The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01283

Related Items

Related Items:
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Seagrams V
Panama American
*'LI fee people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln. *

CANADIAN WHIS
Distilled, aged and hot I ltd In Carnuda under Canadian Gfrernmenl mptrvimk
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER I, 1951
rivB cttrm
Canal Zone
Drowned In Whi
Elmer Middlebrook
;

In Gatunas Spillway
ROYAL FLUSH Princess Elizabeth walks past the Dlonne quintuplets at a reception for the
tourine Roval couple in North Bay, Ontario. The girls are (left to right) Yvonne, Ceclle,
Entile Marie and Annette. Their father, Oliva Dionne, holds hU'hat in his hand, and their
mother can be seen over the Princess' shoulder.
*
Princess Liz Swirls
Hectic Washington Schedule
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 (UP)
Princess Elizabeth and the Duke
of Edinburgh were scheduled
to end their two-day Washing-
ton visit today with a whirl-
wind sightseeing tour, like a
couple of tourists completing
an all tour short vacation.
They were due to board a
Royal Canadian Air Force plane
at 1.30 p. m. for Montreal.
The Princess and her Prince
charming sipped champagne
with 3,000 selected Washington
notable at a swank British em-
bassy reception yesterday after
laying wreaths on two of the na-
tion's most revered shrines.
The two-hour reception, given
by British Ambassador Sir Oliver
Franks and Lady Franks, was
the social highlight of the three-
day Royal visit and the "must"
event of the year for the all-
aflutter capital wives who rated
gold-crested invitations.
For Elizabeth and Philip, who
scarcely have had time to catch
their breath since arriving here
late Wednesday it meant 2,000
handshakes and "how do you
do's" on top of an already-full
schedule.
Their busy day also included
60-mile-an-hour trips to Mount
Vernon and Arlington Cemetery,
a smaller reception at the Cana-
dian Embassy for British Com-
monwealth d'Dlomats, and a
private luncheon at Blair House
vlth Presiden!, Truman and his
family.
After the two-hour British Em-
bassy party, Elizabeth and Phi-
lip played hosts to the Truman
family at a formal state dinner
in the Canadisn Embassy at 8:00
But if the pace was gruelling,
the Royal covrle could take com-
fort from the fact that their
goodwill visit was a smash hit.
Capital observers agreed that
no visiting foreign dignitaries
in recent memory have captiv-
ated Washington'* heart so
completely as the debonair
duke and the gracious girl
whom President Truman dub-
bed "the fait y Princess."
The tempsr.iture stood at a
chilly 43 degrees and the sky had
o gray, London-like overcast as
Elizabeth and Philip left Blair
House shortly after 10 ajn. to
begin their whirlwind rounds.
Elizabeth wore a slate blue silk
coat and a ha*, of a darker blue
shade. Phlliu wore his British
naval uniform
Their first "nisslon was to pay
tribute to Oeorge Washington,
who had an .iltereatlon some
years back with E11 z a b e th's
preat-greatpieat-great grand-
father. King George III.
Pinch-hitting for her busy fa-
ther. Miss Margaret Trman
served as guide-escort on the 15-
mi'e trip to Mount Vernon.
She nd th- Roval couple rode
in a black, closed limousine.
which was preceded by a car full
of secret service agents and fol-
iowed by nine other cars security
guards, repoiters and photogra-
phers.
To keep to the tight schedule,
the motorcade sped along broad
Mount Vermin parkway, on the
banks of the Potomac River, at
CO miles an h"ur.
It was a tame trip for Phi-
lip, who has a passion for
speedy cars, bat it was one of
the swiftest motor trips Bri-
tain's future queen ever had
made.
An estimated 1,500 sightseers
v;ere waiting for the Royal party
at Washington's home.
They,got an unexpected wind-
fall when the Mount" Vernon
Ladies Association, which keeps
up the beautiful shrine, waived
the usual 50-cents admission fee.
C. C. Wall Mount Vernon su-
perintendent escorted Elizabeth
and PhUip dlrf ctly to Washing-
ton's tomb to lay a wreath of
laurel and fern leaves and small
white and larze lavender chrys-
anthemums.
No one apparently had remem-
bered to tell Elizabeth that 18 of
Washington's relatives also are
buried in the tomb. She walked
past the white marble sarco-
phagus bearing the bones of the
first President, and laid the
wreath on the vault of the rela-
Tactful guard William Holland
Air Force Secretary
Sees Atomic Plenty
For Battlefields
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 (UP)
United States Air Force Sec-
retary Thomas Finletter today
said: "We are moving Into a
i time of atomic plenty atomic
j plenty which will make atomic
! weapons available for the bat-
tlefield."
Then he paused and added:
"In Important quantities."
Finletter declined to be more
I specific, or to set a time when
atomic weapons will be avail-
able for the battlefield.
He sa'.d the battlefield atomic
! weapons will be carried prin-
! cipally by conventional alr-
i craft.
He declined to say whether be
1 counted Sabres and Thunder-
I Jets as conventional aircraft,
finletter. recently returned
from a tour of Europe and
North Africa, said he was un-
happy about the slowness with
which the United States to a-
.quirlng and building air bases
in Europe.
He added that it was neither
Air FcVce nor NATO policy to
match the six United 8tates
ground divisions in Europe with
six air groups.
waited until the Royal visitors
eparted, and then moved the
wreath to the right spot.
> They signen fhe Mount Vernon
guest registei .vlth regal brevity
- "Elizabeth and "Philip." It
was a diplomatic Irony that the
Princess signen just beneath the
name of Iranian Premier Mo-
ahmmed Mossjdegh, whose na-
tion has been quarreling with
Britain over o*l Mossadegh visit-
ed Mount Vet non Tuesday.
Princess Elizabeth was shown
where her parents, King Oeorge
VI and Queen Elizabeth, had
signed the guest register during
their visit here in June, 1939.
Elizabeth icoked startled, and
said, "oh," as if she hadn't ex-
pected to encounter the parental
shadow so far from home.
Err* route back to the capital,
the motorcade stopped at Arling-
ton National Cemetery to permit
Elizabeth to lay another wreath
on the tomb of the' Unknown
Soldier.
Since Arlington is a military
reservation, Elizabeth was ac-
corded both on her arrival and
her departure- 21-gun salutes by
a battery of 75 -mm. cannon
A raw wind whipped around
the tomb ami clutched at her
thin silk eoat as the queenly
girl, assisted by Philip, stepped
forward to place the wreath of
! rellow and bronze chrysanthe-
mums at a tr>bute to all- Am-
I frican fighting men who have
! died for their country, many
of them fighting side by side
, with her own people in two
. world wars.
The wreath bore a card on
vhich was typed in capital let-
ters:
"In memory ol the glorious
dead, Elizabeth and Philip."
The royal couple stepped back
and Stood In guent reverence be-
l'ore the tomb while an Army
bugle sound-d taps.
The tight schedule tugged at
Elizabeth and Philip again, and
they sped away iron Arlington
toward the Canadian Embassy
where they arrived, four minutes
late, at 11:49 a.m.
For the next hour, the royal
couple received the Ambassadors
and senior diplomatic officials
of the eight British Common-
wealth diplomatic missions here.
About 150 persons attended the
c'lplomatic reception, and all fil-
ed past to snake hands with
Elizabeth ant Philip.
The Prince* apparently un-
ruffled by the morning's mad
pace, was described by the guests
at "relaxed" and chatting teior-
-nally throughout the party. She
;ipped a gloas of champagne
toon after entering but declined
r refill.
Instead she asked for and was
served a glasi of orange juke.
The Royal t"uple returned to
Blair House at 12:97 p.m. and
nastened Inside.
They had lust II minutes to
] "rest" and get dressed for lunch
I with the Truman family.
Sabre Pilots
Bag 100th Mig
gTH ARMY HQ., Korea, Nov.
2 (UP)United Nations planes
shot down their 100th Mig to-
day, and damaged four more.
All the United Nations planes
returned safely to base from
a total of nine dogfights
the largest number ever fought
In a tingle day over Korea.
- The Reds threw more than
200 Mlgs against outnumbered
flights of United Nations Sa-
bres, Thunderjets, Shooting
Stars, Meteors and Mustangs.
Two United States Sabres
shared the credit for shooting
down the 100th Mig sinee the
Russian-built jet fighters first
appeared over Korea about a
year ago.
They downed the enemy
plane in a sharp dogfight near
Pyongyang.
Meteors of a Royal Austral-
RP teds Attempt
An otherwl.se uneventful Jjoll-
tical meeting in Santa Ana Plaza
was marred Tart night by a phy-
sical attack on an American
newspaper c<-respondent by a
group of Panamanian Commu-
nists.
The opposition parties that
staged last night's mass, meeting
did little more than to attack
President Aluibiades Arosemena
and Presidential candidate Jos
A. Remon, out the Students' Fed-
eration has planned a more pro-
vocative maneuver.
The executive council of the!
Federation today Issued a call to
all studenu- to refrain from par-
ading before tin* President at the
Presidencia ir. the traditional In-
dependence Day parade tomor-
row.
A crowd. Variously estimated
at between 5,000, 7,000 and 10,000,
listened to vituperative speeches
delivered oy spokesmen for the
opposition faction of the Liberal
Party, the Independent Revolu-
tionary, the Frente Patritico,
the Communist Partido del Pue-
blo and a municipal party known
as MIR.
The Communist? had not
been scheduled as *ne of the
sponsors of the meeting, but
they showed np with a delega-
tion carrying the Panam ver-
sion of the Communist flag: a
pick and shovel emblem.
One of the spekesmea for the
opposition partieg emphasised
during his speech that they
had no alliance with the Com-
munists.
Policemen were almost totally
absent from the scene of the
meeting last night. Two'motor-
cycle policemen were on the out-
er fringe of the crowd diverting
traffic and a police radio patrol
car was on the scene a part of
the time the meeting lasted.
The policemen were not near
enough, however, to stop a group
of Communist' from roughing up
Jules Dubols. Chicago Tribune
correspondent, after he tried to
have a photographer take a pic-
ture of the Psrdo del Pueblo's
flag.
Dubois lias declared that his
attackers were "inspired and di-
rected" by Domingo Barra, a
known Communist and president
of the Panam Federation of
Trade Unions.
The Santa Ana meeting was
preceded by mass meetings in the
Maran and Chorrillo areas.
At the conclusion of the Chor-
rillo meeting a grouii of some 30
demonstrator, marched along
Avenue "A" parrying banners and
a big painting of Norberto Nav-
arro, president of the Independ-
ent Revolutionary Party (PRI)
and former Minister of Public
Works.
When the group passed by the
National Police headquarters
they started shouting "down
with Remon, the assassin." Po-
licemen around the vicinity look-
ed on but said nothing.
- In addition to the attacks a-
galnst the President and Re-
mon, the main theme of last
night's mass meeting was the
need for a unified front In the
next elections.
Ian: Air Force jet fighter squad-
ron also damaged two Mlgs
today. So did United States
Thunderjets.
No hits were scored by either
side In the other six dpgfights
of the day.
United Nations air fighting
claims against the Migs now
stand: 100 destroyed, 22 prob-
ably destroyed, 243 damaged.
On the ground United Na-
tions forces holding strategic
hills southeast- of Kumsong
beat off a series of Commun-
ist probing attacks.
Farther east: up to four in-
ches of snow blanketed the
rugged peaks and valleys north-
east of the Punchbowl.
Only patrol activity was re-
ported from there, and from
the western front.
Negotiators Dicker
Over Kaesong; Reach
ffe Conclusions
PANMONJON, Nov. 2 (UP)
United Nations truce negotia-
tors said here today that they
have offered to withdraw from
all Korean islands north of the
Jith parallel, to evacuate the
Kumsong bulge, and to pull back
their forces some distance on
Korea's east coast.
The spokesman for the Unit-
ed Nations team said the Com-
munist negotiators had accept-
ed this offer, but rejected the
Allied demand that they give up
Kaesong, on the approaches to
Seoul, in return.
The 'spokesman said: "The
Reds have taken everything and
given nothing. We will adopt
quite a firm stand on the Kae-
song issue."
But he did not say whether
the United Nations negotiators
would break off the truce talks
rather than give up their claims
to Kaesong.
The negatlators are to meet
again tomorrow.
Husband Confesses
Strangling Wife,
Hiding Body in Trunk
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 2 (UP)
John Kelly, Si., 44, house painter
and former musician, confessed
to sheriffs deputies yesterday
that he strang>d his wife, Mar-
garet Theresa, 39, and stuffed
her body in a trunk nearly three
weeks ago.
The trunk and its grisly con-
tents were discovered in east Los
Angeles last week end but the
victim remained unidentified
until yesterday.
Sheriff Eugene Discailuz dis-
closed Kelly had confessed slav-
ing his wife, mother of two chil-
dren, on Oct. 13 during an argu-
ment after a drinking bout.
Officers reported Kelly said
the argument was over money
and another woman. They said
he told them he grabbed his wife
from behind and "squeeezd until
she became limp."
The body nad been so badly de-
composed when it was discovered
that a coroner's autopsy failed to
fix a cause ol otath.
Kelly said, according to offi-
cers, that after he squeezed his
wife into unconsciousness he
stripped hci clothes off and
stuffed her into the almost an-
tique trunk.
Kelly said tnat when the chil-
dren, Richard. 7, and John, Jr.,
19, returned from a movie he told
them their mother had been
summoned East by an emergen-
cy.
The painter aid he left the
trunk In the house lour days and
on Wednesday the children be-
gan to notice an odor.
He then loaded it Into a bor-
rowed automobile and dumped it
in a vacant lot where It remain-
ed undiscovered until last Sun-
day, II days after the strangling.
Britain Sends
Crack Division
To Suez Zone
CAIRO, Nov. 2 (UP) Britain
sent its crack 1st Infantry Divi-
sion to the Suez Canal Zone to-
day In the face of Egyptian
threats that underground war
will flare soon in the Zone and
in the Sudan.
Socialist leader Ahmed Hussein
told a youth rally today:
"The government Is unable to
launch regular warfare against
the British in the Canal Zone.
Therefore the struggle rests with
the people."
He urged the Egyptian govern-
ment to prohibit trade with Brit-
ain, saying such a boycott would
paralyze Manchester's cotton
mills.
Meanwhile at Fayid, British
military headquarters in the
Canal Zone, It was announced
that the first units of the 1st
Infantry Division, had arrived
iiKthe CanaJ Zene irmm Jrif-li.
The British moved the destroy-
er Chequers, on which the Duke
of Edinburgh once served,
through the Suez Canal to the
city where British troops first
went into action against a de-
monstration mob.
The British today rejected
Egyptian protests over yester-
day's expulsion from the Canal
Zone of 11 Egyptian policemen.
The British said such expul-
sions would- continue so long as
Egyptian officials Intimidated
native workers employed by the
British. r
A British military spokesman
denied that the British had stop-
ped the passage of fuel oil trucks
from Suez to Cairo. About 1230
trucks make the trip dally.
The spokesman said some were
held for a few hours last night,
but denied Egyptian government
claims that the delay constituted
a blockade.
Canal Zone Policemen Elmer L. Middlebrook dr
ed in Gatun spillway this morning when he was swept I
a whirpool after falling from a ledge where he had I
fishing.
An all-round athlete, and an experienced fisher
Middlebrook was casting his line from a point on the
side of the Chagras River about 150 feet below tfwrT
way apron, eye-witnesses said.
A number of other fishermen were casting in thaj
at the time Middlebrook lost his footing and wat]
out into the current that was unusually strong. One o
spillway gates was open at the time.
Onlookers did all they could but were unable to
former Canal Zone League baseball player.
Middlebrook, 28. was a good
swimmer. He kept afloat lor five
minutes or more while other fish-
ermen attempted a rescue.
While men on the bank tried
to cast lines for him to grasp,
Army Sgt. Mikt Barzowski jump-
ed into the stream and swam to-
ward the policeman.
BarzowsKi, no is attached to
the Provost Marshal s office, At-
lantic Sector, was unable to
reach Middlebrook before he
went down.
Spectators aid the Army man
almost lost ni.- own life in the
rescue attempt. He and Middle-
brook were fishing partners
when the acciaent occurred at
9:27.
Policeman Viddlebrook's body
had not been recovered early this
afternoon. Tw. boat* were mak-
ing a ^search for It, and a diver
had been sun nioned.
Middlebroox was born in Wat-
erbury, Conn., and attended
school In Thumaston, Conn.,
graduating from high school
there with th.class of 1940.
After employment in Water-
bury as an electric plater for a
c'ock company, he enlisted in the
Navy in 184? and served as a
Ohief Pharmacist's Mate.
He was employed by the Pan-
ama Canal as :> policeman in Oc-
tober 1945, following his release
from the Navy at Coco Solo. At
the time of his death,
traffic officer assigned
Cristobal District.
It was while he was in
Navy that '.tliddlebrook i
his Canal Zone
League career.
He was a r)Kbt-nand pit**
for Colon in 1913 and was on $
club's roster lor several j
In 1949-50 he pitehed for Ol
bal and last >ear he switch*
an infelder ir. the Atlantic T
light League. He had intended
play in the twi loop again J
coming season. Recently he i
joined the brazos Brook Count
Club and was recognized ajri
of I he coming golfers of the I
mus.
Middlebrook is suivi
widow, Mrs. Marion EJ
brook, of Maijtfcrtt^^L
Patricia, who will be el rht yeas
old tomorrow, a son, Michael D.,
who is a year i-,d, and his moth-
er, who resides to Thomaston,
Conn.
Canal Zone police recalled to-
day that Middlebrook's death
was the first violent death on the
force since August 1945, when Po-
liceman Sami'el Vio.'ln. also a
traffic offiaer In Cristobal, died
after injuries received In a tra. -
f lc accident while he was on duty.
Churchill May Visit
Washington Next Month
LONDON. Nov. 2 (UP)Prime
Minister Winston Churchill
started a series of top-level
Anglo American conferences
today that will probablv lead
next month to a Churchill visit
with Truman In Washington.
W. Averell Harriman. Tru-
man's roving Ambassador, and
an old wartime friend of Chur-
chill's, flew Into London from
Washington today.
Former Isthmian
Artist Dies In US
Word has been received on the
Isthmus of tfc? sudden death In
New Jersey ol Fran* La Vaneo,
well knowi. artist, who spent tbe
war years at Ai'nrook Field.
During that time ne contribut-
ed to the anima! Art Week Exhi-
bition at the YMCA receiving a
number of prizes. He also had
two one-man hows, one at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Ko-
erber and the other at Albrook
Field Library.
AFL Ship's Officers Plan
New Waterfront Walkout
NEW YORK, Nov. 2 (UP)
AFL ship's officers got ready to-
day to start a new waterfront
walkout that would paralyze Uni-
ted States shipping In every At-
lantic and Gulf port.
While 12.000 members of the
Masters', Mates' and Pilots' Un-
ion (AFL) awaited a midnight
call to the picket lines, authori-
ties moved to end the longest
dock strike In the history of the
nation's largest port.
Defiant members of the Inter-
national Longshoremen's Asso-
ciation (AFL) were enthusiastic
over the prospect that the ship's
officers would tie up 600 Atlan-
tic and Gulf vessels.
The longshoremen showed no
sign of ending their 19-day-old
wildcat walkout.
The longest previous strike a-
long the sprawling New York
waterfront lasted 18 days. ,
Hitler's Mountain
Chalet To Come Down
MUNICH, Nov. 2 (UP)Unit-
ed States and German authori-
ties today agreed to tear down
the ruins of Hitler's former al-
pine chalet at Berchtesgaden.
The nearby houses of Her-
mann Ooering and Martin Bor-
mann will also be torn down
The authorities had learned
that Berchtesgaden guides were
giving pro-Nast talks to tourists
and feared that this might con-
vert the ruins to Nazi shrines.
(NEATelephoto)
OUT OF LINE A rebel longshoreman Is collared by police
who broke through a picket line to let strike-breaking "loyal-
ists" get to work. Although some men reported at this New
York pier, most of the commercial docks remained paralyzed
by the wildcat walk-out



.4.
/
TWO
~-------- -Mill
THE PANAMA AMEK1CAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
[0*NIO .MO W..|.,ID ., INI PANAMA AMHICAN fHlll INC.*
>UNO0 NKLSON MUNHVILl IN !
HAWMODIO ARIAS. coiTOR
6 M SlKir? P O BO 134. PANAMA. P. Of P.
'(UfnONt Panama no a-0740 IB Link)
Cabli addbi.s. PANAMKHICAN. Panama
'OMIION KlPKCStNTATIVI*. JOSHUA B POWERS. INC
*4?i Madison Avi.. Nw York. <17i N. V
LOCAL M*u
Pnim in n..n g I 70 2.SO
* MONTH*. IN e so I3.O0
ITU" in 4nu.N1-. IB 5>0 24 OO
Walter Winche
In New York
Labor News
And
Comment
'And the GoblinsII Citcha If Yuh Don't Wctch Out!'
*THI
LETTER. OF THE YEAR
(The following is from the New York Editor of the Pittsburgh
n Courier, leading Negro newspaper.)

By Victor Ricscl
Blackjack anci brass knuck-
les are being welded to the
hammer and sickle.
The underground and the un-
derworld, after 25 years, again
are ganging up on decent
unions across countrystirring
unrest, crippling facilities and
terrorizing the rank and file
working stiff in many a big.
city.
The mobs want a bigger
cut for their gambling syn-
dicates. The comrades want
a bigger cut in our war pro-
duction Those are their
ordfrly So, as they did a
quarter of a century ago
when their fur industry
specialists sought out the
Black Glove gang (who
wore the leather sheathings
to cover their brass knuck-
les), the Communists have
turned to the mobs for sup-
port, s
This happened on the New
"Dear Waller: Reading you daily for years and knowing how,
>cu have never failed to go out of your way lo put in a merited
|>iT99q wo"u ioi-coiorcd Americans or to denounce racial bigotry. I
navt resemed from us inception the criticisms of you in connec-
-en with the alleged discrimination against Jcsephine Baker at'
the Stork Club. One would think that you were the owner of that
establishment and had personally ordered thai 'he actress be in-
' sill*"
^'Whether or not she was the victim of racial discrimination
ffwis to be obscure, since how long a person hts to wait for ser-
vice in a public place depends upon the hour when they seek ser-
fjice and how many other patrons ore seeking it at the same time.
pEhUe naturally holding no brief for the Sto-k Club, it would
~tdi to me that the responsible people directing the picketing of. Ynrk witerfront onlv ii
.place would first clarity the situation as suggested before as- ^Yor
ting the worst and acting upon it. Some of the Negroes' cham
Is are much too quick on the trigger. We all loathe prejudice
ii discrimination but we ought to be sure beiore we act.
"Anybody who has closely followed Josephine Baker's activities
(aide the theater since her re-discovery of the American flesh-
ots will want to examine closely any complaints from her about
discrimination. Since last Winter when she became the'flrst col-
iWwl performer to play at the swank Copa City in Miami Beach,
*~;has been successfully hornswoggllng the colored brethren into
Ipting her as a group heroine and champion. From the time a
|-known Negro fellow-traveling Journalist tourneyed to Mexico
City to brief her and she entered the country with a big ballyhoo,
...hc went through all of the expected routineconstant statements
denouncing bias, dramatic appearance at the Trenton Six trial,
championing the late and unlainented Willie Magee. Although
warned against efforts of fellow-travelers and crypto-Communists
''tiftfse her, she only repudiated them once, and then perhaps in-
aowertentiy, when she protested that she had been fleeced by the
"Kens on Magee's funeral expenses.
"One of the Pittsburgh Courier's best reporters, Ernie Durham,! Union international headquart-
-!* her statement in a Detroit interview wnicli shi hastily repu-' ers in Detroit refused to aid
\XUI
The Neto York Police Dept. wa-
l tetfronj squad knows this. So
do legitimate, but frustrated,
AFL union chiefs
The Detroit Police Sept. rj
knows this. So do the lronest1
Detroit AFL and CIO leaders.
In the Motor City, as in other
cities, such as certain atomic
energy centers, the regular lab-.
or leaders are trying to fight
this unholy underground unity
entirely behind the-scenes so i
that the political and money
racket boys are slowly picked
off without disrupting produc-
tion with wildcat strikes. But
that's Just not working.
When, for example, the Auto
diated the next week, perhaps when the Comrades got to her.
r io -"Last Summer Miss Baker refused to appear at the annual
conference of the National Association for tne Advancement of
"Colored People in Atlanta, Georgia, because she coula not get hotel
accommodations, knowing full well the racial segregation laws Of
"*"tuar> state. However, the previous December she did not refuse to
jappear in Havana, Cuba, when barred from the Hotel Nacional.
wi.nam Portuondo, the Pittsburgh Courier's Havana correspondent,
reported in its December 30, 1950, issue how upon arrival with her
husband and a ilock of reporters at the hotel, the clerk told her,
Sorry, but there is no room empty.' She said, 'Well, it seems like
we'll have to tind another place.
"Portuondo wrote: 'Cuban newspapermen tall white) staged a
warm protest over what they considered the "impro-slavery pol-
icy" of the Nacional Hotel.' But La Baker made no protest and
did no picketing No howl for Justice and fair pl-ty came from her.
"When my good friend Willard Townsend, president of the
United Transpon, Service Employees' Union, attended a soiree in
her Chicago suite, tie told tne readers of hi> Chicago Defender
'. hew astonished he was to find the place packed with no- !
Reus and pinks, some of them high in the NAACP and the
League. #
"The same element dominated the financially successful
trie Baker Day in Harlem on May 20th. The program for the
contained 28'2 pages of advertising, elgh tcoming from such
totic' organizations as District. 05 DistrlDutWe Processing and
Workers' Union, the 31 evicted tenants of Stuyvesant Town,
itematlonal WorKers" Order, the Committee for the Negro in
B, the American Peoples' Congress and Exposition for Peace
sored by Howard Fast, Ben Gold, Dashit! Hammett, Paul
on, Abraham Flaxer, Harry Bridges and such worthiest), tne
konai Committee for the Defense of Doctor W. E. B. Du Bois
his Associates, Defense Committee for William L. Patterson,
gem Trade Union Council, the Harlem Civil Rights Congress,
uch.
"As the astute editor of the Los Angeles Tribune, a Negro
rspaper, remarked: So this time the rout was shrewdly master-
toed and we'd like to meet the guy that cooked it up. He should
our next President or at the very least ambassador to Russia,
pas, he continued, 'humiliating that she should have thought
easily taken In... and that we were.'
Jjtt least, Walter, a few of the Negroes are hep to La Baker.
J none of us doubt that The Stork Club or any of a thousand
Br bistros are quite capable of discriminating against Baker or
r other Negro, we are dubious about buying this latest Job of
fcoce-glamorous Josephine. Sincerely yours. George S. Schuyler,
1 York Editor, Pittsburgh Courier."
workers at a'l Ford olants we used to know M Joe lMVtis-
!-w? til I,i. rffn^rt But 1 think the old gentleman knows for
tfBSi ISJ&iLSSr!* A" that he's through8 that the time has c
[IS TOUR FORUM THI KtADiRS OWN COLUMN
TH MAIL BOX
The Miil tos M an open forum for rcadcri of The Panama American.
are received fratciully and ara handled in a wholly confidential
M you contribute a letter don't be mpatian if ft doesn't appear the
ay. Letteri ara published in the ardor received.
pata try to keeo tha rattan limited to one poje length,
ntity of letter writer ii held in strictest confidence.
a newipepar mumii no responsibility far statements or opinion!
la hrttara from readers.
several gamblers fired out of
a Ford Motor Co. plant, the
left wing In the factory Itself
i.'shed to their defense.
The was bitter talk on the
factory level. The men were
reinstated although the union's
central headquarters thought
them so guilty that the head of
the United Automobile Work-
ers' National Ford Dept. (cover-
ink
throughout
to ask that they be rehlred.
Furthermore, both Federal
and local probes have dis-
closed that some of the
gambling crowds' bookie
agents in the Ford plants
are members of the Com-
munist caucus there, al-
though they'd have a tough
time telling the difference
between Groucho Marx's
mustache and Karl Mam's
beard.
This is true, too, at some
General Electric plants where
bookies were fired. The pro-
Communist union chiefs rush-
ed to their defense, threatened
*
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER t, 1M1
A"
^HeDAiLY WASHINGTON
MERRY- GO- ROUND
y DREW MARION________

-
Joe Louis
By BOB RUARK
.

NEW YORKIt hurt to see the old boy belted
-lirough the ropes that way, to lie theie crump-
led and temporarily paralyzed by a punch that
would never have reached the tawny panther
sure
come
to quit.
His fights since his "comeback" started have
; been farcical, and the man has embroidered too
, much dignity into his life, to wind up as a pathe-
i tic has-been, a figure of pitying scorn.
Somehow you have a way of attaching your-
self to certain sports figures.
I have always tied my sell to Louis and Joe Di-
i Magglo, since we all hit the spirts business about
the same time.
I gueas I saw all of Joe's more important fights
except the first with Schmellng, and I felt that
one. I felt it in the poefcetbook.
Seems'-I was in Germany at the time.
Max was then high in the Hitlerian favor. He
was going to protect the Aryans from the men-
ace of darker races.
He was a self-nominated Siegfried, and Louis
tie-ups and got the gamblers waa cast ^ a dark and smlster dragon.
i-n t *\- 4 n Inri rm____._ _____u________ > .
' WAR BETWEEN THE GENERATIONS
[Box Editor.
[Mr:
I would like to call the attention of the manager of a well
]im Panam Canal clubhouse to two important changes that
be made in his establishment.
|In the first place, I want to congratulate this manager for
Tflrst class establishment he is operating, providing the public
i good food, fair prices, good i-ervice, court* s personnell, and
^ict can only find two mistakes, and I am good at criticizing.
[X Please don't call your pea soup "Puree f Jardn Jullene"
ptttever It is. Just call It plain "Pea Scup," then we don't
I afraid of It.
t Throw that %$) Juke box out in the alley. The other day
[enjoying a very good meaj in your clubhouse All was quiet
I peaceful when in comes a^uvenlle, age about, 18 or 19, puts
nickels all on one song, parks himself at e table and starts
Maun. Out of the Juke box came the wal'.ing of some snot-
I dame bellowing the words repeatedly, "I Love You," about
36 times.
rVhls Juvenile got in the groove, went into a tranc, beat his
MB.together, scratched his leg, drummed the table, swayed his
Blflulders, and tried to croon in a deep quivering voice, mournful
and lonely. Three times this snot-nosed dame and the Juvenile
performed.
When the final record ended, he burled his head in his arms
ocxhauited, with that "Farewell Dear World" expression.
One old guy watched him through two records, couldn't stand
It any longer and went into the men's room to continue reading his
book, in peace and quiet.
The Juvenile, apparently out of nickels, dragged his lonely
irtbroken body out of the clubhouse, mounted his black motor-
Je. and in a suicidal bunt of speed roared away from his me-
relnstated.
Yet the local police depart-
ments say nothingand fur-
thermore, they tell the antl-
Communlst union leaders that
this isn't the time to open up.
Then they shut up. Why?
This is the very moment when
the Communist apparatus is
under orders to make every
every conceivabje liaison "from
below."
That order came through
here to the American Commun-
ists, if you'll excuse the ex-
pression, during the week of
July 8, 1951.
That war part of a coordinat-
ed preparation for a world-wide
series of strikes using every
element capable of disrupting
the economy of the Western
world.
Immediately after that, the
Italian Communist Party re-
organized Itself into a series of
undercover factory cells. So did
the French- The American
Communists prepared to move.
Now the State Dept. has
learned that the implementing LUXEMBOURG (NEA)
order has come through fromiTiansport Service special plane carrying a'load
the Comlnform for a series of of American correspondents on an inspection of
large-scale strikes in Italy, European defense establishments was fog-bound
German excitement reached fantastic heights,
which they were eager to protect with money.
Yours truly was willing to cooperate. I believe
I was engaged In the smuggling business in Ham-
burg at the time, and was fairly fat.
The Nazis were screaming for action, and of-
fering odds as high as ten to one.
Buster here reached into his poke and bet it
all, which was considerable, for American cigar,
ettes even then were extremely profitable If you
didn't Insist on declaring them to the customs.
You remember the story. Schmellng banged
him a beauty Just after the bell, and a hundred
solid smashes later young Joe folded.
I folded right along with him The budding
king of the smugglers collapsed his empire and
shipped home on a rusty old freighter, as ordin-
ary seaman at $10 a week.
Every time I fell to with a suji-bucket or a
chipping hammer I ".ailed Joseph a short and
ugly name.
We got well on Joe, and even with the Nazis,
though, when Herr Maxle came over to cinch the
second leg on his ideolgica, trophy.
The visiting firemen were Just as arrogant here
as they were In Germany, as they flashed their
little Lelcas during^ the training stint.
I had turned legitimate, which is to say I was
working for a living, and there wasn't as much
loose money around, but what I had I bet and
when Mr. Louis netted Mr. Schmellng into poli-
tical disrepute I was practical-y repaired.
Joe and I continued in our .intimacy. I caught
him one night In Washington, when Buddy Baer
started a swing in Baltimore jnd finished it in
Griffith Stadium. ~
It hit Joe In the chin ancTthe next? thing I
knew I was baby-sitting 208 pounds" worth of
Louis.
He winged through the ropes and lanced in my
lap, a startling experience for a non-combatant.
Joe was ever a cocker for a looping right, even
when it belonged to such a clumsy fellow as the
Junior Baer.
This is mostly reminiscence, and has no real
point to the piece.
It's Just that I have been fond for more'n 15
years of a fine gentleman who did great things
to make the boxing business respectable, even
though his major managers were in highly sus-
pect businesses.
One of them went to Jail, I recall, but the
tarnish never rubbed off on Joe.
Louis took very little punishment in nearly
two decades of fighting. He was never bruised
around, never marked up very much, and I
think he has all his marbles now.
It Is not the clean knockout that loosens a
fellow's brain from its moorings so much as the
repeated Jarring that leads to the kayo.
Joe caught one big one from Baer and a stiff
left from Galento and a lot from Schmellng
and a fair one from Braddock, but considering
his time In grade he dished a lot and accepted
few.
His knockout the other night tells me He is
a cinch for punishment now, and I don't want
to see him take it.
I would like to see Louis barred from Jurther
fighting by law. He can't go up. He can only
go down.


Pearl Mesta
By Petei Edson
The Military Air
Balboa High School kids, and some very young soldiers, will
those slobbery love songs for hours, totally disregarding the
It their are other people in the clubhouse who wish to eat
ace and quiet and who despise such gooey trash.
When you have been married for 20 years you will understand
ffeoUsbhess of such pretense. ,
id suggest that the manager replace the Juke box with
"Ter installed on the wall, connected I o a phonograph in
ers office. Classical music, and the old time tunes of
foster, played in a low soft tone, will do much to relieve
atton and ulcers of your customers. ,
a CHOMBO.
France. Western Germany. Bri-
tain and the United States.
Over there, the Party has
millions of followers.
For example, only on Oct. 22,
the Communists decided on a
test run In Bremen. That port
was paralyzed when the Com-
munists used strong-arm tac-
tics, with muscle bought and
paid for by money from East-
ern Oermany, and terrorized at
least 80 per cent of the long-
shoremen who wanted to work.
77ie terrorists were di-
rected by high level Stalin-
ist operators imported from
Eastern Europe. During the
first two days, loyal union
members who defied the
wildcatters were slugged.
Then the Bremen govern-
ment, backing up the union,
declared the strike illegal
and guaranteed protection
to those at work. That's
more, incidentally, than the
New York Police have done.
The Bremen rebel long-
shoremen strike ended
swiftly after that.
But in this country, the Com-
mies have only limited support
and funds. So they've turned
to the thugs for terror and for
support down in the plants or
on the waterfronts.
In turn, they're willing to
threaten to howl for grievance
action if any bookie Is fired
and If the honest union chiefs,
won't act, the Comrades will
supply wildcat action.
at Luxembourg, en route from Brussels to Wies-
baden.
So Pearl Mesta, the U. S. Minister to this tiny
picturesque duchy, Invited us all to dinner. Ana,
what an evening it turned out to be!
When Maoam Minister Mesta first came over,
there was a great rush of the curious and the
social climbers to have the first dinner date with
her.
That era has now passed. Mme Minister has
become an institution in these parts. So this is
merely a report on the latest, if not the last,
supper.
tine is Lady Bountiful of Luxembourg. When
her two Cadillacs, driven by faithful retainers
Frank Toomey, chauffeur and bodyguard, and
Garner the butler roll over the winning Luxem-
bourg streets and roads, American flags flying
from the fenders, rosy-cheei;ed Luxembourgers,
young and old, line the roads to wave and cheer.
Mme. Minister waves and smiles back at them
all, and everything is very gemeutlich.
She's almost as popular as the Grand Duchess
herself.
They tell the story here that when the Grand
Duchess's daughter was married this summer,
Mme. Mesta was Invited to attend as matron of
honor.
She got every bit as much applause from the
Sopulace as the Grand Duchess and the bride
erself.
She has done wonders for Luxembourg war
orphans and other deserving local charities.
She is asked to speak, and she accepts nearly
all invitations to speak at local gatherings. She
Is Invited to be present and lay wreaths on the,
graves of Luxembourg war heroes, on the an-
niversaries of their deaths.
Every letter that comes into the embassy gets
an answer, signed by the MlMster herself, from
faithful Secretary Pat Ventura, daughter of the
New York World-Telegram At Sun's Society Edi-
tor.
In short. Pearl Mesta has spread more good
will for the United States in the Benelux coun-
tries than anything that eve: happened.
Her guest book carries the name Qf every Am-
erican oig-wlg who has been la these parts. Sec-
retary of Treasury John Snydcr, Jim Farley and
wife, General Vandenberg, Gensral Norstad, Gen-
eral Eisenhower and Mamie.
Her parties are famous. Fifty is Just a small
gathering.
The bowl is always flowing and the cup always
cheers. The buffet is always olg and beautiful.
For the correspondents who just dropped in on
her it was roast beef, roast vral, roast ham, chic-
ken, macaroni, rice, potatoes, vegetable salad,
potato salad Elsenhower, ice cream with chocol-
ate sauce, coffee, champagne, liqueurs and whis-
ky.
A six-piece orchestra plays contlnuosly. And
everything is done with the spirit of gracious-
ness which shows that the only thing the hostess
wants is for people to have fun.
About this potato salad Eisenhower.
Ike, it seems, is quite a cook. He comes over to
Luxembourg whenever he can to get away from
it all.
He and Mrs. Mesta like to go out in the kit-
chen and whip up something new, Just for the
fun of it, while tney talk. Out of one 0 these
sessions came potato salad Elsenhower.
The secret, it seems, is to make it up the day
before, to let all the flavoring and seasonlng'soak
in. The potatoes are almost mashed. Lots of cel-
ery, garlic powder, eggs, mayonnaise.
As she knows Ike so well. It was only natural
that Mrs. Mesta be asked about his presidential
intentions.
"What do you. think?" abe counters, looking you
straight in the eye.
Is he a Republican or a Democrat?
"What do you think?"
Well, how can he possibly run as a Republican,
If the GOP stands for an isolationist foreign pol-
icy?
"What do you think?"
Maybe Mrs. Mesta ought "to try converting
him into a Democrat.
"Maybe you .think I haven't tried I" she-ex-
claimed .
Then, clapping her hand to her mouth and
turning away: ,5Oh, goodness! What did.I Just
say?"
i
Drew Pearson says: Sen. Malone's secretary sought $50,000
- tee as tidelands oil lobbyist; Malone was favorable to
Long Beach, Calif., position, but reversed himself af-
ter Long Beach foiled to hire his secretary; Magnate
E. L. Cord now has Nevada senator's heart.
h. jyWgOTCjWv-^ now looks as If senator's secretaries might
be put on the Investigating griddle.
rin- ^Lfl th!f column has turned up a letter pertaining to the of-
22L2! Ne.vad*s Senator "MoUy" Malone that makes Flo Bratton,
of,* at a Sunday-school picnic.
.,..3e,tte,r.rw.^uwrlten by Senator Malone's idmlniatrative sft-
BTOr JWP. WMJqjfrqrit, and proposed that he work for the Long
Beach, Calif, harbor commissioners against federal ownership of
tidelands oilfor fifty grand plus expenses and plus taxes.
.. yne funny thing about the letter is that Whiiehurst's boss, the
senator from Nevada, is now for federal ownership of tidelands oil.
Of course, the senator has had a position on the billion-dollar
submerged oil lands which seems subject to change
. ?i:.nr5ti Malone appeared hostile to Federal ownership, now
has turned around and is for it.
9S5S recently Malone has been conferring with E. L. Cord, the
Industrial magnate, who vigorously favors Federal ownership and
has been buying up hitherto worthless Civil War scrip, which he
claims, entitles him to vast tracts of oil rich tidelandsIf the Fed-
eral government controls.
n, TH5. WHITEHURST LETTER
The manner in which the senator from Nevada has taken dif-
ferent sides on tidelands oil, and the manner In which his admi-
nistrative assistant was willing to sell his services is a highly in-
teresting chapter in backstage congressional wire-pulling. Here is
what happened. >"s
One year ago, Sept. 20, 1950, Ben Whitehurst wrote the Long
Beach Harbor Board which has mor oil wells sticking up from its
Harbor than most cities have telephone poles, offering his services.
The letter was written on Senator Malone's official stationery
and read:
"Board of Harbor Commissioners
"City of Long Beach
"Long Beach, Calif.
"Gentlemen:
"I wish to thank you for your courtesies to me in our discus-
sion of my proposed part in getting through the Congress and over
a possible Presidential veto tldeland legislation which would be ac-
ceptable to the harbor board.
"You requested that I inform you at once as to the kind of
finunclal arrangement which would be satisfactory to me. I would
want:
"Salarynone:
"Expenses$1,000 per month, payable monthly: (this amount
for expenses Is required as I would immediately go off the U. S.
Senate payroll.) Plus the actual cost of any long distance tele-
phone calls and telegrams relating directly to this matter and any
travel authorized in advance by the harbor board, the cost of these
items to be accounted for;
"Retainer$1,000, payable upon signing of contract:
"Fee$60,000 is a lump sum to be paid me upon passage of
legislation acceptable to the harbor board or upon other settlement
acceptable to the harbor board; plus an amount sufficient to off-
i set the Federal Income taxes involved.
"If the general principles of this proposal are acceptable to
you, or If you prefer to suggest a counter proposal, will you kindly
have a contract drawn up for my consideration.
"Yours respectfully,
"(Sgd.) Ben Whitehurst.
P. S. My home address in Washington is 1018 10th Street,
Noithwest; on Friday and Saturday of this week, I will be at the
Desert Inn, Las Vegas; for the seven days following, I will be at
j the Mapes Hotel, Reno;. My office is. 447 UB. Senate, Washlng-
'*" DC" l FRIENDLY MALOSTE
At the time. Whitehurst wrote this letter, Senator Malone seem-
ed friendly to state ownership of tidelands oil and against Federal
ownership.
Certainly when Irving Smith, a representative of the Long
Beach Harbor Board testified, Aug. 17, 1950. before the Senate In-
terior Committee of which Malone is a member. Malone went out
of his way to be friendly.
"Mr. Smith," Malone asked, seeking to draw out the witness,
"you do consider the situation at this time Impossible from the
standpoint of the city of Long Beach?
"In other words, without-a modification of the Supreme Court
decision or legislation by Congress, you do consider the situation
the city now finds Itself impossible (sic) and practically without
rights if the decision is enforced?"
This friendly questioning took place at about the time Malone's
assistant was dickering with the Long Beach commissioners for
tne fat fee of $50,000 plus taxes and plus expenses.
But the Long Beach people did not sign up. Whitehurst did
not get his Job.
And later, Senator Malone completely reversed his position.
In fact. Malone was the senator who, with Murray of Montana
Democrat, blocked the O'Mahoney-Long compromise tidelands oil
bill inside the Senate Interior Committee.
This compromise would have kept tidelands oil under the con-
trol of the Federal government, though permitting present lease-
holders to continue. This would favor Senator Malone's old friends
from Long Beach who own leasesbut despite that fact, he voted
against them.
But It would not have favored his new friends, including vari-
ous speculators who staked out claims to tidelands oil or these
who want to lease under the Federal Leasing Act.
One of these groups is represented by the son of Montana's
Senator Murray, and it was Murray who first moved inside the
committee to block the compromise bill.
CIVIL WAR SCRIP
The other group includes E. L. Cord, who nas entertained Sen.
Malone of late, and who has been buylpg Civil and Mexican War
scrip. y 1
This scrip was given to Civil and Mexican Wat veterans author.
Izlng them to claim any uninhabited lands In the west.
After the Supreme Court declared that the tidelands were
Federal domain. Cord began buying up this scrip on the theory
that under It he could claim tidelands oil.
Significantly, Sen. Malone not only helped block the compro-
mise bill which would have helped Long Beach, who did not hire
his assistant, but which would haye, hurt his new friend. Cord;
but in addition Malone Introduced a resolution friendly "to those
who had scrip claims to tidelands oil.
"Whereas," read the Malone resolution, "certain lands have
been filed upon through certain 'scrip' authorized under prior suc-
eesflve Congressional acts...etc.. .resolved, that the Senate of the
United States through its proper committee investigate such ap-
plications under the National Oil and Gas Leasing Act and filings
made under the 'scrip' authostzed by^Jfla cooKrejsional Acts..."
Maybe the Investigation oft Vkfr JresldenthU Secretary Flo
Bratton should be broadened.
(Copyright, 1951, By The Bell Syndicate, Inc.)
r*

Special Flight To Miami
* r!
LEAVING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
ONE WAY. ._ .* .$ 67.00
ROUND TRIP. ... .' 120.60 ,
- Contact
PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICE
4th OF JULY AVENUE
OPPOSITE ANCON BUS STOP
TIL. i-UM

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ft

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a
4)
hi-
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I

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t*t

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0

4

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER t, 151
-*fU
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAG|
Byrd Urges
To Reform
SELMA, Ala., Nov. 2.(UP)Sen. Harry F.
Byrd (D-Va.) urged Southerners today to unite to
save democracy from "dying on the cross of the
Truman Fair Deal" but said they should try to re-
form the party rather than bolt it.
The outspoken Virginian, who has been men-
tioned as a Southern protest candidate for the
Democratic Presidential nomination, came to the
heart of the 1948 States' Rights revolt country to
make his appeal.
It .was the new political season's first big as-
semblage of anti-Truman sentiment in the South and
after Byrd's speech, sponsored by the Dallas County
Farm Bureau, states' rights leaders went into a
"strategy" huddle.
Democrats
Not Bolt It
The "trateglats" adopted a
resolution calling for election of
a President who will not take
over congressional powers and
"who believes In the supremacy
of the constitution."
Byrd poke the States' Rent-
ers language and drew loud
cheers when he asked for en-
dorsement of the true principles
of democracy and the reaf flrma-
tton of SUtes' rights In the plat-
form of the 1982 Democratic con-
vention.
"In my Judgment," Byrd said,
"an overwhelming majority of
Southerners disapprove of Mr.
Truman and his policies.
"If representative government
means anything, there are ways
to register this opposition when
we vote in November, 1952."
But first, Byrd said. Southern-
ers should work at the conven-
tion to see that "the real Demo-
cratic Party la preserved and
strengthened."
This should be done, he said,
by demanding a restatement of
the democratic and states rights
principles, by seeking restoration
of the two-thirds rule for nom-
ination of the President, and by
seeking rental of the 1948 civil
rights platform.
Then, Byrd said as his audience
shouted approval, if the requests
are refused Southern Democrats
should "determine the course ne-
cessary to preserve fundamental
freedom."
Byrd went back: over his pre-
vious attacks on the Administra-
tion's spending, morality in gov-
ernment and treatment of the
Southern wing of the party.
"The Trumanltes would first
break down the Integrity of
Southern Democrats, then take
over the great Democratic Party
with an unholy alliance'of tin-
horn political incompetents and
socialistic do gooders," Byrd
said.
"The freedom and the demo-
cracy of this country are dying
on the Truman Fair Deal cross,"
he added. "And the democracy
of the South can save the real
Democratic Party, if we take
courageous action, even if this
means reformation and reorgani-
zation of the national party."
Byrd condemned the higher
taxes that went Into effect yes-
terday and commented "there Is
no reason to expect the Truman
Fair Deal Democrats to slaughter
the cow they are milking, or to
be safe, sane, responsible or con-
structive."
As to the Sen. Hubert Hum-
phrey (D-Mlnn.) dvll rights re-
solution surprisingly put into the
1948 platform, Byrd said Its en-
actment would "set up a whole
new pattern of Justification for
Federal intervention.''
"Self-determination, local self-
government and states' rights
are fundamental to American
democracy, but with respect to
the so-called civil rights, they
would be demolished by these
rules.
"We are gradually changing
from a nation built on the firm
foundation of individual initia-
tive, local self-government and
states' rights, to one of peonage
and servitude to a paternalistic
Federal bureaucracy In Washing-
ton," Byrd said.
A sponsor of the rally, State
Sen. Walter Olvhan, hoped that
the party leaders would be able
to lay groundwork for a detailed
anti-Truman program to be con-
sidered at next month's South-
ern Governors' conference.
The man who Invented the
modern plow, Jethro Wood, whit-
tled his first models out of pot-
atoes.
"Out of my way I"
We've get an RCA VIGOR
EASY CREDIT TERMS

25 cycle... S speed Radie Console
Nipper knows: An RCA VICTOR RADIO makes the
beat Christmas present in the world!
PANAMA RADIO CORPORATION
89 Central Ave. Teto.: 1-3344 1-2568
TO THE HOLDERS OF
SCHLUMBERGER OVERSEAS, S. A.
Serial Bonds Second Soria
payable on or before August 1, 1957
NOTICE OF REDEMPTION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to
the provisions of the Serial Bonds Second Series of
SCHLUMBERGER OVERSEAS, S.A., payable on or be-
fore August 1, 1957, the following numbered Bonds
have boon drawn by lot and will be redeemed on Feb-
ruary 1, 1962:
Nos. 2MX 3 and 2MX 6, each of
the principal amount of $10,000.
On February 1, 1952 said binds will become due
and payable at the principal amount thereof, together
with accrued interest to February 1, 1952, upon pre-
sentation and surrender thereof at the off ios of ths
Company, 33 Central Avsnuo, Panam City, Republic
of Panam. From and after February 1, 1952 interest
en said bonds will eeass to accrue.
SCHLUMBERGER OVERSEAS, S. A.
by A. J. Stoll, Treasursr
GOVERNMENT POSITION
' WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 (NBA) Because of the
controversial nature of Leonard Yaseen's opinion, expressed
in the accompanying story, NBA's Washington Bureau ask-
ed Presley Lancaster, in charge of the plant dispersing pro-
gram for the National Security Resources Board, for a reply.
Lancaster said Yaseen's arguments have "some merit,"
but, he added, they were "considerably overstated."
First, said Lancaster, in approving Certificates of Ne-
cessity, speed of getting production was absolutely the most
important thing considered, with the problem of dispersal
somewhere down the line.
Lancaster's next point was that Yaseen'? argument,
that so many plants are locattd in one city, isn't exactly
valid. He says even if a firm has a Detroit address for ex-
ample, the plant can be far enough outs:de of'Detroit to
make it dispersed according to resent NSIvB standards.
Lastly, says Lancaster, Yassen quotes the 1948 NSRB
Standards of dispersal. The 1951 program is considerably
different, although it does say that the 1948 "general con-
clusions are as sound today as they were three years ago."
However, the 1951 program eliminates the need of
plants being built only in cities of under 50,000 popula-
tion. The new recommendation is merely that new indus-
trial areas "should be 10 to 20 miles from *ny densely pop-
ulated or highly industrialized section of t>n urban area."
This, says Lancaster, is not violated by many of .the
new plantjlocations as Yaseen claims._____________________
[ JACOBY ON BRIPtH
BY OSWALD JACOB!
Written for NEA Service
NORTH SI
A74S
V 10743
? QJ
*A63
west bast
ftKISI W1098
? A79J OK54
sex *qjio
1 SOUTH fl
ie)AQ
VAKQM
? J10
? K7S^
Neither side vul.
West Net* Bast
Tut J Pass
.Pass Pass
L
4*
One of the strong points of the
expert bridge player is that he
makes life as difficult as possi-
ble fo rhls opponents. For exam-
ple, suppose the opponents can
defeat the expert's contractis
he downhearted? Not a bit of it.
It's still their Job to find the right
defense, and the expert will do
what he can to complicate their
job.
Today's hand would be muffed
by most average players but
would be made by most experts
for Just the reason described.
Let's examine the difference.
The average player wins the
first club in dummy or in his
own hand at random, draws two
rounds of trumps, and then leads
the Jack of diamonds. West na-
turally ducks in order to let East
win with the king of diamonds.
East, just naturally, returns the
jack of spades; and the fat is in
the fire.
South must take the spade fin-
esse, and the contract is defeated
when the finesse loses. Two dia-
monds and a club must be lost
no matter what happens, so the
loss of a spade trick is fatal.
The expert sees all this coming
and therefore wins the first
tncK in dummy with the ace of
clubs. His next step is to return
the deuce of diamonds from the
dummy. /
The opponents can still defeat
the contract, but they have to
find the right defense Instead of
having It handed to them on the
proverbial silver platter. At the
second trick East must put up
the king of diamonds. Do you
know anybody who will make
that defensive play?
I'll agree that a great expert
will occasionally come up with
the right defense. But if this
type of play Is made against him
ten times a month, he'll meekly
play low six or seven times out
of the ten. (Eight or nine times
would be closer to the truth, but
I wouldn't want to be considered
ungenerous.)
Once East is persuaded to play
a low diamond at the second
trick, the hand is home. West
must win the first diamond, and
West is in no position to lead
spades. West must lead another
club (as good as any), and South
wins with the king. South then
draws two rounds of trumps and
leads his other diamond.
This sets up dummy's queen
before the spades have been
touched. South ca nget to dum-
my with the ten of trumps to
discard his queen of spades on
the queen of diamonds. The rest,
of course, is child's play.
New Spanish Hag
io specialize
in rarm tquipmenl
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Nov. 2 "Im-
plementos y Tractores," a new
opanisn language publication
devoteo to farm equipment with
a circulation in the Latin Amer-
ican and tipanish-speaking coun-
tries of the world, will make its
debut in Marco, 9, when the
iirst issue is puohsned. It was
announcea toaay by Implement
and Tractor, me national farm
equipment business paper.
jaitorial coverage oi the ma-
gazine will be similar to Uuu of
implement and Tractor, it will
report all- siguincant develop-
ments in U.b. agriculture, new
and experimental techniques in
power farming, and new Ameri-
can bum luriu equipment.
special articles will cover the
repair and maintenance oi trac-
tors, farm machinery, and auto-
motive units, according to the
publishers. Many of the special
features and departments of the
English-language edition and i
new material developed for the
Latin American market will be
published m the magazine. It is
the first and only publication of
its kind for the overseas farm
equipment market.
Circulation will exceed 8,000
controlled, comprising coverage
of all rated Importers, distribu-
tors and dealer in farm ma-
chinery in Latin America and
other Spanish-speaking countries.
Coverage also includes top rat-
ed service shops, large planta-
tions, government officials, buy-
ing commissions, lib r a r 1 e s,
schools, etc. The circulation to
the farm equipment trade in
these countries is the highest ev-
er achieved.
According to the publishers,
the magazine Is being Introduced
to fill the need for more com-
plete Information on American
farm equipment, agricultural
practices and to supply detailed
assistance in the service and
overhaul of farm and automotive
units:
The growth of farm mechani-
zation In Latin America in re-
cent years and Its potential de-
velopment in the future are ad-
ditional reasons given for the In-
troduction of the new publica-
tion.
The optician fills prescriptions
for vision specialists by grind-
ing the lens or prims to their
specifications.
14 Field Artillery
Officers Commended
For Safe Driving
Fourteen drivers from the 504th
Field Artillery Battalion receiv-
ed the USARCARIB Safe Driving
Commendation at ceremonies
held recently In Lt. Colonel
WUUam Bach's office at Fort
Kobbe.
The men, from A and B Bat-
tery .were congratulated by Col-
onel Bach for completing one
year of driving without a single
traffic accident or traffic viola-
tion.
E. W. Hoopes, Safety Director
USARCARIB, spoke briefly at
the Informal ceremony. He said:
"There has been over 100,000
more deaths due to auto acci-
dents since the turn of the cen-
tury than by all wars. It is not a
miracle that you have come
through a year without an acci-
dent, it is Just good hard work on
your part."
j***~
**m
CORPORAL WILLIAM ALFARO, "A" Battery, 504th Field I
tillery Battalion, receives the USARCARIB Safe Drivlnjv
mendatlon from his commanding officer Lt. Colonel ^
Bach, right. Mr. E. W. Hoopes, Safety Director, looks,
F
L
O
R
E
C
I
T
A
Available at your favorite store 1
Mode in New Zealand
Distributed by the Swift, Co.,
Panam.
B
U
T
r
E
R
DON'T BE A
CERVEZA
SECOND FLOOR
MttH*
WE ARE UNPACKINC
Electric Broilers..............li-M
Wooden Boards for Pastry
Work......................
Metal Garile Press........'.. **
Glass Salt ft Pepper Shakers 0.35
Rubber Piste Scraper........*M
Metal Bottle Opener ft Cork Puller 1.4
Plastic California Coasters, set of 8 1.5S
Steel Potato Bakers................
Steel Potato Peelers................ *M
Plastic Party Picks, box............ t-M
Csechoslovaktan Crystal Pitcher ft Glass Sets...... 11 J
Plastic Shades tor Floor Lamps................... 4.78
Iron Nest of 3 Tables with Lamp- .......... *
Magazine Tables with Lamp ft Glass Top........ ls.95
Floor Reading Lamps with Adjustable Shades.... 19.5S
Earthenware Bowls In sets 4.M
Paper Napkins in colors-
pack .................... ''
Plastic Bath Brashes...... 1.5S
Nylon Baby Bottle Brash.. 45
Brass Pot ft Pan Brash... 0.35
Ruy NOW
Second Floor 5a Avenida
EVA BENNINGTON, a member of one of the tlrst.
Control Center's first aid Instructor classes, receives 1
ploma from Colonel Francis P. Kintz, United Sta^se*
Caribbean Surgeon and Chief of the DCC Army41
Force Medical Staff, at the graduation ceremony eotW
recently at Fort Clayton. These instructors will |
other dependents in the area in First Aid. as part
Disaster Control Center program for total preparad^
(US AruyJQsptsl
1
----------------------------------------------------------------------**
ti

111
SW QUALITY
-*r is so much better


m
JUST ARRIVED
sw
iliU
pan
:.
QUALITY FOOD PRODUCTS
** e.u
S7i


NEW ORLEANS.
OYSTERS
n the shell and shucked
' 'iista*
., I
5 Ti
AT YOUR FRIENDLY ONE-STOP SHOPPING CENTER
.
CLOSED ALL DAY SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 3RD."
OPEN SUNDAY 8:00 A. M. TO 1 00 P. M. fo
FREE HOME DELIVERY
PHONE 3-0031
15th A. Via Bslisario Porras San Francisco Celt Club Read
PLENTY OF PARKING SPACE
)%4 *-
1
. ...
-111K



/
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSrAPER
ERTOAT, NOVEMBER I, 1M1
I
and FreightShips and PlanesArrivals and Departures
Pood Fish
tie
Idem
IT I'alsehood
's -symbol tor tin
I > Renovated
ill One key only
. (b.)
f Myself
! Daybreak
(comb, lorm)
[15 Percolate
slowly
B7 Thrived
I Ellipsoidal
1 Mature
Baltic gulf
[Continent
Fish auee
[Wharf
[French island
[Chief priett of
a shrine
[Musical note
Deepens
(Greek letter
[Malt drink
[Mountain
f nymph
1 Stroke liihtly
Color
I Freebooter
I Compact
r Color
qualities
VERTICAL
lGe-by
2 Press
3 Footed vase
4 Symbol for
tellurium
5 Domestic slave
6 Yarn
7 Railroad (ab.)
I Lubricant
9 Distinct part
10 Devices used
by golfers
12 Number
13 Stomach
18 Hebrew letter
IS Supplanted
20 Lowers
22 Jejune
24 Prayer
23 Rail bird
21 Wicked
Answer to Previous Puzzle
i :i''_','lHi:4^m>j>i-i:4
II.-HliOJ.JllUMMl'lMM
BMkJ sdlaK'.lM-: aJMlfi
MM MMfceUaJMM ISIM
UHI-llil ,l|il Vila
>i--f nrjiJiJii un kiM
MMi>]i i-'.ii i-u ( umu
MUIiCli-1f-3sjr 1WJMMI1
> SaaaJ. 4Ui I
28 Heroic
29 Debilitated
38 Reality
39 On the
sheltered side
41 Flower
42 Before
43 From
44 Breach
45 Redact
48 Companion
47 Indians
49 Stray
51 Cooking
u ten.sil
S3 Exists
language
55 Universal
PACIFIC-ARGENTINE-BRAZIL LINE
>OPE ft TALIOT, INC.
ANNOUNCE
SIS "PT TRADER"
ON BERTH AT
:
BALBOA

NOVEMBER 5TH. 1951
accepting cargo for
LOS ANGELES
SAN FRANCISCO
PORTLAND
SEATTLE
&
VANCOUVER
S S> SI i


safest*
**>*,
W. Andrews & Company
BALBOA
Pheae 2-1251
CRISTOBAL
Phone 3.2161

ESSO STANDARD OIL
(CENTRAL AMERICA) S. A.
. .announs that
the corporate name of the
company has been
changed to
ESSO STANDARD OIL,
i
S.A.

. .The name changes,
but not the products.
ESSO quality remains
as always the best
in petroleum products.
_ ?_______mmmmmmmm
L____L,
C,E C" TRANS A T L \ N T I Q IJ E
t ASI HllK.im K Sf KVICt BETWEEN
ci'Korr. AMD north and south pacific coasts
(A Limited Number of Panenger Bent)
ro EUROPE!
S.S. Valognes ........................................ November 4
S S. Avranches ....................................... November 27
TO ECUADOR, PERU & CHILK:
S.S. Trun........................................... November 17
TO CENTRAL AMERICA A WEST COAST V 8.A.
MS. Washington ................................... November IS
FROM NEW VOBK TO PLYMOUTH LE HAVRE
"D Crass" ........................................ November 10
He De France....................................... November IS
Passenger Service from CARTAGENA lo EUROPE VI Caribbean Pert:
"Cojombl"....................................... November 17
Cristobal: FRENCH LINE, P.O Bo M15 TeL J-MJ ISIS
Panam: LINDO Y MADURO. S A. Boa 10.11
Tel. Panama S-ISS.1 3-ISSI
Shipping &'Airline News
Board To Establish
Eligibility List
Of General Officers
A selection b..ard which will
recommend Army officers for
promotion to the ranks o Briga-
dier General and Major General
will convene Nov. 5, the Depart-
ment o the Army announced to-
day.
The board will establish an eli-
gibility list from which promo-
tions can be made. The Army
emphasized that promotions will
be made only as vacancies oc-
cur.
Lt. General Edward H. Brooks,
Commanding General o the Se-
cond Army, will head the board.
Records o officers in the fol-
lowing zones of consideration will
be considered for the purpose of
establishing their eligibility for
the indicated grades:
Permanent Major General:
All permanent brigadier generals
who have completed one year's
service in that permanent grade
as of January 1. 1952.
Permanent Brigadier General:
All permanent colonels who will
have completed one years serv-
ice in that permanent grade on
January 1,1952.
Temporary Major General: All
Brigadier Generals, permanent
and temporary, serving on active
kiuty.
Temporary Brigadier General:
All permanent Colonels and all
non-regular Colonels serving on
active duty as of June 30, 1951
and all Permanent Lieutenant
coloneis as of June 30,1951.
The board will recommend ap-
proximately the following num-
bers for promotions: Permanent
Major General, 25: permanent
| Brigadier General. 40; temporary
Major General, 70 (of which 40
[will be of the combat arms, 52
I years of age or less, and quali-
fied to command appropriate
combat units); temporary Briga-
dier General. 400 (of which 100
will be 45 years of age or less and
qualified to command appropri-
ate combat units).
PAN AMERICAN AIRWAYS' cargo clippers are making extra
flights to Panama for the handling of cargo that has been
delayed at East Coast posts by the shipping strike. Shown
above are 400 cases of Chesterfields arriving at Tocumen
from Miami yesterday.

The Scythians, a nomadic tribe
that roamed the contry north of
ancient Greece, lived In ox-
drawn house trailers before 200
B.C.
Ex-Liberty Ship
Transits Canal
The motor ship Ital Cielo, a
former Liberty ship now re-en-
glned, arrive! yesterday in the
Canal farn Vancouver. Belong-
ing to the Hal Navi. an Italian
line, the ship is bound for Alex-
andria with a cargo of lumber
and wheat. Bayne and Wardlaw
are the local agents.
British Cargo Ship
Carries 12 Passengers
The Loch Garth arrived yes-
terday from Los Angeles on her
way to England, carrying 12
passengers, and a general cargo.
Two of the passengers will dis-
embark here. Ford and Co. is
the local agent for. the-9,000-ton
Royal Mail steamship Line ship.
Panagra's Representative-,
Leaves for Lima
Harold J. Eby, Sr., Panagra re-:
presentative, leit last night for
Lima where he will spend a few
days on business.
Panagra also marked the ar-
rival this week of their Presi-
dent, Andrew Shea, who just
completed an extensive tour a-
round South America. He left
for New York after stopping in
Panama for a day.
Rheumatism and Backache
Fought Through Your Kidnoy
I you ar feeling run-down. Get up laboratory of l.o Angeles, Calif
,K(> ...#F.r frnn, T.-L.rh. .trfin la HOW heltlilia- thOllaUlldl fO TttVl
If .'"11 l l,,l,a, |y,i*v-H| -* ..,-
Sight, or uffer from Backac-he, utrong
Inntlv urine. Burning Paiaafea, Rheu-
-natlsm, I.eg Palm, Swollen Ankle,
Scrvouanes, DUilnoa. and feel old
for your time, kidney trouble may
M tb i-auae.
Wrong food and drinks, worry, cold
ar overwork place a heavy tmln on
rour kidney < that they function
poorly and often may need help to
properly purify your blood and maintain
oealtli and energy.
Halls Year KlaWs
A fa*t acting Internal medicine callad
lyatax, developed by th Knox Control
___fornla,
la now helping thousand to revitalise
kidney ctlonln the 1 poltlr way-
1. Helps kidney clean out polaonoui
acid* and purify th blood. 1. Combat
gernia In the urinary syatem. S. Soothe
and calms Irritated tlaiue.
Cystex Is now Imported by leading
druggists, so there la no need of any-
one Buffering from Backache, Oettin
Up Nlghta and th othar symptom
mentioned above without th benefit
of thl great medicina.
Get Cyetex from your drugglat today
and sea how quickly It help put yo
on th road to better kealtb.
Good Food habits are ""'Good Health"
habits. Cream of Wheat is so generally.used for
Baby's first solid food because of its easy digesti-
bility, a good "food habit" to start Baby on.
As your child grows and becomes more active
you will find those extra mineralsfood iron
and calciumwith which "5 Minute" Cream
of Wheat has been enriched, highly beneficial in
building up healthy bodies. Rich in flavor, too!
> '
LdSB
Cream of Wheat
OILICIOS. .
...NUTRITIOUS
V"
vetyboy ffeaJs Classifieds
FAST
DAILY
SERVICE
to
LONDON
&
EUROP
WITH ONLY 2 STOPS
(Miami & New York)
Overnight
to
Non-Slop
on the luxurious
Monarch
STRATOCRUISER
B.O.A.C.
Takes Good Care Of You
The only airline operating
double decked stratocrulsers
exclusively on every North
Atlantic lllght.
Free advtc anc tnformatton
available on request from
your local Travel agent
Qtitish Oversets
/\'rwaVJ Corporation
20TrvoliAvfj.-Tfjl.2-2.i2
Hooded Klansmen
Arrested Entering
Baptist Church
CONWAY. 8. C, Nov. 3 (UP)
Fourteen men were free on
bond here today after they were
arrested on charges of violating
South Carolina's new anti-mask
law by Klan-flghting sheriff C.
E. Sasser of Horry County.
It was the first mass arrests
under the anti-mask law which
was enacted by the legislature
this year In a move to curb
Klan activities.
The 14 masked men were ar-
rested last night as they en-
tered a rural Baptist Church
where a service was In pro-
gress. About 10 others fled into
nearby woods and escaped.
Deputy Sheriff Watson Mc-
Kaskill, who took part in the
arrests, said the men were from
Horry and Marion County, & C,
and from nearby sections of
North Carolina. He said they
were freed on bonds of $1,000
each.
"I guess they were Just try-
ing to Impress the people In the
church." McKasklll said.
Sasser said the men were
dressed in robes and Hobbs in
violation of the anti-mask law.
That law prohibits the wearing
of masks In public and on pri-
vate property only with consent
pi the owner.
Sfssser said he was tipped that
the masked men. were going to
the church and he dispatched
five of his deputies to the scene.
The officers moved in on the
hooded men aa they started to
enter the church.
-------------------------------------------------------i. V .i
U. S. ROYAL
"*

4
i
Takes the bounce out of the bumps
cushions and proteas you and your
car. In fact, the U. S. Royal Air Rid*
takes-the bounce oat of the
bumps like no other tire!
PANAMA AUTO S. A.
. Aportado 1913, Panama
?>
a
a
'
in

Now! Stop unpleasant
mouth odor 2 ways as you


brighten your teeth!
A clean breath one day, a tainted breath die
next dayit can happen to mtybtiy. So guard
against this hard-ao-forgive fault by brushing
your teeth with Ipana after every meal.
Yes, Ipana means a sweeter, cleaner breath
became it stops unpleasant mouth odor two
ways, right while it's cleansing your teeth!

lasimaa'i a*lmmnulv ipotfO wwniirr'f i "a*mm Ptvwu^f* iwiwivw r*vj
meriting fsved partalas emJ etieky ting
which causa bad krea-rh.
a. I|miim's keoa, cUam flavor muggy ever;
aaissia ".I ...|L 11 ...,-aUaa ka^kasaffsV Latw
WlTTWcl TWIfJ IIPWWin WtaVWIVIafi S"rT^fWW WvTw
stwittye
At the mme rime, Ipana gets teeth tferkimg.
4
clean and bright So fee a tweeter breath,
brighter smile-get rube of Ipetm.
TO MMKI TOOTH MCAT OTKTIVET-
No other tooth paite, ammoniated
or-regular, has been proved better
than IMN-4V
IPANA

1WWa "*S
TOOTH PASTE
#>
FISK TUF LUG
GREATER TRACTION
0FF-THE-R0AD
4
e*

*
r*
GREATER MILEAGE
OH-THE-ROAO
Sand, r-l. -1 ^j^ffSX
thty"*' ^rSTt'swhy they are cbotwh wher-
^withon-tha-road-erviee.
FISK Tires
A(W^felttudlonv.No.OO
*





I RIO A Y, NOVEMBER t, 151

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE

4



-

r
*

*
4
*
4
pacific Society
W. Cmrroll L JCacktr
&>.l7,JLe- DiLBatL 332/
CHILDREN OF NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS at Ft.
Kobbe attend Hallowe'en party In clubroom
I
HALLOWE'EN PARTY HELD
FOR CHILDREN OF NCO AT KOBBE
The Non-Commissioned Officers Club and the Non-Com-
missioned Officers Wives sponsored a Hallowe'en party for
their children last* Saturday in the clubroom at Fort Kobbe.
Games were played and refreshments were served to all
those who attended the party.
The attending children were placed In one ef the tour
age groups and each, group was judged for its most original
and for its most beautiful costumes. Judges for this event.
were Chaplain Wilfred W. Ahrendt, Mrs. Frank Pledger and
Sergeant Carl W. Watson.
Those children from the four groups winning praes for
most original costumes were Michael Rawls, Wanda Snyder,
Mary Jane Timms and Michael McAllister. Winners of the
prises for most beautiful costumes were Patricia McFadden,
Evette Storer. Sandra Rawls and Norma Kay Richardson.
British Specialists
Hired at Luncheon
Dr. and Mrs. Adolfo Arias P.,
honored Dr. T. Holmes Sellers,
Dr. Parry Brown, Dr. and Mrs.
Francis J. Bach and Dr. and
Mrs. T. M. Ling with, a lunch-
eon given Wednesday at-pbelr. re-
sidence on Avenida Norte.
The four Internationally known
British specialists left yesterdav
by plane after a three day visit
to the Isthmus, where they were
Kuests at Hotel El Panama and.
will continue on their good-will
tour of six South and Central
Amerlean countries.
Sheila Fogarty Is Hostess
for Hallowe'en Party
The daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
John T. Fogarty of La Cresta,
Miss Sheila Fogarty", was hostess
at a Hallowe'en party Wednes-
day evening to sixty of her
friends.
Coleen Jeanne Hatcher .>
is New Canal Zone Resident .,, ,-
Mr. and Mrs. JamesL. Hatch-
er, of Balboa, announce the ar-
rival of their fourth child and.
second daughter, Coleen Jeanne,
who was born October 15 in Dor-
gas Hospital.
Mr. Hatcher Is a Sergeant of
the Police stationed at the Bal-
boa station and is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. D. C. Hatcher of Greer.
South Carolina. His wife is the
daughter of former Canal Zone
residents. Mr. and Msr. G. H.
Evers who are now residing in
Noeshr, Missouri.
Mr. and Mrs. Arias y
Leave for Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. Juan B. Arias
left Thursday hy plane for a va-
cation to be spent in Miami. Flo-
rida.
Commander and Mrs. FarweB
Entertain Departing Friends
Commander and Mrs. Charles
3. Farwell, of the Naval Reser-
vation, entertained Monday even-
ing with a dinner at Hotel El Pa-
nama in honor of 1,1. Comman-
der and. Mrs. Clarence Diehl and
Mrs'. Mybelle Thompson, who
sailed Wednesday on the Trans-
port "Private Thomas" io.- tnelr
new station m Corpus Chrlsti.
Commander Farwell returned
early Monday from a short-offi-
cial visit to Washington, D.C
Durhig his., stay in Washington
her visited his parents. Captain
and Mrs. Neal B. Farwell.
Mr. and Mrs. Porras
Return from Mexico City
Mr. and Mrs. Hernn Porras
returned recently from a stay o
several months in Mexico City.
Mrs. Porras is the former Marit-
za Gulzado.
Charity Card Party To Be
Sponsored By Navy Wive
The Navy Wlvas Club- Is spon-
soring a benefit card party and
bake sale on November 6 at 1:30
p.m. at the Army and Navv Club
at Fort Amador, m an effort to
raise more funds for the club's
charitable activities.
Panama merchants Mercurio,
Casa Fastllch, Motta's, Madurl-
to's, Shaw's, Dagmar and Bazaar
Hindustani have donated door
prizes for the benefit.
Fortune, telling by Madame
Lozonga and a white elephant
table will be features of the af-
ternoon and plans have been
made to have a display of the
products made in the various or-
phanages in Panama and for the
articles to be sold during the
afternoon.
Tickets are $1.00 per person
and may be obtained from Mrs.
Cathleen Lanke by telephoning
25-3748. Mrs. Kay Aldous is
chairman for the party.
Kline's to Week-End
at Coronado Beach
i Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Kline
of Ancon will spend the week-
end at their cottage at Coronado
Beach.
6Panama Rotary Club
Attends Luncheon
The weekly meeting and lun-
cheon of the Panama Rotary
Club was held yesterday at Ho-
tel El Panama. Special music
emphasized the approaching In-
dependence anniversary.
Speaker at the meeting was
Historian,. Jose Lefevre, who
spoke on the Separatist move-
ment which gave Panama her In-
dependence on November 3,1903.
Ft. Davis Has New
Catholic ChanlHn
FT DAVIS. Nov. 2A new
Catholic Chaplrin. Capt. Wil-
liam K. Graw. Joined the 764th
AAA Gun Battalion this week
from Ft. Leavenworth. Kansas,
where he served his last assign-
ment.
A veteran of the Asiatic-
Pacific Theater in World War
II.- Chaplain Graw will conduct
Cathol'c f"vices at the Ft.
Davis Chaple.
Mak-ers alternating with their
music making. Th dance will
continue until 4:00 the morning
of the 4th.
SCHOLL'S SERVICES
Panama No 58 Jusiu Arosemena Ave.
Foot Treatments, Corns, Callouses, Ingrown Toe Nails,
Arch Supports. REDUCING Treatments. Massages,
Slenderising Machines, Turkish Baths Male and female
operators. For information call: 3-2217 Panam.
8 ^^hj^^^^^^^
, THIS IS VOL'R INVITATION TO TRE
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Balboa Heights, C. Z.
SUNDAY November 4, 1951
10:45r-Mornlng Worship. "ASHAMED OF CHRIST?"
Choir"Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing."
7:30Evangelistic Service.
THE UNWILLING CROSS BEARER."
ChoirTrumpetQuartet.
Sunday School for every age. Inspiring Services.
EVERYONE WELCOME
Pastor W. H. BeebySpeaking. Radio ServiceHOXO780.
We Preach Christ Crucified Risen Coming Again.
=tS= II III I l<
*-
CoW*
^JW
with
POND'S
"ihaar-gooflo"
\ POWDER
Dr. Conlev Is Gnest
at Hotel El Panama
Dr. John J. Conley. the chief
of the Head and Neck Depart-
ment of the Pack Medical Group
of St. Vincent's -Hospital In New
York City, arrived here Wednes-
day and is-a guest at Hotel El
Panama.
Dr. Conlev lectured last even-
ing under the auspices of the
National Medical Society to the
medical profession. Appoint-
ments for consultations may be
made through-the Instituto Ra-
diolgico.
Mrs. Black Hostess
for Evening Club
Mrs. William Black of Pedro
Miguel was hostess recently to
the members of the Evening Club
who met at her home..
Those attending were Mis. Flo-
rence Adler. Mrs. Marlon Lucas,
Mrs. Ethelyn Wood. Mrs. Edward
Schnake, Mrs. Frank Bryan, Mrs.
Mary Davies, Mrs. Herbert Jud-
son and Mrs. Vance Howard.
Cocktail Party and Dance
Tonight at Legion Club
The American Legion Club at
Fort Amador extends an invita-
tion to attend the regular Cock-
tail party and dance to be held
at the club tonight. Music will be
furnished, by "Two Sharps And A
Flat" and free cocktails will be
served from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00
pjn; .
El Panama to Hold
"Third of November" Dance
A dance will be given on the
Third of November on the roof of
Hotel El Panama with Ken Dela-
ney and his orchestra and Ave-
llno Muoz and his Rhythm
Emblem Club to Meet Tonight
The Balboa Emblem Club will
meet tonight at 7:30 o'clock at
the Balboa Lodge Hall. All mem-
bers are requested to attend this
Important meeting.
Second Smoker To Be
HM at Legion Club
The American Legion Club will
hold Its second Smoker at the
club tonight from seve nto eleven
o'clock.
Arrive at Tocnmen
Dr. and Mrs. Augusto Boyd of
Panama City, arrived at Tocu-
men airport early this morning
on a Branlff plane from the
United States. They were ac-
companied bv their daughter,
Mrs. Dorlta Eleta.
Junta Femenina Plans
Open-Air Fair Dec. 1
At Parque Lefevre
Another,venture to raise funds
for the annual distribution of
Christmas packages will be spon-
sored by the Junta Femenina de
Beneficencia on Dec. 1.
This venture will be an open-
air fair at the Parque Infantil at
8th Street in Parque Lefevre.
with ente: tain Tient for both
children and adults.
Further plans for the annual
Christmas Cheer program of the
Junta*. will be discussed next
Tuesday evening at 7:30 in the
Pacific Clubhouse.
Nov. 3 Dance Set For
Jamaica Society Hall
Local* dance lovers are re-
minded of the gala Nov. 3rd
dance that will be held at the
Jamaica Society Ball tomor-
row night.
Everyone Is cordially in-
vited.
MOTHERS TAKE OVER
NEWBURYPORT. Mass. (UP.)
Mothers took over school cros-
sings on their own initiate when
they saw motorists falling to
stop at the signals of boy mon-
itors. School officials asked the
mothers to take over permanen-
tly.
LARGE SELECTION OF


French L^ruslat

v&nw
SAINTLOUIS
THI fINIIT CtYSTAl MADI
All Patterns In Open Stock
* Easy Terms Available

RUTH MILLET! Says
Johnny r.no Susie are starting
a new school vear. Whether or
not It will be a happy one for
them depends to some extent on
their parent*' attitude toward
the school and their teacher.
If you want vour child to get
along well at schoolDONT.
Criticize his teacher or modern
methods oi teaching In.front of
your child. Even If you are con- (
vinced thut the Old-fashioned
methods wire better your child
Is being educated today and since
you can't put mm In the kind of
classroom you remember, quit
making comparisons.
Send your child off In the mor-
ning upset an.l unhappy because
he has been rushed and hurried
or because h*> fias nad to suffer
through a 'an Hy quarrel.
Let your child call his teacher
by such lerm.s as "Old Lady
such-and-such." He'll show little
respect for his teacner inside the
classroom if you let him get away
with speaking of her in disres-
pectful terms at home.
Sympathize with him when he
insists tht the teacher has
"pets" or that she Isn't fair.
Give hin too much help with
his homework What he needs is
suocrvision not a parent who will
tell him the answers to questions
and let him write them down.
Make a snob out of him, by en-
couraging him to make friends
with chllcren from well-to-do
homes and discouraging him
from brlnglnR children from
poorer families home to play
with him.
Expect him to make straight
"A's"simply because you did
when you were in school or be-
cause some of your friends brag
about their children's straight
"A" report cards.
Refuse to let him dress the way
the other children in the room
dress, or make him wear an ar-
ticle of clothing he hates
, ^L^RANCHO'
TWL1. < """onc, .
toiorn-n. > **W*TLk (or .W rt
Li ** iT -*-s;
*.re *f ... ppp.t.1. < la
Z. *-- 25 rrS
Wat IOUna
MM
.,). 1
?S.
Subdued Muiic By "
oLos Kancntroi
FOR BABY'S
TENDER SKIN!
Um Johnton's Baby Powder after
baths, at diaper changes, and in be-
tween times, too. It
soothesprotect! I
USTFOtSAMY. ..
usr to rou ^*\
(JoA+ttOK^f0^**0*
LI, At
At Mb tin*, wash baby with gentle,
fragrant Johnaon" Baby Soap. Alk
torn today I
Ctinccr
PANAMA'S FINEST

MEDICAL TEST PROVE
this
great to relieve
FEMALE PAIN!
with uncomfortable firilness
Are you troubled by distress of female func-
tional monthly disturbances? Does this
make you suffer from pain, feel so nervoni.
restless, cranky, weakat such times? Then
do try famous Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound to relieve such symptoms I
in a recent medical test it proved remark-
ably helpful to women troubled this way.
You owe it to yourself to try it.
Pinkham's Compound^ Is what Doctors
call a uterine sedative. It has a grand sooth- -
lng effect on one of woman's most important
organs. Taken regularlyPinkham's Cotn-
If a grand, pound helps build up resistance
girls | against such distress. Also a great
stomachic tonic 1
NOTE: Or yea may prefer LYDIA
B. PINKHAM'S TABLETS Wh
added iron.
^ Lydia E. Pinkham's VEGETABLE COMPOUND''
YOU MUST GET READY FOR
CHRISTMAS IN TIME
Be practical! Your wife and children will be delighted if you give them new
Furniture for the Home!
Give your skin a toff, velvety,
aweer-tinted finish with Pond's
heavenly face powder. Became
it's "sheer-gauge," Pond's Dream-
owr Powder drifts on lightly,
smoothly .. and ding for hourtl
Choose your Pond's Powder today.
CHooie from eight enchanting
Oreaeiftewer shaded
, a
VIlCOUHTISS IIDPOIT. DUCHIIt
Of MONTf. ikmAi Ml pitaaat,
eya. Ta ifi" Mrt w afc
Cmnliw rwat. k iiwi I* fla* >
Ua lamaiia, atea* wMa nktm."
*
We sell only First Quality Merchandise
EASY Wa^SHERS 25 & 60 cycles SERVEL REFRIGERATORS 25 cycles
SIMMONS MATTRESSES and SPRINGS Genuine PHILIPPNE BAMBOO.
It you belonc to the Armed Forces or if vou htm a steady Job come to our
Store and you may choose your own credit terms ,
ELDlBLQ
The Store Where Yon will Find the Largest Assortment of Glass and Linoleum.
86 CENTRAL AVENUE TELEPHONE 2-2465
"Leaders in the Furniture business since 909"
A fine, famous make watch seems less costly when purchased on our
Layaway Plan. Come in today, and choose the MOV A 1)0. KOI IX.
LAMONT, ELGIN. BULOVA or HAMILTON you want to give (or keep).
A small down payment will reserve your choice and small weekly
payments will cover its cost by Christmas!
o^vCa/a fa/Ulch
JEWELRY HEADQUARTERS
PANAMA
STORE


' J,-^M-J




THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSFAPFJt
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2 1951
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
M. 4 Tlvnll vt
ion uvn
KIOSKu DE LESSEP8
Jareur r 1,001 leg
MORRISON'S
N 4 ro.rlh .( J.|7 At*.
BOTICA CARLTON
IMS Metarules A v..
PIMM tee-Colaa.
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
He. J* WbI lllk Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
He. 17 Street Fuuu
No. 12.17 Cotral Ave.-Celaa.
Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
FC3 SALE C M. 25 cyclt refri-
gerator, Hallicratter SX 28 rodio.
8 mm camero Sunbeam coffee
maktr. kitchen table ond stools,
dishei child's toble end choirs.
8lboo 2-2901.
FCR SALEOn account c.f vovooe
livingroom let. dmingroom set. bed-
room, piono ond kitchen set olso
office equipments almost new. Via
Porros 131 Tel. 3-3553. From
I 1 a. m. unti A p. m
FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS
Automohle
FOR SALE:1948 Pontiac convert,
ibfe, hydramotic, radio, $1,000.-
00. dut,- poid. 2-6319.
FOR SALE:1950 Pontiac, 4 dcor
Sedan, light' grey, hydramotic, ra-
dio, good tires. Call Kobbe 5143.
0* rev hare a asriakiea proalera*
Write Alcoholice Am,mew
Bes 2031 Anco. C. Z.
FOR SALE:Lorge Porcelain. Ice-
box in excellent condition. $20 -
00 1441.D Owen St. Bolboo.
FOR SALESteel bedsprmt double,
like new. beoutiful lorge mirror
with gold leof frome. twe bracket
shelves to motch. Albrook 5225.
FOR SALE -1950 Chevrolet, four
door, undercoat, visor. Informotion
call Panama 3-4436, after 5 p.
FOR SALE:1939 Grohom 4 door
sedan, motor recently overhouled,
new clutch. $125.00. Coll Fort
Cloytcn 6209 or see ot Quarters
353-A, Ft. Cloyton.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED: Clean soft rogi. Job
Depl Panamo Americon
WANTED:Furnished or unfurnish-
ed oportment or house for British,
Couple. Tel. 3-1388.
WANTED:Piono. prefer Baldwin '
3ood condition necessary. Write1
Box 581. Ancon. H. H. ummer-
fprd.
OR SALE: 1947 Chevrolet two
Door Rodio. New tires. Excellent
condition. S875.00. Phone Albrook
86-4239. '
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:Six 50" x 60", five
41" x 72" blinds. $150.00. 5089
A, Diablo.
TIRES AND TUBES: New; 11.00 x
22; 12 ply; for trucks; bargain
prices. F Icoza b Company, 79
B Avenue.
RESORTS
Gromlich'e Sonto Cloro beach-
cottage. Electric Ice boxes, gas
stove*, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567,
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
Williams Santa Clora Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Frigidaires, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboa 2-3050.
FOR SALE1941 Buick 4 door
sedan, plastic seot covers, good 6
ply tires, radio, must sell, leaving
Isthmus. $375.00. Contoct Wo-
son, Auto Service. Ponoma..
FOR SALE: 1941 Studtbokef
Commonder Sedan. Engine a nd
tires in excellent condition. House
5360 Davis St., Ctoblo, Bolboo
2918.
FOR SALE:Miscellaneous lengths
used rubber hose, I", 11 -2", 2"
ot 10e? per foot. Best offer takes
entire lot. The Texos Company
i Ponoma) Inc. Tel. 2-0620.
FOR SALE:Block cocker male, 2
yrs. old A. K. C. registered, beou-
tiful dog. ideal for breeding. Al-
brook 6223.
Position Offered
FOR SALE: 1950 Crosley 'Sport:'
Roadster' with radio. 8,000 miles.
Motor. b)y and tires, excellent. I
S550.0C. 0435-J, Frongiponi St.. I
Ancon.
WANTED:Male typist for general
office work. Must hove references.
Paul Sullivan, Dock 6. Balboa.
/I
i b FOUND
FOR SALE:1950 Chevrolet For-
door Sedan. Telephone Bolboo
1385.
FOR SALE; 1939~Chevrolet Panel.
1939 4 door Eliick. 1941
Pontiac Coupe. No. 27 Q Street,
Ponamotors.
FOR SALE:One wordrobe trunk in
good condition and one large doll
house complete with furniture anal
electric lights. Phone Colon 1118-
L.
FOR SALE:AKC registered cocker
puppies. 1 -mole. 1 female, excel-
lent pedigree. 516-D, Curundu
Hgts., phone 83-4109.
FOR SALE:26" boy's bicycle $10.
00 25 cycle. Ceiling fon $30.
00. 1471-B, Holden St. Balboa.
Tel. 2-3096.
Phillips. Oceanslde cottage. Sonta
Claro. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Ponomo 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673
CASINO SANTA CLARA:Cobins.
food, swimming. No reservotioni
necesory.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMSNTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished apart
ment. Contact off leo No. 8061, 10th
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386. Co-
lon.
FOR RENT
Rooms
LOST: Femo'e police dog, nome
"A/irkey." child's pet. Liberal re-
ward, onyone knowing where-
abouts. Telephone 82-5124 or
84-5181 Sgt. Morkham.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
vo!ui,teer Disaster j HOG-840
i*Hef Teams To Be
>rmed Around PC
FOR SALE
Real Estate
ROOMS AVAILABLE Light, cool
entirely renovated and well fur-
nished. Rate reasonable. Bache-
lor* only. Intuir, at-The Ame-
rican Club racing Da Limp,
| Park.
FOR RENT:Furnished room, ocean
view in honorable family home.
To single person or married couple
without children. No. 1 Ramn
Valds street Apt. 2. First floor,
opposite "Botica Gonzalez Re-
villa."
DON'T STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL.
VERTAGREEN
3-Way Plant Food
is cheaper than water
fot it
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. .Tel 3-0140
*
f
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel El Panama
Has for Sale Stocks
Preferred or Common of
Panam Forest Products
and Nat. Abattoir
Tels.: 3-4719. 3-1680
POR RINT:Hotel Actor Bar. Ix-
cellent location, opposite RR Sta-
tion in Calan. Apply on premises.
Disaster Relief teams are now
Being lormed on all Armed
Bgcea Installations in the Pa-
nama area, is was announced
i today by the USARCARIB Dis-
Mer Control center, Fort Ama-
ftr, C 7,
fehe relief teams are made up
W all recent graduates from
Wsaster Control first aid classes.
A strictly volunteer group, the
lams are trained and equipped
Me act promptly in the event a
aster of maior proportions
AfttUld occur in I he Panama
m~%, USARCARIB.
In connection this program.
Henry F. Taylor" has an-
iced that another first aid
will be offered to civilian
jyea. their dependents and
dents of military personnel
ir at Ft. Gullck beginning
Where 100.000 "eoalo Moot
Presents
ere are about 25 0.00 0
ihes in the United States.
Med with more than 280
nominations.
For
UTOMOBILE
INSURANCE
SEE
MY IMTNUl. IMC
De Leaaept Park
Tel.: t-?WI 2-2M1
Today, Friday, Nov. 2
KaJocL
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Jennifer In London
(BBC)
4:30Whafa Your Favorite
6:00As I Knew Her (BBC)
8:15Evening Salon (request)
7:00Mayor of Casterbridge
(BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBON 8PORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:0Or-NEWS and Commentary-
Raymond Swing (VOA
8:15Radio In Review (VOA)
8:45Facts on Parade (VOA)
9:00The Perry Como Show
(VOA)
9:15Science Digest (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Die eat
(VOA)
9:45Sports World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures of P.C. 48
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.-Sign Off
FOR SALE:Houses No. 13, Puerto
Piln and No. 7031, 6th St. Co-
lon. Phone 6, Colon.
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM BUILT
Slipcover. Reupholstery
VISIT OUR SHOW-BOOH!
Alberto Here
A. r. do la Ossa 77 (Auiosnoblle owl
E*.1flBi> ..fttsg Deliver,
Tel l-aexs :0t .as. te 7:et pj
gather to how originality and cleverness of "co ftJ'SZgJ. tUgg wU^tn^est^S
------1_-------------------------____ (Official USAF Fboto)
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous
LESSONS
Learn Bollroom dancing at It best.
Professional Instructors. Bolboo
YMCA, Hornett & Dunn.
Popular or classical piano playing
taught home or studio. Phone 2-
1282 Ponama.
r-z
JQaacAo
. ir nf
a*..:
a -..m'tiw
SUNDAY
SPECIAL LUNCHEON
Suit Cocktail au Maraschino
Jjar Mackerel en Escabeche
Pure of Lentil Soup or
Consomme Chantilly -
Siria* Steak l.H
. Roast Suckling Fig l.M
Ice Pilaff Fresh Broccoli
Oreen Salad
Hot Rolls Butter
Cream Cheese with Coconut
Coffee
Tea
Beer
COCKTAILS
'..c, Sunday Ife
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 3
M.
00Sign On
00Alarm Clock Club
30Jazz Salon
15NEWS (VOA)
30Hong Kong (BBC)
45The Duke steps Out
00NEWS
15Women's World (VOA)
30Highwayman's Hill
00NEWS
05Off the Record
00 News
05Off the Record (Contd.)
30Meet the Band
00NEWS
M.
05NEW TUNE TIMEPAN-
AMUSICA
:30The Football Prophet
: 00NEWS
: 16Personality Parade
:45Tour de France (RDF)
00Latin American Serenade
15Date For Dancing
:30Afternoon Melodies
45Battle of the Bands
00American Band concert
15Tha Little Show
30McLean'a Program
45Musical Interlude
00Music for Saturday
30What's Your Favorite
:00Guest 8tar
: 15Masterworks from Farnce
(RDF)
:45American Folk Songs
:00Gay Paris Music Hal)
(RDF)
30Sports Review
45Jam Session
00Newsreel US.A. (VOA)
15Opera Concert (VOA
45Salute To Panama (VOA)
:00Radio University (VOA)
: 15Stamp Club (VOA)
:30Radio Amateur Program
(VOA i
.45Sports and Tune of Day
(VOA)
00HOTEL EL PANAMA
30The HOO Hit Parade
00The Owl's Nest
00 a.m.Sign Off
A
6:
6:
7:
8:
8:
8:
9:
9:
9:
10:
10:
11:
11:
11:
12:
F
12:
12
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
6:
8:
6
7
7
7
8
8
8
9
9
9
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:Johnson sea horse 5
I. P., run approximately 50 Hrs.
Albrook 6223.
FOR RENT:_Centrel locle, suitable
for office or Pijouty Porlor. ad-
jacent to PRA locale. No. 14 Cu-
ba Avenue. Coll Mi Arios, Tel.
2-0825.
-----_____^___
Smallest bird in the world, the
Princess Helen's hummingbird of
Cuba. Is twolnchea long, accord-
ing to the Encyclopedia Brltan-
nlca.
PUT IT IN WRITING
HARTFORD. Conn (UP)New
applicants for Connecticut driv-
er's license may find themselves
faced soon with a written In-
stead of an oral test, based on
the driver's manual. The new
method is being tested here. No
change in the eye or driving ex-
aminations is contemplated
LEGAL NOTICE
United State of America
Canal Zone
UNITfD STATIS DISTRICT COURT
POR THI DISTRICT OF THI
CANAL ZONE
Divisin of Balboa
John William ristra,
plaintiff,
TI.
Emma Anne Piftro,
SUMMONS D,',nd"-
Cast No. 3410
Tivil Docket IS
ACTION' KOR DIVORCE
To the above-named defendant:
You ir. hereby required to appear
an* answer the complaint filad in 'he
above-entitled artion ithln ninety
daya after the first publication,
In caio of your failure to ao' appear
ad answer, judfment will be taken
sganat Jou by default for tha relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS tha Honorable JOSEPH J
HANCOCK. Judge, United States Dia.
tnet Court for tha District of the Ca>
nal_ Zona, thia 19th day of Cejteber.
C. T. McCarsalek, Jr.
.SEAL,
y Sara ale la P,.
Chiof Dewuty Clark
To Eaima Anna PIst.ro
The foregoing aummons la served
neon you by publication aursoant to
tha order of tha Honorable JOfeEPH J
HANCOCK. Judge. United sutes p.
trlat Ceart far tha District of the Ca-
nal Zona, datad Oeteber U, ltll and
nterad and filad la this setloa In the
afflea of tha Clark af said United
States District Court for tha Division
of Balboa an Oeteber II. nil.
C. T. McCar.Uk, Jr.
Clark
By Sara ae la Pasta
Chief Deputy Clera
Don't Sacrifice
A Beautiful Smile,
Healthy Gums To.
PY0RRHEA
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
TRf%rL SERVr.1-
1B Tivoli Ave. Pan. 2-zcW
DON'T BE A
? M fS
May Suffer from
This Dread Disease
Pyorrheaa dangerous infec-
tion that leads to ugly, shrink-
ing gums and loosening teeth
that must be pulled, often sura
with minor gum irritation and
bleeding. These first signs
should not be ignored for actu-
ally 4 out of 5 regardless of age
can become victims of this
dread disease.
Bleeding gums can be effeo
tively curbed bv Forhan's Fot
the Gums. Forhan's not- only
deans the teeth to a bright,
natural lustre but, with mas-
sage, also makes the gums firm
and hard because it ALONB
containa Dr. R. J. Forhan's spe-
cial anti-pyorrbea astringent.
Clinical tesa made recently
have shown that 95% of Pyor-
thea-threatened cases improved
after 30 days use of Forhan's.
Don't take chances with your
teeth, sun now to use Forhan's.
"Btuih your teeth with it"
Forhan's
fWmiJWS
CERVEZA
Effort Being Made
Te Raise Interest
In PC Adult Classes
An .effort it now being made
to stimulate Interest and Increase
.he number of studenu In adult
courses of lnsuuctlon offered by
the Division cf Schools.
Dr. Lawrenci Johnson, Super-
intendent of Schools, has out-
lined the services of the Schools
Division in the field of adult edu-
cation In letters to the heads of
Canal bureau* and divisions and
local labor leaders.
' He has asktil the assistance of
both groups in developing and
promoting a complete and sult-
t ble program of adult education
in the Canal Zone.
Both the Caal Zone Junlr
College and the Apprentice
School are prepared to offer any
general or special course that
Canal employes wish to take,
provided qualified Instructors are
available to teach the classes,
and ten or more students regis-
ter for each course.
Evening courses for local rate
employes are offered by the La
Boca Junior College and the La
Boca and Silver City Occupation-
al High Schools.
Regular Junior College Exten-
sion Division courses begin on
October 1 and on February l
each year. However, special
courses for employe groups can
be arranged to begin at any time
and extend over any period con-
sidered sufficient to cover the
course work.
The Divlalon of Schools and the
Personnel Bu:eau cooperate In
planning anc carrying out pro-
grams of general education and
in-service training for Canal em-
ployes. Both units have offered
assistance in planning courses
lor employe groups.
Labor organizations have been
asked to urge their members to
take advantage of the adult edu-
cation facilities now provided
throught the extension Division
of the Collage and the Appren-
tice School.
Mambo Queen Makes
Debut At Amador
NCO Club Tomorrow
Hedy Aln?'? Internationally
famous man'oo and rhumba
dancer will make her first ap-
pearance at t!;e Fort Amador
NCO Club tomorrow night.
Miss AfOnso'i charming per-
sonality and Variety of Dances
has won he.- fame and friends
Irom all parts of this continent.
She will be backed up by Dan-
ny Bishop and his orchestra,
featuring Dok ret Leacock at the
piano.
There will be dancing from 8
p.m. until 12 midnight, with two
shows, one at tf:S0 p.m. and the
other at 11 p.m.
All NCO's and their guests are
invited to celebrate Panama'!
Independence Day.
25 New Employes
Join Canal Company
In Lafe October
Ten new employes from the
United States and 15 who were
employed loctOly Joined the Ca-
nal organization during the last
half of October, according to In-
formation from the Personnel
Bureau.
The new personnel from the
United States their positions and
birthplaces are:
Locks Division.Lester R. Nor-
ton, lock operator wireman at
Pedro Miguel. Carrollton, Ohio;
Richard H Orowell, lock operator
wireman at Mtraflores, Neptuen,
New Jersey; and Warren J. Wa-
then, lock operator wireman at
Oatun, San Diego, California.
Engineering Division.Paul F.
Kenyon, civil engineer at Diablo
Heights; and James W. Mat-
electrical engineer at Balboa
Heights, Hamlet, North Caroli-
na.
Contracts and Inspection Divi-
sion: Duaiu- A. Hunter, construc-
tion Inspector, at Cristobal, Car-
roll, Iowa; and Charles L. Nix,
contracts a&*l?tant at Balboa
Heights, Ctiic&go.
Electrical Division.George W.
Saunders, J.. cablespllcer at
Cristobal, Powderly, Alabama;
and Jame R Arnold, telephone
mstller-mar.tainer at Cristobal,
Mitchell Flelo. New York.
Dredging Divlalon.Paul A.
Jones, Jr., floating crane steam
engineer at Gamboa, Berlin,
Maryland.
New personnel employed local-
ly In the last l:aif of October are:
Engineer.. g Division.Victor
M. Lopes, Donald H. Boland,
Manuel Quintero R., and Jorge
E. Vaquaia O, engineering
draftsmen; and Ramiro A. Aran-
go, general engineering aid.
Police Divslon. Robert R.
Duncan, poiicema nat Balboa.
Civil Alfairs Bureau.Miss
Gloria A. Shelton, stenographer-
translator.
Division of Schools.Miss Ma-
ry L. Azcarrap.a, clerk-stenogra-
pner.
Motor Transportation Division
Oliver G. Paterson, auto repair
machinist at Ancon.
Health BureauDr. George G.
Bland, medical officer at Cristo-
bal; and Mrs. Grayce L. Nadeau,
clerk-typlart at Gorgas Hospital;
and Mrs. Kathryn E. Wilson,
medical technician (X-ray) at
Ancon.
Postal, Cuslo/.is and Immigra-
tion Division.Joseph L. Stall-
ings, postal clerk at Ancon.
Terminis Division.Mrs. Chi-
quita C. Casslbry, mail and file
clerk.
Commissary Division. Mra. j
Mary E. Evans telephone oper-'
ator at Mount Hope.
Gatun CIO Chapter Holds
Special Meeting Tonight
The Gatun Chapter of Local
900, CIO. will hear a report from
E. A. Gaskin, president of the
local, at a special meeting
scheduled for tonight.
Gaskin hag been making the
rounds of all the different
chapters of the local to report on
a recent conference between
the CIO and Go v. Francis K.
Newcomer.
Scouts Round Out 7 Service Days
7oErNtDhefrFPr^nG,R^ SF9OTS 1Cam hW *** <**>* f
ior tneir troops out-of-doors program. "Out.of Doors Day-
Is among those specially observed by the scouU.
(OS Army Photo)
ARTS AND CRAFTS DAT calls for the stenciling of designa
for montuno blouses In a troop project for the Western
Hemisphere badge.
(US Air Force Photo)
For This CHRISTMAS
Choose A Solid Gold
BIRTHSTONE RING
For Ladies For Men
se.ee sun
Use ear I.AV AWAY TsQUat:
tear "as* ear latee
HAWAII JEWELRY
THT. BRUABLI OTOBK
H Central Ara. St
DM ran elroaats- gat s-aur Xgaaa
Dallar t Calas It TODAY at mr
atara a4 aaa H tar yaar Xflsas
akasrasa.
fSJf^h^** ^FBiBtm DAJ ior t" Oirt Scouts it
typified by Mrs. F. K. Newcomer, left, chairman of the Canal
Zone Olr Scout Council International Friendship Committee,
who, explains local friendship projects to Miss Hlsabeth
afundle, Director of Region II, on her recent vlait here
y "' ____________ (US Army Phot)
Troops To Honor
Retiring Colonel
RUnited States Army Caribbean
?', Repreaentattve troops of the
''will parade tomorrow in honor of
Col. Daniel H. Mallan, retiring
United States Army Caribbean
veterinarian, at a review cere-
mony to be held at Fort Amador
at 10 am.
Bri. Oen. Francis A. H*rch,
Chief of Staf United States
Army Carlibean, will be the re-
viewing ofjuei. and will present
Col. Mallan with a miniature
United. Stale* Army Caribbean
flag during ILc ceremony
The Partees of India, for many
years, have disposed of their
dead by placing the bodies on
towert where vultures eat them.
Albrook CPO
Will Employ
Clerk-Stenos
It was announced today bj
the Civilian Personnel Officer
at Albrook Air Force Base, that
several Clerk Stenographer
positions will become vacant
during the month of November.
Interested applicants may
submit Standard Form No. 51
(Application for Federal Em-
ployment) to the Civilian Per-
sonnel TOf fleer. Albroo* Ah
Force bate. Applicants wfll be
required to past a typist and
ttonographer test.
Further Information may ba
obtained by calling; at the Civil-
ian Personney Office, Albrook
Air Force Basa,
a
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FRIDAT, NOVEMBER t. MS!
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NFWSPAPF
PAGE SEVIH
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COPTER CARRIER 18 NOT QUITE A FUT-TOP-Anohflr tew h.licopter. on the Si7-foot-
long deck of an L8T (Landing Ship, Tank) nd you get a now naval vaaaal in aircraft arriar (or
'copters. It's not quita a flat-top, but tht varaatila landing craft doe yooraao atrviee it a floating
air baac. Hart a vetaran 'eoptar named "Old Dad" rava up it* tail rotar preparing to taka off. (V a.
Navy photo from NEA-Acmt.)
Communism Flayed
By National Council
Of Negro Women
WA8HINOTON, Nov. 2 (UBIS)
The National Council of Negro
Women, representing- some 150.-
000 Negro women inline United
States "reaffirms its support of
the democratic Ideals of the Uni-
ted States of America and con-
demns Communism or any man-
ifestation thereof."
This statement is contained In
a resolution unanimously adopt-
ed Friday by the Annual Conven-
tion of the Council now meeting
htre.
The remainder of the resolu-
tion rends:
"It (the Council> hereby calls
upon Its membership to take
note of the stand of the Council |
and further advises each consti-
tuent that any violation by word
or deed of this expressed posi-
tion is a violation of membership
obligations in the Council."
The convention is being atten-
ded by more than 400 delegates
of some 21 Negro women's or-
ganizations throughout the Uni-
ted States.
Mrs. Edith Sampson, former
member or the U.S. delegation
to the United Nations General
Assembly, in an Interview at the
convention said American Ne-
groes will solve their problems
within the framework of Amer-
ican democracy.
"Despite the discriminatory
practices in some parts of our
country," Mrs. Sampson said,
"as Americans, we know what
freedom means and we are go-
Ste continue to work out our*
ration within the framework
of tH's democracy in the Unitad
States.
Nesroes who have been
the victims of slavery, long since
-?ed in this country, know
the value of freedom."
i-i commenting on the work of
the Council Mrs. Sampson said,
"The Council Is dedicating itself
to implement the United Na-
tions In its objectives to achieve
peaceful solutions of the prob-
lems of the world."
Speakers during the various
discussions emphasized that con-
siderable progress has been made
In improving the social and cul-
tural positions of the Negroes in
the United States and urged the
members to continue to work for
further progress In this direction.
US Official Feels
Britain And Iran
Getting Friendlier
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 (UP)
Acting Secretary of State James
E. Webb exprened optimism yes-
terday over tfce chances of suc-
cessful U.S. mediation efforts in
the Britlsl -Iranian oil disputa.
Webb reported that some pro-
gress has beer, made during re-
cent separate informal State De-
partment talks with Iranian Pre-
mier Mohammed Mossadegh and
British Ambassador Sir Oliver
Franks.
TOO AMBITIOUS
Large Amphibious
Assault Exercise
Planned By Navy
The largest amphibious as-
sault exercise since the con-
clusion of World War II is plan-
ned for Nov. 13 to climax the
Atlantic Fleet exercises, known
as Eantflex 52.
Scheduled to participate in
the operation at Onslow-Beach.
This time, he was taken to city N. c, are some 100,000 men, 280
Jail. ships and 900 planes.

HAMMOND, lnd. (UJ.) A
shoplifter was let off with- a
stealing several pairs of men's
gloves from a Hammond depart-
ment store. Several hours later,
the store detective caught the
same man doing the same thing
Webb said at a news confer-
ence that American mediation
seeks som? basis on which nego-
tiations cculd te esumed be-
tween the British and Iranians.
Office Equipment
Exhibit Planned
In San Francisco
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 (USI81
The annual office machine
and equipment exposition for
1952 is again being sponsored by
the National Office Management
Association. It was announced by
the U.S. Deoartment of Agri-
culture recently.
A. C. Spangler. Staff Director
of the Field Services, stated that
the show is open to foreign ex-
hibitors and many requests have
already been received from forr
elgn manufacturers of office
equipment, machines, furniture
and supplies, for display spare in
the Civic AoHltorlum In San
Francisco, where the 1952 xhi-,
bitlon will be held beginning
May 19 and ending May 21.
It is possible the show will last
an extra day because more
space, including deeper and wid-
er booths. Is available than ex-
isted in the exposition held in-
New York last May. Visitors
from several countries. Including
South Africa. Sweden. Switzer-
land. Japan and England atten-
ded the exposition last year, but
due to the demand for and the
limited amount of space avail-
able, all applicants could not be
accommodated.
ACOB
CANASTA
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
One good reason for the popu-
larity of Canasta is that there
are so many different circum-
stances to consider in actual play
You can have the very same
cards ten times in a row and play
them differently each time be-
cause the situation is different.
For example, suppose your side
has melded Jaker-A-A-A-A,
Joker-K-K-K and Q-Q-Q. You
hold K-K. Q, 3. 2 (the three be-
ing black, of course), and you
draw an ace from the stock
What should you do?
If you wish, you can add the
ace and the deuce to your meld
of aces, thus completing a ca-
nasta. On the same play it is pos-
sible to meld the kinga and the
Seen and discard the black
roe, thus melding out. That la
one way of playing the hand.
Another possibility is to dis-
card the black three and meld
nothing. A third plan is to ask
for permission to mld out. A
fourth plan is to meld some, but
not all, of your cards. A fifth
plan Is to discard the deuce
freezing the deck. And so on.
What are the reasons for a-
doptlng one plan rather than an-
other?
Suppose the opponents have
not yet melded but have put i
down all four red threes. If you
meld out you can set them back
800 points in addition to the
count of their cards. If you play
on, they will probably meld soon- i
er or later: and then they will
wm 00 poinU for their rod.
threes and will loae less for the
count of their cards. The differ-
ence between melding out and
playing on is likely to be more
than 2000 points. Hence in this
situation you would meld out at
once.
Take a different case. The op-
ponents have melded. Your score
at the beginning of the hand
waa 400 points. The opponents
had 2500 points. Should you meld
out or play on?
In this case you should play
on. If you can scrape together a
second canasta you will end the
hand with over 5000 points. II
you end the hand at once you
will again need 110 points while
the opponents need only N
points for the initial meld.
Your best course in this second
situation Is to add the ace and
the two kings to your melds.
Then you discard the black three
and wait for your partner's reac-
tion. With two six-card melds on
the table your partner is very
likely to complete one of the ca-
nastas. In fact, your play invites
him to do so. The moment he
does so. you are in position to
complete the other canasta and
""", meld out.
PAINS IN
THE BACK
Hen's 9 tidy to relief!
Do yon koow that on* of the common
canee* of backache lias ia the kUasrar
When they are healthy they filter harmful
iapuritiea oat of the yeteto -thai natural
function. When they pow luggih, the**
npuhtirs rcumulato and the resulting
caof atbon ia often tht cute of backache.
De Witt' Pilla arc aerially pro-
pared to help wake np sluggish
kidney.; Tboy have a cleansing and
organ, oothiag ad rtnoring the*
to their natural actiTtty. Relief from
bocharte followao a aatnral conaeamnce
It is far hatter to taokla the osase of
backache than to go an Buffering ia a way
which i hound to fact our work and
haaaleaos For over half a century Da
Witt' Pilla hare been bringing relief to
aufferars from backache and we have
received ceuatleee letter of gratitude. Go
to your chomiat and obtain a supply to-day.
DeWitt sPills
anaMOSiaacHlyHi
BACKACHE
JOINT PAINS
RHEUMATIC PAINS
LUMBAGO
SCIATICA
OUR CUARANTll
Da Writ's Pills aro
made andar tnctlj
aygtaaic caadiboaa
and kagroaiaata
coafern to oat
rigid etandarda
a/aoritf.
Have You
Cot Yours?
Remember to make your re-
eervations for the "Eireman'a
Ball" on Nov. .
Call S-tttZ. Ticket may bo
Fire Station,
obtained at any Canal Zone
Worry of
FALSE TEETH
Slipping or Irritating?
Don'! be etnberraaed b looae talat
teeth lipping, droppln or woBbllnf
Than eu at, talk or Uu*h Jul crin-
kle little rASTEXTH on vour plata
Tht* alaaaant Boarder Ire > remarkable
wm of added eemfort and acuri ty by
holding platal nor ttnn*r, No xunmy
noey. pffTWor toejfo If ikalSM
/nefeei> Oar SASTirn? I nr dru
taro. .
DE WITT SPILLS
Kidne\ <*>,,,s
Imported
Canned Hams
p
DREWS
KRAKVS&
ATALAfiTA BRAND
art offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phono 1000 colon
HOME DELIVERY
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NEW LUCKY STRIKE SUPER CONTEST
4U
P. A. CLASSIFIEDS


aVsho.



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|GE EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILV NEWSPAPER
ISTHMIAN CHURCH NOTICES

Union Churches
Where all Protestan cuvperalt with
ally la essentials, liberty In non-
tial and charity In all things
mi ATLANTIC SIDr
._ Rev Fhllltp Havener pastor
Phone 3-1463
19:45 Worship service ano Church-time
Young People Meeting
Rev. J. William L Graham. Pastor
Phone 5-353:
t:00 .*:30 Broadcast on tiOK. HP5K
**.nd HON
9:45 Sunday School
11:00 Worship Service.
5:00 Christian Endeavor
Margarita
. The Rev Henry BU.
Phone 3-1498.
9:30 Bible School
10:44 Worship service and Church-tlrne
nursery
9:30 Youth Fellowship
i III PACIFIC M1M.
Below .
The Rev. Alex ,i:der H. Shaw. Pastor
Balboa Rd. at Sni. Pablo SI.
Phone 2-1486Church OMice 2-3236
9:30 Church School. Free bus service
10:30 Worship Service. Junior Church.
Primary Story Hour Church-lime Nur
5:00 Clii Rho-Senlot Hi Fellowship
6:90 Post Hi Fellowship.
Gamboa
All services in Uainocia uivh cerner
The Rev Raymond A Urav Minister
Phone 6-130
9.-00 Sunday School.
7 JO Worship service
Pedro Mlgui i
9:30 Church School.
10:45 Divine Worship
7:30 Eveninc Vespers
Churches of the many faith in the Canal Zone, and the terminal
cities of Panama and Colon, Republic of Panama, extend a welcome
at all timas to man and women of the, armed services, and ta civilian
neighbors, friends and stronger!.
As o public service, the The Panama American lists below, by
denominations, notices of hour of worship and other regular activities.
Listings are rotated from tima to time. Denominations having
only one or two congregations re listed undei "Other Churches And
Services." A special listing is included for services at Army posts,
Air Force bases and Naval stations.
Ministers, church secretorias and chaplains are asked ta Inform
the news desk by Wednesday noon at the latest of any changa* for
the Catholu
10:00, 11:00.
.taan
nt
cNITAKIAN
SOCIETY
10:30 am
J WB Armed
orces Service
enter Library
Balboa. C Z
four Inviiailon
to'liberal
religion.
UiptlS.
.s.lll.l.NH UA. .431 ciltalllta
Panama H..UI.M. Prayei Meeting a.*.
in Divine Service. 9:30 a m invine ser-
vice I'M p-m and ServuiK ol The Lord ?
Suppei il both Service- Sunda Schoo'
lu o m
Ooyu tuulisi. L duca l i. UlVUa
atavie* 11.lid a in and I.M p Bi Servm*
the Lord Supper al uoih Sei vice sun
dav Schuoi i '< oo o.m
new tu.pt. Clin.. Chiva, i. a.
Service 11 Ol im Snndas
l:U.i n n,
Kc-y S N ttruwn, Mini.HI
iuii.~> -. Jlvlnc a, me !_ li.00
.in anu :in ii hi
el 1 im1 urn
Rev A
Oiviih
School ai
wiih Sunday School
W Crook Mlnlsiei
Kl.
6:00
,!,,, nf -.imOav -M'tsnol ai
COCOi.i BAKIIS CHURCH.
BuilUinc -Hi Bru)a Road
W Y Pond Jr Panto .
Sunuaj :.. ritiin
prcachin. Service
training Onion
eh caching Service
:45 a m
10:45 a m
. 6:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Brotherhood 7.00 p.m Mondays
praver Meelin- *' Weunosaay
KKDWII'I ios BAT1ST CHURCH
&. 1" Street
(Beside the National Institute)
Box 1442. Panam City.
Rev. Jos* Prado eideres, pastor.
services; in Spanish
Sunday Services
Sunday School........... iM a.m.
Preaching Service ....... 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday. B*h'r Study .. 7:30 p m.
iLlalea below ait in caUiullc Churches
in the Canal Zone and uiose ui the lex-
nniul cicles ol Panama and Colon wboat
coiigtCc^lions are primarily eJiglLsh-
peaking bcsiucs Lheae, ihe Caiiieurai in
Panama City, the Catheoiai ol Use Im-
maculate Conception in Colon, and num-
erous parish churches in bolh cities, wel-
come English speaking visitors, though
iheu congregaUons are orlmarily Span
isti-speaking '
ST MARY'S
Balboa
Sunday Masses aiaa, a.00
12.00 a.m.
denedicilon 5:00 pin
Holy Day Masses a:aa s:00. 11:10. 11:55
a.m.
Comessioiis. Saluiday J:3U. 5:00 p.m
7:00, 8:00 paai Thursdays loi Flrsl
Kml.iv ii.i. 8:00 p.m
Miraculous Medai Novena Monday ai
7:00 p.m.
Roaarv every evening ai 1:00'
SAIKIU HEART
Ancon
Sunday Masse a:aa. 1.30. 9:30 am
Holy Days: 5:55. 7:30 am
Confessions. Saturday3.30. 5:00 p.m
V ini. 8:00 p.m Thursday lor First
Friday 7.00. 8:00 p.m
Sacred Heart Devotions Friday at 7:00
om
SI IK HI SI 'S
Cocoll
Sunday Mass. 8.30
Days
Episcopal
4:31.
Holy
i> iiii am
I l Hl.NIU < HAl'l 1
Curundu
6 Mass. 8 30 am
ays: 5:45 am
Confessions 3 .10 5:uli 0m Saturdaya.
ASSUMPTION
Pedro Miguel
Sunday Mass. 8:30 a.m
Holy pays. 6:30 a.m
Confessions. Saturday i:15. 1.45 pm
Rosary Monday Wednesday and Satur-
day at 7 .00 p m
Catechism Classes Sunday 10 30. 11:30
i.m
ST. JOSKPH
Paraso
Sunday Mass. i :00 a m
Holy Days. 5.45 am
Confessions: Saluiday 3.30. 4:00 o.m.
Rosary Tuesday-7:00 pm
Catechism Classes Sunday 10.30. 11 30
-m
VINCENT-
Panam
Sunday Ma si. 6 00. 8:30 am
Holy Days 6:00. 8:30 am
Confessions Saturday 3 00 5 00. 7:00
8.00 p.m
Belore Holy Days 1.00, 8:00
Rosarv evr-i-y evening 7 on p m
SI ii HI'- ll II' l is. I III I.A ALL*
Rio Abajo
Sunday Musses 6:30. 8:30 am
Benediction. 4:00 pan
Holy Day Masses 5:45 am
Confession* Saturday 3:90. 4 39 p.m
Fridav after Miraculous Medal No-
vena.
Miraculous Medal Novena Friday 7:00
p m
Rosary Monday and Wednesday7:00
i. in
ST. l"HEKESE-
Sunday Mass: 7:00 a.m Holy Day Mass
:45 am.
Sacred Heart Devotions: Friday 7:00
f.m.
esclons Saturday -:30. 5:00. 7:00.
8:00 p.m.
Rosary every eveninc except Tuesday at
T Dm
CULO SLITO
Pastor. Rev Wm
Sunday Mass
Holy Day Mass .
Sunday School
PLAVsHKD
J Finn CM
1:45 am
8:00 a m
8:45 a in
iii.ii i.u'iim llt.u4.al
I5.i I boa Heights C /.
627 Ancon Boulevard
Drawer 'B" Balboa Heights
Phone Balboa 1727
"Your Church away from
with welcome lust as friendly"
P William H ttethv Paslui
Sunday School ............ 9:30 am
Horning Worship ......... 10:45 a.m
Baptist Training Union____ 8JO p.m
Jfcranteltstic Service 7 30 o m
Mayar Meeting Wednesdays 7:30 o.m
V. MS Bible Study
Thursdays ..................... a a an
Men's brotherhood
(Last Mondav In month < :u o m
I Al'I.AMlt dAPTISl CHURCH
Bolivar Avenue al 12th Street
Cristobal. CZ
Rev Fred'L. Jones. Pasiui
Methodist
lllK mi 11 hid is, i cm tun
i British Conference i
Ministei Hev O iiiTi.nl Moon
9:00 a.ru. Morning Praver and Sermon
2:00 pus Sunday School
4:00 Men's Meeting
7:15 om evening Prayei no Sermon
ruiNlli METHODIM CHURCH
7tb Street and Meic-ndea Avenue
Colon. R.P
Rev Norman Pratt. Minister
Sunday Service* at 9 JO a.m ana 1:15
Mi, Sunday School for all ages at 1
>
Monday 3( o m Weekly Prayei
Meeting
KBr-Mr,l.l. .11.1 HtlUlSI CHURCH
Siver Lily. CZ .,
Kcv Noimaci PraU. Muusiei .J
Sunday Services 8 am and 5:15 p-m
Sunday School for all ages al 8:30 pm
Tuesday 7 30 nm Prayer Meeting
"Year Invitation Ta Worship'
Bible School 9:45 am
Worship ............... ilOOara
Sraining Union ............ 6 JO p.m.
orship................... 7:30 p.m.
Prayer Meeting iThurs 1 .. 730 om
Seventh Day
Adventist
Pacific Side
Cabo Verde. Panama CU No i j A
Ma., oard. Panam City No 2 Jamaica
Sooety Hall iSabbath Services only!.
Adoiphu Lawes. Chorrillo. P A Henry:
Rio Abalo. C D Abrahams: Gamboa. A.
A Bnnle. and Soanish City Church t-
duardo Ruilnba
Atlantic Side
Colon l'hird Street. Joseph Bryan Crta-
tobai English New Church E A Cruck-
shank Cristobal Spanish Church B J
Maxon. i No Sunday right service el
yresenl
Servicia Thursday nights ''45 o m
Jnnfe*on "seforf Mass
CHURCH Of im HOL AMII Y
MargarlU CZ
Rev William J Finn CM
Jam 9:15
MIRACULOUS MEDAI CHURCH
New Cristobal. 4th ar G St.
Pastor. Rev Vincent Ryan. CM
Sunday Masses. I, 8 & 10 30 a m
Weekday Mass. I urn
Sat.. 8:00 a in
Holy Day Masses 8 00 i s 00 am
Confessions. Rosary, nightly 7:00 pm
Sunday School after the 8 am Mass
Miraculous Medal Novena service -
Moo 5:00 & 7:00 p.m
1st Sat Devotion, every 1st Sal after
Masa
IMMACIILATK CONCEPTION CHURCH
Bolivar Highway Gatun. CZ.
Pastor Rev Francis Lvnch C M
Sunday Mass, 8:00 a m
Weekday Masses Thur< 6 30 a.m
Sat 7:00 a.m
Holy Day Mass. 1:00 a.m
Miraculous Medal Novena service
Mnn 7:15 pm
1st Fridav. Confession Communion.
1:15 p.m
Confession Sa 8 30 & 1 on o Da.
ST. THOMAS' CHURCH
Gatun. Neai Locks
Pastor. Re Francis Lvnch CM
Sunday Mass. 6:45 a m
Weekday Masses Tue Frl 8:00 a.m.
liniv Day Mass. 6*00 am.
Miraculous Medal Novena service
Frl 7:15 p.m.
Confessions Sat.. 1:15 & 8:00 pm
1st. Sal Devotion every 1st Sat after
Mass
Hill Ulllll CHURCH
Margarita. CZ.
Pastor Rev William J Finn. CM
Sunday Masses. 7:3" at 9:30 am
Holy Day Mass. 6:00 am
Miraculous Medal Novena service
Mon. 7:00 p m
Instructions for adults Frl 7:00 pit
Confessions Sat 4:00. 5:00 & 7:00 to
8:00, om
SI. JOSEPH'S CHURCH
Coln, 10th A Broadway
Pastor. Rev J Raymond' Maohale. C M
Assistant. Rev Robert Vlgno|a. C M
Sunday 'Masses. 5:45 A 9:00 em
Weekday Mass. 5:45- am
Holy Day Masses. 5:45 A 8:00 tm
lac Fri Masses. 5:45 A 800 am
Communion. VM am
Baptisms Sun.. 4:00 pm.
Miraculous Medal Novena services
Wed at 6:15 A 7:00 p.m
Novena of the Sacred Heart. Frl. 7:19
Dan
Conlessions Sat. 4:00. 5:00 pjn A
7::0 to 8:00 p.m.
Sunday School, 3 00 p m.
Discussion Club Young man of Parish
Sun I KM p.m
Instructions tor adults seeking know-
ledge of the Catholic Church. Man. A
Thurs at 7:15 p.m
1st. Sat Devotion every 1st Sat after
Mass.
T VINCENTS CHURCH
Sliver City. CZ
Paslor Rev Raymond Lewis, CM *
Sunday Masses. 5:45 A 8:00 o m
Weekday Mass, 6:00 a m.
Holy Day Masses. 5:30 A 9:30 a.m
Sunday School. 11:00 am
Miraculous Medal Novena sanrice
Tues 7:00 p.m
Baptisms Sun :00 p.m
Confessions Sat 3:30. 5:00 om A 740
to 8:00 pm.
Instructions for adults. Tues A Frl..
7:30 pan
1st Sal Devotion every 1st Sat after
Mass
AM ON, < /.
THE CATHEDRAL OF SI LIlKfc
The lit He K Heber Gooden. Bishop
Ihe Very Rev Raymond T Ferris, Dear
7 .in a.m Holy Communion
9:30 a m. Cathedral School
10:45 Morning Prayer and Sermon.
I First Sunday of the month Holy Com
nunion and Sermon.)
7:00 p.m. Evening Praver ana Sermon
CRISTOBAL, R.P
CHURCH OF OUR SAVIOUR
3rd St near G. Navy
Rev. Mlltorr A Cookaon. Pastor
Holy Communion 7:30 san
Church School 9:30 a.m
Morning Prayer-Sermon n 00 a.m.
Ill C first Sunday In the month I
Youn People's Vesper Service
a in
Wednesday. Holy Communion 9:30 p.m
Choir Rehearsal 7JO am.
A House of Praver for all people
COCOU
Church ot IM. Andrew
I'he Rev Gideon C Montgomery
Rev M A Cook-son. Chap USNB
Holy Communion 7:30 a.m
Sunday School 9:30 a am.
Public Worship 10:45 a.m
JI1C flrsl Sunday In the month I
Young People's Fellowship 4:00 p.m
Choir rehearsal Wednesday evemnsy
11 6:30 p.m
Women's Auxiliary 2nd and 4th rhurs
days al 7:30 p.m.
House of Praver and Fellowship for an
oeople
COROZAL
Good Shepherd
The Ven A F Nightengale .
8:00 a.m. Every Friday; Morning Pray-
er.
IH.C 1st Friday i
GAMBOA
St SirnonV Church
Rev Antala Ocho* 8.
Pedro Migad 4-131
Holy Communion ......... 10:30 a m.
Sunday School .....,...... 3.00 pm.
Youth Organiza:ions 5:00 A 6:00 Dm.
Evening Prayer A Blbble
2nd A 4th Sunday ........... 7 30 p m
Women's Auxiliary ........ 7:30 p.m
2nd and 4th Thursday
LA BOCA
Si Peler's Chnrcfe
Rev Lemuel B Shirley Priest
8 a.m Holy Communion
7 a.m.Choral Eucharist and Sermon
10 am Momlnr' Praver and Church
School
5 o ni -Holy Baptism
7:30 pm.-vespers and Sermon
Communion Tuesdays and Thursdays.
1 a.m Wednesdays and Fridays 9 am .
Girls Friendly 6 and 7 o.m Monday 8
p.m Tuesday: Vesper nightly at 7. ear-
cepf Saturday Compline 7-30 p.m
MARO ABITA
St Margaret's Chapel
Margarita Hospital
The Rev M A Coqkson
" Sunday School 9 a.m Evening Prayer
' 00 om
aaooaul school each church Saturday
I t JO a m. Divine worsfUp 11 am Suodav
I Ugh! enrice at aT
arwlse indicated.

airrsa-vsasr LUTHERAN CHURCH
The Church of Ihe Lathersn Hear"
il T Bemthal Pastor
130 Balboa Road. Balboa
Sunday School and Bible Class 9 a ta..
Worship service 10:15 a.m., "Come Thou
With Ua and We Will Do Thee Good A
frlendlv welcome awaits all visitors Pot-
lurk stiDoer ecnnd Sunday each month
6:30 paos., gama night, fourth Sunday
i is mm aunasv coniessiens sat 7W pJJB. I 7 JO oan The Service Center, open Wed.
courobas axoept 1st Cat Devotion, every 1st Sat. after nesday through Sunday, extends enr-
asaos, dial welcome to at} military personnel
OUR LADY OP GOOD COUNSEL
Gamboa, CZ
Pastor Rev Charles Jacobs. CM
Sunday Masses. 7-00 A 8JO am
Weekday Masses 9:30 am
Holy Day Masses. 5 45 A 6JO am
Miraculous Medal Novena service
tues 7.-00 p.m.
Sacred Heart Novena service, frl. Ta
pm
Confessions Sat 7:00 p.m
PALO SECO
Church of The Holy Comforter
The Ven A P. Nightengale
Every Mondan 940 a.m Holy Com
nunion
PARASO
Rev D A. Osborna
8:00 am Holy Communion 2nd Sunday
9:30 a m Sunday School
' 3 JO p.m Evening Praver Sundays
Monday. 1:00 pm Youth Meeting
Wednesday 8:30 o.m Girls' Friendly
Society
RED 1 ANR
Rev D.A Osborne A Rev CA Crafweli
11 oo a.m Holy Communion and Ser
non 1st and 3rd Sunday*.
11:00 em Morning Prayei and add
ess. 2nd and 4th Sundays
3:00 o.m Sunday School and Baptism
7:30 pm Eveninp Praver .and address
:nd and 4th Sundays
PANAMA CITf
SI PAUL'S CHURCH
A F Nightengale, a U M BE
snd the Rev Rlt Reginald Afwell
Venerable Archdeacon
6:00 a.m Holy Communion 9:00 am
i oo o in Evensong snd Sermon
CIIRIS1 CRURCH HY-rar.-8EA
Colon. R de P
I Opposite Hotel Washington!
The Rev Mslnert J Peterson
STB Rector
SUNDAYS.
6 a.m Holy Communion
9am Choral Eucharist and Sermon
10:30 am Church School.
7rSO nm Solemn Evensonp A Sermon
WEDNESDAYS
6 a.m Holy Communion
7:30 p m EvensonR and Sermon.
9:30 nm Adult Confirmation Cla
ITIURSDAYS
5 p.m. Prayei Guild
'R1DAYS: '
8 p.m Children's Eucharist
7:30 om. Choir Practice
SATURDAYS:-
10 a m Children's Confirmation Class
7J0 o.m Complins *nd Meditation
GATUN
St. George's Church
Gatun, CZ
Rev Solomon N Jacobs
8:45 am Church School
9:45 a.m. Morning Prayer
10:00 a.m Holv Eucharist and Sermon
Cuesdavs:
1:00 am Holy Communion (Also Holy
Oavs and Saints Days I
Wednesdays:
1:00 p.m Evening Prayer
8:00 nm St Vincent's Guild
130 om Choir Rehearsal
TTmrsdsvs f
Choren of St. Mary The Virgin
Archdeacon Waldock. Priest in Charge
Morning Prayei .......... 6:45 am.
Holy Eucharist and Sermon 7.00 am.
Church School ............ 3:00 pm.
Solemn Evensong ......... 6 -00 p m.
Woman's Auxiliary. 2nd Mondays.
Order of St Vincent Acolita Guild.
Tuesdays.
Vestry Meeting hid Thursday*.
Holy Communion, 7 am. Thursday.
Evensong 7:30 p.m.
Morning Prayer. 9 am Friday, Choir
Rehearsals 9 pjn
BIO ABAJO
St Christopher's Chnrrh.
I* St.. Psreae lasfevre
Rev Antonio Oehoa B. .
Peone Peora Mlgael 4-338
Holy Communion......... 7:30 sa-a
Sunday School .......... 19:39
Baptisms. 5 to 6 p.m 2nd A 4th Sun-
Evening PrayerBible Study p.m..
1st snd 3rd Sundays
Woman's Auxiliary End A 4th Sundays
7:00 p.m J..
Holv Communion. Wednesdays. 7 s m
I Other Churches
And Services
HAHA'i CENTER
Apartment I Lux building. 34th Street
Panam Mondav: Lectures and Dis-
cussions 8:00 o.m
Church ul Jeras Christ ot Latter Day
Saints (MormonI Balboa CZ.
Sunday School 9JO a.m.
Services 10:30 a.m
At JWB Armed Forces Services Cento
on La Bora Road
Evening Service at S p.m. at place
of meeting announced at morning
vice.
CHURCH Of CHRIS 1
0951 Balboa Road, Balboa
W Harlafld Dilbeck. Evangelist
Telephone 2-3602
SUNDAV SERVICES
Blbla Clase* i.m all age ... 10:00 am
Preaching and Communion 10:45 am
Preaching and Communion .. 7:00om
MIDWEEK 'SERVICES
Bible Study ...... Wednesday 1:0b pm
Ladles' Bible Class Thursday 1:45 o.m
CHURCH Or CHRISTOld Cristbal
SUNDAYS:
We meet in the American Legion Han
n from of the Clubhouse
Morning Worship 10:45 s m
Visitors welcome
Ladles Bible Study at Gatun
Phone Gatun 416 ot rt Guiles 309
CURUNDU PROTESTAN1
COMMUNITY CHURCH
. Chaplsln William H Blah
Sunday School ............... 9:99
Morning Worship ....'...........
Young People'* Service .........
evening Worship..............
Prayer Meeting .Thursday......
Choir Practice. Wednesday at
7:00 o m and Saturday 9 JO am
OLD CATHOLIC CHURCH
St Raphael The Archangel -
l.'lth St West No I
Holy Eucharist Sunday al i :30 am
Tuesdays Wednesdays snd Thursday'
6:30 a.m
Sacrament ol unction (Healing Ser-
vice. First Sunday of each month
7:30 o.m
Mount Hallbeth Christian Church
' Panam R. P.
Rt. Rev. T. James. D. D Bishop
officiating
Morning devotion at ........ 6:00 am
Holy Communion at ........ 6:30 am.
Fellowship Worship at ...... 11-00 a.m.
Sunday School at .......... .1 00 nm.
Divine Service-at ........... 7:30 pan.
Sermon at................. 8'30pm.
Holy Communion at ......... 9:30 pm.
Mondays Roll call and pray-
er meeting at
Wednesdays Evangelistic Ser-
vices at................... 130 pm
Fridays, Litany, Fasting, and
Sermon from.......... 7:00 p.m.
Christian Scientist
CHRISTIAN SHIM I CHURCH!
irst Church of Christ Scientist Anc
560 Ancon Boulevard
Sunday 11.00: Wednesday a.Of o
Sunday School 930 a.m
irVt Church at Christ. Scientist. Cristobal
13th Street A Bolivar Highway
Sunday 11 00 a in Wednesday 7:30 o m
Sundav School 9:30 am
Christian Science Society, iamrtM
Civic Center Building
Sunday 11-30 am First A Third Wed
esday 730 pm
Sundav School |0:15
Lutheran
C


Salvation Army
Panam City Calle 19 da reorero
Service* at 11am and 7 30 p.m (Mai
> Wilsoni. Sunday School at 9 pro
La Boca: Services at 11 a m and 7 3ti
) m Sunday School at 3 JO p.m
Red Tank: Service at .730 pan Sunday
'.ehopl at 3:00 Dm
Services at...... 11 a m A 730 p.m
Colon. I4th Street
Sundav School It .. .. 8:09 om
Colon. 3rd Street
Services al ... 11 a.m A 139 p-m
Silver City
Service at ............... 130 p.m
Sunday School at ..... 339 Dm
Jewish Welfare Board. Bid* 192'X. La
Boca Road. Balboa CZ Rabbi Nathan
Wltkln director
Services on Friday 130 ptmi
(See also listings ol Jewish aehvtce.
inder Posts Bases and Stations I
Congregation Kol Sheertth Israel. Ave-
nida Cuba and 38th Street. Bella Vista
Panam City Rabbi Harry A Merfeld
Services on Friday 8 o.m
Posts, Bases
And Stations
PACIFIC ID
"rotestant
t ORT AMADOR
Sunday School.........
Morning Worship ......'..
FORT CLAYTON
Sunday School. Bldg
Morning Worship ..
FORT KOBBE
Sunday School ..........
Morning Worship .........t
12th Station Hospital ......
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Bible School .............
Morning Worship..............
.Youth Group.................. HM
Servicemen's Hour.............. 7 *0
U S NAVAL STATION. RODMAN' '
Morning Worship............... |0-S
Protestant Sunday School ...... 9:29
Corot*I Chapel ................. 930
Cathonc
FORT CLAYTON
Dally Mass............... .730
Sunday Masses......8.99. 9:00 A 2:4
12TH STATION HOSPITAL
Sunday Mas* ...................'7:49
COROZAL CHAPEL
Sunday Mass ................. 10:30
FORT KOBBE
Daily Maaa
Sunday
U.S. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Sunday Maaa ................
ALBROOK 'AIB FORCE BASE
Dally Maas ....................
Sunday Missis........ 7 45 A
Jewtsa
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Saturday .......,,,.........
rORT CLAYTON
^SS"^^.............
FORT KOBBE
..3?IU20?.J "^u *!
IWB. Balboa. CZ.
i mday y .. .......,........... 73*
ATLANTIC SIDR
_ PrMestsnl
FORT DAVIS
Protestant Worship Service......
FOR1 GUL1CK
Sunday School.................. 00
Morning Worship............... 10:00
COCO SOLO NAVAL STATION
Sunday School............... 930
ProteaUnl Worship Service.....11:19
FOR! DAVIS
Sunday Maaa
FORT CULICK
Sunday Mas*
COCO SOLO
Sunday Me
FOR! GULICR
Tuesday .....


IIDAY, NOVEMBER 1951
/
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NKWSPAP
I
PAGE NINE
llantic Society
nu ML J~ YUS
&> 195, (jalu* U.dpLo*. (jUn 378
trVrKAHS HONOR CAPTAIN AND MRS. HEATH '
"* The Cristobal Rebekah Club held their regular meeting
tt the Criitobal Masonic Temple Thursday evening, and join-
ed the Odd Fellows for a social evening in the banquet hall
of the Temple, following the meeting.
given Wednesday evening by Si-
oert Lodge for Its members and
guests. \
Mrs. Kerdls Meeks and Mr.
Neal Hatgl won the door prizes.
Tne table prizes were won by
Mrs. Howard Anderson, Mrs.
Sam Rowley, Mr. Leon Egolf,
Mrs. Henry- Shirk, Mrs. J. A.
At this time, they took the op-
ortunlty to bid Tarewell to Cap-
lain and Mrs.' Denver Heath
vho are being transferred to the
ptates m the near future.
Captain Heath Is the Noble
>rtnd of the Odd Fellows and
keand Mrs. Heath are both of-
c|5 in the Rebekah Club.
fb show their appreciation for" Taylor, Mr. William Smith and
fhelr work with the organization,
vhlle on the Isthmus, both or-
kalxatlons presented them a 400
Bay clock.
Mrs. Fred CRourke, Mrs.
tyd Robinson and Mrs. Percy
iwrance w*re hostesses for the
enlng.
fervey-Wilford Wedding
'hanged to Sunday
Because of the Sunday, No-
rerhber 4th sailing of (he Pana-
na Railroad Liner, Miss Carol
larvey and Mr. Robert Wllford
'"' be married that morning at
nao at the Gatun Union Church.
All friends of the two families
jmd the young couple are mvlted
the ceremony. No Invitations
^re being issued.
Palmer
orcd With Shower
Mrs. Earl Wrenn and Mrs.
illlam Brooks were co-hostess-
for a shower given In honor
ft Mrs. John Palmer at the
Irooks' residence In Margarita.
The pink and blue theme was
sed in the ruffled parasol and
le basket in which the gifts
vere presented. Orchids center-
the, buffet table, encircled
i a row of tiny dolls.
Games were played and the
pHles were won by Mrs. Robert
latikin and Mrs. Roy Perkins.
The other guests were: Mrs.
rold Tinnln.Mrs. Walter Fen-
s', Mrs. Ernest' Cotton. Mrs.
nthony Fernandez. Mrs. H. P.
evlngton, Mrs. W. B. Middle-
las, Mrs. Carl Newhard, Mrs.
toss Cunningham. Mrs. Lucille
Tlennlken, Mrs. Oeorge Hallo-
ran, Mrs. John Leach. Mrs.
Jruce Sanders. Mrs. Owynn. Mrs.
lenry Bell. Mrs. Stephen Dyer,
John Dovel. Mrs. Roy Per-
:ins, Mrs. Worden French, Mrs.
' rs. T. V. Kelly, Mrs. John
Her, Mrs. Emmett Argo, Miss
Ibeth Marsh, Miss Evelyn
linger. Mrs. Louis Maurer.
Irs. Jean Verchinsky, Mrs. Wal-
te. Kuhrt, Mrs. Oeorge Wirtz
ind Mrs. I. A. MacKenzle.
rows Hostess
Morning Coffee
Mrs. James Brown of Gatun,
ntertalned the members of her
ng group with a morning
coffee at her home Wednesday.
Th* hostess Is leaving the middle
of*November to make her home
m the States, so this will be her
last opportunity to entertain the
grWp.
Enjoying her hospitality were:
Mrs. J. W. L. Oraham, Mrs. Ralph
Graham, Mrs. Edward Cox, Mrs.
Sam Mauldlh. Mrs. Carl Nix,
Mrs. B. O. Tydeman. Mrs. Wal-
ter Zimmerman, Mrs. Lee Nash,
Miff. Fred WUloughby and Mrs.
T.JN. Tt].
Mrs. Lorrls Lyons.
Dinner Party
for Mr. and Mrs. Snyder
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Fllnn en-
tertained at their Oatun resi-
dence Wednesday evening for
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Snyder
who are sailing-Sunday to reside
in the States.
The other guests were: Mr.
and Mrs. E. W. MuTspaugh and
Mr. and Mrs. LeRol Leeser.
The party was divided into age
groups with prizes given to each,
and appropriate games arranged
for each group. In the pre-school
and Kindergarten groups the
following prizes were awarded:
prettiest, Edna Mae Forsythe;
funniest, Allen Cotton; appro-
priate, Richard Hakanson.
Prizes for games in this group
were won by Carol La Crolx and
Jimmy Boggs.
Presents were given the chil-
dren by the fairy godmother,
Nancy Gibson.
Mrs. Boucher ,
Guest at Shower
. Mrs. Thomas Harrison and
Mrs. Verncn Seeley were co-hos-
tesses for a shower given at Mrs.
Harrison's residence in Margari-
ta for Mrs. John Boucher.
Spot .prizes were awarded the
children in the first three grades
of school. The winners were:
Bobbv Williams. Judy Hallett
and Elizabeth McLaren.
The 4th, 5th and 6th grade
prize winners were: Marjorle
Butcher, prettiest; Oracle Argo,
most appropriate and Eddie
Marshal, funniest.
In the Junior and Senior High
group Judy Malcolm and Shirley
Keepers, a Dutch boy and girl
were the prettiest and Carol
Newhard was the most appro-
priate.
Mrs. Thomas McGinn was
general chairman for the series
of parties and she was assisted
by Mrs. E. W. MUlspaugh. Mrs.
Fred Newhard. Mrs. Ralph Mai-
IN HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Ex-
clusively Yours: Jeff Chandler
and his wife, Marjorle Hoen-
shelle, have ironed out their dis-
agreement about Marjories act-
ing carreer. Mrs. Chandler who
resembles Maureen O'Hara. now
has an agent and will try for
stardom with Jeff's blessings.
oOo
Overheard: "I've got a great
idea. I'm going to make some
old movies for television."
"Sawdust Caesar," the screen-
play by Robert Buclmer about
Mussolini's career, may now be
filmed in Hollywood instead of
Rome. The subject matter is con-
sidered dangerous for politically
unsettled Italy.
A color scheme of pink and colm, Mrs. Herman Keepers and
_ **r fui-. nnlMaii m*-r> r*n**I Vliii \fr>
blue was carried out In the de-
corations and table appoint-
ments.
The guests were: Mrs. Jean
Coffey, Mrs. Myra Brown. Mrs.
L. L. Highley. Mrs. O. E. Man-
nings, Mrs. Robert Thomas, Mrs.
J. Boucher. St., Mrs. Dorothy
Knox, Mrs. Pat Huston, Mrs.
Gearhard Lust, Mrs. George
Egolf. Mrs, E. W. Wrenn, Mrs.
Bernice Wood. Mrs. F. B. Elliot,
Mrs. C. T. Harrison and Mrs.
J. W. Myers.
Dinner Parties
for-Mr. and Mrs. Poole
Mr. and Mrs. George Poole;
Sb., have been complimented Meeks, Jeffrey Hlpson, Raymond
Mrs. Rainey, Mrs, Carl Nix. Mrs.
Leslie Croft, Robert Thomas,
Mrs. Anderson and Mrs. Hilde-
brand. *
Two-In-One Birthday Party
Chaplain and Mrs. James E.
Hemann entertained with a par-
ty at the Fort Gulick Officers
Club for their sons Donald and
Larry on their fifth and third
birthday anniversaries.
Hallowe'en decorations were
used and each young host had
a table for his guests and his
own birthday cake. Novelty fa?
vors were given the guests.
Donald's guests were: Bobby
with a number of bon voyage af-
fairs. Wednesday evening Mr.
and Mrs-, Poole were the dinner
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd
McDermitt.
Thursday evening, Mr. and
Mrs. Howard Harris entertained
the Pooles for dinner at their re-
sidence. Also present were Mrs.
George Poole, Jr., Miss Barbara
Egolf and Chris an dKate Poole.
Visitors at Santa'Clara
Mrs. M. O. Leon of Colon, en-
tertained Mrs. William F. Cole-
man and daughter, Valerie of
Fort Gulick and Mrs. Brooks An-
derson, with Dusty and Brooks,
Jr., of Corozal. over the week-end
at her home, at Santa Clara. .,_
SltVrt Lodge Entertains
Members
The Masonic Temple in Gatun
was the scene of a card party
Morning Coffee at Fort Gulick
The regular monthly morning
coffee of the Fort Gulick N.CO.
Wives Club was held Wednesday
at the home of the club's presi-
dent, Mrs. Pauline Marsh.
Honored guests for the morn-
ing were: Mrs. Carl Hess. Mrs.
William Besecker and Mrs. D.
W. Burkhead.
The hostess was assisted by
Mrs. William El lings worth
Mrs. Joseph Oormly.
A large number of club mem-
bers were present to meet the
guests.
Patricio, Denis Greer; Susan
Smith, Rose Vasquez, Ronnie
Heath. Terry Thompson, Rose-
mary Montgomery, Miriam Mr-
quez, Jackie Demlco, Billy Han-
kie, Donald Dewey. Gail Knight,
Sandra Brumfield, Nancy Anton-
sen. Karen Davidson, Joyce Wll-
kerson. Paulette Forrest. Louis
Torres, Marilyn Scarborough.
Larry's guests were: Jimmy
Hlpson, Allen Patricio. Daphne
Greer. Leigh Davidson, Anna-
beth Llndstrom, Susan Scarbor-
ough. Mary Ann Mlsivich, Awlel-
da Mrquez. Bobby Domlce. Pe-
ter McBride, Pattv Oakley. Terry
Strub, Roy Wllkerson, Mary
Claire Hankie Roberta Moore
and Diana-Neil
The hostess was assisted by
Mrs. Violet Wllkerson, Mrs.
June Oakley and Mrs. Elizabeth
Patricio.
The word's leaked out that
MGM is paying a king's ransom
to UI for Shelley Winters on a
one-picture deal. Fletcher Mar-
kle, director-hubby of Mercedes
McCambrldge, will put Shelley
through the acting paces.
oOoi
Skip the rumors of Piper Lau-
rie's engagament to UI producer
Leonard Goldstein. He told me:
"I'm four years older than Pip-
er's father. The rumor is silly."
Cause of the blazing feud be-
tween Evelyn Keyes and Mary
Anderson during the production
of "I Want to Be Loved" in Mex-
ico: Mary's tight-fitting red
sweater. Evelyn objected to it.
oOo ,
Nancv Kelly's sister, Carole
Lee Kelly, is in the chorus line
at the Riverside Hotel In Reno...
Celeste Holm and Ingrld Berg-
man's ex. Dr. Peter, Llndstrom
were a surprise twosome at the
Mocambo.
oOo
The happy word from the Reno
world premiere of UI's "Reunion
in Reno" is that Hollywood has
turned out a dllly of a comedy
will lasso the family trade a-
round the heart. Gigi Perreau
proves herself the town's best
moppet Bernhardt since Mar-
garet O'Brien.
Harry Richman joined the pre-
miere festivities and confessed
that he's making another mil-
lion or so on his cattle ranch
near Reno.
I "You can see your dollars by
looking out of the window," Har-
ry tossed it to me.
"Your dollars have four legs.
That's the cattle business for
you. Why, It's Bing Crosby's big-
gest source of money."
oOo
Fredric March is admitting,
out loud, that his British-made
starrer, "Christopher Columbus,"
was a "stinker." "It was a bad
script." he told me on the set of
"Death of a Salesman." "It took
too long to get to the voyage but
that was history's fault, not
ours." -
As the sixth actor to play Willy
Loman in "Salesman," March
isn't worried about comparisons
with the stage portrayals.
"Every actor would play It dif-
ferent. I didn't see Thomas Mit-
chell's performance, but I did
hear the records."
Nan Grey stepped out of a role
in "The Tight Rope" that would
have soared her movie stock a-
gain and the agent who handled
the deal Is tearing out his hair.
Now Nan has decided to remain
plain Mrs. Frankle Laine and run
a San Fernando Valley antique
shop, into which Frankle has in-
vested a big bankroll.
The word from Europe Is that
Jennifer Jones is in a highly ner-
vous state over Robert Walker's
death and is unable to shake oft
her melancholy... The nation's
100,000 deaf persons will have no
difficulty reading Mona Free-
man's sign language to the deaf
boy played by Tony Curtis In
"Hear No Evil." She's studying
three hours a day with a sign
language expert.
oOo
Next for producers Jack Poll-
fexen and Aubrey Wisberg, who
turned out "The Man From
Planet X," win be "Swords of
Venus." It's a swashbuckler, not
scienee fiction.
'Desert Fex' Due
Soon On Screen
Of Balboa Theater
One of Twentieth Century-
Fox's most important productions
of 1951. "The Desert Fox," the
dramatic story of Field Marshal
Rommel, has been booked into
the Balboa Theater with the
playdate to be announced in the
near future.-
Starring James Mason Jn the
title role, "The Desert Fox" Is
based on the best-selling biogra-
phy by Brigadier Desmond Young
and recounts the fabulous career
of Rommel from the North Afri-
can campaign to his untlme'.y
end In Germany. Produced and
written for the screen by Nun-
nally Johnson and directed by
Henry Hathaway, "The Desert
Fox" boasts a prominent sup-
porting cast headed by Cedrlc
Hardwicke, Jessica Tandy, Luther
Adler, Everett Sloane, Leo O.
Carroll, George Macready, Rich-
ard Boone, Edward Franz and
Desmond Young.
The film was made partly on
location at Borrego Springs, Ca-
lifornia, with special on-the-
scene footage taken m Germany
and North Africa.
BALBOA
SOON
Overheard at local nlte spot:
"She's hocked all her Jewels.
She's the most pawnographlc [
star In Hollywood."
DON'T BE A
[Panama C^anat C/ Mouses-
- Showing Tonight
Hallowe'en Party at Gatun
The traditional Hallowe'en
party was held Wednesday even-
ing at the Gatun playshed, un-
der the sponsorship of the Ga-
tun Civic Council.
Junior High Officers Installed
An Assembly was held at the
Cristobal High School on Tues-
day for the installation of the
Junior High Student Association
Officers.
Music was furnished by the
and Junior High orchestra. The
Home room representatives were
introduced at this time.
Mr. Paul Beck, principal, in-
stalled the new officers. They
were Margaret Leigh, president;
vice-president. Brian Cox. Secre-
tary, Pat Leach and Treasurer,
Donna Humphrey.
After the' installation Miss
Leigh gave her inaugural speech.
CWC tries wondorful, auro-to-plaaao
pudding that you eon moke in a /irfy..'.
BURLINGTON, Vt. (U.P.I
Miss Helen Madden, who retir-
ed after 44 years as a Burling-
ton school teacher, says it's bad
luck to spank a student. She tried
It once and broke a mirror in a
small boy's hip pocket. \
BALBOA
Alr-Condltieaed
4:M :1S S:M
Robert PRESTON Johr BARRYMORE. Jr.
"The Sundowners" {Technicolor)
tardar "uTSET MF.AFTER THE SHOW
DIABLO HTS.
Rod CAMERON Audrey LONG
"CAVALRY SCOUT"
Saturday STRICTLY DISHONORABLE"
COCOLI
:1* lit
Humphrey BOGART a Ida LUPINO
"HIGH SIERRA"
Saturday "CAVALRY SCOUT"
PEDRO MIGUEL
:ll 1:2
Cary GRANT Jeanne CRAIN
"PEOPLE WILL TALK"
Saturday "THE LEMON DROP KID"
GAMBOA
ins
(Saturday)
"INSIDE THE WAILS OF FOLSOM'
PRISON"
G A 1 U N
I:M P H
rred MacsCURRAY Eleanor PARKER
"A Millionaire For Christy"
Saturday "STATE SECRET"
Amazing
Value!
t># tntynty Nfnt tnochtmt
MARGARITA
:1S I'M
Gordon MacRAE Julie LONDON
'Return of The Frontiersman'
Saturday "ONLY THE VALIANT'
CRISTOBAL
Alr-Caaditlon.d
CIS *:M
Larry PARKS Barbara HALE
EMERGENCY WEDDING"
Saturday "TilATS RSY BOS"
CERVEZA
DON'T DENY YOUR
DAUGHTER Zk'lS
Vital Knowledge
.. about these Intimate
Physical Facts!
untas h "Two Heat Waal",
a SO* Century PradwcNeu
V'8 Has LiveJjr Ravor ^
Wholesome Goodness
no *sing/'juice can match!
In V-8 there are 8 delicious juices
of garden-fresh vegetables-not just
one. That"s why V-8 has lrvoly flavor
and wholesome goodness no sinsj/e
juice can match. Each juice adds its
own tempting flavor plus vitamins
A, B, C calcium and iron. Your
family will love VS. Serve h often.
ataos of V* h a
Celery Roe*
lettuce
Usad !
Panloy
ewe. by die maaen er CaauHMI'i Sanaa, 'dkc
nueeawie owned a, Ccaeiill teea Ciuai |.
our daughter may hesi-
tate to askso don't you let
her dare approach marriage
without first instructing her
y luiw important douching two
or three times a week often
is to feminine cleanliness,
health, charm and marriage
happiness.
And be sure to tell her to
use Zonite for the douche.
Its principle discovered by a
famous Surgeon and Chem-
istno other type of liquid-
antiseptic germicide of all
those tested is so powerful
yet so safe to delicate tis-
sues.
Caution her against weak,
homemade mixtures for the
douche, such as salt and
water. These do not and
CAN not give needed get-
micidal and deodorizing ac-
tion as does Zonite. Zonite
helps guard against infec-
tion by instantly kilunc
all germs on contact Use
as directed as often as nec-
essary; however, make a
regular habit of using it two
or three times a week with-
out risk of harm!
W Richard jss jana amia art
idmark Andrews IWerrill
Untie Semi UNDERWATER COMMANDOS!
CENTRAL
RUTH ROMAN RICHARD
TODD. In
'LIGHTNING STRIKES
TWICE"
BELLA VISTA
ADVENTURE THAT STORMS
THE SEAS OF THE WORLD!
om'fe
ANTISfrUrC
M
Amimm
|f m. | nettatul
In -
Technicolor!
Giusjuty
PECK
Virrlnla
MAYO
- In -
CAPTAIN HORATIO
HORNBLOWER"
CECILIA THEATRE
The Rousing Story of
JEAN LAFITTE
LAST OF THE
BUCCANEERS
PAUL KNRQO kbih
TROPICAL THEATRE
Jeff Chandler Evelyn
Keyes, in
"THE IRON MAN"
ENCANTO THEATRE
___Air Conditlaaed
Super Double Program!
Dennis Morgan Jane
Wyman. In
"CHEYENNE"
Also: Ida Lupino and
Robert Alda, in
"THE MAN I LOVE"
77VOL/ THEATRE
RANK NIGHT!
Boris Karloff in
"WEST OF SHANGHAI'
Also: .
\v blood ssioinsas-
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Super Program!
Errol Flynn Dean Stockwell, in
"KIM"
Also Greer Garson and
Walter Pidgeon. In
"THE MINIVER STORY"
VICTORIA THEATRE^
SPANISH PROGRAM!
Tin-Tan. in
"Ay, Aueae Ceaaa Me Has Punte"
- Aun: -
Mano'in Schillii
"VrVUXO DESDE CHKJIILLO '
illinaky. In
CrWttlLIJ
freiybody Rsacfe da


'
rr-F TFH
li_------------
THF PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDE. .*T)FNT DAILY NEWSPAPER
FRIDAT, N0>
Wave To Battle Again Tonig
n
<
i
e>-
i-
I
hi
i


*
I
Saturday7 Program
'1st Race "F-2" Natives'.i Fgs.
Fue: S275.0PPool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Julito J. Chuha 107x
' 2Avvate E. Sllvera 110
3Bfalo .'. Baeza, Jr. 108x
4Mir&n.la B. Pulido 120
5W. Money R. Vsquez 110
6Don Cata'-noC. Iglesias 111
''2nd Race "F-2" Natives6! i Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1Exito
2La Prensa
3Cacique
4Cosa Lind:i
5Opex
6AimiranU
G. Ramos 109x
B. Agulrre 116
J. Phillips 112
V Mena 118
B. Pulido 118
C. iglesias 120
3rd Race "C" Natives 61 i Fgs.
Purse:-1325.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1Tin Tan B. Agulrre 112
2Casablanca A. Enrique 106x
3Annie N. B. Moreno 107
4Sixaola C. IglesKs 114
5Elona M. Zeballos 120
8Lolito G. Snchez 120
5Batt. Cloud B. Agulrre 110
8Silver Fox A. Mena 112
4th Race '1-2' Imported',i Fgs.
'Purse: 1375.00 Pool Closes 2:20
tyi'niela
1Charles o V. Ortega 117
' 2Haydn K. Flores 118
3Mayordoir.c J. Phillips 115
, 4Hanna E. Ougnot 118
I 5Daintywooc %L. Pena 112x
5 6H. Star .7. Sanianlego 115
; 7Blumaha V. Arauz 119
5th Race "F" Imported1 Mile
Furse: $500.00 Pool Closes 2:55
1Curaca
2Marlsc.-iiito
3Prestig:o
. 4Beduino
5Mr. Foot
R. Vsquez 115
O. Cruz 110
C. Ruiz 117
E. Silvera 109
B. Moreno 115
6th Race '1-2' Importedt'/ Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
' 1Sandarin C. Iglesias 120
2Costina A. Mena 114
3Betn E. Gugnot 120
I 4In Time B. Moreno 120
5Doa Eields) V.Castillo 120
: 6Baby Betty M. Hurley 117
7D.D.T. O. Chanis 117
.* Baby Rol B. Agulrre 114
!7th Race "H'- Imported 7 Fgs.
'Puiie: $400 (0 Pool Closes 4:05
tsecond Rate of the Doubles
1Montmartrc V. Ortega 111
2 Pepsi Cold A. Enrique lllx
Levadura R. Vsquez 120
J 4Cantaoiirt- E. Daro 108
8th Race (Open) 1-9 16 Miles
Purse: $.c,000.00-added
Pool Closes 4:40Quiniela
"INDEPENDENCE CLASSIC*
1Gorsewoodi C. Iglesias 108
2Main Road K. Flores 108
3Chacabuco V. Castillo 110
4Gris) D. D'Andrea 120
5 Carmela II' E. Daro 108
6Plnard G. Alfaro 127
7Tomebambu J. Contre. 108
8Welsh fox B. Agulrre 110
9Polvorazo V. Ortega 114
10Rathlln Light A. Mena 114
Eliribles:
Montlelito G. Snchez 108
Coragglo O. Chanis 106
fth Race '1-1' Imported4V4 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1-Hit
2M. Fairfax
3Nehulnco
4Sans Soud
5La Chita
6Hechizo
7Lituana
8Interlude
9Poleckas
R. Gmez 111
B. Agulrre 114
R. Vsquez 109
A. Baza a 114
K. Flores 120
J. Avila 120
J. Phillips 106
V. Ortega 112
E. Sllvera 107
10th Race F-1' Natives4>/i Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1Conde F.Rose 109
2Recodo C. Chavez 106x
3Don Joaqun J. Rodgz. 115
4Valaria B. Agulrre 116
5Tap Girl A. Mena 112
6Villarreal J. Cadogen 108
7El Moro J. Baeza, Jr. 114x
8Golden Bal.e E. Sllvera 108
9Diana O. Chanis 110
Juan Franco Tip;
By CLOCKER
1AVIV ATO Don Catalino
2 ALMIRANTE Opex
3SIXAOLA Lolito
4HASTE STAR Hanna
5MARISCALITO Prestigio
bSANDARIN Baby Betty (e)
7MONTMARTRE Levadura
8CHACABUOO R. Light
9 INTERLUDE Miss Fairfax
10-DIANA Valaria
ONE BEST INTERLUDE
GUN CLUB
NOTES
A Jungle puma stole the show
at the shoot held on the Gamboa
Oun Club range last Sunday, Oct.
28. During a round" of skeet we
heard a commotion right next to
the range. We could see the trees
and tall gr.is., swaying as though
struck by a cyclone and could
hear hollering and squealing and
now and then a salvo of gun
shots. Finally two young hunters
emerged from the bush exhaust-
ed, but none the worse, dragging
a puma the six of a half-grown
cow. Old-timers tell us that it is
the largest ever seen In these
parts.
Perfect weather prevailed
throughout the day and all parti-
cipants had a grand time espe-
cially Eddie Francis who said
everything was right. And he was
right when he assassinated. 50
birds at 16 yards on the trap
range without a miss which
makes an average of 98 per cent
he has established with his new
gun shooting at 100 targets.
Nothing to it according to Eddie.
The other shooters were trying
hard but how can you win when
a guy shoots a perfect score. Lt.
Olmstead and "Charlie" Dlsha-
roon came In sr.cond with 46x50.
In the doubles T. J. Tassin broke
41>A"'0 and Captain Spencer 40x50.
High honors in the skeet event
went to "Pappy' Norton who fin-
ished with 47x50. Close behind
were Captain Spencer and Eddie
Francis with 46x50.
Credit for the success of this
shoot belongs to Olga Dlsharoon
who displayed her superb gift for
cooking by presenting the shoot-
ers with a Jambalaya a la Creole
that was so good everyone came
back for more
Don't go av.ay as this is not all.
A 75-bird skeet shoot will be held
at the Baluoa Gun Club Nov. 3rd,
Saturday alternoon, at the usual
hour. The first and last twenty-
five birds will be shot via the .410.
Trophies will be awarded for
high score in Class A and Class
B. There will be a $2.00 entry fee
for the trophti'c and purse to be
divided Lewis system, 50%, 30%
and 20%.
And while your gun Is still hot
step over to the Gamboa Gun
Club Sunday morning, Nov. 4,
starting aoout 9:30, and win
yourself a Dig turkey There will
be an old-fas..ioned turkey shoot
for which no experience is neces-
Fort Davis Handicap Bowling
League Gets Underway Tuesday
FORT GULICK, C. Z.-=-A nln-
vitation to enter the Fort Davis
Handicap. Bowling League has
been extended to all Army units
stationed on the Post. Some of
the units vAM enter more than
one team and a total of sixteen
teams will comprise the league.
The league will be held at the
Post Bowling Alley and will be-
gin Tuesday, Nov. 6 at 6:00 p.m.
(1st shift) and at 8:00 p.m. (2nd
shift). Each team will play all
others twice with three games
scheduled each month.
The followir.g championships
will be determined: Individual
High Average (scratch); Indivi-
dual High Game (scratch): Indi-
vidual High Onme (with handi-
cap); Individual High Series (3
games scratch); Individual High
Series (3 games handicap);
Team High Game (scratch);
Team Hig^i Game (with handi-
cap); Team High Series (3 games
scratch); Team. High 8eries (3
games wltn handicap); Team
Championship.
Each team may submit a ten-
man roster to the Post Welfare,
Athletics and Recreation, Attn:
Captain Leo J. Hock, Headquart-
ers 764th AAA Gun Battalion-
Roster must be submitted on or
before Nov. 1. The roster must
indicate the name, grade, service
number, and organization of
each player nlus the telephone
number of the team captain.
Official rules set forth in the
"Constitution, Rules and Regula-
tions" of the American Bowling
Congress (ABC), Season 1650-51,
will govern, play except as
amended because of iocal condi-
tions.
Handicap will be allowed. Han-
dicap will be established by takT
sary. Any old 12-gauge gun cap-
able of shooting 12-gauge ammu-
nition will do tne trick. Shooting
will be done at a plain paper tar-
get with a cn-ss In the center.
Whoever placts a pellet nearest
the crossing point Wins the tur-
key.
ing the difference between a
bowler's average and 200 pins
and awarding the bowler 75 per
cent of the amount as handicap.
The handicap will De computed
individually for each game for
the first 3 games bowled by any
team member; thereafter, it will
be computed on the bowler's es-
tablished average for 3 or more
games.
Participants must bowl In
bowling siMes or stocking, feet.
Protests, if any, will be made to
the Post WA & R Officer not lat-
er than 12:00 noon the first duty
day after the protested match.
Only one "dummy" may be bowl-
ed by any team during any one
game. "Dummy" score will be ten
pins lower than the lowest score
Sowled by the opposing team/for
that game. Matones may be post-
poned only with prior approval
of the Post WA t R Officer. For-
feiture will be called after a team
is late 20 minutes.
In the event of a tie game, the
teams will bowl an 11th frame
and add one-tenth of team han-
dicap for that frame. The 11th-
frame total will not be added to
total pins. Winning team of 11th
frame will have one pin added to
captain's score.
Each team will receive one
point for each game and one
point for total pins (3 games) per
match.
Request to alter rosters will be
submitted to Post WA & R Offi-
cer 48 hours before change Is to
take place
Appropriately engraved tro-
phies for all championships as
outlined in paragraph three
above will be awarded at the end
of the league.
Chief Warrant Officer John T.
Donahue, Hq. and Hq Btry, 764th
will be League Secretary and foul
line officials will be designated
by 764th Hq. from teams not
bowling.
Schedules of alley assignments
and team matches will be pre-
pared by tne Pest WA St R Offi-
cer and disseminated to dfflcers-
ln-charge and-or team captains
as appropriate prior to league
play.
Ben Hogan To May
Singles. Doubles
Ryder Cup Hatches
PINEHURST, N.C., Nov. 2 (UP)
National Open Champion Ben
Hogan has decided to play In
both the foursome and indivi-
dual matches curing the Ryder
Cup competition with England
this week ond which get under
way today
Hogan previously ask*d Amer-
ican team captain Sam Snead-to
assign him only one match. How-
ever, after a practice round at
the Plnehurst, North Carolina,
course Wednesday, Bantam Ben
said he wuulc be available tor
both types of play.
Snead says he will use Hogan
and Jimmy Demaret as one team
in the scotch' loursomes to be
played today. Snead and Lloyd
Mangrum and Jack Burke, Jr.,
and Clayton Haefner will make
up two other teams. Snead isn't
sure about the fourth team, but
he says it may be Skip Alexander
and Ed Oliver.
In the eight singles matches on
Sunday, Snead plans to use Ho-
gan, Mangiun., Burke, Haefner,
Demaret, Dutch Harrison, Henry
Ransom and nimself. ,
The United States will be
shooting for Its seventh Ryder
Cup title in nine matches.
rJJoq Hoar
Complete Assortment 1
DOG SUPPLIES
at
16 Tivoli Ave.
Tel. 2-3807
Defeat Would Wipe
BHS Championship Ho]
Tonight's football game at Balboa Stadium between U
elge and Balboa High will be the League finale for tas,
scnoolers. They still have two games on their schedull
with the Black Knights and a J. V. game with the Crist
V., but this one is a do or die effort for them.
A defeat at the hands of the Green Wave would ell
the Bulldogs from all but the thinnest mathematical cl
for a tie. In faet, anything less than a Balboa victory
just about terminate their hopes for this year. On the'
hand, If J. C. can win its last two games, this one and the)
with Cristobal, then (he whole thing would end in a
tie.
The Bulldogs will rely mainly on their crushing |
tuck to carry them through tonight's encounter. As has]
the case in all tiie games to date, they only pass enough
the defenses from ganginr up on the runs. With halfbai
May, Bob Peacher, Dick. Ostrea, and John AlbrKton set
the Red and White quarterbacks will probably call
them to pack the pigskin.
J. C. is expected to turn to the air for much of Its off
with Frank Robinson and Bill Maloney doing most of the
On the catching end of these pitches will be George Me
Alex Mc Keown, and Manuel Roy. Maloney Is also the
running threat for the Wave, operating from either a
wing or short punt formation.
PROBABLE STARTING LINEUPS
Green Wave
Manuel Roy
James Neabrey
Jaok Alexlatis
Ralph Hub
Fred Alegues
Jess Cruze
Alex McKeown
Frank Robinson
BUI Maloney
George McArthur
Nick Gorbam
Pea.-,- :
LI Bob Dotan
LT Clair Goon
LG Diek Dillm
C Fred Cotto
RG Frank Byr
RT Jerry Fox
RE BID TJnda
S BUI Dawso
Jin May
RH Bob Peach
B Sam Maph
"
Samuel Smug!
Samuel Smug Is smart, 'tis trae,
If you were he, yon would be toot
Sam ean always find good bays.
Bis secret Is to advertise!
'
\
-

HIPDROMO NACIONAL


i
(greets the [Panamanian people on this i^reat I Lational
(Holiday ana takes pleasure in inviting the (general
Public to attend the.
i

.

INDEPENDENCE CLASSIC
TOMORROW -NOVEMBER 3
8th Race (Open) 1 9/16 Mile
Purse: $5,000.00 (Added) Pool Closes: 4:40 p.m.
Quiniela
-
1. (GORSEWOOD..........C Iglesias 108 6. PlNARD..............G. Alfaro 127
2. (MAIN ROAD..........K. Flores 108
3. CHACABUCO..........V. Castillo 110
4. (GR1SU.............D. D'Andrea 120
5. (CARMELA 11...........E. Daro 106
7. TOMEBAMBA......../. Contrras 108
8. WELSH FOX..........B. Agulrre 110
9. POLVORAZO..........V. Ortega 114
10. RATHLIN LIGHT........A. Mena 114
"
.
1
Elegibles:
Montielito.......... G. Sanche 108
Coraggio......... O. Chanis 106
#_
./
\


+




.

J >*-
1 RID AT, NOVEMBER t, 1951
1!
IB PANAMA AMERICAN All WlfP^HT BAILS KEWSPAPEE
Bribery Scandal Spreads To Pro Baske
Georgia Tech Supporters Claim.
" Team Can Beat Any In The Nation
Motorbike Racers Asked
To Be Ready By 10 A.M-
h
Competitor* in the Nov. 3rd
motorcycles races are reminded
that the Technical Commission
has set 10 a.m iomorrow as the
deadline for all riders to meet at
the Juan Diaz Plaza where the
The results were highly satia-
thi
firming.
capacities
t. The 500
his is necessary so that every
possible deta.l and arrangement
be made berore starting time at
12 noo. ..." ...
The pubHc is also reminded
that the course will be closed to
an traffic at 11:46 a.m. tomor-
row. Anyone who wishes to see
the races aust be at the circuit
before that time.
The Technical Commission rt-
tt quest the public to be well; be-
haved and obey the orders of the
- -National Police This is most lm-
/rportant in oraer to avoid acci-
dents and to obtain a successful
*. Jesuit of the races.
Yesterday, at the course where
,.the rac*s will be held, about
twenty jnocor.j cles were of nclal-
" ly Trained. with the cooperation
of toe police who closed the cir-
'* cult to aU traffic.
factory and most
Twenty racers of all
took part in this event.
cc. class and Open raced togetn
er taking two laps around the
course, startup the Tery same
way they will do it tomorrow.
The speed obtained this time
was far superlcr to those obtain-
ed last Oct. 38 when there was a
practice at the same place. That
day the best lap timed was in six
minutes and twenty-three sec-
onds, whereas this time, Armls-
tead made It in the fantastic
time of five minutes and seven
seconds, what means sixty-nine
point six hunored miles per hour.
He rides a BfeA Gold Star. Sev-
eral other nderr did less than six
minutes, which gives an idea of
the thrill It la i,omg to be tomor-
row- **..
There art three cups for tne
different classes and eleven
prizes for the rest of the posts. In
the 500 cc. class there are some
rider that wish to get a shot at
the Open class prize.___________
Omphroy Tennis Tournament
Net Playing Faults
In the lame of tennis, the net
Is regarded at the standard line
of demarcation and should not
"be invaded b> an opponent.
--hitt
...ould L~
'- touched by the player who is re-
t* net may be hit by the ball
but at no tune should the net be
touched bv the olaver who is re-
turning a ball, fo wit:
If a net player Is smashing a
ban and his racquet hits the net
before the Dai' lilts the court, the
point goes to the opponent. The
net player shouid be careful not
to permit his racquet to cross the
rnefSi yQeylrg until the ball has
hit the opposite court. If he con-
tacts the ball with bis racquet
crossing the net at the moment
of Impact, be is considered as in-
vading his opponent's court and
loses the point
If a ball ii hit in the oppo-
nent's court with much undercut
and bounces back over the court
of the server, the opponent may
hit the ball from his court Into
the opposite court if he arrives in
time, but mav not stretch over
the net to play the dying ball.
He loses the point.
If a bah is placed at an ex-
treme ang.e against a player and
the ball Is returned from the pro-
ximity of the fence, returned ball
must cross net or net post before
it can be considered good. If the
ball is returned and drops good
in the opposite court but did not
cross the net between either net
eost. the point is considered lost
y the player returning the ball,
who should endeavor to place the
ball at a diagonal angle in order
to cross the net. -i L,
These rules will be strictly oo-
served throughout play by any
and all playore, and players err-
ing will lose the
and pi
ATLANTA, Nov. 2 (UP)-Oeor-
gla Tech faca in Atlanta are
spreading a confident line of talk
these days. ....
Tech supporters declare mat
the nation. And when you nar-
their boys can beat any team in
row that down to the home folks
part in the country, taht means
Tennessee.
The general opinion in Georgia
seems to be that Tenneatees
number one national rating is
one notch tor high. Tech fans
golnt to the season record. Coach
obby Dodd's tuam has won more
games than Tennessee, and from
tougher opponents.
Tech knocked over Southern
Methodist of the Southwest Con-
ference, ana moved on to defeat
five Southeastern foesFlorida,
Kentucky, LSI', Auburn and Van-
derbllt.
Tennessee nas had an easier
time with five opponentsMis-
sissippi Stale. Duke. Chattanoo-
ga, Alabama and Tennessee
Tennessee fans doubt heated-
ly that even Georgia Tech can
handle th power generated by
Coach Bob Keyland's Volunteer
steamroller And the argument
will remain m the talking stage
unless both teams draw bids to
the same bowl game.
That's not impossible...most
bowl committees usually find
their talent iu two different con
-ferences. BJt both Tech and
Tennessee aa well as Baylor and
Marylandare at the top of the
Sugar Bowi list It also Is possi-
ble that the Orange Bowl will
consider both teams.
Meanwhile, Georgia Tech
Coach Bobby Dodd says a bdWI
meet with Tei-nessee would be
all right with him. Dodd says
he'd rather meet a single wing
team like Tennessee than a split
"T" offense team like Maryland.
The Duke Blue Devils -will
bring the spht "T" to Tech's
doorstep tomorrow with Teeh a
10-polnt favorite.
Dado Marino
Retains World
title
Referee Charged With
'Accepting' $3,000
By UNITED PRESS
NEW YORK, Nov. 2.The sports bribery
scandal today spread to profesaional basketball with
the arrest of referee Sol Levy, 41, on charges of tak-
ing $3,000 in bribes.
Since Levy was the first official of either col-
lege or professional sport to be arrested that also
marked a sudden new. turn in District Attorney
Frank Hogan's investigation of fixed basketball
game*. .
Levy was arrested this morning after night
long questioning at the District Attorney' office. He
was accused of accepting $1,000 each for three games
played in November 1950Ho officiate in such a
manner that the point spread would be shaved."
In other words, Levy was charged with regulat-
ing the game so as to limit the winning margin of
one team, holding it below the margin predicted in
the wagering._____________________^
Major League News
By UNITED PRESS
f
4
>
>.
Meet
Scotland's
Favourite Son
SOSM llie-JUU 60IN6 STSONC
JOHNNIE
WALKER
SCOTCH WHISKY
lie fashionable drink everywhere
jk> a iwU,i*w>hfcPiwm.Ka~'
HONOLULU. Nov. S Da-
do Marine ei Hawaii last night
outboxed enallenger Terry Allen
f England to win the decision
and rtala the world's flyweight
championship in a 15 rewid
match before MIS partisan fight
fans who paid SM.lN to sea the
f Tent,
Allen forced the fight aU the
way, bat Marino stood Saek hold-
ing his fire before Allen's wind-
mill attack and drove him off
every time he gat too close.
However, Marino never eaite
succeeded in getting Allen Into a
corner for the kill, although he
had the Englishman greggy in
the 14th round when Marina
turned loose his only concentrat-
ed attack.
This was Marino's first defense
of the title he won from AUen IS
months ago. Marine was a slight
favorite to emerge victorious.
>>

4

y
Listen to...
THE FOOTBALL
PROPHET
Every Saturday at 12:30 p.m?
on
HOG 840 on your Dial
The Football Prophet
Picks the winners of Saturday and Sunday's biff
si f^1|Vn ffumes. -. And He's seldom wrong.
The PROPHETS winning average last year 773.
Don't make any bets until you listen
CLEVELAND. Nov. 2The Cle-
veland Indians will open trade
talk with the New York Yankees
and Boston Red Sox within the
next three weeks.
General Manager Hank Green-
berg says he know the Indtans
wUl have to bid high for T e d
Williams of the Red Sox. But
Greenberg Indicates Cleveland
definitely is interested in tne
Boston slugger If he can be ob-
tained without costing the In-
dians too much.
Greenberg says he hasnt dis-
cussed any deals yet but plans to
sound out Boston and New York
before the draft meeting in Cin-
cinnati on "November IM. TOS
former Detroit home run hitter
laughed when a newsman men-
tioned Wllllans, with HU hot
temperament," might be hard to
"I've always found Ted to be
very pleasant off the field''san
Greenberg. "As for his behavior
on the field, it's bis Mltlve
nature and resentment that help
make him the great and_cJor-
iul player he Is."
fntW YO!W.-The New- Yark
baseball Yankees haverewatded
the man,known as 'The Build-
lng Genius" behind their world
championship clubs.
Co-owner Dan Topping has
torn up the contract of General
Manager and Vice-President
George Weiss And he's given
Weiss another contract. Topping
wouldn't mention salary or how
g the new contract runs, ex-
cept to say "it* better" and "It's
a long term c: in tract."
Webs has been with the Yan-
kees since 1W2 and Is credited
with bunding the farm system
which gave the Yanks 12 Amer-
ican League pennants and .11
world championship since that
time. He was farm director until
IMS when he moved up as gen-
eral manager and vlce--presl-
"pHILADHLPHIA. The Phil-
adelphia Phils still have confi-
dence In Manager Eddie Sawyer
even though his 19M National
League champions dropped to
fifth place this year.
President Btf> Carpenter has
signed the 4l-yar-ofc Sawyarto
a three year contract, carpenter
refuses to name the salary, but
ay it is pegged on a flat salary
plus a bonus for attendance.
The young Philadelphia owner
lay'rmdorag thto to express
my confidence in Sawyer' abil-
ity as a manager."____________
Sawyer rei used comment on
vhether he plans any trades or
thakeupes.
"I have nothing to say about
the players now," says Sawyer.
"The coaching staff will be re-
tained unless any of the coaches
prefer to leave of their accord."
The Phil ccaches are Benny
Bengough, Cy Perkins, Maje Mc-
Donnell and Dusty Cooke.
Carpenter apparently feels the
collapse of key players uch as
Jim Konstanty. Del Ennis and
Mike Goliat was responsible for
the Phil collapsenot Sawyer's
managing. Relief pitcher Kons-
tanty, most valuable player In
1950, won only four games and
lost 11 this season. There has
been talk that Konstanty and
Lnnla are trade bait. Second
baseman OoKat slumped so bad-
Sthat he was sent down to
altlmore.
to
The Football Prophet
HOG 840
Canadian Club

Tourney Reaches
Semifinal Stage
The Canadian Club Tourna-
ment has reached the semifinal
stage at the Brazos Brook Oolf
course.
Don Mathleson, who was pick-
ed by many to win the tourna-
ment, was eliminated by a score
of 3 and 1 in the third round of
play by Lt. Waggoner.
Don had to give too many
strokes to nid younger opponent
and, as usual when a Scotchman
gives, lt hurt.
Howard Flnnagan also upset
the dope when he defeated stylist
Paul Richmond In another colse
match, 2 and 1.
Pita Humphries, the banker.
'Chased" Jim Hoverson out of
the tournament with a game evi-
dently so overwhelming that de-
tail were not placed on the bul-
letin board.
Prankle Day staggered through
against Dr. VestalMorris In the
closest match- uf the day, going
one-up at tht ISth hole.
The semifinal matches, which
have to be played by the evening
of Nov. 5, find Waggoner against
Finnegan with the last named
favored to win.
In the lower bracket, the tight
game of banker Humphries com-
bined with the margin of strokes
he receives should overcome Day.
Hose Jet' Virtually
Cinches Filly Honors
With Demoiselle Win
NEW YORK, Nov. 3 (UP)
Maine Chance Farm's "Rose Jet"
all but wrapred up "fllly-of-the-
year" honors Wednesday with a
win in the $25,000 Demoiselle
Stake at Jamaica.
Jockey Hedley Woodhouse took
the brown daughter of Kentucky
Derby winner "Jet Pilot" into
the lead at the start of the mile
and one 18th teat for two year
old fillies. Woodhouse took Rose
Jet near the rail on the first
tunv then held a slim margin
jirough the backstretch and fln-
Iv.-.
Fordham Quarter Fakts To Halves,
Pitches To Fallback For End Sweep
i
Another of a serie of key plays
diagramed and written by fam-
ous coaches for NBA Service.
By ED DANOWSKI
Ferdham Coach
NEW YORK (NBA) Roger
Fran is the key figure \n Ford-
ham'a 22-60
Cross.
Qutr terback
Franz 1 the
best ball-hand-
ler I have eter
seen In college.
The lanky,
blonde sopho-
more fake to
the right half-
back, then to
the left half-
back, finally
pitches to the
fullback going
around right
end.
The guards pull out and lead
the interference.
Franz keepa the ball well hid-
den, Is deadly accurate on pas-
ses. The Norwood, o., boy lack
only experience, is developing
Into a real triple threat.
The Ram are predominantly
sophomores this year and are
fairly encouraging for the next
Sfuanggt
al turn, with "Papooae" always
in hot pursuit.
Rose Jet waited until the final
40 yards before pulling away to
a three quarter length win over
Papoose. "No Score" ran third In
the field of eight.
Rose Jet war. timed in one min-
ute. 46 and one fifth seconds on
a fast track and paid five-60,
three-10 and two-40.
ITHACA,NYCornell has lost
the service, of left halfback Bob
Engel for the rest of the season
because of a knee Injury. Engel
suffered the Injury Oct. 13 In the
Harvard game andaspravated-it
I in last week' defeat at the hands
of Princeton.
couple of seasons. Our defense'
ha Improved above that of- ltfO.
with' enough depth spread
around to cover the holes left
by graduation.
NEXT: Jew Gavin ef Dayton.
SAFES
DESKS
FILING CABINETS
ALL TYPES OP
OFFICE CHAIRS
REMINGTON RANO
SYSTEMS
Ave. Tivoll No. IS
Tel. 2-2010
I
Allie Reynolds
Is U.P. 'A.L
Player-Of-Year
NEW YORK. Nwr. I (OT) -
Twenty fwwr J&WLJFlP*
oiled by the United rrese have
named right-hander Alne Eeyn-
elas ef the NeW Terk Tank tes the
American League Playec-ef-tbe-
Tear.
These writers. three from each
lean* city, east vetos fer aoven
Ers. Banner-., to tornelde
was first baaeman Verrls Pain of
the Philadelphia A's whe lad the
iMgwa with a 144 batting aver-
Others considered were abort-
td Pbll guante, ihitd baseman
hande* Nad Garver of the St.
Louis Browns, teherIlob_Teller
ef Cleveland and J"*Jf-
mie Bfitwsw ef the Chleage trMto
Sox ahvate wen the award mat
T*BeVelds Pttehad tww we-h*.
-ran fames last SI all, the
first time an American League
iteher ever pitched twe In ewe
fear. Alne ne-htt Oeveeand ew
July 12 and repeated against
Bwatra en Sept 2ftaa gasne that
Itecbed pennant tie far the.
_ feaaaat _
Reynolds, whe
17
waeTaBd feat eight, lad Cap
haw
*
ALL SALES and DELIVERY SERVICE ef oar
BEERS and CANADA DRY PRODUCTS
WILL BE SUSPENDED at ALL OUR PUNTS
oa November 3rd In celebrate!, of
INDEPENDENCE DAY
We wM be open for bnriwest
on November 4tii.
.

-
cervecera nacional, s. a
(National Brewery, Inc.)
T-
=



'

ALLIE REYNOLDS AL PLAYER-OF-YEAR
f"" ^^^^ m m am
m.--------------------------;------------------------------------------------------------------'-----------------------------:----------------------------:---------------.______________<- m
It's the End Of An Old Clinic -
"
Gorgas Landmark Is No More
By Amy Sartain
'I The
,"y -m [.




schools and police stations.
Then I have taken these same
key to the old clinic buildings and moved them to
building at 273 Gorgas Road other localities for I learned
as been turned into the Build- that townsitcs grew very rapid-
ftig Division and now she ly and just as rapidly disap-
Stands a lonely and sad old prared when they had served
place aw ailing the axe of the their purpose,
executioner. Undoubtedly .he I have sat on the porch af-
tt outmoded and a liability to ter clinic hours (I repeat after
pe Canal Zone Government, hours) and felt like a chess
ut to me she will always be player as I would help juggle
ijemembered as a building with the present houses with these
a very big heart. of the past. With the help of
The clinic was enjoyed par- my friends I would move the
ticularly by the old timers who Nurses Quarters back up to the
felt right at home. They liked site of the residence of* Mr.
the rocking chairs and the idea Lewis Moore and put the fever
that there were no steps to ward there I would then move
climb. The newcomers liked I he Board of Health Labora -
the old building in the same lory down to the Ancon Dis-
manner in which they liked pensary to make way for Dr.
museums. They were determin- Reeder's ENT Clinic. The pre-
ed to think that it had been =ent Administration of- Gorgas
built by the French and were would disappear for former
resentful If told otherwise. Surgical wards and become a
I decided not to interfere much less pretentious edition
With their dreams even if they on the site of Section C. I
thought that Morgan had sack- would then move the Gover- I
eti the place. nor's house out to Culebra and i
' return It to Col. Goethals in
Although not being able to order to replace it with the!
boast of the longevity of her; isolation ward. Whenever my
neighbor. House 285, which; friends and I would become a
was actually left by the French little confused in our recons-
#ie was one of the first built truction, we would always con-
by the Americans. Erected in suit Mr. Aubrey Todd, a mem-
1906, the building was a part ber In good standing of the
of the large housing project Cardiac Clinic, and a former
promoted by the ICC Commi messenger of Dr. Gorgas. He
Sion for their employes. She, was an oracle of wisdom to me.! It is, there were some who com-
wlth several others of the same I have listened to some heat- | plained that they had missed
type, were assigned to the doc- ed arguments between workers too many boats and had wast-
tors and their families. Prior of the Sanitation and Engine- ed their lives. However, the
to this the doctors had lived ering Departments as to which majority felt as If they had
In the old French hospital division contributed more to been a part of > vivid and col-
wards, the success of the Canal. Work-. orful page of history and were
From the time that the old lng for the hospital made me grateful,
residence was converted Into a little partial toward Dr. Gor-1 Now that we have moved
t clinic building for Gorgas gas. or maybe it was because Into our new clinic, there will
Hospital in 1941, It had a of the twinkle in his eye that be many of my old friends
friendly, happy atmosphere and I had heard so much about, whom I won't see. They will
Often I felt as If I should serve Nevertheless, I learned to deep- be the ones for whom the
tea. When we first started to ly respect the "Colonel" as Col- steps will seem too high and
eharge a consultation fee, It onel Goethals was called. I too difficult,
seemed like a breach of hos- As the patients rocked back' I shall miss hearing "Goor;
pitality on my part. and forth and told their stor- Morning Nurse." (To them 1
The place seemed conducive les, I gained a mental picture!------------------------------------------------
to the swapping back and forth of the construction period. My \ .^ _^ _.
Of stones and the construction picture always had a back- : |\| |7,.__^__ |_ |)..l IV.,.... ...... I
of the Canal became a clear ground of dirt, being lifted by 'J/lCW JT 011111113 I III I OI>V HI (1
and indelible project to me. I huge shovels, dirt rising in the '
AN INDEPENDENT^---------
DAILY NEWSPAPER

Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951
FIVE CENTS

Eisenhower Places Duty First,
Political Parties Well Behind

l
h
Aubrey Todd, former messenger for Dr. Gorgas, and still
working at Balboa Heights.
could visualize*- these same air from dynamite, hundreds
people coming here for adven- of dirt trains like huge spider
tore, for security, or as a part | webs In the bottom of the
Of a tremendous challenge. Canal and workers covered
Many times have I rebuilt Em-, with dirt, tolling In sun and
pire and Culebra and located rain to complete a stupendous
the ICC hotels. YMCA h-iW- Job.
tegs, the disbursing office, Human nature being what
In I dolands Oil Dispute
By DREW PEARSON
However, the Justice Depart-
ment has not yet given its okay
to the legal opinion of the In-
terior Department.
Philip Perlman, Solicitor Cen-
tral of the United States, concurs
that the Surpl'is Property Act of
1949 definitely gives authority to
the President to take over Tide-
lands Oil.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2 Se-
cretary of the Interior Chapman
| has just laid before President
, Truman a new proposal for solv-
ing the loii',-",narled Tidelands
Oil controversy.
A decision on it Is expected
soon.
The propotal Is to apply the
Surplus Property Act of 1949, one
cf the most .weeping acts af-
fecting federal property ever
passed by Cor.gress.
Martin While solicitor of the
Interior DepaMment. has come
up with an opinion that this act
gives ample authority for the Se- i
cretary of the Interior, acting on .. ... _, .
Uehalf of the President, to oper- A hard-fighting Black Knight
ate submerged oil lands off the 'Working Boys) football team,
coast of California and the Gulf wltn on'y flve reserves on the
of Mexico. bench, last night won over Cris-
Under the present plan, Secre-! t0al High School's Tigers 6-0 In
tary Chapman would recognize a thrilling battle,
all equities In the present oil1 The story of the game was not
By Lyle C. Wilson
SUPRIME HEADQt_>JlTERS,
Rocquencourt, France, Nov. 2
(OP)Gen. Dwlght D. Elsen-
hower said today he does not
aspire to be President 'of the
United States.
But he will put duty before
all other considerations in 1952.
And when he puts duty first,
that does not appear to elimi-
nate the possibility of his ac-
cepting the Republican Presi-
dential nomination next year.
I had a long conversation
with Elsenhower today at this
NATO headquarters near the
Paris suburb of 8t. Germain.
He made it clear to the poli-
tical questions of this Wash-
ington reporter that the time
am an honorary nurse Instead has not yet arrived when he
of clerk.) can answer the $64 question.
I shall miss the constant re-1 Tnat question Is: Will you be
ply to my inquiry concerning candidate for President of
their health which was "I am,the Unlted states?
much better, praise God." The General just isn't 8ayteg.:aifferenrin Three""monSs."
Sometimes I believe that they He isn't saying yes and he Isn't There is at least as much rea-
onlv reiiorted to the clinic to I saying no. son to believe the general would
humor ^e^octor or to keep! jg '<*. he Is avoiding poll- ,, .,. to return to civilian
their promise to him, for they "cal discussions and the ap- ilfe m 1952 M to believe other-
completely turned over to the pearance of political activity so wise.
Lord all responsibility of their completely that even his plan Scores of congressional and
blood pressure and blood su- for a visit to Fort Knox, n.y.. business visitors have tried to
gar. For them I am sorry that! and Washington announced smoke out Elsenhower's future
the Clinic days at Bldg. 273 yesterday by the White House pIans ln tht pMt glx or e, ht
has carried the "top secret
label here.
The General feared a leak
here might make it appear that
he was ordering himself home
without President Truman's
knowledge perhaps to play
some Presidential politics.
After the White House an-
nouncement, he told the United
Press this Is an official junket,
plus a family weekened, plan-
ned since last spring and de-
layed by the row kicked up by
does not regard It a duty
and certainly not his to take
on the Job of saving or reviving
any political party, republican
or otherwise.
But he is on record, as to
duties, that no man could re-
fuse to serve as President.
And there can be no doubt In
the mind of any person who
listens to the general now or
who read his Speeches during
his brief time out of uniform
that Eisenhower will be a Re-
publican in civil life.
The general has a very de-
finite idea of what his duty
Is right now.
He was sent to Europe to put
western military re-armament
against Communism on the
rails. His present duty is to alt
In the saddle at SHAPE and
avoid political pronouncements.
But the rearmament job is on
the rails, even If not moving
fast. And duty may look a bit
are over.
Working Boys
Lick Cristbal
The former Clinic Building was one of the first houses in the
Ancon Hospital Grounds built by the Americans. The front
(top) and side views are shown here.
eases granted by the states prior
to the Supreme Court's decision.
This would mean that the city
of Long Beach California, and
various oil companies which se-
cured leases to the submerged oil
lands prior to the Supreme
Court's decision, would continue
to operate pretty much as Is.
Companies s.nd organizations
securing lea;:es after the Su-
preme Court ruled that Tidelands
Oil belongs to the Federal gov-
ernment would lose their leases.
All future leases would then be
put up for bids by the Federal
government and would be sold
tc the hlghe-t bidder within 40
days.
Secretary o the Interior Chap-
man believes it is important to
unsnarl the present controversy,
partly in order to speed oil pro-
auction on tin West Coast and
off Louisiana
His plan, as described above
r.nd as outlined to the White
House, follows pretty much the
present OMahoney Long com-
promise bill which recognizes Fe-
deral controi but protects the
equities of present leaseholders.
The major oil companies have
now thrown lhlr support behind
this compromise.
months.
He has balked so far and it
appears likely. Sen. James H.
Duff who is coming here next
Maersk Line Heads
To Visit Isthmus
month "to get the green light
from Ike" for a campaign to
nomiante him on the Republic-
an ticket will fare no better
than the others.
The general has made it
quite clear he will not make
any statement about his poli-
tical leanings until he is ready
to resign his SHAPE command.
And the time for that hasn't
arrived yet.
Perhaps the most significant
word in our whole conversation
on this subject was a word he
didn't utter.
That word was "No."
He was willing to discuss his
trip back to the United States,
now that the White House has
announced ft.
The general would have been
in the United States last spring
except for the row kicked up by
the firing of Gen. Douglas Mc-
Arthur. So today's Journey has
been long postponed.
By advice unknown or on his
own motion, he stayed away
from the United States last
Eivind Fransen and Knud
Winkel, executives of Moller
Steamship Company, Inc., New
York, will be arriving at Tocu-
the firing of Gen. Douglas Mac- men Airport by' the El Inter
Arthur.
The one statement permitted
to be directly attributed to him
was that he does not aspire to
the Presidency. He has said
the same thing before.
Prior to the 1948 Presidential
campaign Eisenhower wrote to
his cheering section that he
did not want to be President
of the United States.
You get the idea from chat-
ting with Elsenhower that he
Pedro Miguel Boat
Club To Celebrate
Al Meigs Day Sunday
The Pedro Miguel Boat Club
in the score alone. The Knights
ran up a total of 19 first downs
to the Tigers' three. Cristobal's
only Jhreat to score was on Ar-
nold Mannings' run that was wl" celebrat* its anrfBal "Al
callee back on his going odt of Meigs" Day this 8unday, at
bounds "Port Melg.-' in Pedro Miguel.
The knights were constantly a ,The celebration honors retired
scoring threat from the opening oldtixner Al Meigs who was active
?! e b.rlllla,nt Ingle-wing race a,,. the Governor's Cup a-
Knight center Jim Fraser.
gun with Angermuller, Dedeaux.
Thompson and Herring baffling
the Tigers completely by taking
beautiful handoffs through the
line for conslstant games.
The game was played on a ve-
ry muddy field and much of the
credit for the beautiful perform-
ance of the Knight backfield
must be given to the perfect play
n affairs of the Boat Club and
local small tnatlng for many
years.
The prorrani is open to the
public and this year's celebration
promises to be a gala event, Boat
Club officials aid. Racing and
aquaplaning bv some of Pedro
Miguel's bathing beauties will be
a feature of this year's "Al Meigs"
Day In addition to the special
Early In the fourth quarter,
ward.
Other prize* will be awarded
for the various races. These
after a succession of gains j prizes have been donated by the
through the middle of the line, following Panam City business
the Knights brought the ball to firms:
the Tigers' five-yard line. Kodak Panama. Ltda., Bazar
Internacional, Fifth Avenue,
Burnlce Herring, regular right: George Novey. Inc.. Cardoze it
end, playing wingback, took a Lindo, Agendas Pan. Americanas,
hand-off from Angermuller and Colon Motors, Smoot and Pare-
Americano Saturday morning.
Moller Steamship Company.
Inc., is the New York office of the
Maersk Line, which has a fleet
of 53 ships aggregating a ton-
nage of close to 500,000.
Maersk Line vessels in the New
York-Far East run are transiting
the Canal about four times a
month.
Fransen and Winkel are visit-
ing the local agents of the Ma-
ersk Line: C. B. Fenton and Co.,
inc.
Voice Of America
To Air Program:
Salute To Panama
The Voice of America will
broadcast special programs in
Spanish and English tomorrow
evening, November 3, comme-
morating the independence of
the Republic of Panam.
A Spanish program on the
Panama Canal will be heard
from 7:45 to 7:58 p, m. Panama
time, and a "Salute to Panam"
In English will feature state-
ments by Ambassador to the
United States Roberto Heurte-
matte and a distinguished Ame-
rican from 9:45 to 9:55 p, m.
The National Broadcasting
Company'* Symphony Orches-
tra will feature Roque Cordero's
orchestral movement on native
themes In a presentation that
promises to be of Interest to
the people of Panam.
Voice of America transmis-
sions can he heard locally over
station HOG.
spring and avoided for the
time being getting mixed up in
a bitter controversy.
His headqut/ters was aston-
ished yesterday when a visiting
newspaperman casually Inquir-
ed if it were true that the su-
preme commander was plan-,
nlng a quick trip to the United
8tates. This leak came from
the Ulnlted States. The general's
aides denied It.
But when Eisenhower was
questioned, he laughed and said
he would discuss his plans pro-
vided his visitors would no!
"yeall them pending the
White House announcement.
He wanted it understood all
around that Mr. Truman knew
he was coming and what for.
The general said he hoped to,
be able to visit his army son
and the Junior Elsenhower's fa-
mily at Fort Knox without prior ,
publicity.
Those hopes went out the^
window with the White House
announcement tHat he would
leave here today for the United
SUtes and show up in Wash-
ington Monday.
If the Commanding Officer at
Fort Knox and the citizens re-
siding nearby want to do the
general a favor, they can skip
any celebration they may be
planning for fiii arrival
The private meeting between]
Elsenhower and President Tru-
man announced by the White
House for next week will givei
them a chance for the first
time to discuss 1962, If they de-
sire to do so.
Ancon Soldier
Is Promoted
On Korea Service
WITH THE 2ND INF. DIV. IN
KOREA. Nov. 2Miguel D. Gon-
sales of Ancon, C. Z. was re-
cently promoted to the rank of
sergeant while fighting In Ko-
rea with the 2nd Infantry Divi-
sion.
Gonzales, who enlisted in the
Army in January, is fighting
with the division's 7nd Tank
Battalion. He Joined the divi-
sion in Korea In April.
f dunged over for the score. The
ry for the extra point was un-
successful.
des. National Distillers, National
Breweries, Auto Service and the
Bazar Espaol.
Illustrated bv Walt Scott
NOFEAR
STRIKE OR NO STRIKE
$IAR$WILL DELIVER
YOUR CHRISTMAS ORDER
* IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS
REPRESENTATIVES FOR ^^EARS, ROEBUCK AN CO?
Opposite Ancon Post; Office
PANAMA
10th A Melndex Avenue
COLON


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