was frank about its
views.
At September's Ottawa con-
ference of North Atlantic Treaty
Organization powers the British
position was stated by Chancel-
lor of the Exchequer Hugh
aaitskell. He corresponds to our j
Secretary of the Treasury.
aaitskell told his Ottawa au-
dience that rearmament should
slow down for a "steady pull."
Take it easy, said the British.
Ike did not like that.
About half of Britain's voters,
however, were all for it when
the votes were counted, and a
good share of them would have
slowed down rearmament much
more than Galtskell.
Now the Conservatives ar*
running; the United Kingdom.
But you do not have to be a
political expert to doubt that
the Conservatives would deprive
a Briton of his one egg a week
In favor of some more rifles and
bullets.
The situation Is about the
same in France, with one not-
able exception
French politicians In th
past 38 years have lacked the ;
capacity to deal firmly with
their country's financial pre- !
blems. They are afraid te '
erack down on their country- '
men, the French being an in- '
divlduallstic breed which re-
jects regimentation, ration
tickets and nonsense like in- '<
come taxes.
Oen. Alfred M. druenther.'
Ike's chief of staff, said last.
June: "We still are hot In a
Russians by next June, Whatever
Europe."
Oeneral, you can say thai
again todayand you might re-
peat lt next June. But Ike. him-
self, has said Western Europe
should be able to "hold" the
Russians by next June, whatever
that means.
Holding operations are small
potatoes In the war business.
With all of their pension, sub-
sidy, health and welfare plans.
perhaps Europe's welfare state*
should adopt an Idea which was
suggested for the new British
government. ,
It was to Insist not only thatf
all proposed expenditures be
absolutely necessary, but also
that the Treasury could afford
to spend the money.
That might turn up some more
defense money here instead of
in Washington.
CIO Becomes Teen-Ager Today,
He said one occupant, identi-
fied as Willie Bob Sturdivant, 27,
of Fayette, was still alive, but
died a few minutes later. Sturdi-
vant lay under three bodies in
the rear of the car, rraweek said.
Traweek said the car appar-
ently failed to make a turn at
the bottom of the hill. The bridge
across the creek Is In the middle
of an "S" turn a short distance
away, he said
8hortly after Traweek arrived
he was joined by two other pas-
serby, Roy1 Pennington and H. C.
Traweek, and together they tried
to extricate Sturdivant but he
died before they could help him.
The other victims were iden-
tified as Josepn S. Guyton, about
40; Fred Mtu:iif, about 35: his
wife Willie Mae, about 30: her
mother, Delma Johnson, about
50: Inez Terrell, about 38: and
Nina Mae Nunn, 23.
Pur
n
o
SHORTS
Fire Right At Hand
NEW BRITAIN, Firemen of Company One wish
all fires were as convenient. They
quickly controlled a backdrart
soot fire in the cellar of the block
housing fire department central
headquarters and the detective
bureau.
Neaee Freve It
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (UP) _
When the town council asked
proof that Lawrence Kenyon.
town clerk, had paid 31 boun-
ties of 15 cents each for wood-
chucks, he showed the council a
board to which were nailed 31
woodchuck noses. The council
spproved the bill.
Cat Pat On Spot
GREENWICH. Conn. (UP)
Mittens, a four-year-old house
cat. figured she had eight lives
left after an emergency opera-
tion pulled her through from the
effects of a gangland-style shoot-
ing by two teen-age youths who
fled the scene in a car.
Saints Bebbed
OODEN, (UP) Members of
the Latter-day Saint* Othtrch
have their own candidato for
"meeneet thief." An estimated
gaoo in cash and checks, repre-
senting tithing and church fast
offerings, was stolen recently
from the home of Bishop R. D.
Wardle.
NEW YORK, Nov. 5 (UP)
The CIO today becomes a teen-
ager, fully purged of its left-
wing elements, still feuding with
the AFLand firmly dedicated to
the principle of international
cooperation among anti-Com-
munist workers.
Its 13th annual convention,
first to be held In New York,
opened today. Delegates from
the 35 national union affiliates
210 local Industrial unions face
a busy week listening to
speeches, working on commit-
tees and voting on resolutions.
Although the Congress of In-
dustrial Organizations is only
13 years old. the initials "CIO"
have been In newspaper head-
lines since 1935.
At that time, John L. Lewis
and a handful of other union
leaders organized the Commit-
tee for Industrial Organization
within the American Federation
of Labor.
They were, annoyed at the
AEL's traditional reliance on
craft unionism, and the parent
federation's reluctance to or-
fanlze the huge mass produc-
lon industriessteel, textiles,
autos, rubber.
Lewis' group set up organizing
committees In Some of those
Industries, and were thrown out
of the AFL the next year.
Lewis, whose United Mine
Workers furnished many of the
leaders of the organizing drives,
was elected President of the
new Federation when It held its
first convention in 1838.
Philip Murray, who had been
h
a vice president of both the CIO grounds.
)fg..e7
and .the UMW. succeeded the
tempestuous miners chief when
Lewis quit lh 1940. after the OIO
Ignored his suggestion to back
Wendell L. Wlflkie rather than
Franklin D. Roosevelt for the
presidency.
Three times in the last 13
years, moves to reunite the na-
tion's divided house of labor
have failed.
This year's convention has
before it an Invitation from the
AFL to open new talks On "or-
ganic unity" of the two groups,
but there is no Indication that
the CIO will accept.
The younger organization 1*
still burning over the wiy the
AFL decided last summer to
break up the united labor pol-
icy committee.
But both the^cio and AFL
have given warm support to a
new. world-wide cooperative
labor venturethe Internation-
al Confederation of Free Trade
Unionsand the ICFTU's secre-
tary general is to be a principal
speaker at the convention.
The ICFTU was formed to
combat the Communist-Inspir-
ed World Federation of Trade
Unions, which the CIO helped
form but quit in 1949 when it
started to clean out its own
left-wingers.
The 1949 convention threw out
two CIO affiliatesthe United
Electrical Workers and the Farm
Equipment Workerson charges
they were Communist-domin-
ated, and went on to oust nine
more after trials on the same
of bread almost
as big as
herself. Mavla
Hughes. 7,
"Pearly Princes*
of Acton,"
arrive sat the
Costera' Harvest
Thanksgiving
service in the
Church of St.
Mary Magdalene
>n the Old Kent
Road, London.
4
4
j
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xssaaaBBBBBBaaaai


V

MONDAY. NOVEMBER 5. 1951
>- :


c
It
/
4V'
*
THE PANAMA AMEEICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NKW8PAPES
PAGE SEVEN
Mc
anuc
tit
l9llt ,,&< 195, tm -. ZLLfk* g.lu 378
GALA WELCOME EXTENDED FRENCH OFFICERS
RETURNING FROM KOREA
The Contal of France At Colon, and Mn, Mmreelle Grln-
goire entertained with m reception at their residence, Thurs-
day evening, to honor Captain Andre Haet, Commanding Of-
ficer of the French Natal Veaael "La Grandlera."
The hip docked in Cristobal en route to France after
serving with the United Nations forces ih Korean waters for
the past three years.
Mrs. Wilford will reside with Mr.
and Mrs. Harvey until quarters
are available.
Also In port were three other
French ships. Their officers at-
tended the reception for their
fellow countrymen. These in-
cluded from the 8.8. "Bernieres"
Captain Francis Hervs, Chief
Mate Daniel Wllbert and Chief
Engineer Paul Le Huede; from
the 83. "Argentan" cap-.ain
Jean Champy, Chief Mate Pierre
Martini. Chief Engineer Ives
Kergulaiec. S.S. "Pont Aude-
mer" Captain Jean Audin. Chief
Mate Louis Morlaet ;and Chief
Engineer cam Hie Margin
The local guests were the Min-
ister of France. Guy Menant and
his daughter. Mrs. de Raulln,
Mr. and Mrs. M., Olivier, the
Governor of the Province of
Colon and Mrs. Agustn Cedeo,
the Myor of the City of Colon
and Mrs. Jose D. Basan, Cap-
tain and Mrs. L. L. Koepke with
Mrs J. J. Jackson, the Honora-
ble and Mrs. Charles Whltaker,
Colonel and^Mrs. Henry F. Tay-
lor. Colonel and Mrs. James
Pumpelly. Captain and Mrs.
William Parsons. Mr. and Mrs.
The hostess was assisted by
Mrs. de Raulln, Mrs. L'Aigle and
Mrs. Cappelle.
The table was beautifully de-
corated with one Of the hostess'
original shell arrang e m e n t s
which was presented the honor -
ee as a gift for the ship.
Miss Carol Harvey
Weds Robert Wilford
Miss Carol Elaine Harvey,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray-
mond L. Harvey, of Cristobal,
Slighted he rtroth to Robert
lanning Wilford, Jr.. son of Mr.
Covered Dish Supper
to Honor Visiting Bishop
A covered dish supper will be
given at the American Episcopal
Church of Our Saviour tomorrow
evening, Tuesday, at 6:00 to
honor Rt. Rev. C. Alfred Voe-
geli, S.T.D.. Bishop of Haiti and
Santo Domingo.
Bishop Voegell served from
1038 to 1943 as Dean of St. Luke's
Cathedral in Ancon.
The supper is sponsored by the
Ladles Auxiliary with Mrs. Jul-
ius 8. Deltz and Mrs. Russell
Weade as co-chairmen. All
members of the congregation
and their friends are invited to
attend.
Gatun Civic Council Meeting
The regular meeting of the
R. M. Wilford and Mrs. Emily Gatup Civic Council will be held
Wilford, also of the Atlantic Side, i tomorrow evening at 7.30 at the
in a ceremony at the Gatun Un- Clubhouse. ___
ion Church yesterday at ?30 Crirtobm, Wo^Tcis.b Notice*
Rev J W I Graham rjer-' The Board of the Cristobal
fomed KrcerLemoSTbeforfa Woman's Club will meet tomor-
large gathering of friends and | row morning, at 9 M a.m. at the
relatives of the young couple. Red Cross Building In Old Crte-
coya"XfSu1chereUaedtde''t0Th regular monthly meeting
C0Mi "adS* Fisher, pianist, of the Cristobal Woman, club
played the traditional wedding i will M*!**!*^$J?
marches and a program of lncl-pm. *\tJM OmluUbu.
Hentni mustr nrPreriin* and riirr- i Mrs. Dorothy Melendez, of Pa-
dental music preceding and dur
g the service.
The bride, entered upon
tag the service. |nama City, will be the guest
Herbert Toledano, Dr. and Mrs.
Wayne Gilder, Mr. John Glancy,
Mrs Catherine Stapf. Mr. and arm of her father, who gave her herJ^fc*ffUoM ola
Mrs. R. Pernigotti, Mr. and Mrs. iin marriage. She was beautiful Gilbert House and the Cristobal
the I speaker. She will give a talk on
Ol tll6
Robert Leigh, Mr. and Mrs. E.
R. MacVlttle, Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Canavagglo, Mr. and Mrs.
Laurence Breece. Mr. and Mrs.
Philip 8. Thornton. Mr. and
Mrs. Herman Henriquez, Miss
Adamary Adams, Mr. and Mrs.
Arthur Howard. Mr. and Mrs.
Fritz Humphrey. Mr. and Mrs.
Manuel Castillo, Mr. and Mrs.
Stanley Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs.
Humberto Lelgnadler, Mr. and
Mrs. Julio Salas, Dr. and Mrs.
Antonio Alberola. Captain and
Mrs. John Scheibeler. Miss
Scheibeler. Mr. and Mrs. Jorge jronet trimmed with clusters
in her wedding gown of white
lace over bridal satin. The strap-
less dress had a fitted lace Jacket
finished with a Peter Pan collar
and buttoned down the front
with tiny self-covered buttons,
to the pointed waUtline. The
lace sleeves were long and fitted,
with flattering points at the
wrists. The ballerina, lace skirt
was very full and had a center,.
panel of satin with a trimming j workers at the Coco SoloJjaval
of appllqued lace roses. Her fin- Station took this opportunity to
gertip veil of nylon net wa6 held honor her.
in place by a lace and satin co-
Woman's Club.
Miss Wiehner Honored
with Morning Coffee'
Mrs. Michael Greene enter-
tained at her Margarita resi-
dence, Saturday morning, with a
coffee and gift shower for Miss
Ann Wiehner.
Miss Wiehner is being trans-
ferred to Balboa and her co-
Patlno Linares, Mr. and Mrs.
Frank L. Scott, Captain and
Mrs. Samuel Brown. Miss Bar-
bara Brown and Mrs. Zula Lee
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. E. N.
Stokes, Miss Thelma Godwin,
Miss Thora Baublltz. Mr. and
Mrs. Luclen Mlchenau, Mr, and
Mrs. Henri L'Aigle. Mr. and Mrs.
Marcel Cappel, Mr. Allen Cou-
vert, Mr. Lequoa. and Mr. Gon-
doen.
unity Station
-840
100.000 tool* Most
Presents
Today, Monday. Nov. *
PJtf.
3:30Music for Monday
4:00Music Without Words
4: ISDavid Rose Show
4:30What's Tour Favori.e
6:00As I Knew Her (BBC)
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Kellog's Program
7:30Sports Review
7:46Here Comes Louis Jordan
1:00News and Commentary,
(VOA>
1:15Platter Parade (VOA)
: 45Youth Talks It Over
(VOA)
9:00Story .8.A. (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:46Sports Tune of.Day and,with which she wore white or-
News(VOA)
10:00The World At Your Win-
dow. (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidnightSign Off
of
orange blossoms. She carried a
white Rainbow Bible topped with
a white orchid, from which cas-
caded a ribbon shower.
Mrs. George Flores was the
Matron of honor. She wore a
gown of light gold net over taf-
feta fashioned on the lines of the
bridal gown. It also had a fitted
jacket of matching lace made
with cap sleeves. The full skirt
was of net over matching taffe-
ta'. She wore a lace and net
headdress to match the dress
hydrangeas.
Miss, Muriel MOT land,! the
brides .maid was df^ia^MUjlr'
to -match the matron of|lWht*.
Her flowers were pink carnations
encircled with green mallne.
Mr. James Roe was best nan
forMr. Wilford and Mr. Stuart
Jarvls served as groomsman.
The mother of the bride chose
for the occasion an aqua silk
crepe, street-length dress, made
on tailored lines. She used white
accessories and wore an orchid
corsage.
Mrs. WUford. the mother of
the groom, wore a green gabar-
dine suit with matching acces-
sories. Her flowers were a cor-
sage of gardenias.
Mrs. Wilford graduated from
-"-Istobal High School In the
Class of '51 and Mr. WUford
raduated 1q the Class of '50* He
Is now employed with the Elec-
trical Division.
Following the ceremony Mr.
and Mrs. Wilford sailed on the
Panama for a month's vacation
with relatives In- Kentucky and
Mississippi. The bride's traveling
costume was a white Unen suit.
Bon Voyage Party
for Mrs. Lee
The members of her group of
the Woman's Auxiliary of the
Gatun Union Church honored
Mrs. Gilbert Lee with a lunch-
eon and bon voyage Saturday, at
the Cristobal Gun Club.
Those who participated were:
Mrs. Ralph Graham, Mr. Fred
Newhard .Mrs. Walter Watt* and
Mrs. William Smith.
Orchid corsajres were given
each guest by Mrs. Graham.
Church Ceeoci! Meeting
There will be a meetlng-Of the
Council, of the Gatun Union
Church Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. All
members are urged to attend as
important, business will be dU-
cuesed. '-
* BALBOA
SOON
chids.
Upon
their return Mr. and
Tomorrow, Tuesday, Nov.
M.
1:00Sign On Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15New (VOA)
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Hawaiian Harmonies
9:00News
9:15Sacred Heart Program
9:30As I See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00New
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Rhythm and Reason
3:00A Call From Le Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:80pirlt of the Vikings
2:46Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
1:15tthe Little Show
3:30Music for Tuesday
4:00Radio University '
4:15Promenade Concert
4:90What's Your Favorite
1:00PANA M UBICA STORY
TIME
:15Evening Salon *,.
7:90The Christian Science
T:'.5Mnaftal Interlude
7:30PABST SPORTS REVIEW
7:4*Jam Session
8:00NEWS 1:16What's On Your Mind
(VOA)
8:45Time forBusMeu (VOA)
9:00Symphony HaH
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:46Sports World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:18Musical Interlude
10:30Varletv Bandbox (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Ofi
Qdh^xtfa
STARTING
THURSDAY!
IN HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD. (NEA) The
Laugh Parade: Free movies on
TV? That's nothing. Everything
except the popcorn Is free on
Mondar-and Tuesday nights at
a San Francisco drlve-ln theater.
A sign out front reads:
"Free Admission. Free China-
ware. Ftee Photographs. Free
Diapers.' Free Train Rides for
the Kids. Free Roses for the La-
dles."
Clifton Webb was told about a
rumor that MGM might borrow
him from Fox for a musical re-
make of "Goodbye. Mr. Chips."
"Well," snapped Webb, "I can
always turn it down. Can't you
heajr me sing, Tve got pupils.
hay, hay'? And with GreerFogel-
son as my leading lady."
Harry Warner got to talking
about a rather-large home he
owned at Malibu Beach. 25 miles
from Hollywood, and Writer Ev-
erett Freeman said he was
thinking about building a place
on a lot he had In the same re-
sort area.
"How about buying my house?"
asked Warner.
"But what would I do with my
lot?" said Freeman.
Tl tell you what I'll do." said
Warner. "You buy my house and
111 pay the expenses of moving
It onto-your lot."
"That is an idea." brightened
Freeman. "I'll tell you what we'll
do. Have your movers bring the
house into Hollywood some day
and I'll look at It."
"And she keeps blowing out dif-
fuse *"
Arthur Blake, the mimic, peer-
ed through the darkness of the
night club toward a table occu-
pied by Bette Davis and Gary
Merrill.
"Bette." he called, "Is it all
right If I do my Impression of you
In "The Letter.'"
"Maybe you'd better send her
The Letter.' roared Merrill. "She
happens to be in the powder
room. '
Dorothv Lamour Is telling It
on herself.. She went shopping
early one morning to avoid the
crowds and was recognized In
the elevator by a girl who nudg-
ed her companion and. in a loud
whisper, identified Dottle.
"You sure?" the friend whis-
pered. "She doesn't look so glam-
orous to me."
"Fa goodness sake," the girl
snapped. "It's too early in the
morning for that."
A glamorous star neartag her
50th winter complained to her
producer about the cameraman's
'outrageous'* work in a current
film. The producer promptly
summoned the Ienser. who ex-
plained that no amount of earn-
er magic could conceal the
star's wrinkles.
"For crying out loud," the ex-
ecutive thundered, "try diffu-
sion."
"I diffuse her In every shot,"
shot," groaned the cameraman,
THURSDAY AT THE
CENTRAL
SAVAGE PASSIONS
Aflsao ie the North Atlantic I
A Hollywood agent tried for
months to see Y. Frank Freeman,
Paramount's top executive and
finally hit upon a ruse. He left
word with Freeman's secretary
that he wished to discuss Ava
Gardner.
Next day an appointment was
made and the agent was ushered
Into Freeman's Inner sanctum.
"I understand you wish to dis-
cuss Ava Gardner with me."
Freeman said. "You represent
her. of course?"
"No." said the agent. "I'm here
to talk about another client."
"But you told my secretary
that you wanted to discuss Ava
with me." exploded Freeman.
The agent grinned foolishly
and said:
"Doesn't everybody want to
discuss Ava Gardner?"
Blind Man Drives
Truck Fairly Well
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. Nov.
'UP i An Arkansas state troop-
er watched a slow-moving truck
swerve into a curb here, right It-
self and then move off at a
snails pace toward the downtown
section.
He overhauled the truck and
ordered the driver to pull over.
"What's the matter fellow, you
bflnd?" the officer asked.
The driver replied calmly
"yes sir. I'm totally blind!"
While the officer stared in dis-
belief, the driver climbed from
the cab with the aid of a cane.
A companion explained that his
buddy had lost his eyes several
years ago "and it was his cher-
ished ambition to drive once
more."
"Come to think of it. that blind
fellow drove more carefully than
a lot of people I've seen with 20-
20 vision," the trooper said.
Harness Man Finds
Time To Catch Up
MIDDLEBORO, Mass. (UP)
George E. Benson, 83. finally"
has yielded to the horseless
carriage and closed his harness
shop after 42 years. .
Benson moved to Mlddleboro
In 1909 and opened his shop,
which has catered to such per-
sons as Tom Thumb, the fam-
ous midget, and the movie star
James Cagney, who got horse
trappings for his estate on
Martha's Vineyard.
Benson's shop survived 12
blacksmiths, five carriage ma-
nufacturers, three harness shops
and five stables which were
in business when he came here.
Trade fell off so that he could
not support the shop any more.
He cares for the reduced-f
needs of his customers In a
basement workroom at his
home.
(Pa
nama
Canal Uuohouses-
Showing Tonight
BALBOA
Alr-Condltloned
I <:!
Betty GRABLE MacDonald CAREY
"Meet Me After The Show"
(TxhnicoUr) Tuesday "HIGJIWAY Ml"
DIABLO HTS.
S:U t l
t
David BRIAN a Arlcne DAHL
"INSIDE STRAIGHT"
Tueaday JUNT.l.K UKADHlWTKJj"
COCOL I
:!5 8:4
Gregory PICK
'TWELVE O'CLOCK HIGH'
TuaadaT "THE I.IMON DKOr Mil '
G A 1
im r
______e_
UN
(Tuesday)
'OPERATION DISASTER'
MARGARITA
CIS tl*
John MILLS Helen CHERRY
"OPERATION DISASTER"
Tpcadav "laalde The WMIa Of Ealawn. Priao"
CRSTOBAL
ilr-CodlUoned
, 1:11 :Z
I
Daan MARTIN and Jerry LEWIS
THAT'S MY BOY"
y "MY roKBIDDEN PAST"
CENTRAL
RUTH ROMAN RICHARD
TODD. In
"LIGHTNING STRIKES
TWICE"
BELLA VISTA
ADVENTURE THAT STORMS
THE SEAS OF THE WORLD!
in -
Technicolor!
Gregory
PECK
Virginia
MAYO
- In -
"CAPTAIN HORATIO
HORNBLOWER"
CECILIA THEATRE
The Housing- Story of
JEAN LAFITTE
LAST OF THE
TeCHN/COlOR *
BUCCANEERS"
PAUL NEME w>
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air Conditioned
Tonv Curtli Piper
Laurie, in
"THE PRINCE WHO WAS
A THIEF"
Also: -
Stephen HcNally. In
"AIR CAPET"
TIVOU THEATRE
SPANISH PROGRAM I
Tin-Tan. in
"EL REVOLTOSO"
- Also -
Meche Barba, in
"CUANDO TU ME QUIERAS"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
TECHNICOLOR DOUBLE!
Dan Duryea Gale Storm, la
"AL JENNINGS OF
OKLAHOMA"
Alao: Robert Cummlnfj
Joan Caullield. In
"GIRL OF THE TEAR
VICTORIA THEATRE
SPANISH PROGRAM!
Amalia Aguilar Victor
Junco, in
"AMOR PERDIDO"
Also: Pedro Armendriz. In
"CAMINO_PaX INFIERNO"
veryboyffe




"SEALED CARGO"
Savage Passions...! A Flame in the North Atlantic
Opening at the CENTRAL Thursday!
"SEALED CARGO" with Dana Andrews, Carla alenda. Claude
Rains la opening next Thursday at the CENTRAL Theatre.
COMFORT
IN ACTION
SerWfSeaWI
MODESS
floA+uon cflofcueo
Your Choice of
V-8 and Six Engines
Fold's V-8 is the same type engine
powering America's costliest can
... yei it's priced far lower than
most sixes. And with both the
V-8 and Six, Ford's Automatic
Mileage Maker squeezes the last
ounce of power out of every drop
of fuel.
Look
what
your
money
buys
a

Ford's been winning friends faster than any
other car! And no wonder! For with 43
i'look ahead" features, this '51 Ford is built
for the years ahead.
Once you see its "Luxury Leounge" In-
teriors, "Custom-Keyed" to body colors
... learn ita many other costly car features,
we're sure you'll agree you can pay more
but you can't buy better!
And remember, Fords delivered here are
specially engineered to suit your local driv-
ing conditions.
TAKE A DRIVE AND YOU'LL DRIVE IT HOMII
AvtemaMc RMe ControlIt con-
tinuously and automatically ad-
justs ride suspension to road con-
ditions ... for a smoother ride!
Automatic Postura Control
Slide the front seat into posi-
tion, and seat height and angle
adjust automatically!
Double-Soal King-Six. irok..-
Stops are safer, surer with Ford's
King-Size Brakes... now double-
segued against moisture and dust.
FOR THE WHOLE SAVINGS STORY ON FORD, VISIT YOUR FORD DIALER TODAYI


. .':--.-

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,'.<
mpF FIGHT
*
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INUEPENUENT DAILY NEWSPAPEK
WONDAT, NOVEMBER 5, MU
i ii ii i i ^^ ~~^^ ,.*_. Mm im u'l i ~-
Bad Weather Prevails At Weekend FootbaU Games
fishop, Retired Horse And Mule Broker, Returns With
fluid And Active Racing Stable As King Of The Claimers
* B JOHN N. GREGORY Bishop Is the undisputed King
&NEA Staff Correspondent of the Claimers.
li"M *~ Normally, Bishop sUbles two
CHICAGO, Nov. 5 (NEA>. dozen or more horses at major
JJCHICAUO, NOV. 0 inrji'.
William Hal Bishop retired some
Vears ago from the hard rigors
of running a horse and mule
brokerage at Anna, 111.
Bishop sought the seemingly
Simpler life of racing horses.
He left an eight-hour-a-day
Job to get up at 4:00 every morn-
ing and work out a dozen or more
horses.
He firmly believed he would
retire, of course, but after being
around horses for many years, he
Sad them in his blood. So after
* couple years of comparative
iicreation. the retired broker
fMnd himself becoming more
and more Involved with horse
flesh. Prettv soon he found him-
aelf with lots of horses, which he
was runlng in lots of racesfrom
iour to eight daily at some track. I
tracks, with 12 or 15 always ac-
tive. His expense runs to $2000
a week, or $1000.000 anually.
Since It takes many trips to
the winner's circle to keep his
ponies in oats. Bishop is trying
for purse money at all times.
Trainers have been known to
run thoroughbreds merely for
the workout. Not so with Bishop.
He's out to bag the rotes.
In 1949. Bishop saddled 129
winners, which along with place
and show horses brought him
$237,000 In purses. He picked up
another $85,000 trading. He sad-
dled another 127 winners m 1950,
qood for $218.000. 12th highest
in the land. Last year's perform-
i >ce included 103 which placed.
93 that showed.
He will fare as well this year.
Bishop lost 35 horses via cliam-
lng channels during a three-
week span In 1949, yet finished
with two more than he started.
One mount, Boden's Pal. won
more than $100,000. Last year
Boden's Pal was claimed by an-
other, only to have Bishop fe-
clalm him this season.
Bishop feels the contracting of
Jockey Harold (Red) Keene's
services was one of the smartest
moves he ever made.
The veteran horseman refuses
to place sizable wagers on his en-
tries. Around the tracks he is
known as a modest bettor. Two-
WASH1NGTON. D. C. Putting one little word after an-
other ana whatever became of the Garsson brothers? Been here
two whole hoars and haven't been approached by a 5 percenter.
Hsader hat Maria rets doing* There's more Interest around
here la Maryland 1. than In George Marshall's Redskins. The
neeaUn Terrapins' win over Louisiana State dominated the
sports pacos here. Buck* Harris says he thinks Joe DIMaggio
it. "Remember, he's not a pop off."
CO AND CET IT__William Hal Bishop helps Red Keene Into
the stHdle. (NEA)
Left Guard Pulls Out To Throw
Key Block On Colgate Quick Trap
.., hands off to
' Fullback Liggett.
fakes to the left
halfback, fades
back as if going
! to pass.
The left guard
pulls out to
throw the key
block. All of our
linemen have
good angles for
blocks.
As illustrated
in the accom-
panying d 1 a -
Paal Bizler gram. I have
Anoiher of a series of key plays
diagramed and written by fam-
ous coaches for NEA Service.
B YPAUL BIXLER
Colgate Coach
HAMILTON. N. Y., Nov. 5
(NEA) Walt Liggett has grab-
bed off large chunks of ground
on Colgate's quick trap play.
Quarterback Ted Stratton
drawn this play against a 6-2-2-1
defense, but It Is designed a-
gainst a half dozen possibilities.
While Colgate is strong at the
' backfield and end positions, our
biggest problem this Fall has
I
LA MASCOTA
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LA MASCOTA
Opposite Aacon Post Office
dollar plungers around the parl-
mutuel windows. on the other
hand, rarely hesitate to wager on
Bishop's horses.
On the subject of betting.
Bishop says:
"I throw away almost one
whole purse a year making small
bets and playing poker. A man
shouldn't do those thingsyou>
;o-to watch yourself in this bust- Rocky Marciano would bo my pick over Jersey Joe Walcott,
ness." anilhiH M pappy guy- I wouldn't be too sure of him right now
., ... mmi. -^, f**asA Kmard Charles who can fight real good when he wants
As for advice. WUIttra Hal IWk s l^j, demonstrated, these old pappy guyi come apart
Bishop suggests tsro nuts: ^ j^, n^, lhiv 11, hit a stiff wallop Their nervous systems
Leave whisky atone and stay Meaty imam disorganised. They have no roeuperatvie pow-
ray from strawberry roan** I ctv jy, 9tm happen Urn* and again. Marciano was strong;,
MMttraid and a huir.ul hitter. He should have been 1 to It. By
taw way, a* a*t Si** to SUM on himself. First time he had
XI MM toM aw: -Von do the fighting, 111 do the betting.'
Montana wool fight again until next year, very likely in Mia-
mi.

Y* is as rx\i a time as any to say a few kind words about
V.tiii whft as e\c:\ kid in the street knows, owns a hunk of
if* WHS* Brock:.".. Mass.. fighter. He was the unsung hero of
CM tit. He took dead, aim at Louis two years ago, directed
the teaching *:- training of Marciano and when the moment
sjTw h*d him readyl He even gave Louis what amounted to
a bonus W Mot 'he kid, 45 per cent against 15 per cent.
WV*M h taw target tor much critical abase these days. This
tstt a.aoi'l It is the fate of all Garden matchmakers. It
s w say tr*e* te satisfy hungry managers and when they don't
get bat hey they resort to the smear brush. This ex-
tant nut 4 the disparaging comment you hear and read
**. the M ballroom dancer who used to compete for cups
- ami dolls against Body Valentino.

Vena It no angeL Tou can indict him oiy guilt by assocla-
i tsm. Be knows all the racket guys, grew up with some of them,
i aad a doubt in his time has done business with them. It would
be hard to escape doing so, considering the kind of people who
tank* p the prize ring. It seems to me Welll has conducted
ghjgatgf and his office with a minimum of Indecency. This much
on tot to gire him: He's the generation has had. True, some
of tun minor matches have been terrible but they were for
TV and home viewers aren't too discriminating. Neither are
sponsors. # .
Tea saay be reading soon Welll hss left the Garden. In
Marciano he owns 2 per cent, has a'million dollar potential.
Only reason be doesn't step out now is that it would give his
envious and vindictive enemies too much satisfaction. Jim Nor-
ria, who bosses U.S. boxing, may have a hard time keeping him
on. There h internal strife and It's nearing the biowoff stage.
Norris is familiar with the situation in his own office, a bitter
clash of personalities with undertones of personal Jealousy and
intrigue. The yoang millionaire has a delicate decision to make,
it's been a long time since the One Big Happy Monopoly had
any happiness. .
Lady Heathooat-Amory writes from London to an American
friend: "Seldom play golf any more. I have given up competi-
tion entirely. The time ha come to retire gracefully to our
garden.". Youll recognize the Lady quicker as Joyce Wether-
ed, probably the finest woman golfer of all time. She admits
she'll be 50 In November. Aside to- Date Olaaonan (Manhat-
tan) : Jack Kearns repeats he tied Dembsey'a right arm to hit
body so he'd use his left more and from this came the bob-and-
weav estyle. It may hive been Marty ParrelTa idea. He was
around them at the time. ^ ^
The AJ. All-Star pon showed Muslal, Ktaer and WUUami
making the outfield. Muslal drew 179 votes. Klner 105, Williams
102. Further evidence that Muslal is the game', ratotaadtai
player today. Incidentally, Muslal. who topped the hitters this
"car for the fifth time, has a new contract coming up and Its
the confident prediction here that he won't sign for less than
SlOO.000. That would be an np of $20,000. And did you read
those figures out of Washington The Cardinals' annual payroll
is 5385,500, the Giants JS49.000. ( g
The grapevine has Hank Oreenberg pricing the Philadelphia
AAA franchise Oarrv Schumacher of the Giants' executive
family, predicad to thta space last March the Giants and the
Dodgers would run one-two, "could be a dead heat" he added.
It was John Campbell, who put three noses on the wire sev-
eral seasons back inthe Carter Handicap (and the picture of
that thrmSfg finish has become nationally famous) couldn't have
cone* Best trainer In racing? Old chap named Cary
Winfrey Bet you never heard of him. Handles Jan Burxes
stock and win his hare. # # #
The dames who edit Mademoiselle have picked their All-
American football team. Makes much sense as any What
iSttK IsXWo ^heMark TsVn JSLS' ib.
Bridal Sata at Nelrnan-MM^Dallas). the club on he Super
Chief (en route), the Chl-O-House at Ohio State and the Gym-
2stam rt ffifc HoWd they overlook Antonle". at Saks?
THROUGH MIDDLE f""Sl
terback Ted Straiten bands etT
to Fullback Walt Liggett, fake.
U the left halfback, tbe. fad-
bark as If to pass. (NEA)
been filling in the vacuum creat-
ted in the middle of the line by
wholesale graduations. Seven re-
gular linemen from the 1950
team are missing.
Despite gaping holes torn by
graduation, we manager to move
the ball against Buffalo, West-
ern Reserve and Brown, but
bogged down against Cornell and
Yale.
Our Job is to stop the other
side.
NEXT: Chnck Mather of Wash-
ington High, Massillon. O.
Mutuel Dividends
Juan Franco
HBsT RACE
1El Indio $31 20, $16.80, $17.60.
2Fonseca (e> $3.40, $5.
3Pesadilla (') $5.
SFCOND RACE
1Luck Ahead $5.20, 83.60, $3.40.
2Campesino $3.40, $2.60.
3Caaveral $3.80.
First Doubles: (El Indio-Luck
Ahead) $137.
THIRD RACE
1Cyclone Malone $11. $7.80,
$3.20.
2Breeze Bound $8.20, $4.20.
3Vermont $450.
One-Two. (Cyalone Malone-
Breeze Bound; $60.30.
FOUI.TH RACE
1Anteceae $5 80, $350, $3.20.
2Llmlass $6 $3.40.
8Islero $3.80.
Quiniela: (Antecede-Limlass)
$17.20.
FIFTH RACE
1Sun Cheei $580, $3.60.
2Mimo $3.30.
SIXTH RACE
1Porter's Star $7, $3.40, $2.40.
2Beltarsui $4 20, $350.
3Piragua $2.
SEVENTH RACE
1Microbio $l.-.60, $4.4C. $2.40.
2Mosqueton $3.20, $2.20.
3Fair Chance $2.60.
8 e c o n d Doubles: (Porter's
Star-Microjio) $M.
ElGirtU RACE
1Walrus 4, $3.60, $2.40.
2Blen Hecho $1620. $5.
cobrador t- 60.
Quiniela: (Walrus-Bien He-
cho) $28.
NINTH RACE
1Guarina $7 30, $4 80. $3.80.
2Apprise $4, $3.60.
3Bendigo $3.20
One-Two: (Guarina-Apprtse)
$12.20.
TENTH RACE
1Juan Hulncho $1260, $480,
2Mueco $i.6C, $2 60. ($350.
3Politico te; $6.
OmphroyT$nnis Tournament;
Footfaults
cm, nt the natest enemies to or over the sefrlce Une (4) when
th? enter$wStn P>*' U K*" '* ""* *"" "^ thi
the bad haWMBf o^ult.
Footfaultttoerely thedevelopr
ment of careless unchecked i"1-
ty habits on the tennis court. _
Footfault la found to most
every player in Panama d the
Canal Ztone. from the champion
to .the youngest plyer. and
should be broken off o* P
plsyer who may have a chance
of playing a representative_game
of tennis. Many a tournament
winner has been converted tato
a miserable loser because of serv-
ing footfaults.
Marital Status
Left Gamecock
Yearling At Sea
COLUMBIA, 8. C, Nov.
(NRA). While University of
South Carolina football players
were filling out eligibility papen
for Southern Conference record,
one burly freshman pondered the
question labeled "Marital stat-
us."
Tbe Gamecock yearling
thought about it for a momment,
scratched his head, turned to a
neighbor.
"Shucks.- he- said. -I ain't
never had any ata duty."
In all neighbouring 5oun,trie"
where representative teimis to
being played, footfault-ltPt>
ized which would $*"!"
players at a great *?*22**t
The cardinal rule to rring *
that In tbe act of covering a
service, one foot must iremsun
constantly In contact with the
ground without movement of aw
sort: the right hand server must
maintain to left ft constant!
on tbe ground without movement
frorn^bTmomStthe ball leave,
his hand until tt cromes the "*
The left hand serrer mutt main-
tain his right foot mstanUyon
the ground without movement
fVomKKon!en1 l-*2
his hand antll R erc-eeatfcenet.
A footfa ***!*??
the server
tact of the^sal^gel^gel^L^geff
atittiy,
iivenng
foot tod
tattle]
a ball is served It must cross the
net before the server can Invade
the court In rushing the net. If
the server's opposite foot touches
the court before the ball crosses
the net, it is a footfault.
In the series of tournaments
which Mr. Omphroy will be pro-
moting, a gradual upward trend
will be taken to Improving the
standard of tennis in Panama
and consequently it has been de-
cided that footfault will be cal-
led against each player during
the semifinals and finals of all
tournaments.
Warnings of footfault may be
given to-players in the primary
stages of tbe matches without
penalty so that correctiva mea-
sures may be made to Improve
their serving that when semi-
finals and finals are being play-
ed, it will not be necessary to all
f ootfasUU which is hoped will be
gradually eliminated from our
local tennis play.
Soft Music Grinds
Out More Buckets
CUOEMaT, Ore.. Nov. S (IfBA)
Bill Borcher. who takes otti
ss Oregon basketball eoneh.
played phonograph music to hit
youngsters when he was eoaeh-
Priiiceton And Tennessee
Continue Unbeaten March
By UNITED PRESS
NEW YORK, Nov. 5. Crazy bounces, wind-
blown passes and slippery footing were the order
of the day on the gridirons this weekend.
An Army .tick splashed to a
Suddle and stopped dead as Sou-
ern Caluornia hipped the
Cadets to rali, snow and ankle
deep mud ac New York. 28-6.
Army scored ilrst and held a 6-0
lead at the end of the first quar-
ter but the Cadets were no match
for the Trojp.ns once the Cali-
fornlans got used to the messy
weather.
A mixture ct rain, snow and
cold prompted two Fordham
fumbles which Rutgers recover-
ed and turned into a 13-7 win.
Babe Par ill", passed for three
touchdowns as Kentucky whip-
ped Mianr 32-6 in a snowy
game at Lexington, Ky Four
of the' Min>i laye- spH It
was the first time they had
seen snow.
Illinois marched one step clos-
er to the Rose Bowl with a dra-
matic 7-0 wn o/er Michigan. The
Illinois counted in the last min-
ute when Tommy O'Connell
heaved an elgnt-yaru pass into a
4u-mile an hour wind and Rex
Smith took it into the end zone.
In another snow-swept Big 10
game Wisconsin edged Indiana,
6-0. Bill Hutcrtoson raced Into
the end zone in the last minute
of play and then reached into
the swirling snow to grab a
touchdown pass from Johnny
Coatta.
Sub freezlr.R temperatures
chilled the fan.' at Columbus as
Ohio State squeaked through to
a 3-0 win over Northwestern. Vic
Janowlcz, who has been suffer-
ing from a leg injury most of the
season, booted an 18-yard field
goal to make the difference.
Sloppy going cut down on Dick
Knzmaier's passing game, but it
didn't keep the Princeton ace
from running Kazmaler ran for
two touchdowns as the Tigers
won their Uth In a row, beating
Brown, 12-0
Cornell apparently nevar re-
covered from last week's lop-
sided loss to Princeton. The Big
Bed bowed ii Columbia, 21-26
as Lion end El Ward booted all
three extra points on a snew-
rovered field at Ithaca, New
York.
In Maryland. Notre Dame
proved better in the mud than
Navy and snipped the Middles,
19-0. At College Park, unbeaten
Maryland University kept its
slate clean with a muddy 35-0
win over Missouri Substitute
safety man Joe Horning high-
lighted the Terrapins' victory by
intercepting a Tiger pass and
running 100 yards for a touch*
down. ,
The cold wave knifed all the
way to New Orleans where some
27,000 faru to overcoats and
mufflers watched Mississippi
State take Tu;ane, 10-7. At Bat-
on Rouge, Louisiana, the therm-
ometer was only eight degrees
above freezing at Louisiana State
and Mississippi played a 6-6 tie.
Unbeaten Tennesseethe na-
tion's' top-rarfked teamhung
up victory number six with a 27-0
rout of Noitr. Carolina.. Hank
Lauricella starred for the Vols,
scoring two loucnoowns and
passing for another.
Another unbeaten eleven
Georgia Teenhad a tougher
time. The Engineers had to
settle for a H-14 tie with un-
derdog Duke.
Pacific Coast Conference fans
saw an upset when UCLA down-
ed mighty California, 21-7. The
lighter UCLAh line was at full
strength for the first time this
year and consistently out-charg-
ed the Beais' forward wall. Stan-
forda surprise team on the
West Coastrboosted Its winning
streak to seven with a 21-13 win
over Washington Stato Gary
Kerkorlan aept the Indians mov-
ing, scoring onr touchdown and
setting up two others.
Texas Christian took over the
lead in the tough Southwest Con-
ference race with a 20-7 win over
Baylor. Dann> Ray McKown
scored once and set up another
touchdown. In another confer-
ence battle, Arkansas all but
knocked tho iv.xas Aggies out of
the race with a 33-21 win.
Halfback Johnny Bright of
Drake showed that it takes more
than- a broken Jaw to slow him
down. Brighi,, who suffered the
injury to the Oklahoma Aggie
game two wee** ago. playedwfth
a special mask as Drake romped
over the Great Lakes Naval
Training Center team, 35-20. The
Drake halfback10 pounds un-
der his usual playing weight as
a result of a liquid dietscored
once, passed for two touchdowns
and gained 20* yards.
DOZEN HOtDOVEM
PINK HURT'(iTgA). Of
the 20 golfers from the United
states and Great Brltatnl that
participated In he 1M1 Ryder
Cup matches, 12 are back again.
Bulldogs Dump Green Wave
26-0 At Balboa Stadium
Scoring three times in the first
half, and once in the third quar-
ter, the BaJbov Bulldogs defeat-
ed the Junior College 26 to 0 last
nigh? at Bulbos Stadium. Quar-
terback Ray Nicklsher picked up
the first Baiboa points, when he
took a quarterback sneak over
from the one-yard line, after the
Bulldogs had .narched from the
J.C. 37-yard line to five plays.
Jim May picked 29 of the yards
in one run when he broke
through the line on a quick hand
off.. Bob Morris missed the try
for "point.
Seconds after the second quar-
ter started, May again shot
through the line on the same
quick opener, broke to his right
behind almost perfect blocking,
and ran 69 for a six-pointer. This
time Morris' luck split the up-
right. The Bulldogs' third touch-
down came as a result of a pass
from quarterback Bill Dawson to
end Bob Dolan, who took the six-
yard toss ail bv himself to the
end zone. Again Morris kicked
the point.
In the second naif. BHS used
mainly their reserves ( but not
until they hat. scored their final
touchdown. Fullback Sam Ma-
puto accounted for this one on a
one-yard plur.ge right down the
middle. College tumbled on their
own 25-yard line, and Balboa re-
covered. Fron- here It took them
four plays to score, with May
and Maphis alternately carrying
the ball ntil Maphis took it
over. Morris' trv was blocked.
The Balboa defenses were hard
for the J.C backs tp penetrate,
as they were limited to two first
downs to the game, one to each
half, pair Godby so effectively
plugged his side of-the line for
the Bulldogs, that College didn't
pick up so much as a yard on this
side until Godby left the game
late to the third quarter. Dick
Dillman was another standout
lineman for the winners, as he
was to about every tackle during
the first half, as well as throw-
ing several key blocks.
Jim May was again the big of-
fensive threat for the Bulldogs.
In addition to scoring once, Jim
had a touchdown called back
early to the first quarter on a 40-
yard gallop. Be carried tbe ball
11 times, picked up 188 yards for
an average of 17 yards per car-
ry. 8am Maphis was almost as
effective as May. repeatedly pick1-
tog up added yardage on his off
tackle smashes and quick plays
down the center.
For the College team, Nick
Gorham.BiilMDloney and Ralph
Huls were the outstanding boys.
Gorham and Maloney were the
most effective i unnlng backs for
the College, arid Huls did a nice
bit of work at center.
tog to high school
iomeone
asked him to sssplata
the idea from dairy
ti
DITTO"
THE DUPLICATOR THAT DOES NOT USE INK
PRIHTS IN 4 COLORS
COMPLBTB STOCK OF ACCESSORIES ON HAND
ASK FOR A DEMONSTRATION 1
V
Ave. Tlvell Me. 16
Tel. 2-2tl6
. that they puy
He cows to make
gtBBsBBsBBsBai.''
Dog Tired Dave!
Datld was a busy leUew. ,
Mgptng aerar lad bis. attttaw!
Tern /!*/ **. *Mfc
fir aet read ear Waat Ada. Dave?
I
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11
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I PANAMA AMERICAM AM PltfEMPsTJiT QAH.T WKWgPAP ^_
FAOIIfWi
MSflT
omAt. Novnon ,i* ...,,_________ w--------.-.- *" "* -~- ^_ ...------------------rm...m.r^..-.r-nr----------T-~n----------^r
Puerto Rico, Venezuela Top Amateur World Series Standings
Three Teams TtedWith 2-1
Records For Second PMc
97 UNITED PRESS
TMI STANDING*
p**te KM .........-..............
VanMUela ..............<...........
Pominleaa *p.....................
Cult ..................*............
Nicaragua ..........*...............
6Ml Rlea.........................
esico .............................
Guatemala ........ ................
E enema ............................
olombia ...........................
salvador ...........................
i
\
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS k ___, ,
Vnexttla 7, Colombia (ten ntol*>l Cd-4J^S1 f."
Hop. 1r (8I Indinis); Kietragiia M. Guatemala 4; Costa lie 11.
MMiM i.
TODAY'S GAMES ___,
Guatemala vs. Costa sties; Mexie* vs. Colombia; Venesaela
t ^MkTKwto *leo vs. Mesrsma.
Mexico cm, hot. sUraerw tiee end Tamul "*{??*-
rdl, dominated the .tsndlni In the amateur bMball world *
Tie* tAni far with perfect record.
to tie the core, 4-4, and keep
their r.opes alive.
When the colomolans cored
two in the lst of the tenth, it
looked again axe their ball game.
But the Venezuelan refused to
The Nlcartriana, boaitlni a
.400 hitting flela pounded
seros ten runs In wild elfhtn
Inning In which eight, men of the
team hit safely at ieat once.
Bert Bradford with six singles
to even times at bat parked
mesrtgue's tuck at hi* team
movedlnto a tie behind the first
place club.
The league leading vepetua-
lan cama from oehlnd four
times In a tame with Colombia
in a battF* ttat was one of the
day' thrillers Venezuela tallied
twice in the bottom of the ninth rally.
surrender ana lashed out with
four single* lu tie up the game
again and then scored the win-
ning run on a sacrifice bunt.
In a ni|hi game, Costa.Rica
downed Mexico H-S with the
winning Coito Ricen run com-
in.a five-run eighth inning
Pressure Football Hardly New;
It Was An Issue 62 Years Ago
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Aporta Editor
T-Formation On Way Out?
So Says Veteran Andy Kerr
BT STEVE SNEIDER
United lVeee Sports Writer
unf
MgW'TOmC. Noy 5 -f a th*
T-rormtlon on the way out?
Sharp-eyed Andy Kerr, the
old-timer who worked wonder*
with the doublewing, think* It 1*.
"Say, I'm In town right now
to collect *ome royaWes,"he,enld
an Impish grin. TsWWW}
go I see a lot of my old double
wtogitnft- vraot mebcki?
. The double wing Andy wed
with such telling effect at Col-
he had those unbeaten,
-KJ4inIn-
_* *8lha*.
Umade. oomooack it
i poemlarity whesi the T
^jims a erase. Bat now:
"A lot of u are making effort
to get away from the T-forma-
tlon," admitted Jimmy Phelan of
the New York Yanks. "We run
a lot ni double wing."
"We feel we have an advan-
tage over T teams," aid Charlie
Cldwell of Princeton, "If only
because they don't *ee our wing
type of offense very often."
"A boy now learns the T In
high school, he net* it In college
and he get It in the pros," said
Steve Owen of the New York
Giants. "It was only a matter
Of time until everybody got to
well grounded In that system
they'd be doing a better Job de-
fending agaliKt It."
Oeorge Salas of the Chicago
Boars, developer of the T, to
looking forward to the day
when the T goo* out. The few-
er team, the bettor Hal
likes it. There'll always be at
lout oneh own.
The solution m manv cases 1
t combine the T, single and
double wings while others swine:
to the 8DlIt-T offense designed
by Don Parent of Missouri.
"Michigan State uses the com-
bination," *aid Kerr. "They
WOked like a real sound team
the day I saw them, running or
passing from any formation."
Oven use* the T and the A
formations, the A being a wing
variation.
"There's a right spot to aso
both type,- said Owen. "Ob-
vlouly, It makes the opposi-
tion seouts earn their money
when they're looking us over.
So that mages It lost that
mack harder te prepare de-
fense for us."
Phelan reports that the last
time he checked on the Cleve-
land Browns and- Lo* Angel**
Rims, top pros of ledT.thsysirere
u*lng plenty of spread forma-
tion play lnstesitf^tj* T of
oa, iifW0br.o-u
.,.,. i,7.4ii\*> lita YV.M
iHpNg
said Jimmy.
Southern Methodist was de-
vastating ut of It spread a-
Ctntt NOtre Dame and the
it that game was televised
may have Influenced a lot of
minor coaches In colleges and
high schools.
Spectator* probably get more
of a break watching the Prince-
ton or Michigan style of single-
wing that any other: The*e feat-
ure dlpsy-doodle ballhandllng
but much of It la out In the open
where the customer can see It
even If the defense cannot.
Even a one-yard gain from the
wing look* like a sizeable run.
It's a bit of a distance juit to
the line of scrimmage.
Sports Briefs
By UNITED PKBM
BASEBALL -President Walter
O'Malley of the Brooklyn Dodg-
ers la expe-ted to announce the
re-hirlng of Manager Charley
Dreaaen today atan afternoon
new* conference. O'Malley says
he orlglnahy had planned to
withhold the announcement un-
til mid-winter, but decided
against that plan when Dodger
second baseman Jackie Robinson
revealed last week that Dresaen
would return.
K1W YORK Nov. f (REA)
Pressure football In the colleges
l* vastly more prevalent today
because so many more young
men play It but it's an old song
and dance.
This reporter 1* indebted to
Dr. Wlllard iiavell of New York
for a copy of an article written
by a Wflllaui* graduate, and
printed in the New York Nation,
Sec. J, lM-J. Tht wa 3 year*
ago, but it would be difficult to
imagine a better summation of
the current problem*.
A* though writing as of today,
the author discusses;
t Abolishment.
The sport superseding scho-
larship.
J Enrollment of player* In-
stead of studftuts.
4The altering of transcript*
to keep up with the gridiron
Joneses.
Spectators Instead of parti-
cipants.
6Vicious, malicious and In-
tentional attack* on the field.
7-Oambiine.
8Drinking.
Thi wa* three year* before
Amo Alonio Stagg took the
game to Chicago and the mid-
west, mind you Pennsylvania
and New Jersey institutions were
not yet wonaer Jig what southern
school* offeree, superior combat-
ants that they didn't have. The
ame waa dominated strictly by
larvard, Yale and Princeton and
largely confined to the east.
A. B. MEANS GOOD
PLAYER, TOO
Yet already there apparently
was cause fot apprenension.
The au*Jior submitted that
these intercollegiate contest*
were an evil, wanted the whole
thing called off.
"These contest* attract a class
of fellows to co'lege who have no
proper place there" he wrote
"The consequences an that a
bad lone.,morally snOU uaUy, to given ths colfife, Inter-
est >n scholarly pursuits 1* de-
creased.
"Degrees are given to many
without the slightest real claim.
"In your editorial, you say:
'The next great step In collegi-
ate education will, we believe, be
the resolute shutting of the doors
on all boy who are not eager to
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learn, and are not willing to lead
scholastic live.
"Yet the afea to made that
these contests advertise the col-
leges, and niaxe them attractive
to *rlch men's sons who dp not
care for such stupid pursuits as
science and literature.
'Thi inducement* held out to
men of not the slightest taste
or capacity for scholarship to ear
tor certain colleges are a dis-
grace to education,
"The degree of AB. is just as
likely to mean a young man Is a
good hall plager as that he has a
trained mind. Instead of an at-
mosphere of scho.srship, the
tendency Is toward an atmos-
phere of professional sporting.'
TAKE THEIR KXERC18E
BY PROXY
There must have been early
William and Mary cases, too, for
on the season's close the com-
plainant commented:
"Dignified faculties may now
cease making affidavits that they
have not falsified college records
for the sake of strengthening the
He'pointed out that theae In-
tercollegiate contest* prevented a
general physical culture.
"Time that should be given
vigorous exetcise Is given to a
hump-backed watching of the
practicing team," he stressed.
The college populace takes its
exercise like the Roman popu-
laceby proxy. This to no small
evil. This to making a concen-
trated extract of athlete. It Is
bad for the extract and bad for
the residuum' w
Stars were tettlng the works
A spirit of'brutality andun-'
fairness to produced," reported
our man, "the brutality more es-
pecially by football. The desire to
win becomes so rampant that any
meansslugging even oMbMm.
tricks of all findsare resorted
to"
The old boys bet "em higher
than a cat'd oack, and then some,
closed with prohibition. '
In the over-all picture, how-
ever, It to utterly amazing now
little the situation nas hanged
since the days of turtieneck
sweaters. ._. ..
About the only thing they are
olng differently 1* cutting their
Mr.
^seassssmss&smi^SS^^^^
Football Results
By I'M -4) PRESS
Reatucky S, Miami)
Georgia Tech 14, Duke 14
Princeton it, Brown t
Dartmouth 14, Tale 19
William Wary M, Pen li
Boston V. H, MU
Holy Croes M, Colgate
Tennessee 17 No. Carolina I
Ratters IS, Pbrdham 7
southern Cal M. Army
Maine M, Colby '
Bowdeta'n Bates 1 _,
G. Washington *, So. Carolina 14
Notre Dame 19, Navy
Bucknell U. Temple 7
Lehlgh S, Mabienberg 1
W. Maryland e. Drexol I
William 4, Union
Kutstown Teh. 18, N. Brit. Teh.
Alabama -, Georgia 14
Ohio BUlo I, Northwestern
Wash. Lee SO. Vs. Teeh
Clesnon II, Wake Forest 9
Hobart 41, Haverford 4
FSU i, Jas. Navy *
Maryland as, Missouri t
W. Virginia 45, West. Beserve 7
Columbia- SI, Cornell t*
Wayne SI, Wash. C. (St. L.) 7
Ohio Wesleyan IS, Mt. Union 11
West. Michigan St, Butler
Norwich Si, Mlddlebary IS
Howard 7, Hampton Inst.
Illinois 7, Michigan 9
Tampa V. tS, Livingston .tate 13
Deatoon Ss, Wittenberg 7
Bowling Green J5, Kent 17
Purdue Z, Pena State
Minnesota M Jewa S*
Conn M, Row Umpshlre 0
Valparaiso S3, Luther 7
Coast Guard IS. Northeastern IS
Rochester 14, Oberlln 0
Virginia W, Citadel
E, Str'sbarg Tchr. I*, CHUnd I
St Lawrencs M, Hoftra
St. Bonavenlure 19, Y'ngstown I
Lincoln SL Paai Poly
Tulsa 5, Oklahoma A. A M. 7
Wisconsin Indiana 4
9. Dakota li. Iowa St. Tekrs. 7
VanderbUt II. Chattanooga 14
VM1 33, DavtoSon 13
AUrton 34. Kslamasoo
Wooster M. AUegheny 4
ettysburg S4, Dickinson 7
Hopkins SI dwarthmore 4
American tatL 4, Wesleyan
Alma U, HUMato !-_..
St. MlebaeiaSd. Kings Point I
Msssaohnsott* 1 Vermont
Carroll *, Maealester t
Drake S5, Great Lakes M
Miami (O.) 27, Bnffalo 7
Wichita IS, Houston 7 ,
Mississippi St. 14, TaUno 7
Arbaasa SS, Texas A. A M. 11
Oklaboeaa SS, Kaauas State I
Morris Br'a i7. 8. Carolina St. f
Amherst tl, Tufts IS
UVn Valley le, Pona M'tary I
Centre I, lud. Coa. Col. 4
Albany dt. it R'vllle
Musklngum S*. Marietta 7
Tkiel 14, Grove City
Capitol 18, Ohio Northern 9
Auburn 49. La. College
Col. Aggie 13. Santa Barbara 7
Kansas 27, Nebraska 7
TCU to, Bsyle 7
Texas St, SMD IS
Rice 21, Pitt IS
Susquehannm SI, Juniata 12
rnton Tebr. tNJ) 26, Cheae 8
Indiant'n Gap 44, W'te RUI i
Albright 2, Seranton J
ruin M'shell S5 Urrinns 0
West Vs. St. 14, VS. State IS
NC College SS, J. C. Smith
St. Joseph's 39, Ball State II
Knox 9, Ooe 4 ....
Carnegie Tech It, Wash lef. 0
Wllberforee 14, Michigan St. 7
Waynesbarg 24, W'mlntotor 4
BI State SS, Springfield It
Simpson 1, Central IS
Counterpoint Wins
Another Handicap
To Cement Top Spot
NEW YORK, Nov. S (UP)It'
not official yet. but C. V. Whit-
ney's Counterpoint looks like a
abe-in for "Borae-of-the-Tear"
honon la 1951.
The son of tb* greet Count
Fleet cast off any lingering
doubts to hie claim Saturday
with a length and .one-half wta
in the $50,001 Empire City Han-
dicap at New York. It's the fourth
straight wta for Counterpoint
and was all the more lmpresain;
because the colt carried s high
weight of 13* pounds over One
mile and three-ltths of muddy
traes.
Hill Princelast year's Borse-
of.the-Yearwas asked to carry
the same weight ever a mile and
one-eighth In the Trenton Han-
dicap at Garden State Park The
Chris Cheaery colt failed with a
fourth place finish as Call Over
R. Megan Cops
Motorbike Race
R. Megan Is here winning the
Nor. 3 motorcycle clastic In the
excellent time of 56 minutes 48
seconds for the ten laps of the
slx-mlle circuit which was a
stretch from the Juan Diaz Plaza
to near the Tocumen Airport
roundtrip.
Megan wa* rewarded with two
trophies donated by the Munici-
pal Council and the Spanish
Consulate.
The winner of the "big bike"
prizes drove s B.S.A. 500 and av-
eraged tYt minutes per lsp. His
time was good enough to cop first
prize In the 500-750 c.c. class and
also In the open (unlimited)
clas*. x
The 125 c.c class contest was
won by Dan Kiotz with a time of
26 minutes 15 seconds for the
three laps.
A handicap of six minutes was
given to the 125 c.c. motorcycles
or smaller in the open competi-
tion. t
Seoon4.UcB to the 500-750
class was taken by D. Hinds
while W. Hidnlgo took second
place In the unlimited class.
GOLFThe United States Ry-
der Cup team has whipped Brit-
sin for the fifth straight time.
The Americans clinched the Cup
by downing the British In the
first four singles matches at
Pineharst, North Carolina. The
United States had taken a 3-1
lead en Friday In team play.
Panam Swim Team Virtually Sweeps Independence Heel I
The Republic of Panama swim-
ming team swept the Nov. 3 In-
dependence Day swim meet held
at the Panam Olympic Pool
Saturday.
A team representing the Arm-
ed Forces participated but the
Canal Zone civilian team did not
take part. According to a Pana-
m team representative, the C.Z.
civilians notified the organiser*
of the meet at the last moment
that they could not participate
and failed to explain why.
The program however, was a
success with many thrilling fin-
ishes.
1,500 Meters Freestyle
1Ricardo Arosemena B.
2Jorge Barcenas.
25 Meters Freestyle (Boys)
1Alexis Jan.
2Rolando Saenz.
3Ernesto Echevers.
60 Meters (Boys)
1Felipe Lera.
2Jaime Labrador.
SOmar Montero.
50 Meters (Girls)
1Marina Bazn. T. 38
2Billy Joyce. .
3Carmen Barsalio.
ltd Meters Freestyle "A"
1Alcldes Bernal. T. 1:02.7.
2Norman Arosemens.
3R. Lpez (Military).
100 Meters Backstroke
1Carlos Arosemena B.
2Rolando Sucre. ,
50 Meters Backstroke (RTS)
1Jaime Labrador. T: 87
2Jacinto Labrador.
3Roberto Lam.
50 Meters Backstroke (Girls)
1Juana Jan.
2Marina Bazn.
3Billy Joyce.
ROY. Utah, (UP) Tommy
Hansen, aged seven, entered a
banana squash three feet nine
inches long, weighing 70 pounds,
in the state fair. Dozens Of spec-
tators tried to buy the squash
but Tommy decided he'd like to
keep It around.
50 Meters Breastatroko
1Roger Martinet.
2Svartoto Saenz.
100 Meters Freestyle
lJaime Labrador.
2Abraham Gar ca.
SFelipe Lash.
Ii


WANT/I0$
m.
Counterpoint new has won
mere than a quarter of a million
dollars this year. In two previous
Mg races the Jockey Chyb Gold
Cap end the Empire City Gold
Cupthe Whitney eolt best Hill
Prince.
FRO FOOTBALL SCORIA
"hieago Rears 27. Wuhtngten
tfew York GUaU 17. New Yo
ork
Yanks SI
Philadelphia 84. Pittsburgh IS
Cleveland 84. Chicago Cardin-
als 17
Detroit 24, Green Bay 11
OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
Complete Priie-Wiiiiiig Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1704, Sunday, November 4, 1*51
The whole ticket ha* 48 pieces divided in two series "A" 4k "B" of 24 pieces each.
First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize
6083
9952
91 02
48,000.00
14,400.00
7,200.00
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Prise-winning numbert df vestsrdaVs Lotter drawlns were sold: first, second and third la PeassnA.
Th. nla. hwdred whlo UcksU din, in 8 sad t iaol-dod in the ab*v *****"** D^tow <$tt-) m
The whole ticket has 48 pieces which comprise the two serie A ana a.
Signad by: HOaCBtO VKLABQUKZ. Oovernor of the Province of PanaA.
ANTOKIO M08C060 B.. RepreeentaUve of the Islnistry of TreeAury.
S
M>4nMetM Alapuro lartln*--CduU No. 18-8841
WITNESSES: m55l0 cones w^ceduia No. e-soo48
JOSI DOMINGO SOTO
Notary PuWid, PanamA
PABLO A. PXMSL
aecretary




"
KEY WEST HS TO PLAY HERE DEC. 7
Florida Gridders
To Face Cristbal
At Mount Hope
They Key West (Florida)
High School football team will
become the second Stateside
school gridiron aggregation to
play on the Canal Zone, it was
announced today.
Negotiations for the Key West'
team to oppose the Cristobal
High School at Mount Hope
on Dec. 7 were revealed by O.
C. Lockrldge, director of phy-
sical education and recreation
In the Zone schools system.
Arrangements for the game ]
were made three weeks ago by
John Pettingill, assistant to
Lockrldge. and Ed Beckman.
former coach of the Canal Zone ;
Junior College and present grid
tutor at Key West.
------
AN INDEPENPE^^f^g^DAILT NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1951
FIVE CENTS
Sinks
Argentine Luxury Liner
After Ramming U. S. Troopship
..HAMBURG, Germany, Nov. 51 Hersey off the North German! The collision occurred three
(UP) Survivors from the $4,-1Coast and the liner sank three miles north of the Weier light-
000.000 Argentine luxury liner and one-half hours later. house and the lifeboats of both
Maipu charged today that many A huge hole was torn in the i vessels, plus German and Am-
ninn'o ii-ta Th Imarlnan im* .alua *.... *.... n*- l-*
Luke Palumbo. Cristobal's
coach, confirmed the game by
te^hor^thl^ morning^ ... i crew members including offi- Maipu's"side. The American ves- >rcan nvy tugs, went Into ac-
-^. K- rw s Ptu! m~, leers, jumped into the lifeboats sel was moving slowly at the
arrive here Dec. 5. The Florl- j before aif passengers were off time.
dians. from a school shout the; the m.fated ship, which sank A few soldiers on the transport
tame size as Balboa Hleh. have eariy yesterday after colliding
a 5 and 2 won and lost record
this year.
Tickets for the game will be
placed on sale Immediately on
both Atlantic and Pacific sides.
General admission wi'.l be $2.
Student Association tickets will
be |1.
with United States troopship In
a North Sea fcg.
FMermdn Reels In
Distressed Swimmer
were bruised when thrown a-
gainst bulkheads.
Commander Dillon McMillan,
Some 232 haggard passengers' of Philadelphia, in charge of
and crew members of the 11.- the Bremerhaven port, said the _
500-ton motorship. launched only fog was so thick that the Her- men carried out the action with
in January, arrived here early sey radioed its own lifeboats were discipline and I am happy to re-
today and were taken tempor- lost for mor? than three hours, port that all were saved."
arily to a camp usually used for ~
tlon Immediately
Mrquez radioed the following
message:
"My vessel, sank. The pas-
sengers and crew have all been
rescued. When I was aware that
my ship was sinking fast, I or-
dered my men Into lifeboats. The
displaced persons.
They came here by train from
Bremerhaven where they had
been landed from the 8.500-ton
United States troopship Gen. M.
L. Hersey.
The Hersey. bringing 2,500
When A Bobby
Meets A Body-
SYDNEY, Nov 5 (UP)Curve-
NEW YORK. Nov. 5 (UP* Infantry Division to join General
Ebert Sprecher went fishing Dwight Eisenhower's Atlantic
today and caught a man. pact army, was only slightly
Sprecher. 37, was surf casting., damaged in the crash.
for striped bas on a Long Is-
land beach, when he heard a
cry for help.
2??L^i2-S?M^?_*5lm Jean Parker of" the movies
was ordered off Bondl Beach
here yesterday for wearing a
Bikini-type bathing suit describ-
No Uves were lost on either
ship.
Edith Born. 27, returning home
to Bremen af i er a trip to Argen-
tina, said: "Many of the crew.
before all passengers had climb- :
He saw a swimmer flouunder-
ing In the heavy sea 50 yards
off shore.
Sprecher made a cast to the j ed Into the lifeboats."
swimmer, but missed him. The Jahann Baler. 31. said: "Some
awimmer finally caught the line : uf the crew got into the very
on the third cast and wrapped
ed by the chler beach inspector
as "below all decency."
"I've never been so embar-
rassed in all my life," Miss Par-
ker said. "I've worn this swim-
including office s.'.eft the Maipu ^% ^^
I like my swlmsults loose and
I like plenty of sun."
It around his arm.
The fisherman reeled In 59-
year-old Robert Stula, who was
taken to a hospital suffering
from multiple cuts and ex-
posure. Stuls likes to swim the
year around.
Observers said the suit con-
first boats." slated of two pieces of material
Officers and crewmen refused j white polka dot* on a green
any comment on these charges.! background and that "neither
Said one: "If anybody is to do piece was as big as a man's
any talking It will be the cap- handkerchief."
tain." "I thought that in such a
But Capt. Juan Mrquez re- sunny, healthy country these
fused to see newsmen. | suits would be the thing," said
The Maipu rammed Into the Miss Parker.
Eyewitnesses aboard the Her-
sey said the Maipu "loomed up
through the fog almost at right
aneles to the transport."
They said the Hersey veered
sharply to starboard in an effort
to cut nside the Argentine ship,
but that It was "too late."
The Hersey backed away from
the stricken Maipu as water
poured Into the hole in her side.
The Argentine vessel listed to
port, but the^c were no signs of
panic, officials and eye witnesses
said.
Rough seas hampered rescue
efforts and some or the injured
Maipu passengers had to be
strapped to stretchers and haul-
Shapely Samia
Judders For Joy
At Divorce Data
CAIRO, Nov. 5 (UP) Shape-
ly Samia Gamal, the auburn-
haired Egyptian 'belly dancer,"
wriggled with joy today when she
learned that Abdullah Shepard
King of Texas had obtained a di-
vorce in Mexico to clear the way
for their marriage.
"At last," she said, "you've
given me the best news I've had
for a long time."
King, who became a Moslem so
he could marry Samia, divorced
his wife. Gloria, Saturday In
Juarez.
He said he planned to fly back
to Cairo in two weeks, marry 8a-
ed aboard the transport. A num- mia and "drown half of Egypt in
champagne."
"Has he forgotten he's now
Moslem and shouldn't drink?"
she asked.

TRIBUTE FROM A PRINCESS Princess Elizabeth and Prince PhlliD return after tkev r,lc-
ed a wreath at the tomb of the unknown Soldie, in ArlingtonMemoria?Cemeter Va* ^tS*
color guard carries the British flag. In honor of the visit of the royal couple
ber of American soldiers went
into lifeboats and helped the in-
jured aboard.
PLATTSMOUTH, Neb. (UP)
James Boswell, a painter from
Tennessee, went to Jail on the
complaint of a Nebraska farmer.
The farmer paid Boswell 1600 for
painting a barn. A week later It
rained and the barn returned to
Its original color.

-,
Taxpayers Foot The Bill As...
Congressmen Gallop Off In All Directions
WASHINGTON, Nov 5 (UP) Webster says a junket is "an tatively scheduled to leave for Nov. 19 meeting with the Coun-
One congressman out of every outing at public expense." two weeks m Europe to study dl of Europe studying the nro-
fiv* now is globe-trotting on "of- The congressmen insist their Western Germany's future role blem of unifying Eurone
flclal business" at public expense trips are official business, involve in world affairs. A five-man House subcommit-
or expects to leave soon on such hard work and frequently save Saturday A House subcom- tee on Indian Affairs left for A-
trip, a survey disclosed today, taxpayers millions of dollars by mlttee on State Department Ap- laska recently to hold 10 davs of
The United Press survey show- providing Congress with facts it proprietlons boards ship for Eu- hearings there on native claims
ed that between 105 and 120 could not otherwise get. rope. Six or seven members, bills The group is headed bv
members of Congress plan to While on such official trips, headed by Rep. John J. Rooney Rep Chester B McMullen D-
apend at least part nf their cur- members of Congress, like gov- (D-N.Y.). will be away for four Fla)
Tint adjournment vacation trav- ernment officials traveling a- weeks inspecting American Em-
eling abroad broad, are entitled to transpor- bassies and Consulates in Eu-
They will make the trips el- tation, hotels and meals and rope,
ther as members of one of 15 other necessary expenses.
Also on Saturday. Chairman
Robert Crosser (D-O.) plans to
lead IS to 20 members of his
House Interstate and Foreign
Commerce Committee on a 34-
day air tour of Latin America.
Purpose: To investigate busi-
ness and industrial conditions
in Mexico and 11 other Latin
American countries.
Pour days later on Nov. 14
Scheduled to return next week
from a seven week tour of Europe
on official business for the
House Armed Services Committee
are Reps. W. Sterling Cole R-
N.Y.) and William E. Hess (R-
O.)
Congressional investigating sub- The pilgrimage picks up steam
committees or as members of one this week with the following de-
of three delegations appointed to partures scheduled,
represent this country at inter- Tuesday A 10-man House
national conferences abroad. Armed Services Executive Ex-
More than 30 members of Con- penditures group headed by Rep.
M already have taken off. Porter Hardy, Jr. (D-Va.) leaves
Taja includes two House Subcom- by military plane for a 14-day
mHtees now circling the globe, whirlwind Inspection tour of U.S.
A seven-man House Executive military bases being constructed
Expenditures S u b c o m m ittee, in Europe and North Africa for
headed by Rep. Herbert C. Bon- use bv American forces.
r (D-NC), is flying westward Wednesday A five-man Im- A House Subcommittee'on Inte- MontTlaTlWmVVoiva (R-
and the world for a six-week migration Subcommittee headed rior Department appropriations o ) left Oct 25 to r.wni
ck on American military sup- by Rep. Francis E. Walter (D- plans to leave by ship for Hono- Congress on the of flclalK
.operations. It Is scheduled to Pa.) leaves for Europe to check lulu and an inspection of Pacific can delegationto theUnited!
foiDec. 7. up on the displaced persons pro- territories. This group Is headed tons' Genera" Assemblv mt-
T t blem. A seven-man House Bank- by Rep. Christopher C. McGrath ing opening at Parto^tomorrow
%>two-man House Interior Sub- lng Subcommittee headed by (D-N.Y.). opening n rana tomorrow.
MBmlttee Reps. Monroe M. Chairman Brent Spence (D-Ky.)
Hodden (D-N.C.) and Fred L. also boards ship for Europe to
Crawford (R-Mlch.i attended look Into lending operations of
ineva conference, then tra- the Export-Import Bank.
A Senate Foreign Relations
Subcommittee is expected to
leave in December for a tour of
Japan and the Far East. Sen.
H. Alexander Smith (R-N.J.)
probably will be In the party
Reps. Mike Mansfield (D-
lltd east around the world for
f-Inspection visit to U.S. Pa-
jfcfic territories
About 65 additional Senators
HlHousr members are schrd-
lljtd to leave in official parties
m- ship and plane in the next
I days for Europe and South
Series. Others will follow la-
tar.
Also on Wednesday, six or
seven members of the House
Banking Committee will board
a Navy plane to fly around La-
tin America for four to six
weeks. Led bv Rep. Abraham
J. Muller (D-N.Y.), they will
look Into Export-Import Bank
loans south of the border.
Thursday A House Foreign
A two-week Latin American
trip by a five-man House For-
eign Affairs group is tenta-
tively planned for Nov. 15. The
group, headed by Chairman
James P. Richards (D-S.C.)
would get a first hand view of
uncompleted portions of the
Inter-American Highway. Le-
gislation pending before the
committee would have the U.S.
pay part of the cost of com-
pleting- the highway.
Sens. Milton R. Young (R-
N.D.) and Allen J. Ellender, 8r.,
(D-La.) leave next week for
Rome as delegates to the UN's
Food and Agricultural Organi-
zations conference.
Four members of Congression-
al Appropriations Committees
boarded ship for Europe yester-
day to inspect Coast Guard and
other matters.
In addition to -the "official
trips" more than a dozen Con-
^Members of Congress heatedly Affairs Group of four to six Congress is sende seven Sen ^LI ., JSI SES..'
Et when such trips are call- members headed byRep Clem- JStt*mBsTstt SSSa? &sXMSlm&
[junkets._______________ent J. Zablockl (D-Wia.) is ton- to Straaburg to represent it at a to the government. '"
XHE FIRST THANKSGIVING
"But I guess 111 allow him to
have a wee bit of champagne on
our wedding night to toast our
happiness with the guests."
When the 27-year-old dancer
came home for lunch today, a te-
legram from King was waiting
for her on the mantle. She open-
ed it with nervous fingers.
"Get champagne ready," it
read. "My divorce granted Sat-
urday. Be In Cairo Nov. 30.
Would like get married on that
date. Love you very much Shep."
The telegram was sent from El
Paso, Tex.
This la like a dream," Samia
said.
"I'm so thrilled I don't know
what answer to send back. This
to such wonderful news I can't
believe it.
"There's one crazy wish I'd
like to make nowI'd like to
close my eyes and when I re-
opened them find Abdullah by
me." .
She said she would hardly
have time to get ready for her
marriage by the date King men-
tioned, because after finishing
her present film "Beautiful Face"
next week, she to scheduled to
start work on "Night Train."
Truck, High-Tension
Pole Tangle; 11 Rio
Football Fans Die
RIO DE JANEIRO, Nov. S
(UPiEleven persons were kill-
ed when a truck loaded with
several acore football fans re-
turning from a game careen-
ed into a high-tension pole
suburban Camp Grande last
night.
A wire charged with 25,000
volts snapped and on the open
truck electrocuting nine. Two
others were killed in the crash.
This was the second time
within a week that passengers
had been electrocuted In a
vehicular crash.
Last Monda,, four persons
were killed when a but struck
a high-tension pole after its
brakes failed, and a live wire
fell on the vehicle.
Watchdogs Braced
To Comb Contracts
Let By Air Force
WASHINGTON, Nov. I (ijPh-
The Senate ^Preparedness Sub-
committee ws preparing today
for an Intensive campaign
against "fraud and favors" In
defense procurement
Exhibit A in this new phase of
the subcommittee's activity will
be the giant Wright-Patterson
Air Force Base near Dayton. O.
Informed sources said public
hearings on procurement Irregu-
larities theie probably will begin
before Congress reconvenes in
January.
Preliminary inquiries at other
military establishments are al-
ready being conducted by the
subcommittee's own investigat-
ors.
The Investigations, concentrat-
ing on cases of bribery and fav-
oritism In the preparedness pro-
?ram, marl a shift In emphasis
or th$ ten-member subcom-
mittee.
In al official reports Issued
since its formation in August.
1*50. the subcommittee haa
concentrated on mobilisation
policieslike the tin and syn-
thetic robber programs, and on
growing pain* of the Armed
Services.
Chairman Lyndon B. Johnson
(D., Tex.) signaled the change
when he announced last week
that a preliminary lndulry al-
ready to under way at Wright-
Patterson where some Air Force
buyers allegedly have accepted
"money, gifts, Jobs and favors"
for swinging contracts to pet
contractors.
Earlier, Johnson had appoint-
ed former FBI agent and Senate
Crime Committee Counsel Down-
ey Rice as a special member of
the subcommittee staff.
Johnson said Rice will help
ride herd on the "chlselers,
spendthrifts, grafters and blue
sky artists" who are sore to be
attracted by the record $57,-
OOO.Mt.eOO defense budget.
Johnson feels that the plan-
ning stage of the nation's giant
rearmament program to fast
moving inte the period Of deliv-
ery and payments. He wants his
committee to act as a watchdog
in keeping fraud and chtoelers at
bay.
The work of examining con-
tracts, inspection, delivery and
other procurement activities will
make the subcommittee's activi-
ties look more like those of the
special war investigating com-
mittee of World War II days.
Chairmanship of that commit-
tee made an important public fi-
gure out of a little known Mis-
souri Democrat named Harry
Truman.
INTO THE ROYAL BLUE Princess Elizabeth and her hus-
band, Philip, pause In the doorway of their plane to wave
farewell at the Washington airport as they leave for Montreal
______ after their three-day visit to the U.S. capital.
-r-
Hoving obtained riten potent of e .i in America,
the Pilgua envoys London purcheji- o J.r.p cones' Km
________________Mayflower.
Illustrated bv Wart Scott
MsMs. rk. Marias *W left
Lsydee beard die SpsaeWI at
Oerrsfcsvea. Fra aere, they soiios to
Soarhootpton, England, a root of
toar days.
ft' IT Mi avrira
44 Zone Teachers
To Take Course
In Monitoring
Forty-four teachers In the Ca-
nal Zone schools have volunteer-
ed li a course In radiologlal
monltorlngJto be given at the
Panam Area Damage Control
School at Fort Amador, starting:
tomorrow nlgnr.
The course will be conducted
by Malor E. G Halligan. Execu-
tive Officer of Chemical Section,
U.S. Army Caribbean. It will in-
clude six -two-hour sessions of
classroom and laboratory work.
Untimely Cold Snap
Kills 177; Destroys
Cotton, Fruit Crops
CHICAGO, Nov. 5 (UP)The
death toll caused by a vast
pre-winter cold wave mounted
today as frigid weather blan-
keted the United States from
Maine to Oregon and south to
the Gulf of Mexico, with no
relief in sight.
At least 177 deaths have
been attributed to the weather.
Traffic accidents caused 138.
16 persons died In fires caused
by overheated stoves, seven
drowned, two froze to death
and 14 died, in miscellaneous
mishaps.
Crops damages were extensi-
ve, particularly In the south
where the unseasonable cold
spell hit cotton and citrus
crops.
US Ambassdaor
To Attend Annual
Legion Affair
A number of distinguished
guests are expected to partici-
pate in the annual Armistice Day
olnner dance planned bv Amer-
ican Legion Po&t No. I sKdset for
Saturday evening at the new
Legion Club on the Oanalbanlj.
Among those who have accept-
ed the post's invitation to the
annual affair are the UJ3. Am-
bassador to Panam and? Mrs.
John Cooper Wiley.
The dinner dance starts at 8:80
p.m. and a price of $1.80 per per-
son has bean set for tickets.
Captain Geoghegan's
Funeral Services
Tomorrow al 9 a.m.
Funeral services for Captain
Clarence E. Geohegan. who died
Saturday morning at Colon Hos-
pital, will be held tomorrow at 9
a.m. at Our Lady of the Miracu-
lous Medal Church In New Cris-
tobal.
Arrangements are being mads
for shipment of the body to Ar-
lington Cemetery in Washington,
Capt. Geohegan was Master of
the United States Navy Ship
AKL-21 and was 61 years old
when he suffered the heart at-
tack Friday afternoon. He had
planned to retire in another year
and return to the States.
Through his many years of
duty aboard ships servicing the
Army. Navy and port authorities
throughout Central and South
America. Capt. Geohegan be-
came a well-known and popular
emissary of the United States.
He was employed by the Army
Transportation Corps since July
1934. Last year he was transfer-
red to the MSTs service of the
Navy.
The deceased is survived hy hla
wife, Mrs. CelenaA. Geoghegan,
his daughter. Marie, both resi-
dents of colon, and a sister. Mrs.
Myrtle Bresneham of Baltimore,
Md.
Members of the American Le-
gion will serve as pallbearers at
the funeral service tomorrow
morning.
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