The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01268

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe** Abraham Lincoln.
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TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, B. P., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1*51
FIVE CENTS

Earvptian Tanks Rumble Across Suez Zone
cV Jl / __
As British Troops, Ships Race To Canal
TRASH BRINGS CAPTURETwo North Korean prisoners stand stiffly after their capture, un-
der tt" watchful em of the Marines who captured them. The Marines flew a htUcopter.to
the front lines to rescue met; who were trapped when an earlier helicopter crashed. While
there, they seized the two Reds. ______________________L _____________________
(NEA Telephoto)
COLLINS MEETS TTTOGen. J. Lawton Collins (left). VS.
Army Chief of Staff, speaks v.iui Marshal Tito (right) at a
reception In Tito's home In Belgrade. YuRoslavia. Collins and
Gen. Earle E. Partridge (center) visited Yugoslavia during a
tour of European defense Installations.__________
---------,----------------------1------------------------_
Zonions May Fallow Game In
Miami Via Local Broadcast
The scores of the Balboa High
School-Mluml Jackson football
fame in Miami Saturday night,
he first pame to be played in
[the United States by. a local
school team, will be broadcast
I over Armed Fo ees Radtq Service
'Saturday night if atmospheric
conditions permit.
Arrangements for transmis-
sion of the scores to John F.
Bunting at AFRS have been
made by P. C. Compba, R. M.
Howe, ana F. H. Lerchen, local
amateur rrdio operators, and an-
other "hair" in Miami.
It is hoped that band condi-
tions Saturday night will per-
mit the local amateur opera-
tar to receive scores from the
Miami station at the end of
eacb quarter.
A memec-r" of the Canal Zope
arty in .Miami whi telephone
t scores to the Miami radio
i operator.
The game will be played at 7:30
.m. Saturday in the Orange
Bwl
Tha Balboa High School squad
Iof 26 player left the Isthmus by
Icharter pkne *esteroay and ar-
ired to Miami at 2:10. They will
turn Monday
The. squad la accompanied bv
jr Harol C Deering, school
[phvsician; .oarhes John C. Faw-
tt. and Paul Dreska: T.F. Hot
Director of the Physical Educa-
tion and Recreation Branch.
Pettingllt will remain In the
United StaUs until Oct. 25 to in-
terview se\eral school principals
and athletic directors concern-
ing the possibility of further
games between Canai Zone teams
and teams In the United States.
Flares Raise
Hopes
(UP)
Mass., Oct. 19
concentrated search
was being made today of the area
50 miles outhwest of Newfound-
land where a C-54 cargo plane
ay
yellow flares that raised hopes
yesterday evening sighted three
for (he survival of the 11 United
States Air Forct flyers who dis-
appeared with their Strato-
freighter four days ago on a
flight from the Azores to West-
over.
The C-54 slg.ited the. flares in
Cabot Strait, between Newfound-
land and Prince Edward Island.
Poor weather prevented search
planes fnrr. following up the
sighting last night but condi-
tions are expected to Improve.
An SA-16 amphibious plane,
one of about 75 planes searching
in bad weather, also sighted
flares yesterday in the same area
where a patrol plane reported
seeing a limiting light" Tuesday
night and where weak SOS sig-
nals picked up by searchers were
believed to have originated.
The air-sea search was main-
tained throughout yesterday
though a storm had moved into
the area.
Driving rain and a low celling
hampered the hunt but officials
said it wou.d continue as long as
possible.
Search planes spotted what
they thought was a yellow dye
marker. 490 m.Ies east of Cape
Cod Wednesday but after in-
specting It at low altitude, pilots
said it was on!v an oil slick re-
flecting the sunlight
Flight B,'' 1st Air Rescue
Squadron's :wr 8B-i7"s that left
Aibrook early vesterday to Join
the search work arrived In Ber-
muda at 7:U2 and 8:30 p.m. yes-
terday.
UN Infantrymen
Close On Kumsong
o
Red Cops Move
Into US Zone
Of W. Berlin
8TH ARMY HO.., Korea, Oct. New Jersey provided gunfire
10 (UP) United Nations ar-| support for 8th Army troops
tillery smashed Into burning over 18 miles Inland, near Kan-
Kumsong today as tank-led song and Kosong.
United Nations infantrymen1 The battleship poured more
drove to within two miles of than 150 tons of high explo-
the Reds' vital supply center. slves on the Reds, knocking out
In central Korea.. |many mortar and artillery po-
Allied units are converging sitlons which had been giving
from three directions on the vi- our troops trouble,
tal highway Junction city which I The destroyer Waller from
at one time was the Red supply Task Force 5 gave heavy gun-
center for the entire eastern i fire, support to troops further
front. north.
Chinese Reds defending the! The escort carrier Rendova
city are reported to be Inexps- met with supply ships from the!area was "pait of the Russian
rlenced, and lacking the fana- Pacific Fleet .8ervice Force and zone."
BERLIN, Oct. 10 (UP) Com-
munist East German police last
night moved into and claimed,
as a part of t'.ie Russian zone of
occupation, an American-admin-
istered district of Berlin.
West Berlin police said 300 of
the Red "People's Police" moved
into the little community of
Stelnstsecken, on the border of
the American sector of the divid-
ed city and the Soviet zone of
Germany.
The Communist police said the
tical spirit of the troops they refueled. and took on supplies
relieved. at sea.
Nevertheless the Communist' The United States destroyers
used heavy mortar and artillera Thompson and Carmlck patrol-
lire today In their effort to1 led the coast from Chongjln in
hold the United Nations' Kum- t h e extreme north of Korea
sons drive, now In its seventh o.'hward to Sonjln.
ay i The British frigate Black
In\ small, bitter battles north- Swan and New Zealand frigate
west of Yonchon. on the west-1 Taupo again fired at enemy
ern front, A'.'ied troops failed troops around Pungdongni as
to throw Chinese defenders of
two hill positions.
Fierce Chinese resistance also
stalled a United Nations at-
tempt to take control, of the
highest hill on the eastern
front -
The TTnlted ;SUtes_bttlesmy f Wonsan.
RP President Says
No # mi?e For Amulfo Arias
they sailed up the Han river.
A full moon lighted the Ko-
rean countryside for "night
hecklers" Irom the big United
States carrier Essex as they
struck at Red truck convoys In
the busy highway network west
iiif area has been in dispute
ever since the four-power occu-
pation of Benin began in 1045.
When the e&st-west boundary
vas drawn, trie area was placed
under the Jurisdiction of the
American sector. Soviet zone
authorities na/e argued repeat-
edly it should have been in their
occupation one.
The action last night followed
i- warning by the Communist
East German Foreign Minister
Georg Dertlnger that reprisals
would be taken against West
Berlin unless the west German
republic took part in Russian-
sponsored taiks for the unlfica-
' iPon?.r'? Ullu ror W unifica- Egyptian euetom official at
tfajfttrfOfrmyT. r^_T_ &x* WS aBeiMng^r- xe
"tf- ~U~-----*** throH-h thp non to the British
CAIRO, Oct. 19 (UP) Another bortalion of BriHs'i
troops has left Cyprus for the tense Suez Canal Zone an !
two more British destroyers, the Chequers and the Che
ron, have left Malta for Egyptian waters
Press reports here say Egyptian army marine and a*
force reservists are being called up.
A British communique reports an Egyptian armorc I
column, including 16 Sherman tanks moving through tr
Canal Zone though apparently without seeking fight.
At one place entrenched Egyptian and British so-
diers are facing each other across the Canal.
The British cruiser Liverpool | troops go Into action, the no
Is standing by at Malta with oth- < said.
er British reinforcements await-
ing orders.
British troops are arriving
steadily at the three main Ca-
nal Zone ports, Port Said. Ismal-
11a and Suez and Royal Air Force
air traffic into the Canal Zone
Is heavy.
The roving Egyptian armored
column, comprising 16 tanks, 12
armored cars arid infantry re-
mained stationary all day yester-
day about half way between Cai-
ro and Suez.
It was under constant obser-
vation from Royal Air Forre
planes, which proposed later to
drop notes to it from the Brit-
ish commander laying down the
area In which it will be permitted
to operate.
The column was last reported
moving back towards Cairo.
The British communique re-
ported all Canal Zone towns
quiet, but the position at Ismai-
lia had worsened.
US Offers Panama Additional
$360,000 As Aid For Highway
. ._ un -.-ii-. The Republic of Panam will
A rumor that a bill granting be oUtIf an additional $380,000
amnesty to former President Ar- bv tQe Uniteri states of America
nulfo Arias and his followers who aj farther aid to Panam in the
have been in Jail since May 10 construction of the Panamanian
last would be introduced m the section of the Inter-American
National Assembly, galvanized Highway, it was announced to-
both President Alciblades Arose- day Dy the Unt'.ed 8tates Embas-
mena and Assemblymen;Into ac- sy.
tlon yesterday. Monthly deposits which have
While the Deputies were deba- not yet been made in full by
ting on the rumor. President panam In accordance with pre-
Arosemena sent a message to the
Assembly warning that he will
oppose any sort of amnesty bill
the soions should approve re-
garding those individuals held
responsible for the May 10 klll-
lnes.
The rumor also brought Urge
numbers of spectators to the As-
sembly. Among them was Mrs
Alfredo L. Gomes, widow of the
chief of the Presidential guard
who was killed during the selge
on the Presidencia.
Mrs. Gomez was assured by De-
puty Marcos Robles, who took
the floor as soon as the afternoon
session began, that her husband's
death would not go unpunished.
Following a motion by Deputv
Luis Q. elerin. one minute of
silence was observed for Gomez
and his aide, Lt. Juan Flores,
who also was killed during the
uprising.
President Arosemena's warn-
ing to the Assembly was delivered
by Minister of Agriculture Da-
vid Sawjdio.
vlous commitments to match
United States contributions, are
to be deposited in the Joint
Highway Fupi' by Panam as a
condition precedent to Panama's
receiving the'addltlonal $360,000
from the Uniud States.
Panam, to qualify for this
additional $360,000, would be ex-
pected to deposit its matching
fhare of $180.-'HM), thus making a
Light RP Plane
Crashes In Tonosi
Another AGSA light plane
went down yesterday, according
to a report released bv the Min-
istry of Government and Jus-
tice today.
The report revealed that the
plane, piloted by Miguel Arela,
crashed in Tonosi. near the
town of Valle Rico. No passsen-
gers were aboard the plane. The
pilot was rescued and taken* to
the hospital for emergency
treatment.
Bars, Beaches, Barbershops, Cabanas
Are Miami Vets Idyllic Schoolrooms
MIAMI, la.. Oct. 19 (UP) ans Admin..-.tratlon for training Two of thi 16 Mlamlan were instructors to student records ln-
The FBI jrresttd 18 employes of and supplies supposedly given to caught in Detroit. dicatlng that the veterans had
three Miami language schools to- GI students. At the same time, the FBI is- received lessons when "In fact
day on chnrpesof deflauding the "One veteran student of the sued arresr warrants for six oth- they did not.'
Government, of $2iC 000 while Berlitz School *t Miami who was er Miami *anuage school em- "Some students of the Berlits
giving their "'essonf' at bars, a barber received ^art of his ployes wt.o have skipped the School at Miami Bea-r took their
beaches, and cabanas Spanish Instruction while shav- country Into Latin America. lessons while riding up and down
Most of t.iero were teachers at ing the tepcher In his shop." said The 22 an esU brings to more the palm lined streets in the
the Miami and Miami Beach Robert W. Wall. Jr., special agent than 300 the number nabbed In teacher's niton-, oblle. Wall said,
branches of tne fa'ned Berlits in charge of the FBI'here. the last 10 months for trying to "Another wa taught at one of
School. "Another received all of his cheat the Government on the VA the cabana cluos of s beach ho-
FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover lessons in the lobby of a down- educational program tel."
announced in Washington that town hot* the gretter portion The FBI said the trauds have Several students wto were life-
six teacher and officials of two of which consisted of viewing fe- totaled mo e 'nan $1,000,000 guards were taught at the swlm-
oher GI training schools were male pulchritude passing in and Wall said thr schools created mirig poo ^ where they were on
nabbed simultaneously In New out" fictitious instructors and attend- duty.. .another while he was
York, Neward, N.J., and Dayton, Wall said one veteran of the anee recoras In order to bilk the tending bar. Wall said.
Ohio. Miami School of Languages was Government oi $3.50 per student The 22 suspects were turned
School frauds in the four cl- recruited to enroll while ha was a'lowed b7 the VA to> each hour over to the U. 3 marshals In the
ties amounted to more than sitting at a bar of Instruction. five cities pending hearings be-
$350,000, Hvei salJ "He never attended the school. At one institution-the Miami tore Fedeiai commissioners..
The FBI said most of the never recet/ed a booK, and was School of Languagesone per- They face maximum penalties
total of $540,000 in new funds
which would be immediately
available for tha construction
work in Panr.m on the Inter-
American Highway.
To date the two Governments
have agreed to set up a joint
fund of $1,200,000 for this work,
two-thirds to be contributed by
the United States and one-third
by Panam. If it becomes pos-
sible to ado the prospective
$540,000 to this figure, the total
available for the Highway work
in Panam In the months direct-
ly ahead would be $1,740,000.
Today's announcement by the
Embassy was made In connection
with a visit to Panam by E. W.
James, Chief of the Inter-Amer-
ican Office of lie US. Bureau of
Public Roads, and Frank C. Tur-
ner, assistant to the director of
the bureau.
James and Turner, returning
to Washington after attending
the Fifth Pan-American High-
way Congress m Lima, Peru, are
in Panam in connection with
the olan for renewing work as
soon as possible on the Panama-
nian section of the Inter-Amer-
ican Highway
Ancon Sails Sunday;
Hay Dock Al Other
Port Due To Strike
The SS Ancon will sail from
Cristobal for New York at 10
o'clock Sunday morning. If the
longshoreman's strike Is not
settled before she reaches the
United States lt Is possible that
she may be diverted Into Balti-
more, Philadelphia or Norfolk.
By telephone to New York
this morning, local officials of
the Railroad and Terminals
Bureau were advised that the
strike Is not settled.
There Is as vet no sailing date
for either the SS Panama,
which was to have sailed last
Wednesday, or the Cristobal,
which arrived in New York last
Wednesday.
14-Year-Old Missing
F-i Fnroo tn Ppraisn
A young Panamanian boy
who is missing from his home
in Paraso since Oct. 16 was
being sought today by the Bal-
boa Police.
He Is 14-year-old Rafael San-
chez C, 5 feet tall, and welehs
lnclpal of Balboa High 8chool; i schemes 1
John S- Peitingill, Assistant and forced records to the Veter- was located "
80 pounds. When last seen the
boy was wearing blue trousers.
involved sending false not even sure where the school son was Aired for the express of a $10,000 fine ano five years a blue striped "T" shirt, and
purpose of iguing the names of in prison. brown tennis shoes.
through the port to the British
garrison, and Egyptian labor had
been withdrawn from the docks
there.
The British today delivered a
sharp note to Egypt, holding re-
sponsible for all damage to Brit-
ish property during the recent
riots.
The note reminded the Egyp-
tian government that it was re-
sponsible for the protection of
all British lives and property In
Egypt.
Only when this responsibility
was not fulfilled did British
The newspaper "Al Ahrar "
said 10,000 students met on tl I
campus of Fuad Elawal univert -
ty. on the outskirts of Cairo, ar. :
demanded a declaration of w: r
against Britain.
They also shouted for tl t
death of all British troops t i
Egyptian soil and urged th
British stores and other instal -
atlons be destroyed, the pap- r
said.
Egyptian sources said five sti -
dents and 14 policemen were h -
jured in an Alexandria disturl -
anee in which 800 students ar !
workers pelted police with stone 3.
The Cairo newspaper Al Z: -
man reported from Kantara, i i
the Canal Zone, that a Brltls i
soldier was shot and killed by n
Egyptian customs guard whe,i
customs offices there were seis-
ed by the British.
A state of emergency was pro-
claimed taseaghoat" Egyp^,.*
TieTent -/ivibreiCe spread.
^rnil^i"^ta3p-.4*elfnrceeT
still were' poudng m. and met *
were on the way, as the Brrtis i
dug in, ready to fight if necesss
ry, to hold their strategic control
of the vital canal.
Lottery Winner
In David Killed
Along Lonely Trail
DAVID, Oct. 19 (UP) A
lottrrv ticket vendor, who won
about $1,000 on the lotterv last
week, was found along a lonely
trail yesterday with his head
cut clean off his body.
The man. Elseo Smith, re-
portedly sold some $2.000 worth
of lottery tickets every week.
When his body was found, his
pockets were empty and ap-
peared to have been rifled.
Some years ago a West In-
dian, who also sold lottery tic-
kets, was found murdered in
almost the same spot and un-
der almost similar conditions.
Zone Cop Chalks
Assist For Baby
Boy In La Boca
It's all in the Une of duty. Po
liceman Patrick Francis McDon
nell thought early this mornln,
as h heard the first cry of a
newborn baby boy that he ha'l
Just helped bring into the work .
Of'course he wasn't suppose.-'
to be a midwifeit Just happen-
ed, becaus" sometimes babie .
dont follow arrival trhedules.
When an employe of the Bal-
boa Clublious.. Marcos Avila.'
summoned the Canal Zone po-
liceman to his nome in La Boca,
he merely wanted to get an am-
bulance to take his wife to Gor-
gas.
However, when they arrived,
Mrs. Juan?. Avila had already-
started to deliver. So Policeman
McDonnell rolled up his sleever
and pitch 2d in.
After Aviia's new son was bora,
Dr. James Young of Gorgas ar-
rived and transferred mother
and child to tne hospital.
Both are doing "juct fine.
Out In
Front
Twenty-year-old
Cathy Hlld. of
New York City,
proudly holds
her prize loving
cup and displays
the form that
put her well
ahead of rivals
for the
, title of "Miss
Sweater Girl ,
of 1051."
Curvaceous
Cathy Is flva
feet, five and a
half Inches tall.
weighs 110
pounds and
measures 36
Inches around
the sweater. Tha
contest, held la
New York, waa
sponsored bv
the sweater and
wool Industries.


V
r '
"'*>
J PANAMA AMESICAM AN INDEPENDENT OAO.T NEW8PAP1
FRIDAY, OCTOBER II, 1M]
C-.,o ar.d FreightShips and PlanesArrivals and Departures
wsassa
C,E CLE TRTTSATLAJMTIOL
~ ==^==nr===te=ri=nFi
i AM tKHI.IITKH SLKVIl't UKTWF.EN
HKIIPE AMD NORTH AND SOUTH PACIFIC COAST
A Limited Number of Passenger Berths!
TO El'ROPK: N
MS Chill ............................................ October 2S
S.S Bern.eres .................................,-......... October 30
S.S. Pont Leveque....................................... October 31
TO COLOMBIA. LCI ADOR. PERU A CHILE:
S.S Pont Audemer ..................................... October 27
S.S. Aretnlan ......................................... November 4
TO CEKTRIL AMERICA A WEST COAST U.8.A.
MS. Winnipeg .......................................... October 21
FROM NEW YORK TO PLYMOUTH LE HAVRE
"He De France"..................................... October 24
"Liberte" ........................................... November 2
"De Grane" ......................................... November 10
Passenger Service from CARTAGENA lo EUROPE Via Caribbean Ports:
"Colombio" ..................................... November 17
(Tistnhal. r HI Mil LINE I'd Boa S015 Tel. J-2476 A IH1>>
Panama- LINDO Y MADURO. 8 A Bow IM*
Tel Panama 1-IKS.t 1-1691
Agile Animal
Answer to Previous Puzzle
l^mi-.'^l^ir.iiji..|ir^ri,j,
HORIZONTAL
1 Depicted
animal, the
flying -----
lit is able to
take-----
leaps through
the air
VERTICAL
1 Flurry
2 Printer's term
3 Footed vase
4 The same as
(ab.)
5 Perdition
6 Peel
PIG IN A POKE
U2SS** 7Chiefprtestof
1mn,h? "Shrlne
14n*he. ., 8 Master
sheltered side onln.
15 John (Gaelic)rJ
a7~ifH2? "Bacteria
17 More flushed i8 Babylonian
19 Highway (ab.) de|tJ-
2?igeoPea *> Collection of
i- laBJuilaWtJUaJ
L-JliiUHLJl:JM
;-ll-i:-Jli.'i-4l- 26 Appendage
27 Military
assistant
29 Masculine
appellation
44 Former
Russian ruler
43 Goddess of
discord
48 Sloping way
Balboa Y Offers Friendly Aid
*
To All Comers It Needs Funds
o
Most everyone is familiar with YMCA on
the larger, more publicized ser- 12, 1951.
vices of tho Armed Services
YMCA in Bamoa but there are
numerous other personal ser-
vices, all wHh'-ut charge, which
make up a large segment of
YMCA servio.- to both military
and civilian personnel.
This Red Feather Agency needs
string support in the Commun-
ity Chest Drive.
Everyday calls come from new
people on the Zone or visitors
asking how -.o locate a friend in
military service or employed on
the Zone. Othi-r such services in-
elude checn'ng of valuables,
cashing checks when banks are
closed, selling postage stamps,
placing long distance calls, pro-
viding free vriting paper and
envelopes, ets. Folks have come
to expect the YMCA to have the
answers to all of their questions.
Recently, a. a ship passed
through Ballica on Its way to
Korea, a young Yeoman check-
ed some valuable prescription
glasses at the 'Y' and forgot to
pick them up.
In response :o k note sent back i
to the "Y", the glasses were care- i Contracts
fully packed and air mailed c/o and sale of
the 8an Francisco Fleet Post Of-
fice. A letter receive^ laterals
U
the evening of April
"All who had the good for-
tune to attend, praise and ap-
preciate your efforts to enter-
tain them. All had a very en-
joyable evening."
The YMCA attemps to repre-
sent the locai civilian comjunity
in providing a "Home Away from
Home" for youth in the military
services whether In transit or
stationed on the Canal Zone.
Contributions to the Canal
Zone Community Chest help the
YMCA prvido these and many
other personal and group ser-
vices.
22 Decimeter
(ab.)
23 Article
24 Measure of
type
26 Ancient Irish
capital
28 Bargain event
81 Ventilate
32 Low haunt
33 Fish
34 Period
35 For fear that
37 Smooth and
unaspirated
38 Preposition
39 Onward
40 Volume
42 Decay
45 Age
47, Symbol for
thallium
49 Buries
51 Sun god of
Egypt
52 Exist
53 Approach
54 Quickens
67 Group of three
singers
58 Intervals
sayings
23 Take into
custody
25 Enrage
30 Grafted (her.) 47 Large plant
36 Bullfighter 48 Minus
37 African worm
40 Coin
41 Heavy blow
43 Correlative of
either
50 Oriental
52 Pewter coin of
Thailand
55 Compass point
56 Sloth
HECKLES AND HIS TO IEND
I Am?
^Cheerio,sosar/tell old mam "j
bumweil im here rvitvi cou3ssal news'
J.6-.TMIS BWUM-v
WAVE IS NOT J OKAY.
MERELY SUPER-/ SPIWK.
STUPENDOUS I
ITS .
COSMIC'
ST MMMtfLL BLOMOt
l?Ff OMS "*> SPONSOR, TWlRP
Sf^^ANOMAKE rrAOREATAMERCAN
iNSTTIUTION
X
AND WHAT IM OTH
is I
ALLEY OQP
Hail the Conqueror
T V. T. HAMLT)
Chain Sinoh & Co.
Wins Bid For 17
Old Buildings
- rv!
typical of the .numerous verm'i
and written yianVjaoO's which
come.
"Your letter and glasses were,
received on board on May 12,
1951 one day after our arrival in
Yokosuka. Japan. Needless to say
I was surprised but overjoyed in
the expeditious manner in which
you handled my request.
"Mr. Pipe, I would venture to
say you have restored my faith
in human nature; you can
readily understand my amaze-
ment upon arrival, to find your
air mail letter and box' with my
glasses neat!.\ secured.
"I am extending your regards
to the men on board. We are
facing a test, a new experience
for most of us but Mr. piper, I
can make my report that we are
coming out of it better and
stronger men Morale is at the
highest."
Another note from a ship's of-
ficer is quoted in part. Capt. G.
C. Wright of the USS Missouri
wrote as follows:
"This is to express my sincere
thanks, in the name of the crew
of the Missouri for the fine
spirit of hospitality evidenced by
ttte in providing the
your Commi
dance at the
Armed Services
for the demolition
17 old buildings in
Ancon, Pedro Miguel, C o c o 1 i.
Camp Bierd and Balboa have
been awarded to Chain Singh y
Ca. Repblica Construcciones y
Reparaciones and T. J. Butler
pnd Sons.
There were nine bidders on the
buildings. The bids were opened
Monday In the office of the
Superintendent of Storehouses.
Chain Singh was the success-
ful bidder on Building 315 in An-
ton, a four-family structure on
Fourth of Juiy Avenue; Building
184 In Pedro Miguel, a bachelor
nuarters building; and Buildln"
862 in Balboa, a frame cottage.
Gia. Repblica was awarded
he contract fir these buildings:
Number 322 In Ancon, a two-fa-
mily structure on Culebra Road;
and Buildings 1053.1055 and 1064
in Cocoli. r'ruetures formerly
used by Panam Constructors,
Inc.. contractors for the Paci-
fic excavation for the Third
Locks.
The buildings sold to T. J.
Butler and Eons are two-story
structures in Camp Bierd which
formerly were used to house
local rate employes. They are
numbered 4001, 4016, 4018, 4020.
4022, 4024, 4028. 2048, 3343. and
4027.
Shipping & Airline New
Jap Cargo Ship
Transits Canal
Arriving in Balboa yesterday
from Chile, the Japanese ship
Wayo Maru was carrying a full
cargo of nitrate of soda which is
headed for Savannah, Georgia.
The ship belongs to the Mitsui
Steamship Co., and leaves today
for the States.
motor, reportedly has been flown
experimentally.
Experimental Helicopter
Developed in Paris
A helicopter so light it can be
carried on a man's back is report-
ed to have been developed by a
Paris manufacturer. The craft,
equipped^avith a 12-horsepower
WATCH OUT!
Bleeding Gums
Warn Of Dreaded
PY0RRHEA
MAERSK LINE
accepting passengers for
NEW YORK
BY
m.s. "LAURA MAERSK"
SAILING OCTOBER 20th.
(Every room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO, Inc.
Tel.: Cristbal 1781 Balboa 1065
MAERSK LINE
ACCEPTING PASSENGERS for
SAN FRANCISCO
BY
M.S. "GRETE MAERSK"
SAILING OCTOBER 23rd.
(Every room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC
Tel.: Cristbal 1781
Balboa 1065
4 OUt Of 5
Hay Have This Oread Enemy ol
Handsome Teeth, Healthy Gumj
If your toothbrush warns of
bleeding gums, take action,
for this may be a sign of
Pyorrhea that leads to soft
shrunken gums and loosen-
ing teeth that must be pulled.
See your dentist regularly
and make Forhan's care a
twice-a-day habit at home. By
using Forhan's For the Gums,
you can brush your teeth to
new brightness and lustre,
massage your gums to health*
firmness and hardness. For.
ban's is the ONLY toothpaste
that contains Dr. R. J. Forhan's
special anti-pyorrhea astrin-
gent
Take care of your teeth and
gums NOW the easy Forhan's
way. Buy a tube todaybrush
and massage your way to
dental health.
"Brush your teeth with h"
Forhan's
PAA President Awarded
Legion Certificate
The American Legion awarded
a Certificate of Meritorious Serv-
ice to Juan T. Trippe, president
of Pan American World Airways,
during the group's 33rd annual
national convention sessions In
Miami.
Legion National Commander
Erie Cocke. Jr., presented the a-
ward before an audience of more
than 3,000 Legionnaire delegates,
representing posts throughout
the world, at the Dinner Key Au-
ditorium, baa of Pan American's
pioneering seaplanes years age*.
The award, bestowed upon
Trippe and the company, cited
"alt of the officers and person-
nel" of Pan American "In grate-
ful remembrance of cooperation
accorded the Amreican Legion In
the conduct of the 1951 "Tide of
Toys,'" which sent more than 3,-
000,000 toys to children through-
out the world.
The citation points out that
Trippe and PAA personnel "gave
of their time and facilities that
the message of friendship
through Tide of Toys' might be
spread In distant lands the world
over by the American Legion,
thereby serving invaluably the
purposes of International good-
will and people-to-people under-
standing for which "Tide of Toys'
was executed."
Last New Duplexes
Built In Margarita
Finished, Assigned
The last of the new houses
built under contract In Marga-
rita In the 1951 fiscal year hous-
ing program recently were as-
signed by the Housing Division.
Included in this last group to
be transferred to the Canal by
the contractor. Panpaclflc Cons-
truction Corporation, are two
two-bedroom duplexes; two
thre-bedroom duplexes and four
cottages.
All are composite type houses
and are located on Sixth 8treet.
The entire group of new houses
in this area Including nine
which were completed In August
was originally scheduled for
completion in December.
Canal Health Bureau
Employs Dr. Sauer
Dr. Curtis E. Sauer has been
employed as medical officer in
the Canal Health Bureau and will
be assigned to one of the Pacific
side district medical clinics.
He and his wife and six-year-
old son will arrive from Van
Wert, Ohio, where he has been
in private medical practice alnce
February 1950.
Following his graduation from
St. Louis University in 1938, he
was In private practice In Ava-
lon, Callfortpla for a short time,
he served three years as chief
medical officer of the South
American Development Company
In Portovelo, Ecuador; and, an-
other three years as associate
chief of Health and Sanitation
for the Institute of Inter-Ameri-
can Affairs for an area including
Peru, Colombia, Panama and
Ecuador.
He was a major in the US.
Medical Corps during World War,
i, -


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1991
TUB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
PAGE
If Afraid Of Lightning,
Go To R*ode Island
BOSTON (U.P.) Rhode Is-
land is the safest place In the
country to live as far as lightning
Is concerned, according to the
New England Journal of Medi-
cine .
The state has not recorded a
llghtnlng-caused death since
1936, the .Journal said.
About 250 persons are killed by
lightning each year, the journal
said. Nine out of 10 fatalities
from lightning occur In places
with 2,500 Inhabitants or less,
and four times as many men as
women are killed by bolts.
Old Dobbin Fading
Out In S. Dakota
PIERRE. 8. D. (U.P.) Farm
mechanization threatens the ex-
istence of old dobbin.
The 1951 state assessment fig-
ures show South Dakota farmers
now have more tractors and
combines than horses.
There are about 98,600 horses
In the state, a decrease of 21,000
In a year.
There are 85,800 tractors, an
increase of 3,000 In a year, and
20,800 combines, an increase of
2,000.
7lew cfashu
ions
for the coming Holidays!
DRESSES
for that special occasion
SKIRTS and
BLOUSES
up-to-the-minute styles
From Miarhi famous "Stylecraft"
BAGS
A varied assortment of HATS
for all occasions
and many other Fashion values
for Holiday wearing!
\
LA MODA AMERICANA
702 Central Avenue
Uoclau s fesl (/Juu I
iv
1951 PLYMOUTH
Immediate Delivery at
OLD PRICES
'All Models
All Colors
AGENCIAS PANAMERICANAS, S. A.
Across from El Rancho
Agencias Panamericanas
David Chiriqni
Tels. 2-9885, 2-088S
Powell's Garage
Coln
PAUL'S MARKET
SAVE MONEY ,
<, VEBY SPECIAL PUT IN YOUR
HOME FREEZER
Sirloin Tip Roast ...... 1 lb. 42c
Shoulder Roast (Boneless) lb. 3fy
Honeycomb Tripe 19c. Pckg.
Ready to Eat
SHRIMPS BROILED CHICKEN
ARMOUR'S
Star Bacon................1 lb. 79c
Banner Bacon..............1 lb. 69c
Finest Danish Bacon.......Vi lb. 42c
JACOBY ON BRIDO!,
BY OSWALD JACOB!
Written for NEA Service
NORTH (D)
* J 10 4
V AT3
? A Q 10 4 3
84
WEST
*Q02
v j loos:
692
:> AS-
EAST
? 73
Q54
? KJ87
+ KQJ3
North
< ?
2*
Paw
SOUTH
* AK865
K8
? 0
4*107002
Both skies vul.
Bast South
Pass 1 A
Pass 4*
Pass
West
Pass
Fail
Opening lead J
Burglar Alarm Traps
Its Smart Inventor
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. (UP.)
Jacque P. Whaumbuah, 45, a
night watchman for several a-
partment houses. Invented a bur-
Elar alarm that helped catch a
urglar and landed the Inventor
In jail.
Whaumbush set up his burglar
alarm In one of the apartments
and It worked perfectly when
someone broke a window and en-
tered the building. The man was
captured but that's not the end.
At a police roll call one of the
policemen called to arrest the
suspect recognized the Inventor's
name in the list of those wanted
for several -traffic violations.
The officers sped to Whaura-
bush's home and arrested him.
Spooks Nail Dynamiters
In Truck-Driver Lingo
ATLANTA, Ga., Oct. (U.P.)
"Where's Joe?"
"That dynamiter? A spook fin-
ally nailed him!"
That is plain English, at le,ast
to truck drivers, according to an
Emory University student,
Claude Sltton. It means that Joe,
who abuses his truck, got caught
by an Insurance agent.
According to Sltton, who as-
sembled a small glossary of truck
driver's jargon, explosives ride
on a "boom wagon:" driving a
tractor without a trailer is "run-
ning bareback:" low gear is
"down In the kitchen:" a deliv-
ery truck driver is a "tap danc-
er:" and "itchy pants with the
Bible" is the dispatcher wjth the
bill book.
The buffalo nickel is 39 years
old. It was first put out In 1913.
It's probably foolish of me to
stick my neck out, but I'm ne-
vertheless about to do so. I be-
lieve that not one bridge player
In a thousand will think of the
correct defense In the hand
shown today. Try it, and see if
you're the exception.
West opened the jack of
hearts, and dummy won the ace.
A low club was returned from
dummy and East wisely put up
the jack of clubs to return a
trump. South put up the ace of
trumps and led another club,
which West had to take with his
ace.
Now, suppose you pick the best
lead at this point from the West
hand. You can look at the whole
hand, and even that won't help
you unless you're wide awake.
While you're thinking, just see
what happened when West ac-
tually returned a second heart.
South won with the king, ruffed
a club in dummy, and ruffed a
heart in his own hand. He then
ruffed another club in dummy,
cashed the ace of diamonds ,and
ruffed a diamond in his own
hand. Then he laid down the
king of spades and led his last
club. West could take the queen
of spades, but no more.
Mind you, West thought of
ruffing the third or fourth club
with his queen of spades, but
that would have done him no
good. He also thought of discard-
ing diamonds to be in over-ruff
position when South got back to
his hand by ruffing a diamond.
That also would have done him
no good. West had missed his
chance when he returned a see
ftave you found tha mllllon-
1 dollar lead yet? West must re-
' turn the queen of spades. It looks
like the worst possible lead, but
i 't's actually the best.
If South decides to draw
trumps, he loses n otrump. tricks
.but must give up four clubs. If
^outh. instead, decides to ruff a
club In dummy. West's nine be-
comes the high trump. South
then loses one trump and three
clubs.
If you found this defense, you
are entitled to pat yourself
heartily on the back.
10 Zonians Among
New Students At
Bradley University
PEORA. 111.. Oct. 18 Ten
students from Balboa are among
more than 3,000 students who' re-
gistered at Bradley University
for the first semester of the 1951-
52 college year.
The students are Mayer Bai-
tel. George Bull. Dorothy De-
deaux, Marilyn Tlynn,/ Richard
Herman. Robert J. Kurikel, War-
ren LaClalr, Charles Lecuer. Lil-
lian Norris and Raoul Theriault.
They are members of a student
body which representa 46 of the
48 states and seven foreign coun-
tries and includes more women
students and more non-veterans
than ever before in Bradley his-
tory.
Average weekly earnings of
nroduction workers in the auto
Industry was $73.25 in 1950 for an
average work week of 41.2 hours,
according to the Automobile
Manufacturers Association. This
compares with an average of
$65.97 for 38.9 hours in 1949.
More Comfort Wearing
FALSE TEETH
Here I' a pltasant war to overcome
loose piule discomfort. FASTEETH. an
Improved powder, sprinkled on upper
snd lower plates holds them firmer so
that they feel more comfortable. No
rummy, Kooey, pasty taste or feellna. It'A
Ikallne Innn-ncld) Does not tour. Check?
"nlnte odor" (denture breath). Gel FAS-
TEETH today at any drug atora.
Imported
Canned Hams
PEK
DREWS
KRAKUS &
ATALANTA BRAND
are offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Coln
BOMB DELIVERY
BEST
JEWELRY VALUES
AT TAHITI
New Books
"Ballet for Beginners," by Nan-
cy Draper and Margaret F. At-
kinson, is one of the new books
placed in circulation during the
; past week by the Panama Canal
Library. The book is written for
beginning ballet dancers and for
those wiih a general interest in
ballet.
It describes, with text, photo-
graphs, drawings and charts, the
process bv which young students
learn ballet, the basic positions,
i early experiences of now-famous
j ballerinas, a hlstpry of the art
| and synopses of many well-
i known ballets.
The complete list o fnew books
at the Library follows:
Social sciences What's ahead
for American business? Sllchter;
A socialist's faith, Thomas; and
We gather together, the story of
Thanksgiving, Linton.
Applied science The miracle
of growth. Chicago Museum of
Science and Industry; How to
build your own house, Laidman.
Fine Arts The art of the la-
pidary, Sperisen; Principles of
color and color mixing, Bustano-
by; Ballet for beginners. Draper.
Biography General Charles
Lee: traitor or patriot?, Alden.
Fiction Mr. Smith, Brom-
fleld; The polkadot murder,
Crane; Moonfleet, Falkner; A
time to kill, Household; Accident
by design, Lorac.
Gift Replacements Founda-
tions of national power. Sprout;
Practical mathematics for home
study, Palmer; The story of clin-
ical pulmonary tuber culosla.
Brown; Crowned masterpieces of
eloquence. Brewer; Omnibus of
modern American humor, Line*
cott; Collected poems. Housman;
The bayous of Louisiana, Kane;
The Arabs. Hlttl.
Added to the Reference Col-
lection during the past week
Guide to the Hispanic American
j historical review, Butler; Private
independent schools, Bunting.
Backache, Getting Up Nights
Rheumatism and Kidney Trouble
If you are feeling run-down, Get up
Nights, or suffer from Backache, strong
Cloudy urine. Burning Passages, Rheu-
matism. Leg Pains, Swollen Ankles,
Nervousness, Dizziness, and feel old
before your time, kidney trouble may
be the cause.
Wrong food and drinks, worry, colds
r overwork place a heavy strain on
your kidneys so that they function
poorly and often msy need help to
properly purify your blood and maintain
health and energy.
vitalise Your Kldaays
A fast acting Internal medicine called
Cystex, developed by the Knox Control
'.aboratory of Los Angelea, California,
is now helping thousands to revitalise
kidney action In these t positive wfcys:
1. Helps kidneys clean out polsoaoua
acida and purify the blood. 1. Combat*
germs In the urinary system: I. Soothea
and oalma Irritated tissues.
Cystex Is now Imported by leading
druggists, so there Is no need of any*
one suffering from Backache, netting
Up Nights and the other symptom*
mentioned above without the benefit
of this great medicine.
Get Cystex from your druggist tad*/
and aee how quickly It helps pub yeeJ
on the road to batter health.
gssgg Sew*
*int- $125.00
6-
Both-- *>l 7-w
f0,?ormounur.K;ftftBoth.a.
$87.50
'
3-piece Bridal Set tlfin AA 3--tr,i"'.J!SkUce of ,imu*
> I U.O |-,ted LUSTRA Pearls
$4.50 Up
TAHITI
THE jtivnn T08
157 Bay your ticket for the monumental raffle of the Lions
Club at Propaganda. S. A., No. 2 East 16th Street, or from
any member of the Lions Club.

oOirect from, C^naland
...for the style-wise women of the Isthmus!
!'

-


Sweaters
' TWIN SETS
PULL-OVERS
CARDIGANS



complete selection of colors sizes 34 to 42
Wool Dop Coals


three-quarter and full lengths.
\
'
Pflnam6 edn MOT TAS



SECOND FLOOR
AVEHtDA
WE ARE UNPACKING
Baby Plate, Bowl & Cup
Sets '..................... .
Party Paper Plates Plastic
Treated, in colors, pk..... 1.54
Plastic Party Spoons, Porks
ft Knives, dos............ 0.25
Plastic Baskets for Birthday
Party, do*................ l.tO
Paper Cups Plastic Treated
pk....................... 1.50
Complete Stock of PYREX
ware.
Lamp-Table Combination
with glass top.........16.96
Iran Flower Pot Stands
(for 4 pota).......... 8.51
Plastic Refrigerator
Pitcher* .............. l.t
Metal Floor Lamp* for
Porche* ..............19.58
Modern Wooden Lamps with
Colored Shades ............ *-
Wooden Bridge Table-Lamp
Combination ...............H-*
Plastic Wading Pools for Chil-
dren ...... ................10-50
Pepper Mill Imported from
Franca .................... 2.10
Plastic Tumblers............ 0.15
Brass Sprinklers .................... 2-50
Brass Hof e Nozsles ................... 0.75
Rubber Anti-Splash Faucet Strainer.. 0.45
Household Fire Egtinruishers......... 1-05
Metal Kitchen Tables with Wheels.. .11.16
Buy NOW
Second Floor 5a Avenida


TODAY... BUY YOUR


3RD. OF NOVEMBER
SUIT
(BRAND NEW)
MOW
FROM 50.00, 45.00 & 35.00............... 24.50
FROM 30.00 & 25.00............... 21.50
FROM 25.00 & 21.95............... "50
SLACKS
NOW
FROM 12.00 & 10.00... 6.50
i
FROM 8.00 & 7.50... 5.50
FROM 6.95& 5.95... 4.50

CASH SALES ONLY I
PANAMA COLON
34 Central At*. 11th Street Opp.
Santa Ana Pla* PK.. Commtaaary
"Quality Suits"



"-'
PAGE POH

FRIDAY, OCTOBER If, Iff]
Ci? N'T
W I K
V, how long can Fie last? What signs poinl lo
a new freedom in Russia? What olher satellites
are ready to pull a Tito? Learn the answers and
relive the most dramatic moments in mankind's
struggle to be free. Here Allan Nevins, famous-
political scientist, proves that Tyrannies Musi
Fall. In the October 20th issue:
NOW ON SAli
Collier's
irtinama \^anal (^iuohuuses
- Showing Tomght
BALBOA
Alr-CondfUonefi
\.:m 6:21 s:io
DIABLO HTS.
1:13 K:li
Ceorte MONTGOMERY Paula CORDAT
"The Sword of Monrecristo"
Saturday "mCH. VOl'NG APKETTV
Lax BARKER Viriinia HUSTON .
"TARZAN'S PERIL"
Saturday "Mr. Bel\ed*r Rliur The Bill"
C OCO LI
Vaughn MONROE rila RAINES
Ringing guns"
Saturday "TAR7AN'S FERIL"
PEDRO MIGUEL
7:00 P. M.
Fred MacMURRAY Eleanor PARKER
"A Millionaire For Christy"
Saturday "ONLY THE VALIANT"
GAMBOA
SMS
(Saturday)
'A MODERN MARRIAGE"
NEW DRESSES
-
Have Been Added To

Our Collection,
FOR TOMORROW,
TH LAST DAY
OF OUR
SPECIAL SALE!
Many Attractive Models
from
$ 5.90 to $ 7.50
20% DISCOUNT
on all others not specially
reduced!


The French Bazaar
JUAN PALOMERAS
COLON
COLON
LUX and CECILIA THEATRES
IMULTANEOUS RELEASE WITH ALL LATIN
AMERICAN COUNTRIES!...
The incomparable voice of
the immortal linger. .
U. S. ROYAL
SUPER-RIBBED TRICK TIRES
THE GREAT
CARUSO
MARIO LANZA ANN BLYTH,
DOROTHY KIRSTEN J \R.MILA NOVOTNA
BELLA VISTA iTl'SpST
An Explosive Crime Drama!...
STEVE COCHBAN GABY ANDBE, In
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air Candltled
Elear.or Parker, in
"THREE SECRET"
Ann Sheridan, in
THE DOUGH GIRLS"
TIVQU THEATRE
Bank! $100.00 Bankl
At 5 find 9 p ni Also:
"SIDE SHOW Also:
"FOREVER YOURS"
Victor Mature Hedy
Lamarr. in
"SAMSON AND DALILAH"
- Al*o: .
"ISIE OF TABU"
An Alt.ac'jve Show I
VICTORIA THEATRE
Rosta Quintana, in
"SUSANA"
Ramn Miller, In
"LA NOCHE del PECADO"
Dog Tired Dave!
David waa a basy fellow,
shopping never left him mellow!
Worn out, weary tirad and krava.
Why not read our Want Ada, Dave?
Q A I II M Kathryn GRAYSON Ava GARDNER
t,i "SHOW BOAT" (Technicolor)
Saturday "THE IXDrRWOBLP STOBY"
MARHABITA Fr !;.. "THE SOUND OF FURY"
________Saturday "FRENCME"
CRISTnRAI Rod CAMERON o Audrey LONG
aE-condHild "CAVALRY SCOUT"
*:IS s:l Saturday "PEOPI f WILL TALK"
Legion Votes For
Acheson And His
MIAMI, Fla., Oct. 19 (UP)The American Le-
gion called for immediate removal of Secretary of
State Dean Acheson and his policy-making lieuten-
ants yesterday and elected a loud-spoken critic to
^champion its cause during the next year.
The Legionnaires said the nation "lacks the dy-
namic and courageous leadership" needed to admin-
ister this country's foreign policy.
They said the State Department leaders have
failed to deal adequately with the "grim and bloody
advance of Communism throughout the world."
Bundling Ou
Top Adviser
After adopting the strong for-
eign pour i program the Legion
unanlmou >'.y elected Donald R.
Wilson of flarksburfc, W. Va as
National Commander
Wilson, a former law partner
of ex-Secretary of Defense Louis
Johnson, endorsed the Legion's
foreign policy program and ad-
vocated rounding Communist
China with atom bombs If neces-
sary to win the Korean war.
"If ever mere was a time when
inspiration anu leadership was
needed this is the time, this is
the nation,'' he said, "and with
God's help, the American Legion
will be the insti umem."
"In the proud tradition of
American irms let us seek the
enemy and destroy him," add-
ed Wilson, who succeeded Erie
( eke, jr., of Dawson, Ga., as
commander.
The Legion closed its 33rd an-
nual comention shortly after
electing officers.
The blL.irrinc foreign policy
resolution brought a 53-minute
fight on the floor of the Legion's
33rd annual convention before it
was approved.
A minority faction charged
that the Legion was being used
as a "political football" on the
eve of national party nomina-
tions.
Acheson's name war not men-
tioned in tne formal resolution
but it was obviously directed at
him and n! his Departmental
heads, in tho State Department.
"We, demand immediate re-
moval of *ne present corps of
leaders whese very action has re-
flected lncompetency, indecision
and defeatism," the delegates
said in a resolution adopted by
an overwhelming vote.
The resoiution, presented by
the Legion's foreign policy com-
mittee, specifically complained
that the State Department had
I turned into "an operating agen-
cy, -giving away the substance
of America' instead of concen-
trating on "the major task of for-
mulating American plans to
combat the very real threats to
CARUSO SINGS
TODAY!
LUX THEATRE
Shows: 2:45 4:33
H:50 9:95 p.m.
it
CECILIA
THEATRE
S IMULTANEOUSLY!
Shows: 1:45 3:33
5:58 3:25 p.m.
our security throughout the
world."
The Legion said it also was
"disturbed ly the consistent re-
ports of the ineffective adminis-
tration of *he Voice of America
program."
It urged that administration of
the program be transferred to
some other governmental agency
if the 8tate Department "can't
handle If
William Creen, president of the
American Federation of Labor,
assured the Legion that the AFL
would support its program
against Communism.
He said the AFL had pledg-
ed its support to the ".efforts
of our government to achieve
and to maintain the levels of
production which will be re-
quired to meet and to overcome
the menace of Soviet aggres-
sion." i
Green said the price control
law, which "makes every mer-
chant and businessman a cost-
plus contractor and a commis-
sion agent lor inflation," needed
strenglhen'ng.
CivH Defense Administrator
Mlilard Caldwell replied to Gen.
Douglas MacArthur's statement
to the Lesion vesterday that "I
do not associate myself with
those who hysterically talk of
American cities being latd to
waste."
Caldwell said Russia Is "creat-
ing stockpiles of atomic bombs"
and that civil defense is "the on-
ly insurance" that this nation
can rise above the ruin and rub-
ble of our cities from an enemy
attack and still strike back to
win.
The statement on foreign pol-
Swas adopted by a voice vote,
e only recorded vote came on
a minority committee report,
which some delegates said would
"whitewash' the 8tate Depart-
ment. The1 minority rtpbrtrVas
President Dubs
MacArthur Charge
Knowingly False
WASHINGTON, Oct. 19 (UP)
President Truman said yesterday
L ?Vi E"iKlas MacArthur
made a false statement when he
charged, that the Administration
once planned to surrerWer Chi-
ang Kai-shek's Island stronghold
of Formosa to the Chinese Com-
munists.
What Is more, Mr. Truman
IN
HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
HOLLYWOOD (NBA) Hoi
lywood and Grapevine:
George Bernard Bnaw'a feu
with Hollywood movie makers li
being carried on from the grave
RKO, filming the late authorl
"Androcles and the Lion," mus
bow to two provisions in Shaw'I
TECHNICOLOR
mime
_ MARIO ^ ANN
Lanza Blyth
DOROTHY JAMflLA
KirstenNovotna
ilancheTHEBOM
itm Teresa celu
Richard Hageman
m "3
.aolcd, 2,881 to 101.
"The ouly record to come
from this convention is criti-
cism of our governmentthe
State Department, the Joint
Chiefs of Staff and the Admin-
istration," said Col. Joseph Do-
nahue, a commissioner of the
District or Colombia.
Donahue, the only delegate to
mention Acheson's name, and
fNeal Bishop of Co.orado were
minority leaders who tried un-
successfully to tone down the
foreign policy resolution With
amendments.
Rogers Kelley of Texas led the
fight for 'he.program as chair-
man of tie foreign relations
committee.
Other fecom.nendations con-,
talned In the Legion's seven-page
statement of foreign policy call-
ed for:
1) A bombing of military targ-
ets in Communist China to
shorten the Korean war.
2) The expelling of Czechoslov-
akia from the united Nations
and a complete boycott diploma-
tically and economically of that
country because of the Imprison-
ment of Wi'liam Oatis.
3> Discontinuance of Marshall
Plan aid to Western Europe as
soon as possible and the limiting
of further payments to those
countries aiding their own recov-
ery without trading with Russia
and its satellites.
4) Fortifying the United States'
I Western defenses with a pact a-
mong far Pacific democracies and
taking the lead In settling ten-
sions in the Miadle Last. A con-
ference should be called between
leaders of Turkey, Iran, Iraq,
Egypt. Palestine, the Arab states
and other Midd'.e Eastern nations
to work out this agreement.
5) The tnitt'd States not tol-
erating any type of Russian in-
terference in the entire Middle
Eastern are,.
Later Legion delegates killed a
resolution urging a 375 a month
Federal bonus at the age of 60
and 395 a month at the age of 65
for all vete.ans of World Wars I
and 11/
said .the five-star general knew *J"" ,Tbt contnict wKh his est
the statement was not based on e
fact when he made It before the
American Legion convention In
Miami, Fla., Wednesday.
MacArthur, who was removed
as Far Eastern commander by
the President last April, said the
Administration had a "secret
plan" as late as last March to
give Formosa to the Chinese Reds
and seat them in the United Na-
tions "as the price for peace In
Korea."
The general said the Adminis-
tration was blocked by "the op-
position I expressed" and the
"overwhelming support" this op-
position "received from the Ame-
rican people."
Mr. Truman was asked about
MacArthur's statement at his
weekly press conference. *
He declared dogmatically that
MacArthur's statement was not
based on fact and thex general
knew It.
Mr. Truman also:
1) Said he will not announce
his 1952 political plans at least
until after he sends his legisla-
tive program to congress in mid-
January. The President also
ruled out any chance of a "whis-
tle-stop" speaking tour until af-
ter that time;
2) Insisted that William M.
Boyle, Jr., did resign as Demo-
cratic National Chairman for
reasons of health regardless of
what Is being sal dabout him. He
did not fire Boyle but rather
urged him to stay. Mr. Truman
said;
Mr. Truman removed MacAr-
thur from his Far Eastern com-
mand because, he said, he felt
the general would not carry out
Administration policies. He act-
ed after MacArthur spoke out to
riember* of Congress and others
of'^ist the Government's Ko-
rean war tactics.
Since then MacArthur has se-
verely criticized Administration!
domestic and foreign policies in
a series of speeches across the
nation.
Until yesterday, most Admin-
istration officials have made on-
ly guarded replies to the gener-
al's statements.
PET-TY LARCENY With
pennies getting- scarce, organ-
grinder Tony Campanardo's
monkey finds a solution In help-
ing himselt to the contents of a
youngster's pocket while mak-
ing his rounds in Philadelphia.
It was atl part of the fun at the
Chestnut Hill Main Street Fair.
to II per cent th
amount of Shaw dialog tha
can be rewritten.
Also he must be billed as Ber-
nard Shaw. His wUI specifies thai
George was reserved for his pri-
vate use.

No mother roles for Mae West
who's back on Broadway in
Diamond Lll," and she won'l
be returning to Hollywood "un-
til the right story with tht!
right part comes along." Walled
Mae over the phone from New,
York:
"Hollywood works in trendi
and now.it seems they're Offer-
ing everyone, even me, mothei
roles. I don't want to make a
picture just for the sake olj
making a picture. I want
make a great picture."

Watch for a new addition
the Edgar Bergeh family
blockheads a snuff-chewini
Swedish fisherman, as yet unl
named, who may be tried soor.
on the Bergen Sunday air show.l

Evelyn Keyes, in Mexico Cityl
for a movie, has been dating
Cantinflas and several bull ring i
impressartoe, and attends par-
ties bare-footed. Why Evelyn!

Kent Williams, the shaving lo-
tion heir, and Alice Key, hos-
tess at the PalmSprings Doi||
House, are an item.

Elsa Lanchester let down hei
hair for the role of a spirit-
ualist with Glenn Ford and
Ruth Roman In "Young Man in
a Hurry," then put It up In a
Sydney Gullaroff creation, and
hopped a plane for London and
a starring date at the Cafe dej
Paris.
As you read this, ElsaVcc
vuislng staid Britishers
patter about Eaters Anonyi
us"see the light and gr
lighter"and the saga of
British movie star who coml
to Hollywood and can't get bac|
home because she owes mor
than she earns in taxes.

Celluloid movie queen of 24
years ago can stop, worrying aj
bout Jean Hagan'a composite
portrayal of a 1927 star t
Slngln' In the Rain." Confided
Jean: "No star will be able td
recognize herself. We created
feeling, not a definite personal-l
ity."
As part of her research, Jean |
read several 1927 movie fan
magaslnes. "And you know," aha
informed me, "even In those
days the fans were clamoring
for more glamor dolls and less
I girl-nextdoor types.

Add the name of cute Debbie
Reynolds tp the list of stars who
can be happy without seeing
themselves on the screen. Wear-
ing a 1927 hairdo and gown for
the same picture. Debbie told
me:
"I Just don't like myself on
the scree. I flip whenever I.tee
myself urFthere."

This year's Miss America con-
testants are faring better in
Hollywood than nv other crop.
gillie Taylor, who waa Miss
ouston, is being tested by
MOM.

VI has postponed Jimmy Dur-
anwJ's "i ve Been Working on thji
Railroad" picture to 1952. The
Schnos will be working too hard
in TV this year.

It may or may not be At-
lanta, Ga.'s way of getting even
with Hollywood for "Oone With
the Wind." but cameras are
turning there on a full-length,
evil-of-drink movie. "The Cure."
The stars are Virginia Grey and
Jackson McBrlde from TV.
Dr. Carsble Adams Is produc-
ing the film adaptation of his
own'novel and he Isn't worried
about the Dixie accents of the
supporting players being recru-
ited from Atlanta little theater
circles.
He told me before leaving for
make safe discards almost in-
definitely. You have a very poor
Atlanta:
"Suh, we doan't have South-
un accents any moah."

Farley Granger may froth
when he hears it. but there's a
plan afoot to co-star Shelley
Winters and husky Vincent Ed-
wardsthe new flame In Shel-
ley's heart furnaceIn "Whip-
hand" at UI,
He's a rugged newcomer who
makes his film bow In the Mar-
tin-Lewis starrer, "Sailor Be-
ware."
Shelley, he admits, has been
calling him long distance from
Paris.
Will he try to cut out Farley
in the sweepstakes for Shelley a
hand when the pair return from
Europe?
.."Definitely," grinned Vincent-
Very definitely. I like her. She
root kid. She's a real good
heart.- .



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN- AN INDEPENDENT OAILI RBWSrAPER
PUnw W1W
Elizabeth Ties Up Traffic
In Caadas Breadbasket'
REGINA, Sask., Oct. 19 (UP)
Princess Elizabeth crossed the
snow-overed prairies to the
"Breadbasket" of Canada to-
day and received a gift of 500
bushels of wheat.
Elizabeth and the Duke of
Edinburgh arrived In their 10-
car red and green train and
welcoming crowds tied uo traf-
fic this morning at this Saskat-
chewan home of Canada's fam-
ous red-coated Mounted Pence
and heart of the Dominion's
cattle and farm land.
The Princess, who has re-
ceived dozens of gifts' during
her Canadian tour, was given a
certificate for 500 bushels of
wheat. Mayor Gernet Menzies
of Regina made the presenta-
tion, and he told her to us the
wheat In any wav she chooses.
Elizabeth said she was In-
terested in seeing the land
where so much grain ana
bacon sent every year to Britain
Is produced.
Elizabeth and Philip ex-
changed surprised smiles over
the gift of wheat and later a
member of the Royal staff in-
quired: "I say, how much Is 500
bushels of wheat?"
Re was assured that the
Princess can exchange the
Wheat certificate for its equi-
valent in cash, if she wants
Edward Altman Is
New Magistrate
O'.Mho* Court
Edward M. Altman has been
enpolnted Minstrate of Balboa
Magistrate's Court It was an-
nounced Wednesday at Balboa
Hplehts.
The appointment Is effective
Thursday. October 18, and is for
a term of four years.
The previous appointment of
Roland K. Hazard as Balboa Ma-
gistrate has been canceled at his
reouest. This' action follows a re-
quest to.Mr. Hazard from the De-
partment of Justice that he re-
main In his present position as
Assistant Disf.lct Attorney pend-
ing developments in that office
brought about bv the impending
transfer of District Attorney Da-
niel E. McGr-ith to enother ap
pointinent in the United States.
Judge Altman has served as
Interim Magistrate for the Bal-
boa Magistrate's Court since
Beptember 31
A native of Lawrence. Mas-
ichusetts. h has been employ-
ed in the Canal organization for
fcbout ten years. He is a member
of the Canal Zone bar and has
?rved on severa: occasions as
Acting Maglsirate In the Canal
zone courts.
to. It would come to about
11,0m.
She also received four water
colors to add to the six paint-
ings given her last week by the
city of Toronto. Tour officials
said the Royal couple will be
able to open an art nailery of
Canadian works by trie time
their five-week trip is over.
Elizabeth and Philip were
weighed down with leatherwork
don by Indians of northern
Saskatchewan. Slippers of cari-
bou skin arrived for her and
her two children. The Duke re-
ceived a pair of embroidered
caribou gloves.
Ronald L. Seeley
Wins Scholarship
At Denver U.
Ronald L. Seeley, valedictor-
ian for the Class of 1950 of the
Canal Zone Junior College, has
been granted a scholarship at the
University of Denver, according
to word Just received. Seeley is
attending the University's School
of Business Administration, ma-
joring in marketing and mer-
chandising.
Seeley is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. M. M. Seeley of Pedro Mi-
guel. He and his wife, the former
Jolle Ann Kilbey, were employed
by the Armv Quartermaster Of-
fice at Corozal prior to their de
parture for Denver, early in Sep-
tember.
S hhled When
Piane Crashes Into
Mountain Slope
,v-------- Brif,sh Columbia,
Oct. 19 (UP) All 23'persons
._- &.ULu i.in a oata-
iui-j. ttylng boat of Queen Char-
lottee Airlines crashed into Mt.
Benson last night.
The Catal na, with 20 pas-
sengers and three crewmen, hit
the timbered slopes of the
mountain about the 2,000 ft
level.
It exploded on Impact, set-
ting the surrounding trees on
fire. This fire guided ground
parties to the scene.
The Catalina was circling, un-
able to find its landing area for
uilck mist, when It hit.
It was the second worst crash
in Canadian civil flying history.
Worst was a 29-death moun-
tain peak crash in July, 1948.
Letter-Carrying Dog
Gels Signals Mixed
NEWTON, Mass. (U.P.) Duke
a 4-year-old collie, did all right
as a letter carrier and newspaper
boy but he got into trouble when
he entered the laundry business.
Charles D. Train, who trained
.he dog to'bring home his mall
and newspapers, was puzzled be-
cause Duke started prrivlnR with
sheets, towels and pillow cases.
Mrs. Thomas F. Thrasher
cleared up trie mystery when she
found Duke stripping her clothes-
line.
MEET the AUTOMOTIVE 'CRYSTAL BALL'...
JOE PUT ATURO'
Hours For Fever
Inoculations By
PanCanal Changed
The hours during which yel-
low fevtr inoculations will be
given at the Panama Health
Office and the Board of Health
Laboratory will be changed ef-
fective Monday.
The new schedule will be:
Panama Health Office 1
to 4 pjn. on Monday and Fri-
day.
Board of Health Laboratory
8 a.m. to noon on Wednes-
days.
The schedule for yellow fever
inoculations at the Colon
Health Office will remain the
same, from 1 to 3 p.m. on Wed-
nesday.
For 42 years Lyle Pridcaux,
Adrian. Mtrm., rural mail carrier,
has made his rounds, traveling
540.000 miles on horses, three
motorcycles, four model Ts and
14 Chevrolet in succession.
F
L
O
R
E
C
I
T
A
Available at your favorite store! B
U
T
T
E
R
Mode in New Zealand
Distributed by the Swift, Co.,
Panam.
Start* h. %* Car",
Paramwit ftdw*
V8 Has lively Havor and
Wholesome Goodness
no *s/nGf/ju/Ge can malcl
In V-8 ther* are 9 delicious juices
of garden-fresh vegetablei-not just
one. That's why V-S has lively flavor
nd wholesome goodness no anile
juice cam match. Bach juice adds ha
own tempting flavor plus vitamins
A. B> C caldum and iron. Your
frmily will love V-8. Serve it often.
v7 .1 V-s b e'Afcbw MM1 efi
W'll|.CM*.hn||,
V4ht
1-
Just Received
DIRECT
From Cerro Punta
By Refrigerated Truck
FRESH-CRISP
LETTUCE
SCALLIONS
ALSO
CARROTS
RHUBARB
BEETS
PAULS
MARKET
How can you tell
your Daughter
. you don't know these
Intimate Physical Facts!
Before your daughter mar-
riestell her bow important
douching often is to femi-
nine cleanliness, health and
lasting happiness in mar-
riage. But first be sure your
own knowledge is up-to-date.
Don't place your faith on
weak, homemade mixtures
such as alt and water!
These do not sad can not
give the great germicidaUnd
deodorant action of Zoniti
its revolutionary principle
discovered by a famous
Surgeon and Chemist
No other type of liquid an-
tiseptic-germicide for the
douche of all those tested is
so powuFtn. vet so san to
delicate tisinea as Zoniti 1
Zonite helps guard against
infection by immediately
killing all germs on contact.
Use as directed as often as
necessary; however, make a
regular habit of using it two
or three times a week with-
out risk of injury. To be rare
of appealing feminine dain-
tiness; get Zomitx today!
Tom'te
ANTISIPTIC
At*to*Utty
JmtMim
nM<7'M
That's what the boys in the shop caU him and you'll
agree once he's analysed your automotive troubles! Ex-
perienced mechanics and technical skillyour assurance of
dependability when yon drive In for inspection, adjustment,
and repair work!
AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALS
OCTOBER 20 to 26
OIL CHANGE & LUBRICATION
with 5 QTS. of 40c OIL +\ QQ
ALL FOR ONLY fcyy
*
MOTOR TUNEUP
CMimt VK.MACt' CAUMMtUf\ wAtntD Km Amo simar/1 1 Your motor analyzed by .
artife expert craftsmen
%-y^*
replace worn parts.
clean carburetor, ignition system, tighten head
and manifold! goo ^ '

We will CROSS SWITCH
tires, BALANCE ALL
FOUR WHEELS. ALIGN
FRONT WHEELS, CHECK
CASTER, CAMBER and
TOE-IN. /4^9
(plus weights)

Mil MP m
SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY
'
BACON
Swift's
Premium....................Vz" lb.
.41

BUTTER
Swift's
Florecita
.67

LARD
Swift's
Silverleaf
.29
I

CORNED BEEF
Libby's
.39
PYREX CASSEROLES .52
-j
.06
HEINZ PEANUT BUTTER .39
'

BRAKES RELINED
the ^Barretf-way
only 7.9 9 plus pars
HEINZ
SOUPS
PINEAPPLE
JUICE
HEINZ
ANCHOVY
SPREAD
CLAPP'S
BABY FOOD

TRIPE lb. ; .19
RIB ROAST lb.......39
PORTERHOUSE STEAK lb. .58
SIRLOIN STEAK lb.......49
CUBE STEAK lb.......39
HAM Ready-to-eat-lb.. .65
A small investment for so much SAFETY!
* % *
AUTHORIZED
STEWART WARNER
Speedometer and Instrument Service
Service
15th & Belisorio Porros
(Golf Club Road)
NEXT DOOR TO
CALL 3-0035 for ROAD SERVICE
JOHN HAIG...... 3.95
CHILEAN WNS....... 95
AGEWOOD Itis......2.80
CASTLE CLUB GIN...... 1.75
NOILLY PRAT VERMOUTH 1.95
'

LEMON PIE....59
CHEESECAKE .85
DANISH SQUARES 2 for .15
FLOR ADORA CUPS.......05
RYE BREAD.......10
-
HOME DELIVERY 3-0034
PANAMA'S ONE STOP SHOPPING CENTER
WHERE YOUR $$S
GO FARTHER

PANAMA'S FINEST
FOOD MARKET
-

OPEN DAILY7 .m. to 8 p.m. SUNDAYS: 8 *.m. to 1 p.m.
15th & Via Belisario Porras San Francisco Goif Club Road
PLENTY OF PARKING SPACE




PAGE SIX

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER/
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, II
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
No. 4 Tlvull Ave
Phone 3-TS8I
KIOSKO DE LESSEPS
Parqtir fie l.es*epft
Panam.
MORRISON'S
N*. roiulh of Julj At*.
Phone 2-1HI
BOTICA ARMN
1I,*S Melrdez A va.
Phone MSColo.
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
No. H Wot Utb Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
No. IT "M" StreefF-iiMnaA
No. 12.17* Central Ave.Caln.
Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE:Pair of 5 candi* can-
delcbra, Peruvian silver. Selling at
S200, half original price. 37th St.
No. 1S necr Panama Hospitol.
FOR SALE:Beautifully upholstered
.combination couch and bookshelf.
Panoma 3-3319.
FOR SALE: 2 single beds with
.(Tiattresses, desk, four diningrocrr
chairs, toll boy. 3 rugs. 5533-D.
telephone 2-1334. after 4 p. m
FOR SALE:Ch.ldren's tobies and
chairs. Frames of metol tubing.
Sturdy n d practicable. House
;0954 Amador Road. Phone 2-
3708.
FOR SALE
\iilonioliiif -
Whatever used car you want to
buy or 1*11 consult first with
Agencia Cosmos S. A. Automo-
bile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-4721.
Easy term. Opened all day Sot
urdays.
FCK SALE:Youth bed. waterproof I
mattress. children's congoleum.
"excellent condition. House 2157-
C. 7th Street. Curundu.
FOR SALE:One crib ond mattress.
' 2 sets children's books. I ladies
wool cornel's hair coat. 5616-C
Hodges Place. Diablo. Telephone
2-2 89.
_ ------------- ------------------V-
FOR SALE:One 25 cycle Bendix
washer, excellent condition $180.
00. 7 wood slat porch shades.
S4O.C0 Phone 6-374. House 151
Gamboa.
FOR SALE:Mahogany livingroom
s?t; double bed, big chifforobe.
Magic Chef stove. Curundu, 83-
6254. House 2042-A.
FOR SALE:Esy Spin-Dryer Wash-
ing Machine; Gotland gas stove;
G. E. toble model radio phono-
groch both standard and long-
playing records. All less than two
years use. Call between 10 and
12 or 4 and 6 at 5Cth St. No. 40
Apt. 5. Bella Vista.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
PONT I A C S
4 for New York Delivery
Beef excise fox increase)
6 tor Local Delivery
At OLD Price
SAVE MONEY BUY NOW!
CIVA, $. A.
Your CADILLAC & PONTIAC Dealer
T.I. 2-0S70 Panama
FOR SALE:1949 Cadillac Convert-
ible, gray, excellent condition, all
accessories. W/W tires, 27.000
miles. E. M. Cox. phone 380 Co-
co Solo. "Duty Paid" if desired
Immediate Off-Floor Delivery
NASH AMBASSADOR
NASH STATESMAN
Can Be Sale! At The
OLD DIRECT DELIVERY PRICE
a Trode-lni Accepted
NASH AGENCY
Panama 2-1790
FOR SALE:Furniture, one yeor old
eleven feet G. E. refrigerator.
$285. four burner gas stove $60,
Kenmore automatic washing $190.
dinnette set $25. two piece sec-
tional touch. $100. overstuffed
dlair. $40 *nd $50. platform
rocker $35. dropleof dining table
$45. desk $25. lamps, walnut end
toble, children's outdoor swing.
Venetion blinds, ipth St. No. 17,
San Fraxisco da* la Cateto.
FOR SALE:194 Pontiac 8 Hydro-
matte, radio, duty paid. Insured
until June. Very good condition.
$1.650.00. Phone 268, Colon.
MISCELLANEOUS
*)o roii have a aVinkina archtam?
Writ. Alcoholics AaMyaiaaa
*> 2031 Anean. C. X.
RESORTS
i
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:Don't toke chancel in
repairing your tape Or wire re
corder. Radio Calidonia, phone 2-
1326.
FOR SALE New Tripod, never
used, ond second hand movie ca-
mera. Gatun 5-188.
FOR SALE.TIRES AND TUBES:
New; 11.00 x 22; 12' ply; for
trucks; bargain prices. F. Icozo &
Company, 79 B Avenue.'
FOR SALE:Satine) Proyecta. Ra-
yara 16 mm. I list arica $J25.00)
far only $255.00.
INTERNATIONAL JEWELRY INC.
"odjoininj Internationa! Hotel)
We offer you any kind ond size) of
lumber, imported or native, nails
ond screws of any description.
Lowest prices. ALMACENES MAR-
TINZ, S. A. North Avo. Tot 2-
0610 Martin Sosa Street Tal. 3-
1424.
FOR SALE:25 cycle Westinghousa
refrigerotor with 3 yeor guaran-
tee for $200.00. 1950 Pontioc
4 door sedan Cavalier grey, Hy-
Hromotic. radio. Best offer over
$1,750.00. Mrs. F. M. Glaze, fl-
voh Hotel.
Early inspection this year, replace
your shattered gloss by our new
expert Mr. De Leon. Tropical Mo-
tors.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED: Clean soft rogs. Job
Dept. Panama American.
WANTED:Bbxer puppy under one
year. Housebroken. A K.C. re-
Qi-try not necessary. Write fulll
Information to Box 945, .Ancon.
C. z.
Specialists May
Obtain Commissions
In Reserve Corps
Opportunities for professional
and technical specialists to ob-
tain direct commissions in the
organized Reserve Corps with
concurrent call to active military
service were announced this
week by the Department of the
Army.
The Army currently has va-
cancies fo ra large number of
qualified Individuals with or
Without prior military exper-
ience In the Transportation
Corps, Chemical Corps, Corps of
Engineers, Signal Corps and
Ordnance Corps. Initial appoint-
ment will be made In the rank
of captain and lieutenant, de-
pending on the age of the appli-
cant and number of years of pro-
fessional or technical training
fc .' experience.
Many of the vacancies are in
the field of engineering, includ-
ing automotive, marine, chemi-
cal, mechanical, civil, electrical,
mining, radar, met allurgical.
highway, industrial and aero-
nautical engineers, in addition,
the Army needs officers with
professional and technical back-
grounds in business administra-
tion, mathematics, physics, sta-
tistics .geology, meteorology and
bacteriology.
Quotas for direct appointment
have been allocated to each Ar-
my area and Army commanders
have convened boards of officers
to consider applications of quali-
fied personnel.
Applicants must be college
fraduates between the ages of
1 and 39 and. depending on age.
must have from one to five years
experience In his field of spe-
cialization .
Applications may be submitted
through the headquarters of the
Military District or the Army a-
rea In which the individual re-
sides
FOR SALE:1950 Studebaker Re-
gal De Luxe Commander four
door sedan, driven 10,000 miles,
nylon upholstery, two spare tires,
one unmounted. Priced for quick
sole. Curundu 3194.
FOR SALS:-- Ui.d CADILLACS in
encallan candiran auarentacd.
"2" with
cavan
1-1946 4 doar Moan
hydramatic anal i.at
Slue.
1----1947 4 oar "2" with hydra-
matic, radia, teat coven, white-
wall tiras Now paint Dark
Snt.n.
11941 4 doer Fleetweed Special
with hydramatic, radio, wtiite-
walli ond teat caven Hack.
Finance aveileblo.
CIVA. S. A.
Your Cedilloc-Pontiec Dealer
Tal. 2-0170 Panama.
Anyone interested and having proper
vessels to carry ore from Costa
Rico to United States please write
airmail to Robert E. Somerholder,
Hotel Europa, Son Jose Ccfsta Ri-
ca.
HOTEL PANAMERICANO, EL VALLE
Special Rotes for this month, rooms
$2.00 per person; children $1.00.
Phone 2-1112 Panama for rt-
servotions.
Phi Mips. Oceoniide cottages. Sonta
Clara. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Ponama 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
CASINO SANTA CLARAS-CaWns,
food, swimming. No reservations
necessary.
FOSTER: Cottage* for rent by
day, week or month between Santo
Cloro ond Rio Hoto. Tal. 2-3142
or sea care taker.
Gramlich's Santa Claro beach-
cottages. Electric ica boxes, gas
stoves, moderte rotas. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
FOR RENT
Apartment!
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modem furnished-unfurnished apart
mont. Contact office No. 8061, 10th
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386. Co-
lon.
FOR RENT:One-bedroom screened
t apartment, furnished with all mod-
ern convenience. Well located.
Available immediately. Coll. 3-
4651 at 7 p. m.
FOR RENT:Available Nov. I De-
Luxe ooartment with two bad-
rooms, two bathrooms, hot water,
servonts quarters, garage, etc.
Phone 3-2144.
FOR SALENew field glasses, $25.
00. Greenheart rod $15.00. 6-0
German silver reel ("Adams")
cost $39.00 Commissary price,
$25.00. 4-8 Plywood Dinghy with
new 2 1-2 Johnson outboard and
parts $150.00. 1 Everwear locker
trunk, $10.00. J V. McGimsey,
Panama Canal Yacht Club. Phone
3-1983.
FOR SALEEnglish boy's bike, suit-
able for six-eight year old, needs
tires, $15.00. Girl's Roodmaster In
new condition. $25.00. 615-B
Ancon Blvd.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom opart-
men t, livingroom, dlningroom,
porch. Completely furnished; stove,
refrigerator, telephone. For infor-
mation Tel. 2-2454.
FOR RENT:Well furnished oport-
ment beginning November first.
Two bedrooms, livingroom, dining-
room, kitchen, porch, two bath-
rooms, maid's room, garage, hot
water, telephone. Sousa Building
44th St. No. 37. Coll 3-2007.
DON'T STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL.
VERTAGREEN
3-Way Plant Food
it cheaper than water
fot It
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ave. ..Tel. 3-0140
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel El Panam
Has for Sale Stocks
Preferred or Common of
Panam Forest Products
and Nat. Abattoir
Tels.: 3-4718, 3-1660
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM BOUT
Slipcover keapholstery
VISIT OUR SHOW-ROOM!
Alberto Herea
J r. de la Owa 77 (Automobile Row)
Free Estimate* Pick Deliver*
Tel. 3-4H8 :00 a.m. lo 7:00 p.m.
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
FOR SALE:1947 Ford 4 Door Se-
don. in excellent condition with
radio for $850. Lo Boca Road 795
XB. Phone Balboa 3296.
FOR'SALE:Chevrolet 1-2 ton Pa-
nel Truck, 51.600 miles. $500.-
00. Call Panama Radio Corpora-
tion. Tel. 2-2566 or 2-3364.
FOR SALE: Buick 38. two door
new tires ond botterv. Excellent
transportation, $190.00. zone em-
ploye. Federico Boyd No. I. Phone
3-1516.
FOR SALE:1949 Fcrd. 8, sedan,
over-drive, groy, 18,000 miles
plastic seat covers, excellent con-
dition. $1.250.00. Call 94-436
offer 5 p. m. Qtrs. 338-G. Pedro
Miguel.
FOR SALE:1951 Pontioc Tudor,
streamlined, black, plastic uphols-
tered throughout, iust broken in.
extras. Coll 6-200, or see it at
104-X. Gamboa.
FOR SALE: Pontioc 8, 1949. De
Luxe Chieftain. 2 door sedan, Hy-
dromatic, radie Call 26-336.
CRIER'S CRY CHANGES
8PRINGFIELD. Mass. (UJ?.)
When the first five women ever
drawn for Hampden Country
Jury duty reported the Superior
Court crier changed the greeting
to: "Ye Rood women and men of
Hampden County."
FOR SALE:Used PONTI ACS
Excellent condition and aeeaarance
law mileage*.
11941 Snort Coup. '" with
hyaVamatic, radia, pot liaht, etc.
Mas,
1 1949 Sedan Coup, "6" with
plastic ieot carers and white-
wall tires gray.
1 1950 Mm ear. "6" with
plastic teat cavers and whitewell
tiras (ray.
1-1950 2-eoor laden "" with
hydramatic. raaia. seat eivers
and whitewall tires two-fan.
FOR SALE:Grey Persian coat size
12. girls winter clothes 12. Boys
jacket 10. 768-C Barneby, Bal-
boa.
"FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SALE:1 1-2 Ton Dodge fire
truck motor and pump excel-
lent condition. Phone 6-374,
House 151, Gamboa.
FOR SALE1940 Oldsmobile Coupe
$300. 2105-D. 5th Street. Cu-
rundu. 83-6141.
FOR SALE:1949 4-door De Luxe
Chevrolet Sedan, 13,200 miles,
nylon seat covers, oil filter, un-
dercoated. Call between 10 ond
12 Or 4 ond 6 of 50th St.. No.
40. Apt. 5, Bella Vista. Tel. 3-
3196.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:Motor for boat 10 H.
P., $250. Inquire No. 2, Second
Street, Son Francisco.
FOR SALE
Motorrvolf
FOR SALEr45 Harley motorcycle,
excellent condition, $250. Coll Al-
brok 4266 during duty hours.
FOR SALE'Lowton motor scooter,
$50.00. Just overhauled. Gatun
5-188.
Easy Term.
CIVA. 1 A.
Yeor Codillnc-Ponti.c Dewier
Yel. 2-M70 Panama.
FOR SALE:1949 Chevrolet 4-door
sedon. 4 new tires, new battery.
Call Sfegman of Coco Solo 703-
601.
rCR SALE1941 Ford Coupe 194?
eng:ne In excellent condition. Goo-'
tren oort.fi-n. Phone 88-658, 524
C, Gulick Heights.
We Are
Headquarters for
Shertcin-Williams
Paints
We invite you to visit
our Stores to inspect
our huge assortment of
colors. We have a paint
for every purpose.
BEST QUALITY
LOWEST PRICES
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Whore 100.000 People Mae*
Presents
Today, Friday, Oct. 19
TM.
3:30Music for Friday
4:00The Home o the Three
Bears (BBC)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00As I Knew Her (BBC)
8:15Evening Salon (request)
7:00Mayor of Caaterbridge
(BBC)
7:30BLUE RJBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00NEWS and Commentary-
Raymond 6wind (VOA>
8:15Radio in Review (VOA)
8:45Facts on Parade (VOA)
9:00The Perry Como Show
(VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA) ,
10:30Adventures of PC.
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
TIWFii ^FftvlcE
II Tvoll Ave. Pan. 2-2006
49
13 North Ave. Tel. 2-061
Martin Sosa Street
Tel. 3-1424
Saturday, Oct. 20
AJM.
6; 00Sign On
6 rooAlarm Clock Club
7:30Jazz Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30The Sorcerer's Revenge
(BBC)
8:45The Duke Steps Out
9:00NEWS
9:15Women's World (VOA)
9:30Highwayman's Hill-
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00NEWS
P.M.
12:05NEW> TUNE TIMEPAN-
AMUSICA
12:30The Football Prophet
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Tour de France (RDF)
2:00Latin American Serenade
2:15Date For Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Band Concert
3:15The Little Show
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude
4:00Music for Saturday
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Quest Star
1:15Masterworks from Famce
(RDF)
6:45American Folk Songs
7:00day Paris Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00Newsreel U.S.A. (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Battle Report 'VOA'
9:00Radio University (VOA)
: 15Stamp Club (VOA)
Edna Brandt, Health
Service Consultant
In US Visits Panam
Miss Edna Brandt of the Uni-
ted States Public Helath Service,
Tuberculosis Division, arrived in
Panama Wednesday to study the
progress being made in the Re-
Subllc through the cooperative
ealth and sanitation program,
It was announced today.
Miss Brandt is one of several
consultants composing an eval-
uation team which Is visiting
several Latin American countries
where the Health and Sanitation
Division of the Institute of Inter-
American Affairs has missions
working on cooperative projects.
In Panam, the Institute as
the representative of the United
States Government, and the
Ministry of Health. Welfare and
Labor as the representative of
the Panamanian Government,
guide the Servicio Cooperativo
Interamericano de Salud Pblica
which Is directed by Dr. James
G. Townsend.
Miss Brandt came to Panam
from El Salvador and will re-
main here until about November
1 when she will return to Wash-
ington.
She Intends to devote the
greater part of her time in Pan-
ama to a study of nursing pro-
grams, both Institutional and
public health, and in discussing
orojects of nursing education.
She will work with Miss Char-
lotte Kerr, Nursing Education
Consultant who Is in Panama
with the Health and Sanitation
Division of theHAA.
On Thursday, Friday and Sat-
urday, Miss Brandt and Miss
Kerr will visit health centers in
the interior at Chorrera. Chame,
Anton, Penonom and Chitr.
9:30Radio Amateur Program
(VOA)
9:45SDorts and Tunexof Day
(VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice o' America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp.
RDFRadlodiffusion Francalse
Far
AUTOMOBILE
INSURANCE
SEE
V
De lessens Park
Tel.: 2-2091 2-2999
.V
!. '
THIS IS AN ARTIST'S CONCEPTION of the Navy's newest aircraft carrier USs'ForrestaMCVB.
59), named for the late Secretary of Defense, James V. Forrestal. The 59,900-ton, flush-deck I
vessel will be built by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Newport News, Vlr-I
ginia. Preparation of plans are well under way now and completion of the new carrier is ex-I
pected In about three years after the plans are completed. The keel is expected to be laid next!
summer.
The USS Forrestal will be the Navy's first carrier with a retractable bridge. Her four cata-
pults, four elevators and large flight deck will enable the ship to handle the heaviest carrier
aircraft of the latest design. The ship will have an overall length of 1940 feet a beam of 1281
feet at waterllne, and extreme width at one point on the flight deck-of 252 feet, and will ln-l
corporate the latest known advances In carrier construction. /
Designed to accommodate approximately 3,500 men Including her air group personnel, mortl
comfort and efficiency for her crew will be provided by air conditioned quarters, while escala-
tors will quickly dairy pilots to the flight deck from ready rooms below. A television system to
aid in landing aircraft will be installed in the ship. The Forrestal will cruise at a speed of 30 J
knots plus and will be capable of remaining at sea for three months without replenishine
Estimated cost of the new carrier is $218,000.000.
eM JjJaW-j, I HHHj a aagnajJjBjjn ... BSJI

1 j anal
*SL M$
$ V leanat, '',*' a*1
& '$

%
r
O (Official USAF Photo)
ONE OF THE SERIES OF INCIDENTS during the Disaster Control problem at Albrook Air
Force Base yesterday morning called for the "sabotage" of France Air Force Base on the
Atlantic side. The information was supposedly received by anonymous telephone call. Here an
airman alert crew takes off In an Albrook C-47, flying to France AFB to guard the un-
occupied base during the course of the problem. ______________^^^
JOHN C. FLOYD, Associate
Director of the Education Divi-
sion. The Institute of Inter-
American Affairs, has arrived
in Panama from Washington,
D.C.
He Is planning to spend two
days with the Education Field
Party in Panama before visit-
ing the Education Field Party
In Nicaragua. Floyd has been
with the Institute of Inter-
American Affairs for the past
nine years serving both in
South America and in ^be
main office in Washington,
D.C.
The Automobile Manufacturers
Association says that tests show
that the average car Is driven
12,260 miles Its first year but that
the figure decreases each year.
The average number of miles
driven in 1950 by 1937 models was
only 5,890.
B0STICH STAPLERS
the best t
5,000 Staples95c.
Bwiaurorais.Mc
#1 THroIl Ave.
Tel. 2-2419
Field Day Listed
For Tomorrow
At La Boca Park
In observance of youth week by
the Episcopal churches, a field
day will be held on La Boca ball
park tomorrow under the auspi-
ces of the Youth Fellowship of
St. Peter's.
The list of activities follows:
9:30 a.m. Parade of Athletes.
9:45 a.m. Track and Field
Meet.
11:30 a.m. Lunch.
1:00 p.m.Softball.
1:00 p.m. Volleyball.
Entries for the various events
have been made by Episcopal
parishes on both the Pacific and
Atlantic sides. Each parish is re-
KOREA IS ROUGHEST
NEWPORT, N. Y. (U.P.) \
S/Sgt. Francis Van Kuren, whul
returned home recently after h
year's fighting in Korea, say.i
the Korean campaign is rougher
than any of the World War DC
battles. He served in five World
War 11 campaigns.
There are more than 300 lakes
and ponds in New Hampshire
which are un-named, according
to the State Planning and De-
velopment Commission.
strlcted to one boys* and on
girls' softball teams and similar-
ly with the volleyball teams.
Bats, balls and other equip-
ment will be supplied by La Bo-
ca playground through the cour-
tesy of the physical director, As-
ton M. Parchment
JOHNSON*,
: GL0C0A
fir PtooM
Make floors shine
the easy way
with the wonder
polish that's now
water "repellent!
Your tile, wood or linoleum floors get a beauti-
ful, protective shine in minutes, with self-
polishing Glo-Coat. And now you can wipe
away water or spilled things, yet your floors
keep their shine! Johnson's Glo-fcoat is now
positively water-repellent! Save time and
effort Make your housework easier. Get Glo-
Coat Save money, toobuy larger sizes.
JOHNSON'S GLO-COA1
Distributors:
TROPIDUPA fi
/


FRIDAY, OCTOBER M, 1W
TE PANAMA AMERICAN 4 INDEPENDENT DALT NEWSPAPER '
PAGE SEVEN
.i -
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
WNie NO uLiMIO TMt PANAMA AMERICAN Ml. <-
OUNf>0 NILMN ROUNMVBU- IH !!
HARMODIO ARIAS. COITO* 1
7 M TOUT P O BOX 134. RAN* R O R.
TtlCfHON RAN*M* NO 3-0740 \ CAOl Addri. RAHAKBRICAN. PNM ___-
Cl*n *)fici. It 17 Crirmu Avinui KT*ri i?tm no iitm thict
FOftllON RenMtNiTivt. JOSHUA B RCWrRS. INC
S4B MABIBOW AV, NW VO*K. "' N. V
,/ LOCAl "
t. MONTH. .N AOVANCf------------------------------------ 112 |5 OO
fO* I MONTH. IN OVNCt m 'I ''
_^______^ IS.00 14 oo
o* on yca*. in DvNr-_
Waiter Winchell
In New York
' By Victor Riesel
It won't be a cold war for
the Sovietlzed Chinese troop
In Korea this onnishlng win-
ter.
They'll be warm mug In
uniform*, socks and other gar-
ment sewn of cloth supplied
(hem by the Japanese, because
a coalition of Tokyo business-
men and union want to do
business a usual With Red
China.
Furthermore, mott of.
these Nipponese textiles
will be spun from raw Ame-
rican cotton bought from
areas of our country which
also alsa. contribute- their
share of dead, maimed and
missing QIs.
I have before me a copy of
a memorandum from Tokyo'
International Trade and Indus-
try Ministry .to all Japanese
business men. officially approv-
ing trade with our enemy.
These businessmen, backed by
politically powerful Nipponese
union eager to keep their peo-
ple at work, may now send Red
China a* much cheml:al tex-
tiles as the Pelping government
can pay for In American dollar.
At the ame tim, the Ja-
panese can ship as much cot-
ton thread, cotton cloth, staple
. fiber thread, staple fiber cloth.
The Washington Ticker: The Dept of Justice has a maneuver fJber cotton rayon thread
(or project) that could cbuck the Communist newspaper The Daily it fi textties a8 tne Chi-
Worker into the waste-basket TheFBI[ "^* **" *" n" tmre l nese can barter for with coal,
than zu communists left in the movie industynone are stars... = ... mgtprjgig
At their peak they had about 500 members N V*"* "xhesl "other material." are
been tipped that phony G-men are cl?ln* ^h*'n'?w? the raw stuff which Japanese
^^^^tT^^^iS^^ merchants want for low cost
Ones with his disclosures at New York' Union League Club.. .Big
lumor: That Elisabeth and Phillip return by boat su they can taga
*. _____ .a n....i .1i_..m>r.*r htnnt MAN ABOUT TOWN ...,..
The Rita Hayworth-Gllbert Roland Idyll Un't even suspected by
their closest chums because of the sotto-voce trysU...The Broae-
rlck Crawford are reconciled.. Mickey (N. Y. Yankees) Mantle
and hi fiancee cancelled it...Jani Paige's name get itemed with
scad of lads but Mr. Big remain Dick Stabile. .On of Boston
top baseball stars has gone maaad over a TWAirline Hostess and
will beseech his wife to free hln...Nornin Bel Geddes 1 at the
swank Virgin Isle (St. Thomas) while taking The -Week Cure
When Joe DIMaglc doubled (In that final Series game) he jarftrti
of germs plus 102 temp. That's why he didn't show up at the Bllt-
more victory affair.. Anna Roosevelt is almost mended from her
long Illness".... Standard OH heir Amaf Archbold and Miriam
Thropp the Pennsy RR heiress, have a flah..Martha Raye can t
remember where she put her husband.
Joyce Mathews Is The Other Woman In the Billy Rote, case,
although the gazette omitted her name, having no 'proof .. .The
raid photos show her fully attired ..Only piclvres Mrs Rose has
(of that incident) show Joyce coming out of the Zlegfeia pent-
house with Billy Rose's barrister ,.M. Beries alimony to her is
$2,500 per month... Insiders thawt the Rose affair was over be-
cause Joyce's steadiest date (Ince the wrlst-la-..hlng) was a wan
Street broker named Atworth.. .Eleanor own 81 pieces of jewelry
outright. The only hunk of We she doesn't own 1 a necklace or
137 perfectly matched one-karat diamonds Rose bought for a ca-
pilai-galns setup.
Labor New
And
Comment

Started Off With Bang

tumor: That Elisabeth and runup return Dy wat a* ., "'-- J~" ,""V "--T, the worid
home the Crown Jewel, and Royal .l.verw.re .hipped her. for "" safety in 1939.
Marlene Dietrich .was decorated by France and the S. for
her great work during the war. But her tax agony ha her on the 0f one of their Nipponese ra
ropes England refuses to let her pay what she owes Uncle Sam dio commentators who plugged
(ironi her frozen $400,000) because "she's a foreigner"... Mrs. Darlo, f0r "business-as-usual with
reported divorcing the LaMartlnique landlord. Is said to be join- Mao Tse-tung' government
ing him in Mexico.. .Eddie Foy, Jr. is back at St. Clare's...Gloria Kobashl. by name.
nc,u.0n anrt o/Mithv n Haft, i don't, be Haft-sale I have reaumed, v. ant n- the
U1II nil" 1 mc*it". .buuic wj, j>. v -----------------" j
DeHaven and wealthy D. Haft (don't be Haft-safe I) have resumed
according to the LaRuemers... Screen writer Jay Corrigan is try
He got on- the air In Tokyo
" on Sept. 21, the day the Japan-
ing to convine* the ex-Mrs. Wm. Saroyan that Hes The One... ese goTcrnnient restrictions on
Betty Belgel (of the Stork-El Morocco Circuit) was r D_j .,<,h.
OfLiy Drivel vui me um *.-<>> X CX jT.------j ->
Knicker-bocker Hosp. Very serious.. .Jesse Lasky s dghtr.andMar
tin Ragaway are the talk of Hollywood's Lox-and-Hounds set.
The Infl Intrigues: Londoners are concerned about I^rdand {prnatlonal'Trade and* industry
^:..liLJ-i"!5w^^ ^S'c-unTshould be relaxed
is on Priniess Margaret' It Most Popular Men list... Edith Piaf
is fine after her auto injury. The medic, of course, is now her
Favorite Dish...Lady Astor and her son Franc aren't talking.
Her Ladyship's in a swivet over bis recent divorce and the fact
that The Other Gel U a chnteme. .Chiang Kai-.hek's oldest son,
Lt. Gen. Chlng-kuo, and his Russian-born wife will soon confirm
their splituation.. .After 2* years lawyer L Margulies and his Mrs
iniir spi>vuauon...Aiicr < j'i "J" *- ZT *1 r
rawiww.: aaaiiy^-'Fren' ** ^
Benny Goodman's and Harry James's former vocallur (Helen
Wood) is rumored secretly sealed to Walter C. Newton. Jr., under
her real name, Helen Murphy. The merger was about May 28th.
The groom is a WMOM exec and In the N. Y. and Boston sog. reg.
Edith Bell (Janls Paige's understudy), a member of Seattles
isi'i't-lt-difflcult-to-get-a-Butler set. was wed yesterday to Lee
Hessel in the parental mansion at Tarrytown. His pop's M. Hes-
sel the squilllonalre fur mfr...Life's Oct 15th Issue halls Herb
Shilner as a native of Indiana. He was born hi Ohio and moved
to Indiana "as soon as I found out about It!"... Does Mrs. J.
Brooks Atkinson know that the N. Y. Times drama critic is lead-
ing a> double life? A shawt story In the Satevepost is about the
drama critic of "New York' very distinguished morning paper,
who falls for the young actress he panned in print.
The Pre, can expect at least 5,000 Yule cards. They wUl be
from The Peace Crusaders (a high-sounding front for commies)
urging a "cease-fire in Korea"... Peter Witt and Christine Gatto
(she's art buyer for Living Magazine) eloped over the wk-ena af-
ter one of those whirlwind courtships. Debra Robinson of ectety
(divorced from Peter Garvn a year ago) merges wHh Chris O Don.
nell. the AftP exec, on Friday... Ernest Heyn (Macfadden editor-
in-chief) will be the new editor of American Weekly.. .The situa-
tion in Florida this season: Positively'no open gimbling. The S*G
Syndicate's headache with the Tax Dep't is so tougheven their
cars have been seised for arrears. Barbara Pay ton gets SU50 per
week on her tour of personal apps.
, Democrats and Repubs here are quaking about Dlat Atty Frank
Hogan's upcoming blast against political contributionsneither re-
ceipted nor recorded...Phillip Murray will resign In 1952 as Pres.
o C.I.O. but will keep his post as chief of United Steelworkers.
He loses no money by It as he took no coin as CIO head... The
Kel (WORi Rosses1 are Imaging.. .Ice star Chct Nelson and Judy
Fenster, the dance tutor, are making ice at each other... When
"Top Banana" Is peeled at the Winter Garden Nov 1st it will have
an advance sale of over $500.000 "Music In the Air.'.' despite the
divided notices, grossed over 42 0...'The Richard Harper the'
with MOM and she' John F. Royals dghtr Schatzle) are 3'lng...
Lily Carlson, one of the top salaried model, Is In Reno unwind-
ing from art director Julian Dowell.
fMI. I VOUII K)M frll MADIR OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
lbs Mail tea a a m" >'<<" raasen ra ** Amarte*
Llti /vewivea iitTMll> na in hmmilU la Rally can(i*lMi:
nonmi
If rea ssrHhW. Mtet teal k* Imaatiaat H aawi't appMi Km
art say. Utton ara RRbliaked i tha .r*i rsceivea.
Plaai try to aa Hra tthtn limito, ta aaa ft*
lanlity leltW wrRar m hela) la wtktott ceafieeaM.
Tbk aawtsaaat anurnai a. ri.Bi>ilw> to* alatomsaW > aalatam
VRiMe la lattar ftam mitt
WANT THAT HOUSE PAINTED? HERE'S HOW...'
To the Mall Box Editor:
A letter recently appeared in the Mall Box asking the Edit-
or to follow up on some of the letter and complaint appear-
ing In thl ection.
I'frankly don't think that U the job of the mall Box Editor
nor The Panama American and I certainly doubt seriously if
they will make any move in this direction for lt Is not In thelr
laie of duty. can ship wnat tney want or
However I would like to make a suggestloa to the origin- this material to the gateway to
ator of these letters. South China.
, Why not join your different organizations here on'the Zone? e,
For example If you want your home painted la Curundu, hour uu by set to the Red
why not join the NFFE and present your problem to them? factories turning out the unl-
1'm sure with the help of the rest of the member and form, for the troop of our
with some work on your part the houses in Curundu would be 1sy ^
*lnte In other word. Instead of asking The Panama American Especi^JLd^''* J"
to see if they can get your house paiuted. make a mova on your ?,,, if.'
your own part. Work for the naod of your community.
You will also meet tome fine friends and it will help t
make your atay In the Zone a happier one.
Sincerely
B J.
iiii asan -. n -----<----------r
merchants want for low cost
production o they can com-
pete with industries In high
Very clever businessmen, the
Japanese. .
Here are the actual remarns
Red trade were lifted, and
broadcast to his listeners that:
"Some persons in the Secre
munlst China should be relaxed
somewhat, because Communist
China want to buy Japanese
textile good. Japan expects
much from the raw materiel
of Communist China."
He then sourly explained
that..of course, there'd be com-
is because cotton, thread
and Jftth 'are considered stra-
tegic war materials and that
much of the textile sent to
Red China will be made from
American Taw cotton.
Tons of this raw stuff are
pouring into Japan
bought up from American
brokers who have had no
reason not to sell to a na-
tion with which we made
peace with such fanfare.
Restrictions on American sale
of this raw U. S. cotton to for-
eign buyers were lifted by our
Commerce Dept. on Sept. 17.
Eleven days later the De-
partment added that "soft and
hard cotton waste and used
cotton now may (also) be ex-
ported to most countries under
general license without prior
application to the Office of In-
ternaticial Trade."
However. Secretary Sawyers
experts did add that these ship-
ment to the "U.8.S.R. and it
satellites and to Hong Kong
and Macao (Portuguese) will
continue to be restricted and
require export license."
Now, here Is what happen-
ed Immediately In Japan.
On Sept. 17. the American
Supreme Headquarters, which
receives its advice on these
non-military mattera from the
other branches of our govern-
ment dispatched a memoran-
dum to the Japanese Trade
Ministry saying that it will no
longer be necessary for the Ja-
panese government- to get per-
mission from the Supreme mi-
litary commander for the ex-
port of seven types of textile
to Communist China.
Well, four days later, on Sept
21. the Japanese government
also approved this trade with
Red China the first of many
such move. H can be predicted.
Of course, the Jap offi-.
rial* restricted such items
as cotton tire cord, para-
chute and balloon material,
viscose ravon tire cord and
cotton sail cloth. For which,
thanks. But what the Nip-
ponese did immediately af-
ter that was announce that
exports to Hong Kong "will
no longer require emer-
gency item import permits
of the Hong Kong govern-
ment and buyers letters of
guarantee as tn the past."
Which means the Japanese
can ship what they want of
Prints And Princess
By BOB RUARK

NEW YORK. If by some unlikely chance
I were working for His Majesty's government.
I would fire the vice-chancellor in charge of
public relations for insular stupidity in send-
ing Princess Liz and her spouse to this con-
tinent at a time when the nation Is preoc-
cupied with a World Series and the upcoming
football season.
I know the first port of call was Canada,
but we have been covering the good lady In
half-hearted manner from long distance, and
she has been, more or less making the gir-
dle-advertisement section of the press, because
there Is no living royalty, Including King Zog,
who can compete with a World Series of the
Intensity of this late lamented classic.
Liz's safari to this strange land has been
less epic than routine, and. there are some
citizens about who wouldn't know, and couldn't
care less, that the continent has been invaded.
You get to thinking about timing, once in
a whilev and, then you think, how smart the
boy who dumped Willie Morettl were. Here is
an Instance In which the vice-president in
charge of murder must be complimented for
advanced thinking.
It Is well known that any hoodlum of bigger
than .22 caliber is bound to be on hand at
Series time.
All the little tough towns, like Evansville
and Akron- and Cicero and East St. Lou, are
emptied of their criminal content.
The nation' crookedness converges on New
York, and there is no way for an honest cop
to say that Joe and Pete and Sluggy and Ice-
pick are possible suspect due to being absent
from the home fold.
So In the midst of the conclave, some guys
named Charlie meet poor old Willie and give
it to him In the ear. and they leave hats with
local dateline on the hatband, and the moral
is clear: Here la a hat. boys. Don't talk through
it. And then they go to the ball game.
Because they know the ball game 1 a cinch
to obscure anything of Vital Importance, such
as killing; Willie, or developing a new bomb, or
ciudary mSHWTOH
MERRY-60-ROUND
ly OIIW PIAISON
BBmaBmBHMamBRmmB*BjBja^BaiaaaaBiaBsSa>RSSakl
a taxhlke, or a rent raise.
Baseball is about the last thing we have here
of paramount Importance that so far has been
tamper-proof.
As such lt commands a tremendous interest,
and the nation knocks off.
I can tell you simply whv the visit of Prin-
cess Liz and the scragging of poor Willie was.
neglected to the detriment of royal presence
and illegal removal.
-Baseball is a thing we can trust, and the
mere existence of a conflict that reflects per-
sonal security l.s automatic front-page news.
The folks mightn't trust Truman and his
friends, but they know mighty well that a
pitcher would dust off his grandmother to
protect an earned-run average.
Acheson is open to doubt, but DiMaggio ain't.
The kids take dope, perhaps, and muggers
. abound, and you never know whether the man
on the stand Is telling the truth. The cops
teal and the political hookup with the mob
s apparent, and the air Is full of sound and
fury.
But major baseball has stayed clean, de-
spite all.efforts to contaminate lt. since the
boys figured that basketball and football were
automatic cinches for corruption.
The big effort to debate It was definitely on
until the professional football scandal and the
basketball nastlnesses came about, and the
boys lost a little heart.
The Kefauver emphasis on criminality fur-
ther deterred the fix, and all the noise this
year about general wrongdoing has halted a
gang effort to "organize", Ab Doubleday's heir.
It Is a sad thing that a simple sport like
baseball is bigger then a Queen-to-be's visit
or the murder of a top racketeer and bigger
than the mess In Washington, or the implied
doom of us all, atomwlse, oilwlse, diplomacy-
wise.
And the answer Is easily as simple as the
sport. All of us need something to hang onto,
and darned if baseball Isn't about the last best
security- we own. \
Matter Of Fact
By JOSEPH ALS0P
THE STICK AND THE CARROT II
#M* ^-a > .r-
Anparently It's a long long
all from heartbreak Ridge to
-kyo.
{Copyright 951 Post-Bali
Syndicate, Inc.)
BONN.Two rather elderly men neatly sum
up In their own .persons the dangers which
threaten Western policy In Germany.
They are. Dr. Kurt Schumacher, who rules
the powerful Social Democratic party with an
iron hand, and Dr. Konrad Adenauer. Christian
Democratic leader and Chancellor of the Bonn
republic.
Political leadership in Germany is an egg-
shell-thin crust, because the Hitler readme kil-
led off so many potential leaders, and these two
men wholly dominate West German politics.
Schumacher, who lost an arm In the first
World War, and a leg. hi teeth and his health
In a Nazi concentration camp, is a physical
symbol of the hell through which his country
has passed.
There has been a good deal of nonsen.se
written about the rebirth of Nazism In Ger-
many.
Actually, only an Insanely stupid Allied po-
licy could revive anything really like Hitlerlsm.
Yet lt Is also wrong to suppose that Ger-
many could have lived through Nazism, mili-
tary triumph, devastation, defeat, and parti-
tion, and then emerge politically completely
rational.
To hear the angry passion of Dr. Schumach-
er as he explains his view Is to sense the deep
undercurrent of lrratlonallsm In Germany to-
day.
Schumacher ha only a fierce contempt for
the French or anv other Continental nation.
He bitterly denounces the Schuman plan and
the European Army project, and he would sup-
port German rearmament only on term which
are physically Impossible to meet, on the one
hand, and which would lead straight as a die
to a third world war. on the other.
Adenauer makes a strange contrast to his
chief rival. He Is precise, dryly unemotional.
Icily rational. And be believes deeply that
Oermany's future lies in nothing short of total
political, economic and military Integration In-
to a Continental system.
Obviously. If Schumacher and those' who
think like him were to gain total control of
Oerman policy, the result could only be sheer
disaster for the West. Germany Included.
Obviously, the only hope for a rational Oer-
man settlement lies with those who think like
Adenauer, at least in the foreign field.
Yet, through ho fault of the able high com-
missioners. Allied policy In Germany tends more
and more to strengthen the Schumachers and
weaken the Adenauer.
For one thing, the Pentagon timetable for
German rearmament has frozen the Allied po-
sition.
Because they know, or think they know, that
the West must have a rearmed Germany at
any cost whatsoever, politicians of Schumach-
er's stripe feel quite free to reject proposals
like the European Army, and to 'demand Im-
possible terms for German rearmament.
At the same time, aware of the grave dan-
gers implicit in rearming Germany, the policy
makers in all three Allied capitals are wish-
fully hoping that Germany can be rearmed
and simultaneously controlled bv elaborate in-
direction. This further strengthens the Schum-
achers and weakens the Adenauers.
The Indirect control which the planners in
Washington, London, and Paris wishfully ex-
pect to exercise Is embodied In various "an-
nexes" to the "contractual agreement" now be-
ing haltingly negotiated.
According to this fine print In the contract,
Germany is to promise, for example, to con-
tinue in force occupation statutes like the de-
cartelization laws, and to guarantee neither to
make nor to carry out scientific research on
a variety of weapons.
More Important, the high commissioners are
to become a "Council of Ambassadors" with
the power-to resume, in effect, occupation au-
thority by declaring a "state of emergency."
According to some of the ablest men here,
this ort of thing simply will not work, be-
cause lt will become the obvious aim of Ger-
man politicians to defy, for political advant-
age, such word on paper.
The danger Inherent In rearming Germany
are real enough ta any case. The principal
danger is that the German objective, like that
of Dr. Schumacher, will be. not defense, but
the liberation of the Eastern provinces, so that
the German tall will wag the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization dog. Yet this sort ot dang-
er cannot be dealt with by word on paper.
Indeed, here in Germany lt becomes entirely
clear why Gen. Dwight D. Elsenhower has be-
come whollv converted to the Idea of Contin-
ental unification. There Is Just no other way
to deal effectively with the ? risk of
German rearmament.
Drew Pearson says: U.S. finances Philippine immorality;
Senator Capehart speaks to empty seats;Truman con-
siders national physical fitness program.
WASHINGTON. The Veteran Administration Is holding It*
car:, for explosions when thl gets out, but several millions of the
taxpayers' money is being spent annually to finance immortality
in the Philippine Islands.
This Is because widows of Filipino veterans of World War II'
are entitled to disability and death pensions, just as the widow
of American G Is. but lose their pension if they remarry.
As a result, living out of wedlock has become widespread among
Philippine war widows so as not to lose the monthly benefits from
Unrie Sam.
In some cases the practice has fantastic aspects. Philippine
widows have even lived with married men, splitting their pensions
with the men's wives.
V. A. examiners have run across cases of a man having three
of four children In a period of two years obviously impossible
with one wife.
However, how to break up these "harems" subsidized by Uncle
Sam has the V. A. puzzled, partly because there is little or no
enforcement of adultery laws In the Philippines and partly be- .
cause the common-law marriage is not recognized there.
The V. A./has cut off the pension of some widows living with
single men, since cohabitation without marriage is considered
the equivalent of common-law marriage, whether br not such Is
recognized ta the islands. "?:
However, such cases are sometimes tough to prove. V. A. lrr-
vesiigators get little cooperation from neighbors of the couple;
and the lady takes separate lodgings when word Is flashed that
an Investigator is in the neighborhood.
It is even tougher to get at pensioned widows living with mar--
ried men especially when the wife gets a slice of the pension."'
V. A. solicitor Edward Odom claims his hends are tied under
the law. But his mouth isn't gagged, and he could ask Congres
for a new law to stop subsidizing Philippine harems with the tax-
payers' money. I "
NOTEAt about the time of Pearl Harbor, the Philippine'
army Was merged with the U.S. Army, so that all Filipino veter-
ans automatically get the same benefits as UB. veterans.
EMPTY SENATE
One of life's most disappointing moments for likable Sen.
Homer Capehart, the Hoosler Republican, was during the foreign-'
aid debate.
The music-box Senator from Indiana arose with a thick, pre-
pared speech on his'desk. The words of his ghost writers had
beer, carefully rehearsed for this big moment.
But before his oratory was 15 minutes old, the chamber was
well-nigh deserted. Senators retired to the cloakrooms, newsmen'
vanished from their roost.
Finally, Capehart's Indiana colleague, noisy Bill Jenner, In-
terrupted :
"You are making a fine speech, hut you're wasting your
breath," he said.
"You are not changing any votes. The press will not report
what you are saying. You might as well take ;,our seat."
Capehart's deep, discouraged sigh was heard across the cham-
ber. Glumly, he said: "I shall be very glad to take your advice."
NATION'S BAD HEALTH
Disturbed by the large numbers of 4-F's being rejected for
military service. President Tnrman is seriously considering a "phy-
sical fitness" program for the nation.
Truman has been steamed up on the idea since a recent chat
with Congressman E. H. Hedrick of West Virginia, a physician and
former county health officer, who has devoted most of his life
to promoting community health and recreational activities in the
West Virginia coal fields.
What Truman has in. mind is a voluntary system of physical
education, including diet training, that would be open to civilians
of all ages, but particularly young working people.
Schools and colleges meantime would be encouraged to ex-
pand their own physical-training courses.
Dr. Hedrick already has Introduced -a bill which the Presi-
dent is expected to approve.
It calls for a fitness program, partly financed with Federal
funds but under the local guidance of veterans' organizations,
fraternal and athletic clubs and other volunteer groups.
There would have to be some general supervision from Wash-
ington.
However. Hedrick's bill leaves it up to the President to select
the administering agency. Some agency with established local tie-
ins, as the Office of Education or Civil Defense, would do the job,
In order to keep expenses down.
Truman reminded Congressman Hendrick that he seldom
negleted his own daily exercises, including his famous morning
walk.
I've got to keep in shape or this job would floor me," he
remarked. *
"But there should be more emphasis on physical fitness on
a national scale," said Hedrick. "About 50 per cent of our draft
eliaibles are being turned down as 4-F's. I'm greatly disturbed Bf*t
the thought that we are becoming a weak nation." ^
"So am I," replied the President. "Something can and should
be done about it." _I
NOTEIf Congress gives the green light, this Is one "healtrn.
program to which neither Truman nor Hedrick anticipate opposi-
tion from the American Medical Association. The West Virginia
congressman Is a leading member of the A.M.A.
FREEDOM TRAIN
Engineer Jaroslav Konvallnka, the Czech who crashed his
railroad train across a rusty rail line into Germany the other.,,
day, went back to the Czech border the other night to help re--
'.case 2,000 balloon carrying about 3,000.000 messages to the CzechA
people. "u
Reason he did this was because the Czech Communists had
hammered home the tory that this "Freedom Trata" had been''
masterminded by American spies and that the Czech passengers -
were tortured and imprisoned by Americans when they arrived in,
Germawy.
To counteract thl. the Crusade for Freedom printed 3.000,000,',
leaflets featuring pictures of the train, the engineer, and the pas-
sengers happy and smiling, plus this message to the people of-
Czechoslovakia:
"We are coming to you from the free sky again, to tell you
the truth about the escape of the Czech ralUay train with 108-%
passengers on Sept. 11.
"The Communists are frantically trying to explain away the -
dash to freedom of the Prague-to-Asch train.
They have manufactured a fantasy about terrorist group
and foreign agents. Here Is the truth:
"Those who escaped were patriotic Czech, who needed no.,
he'p from foreign agents.' Engineer Jaroslav Konvallnka. his wife "
and two children, aged six and nine, were no foreigners.
"Neither were Karel Truska, former station master at Aschv
and his wife.
Nor were the others who made their wav to freedom.
"They were people like yourself, sick of tne smell of oppres-
sion There was Doctor Svec, who resisted security police attempts,
to make him into an informer against his fnends. There were
two law students who had been forced to give up their studSjJU
because they were not Communists. ..... ,
A "There was a mechanic with his wife and two little daughter.;
who had twice before tried to cross the border
"Do these cound like description of terrorists?
WINDS OP FREEDOM jUi
"Mr Konvallnka. Mr. Truska and Dr. Svec had planned the
escipe for months. It waa a careful plan, and it Involved risk*.
They moved cautiously, waiting for the right moment.
"Thirty-one of the passengers chose to remain In the west
Seventy-seven chose to return to their homes, wives and children.
"They have been allowed to go back witnout hindrance. No
one put pressure on them to remain, as the regime Is trying to
m* "Tney were provided with beds and food until transportation
could be arranged.
"The feeling of all those who escaped is summed up in what
one young mechanic said in a message over Radio Free Europe:
In Czechoslovakia we felt we were always beUig shadowed. TMs
and the lack of freedom were the reasons for our flight.
"His wife added: T don't want my children to grow up slaves.
We are ready to go anywhere people can live their own lives....
(signed i Winds of Freedom.'" 4W-
NOTEThe most important and neglected opportunity tne
United SUtes has these days is winning friendship behind the
Iron Curtain. Every friend that is won makes it mor. difficult
tor the Kremlin to declare wax.



PAGE FIGHT
____ ._. TWK f.N*M AMERICAN AN INDE. "^DENT l>An.T NEWSPAPFR
I
I
I
[

j
i'
^acific S^ocietiA
ff/n. Garroll -Keeker .
o, 17, BJloa "Oil. &JLa 3321
COLONEL AND MRS. GREBE
HONORED AT COCKTAIL PARTY -
Colonel and Mrs. Alfred A. Grebe, who re leaving soon
for flieir new post at Camp Hood in Texas, were guests of
honor at a cocktail party riven Wednesday evening at the
Albrook Officers Club by Lieutenant Colonel and Mrs. L. S.
Inland of Herrlck Heights.
Mrs. Blau Entertains
With Luncheon
The wife of the Consul of Swit-
zerland In Panama. Mrs. Juan
Blau. was hostess to a group of
her friends at a luncheon and
card party given Wednesday at
the Panama Golf Club.
Mrs. Polanco
Guest of Honor at Dinner
The wife of the former Minis-
ter of Guatemala to Panama.
Mrs. Alfonso Hernandez Polan-
co who arrived recently in Pan-
ama to visit her son-in-law and
daughter. Mr and Mrs. Octavio
Mndez G.. was guest of honor
at a dinner given Tuesday even-
ing by Mr. and Mrs. John J.
Scribner at their residence.
Carters Leave for New Post
The First Secretary of the Uni-
ted States Embassy and Mrs. Al-
bert E. Carter, accompanied by
their three children, sailed today
on the S.S. Ancon for New York
en route to their new post In
Berlin, Germany.
the title of "Coffee Queen," at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Enrique
Clement, of Villa Espaa 18, <
Wednesday evening.
The candidates present were
Miss Eva Boyd, Miss Graciela
Campanane, Miss Anna Cecilia
Jimenez. Miss Tota Leignadier,
Miss Marcela de Janon. Miss Ma-
ree.. Obarrlo and Miss Gladys
Preciado.
The first presentation of the
contestants will be held soon at
Hotel El Panama.
Miss Anguizola was guest of
'. honor at a tea given Tuesday by
I Miss Aura Elisa Morales at her
'home.
Magees Move to Balboa
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Mageeand
family, formerly of Gamboa,
have changed their residence to
Balboa where they will be at
home to their friends.
Dinner Honors Engaged Couple
Miss Judith Anguizola and Mr.
Nathnaiel Mndez, whose mar-
riage will take place on Saturday
evening of this week, at Cristo
Rey Church, were complimented
with a dinner in their honor,
Wednesday evening, bv Dr. and
Mrs. Manuel Mndez G. at their
residence.
Queen Candidates Entertained
by Junior Chamber of Commerce
The members of the Junior
Chamber of Commerce and their
ladies entertained for the young
ladies who are candidates for
ar
Complete Assortment of
DOG SUPPLIES
at
16 Tivoii Ave. Tel. t-
3807
Commodore Bailey
Addresses Rotarlans
At the regular meeting of the
Rotary Club which was held yes-
terdav in Hotel El Panama. Com-
modore J. Bailey, former Cap-
tain of the Port of New York, was
the guest speaker.
Pledges are Guests
at Model Meeting
A model meeting was held
Tuesday evening at the Alpha
Chapter Beta Sigma Phi Sorority
House in Curundu for new pledg-
es.
Alice Myers presided at the
meeting and a "History of Beta
Siema Phi" was given by Char-
lotte Cagelv. Stella Gilbert was
in charge of the program, and
Discriminating Parents wait
the BEST n BALLROOM
DANCING for their children.
SMART
CHILDRE
want the
newest and
latest steps!
JOIN the COTILLION CLASSES
STARTING TOMORROW
LLONA SEARS STUDIO
Panam Hotel Phon Pn. 3-1KI
from I to II p.m.
refreshments were served by
Virginia Willett and Peggy
Wertz.
The rushees present wer,e Ei-
leen Adams, Frankie Thomas,
Christine Vendrick, Gloria Schill-
ing. Cynlhia Mathews, Margie
Rathgaber and Jeanette Kovel.
The members attending ..were
Lou Simoneaux. Lorraine Terry,
Pat Kenealy. Claire Hermanny,
Louise Klemmetson. Alice Myers,
Peggy Wertz. Stella Gilbert, Pat-
ty Baker, Barbara Curies, Char-
lotte Cagely, Virginia Willett,
Ruth MacArthur, Dot Taylbr and
Marian Kariger.
Panmunjom, ObscureKorean
Village, Could Be Any Town
New Guests
at Hotel E> Panama
Mr. Francisco Agune arrived
Tuesday from Lima and Is a
guest at Hotel El Panama. Mr.
Agune is the Secretary of the
Pan-American Division of Ame-
rican Road Builders.
Mr. Tomas Arlas, of Panama,
is a guest at the hotel.
The Executive Vice-Presldent
of the American Road Builders
Association. General Eugene
Reybond, U.S.A. (ret.), arrived
Tuesday by plane from Lima,
Peru and is staying at, Hotel El
Panama.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold P. Nut-
ter arrived late yesterday from
Miami. Florida for a visit on the
Isthmus. Mr. Nutter is President
of the Lions International. They
are guests at the hotel.
WASHINGTON. D. C. Oct.
Panmunjom, probable new site of
the Korean truce talks, is a tiny
village on the main road from
Seoul to Kaesong. ,
It Is scarcely more than a hud-
dle of thatched houses on the
bank of a muddy stream, says
the National Geographic Society.
The road jumps the stream
at Panmunjom. Hills rise bleakly
on either side of the battered,
burned-out town. Once, before
there was a military pontoon
bridge blocking the way, log
rafts floated by on their Journey
from the mountains to the wide
meeting point of the Han and
Imjln Rivers farther south.
Even the town's name is obs-
cure, being translated variously
as "the gateway of the rafts," or
"the inn with the wooden door."
Were It not for the Korean war,
Panmunjom might be any one
of thousands' of valley villages
In the "Land of the Morning
Calm."
Yet now the eyes of the
world are turned upon this
country hamlet where truce
talks between United Nations
and Communist leaders may
be renewed.
Six miles due west Is Kaesong,
where on August 23 the talks
broke down. Seoul is about 40
road miles southeast. Between
the two He some of the richest
ricelands of western- Korea,
where men and oxen work in
mud-soup fields below a skyline
of Jagged hills.
In the countryside around
Panmunjom, dotting the gener-
al Kaesong region, are the re-
mains of many monasteries and
temples dating from medieval
times. Kaesong was Korea's cap-
ital, the center of its power arid
culture under the Koryo, or,
Also attending the meeting of
the College of Surgeons, will be
Lt. Colonel R. W. Sattherth-
walte. Chief of the Urology Sec-
tion at Gorgas Hospital, who will
leave the Isthmus about the first
of November for San Francisco.
He plans to return about No-
vember 15.
Colonel Elton
to Attend Convention
Colonel Norman W. Elton, of
Herrlck Heights, left recently by
plane for Chicago to attend a
medical convention. He plans to
return on October 25.

,(M- CC /ove fhese cream/, fasfy puddings!
Thrifty and easy fo make, tool
i i
Dr. Arias to Receive
Membership Certificate
Dr. and Mrs. Rogelio E. Arias
sailed today on the S.S. Ancon
for the United States. In New
York they will be Joined by Mrs.
Arias' parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Guillermo Tribaldos, Jr. .who
will motor with them to San
Francisco where Dr. Arias will
attend a meeting of the Ameri-
can College of Surgeons from
November 5 to the 9th and will
receive his Membership Certifi-
cate. They will then tour through
Mexico and Colorado before re-
turning to the Isthmus around
the first of December.
Second Son Is Welcomed
By Roths of Curundu
Mr .and Mrs. Marvin A. Roth
of Curundu announce the birth
of a second son, Daniel Mercon,
an October II at San Fernando
Clinic. Mrs. Roth is the former
Vida Weeks, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. H. Mercon Weeks of Bal-
boa.
Beta Sigma Phi
Preferential Tea Held Sunday
The Alpha Chapter of Beta
Sigma Phi held a Preferential
Tea for the new pledges, Frankie
Thomas, Jeanette Kovel, Eileen
Adams and Margie Rathgaber, at
the alboa home of Lorraine
Terry on Amador Road. The.co-
hostesses were Stella Gilbert and
Ruth MacArthur.
The tea table was decorated
wl(h a floral arrangement In yel-
low and black, the sorority colors.
Nanette Lynch presided at the
punch bowl and Alice Myers at
the tea service. .
The members attending were
Mary Jane Bean, Charlotte Cage-
ly, Claire Hermanny. Stella Gil-
bert. Marian Kariger, Nanette
Lynch, Ruth MacArthur, Lou 81-
moneaux, Lorraine Terry. Ava*
Howell. Alice Myers, Patty Baker,
Pat Lennevllle and Dot Taylor.
Col.. Easton Is New
Plans, Operations
Director For Army
Colonel R. L. Easton, former
Director of Administration of
the Air university, Montgomery,
Alabama .arrived on the Isthmus
recently for duty with Headquar-
ters Caribbean Command. He will
assume the directorship of the
Plans and Operations Division on
the staff of the Commander in
Chief, Caribbean Command.
Prior to his assignment at the
Air University, he served In the
War Plans Division of Headquar-
ters USAF in Washington as
Chief of Mobilization Control
Branch. Prior to this assignment
he served three years as Chief of
the U.S. Air Force Mission to
Ecuador, leaving there in Febru-
ary of 1948.
Colonel Easton. a rated com-
mand pilot, was accompanied to
the Isthmus by his wife, Mrs.
Carolyn M. Easton.
Bartons to Vacation
in Pennsylvania
Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Bar-
ton sailed today for a three-
month vacation to be spent in
the United States. The greater
part of their time will be spent
in Pennsylvania, where they will
visit Mrs. Barton's parents. Mr.
and Mrs. Herbert O. Gates of
KIttanning and Mr. Barton's
mother of Newport. Mrs. Edith
M. Barton.
They will also spend some time
In Wilmington, Delaware and in
Long Island and New York City,
New York.
Mr. and Mrs. Octavio Mndez
G will leave Monday for Miami,
Florida and NewJfork City. Their
trip will he combined business
and vacation. Mrs. Mndez plans
to return to Panama around the
tenth of November and Mr. Mn-
dez will return early In Decem-
ber.
.


TREAT BABY
GENTLY!
Just odd milk, cook 5 minutes.
'
IF it is MAHOGANY
IN IS FOR EVER
y DISCOUNT
9 CASH
CREDIT
CLUB
For baby's I kin, nothing soothe*
and protects like Johnson'* Baby
Powder. Use it after
baths, at diaper change
BISTFOtiABY...
icsT rot you
i
with
POND'S
>"sheer-gauge"
POWDER
CoV>5
(|ovVnOH 0..........OtmttmKm.t.L.9.
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You'll adore the sheerer, dearer,
soft-spoken colour Pond's Dream-
flower Powder gives your skin.
Because it'* "sheer-gauge,"
Pond's Dreamflower Powder
smooths on evenly, exquisitely ...
gives your skin a delicate radiance
that fasts/ Choose from eight
glamorous shades!
MM. ROW* BACON WHITNIY, I
Hfl MIHX, My* faaa" tiwlb
wafer k "tmMrti, ffwMt... thaw
fmmim atoar rhaS took a muck seAei
awl am alliall M Mml"
LARGE SELECTION OF
Zrrencn (^.njstat
AIRBORNE
You'll feel the differ-
ence with Fisk Airborne.
More air for smoother
ridingflatter, narrower
r treed for easier steering.
FISKI
r Tires Va
Agencias
Panamericanas S. A.
Calla liiudioni. Na. 0
Panama, *, r.
Dirtrlb.lor l.cly.i..
Centralave.at2i*test. phones: 2-183C
& 2-1 o33
SAIN, lOlils
THI Mf.HI CSTSTAL MAM
* All Patterns In Open Stock
* Easy Terms Available
16 Throli Are
-----------
Wang, dynasty, from the early
900's A. D. until the late 1300's.
Then the city was called Song-
do.
The Koryo state, which gave
its modern name, was dedicated
to peaceful Buddhism and Chin-
ese precepts of scholarship. Sol-
diers dropped to a social posi-
tion one step above beggars. To
protect themselves against the
savage Kltan people across the
Yalu River to the north, the
Koryo kings built a great wall
25 feet high across the entire
peninsula, from the Yellow Sea
to the Sea of Japan.
The wall was lnadecuate. In
1231, the Golden Horde of Geng-
his Khan swarmed across the
Yalu. His Mongols swept south
to Songdo, and the Korean king
fled to an island bastion at the
mouth of ^he Han River.
Invasion has followed Invasion
throughout Korean history. Sev-
en centuries after the Mongols,
Japanese overlords came to the
same rocky hills overlooking
Kaesong. They renamed the city
Kaljo. meaning "the opening of
the castle or fortress."
On the road to the west was
Panmunjom, "gateway of the
rafts," the small viHage destined
to hold the world's hope for Ko-
rean peace.
Richard H. Smith
Voted Eagle Scout
By Review Board
Life Scout. Richard H. Smith,
son of Colonel and Mrs. Stilson
H. Smith of Fort Kobbe, was
reviewed for the coveted Eagle
Scout Award at the Pacific Dis-
trict Board of Review, lt was an-
nounced by Charlea F. Ebner Jr,
District Advancement Chairman.
Richard is Junior Assistant
Scoutmaster of Troop 16, Fort
Kobbe and spent one summer at
Camp El Volcan.
First class Scouts Raymond
Poland, of Troop 3 Balboa; Rob-
ert Wheeler of Troop 13 Cocoll;
a?d Richard Magune. of Troop
16 Fort Kobbe, were reviewed for
the 8tar Scout Award.
Members of the Board of Re-
view were Charles F. Ebner Jr
Chairman;. W. A. Dodge L w'
Hearne Jr., Walter A. Collins, C
F. Anderson and John R. Ban-
rilcardo Lay, chtef Scout -of
Panama and Raymond George
Scout Executive of the Interna-
tional Boy Scouts of the Canal
Zone, attended, the Boar* of Re-
view as observers.
Presentation of the Eagle A-
ward to young- Smith will be
made as soon as approval is re-
ceived from the National Coun-
cil. Boy Scouts of America. The
Boy Scouts of America is a Red
Feather Agency.
TOWN CLERK FED UP
CHARLESTOWN, R. I. (UP.)
Linton L. Brown, town clerk
of Charlestown, is fed up with
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 1, 1|
JUST A PITIf the shoe fits,
hop right in. That's what little
Yvette Berger did when she
spied this giant Drogan at the
annual leather goods exposition
in Paris.
BLUEPRINT MAKES IMPRINT
FORTH WORTH, Tex, (UP.)
A flying blueprint sent Mrs.
J. L. Wreri, Jr., home from a
downtown shopping trip with s>
badly bruised leg. The blueprint,
tacked to a piece of beaverboard,
fell from the 11th floor of i
building under construction, and
hit Mrs. Wren on the knee.
THIS IS YOUR INVITATION TO
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Balboa Heights. C.Z.
(Next to the Administration Building)
SUNDAY Oct. 1951
10:45 a.m.Morning Worship Psa. 50
"THE SILENCE OF GOD"
/ i Junior Choir Sermonette Sr. Choir.
7:30 p.m.Evangelistic Service II Cor. 5:17-21.
"HOW GOOD MUST I BE TO GO TO HEAVEN?"
Ladies Trio Gospelalres Youth Choir.
Everyone Cordially Invited.
Pastor W.H. BeebySpeaking. Radio ServiceHOXO760 kc.
WE PREACH CHRI8T
Crucified... Risen... Coming Again.
YOUR
SOCIAL
CENTER
Roast ribs of beaf Andre
Lobster N-ju>b*rg
Chicken Chow Mein, fried Noodles
SUNDAY'S BUFFET
will feature
these appetizing hot dishes
Baked SugJr-c'uud Ha^
Roast Fretb Hat
Boston Pork and Beans.
(plus a wonderful variety of cold dishes)
Musio for dancing by KEN DELANEY'S orchestra
alternating with
AVELINO MUOZ at the organ
Bella Vista Room 6:30 p.m. Sunday
Meet your friends
at the
COCKTAIL HOUR
in El Panama's
airconditioned BALBOA BAR
Dally at 5:30 p.m.
Music by Avelino Muoz.
B?a
mfiimfl
A Klrkeby Hotel
Be
Beauty-Bright
with a lovable
W)odbury
complexion
When romance come* your wy,
be iure you hare oft, romaatfa
complexion. Woodbury Facial
Soap, with it gentle, thorough
cleanwng that remove* dirt and
oily film, leave* your kin spar-
kling with beauty and fceehneaa. Made by kin
cientieU, delicately -acented Woodbury contain*
a new, smoothing- btaiUy-crmm ingredient. Its
extra-mild lather mmmr bom* or irritate* evea
very *en*itie skin. Try Woodbury Facial Cock-
tail today far a flowing complesion that will
light love a hi* eres.
FOR THE SKIN YOU LOVE TO TOUCH .. .
Whip up a rich, creeaiy Woodbury lather ia
lukewarm w*ter. Smooth on with a oft cloth.
Manage, then rinse warm and cooL How soft
your akin look* aad feels.
HO "MUN-BUBN" WITH WOODBURY*S BEAUTY-CHEAll INGREDIENT!
AGENCIAS W. H. DORL, SA. P.O. Box 3


R1DAY. OCTOBER 1. 1951
___
THE PANAMA AMERICAN A nfDEPtNDEITt DA1LT NCWIPAPBB
Atlantic Society
W. Mam J Yl~k
&, 195, Qmlim Mpltm* Q'tm* 378
on Voyage *arty fob mrs smith Wedne-dav
Mrs. Caleb Clement, of Gatun, entertained Wednesday
evenin" with 5 canasta part, to >5?Pr n^ret,T toTer'
Mrs. Lyman Smith, who Is leaving Tuesday to return to her
home in Cleveland. Mr.. Smith has beer, the guest of her
brother and sister-in-law for the past six wee.
Friends Horn both sides of the*
Mrs. Davlrt Kuhn. Mrs. Robert
isthmus were present They in-
luded from Gamboa: Mis.
ieorge Felps, Mrs. Arthur
nomp.-on. and Mrs. h. T. Bleak-
sv; from flalnoa: Mrs. Wesley
"wnsend, "Mater of the honoree,
/it. aoiner Crook; from Gurun-
iu: Mm. William Allen; frdito Las
'umbras: Mrs. James Kennedy.
the ipllowmg Atlantic side
eslcnts: Mr* 'Alice Clement,
nothsr of Mrs. Smith. Mrs. Ben-
r.mln Favorite, Mrs. Herbert En-
elke, Mr. Paul Kunkel, Mr.
Villiam Bndders, Mrs. George
>oole, Sr.. Mrs. Marie Gorman,
Ara. B. B Gray, Mrs. Howard
larris. Mrs. Wii.iam Nessler, Mrs.
b. T. Sweailngen, Mrs Lawrence
phambers, Mrs. Bailie Foot* Al-
len. Mrs. Fred Newhard. Mrs. J.
V, L. Graham. Mrs. Henry Shirk,
Ma Leon r*olf and Mrs. George
igolf.
A bone china florai centerpiece
vas given the honoree by the
lostess. Prizes were won by Mrs.
Sngelke, Mrs. Shirk, and Mra.
ray. Mrs. Allen won the draw
rise and the traveling prize,
nd Mrs. Egolt won a traveling
rise.
reakfast 'iiven for
Departing Friends
(Mrs. George Poo.e, Jr., was
hostess for a beautifully ap-
pointed breakfast given at the
Hotel Washington, Wednesday
morning, for her mother-in-law,
Mrs. Georaie Poole, Sr.. ot Gatun,
who is leaving for a month's va-
cation in the States and other
friends who are leaving the Iath-
rnus soon for duty at posts in the
United States. ^
The guests were: Mrs. Leon
Egolf Mrs. Fred Newhard, Mrs.
Howard Harris, Mrs. Henry Tay-
flor. Mrs. J&me Bowen, Jr.. Mrs.
William Bennett, Mrs. Walter
Skelstaitis, Mrs. Albert Hill. Mrs.
Harry Greene, Mrs. Henry Hart-
wig, Mrs. James Scarborough.
Mrs. John Donahue, Mrs. John
Wlggs, Mrs. George Kennedy.
Carroll, Mr. James Story, Mrs.
Walter Baliey. and Mrs. Albert
Picclrllli.
Cards were played following
Wesley' breakfast with Mrs. Poole, 8r.
and Mrs. Egolf winning the ca'
nasta prizes, and Mrs. Plccirllli,
Mrs. Harris and Mrs Tayldr win-
ning the bddge prizes.
rta
SHORTS
Pre-Tournament Dance
At Strangers Club
The Fort Davla Golf Club la
sponsoring ji gala pre-tourna-
ment.danca to be given at the
Strangers Club Saturday evening,
preceding the Smoot-Hunnicutt
Tournament.
Music will be furnished by
Trimm's fourteen-piere orchestra
from 9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. after
which a Conjunto wili play until
4:00 a.m. Admission ia a dollar
per couple. ...
Tickets may te obtained at the
Golf Club, from Mrs. James Pum-
pelly, telephone 3788445., Major
John Wiggs, telephone 3787451, or
Major J. A. Katollnas, 3788635, or
at the door.
Tea to Welcome New Residents
In Cristoba?
An October tea Is to be given
at the Cristoba) Union Church.
Thursday. October 25, from 3:00
to 5:00 p.m. by the Woman's Aux-
iliary of the Church. The tea Is
being arranged to give the
church ladies an opportunity to
meet the new arrivula In the
community The teachers and
the wives of recently arrived fac-
ulty membors, with all other la-
dles who are new In Cristobal.
are cordially Invited to attend
and meet the ladiea of the
church.
Star Club- Has Social Meeting
Mrs. Joseph Irving. MM. Fred
Newhard and Mrs. Semon Therl-
ot were co-noateaaea for a aoclal
evening of cards for the Gatun
Star Club Tueaday evening. The
ladies met at the home of Mrs.
Irving in Catun.
Canasta and bridge were play-
ed with Mra. Curtis George win-
ning the bridge prize and the fol-
lowing winners at canasta, Mrs.
Kerdls Meeks, Mrs. Henry Shirk,
Mrs. Emmett A-go, and Mra. Ar-
thur Albright. Misa Judy Am-
mons won the door prise.
The other members playing
were: Mra. L. L. Harfleld, Mrs.
Starford Churchill, Mrs. Milton
A. cookson. Mrs. Leon Egolf, Mrs.
John Fahnestock, Mrs. Whitman
Garrett, Mrs Howard Harris, Mrs.
William Hughes, Mrs. Ralph
Hanners, Mrs. Porter McHan,
Mrs. Roger A. Orvis, Mrs. Samuel
Rowley, Mis. Henry Shirk, Mrs.
Emmett Aigo, Mrs. W C Smith,
Mrs. Fred Willoiighby. Mrs. O. K.
Worley, and Mrs. J. W. L. Gra-
ham.
The next meeting of the club
will be held November 30 at the
home of Mrs. Spencer Smith In
Pedro Miguel.
Mr. and 'Mrs. Daniels
Complimented Before Departure
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Nix enter-
tained Mr. and Mrs. Dixon Dan-
iels for dinner Tuesday evening.
With their children, Miss Cath-
erine and Eric they were the din-
ner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Sam
B. Mauldln Wednesday, and din-
ed with Mr and Mrs. Lee Nash
Thursday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Daniels will sail
on the S.S. Ancon, and after vis-
iting his brother and family In
Washington, D.C., and their
daughters in Florence, South Ca-
rolina, will go to West Point, Mis-
sissippi to make their home. Mr.
Daniels has accepted a position
with the Tennessee Valley Auth-
ority.
Korea probably was the first
foreign country with which Jap-
an had relation, according to the
Encyclopedia Britannica.
Record age among birds is 70
years, held by an eagle-owl.
Elephant leather Is so heavy
that a side takes three years to
tan. .
silk token from spiders provr
Ides the best catgut.
More species of native trees
have been found In the Great
Smokies national park by sclen- setts.
tlst than in all Europe.
f wo persons are killed and 200
injured in accidenta In the U-
nlted States on an average of
every 10 minutes.
During daylight fogs, an auto-
mobile with headlights on is vis-
ible from two to three times as
far as one without headlights
burning.
Colorado, seventh In size a-
mong states of the Union, is a-
bout as large as Now York state,
12 times as large as Massachus-
Paris Bazaar
Emilio Palomeras
COLON
offers
THE LAST TWO DAYS
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
OF OUR TREMENDOUS SALE
in
PURE LINEN ARTICLES
CASA FNIX
Av. Central 155 Tel. 2-24M
Lientenant Whipple
Visiting Parents
Lieutenant (jg) Fred E. Whip-
ple arrived Monday from duty
with the Lnlted States Nvy in
Korean waters. He is visiting his
parents. Mr. ana Mrs. J.W. whip-
ple of New Cristobal,
Progressive Cirole
Luncheon Mooting
'Mrs. E. C. Stevens was hostess
at her home in the Riviera Apart-
ments, for a luncheon meeting
of the Progressive Circle of the
Cristobal Union Church, on Wed
nesday.
Mrs. Philip Havener gave a
book review on the life of Martin
Luther, after which, plans were
made for the tea to ne given on.
October 25 to welcome the new
arrivals in the community.
The other ladles attending
rwere: Mrs. K. F. McClelland, Mrs.
Howard Anderson, Mrs. Gordon
Kariger, Mrs. W.T. Jetferles, Mrs.
Catherine Do Forrest. Mrs. H. W.
Moist, Mrs. Freda Boydstrom and
Mm. Anton Holgerson.
^YOU WOMEN WHO SUFFERS
HOT HASHES
then feel CHILLY
Here's Good News!
Are you between the ages of 88 and 12 and
going through that trying functional 'middle-
age'period peculiar to woman? Doss this maks
you suffer from hot flashes, feel clammy, to
ntrvout, irritable, wsak? Then do try Lydia
E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound to relievo
such symptoms 1 It's famous for this I
Many wise 'middle-age' women take Pink-
ham's Compound regularly to help build up
resistance against this distress.
Pinkham's Compound contains no opiate
so habit-forming drugs. It k*lp$ nafor*
(you know what ws mean!). This great med-
icine also has what Doctors call a stomachic
tonic effect.
NOTE: Or yea saay prefer LTDIA K.
PINKHAM'S TABLETS with added Iron.
^lydia E. Pinkham's VEGETABLE COMPOUND^
Active, growing children need certain health
building food elementivin their diet to protect
them against malnutrition. Cream of Wheat is a
food all children love. Rich in body building
nourishment, it is easily digested.
The "5 Minute" Cream of Wheat has been
enriched with extra food iron and calcium. Give
Cream of Wheat> regularly to your children
and watch them grow full of life and energyl
\&0S
Cream of Wheat
' DELICIOUS .
* NUTRITIOUS
Sibert Lodge Has Annual
Visitation of Grand Lodge
The Grand Lodge made their
annual visitation/to Sibert Lodge
in Gatun. Wednesday evening.
Mr. James E. Jacobs. Right Wor-
shipful District Grand Master
and his staff of officers from the
Grand Lodge with the Masters
and Wardens of Lodges on both
sides of the Istnmus also attend-
ed.
Dinner was served In the ban-
quet hall preceding the meeting,
and was attended by 170 mem-
bers and guests. The dinner was
prepared by the ladles of the
Eastern Star, with Mrs. Samuel
Rowley as chairman, and served
by the deMolays.
Beautiful Tea and Coffee Sets
of Enrlish "Royal Stafford"
Bone China
Bone China Coffee Sets
19 pieces service far I
19.50 and 21.50
Bone China Tea Sets
28 pieces service for S
32.50 and 37.50
Shrine Hallowe'en Party
On October 27
The Hallowe'en party which is
planned by the Shrlners for their
sons and daughters and the
members jf the Rainbow Assem-
blies and the deMolays, and their
guests, will be given on Saturday
evening, October 27.
Roger Fort Family
Announce Birth of Son
Mr. and Mrs. T. Roger Fort of
Kansas City Mo., have announc-
ed the birth of their first child, a
-son, born Oct. 12. Mr. Fort was
reared on the Isthmus. Mrs. Fort
is the former Miss Elizabeth Jet-
er of Kansas City.
The baby is the first grand-
child of Captain and Mrs. Roy
Fort, of the Atlantic side.
Paris Bazaar
Emilio Palomeras
, COLON
Just received from
France
Beautiful Assortment
of
MANTILLAS
different tylas,
in whrte and black
from
L95 to 7.50
new

\

C- hin a
^Dinner ^et,
IN THREE BEAUTIFUL, v>
MODERN AND CLASSICAL
DESIGNS-
$ 59.50 And $ 67.50
97 pieces service for 12.
<
See them displayed in our
main windowl
The Bazaar Frances
Juan Palomeras
COLON
COLON
new
fashin-iinius colors
1NDELIBLE-CREME"..
tbt aWtdt lipstick!
fabulous WEAR
fabulous LUSTER
fabulous DREAMINESS
Hero's the first and only truly creamy
indoHble-libitickl Non-drying bocautO if
maa> wi*h Jip-softortint UneBtel And the
color! Not the thin, flat shades you find in
ordinary indelible Hpsticks-but a full
range of foihion-qonlv colors only Rovlon
could croatal Divtover "lnUWlo-Crowe"
llwt.*,'
Tidij~try liviH'ilaisltls-Cr"
tatwsriftcfiiiiiiitlMtickl.
Lifer Will Appear
In Court to Argue
For His Freedom
COLUMBIA. S.C., Oct. 19 (UP)
The state of South Carolina
gave a life term prisoner a chance
today to make his own court-
room appeal for freedom after
he drew up a petition for a writ
of habeas corpus.
State Aitornry General T. C.
Cal'lson satd the prisoner, Rob-
ert S. Smi' i< who was convicted
In 1937 of killing a policeman,
has been granted a hearing on
his petition by Circuit Judge
Bruce Llttlejohn.
Smith, an Inmate at the State
Penitentiary here, drafted the
formal legai document In his cell,
asking for his freedom.
He charged that the jurors
who indict <-d and convicted him
were not qualllied voters, a re-
quirement or jury duty in South
Carolina.
Llttlejohn scheduled a hearing
in Camden. 8.C., on Oct. 22 to
hear the nlea. Calllson said pris-
on officials would bring Smith to
the courtroom where he would be
allowed to make his plea in per-
son.
Smith's petition was neatly
penned on ruled legal paper.
He killed the officer while he
was a fugitive from a North Ca-
rolina prison.
Methodist Sunday
School To Repeat
Rumors Wanted'
The Panama Methodist Sun-
day School will present a repeat
performance of the melodrama
"Rumors Wanted," on Wednes-
day Oct. 31 at the Geddea Hall.
The performance is being re-
peted by request. During the last
presentation the Sunday School*
cast played before, a large au-
dience which enjoyed every min-
ute of It.
The cast Is comprised of Har-
old Kerr. Vllma Nugent. Virginia ,
Wallace, Winston Sinclair, Nor-
ma Fitters, Vllma Martin and
Shirley Sinclair.
HEADACHE?
caused by acid indigestion or temporary slaggishnest
Get sparkling Eno ... today! Let it
relieve your sick headache two
way: Eno quickly helps neutralize
osees stomach acid ... and Eno
also acts as a speedy, gentle laxa-
tive when needed!
I. niASANT- as a glass of spar-
kling, bubbly soda water!
3. IAXATIVI-relieve temporary
sluggishness quickly. (Take be-
fore breakfast when needed.)
9. ANTACID relieves sourness, gas
and heartburn promptly.
Used by millions. Effervescent Eno
is ais good for constipation,
DULLNESS, OVERINDULGENCE aid,
SOUR STOMACH.
At all druggists Get Eno todas*
TAKE GOOD-TASTING
THERE is No Substitute
for Quality
t
GENERAL PAINTS
?.
Of
y
i

r
.-
V
r

.-
in
A fe^w beautiful sets now available
<;>ld-Banl and other intriguing patterns
in MINTON BOlVE CHINA and CHINA
from LIMOGES,
a/a
MBADOUAaTBJH
PANAMA

25 CYCLE
RADIO-PHONO
Any Radio-Phonograph ahown in any currant issue
of Sears, Roebuck and Company's Catalog may be
ordered for uta en 110 Volt 26 Cycle A.C. Currant.
Regular Catalog Price, plus $12.50 for the 25 cyck^
conversion (this does not include tTanaporUtionX at


I

All orders must be placed m ekher one of our office
/*k assiasiatffltiiiii
\}um.nommKmm

Across the Street
from Ancon Post Office
Tenth and Meltect
ia CaKON




rVGE TEN
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INPEPPENT BAIL! NKWSPAPKP
' -'..... i 11 i n
At, OCTOBER 1,
Cristobal, J.C. Clash Tonight At Mt Hop
JOE
by
WILLIAMS
' The football officials run their Kame with an iron hand.
-- The coach, or mastermind, must keep his distance. He is not
* permitted to rush on the field, stop the play and protest a de-
" cisin. If he does it's liable to cost him the ball tame. Just as
it did Dr. Eddie Anderson in the Holy Cross-Tulane ame las.
weekend.
Holy Cio-ss was leading, 12-7, in the second quarter when
the doctor, a forthright but far from frenzied gentleman, walk-
-- ed on the field to register in person his disapproval of a rough-
ing penalty against his stalwarts, incurring without delay an-
other penalty which placed the ball on his one-yard line. "Un-
j.-sponsmanlike conduct." the referee frowned.
The resultant touchdown, a buck on the first play, was the
maraln by which Tulane beat the Crusaders, unbeaten up to
: then with decisive wins over Harvard and Fordham. It's a far
" piece from here to New Orleans and whether the doctor's
squawk was justified is not known, nor can there be any opinion
-here as to how the team might have fared otherwise.
**' The main point Is the coach invites an automatic lo-yard
y- penalty when he invades the field. There are times no doubt
^. viien this can be harsh but there can be no denying that as
* ail instrument of discipline and orderlines It has admirable
virtues. It may also explain why football eams are seldom
crawn out to ludicrous lengths. Perhaps baseball in time will
* have to adopt a similar restraint. One of the reasons baseball
,v;.games run to three hours and more these days is that the man-
agers stop the action so often to dispute the umpires' A
ft woeful and-pointless consumption of time because,
n. wrong, the umpire always has the last word, anyway.
decision
right or
C. NO LONGER PICK OWN OFFICIALS
Football officials have not always enjoyed such supreme
authority. There was a time and It wasn't too distant
> v hen they had to submit to as much abuse, often physical, as
today's baseball umpires) The coach even had the privilege of
.. selecting the officials, or, at least, of declining to accept.
>.-.' This put even the more competent officials on the spot. By
Inference thev were okayed because the coach felt sure they
, .wouldn't carry judicial detachment and stern neutrality to ex-
**_-ess. Now the coaches have no voice whatever In the matter.
The officials are assigned by a central office. Here In the East
the practice is to make the assignments three weeks in ad-
X vanee. Except for extraordinary reasons no revisions are ever
made. \
Some of the older readers mav recall the rhubarb which
"Plteuded the first Fordham-St. Mary's game here in 1930. or
thereabouts. Slip Madigan brought his own referee in from Cal-
"-lfornia. Which would have been all right with Fordham except
. -he turned out not to be the one the two schools had earlier
., igreed upon.
" -: Originally one Herb Dana's name had been presented by
Mr. Madigan. who ran football, all phases of it, at St. Mary's
in those days, and the gentleman was readily acceptable to
. u. Jack Coffey. the athletic director, and Maj. Frank Cavanaugh.
the coach. But when the Slipper arrived he revealed he had
switched from Dana to one Rufus Klawans.
"It wasn't that we had anything against Klawans," Mr.
Coffey said, in recalling the incident. "We must objected to the
last-minute change and. to be honest. I guess, we resented
hat we thought was the arbitrary nature of the action."

TWO REFEREES FOR ONE GAME
The Slipper remained adamant. He had brought his team
3000 miles to make its Big Town debut, had it lodged up in
Westchester. but he wasn't going to travel the last mile to the
Polo Grounds unless his man worked the game. By now Messrs.
Coffey and Cavanaugh had their backs up. They were determ-
ined they weren't going to be pushed around.
Finally Walter Okeson, who was a big man in college foot-
ball at the time, was called In to harmonize the problem. Mr.
Oxeson's results would have done King Solomon proud. In the
end it was agreed that Mr. Madlgan's man should work the
first half and Jack Ingersoll. who proved acceptable to both
Fordham and St. Mary's the second half.
"It was under those conditions that the game was plaved,"
Mr. Coffey remembered. "And what followed was Ironic. With
Madlgan's man running the first half, we led. 12-0. But with
I.igcrsoll running the second half, we failed to move the ball
and ultimately lost. 12-20. Both officials did excellent work. We
had got emotionally aroused over nothing. Besides, it cost us
$600 That was Klawans' fee for working only half a ball game."
That couldn't happen today. As noted, the colleges take
What they get In the way of officials. The procedure Is general.
Officials are assigned by various central offices. If thev prove
unsatisfactory the colleges mav protest after the game. The pro-
test Is assured of respectful attention, and if valid, proper act-
Ion Is forthcoming. It's just as well that Tellows like Dressen
and Durocher (the old Durocher. that Is), never went in for
coaching football, isn't It?
Dodgers, Giants
Load U.P.-N.L
All-Star Team
NEW YORK, Oct. 19 (UP)
The Giants and Brooklyn
grabbed all but three positions
on the United Press National
I.pa cur All-Star team.
The 21 veteran baseball writ-
ersthree from each National
League citygave the Dodgers
a slight edge. Brooklyn has four
men on tne team, the Giants
three, while St. Louis, Phila-
delphia and Pittsburgh hare
one each.
The four Dodgers are first
baseman Gil Hodges, second
baseman Jackie Robinson,
catcher Roy Campanella, and
southpaw Preacher Roe. The 1
Giant All-Stars are third base-
man Bobby Thomson, short-
stop Al Dark and right-hander
Sal Maglic. The others are out-
fielders fctan Muslal of St.
Louis, Ri.-hle Ashburn of Phil-
adelphia and Ralph Kiner of
Pittsburgh.
Musial and Campanella were
unanimous selection's. Both
made the team by receiving one
more vote than Monte Irvin of
New York.
Green Wave To Be At
Full Strength For Tilt
C. Z. INTERCOLLEGIATE FOOTBALL
STANDINGS
Teams Won Lost Tied
Balboa Bulldogs 2 .0 0
Cristobal Tigers 0 1 0
Junior College Green Wave 0 1 9
Saturday's
Program
1st Race "F-l" Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: 27!-:.00Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
The Tigers and Green Wave elevens will battle
each other tonight at the Mount Hope Stadium in an
effort to break into the win column for the first time
this season. The College team is favored to win be-
cause the squad will be at full strength. Most of the
players who were on the sidelines because of illness
or injuries will be ready for action tonight.
Frank Robinson, one of the
versatile playeis on the College
team, will be rrin' to go tonight
He most likely will be used In the
quarterback position and Is ex-
pected to b: one of the main fac-
tors in the Green Wave attack.
Sports Briefs
By UNITED PRESS
PhiladelphiaSeven legal ex-
perts lnciu.iinfc former Senator
Francis Myerswill handle the
defense for the National Football
league in iu case with the Gov-
ernment over radio and televi-
sion policies.
The Justice Department has
filed an anti-trust suit against
the league and its 1? members
charging liat radio and televi-
sion black' 'its of games deprive
the public of
those gamej..
its right to see
Dallas.Third baseman Bobby
Brown of tne World Champion
New York Yankees is honey-
mooning follow>ng nis marriage
Tuesday in Dallas to the former
Sara French. The couple will
have a brief honeymoon In Cali-
fornia before Brown starts the
last six months of his internship
at Southern Pacific Hospital In
San Francisco.
__________
Bill Maloney, formerly a full-
back with Cristobal, will play the
same position for the Junior Col-
lege. He dirl not see much action
( In the J.O.-Buiidog contest be-
cause he was hurt early In the
game.
Henry Phillips, a big fellow,
will add power to the College
backfield He is fairly fast for his
size.
Among others. Jack Alexaltls
and All McKeown will bolster the
hard-hitting J. C. line.
The Cristobal starting lineup
will be almost lie same as it was
against Balboa. Arnold Manning,
who did a good Job when Cristo-
bal lost to the Bdllogs, will again
call the p'ays at the quarterback
position. |
Halfback Bor Grace, however,
is being counted on to provide his
usual flashy play and bouyant
spirit to pop uo the Tigers.
Bob Bailey and Talmadge Sal-
ter round out the Tiger back-
field.
The only expected change In
the starting lineup Ista replace-
ment for Sklppy Anderson, who
uffered an ankle Injury during
mid-week practice sessions.
One-Sixth of Junior College
Squad Is Panamanians
Junior College will have four
Panamanian on their roster. In
spite of the fact that three (Ma-
nuel Roy, Ellas Entehi, and Flix
Larrinaga) out of the four have
never plaveo. football before, they
are proving to be a big asset to
the team. The fourth. Arturo
Cormelli, played for Balboa High
one year, bat has been handicap-
ped with injuries so far this year.
Although the Junior College
men received no serious injuries
In their last game with Balboa,
there were enough minor casual-
ties to keep the team from lm-
Sroving the way thev should dur-
ig the past two weeks.
Despite tnese setbacks the Col-
lege Green Wave has no Idea of
handing the Cristobal Tigers this
coming gat-ie without a fight.
Without a doubt the Tigers will
be bouncing back with much fe-
rocity after their stinging defeat
by the Balboa Bulldogs last week
and will undouDtedly be difficult
to stop.
1Luck Ahead
2Villarrcal
3Tap Girl
4Callejera
SRomntico
6Gold. Faith
7Torcaza
8Caaveral
V. Ortega 118
J. Cadogen 120
A. Mena 116
E. Silvera 110
B. Pulido 120
A. Valdivia 115
K. Flores 114
O. Chanls 115
:^
,/v
zdd Race "P-" Natives6H Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1Embustero J. Cadogen 110
2Strike Two Q. Orael 110
3Recodo J. Phillips 110
4Singapore O. Cruz 110
5Welsh Money R. Vsquez 113
5Cosa Linda A. Mena 118
7Aqoi Estoy A. Enrique 112x
8Cafetal R. Ycaza .107x
3rd Race "C" Natives 1 Mile
Purse: $325.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1Bagaleo
2Manolete
3Tin Tan
4Elona
5Slxaola
C. Chong 109x
O. Grael 110
A.Enrique 106x
M. Zeballos 120
R. Gmez 112
4th Race T-2' Imported14 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00- Poo Closes 2:2
Quiniela
1Celaje II
2Terry J
3England
4LIm Last
5Tully3aba
6Charles S.
7Blumaha
8Antecedo
9Gay Ariel
J. Rule 120
R. Vsquez 110
B. Pulido 120
J. Baeza, Jr. 107x
J. Contreras 113
E. Silvera 112
O. Chanis 110
B. Agulrre 120
A. ngulo llOx
5th Race "E" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $550.00 Pool Closes 2:55
lPamphlet
2Mimo
3Caribe
4Asombro
5Rondinella
G. Alfaro 120
K. Flores 118
O. Chanls 110
E. Silvera 107
J. Contreras 112
LEADOFF MAN-Clark Griffith, (right). pSenWthe
Washington Senators baseball club, confer*, with Rep. Emanuel
Celler of New York as he testified before a House Monopoly
subcommittee. Celler is chairman of the group, which reopen-
ed hearings on whether organized baseball should be exempt
s frnm ontl.trnot !>

from anti-trust laws.
Curtain Goes Up On
Touth Grid Season
Hill Printe, Eddie Arcara u
ANOTHER CHANCE Hill
Prince, above, Eddie Arcaro up,
was to get his ?econd chance at
a $50,000 Golo Cup within a
week at Jamaica, this one also
weight-forage, at a mile and
five furlongs. Counterpoint, a
three-year-old. beat the Amer-
ican champlor of 1950 a head
in the tvio-inlle The Jockey
Club Gold Cup at Belmont
Park last Saturday.
Corvallls. OregonThe Oregon
State footboll '.earn has become
one of the fjrst majoi college ele-
vens to lose a player to the draft.
The Beavers' first string right
halfbackRalph Carrhas left
the campus at Corvallls. Oregon
to go home before reporting to
the Army. Carr was Oregon
State's thltd leading ground-
gainer.
FORT KOBBE, C. Z.The 33rd
infantry Toch Football Season
got off to a living start Tuesday
evening at Quinn Field, Fort
Kobbe, when Company "C"
downed Company "D" 7 to 0.
A large and enthusiatlc crowd,
Including the personalities and
lamllies of Colonel Douglas, Lt.
Colonel Mabry, and Major Ben-
der, witnessed the game.
Blocking, passing, running, all
the thrills of American Football
were in evidence as the two
companies battled hard to score.
Numerous time* the teams
fought down to the opponents
goal only to be stopped on the
3 2, or 1 yatd lines by a stub-
born foe.
, The kicking and passing was
nandled In d professional man-
ner by*Corporal Shepard of "C"
Company and Sgt. Spellacy of
Company "D*. It was Shepard's
pass to Corpoial Kimbrell in the
third quarter that talleycd the
only TD of the game. Shepard
again passed U, Lieutenant Cur-
its for the extra point.
Company "D" was in scoring
position many times but was
held back on? time on the one
foot line. Spellacy completed a
pass to Pvt. Brenard in the end
zone one time but the play was
no good as Bernard was forced
to step six Inches out of bounds
to make the catch.
The feature play of the game
was a long pas-;. Shepard to Cur-
tis, In the closing seconds of the
final quarter. The toss went 50
yards across and down field to
the "D" Company 4. Succeeding
plays moved lt to the one yard
line before the game ended.
The football season will con-
tinue throughout the next two
months, with, games every Tues-
day and Thursday nights at 1P00
hours.
No Regulars Left
On West Point Team
WEST POINT, Oct. M (UP)
The cribbing scandal at West
Point wiped out all but one re-
gular football player and now
even be is gone.
The West Point Academic de-
partment reveals that end Ed
Weaver is Ineligible until be
makes up back work in one sub-
ject. Weaver definitely will be
lost for the Harvard game to-
morrow.
Army also has three Injured
players. Quarterback Fred Mey-
ers injured a knee against North-
western two weeks ago. Guard
Jim Ryan and defensive half-
back Pete Manus also are on the
doctor's list.
6th Race "M" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 3:25
First R4ce of the Doubles
1Delhi G Cruz 114
2In Time E. Silvera 111
3Cyc. Mulone B. Agulrre 115
4Guarina) C. Rula 120
5Doa Bielda) V. Castillo 118
6Montmaitre V. Ortega 120
7Sandarn R. Vsquez 115
8Hit B. Pulido 119
9Bendigo A. Mena 107
7th Race "F" Imported614 Fgs.
Purse: $500.00 Pooi Closes 4:85
Second Hace of the Doubles
1Mr. Foot
2Beduino
3Lujoso
4 Nljlnsky
5Marisco lito
6Mosquetn
7Wild Wire
J. Contreras 120
V. Castillo 112
O. Chanis 120
D. D'Andrea 114
G. Cruz 114
E. Daro 116
B. Agulrre 120
8th Race "1-1" Imported7 Fgs.
purse: $375.0* Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1Batt. Cloud B. Agulrre 120
2-Armeno C. BoVll 109
3Caonazo A. ngulo 117x
4Hob Nob C. RUte 114
5Black Bull K. Flores 115
6Betn B. Pulido 115
7-Hechizo G. Doarte 117x
8Vermont O. Chanis 109
9-Lltuana '! J. Phillips 120
9th Race 'I-r Imported4 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Bool Closes 5:15
One-Two
l_Novelera H. Alzamora 114
2Lightning A. Valdivia 118
3Flamenco C. Iglesias 120
4Costina I A: Mena 120
5Choice Brand K. Flores 120
6Poleckas B. Agulrre 120
7Goyito CTRuU 120
8Walrus C. Bovll 120
11th Race 'C Natives414 Fgs.
Purse: $250,00
1Barn M Arosemena 100
2Capitana II A. Enrique 103x
3La Negra F. Avila 120
4Con Valor II J. Cadogen 11*
Juan Franco Tips
By CLOCKER
1LUCK AHEAD Torcaza
2RECODO Cosa Linda
3MANOLETE Eloina
4CHARLES S Lint Lass
5ASOMBRO Rondinella
6Cyclone Malone Guarina (e)
7WILD WIRE Mosqueton
8BLACK BULL B. Cloud
9GOYITO Costina
in-RINA ROI Arquimedei
11-LA NEGRA Baron
ONE BEST La Negra
The Kentucky Derby winner In
1936. Bold Venture, has had two
sons win the run for the roses.
Assault won in 1946 and Middle-
ground In 1950.
Washington Redi
Told To Turn Over
New Page Or Elsej
WASHINGTON, Oct IB
The owner of the Washln
Redskins George Marshi
threatens to do some head-^
ping If the Skins don't satrt
nlng pretty r.oon.
Marshall's threat fol
Washington's 45-nothing h,
Cleveland 8unday. It was
Redskins' third straight di
Marshall tore into Wash:
Coach Herman Ball for hlsl
leged misuse of Redskin roo
The Redskin owner says
should have put more fres!
In'the lineup when Wash!
dropped far behind In the
Ball refuses comment on
shall's criticism. But he say
going to use rookie Eddie I
and his second string qua
back behind Sammy Bangj
and shift Harry Gilmer to
back.
10th Race "D" Natives*M Fgs.
Purse: $300.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1Filigrana J. Phillips 120
2Mr. Espinosa L. Pea 107x
3Bijagual A. Enrique 105x
4Arqulmedes A. Vsquez lllx
5 'Rlna Rci V. Castillo 112
'Excluded from betting.
FOR THE BEST STEA1
GOLDEN FRIED CHICK]
ANDSEA-FOOl
OUR DAILY'
LUNCH
at 75c.
Can't be beat
Soup
Entre
Potatoes
Two Vegetable
Salad
Dessert & Coffee
THE AMERICAN CLUB
FACING DE LESSEPS PARK
AMPLE PARKING >SPACE
RACES SATURDAY and SUNDAY
DOUBLES
1st, 2nd-6th, 7th RACES
ONE-TWO
3rd and 9th RACES
COLON:
For the convenience of
our patrons we are now
operating both at the
"COPACABANA" and
"SAVOY."
SATURDAY^ STELLAR RACE
5th RACE "E". IMPRTEOS 7 Fgs.
Purse: $550.00 Pool Closes: 2:55
1 PAMPHLET........ G. Alfaro 120
2 MIMO...............K. Flores 118
3 CARIBE............O. Chanis 110
4 ASOMBRO..........E. Silvera 107
5 RONDINELLA J. Contreras 112
i i
QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES

CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
AT THE RACE TRACK

SUNDAYS FEATURE RACES
5th RACE "B" IMPORTEDS 1 MILE
PURSE: $750.00 POOL CLOSES: 2:55
J RATHL1N LIGHT..........A. Mena 120
2 (GRSEWOOD...........B. Pulido 112
3 (MAIN ROAD.......'.____K. Flores 112
4 PHOEBUS APOLLO.......E. Silvera 107
5 SILVER DOMINO........ C. Ycama 120
6 CARMELA 11.............E. Daro 108
7 POLVORAZO............V. Ortega 119
8 PRESTIGIO...............C. Rui* 110
10th RACE -^ "DM IMPORTEDS 7 Fgs. '
Purse: $600.00 Pool Closes: 5:40
J THE DAUBER......B. Pulido 115
2 MICROBIO .......... A. Mena 120
3 MONTIELTO.....B. Aguitre 116
4 CHERIBERJBIN .. J. Contreras 112


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, H51
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEK
PAGE ELEVE*
Boxing Smoker Tonight At Ft. Clayton Gymnasium
Hoople Goes To Schultz Law
Of Mathematical Progression
By MAJOR AM08 B HOOPLE
, Old Bine
Egad! Like lions leaping upon
a fallen gladiator
Like wolves pouncing upon a
mighty stag at bay *
Ike footpads robbing a drunk
in an alley
Like ogres natdgjng candy
from a babe
That Is haw some of my Jackal
readers have been preying upon
me because on a recent Saturday
I chanced to pick more losers
than winners for the first time
In my brilliant career 1
One of the more-lnsultlng
scribblers said: "Why don't you
Sback tJ pi King walnuts off
kes?" Anotner crass person
wrote; "We've got rich off your
selections betting against
them I" Anothet rents his spleen:
"Your selections are the worst
since George Bernard Shaw pick-
ed Carpenner to beat Dempsey!"
Thus you behold me swirling
in a Johnstown flood of insults
from those craven mites who lurk
in tha shadows waiting for the
leader to weaken.
But I am not weakening, and
my strength is as the strength of
10.
I will confuse my tormentors
this very week by picking a per-
fect card. Har-mmphl
I've found a new system, by the
way, sure-fire, consistent and su-
preme. .
It Is the SCHULTZ LAW OP
s&
Majar Ame B. Waqh
THE MA.H.IA'llcAL PRO-
GRESSION Of AUTOMOBILE
NUMBERS
Read- the forecast, paste it in
your hat, and swear by it, men:
California 20, So. Calif. 13
Alabama 14, Tennessee 7
Illinois 20 Washington 14
Texas 21 Arkansas 14
Navy 21, No. Carolina 7
Oklahoma 21. Kansas 14
Wisconsin 14, Purdue 7
Vanderbilt 1. Florida IS
Ohio State 27, Indiana S
Michigan 14, Iowa 7
Notre Dame 28, Pitt
Tes. A. % M. 27, Texas Chris. 19
Rice 2, So. Methodist 14
UCLA 20, Oregon State 7
S.M.U-Notre Dame Game
Set New 'Passing9 Record
By UNITED PRESS
Latest offlcla; figures from the
NCAA reveal that the football
was flying at a record pace last
Saturday when Southern Meth-
odist outsco-ed Notre Dame; 27-
20.
Southern Methodist threw 45
passes ana Noire Dame took to
the air 44 times. It is the first
time two major teams each threw
more than 40 passes in one game.
The total of 8t) passes also Is a
record, erasing the mark of 84
set only two wf eka ago by Flori-
da and Loycia of Los Angeles.
Loyola still leads in passing
with 957 varda gained In four
games. Tu'sa sets the pace In to-
tal offense, averaging 441 yards
per game in three games. Col-
lege of Pacific has averaged 379
yards on the ground to lead that
department
Figures o.i individual perform-
ances put the spotlight on half-
back Johnny Bright of Drake.
Bright leads the major colleges
in total offense, rushing and
scoring. The Drake ace, trying
for his third straight national
ground valnlng championship,
has picked up 1,274 yards this
season. Bright leads with 807
yards rushing and In scoring
Sports Shorties
By UNITED PRESS
8t. LouisManager Marty Ma-
rlon of the St. Louis Cardinals
will do all his piloting from the
bench next season.
The St. Louis Cardinals say
Marlon has been dropped from
the club's roster of active play-
ers. President Fred Salgh says
Marlon's re.ease in no way af-
fects his status as manager.
Salgh say* the move was mere-
ly made to make room for some
yovnger player
Tne Cardinals also announced
that Harry Wa.ker will manage
their Roc'.iestei farm in the In-
ternational Loop next year. Car-
dinal catcher Bob Scheffing has
also been given his uncondition-
al release but will remain with
the club In some other capacity.
Chicago.The Chicago Cubs
have acquired a pitcher and an
outfielder from Springfield of
the International League.
The Cubs picked up righthand-
er I.uvern Fear who won eight
and lost nine this season, and
Jack Wallasea who hit .299. Chi-
cago abo assigned first sacker
Fred Richards to Springfield.
Television fans had a chance
Tuesday night to get In on the
argument ovei the disputed
touchdown pass that gave South-
ern California a 18-14 win over
Oregon State. Movies of the game
were shown and most of the
Viewers agreec that Southern
Cal tailback Frank Glfford was
East the line o' scrimmage when
e threw tne end zone pass to
Bob Buckley.
Films siowea that Southern
Cal had the ball on the Oregon
State 14-yard line. Glfford fad-
ed to the 22. then ran forward,
leaped into the air and connect-
ed with Buckiiy. United Press
sports writer Henry Rleger says
the plctute showed Glfford
throwing from the 12-yard Une,
or two yards beyond the scrim-
mage line, rhe movies also show-
ed two offlclais standing a few
yards from Glfford, In a good
position to see the play.
., ,.. _
Meet Scotland's
Favourite Son
JOHNNIE
WALKER
SCOTCH WHISKY
sosm isioinu come sraoNt
The fashionable drink everywhere
jo waiau a sons ltd. imo vu*> okdbn. anjuanoex
COLLBGE FOOTBALLSixty-
two teams boast undefeated, un-
tied records throughout the na-
tion. A United Press survey shows
that 21 are big-time schools.
Among the smaller schools,
South Dakota State leads the
pack with six wins oat of six.
Chancellor Harvle Branscomb
of Vanderlilt says head football
coach BUI Edwards will stay with
the school Terms of the new
contract were not announced,
but a Na'hviUe sports editor
(Raymond Johnson of The Ten-
nessean i says It has been extend-
ed for "two or three years." Ed-
wards was reported ready to re-
sign when his contract expired in
January of next year unless Van-
derbllt eleued up his "future
status."
with 78 points on 13 touchdowns.
Don Klosterman from Loyola
of Los Angeles is the top passer
with 957 yards gained. Kloster-
man has complete.! 81 passes,
seven of them for touchdowns.
The most versatile back Is Harry
Geldien of Wyoming Geldlen Is
third in total offense seventh in
rushing and lith in passing.
POINTED WARNING
JAMESTOWN. N. V. (UP.)
Miss Thelma M. Cas trier was
driving through an intersection
when something heavy hit the
top Of her car She stopped and
found that a traffic signal light
had fallen and landed on her car.
Listen to...
THE FOOTBALL
PROPHET
Every Saturday at 12:30 p.m.
on
HOG 840 on your Dial
The Football Prophet
Picks the winner of Saturday and Sunday* big
football games. And he's seldom wrong.
The PROPHErS winning average last year 773.
Qon't make any bets until you listen
to
The Football Prophet
0
over HOG-840 kcs.
*
*

BOYD MANBob Boyd, springy-limbed Los Angeles Rams' end,
took to the air like a bird in a desperate attempt to catch a pass
' which Jim Doran, 83, Detroit Lions' end, batted Into the air. The ,
Rams won the tightly-fought National Football League contest
played in the Motor City, 2Y-21. (NEA)
SHORTS
The students at Southern Cal-
ifornia ar feeling a little more
optimistic about Saturday's foot-
ball game vclth favored Califor-
nia. Their 'secret weapon' has
returned.
George Firebiter The Second
disappeared two weeks ago and
Southern Cal was hard pressed
beating Washington and Oregon
State. Now George Tireblter Is
back. He cant run, pass, block,
tackle or even remember signals,
but the Trojans are more con-
fident.
They're real superstitious
about George Tireblter, their dog
mascot.
Silver City Sports
GIRLS VOLLEYBALL
Saturday, Oct. 20. the Silver
City Junior High and Element-
ary Girls Volleyball Selection
will travel to Paraso for parti-
cipation in the Junior High and
Elementary VOileyball Tourna-
ment at fl: cc am.
Junior High School Selection
Constance Warner Daisy Da-
vis, Sylvia Gyles Barbara Clarke,
Mavis Young, Caroline Cox, Glo-
ria Boyce, Ann Miller, Bernice
Brathwaite Daisy Miller, Cyn-
thia Bayne Alethla Dudley, Alice
Scott, Loma Williams. Marjorle
Boyce, Gwendolyn Forde.
Elementary School Selection
Hilarla Quinlan. Marva Hawk-
Ins, Pauline Alston Josephine
Layne, Carol Layne. Jean Bent,
Miriam Tul) Barbara Graham,
Bcverley Suarez. Ruth Thomas,
Selina Tutner, 8hlrley Gaynor,
Pearl Hoy, Mllagra Lpez, Shir-
ley Clarke.
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS SOCCER
Silver City High School soccer
team, crowned champions of the
Interschoc, Soccer League,
trounced La Boca Junior College
3-1 at Silver City on Friday, Oct.
12 before u large crowd.
The Collegietes, sporting all
six-footers were easv victims to
their smaller opponents. Carlos
Malcolm, one of the smaller play-
er of the homesteaders, easily
outmaneuvered his taller oppo-
nents In dribbling through to
score two at the three goals for
Sliver City Carlos Gordon, the
team's ace, scored the other goal
For the La Boca Junior College,
Clarence Skeete scored the only
goal.
Outstanding players for Sliver
City are: Captain Clifton Clarke,
Gilbert Francis, Alfred Barton,
Sinclair Small. Egbert Vernon
and Pauline Castro; for La Boca,
Clarence Skeete, Pablo and Bec-
kles.
The Champs Roster: Harold
Brown. Allan Ogllvle, Egbert Ver-
non, Errlncton Worrell, Robert
Porter, Edaar Dawklns, Paulino
Castro, Julian Layne, Evaristo
Cantlllano, Wilfred Thomas, Car-
los Gordon, Wilfred McCloud,
Walter Kellman, Alfred Barton,
Thirteen Bouts Scheduled
For Action-Filled Evening
Plenty of action is assured ring fans who journey
to Fort Clayton gymnasium tonight to attend the
boxing smoker sponsored by the 65th AAA Group in
which antiaircraftmen, 45th Reconnaissance Squad-
ron the Signal Corps and Albrook Air Force Base
mittmen will take part. The first bout will go at
7:30 p.m.
Thirteen bouts have been scheduled for the v*
ening. They include:
Flyweight Class: Rivas, 65th AA Group vs Jime-
nez, 45th Reconn Sq.
Bantamweight class: Gonzalez, 65th Group vs Ve
lasquez, 7461st Signal.
Lightweight Class: Santiago, 65th Group vs Va-
chon, 45 Recon Sq.; R. Rodriguez, 65th Group vs
Lmdsey, Air Force, and I. Rodriguez, 65th Grouo vb
Reyna, 45th Recon Sq.
Welterweight Class: Velasquez, 65th Group va
Chalk, Air Force, and Morales, 65th Group, vs Ver-
onee, 45th Recon Sq.
Light-heavyweight Clase: Ocasio, 65th Group vs
Mohn, 7461st Signal, and Tate, 65th Group, vs Ro-
balais, 45th Recon Sq.
Middleweight Class: Ortega, 65th Group, vs HaH,
45th Recon Sq.
Lightweight Class: Torres, 65th Group, vs HaU
(Edwin), 45th Recon Sq. .
Welterweight Class: Brado, 65th Group, vs Ed-
monds, Air Force.
Heavyweight Class: Goodwin, 65th Group, vs Ro-
berts, 45th Recon Sq.
Gilbert Francis. Carlos Malcolm, l More thtn 'WMW autoa,
Sinclair Small and Captain Clif- trucks and buses have been pro-
ton Clarke duced by American automobile
^Coaches: H. A Scott and Aston mufacturer8 in the past
Silver City won two games and J***j ecordtag to the Autome-
tied two. I bile Manufacturers Association.


mvmhmhi


GIANTS, DODGERS NL'S 'ALL STARS
(Story on Pae TEN)



AN INDEPEND
NMb.
"Lei f/ie people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWBNTT- SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAT, OCTOBER 1, 1951
FIVE CENTS
Slot Machines
i 8th Of Air
Said
Base
BILOXI. Miss.. Oct. 19 iTJPl
A. Senate c immlttee today sum-
tnoned hl?h official* of this
"Gold Coast" resort to a hearing
on reports that gambling clubs
axe soaking up one-eighth of the
entire payroll of Keesler air base.
A Senate Preparedness Sub-
committee headed by Sen. Lyn-
don Johnson. R... Tex will begin
the hearlnz here Monday.
Two of the 'aces" of the orig-
inal Kefauver crime investigat-
ing machinery are expected to
take part n the Ou^f Coast in-
quiry. Sen Estes Kefauver, D.,
Term.. Is a member of the com-
mittee and Downey Rice will In-
terrogate the witnesses as special
Subpoenas were issued today to
the mayor and chief of police of
Biloxi. a city commissioner and
the sheriff of Haralso nCounty.
total of 12 persons was under-
stood to be under subpoena.
Mississippi's free and easy
eoast, long a popular resort strip
of plush hotels and elaborate
gambling clubs, escaped formal
notice of tne Kefauver Investi-
gating committee.
-But agents of the prepared-
ness group have been gathering
evideqce here for sometime, It
whs learnfd.
The Preparedness Subcommit-
tee took jurisdiction on the
2 Naval Vessels
Berth In Balboa
With 500 Men
A Naval Task Unit, under
command of Commander R. L.
Tully, USN. composed of the
USS Hancock and the USS
George Davis, arrived at Bal-
boa this morning. These ships
are on their way from San le-
go to Newport, R. I.
Together they carry a com-
plement of about 500.
They will berth at Pier 1,
Naval Station, Rodman, until
Monday, when they will transit
North.
The Hancock. Commander R.
L. Tully in command. Is a 2,050
ton destroyer, 377 feet long, and
has a complement of about 17
officers and 287 men. The
George Davis, under command
of Lieutenant Commander D.
p. Wynkoop, USN. Is a 1,350 ton
destroyer escort 306 feet long,
and has a complement of about
14 officers and 18S enlisted men.
During their stay here the of-
ficers and men of this Naval
Task Unit will be granted shore
leave and liberty.
Typhoid Epidemic Shuts
Schools in Alberta
MACLEOD. Alberta. Oct. 19.
(UP) All schools were closed
In this Southern Alberta center
today as a result of an outbreak
of typhoid fever which 16 per-
sons already have.
A mass inoculation program
was ordered to safeguard the
population of 2.000.
5rounds tnat the payroll for the
),0C0 men at Keesler air force
base feels the deepest bite of the
estimated 1 500 slot machines in
the Biloxi area.
In Washington, Johnson said
that the committee's informa-
tion indicates that morale and
efficiency of airmen at the field
are being impaired by the near-
by gambling temptations.
"This inlurmation is so serious
that we are holding a hearing to
determine its validity." Johnson
said. The hearing wii: be an open
one.
The Johnson committee pre-
sumably us data turned over to
it by the Senate Crime Invest-
Navy Secretary
For Air Floberg
Visits Isthmus
Assistant Secretary of the
Navy for Air John E. Floberg
arrived at Coco Solo Naval Sta-
tion at 10:44 p. m. yesterday,
and spent the night as house
?uest of the Commanding Of-
Icer of the Naval station and
Mrs. Lyle L. Koepke.
The purpose of Floberg's visit
is to make an on-slght familiar-
ization tour of the activities
and installations of the 15th
Naval District. This is his first
visit to the Canal Zone.
He was rendered full military
honors at the Coco Solo Naval
Station at 8:30 this morning.
After the honor ceremony
Floberg Inspected the facilities
at the Naval Station and cross-
ed the Isthmus by automobile,
accompanied by Rear Admiral
Albert M. Bledsoe and Koepke.
Lt. General William H. H.
Morris. Jr., gave a luncheon In
Floberg's honor at Quarry
Heights today.
This afternoon Floberg will
inspect the Naval installations
on the Pacific Side and return
tonight to Coco Solo.
Engineer Killed
When Freight Rams
Passenger Train
ASHEVTLLE, N. C, Oct. 19 (UP)
One person was killed, and
eight others were injured when
a Southern Railway passenger
tram and freight train crashed
head-on near here. An official of
the line said the collision was
caused by failure to observe the
block signa!.
An engineer aboard the freight
tram was killed wher. his engine
was derailed and crashed down
an embankment on top of him
after he jimped from the cab.
Two of three passengers were
treated for slight injuries. The
engineer of the passenger train
was serlous'y burned Five other
trainmen were hurt, but none se-
riously.
gating Committee when
groups inquiries ended.
Served pith subpoenas today
were Mayor Hart Chirm, Oity
Commissioner J. A. "Tony" Creel,
Biloxi Police Chief Earl Wetzel,
Harrison County Sheriff Lax
Quave, Cltv Detective Louis Ros-
settl, and District Attorney Lu-
ther Maples.
The probe was understood' to
have been launched following
complaints from parents of
those stationed at Keesler that
their sons were feeding their pay
to the slot macnlnes.
Chinn said yesterday that he
was fully aware of tne fact that
slot machines were operating In
Biloxi.
"They were here when Keesler
air force base was established
and they have been operating
continuously ever since. They are
kept under strict regulation.
They are locally controlled and
are not operated by any syndi-
cate," Chirm said.
"I venture to say that condi-
tions here are as good If not bet-
ter than around other army
posts.
"And I might add that I get as
much pressure from forces want-
ing other forms of gambling Here
Payroll
that as I do irom forces that wat
as I do irom forces that want
gambling stopped," Chinn said.
The Rev. G. C. Hodge, pastor
of the First Baptist Church here,
asserted that the slot machines
and other devices took about $6,-
000,000 of the annual $48,000,000
Keesler payroll.
A Senate committee investiga-
tor made a similar estimate that
about $500 000 of the $4,000,000
monthly payroll was spent on
gambling.
Deadline Near
For US Awards
To RP Students
WATCH ON THE R
Tha rocky shores of Lake Mead
behind Hoover Dam make a nice
The Panam Committee on
Study and Training in the Unit-
ed States announced today that
November 2, will be the final day
for interested young Panama-
nian men and women to submit
completed applications for a year
of advanced study In the United
States with the aid of a scholar-
ship.
The spokesman for the local
six-member Selection Committee
particularly urged well-qualified
graduate students to apply for
the several scholarship awards
covering education In United
States colleges and universities
during the 19S-53 school term.
Available to graduate students
are tuition fellowships, a limited
number of maintenance grants
and travel grants, asslstantshlps
and fellowships converlng all
expenses.
Application forms may be ob-
tained by applying in person or
writing to the Secretary, Pana-
m Committee on Study and
Training in the United States,
Avenida Justo Arosemena No. 76,
Panam City, or the Consulate
of the United States, Ninth
Stree( and Roosevelt Avenue,
Coln.
The qualifications of all can-
didates will be examined care-
fully by the Committee, person-
al interviews will be held with
each candidate next month, and
the most outstanding applicants
will be recommended to the Ins-
titute of International Education
in New York City, The Institute
cooperates with the United
States Government in its grants
made under the VS. Information
and Educational Exchange Pro-
gram and with colleges, universi-
ties, civic groups and private or-
ganizations in the United States
in the coordinating and award-
ing of scholarships and fellow-
ships to students in the other
American republics.
Members of the Committee for
Panam are Jose E. Lefevre,
Prof. Max Arosemena, Prof. Ma-
. -uel Vrela, Jr Prof. Matthew
baccdrop for ""-""" D. Smith, Luis Gomes, and John
end Smith is secretary.
British Ship
Bombed Near
Russian Coast
LONDON, Oct. 19 (UP) A
British freighter was reported
yesterday to have been bombed
by Russian planes near the So-
viet port of Archangel and Brit-
ish sources feared Russia had
launched a new and more ag-
gressive ph.ue of the cold war
against the West.
In Belfast, Ireland, Capt. Les-
lie Gow of the freighter Beryl-
stone said Soviet seaplanes
dropped t.iree bombs near his
ship as lt approached the White
Sea port of Archangel last Sept.
14.
The ship escaped damage, Gow
said.
The captain .said tne attack oc-
curred about 10 miles outside
Archangel and this was his first
opportunity to report lt to Brit-
ish authorities He called the in-
cident "entlrelv .unprovoked."
The freighter's second mate,
Albert Agar, said the British ship
apparently sailed ink, a Russian
maneuver area about which the
crew had not been warned.
He said seven or eight planes
took part in the attack.
British Naval Inteihgence re-
ports on the alleged Incident
were forwarded from Belfast to
the Foreign Office yesterday and
an investigation was started im-
mediately.
British sources conceded the
ship might have blundered into
a maneuver area, but the Inci-
dent was examined In the light
of a disturbing sequence of re-
cent stiff jabs delivered by Rus-
sia against the West.
Britain's new amabssador to
Moscow, Sir Alvary Douglas Cas-
colgne, flew to Moscow yesterday
in the wake of two Foreign Of-
fice statements on the current
friction with Russia.
In tlje first, a Foreign Office
spokesman aligned Britain with
the latest United States request
for Russian intervention to end
the war in Korea.
In the second the Foreign Of-
fice demanded the release of
Mrs. Iralda Ricketts, Russian-
born wife of a Briton who was
kidnapped outside the Bolshol
Theater in Moscow the night of
Oct. 16.
Her husband, William Ricketts,
now in England, said his wife
had written:
"I am living the last days of
my life. My turn is coming for
prison."
Gow said he was unable to re-
port the incident in Archangel
because there was no British
consulate there.
US Senate Approves
SUghfly Smaller
'2nd Try' Tax
WASHINGTON, Oct. 19 (UP)
The Senate yesterday approved
a $5,691,000,000 "second try" tax
bill whlc hwould shave a few
cents a month from personal in-
come tax Increases carried in an
earlier measure rejected by the
House.
The measure was passed by
voice vote.
The Senate acted shortly after
a H o u s e-Senate Conference
Committee hao agreed on minor
changes in the high-priority bill
in an effort to appease House
critics and wlue out the threat
that Congress may not be able to
adjourn this week end.
The measure now goes back to
the House where Democratic
leaders predicted it will be ap-
proved today despite the fact
that the chamber on Tuesday re-
jected an almost identical bill.
But some members thought there
was a chance the new bill would
be rejected too.
If their suspicions should be
borne out, Congress either would
have to hammer out still a third
compromise in the waning hours
of the session or recess until a
new bill co.ild be devised.
In addition to the change in
personal income taxes, the new
bill would make the Increase In
excess profits taxes retroactive to
last July 1 and raise the capital
gains tax from 25 to 26 per cent.
The new excess profits rates had
been scheduled to go into effect
next Jan. 1.
XNEA Telephotoi
MUTINY AT MOUND8VILLESome of the 1,300 prisoners
who mutinied at the West Virginia State Penitentiary,
Moundsville, W. Va., fill the open yard where they were kept
overnight by guards armed with machine guns. The men
made three attempts to storm prison buildings before they
went back to their cells, but all were repulsed by gunfire
over their heads.
Panagra Studies
Direct Air Service
from China lo S.A.
HONG KONG, Oct. 19 (UP)
Edward G. Bern, U. S. airline
executive arrived here to study
the feasibility of opening a re-
gular direct air service between
China and Japan and South
America to encourage the
migration of orientals to South
American countries.
Bern, the general sales man-
ager of" Pan-American Grace
Airways, said here, that South
America offers tremendous op-
portunities for oriental fan-
migrants, especially those who
are ousted from their homes by
Communists.
He said there's a vast expanse
of uncultivated lands in South
America awaiting development
by Immigrants, and one South
American country was offering
150 acress to anybody who was
willing to go over and cultivate
it.
'Babbling Madman Runs Wild
In Lead Pipe Clubbing Orgy
DETROIT, Oct. 19 (UP)A 65-
year-old man was clubbed to
death and six others were attack-
ed savagely today in a strange
series of beatings in Detroit and
nearby St. Claire County.
SUte police said they were
checking the possibility that the
person who killed Alphonse D'-
Hondt at his converted trailer
home near Memphis, Mich., was
the same "dwarfish, gnome-like
madman'' who injured an expec-
tant mothci, her husband, and
their two teen-age daughters
with a lead pipe at Detroit
D'Hondt was slain with a
three-foot length of lumber.
Hls hands and feet were tied
together with rope and a towel
was wrapped around his neck.
Three trucks were seen at D -
Hondt's tiny home early today, a
few hours before his body was
found. ,.
Police said $150 which D'Hondt
was believed to have kept in his
home is missing, along with 24
4 Safe, 5 Missing
In AF Amphibian
Ditch Off Nassau
COCOA. Florida, Oct. IB (UP)
_ A United States Air Force
Grumman Albatross amphibian
Silane made a forced landing
ast night south of Kassau, in
the Bahamas, and five of the
nine persons aboard are miss-
ing.
The other four have been
picked up.
The Albatross was on a rou-
tine flight from Nassau to Ma-
yaguana, one of the Islands in
the Bahamas where the Air
Force Is setting up stations to
track guided missiles fired out
over the Atlantic from the Co-
coa guided missile base.
Chilly Time Ahead In UK Whoever Wins Election
By LEON DENNEN
LONDON, Oct. 19 INEA).Britain is moving irresistably
Almost fatalistically toward a new economic crisis which
neither the Tories nor Labor will be in a position to solve with-
out additional U. 8. aid.
Coal production is running at least 3,000,000 tons behind
consumption. There is an oil shortage primarily due to the
Iranian siezure of Abadan. Cuts in power and more rationing
this winter seem Inevitable.
The more than 8,000,000 mem-
bers organized in the British
Trade Union Congress are getting
The Labor government was
largely the TUC's baby and the
unhappy union leaders had to toe
the line in the face of mounting
criticism from their membership.
For six years they had to sub-
sist on the tasteless diet of wage
stabilizationwhile their Ameri-
can counterparts in the AFL and
CIO engaged in dran.atlc strug-
gles for nlgber wage.
Despite the eloquent (and des-
, prate > picas of the u.bor Party s
speakers, the union members
now insist that "It's the lob of
the unions to square .us with the
coat of living."
"Labor government or Tory
K'eminentand God help the
ries if they do get inwe are
going- to make it difficult," said
a railwayman. "Its our duty.
we're going to get a decent llv-
%for our men?'
le national wage average in
Britain is 7 per week (about
$30).
This rnay have been sufficient
for a family of three or fourin
addition to all the other benefits
they get from the welfare state
to exist before inflation set In.
But now the lower Income
groups fine it extremely difficult
to make enJs meet
Some millions of Britons, at
the bottom of the income level,
are exempt from paying income
tax.
But non* is exempt from the
purchase tax and other "hidden''
taxes.
The purcnase tax on clothing,
electrical appliances and leather
goods runs from 33 per cent to
125 per cent.
On tobat co, cigareu and other
luxuries it is almost 200 per cent.
Rationed foods arr relatively
cheap. But no family can subsist
entirely or. the meager rations.
Unratlored goods are practic-
ally lnacce&iib'e to the average
Briton.
A Conservative victory at the
polls on Oct. 25 will free the
hands of the frustrated union
leaders.
Already under Communist
and left wing pressure "from be-
low" there are demands for
Immediate wage Increases and
threats of strikes.
Winston Churchill's return to
power might unleash a strike
wave that would rock Britain
and have wide repercussions
throughout Europe.
In the furious battle of "Elec-
tion Manifestos" the Tories
blame Labor for all of Britain's
domestic und foreign troubles.
Including the debacle in Iran and
the new crisis over the Suez Ca-
nal.
They profess to see in Labor as
a whole, not merely its left wing
"lunatic fringe- led by Aneurin
Bevan, a deliberate drive towards
the totalitarian state.
Labor goes back to the 1930s
to try to demonstrate not only
Tory Incompetence but also Tory
ill-will towards the wage earn-
ers.
Labor spfakers denounce the
Conservatives as greedy "capital-
lit profiteers" and "warmongers"
who will plunge Britain into war
practically on the day of their
election victory.
Unfortunately both the Labor-
ites and the Tories ias the au-
thoritative London Economist re-
cently wrote) appeat to be as
firmly united as ever on one
main propositionthat the vot-
ers should not be allowed to give
a verdict on the real issues fac-
ing the British people,
(NEA Telephoto)
RESTLESS LABOR: After six years of wage stabilisation,
Britain's strong labor unions. Ilka these dockers massed for a
recent desaonstration, are getting restless over east of liviag.
ANEURIN BEVAN: The Tories
Insist he's not the only one
_ with totalitarian Ideas.
sheets of corrugated iron roof-
ing material.
Clarence Wrouble. 43, was in-
jured seriously at Detroit when
a man described as a "madman
mumbling some foreign lan-
guage" crawled in his bathroom
window an3 began beating mem-
bers of Wrouble's family with a
snort lead pipe.
His wife. Violet,' who expects
her ninth child in a month, also
was slugged. Their two daughters,
Charlotte, 16. and Patricia, 14,
were injured.
All four were taken to Receiv-
ing Hospital, and Charlotte was
kept for further treatment of
shock.
PRR Freight House
Employes Gives 100%
To Community Chest
The first return to the Canal
Zone Community Chest cam-
paign from local rate Panama
Canal employes is from the Pa-
nama Freight House of the
Railroad and Terminals Bureau.
Through the efforts of Ed-
ward Mndez, local rate volun-
teer representative, 100% par-
ticipation of the 81 employes
of the Panama Freight House
with a total of $81 has been
reported to Stanley G. Loney,
vice-chairman of the Pacific
Local Rate Committee, under
the Chairmanship of William
Jump.
For the past three years
Jump has been the volunteer
leader of local rate representa-
tives.
Wrouble fought with the at-
tacker and wrected the pipe from
the man's hand.
Detroit police examined tha
bloody weapon for fingerprints,
but they said it was too rough
and pocked to reveal anything.
Mrs. Wrouble, 35, said she was
awakened by the screams of her
two daughters who were occupy
ing a bedroom upstairs.
She said she rushed up tha
stairs and found a "short, squat,
dark-complexioned man" sitting ^
across Charlotte's body while,
swinging the pipe at Patricia anrj
the prostrate girL
When Mrs. Wrouble scream*,
the man leaped up and began atJ
tacking her. He hit her several!
times before Wrouble,- asleep in 1
a bedroom at the rear of the'
building, was awakened and ar-
rived to battle the stranger.
Wrouble smashed two bedroom
chairs over the intruder's head
before the man hit Wrouble
across the temple, knocking him
unconscious.
Mrs. Wrcuble said she then ran
to telephone the police and that
the clubber wrestled with her for
a few seconds before darting for
the door. .
"He was just like a maniac,"
she said. "He kept babbling in-
coherently."
Patricia told police that "my
mother threw the telephone at
him but didnt hit him."
She said "he must have been
hurt, though, because he left
blood stains on the floor."
The man apparently ran out
the Wrouble's front, door and
tried to force his way into a car
parked nearby, but the frighten-
ed couple inside fought him off
and drove away.
I
JOINT PAINS
Sudden stabs
or crippling stiffness
Whoa kidney* grow sluggishneed
tong opyoo begin to (eel danger
signals flint and muscle pains are one
of them They may mean that foar
kidneys ar failing to do their proper b,
which ia to filter harmful impurities away
from tb system.
De Witt's Pill re specially prepared to
help restore yooi kidneys to their norma)
activity By their tonic aad antiseptic
effect on sluggish kidneys they tackle on
of tha common causes of joint paisa The
impurities which have given risa to rom
suffering art cleared out of tne system, and
pains grow lea* a* natural consequence
We nave recaves letter* tram aO ovet
the world written by grateful people who
have turned to De Witt's Pill* and found
Blessed relie! They may Q* lust what
you oeed Why not try them tor rout
trouble? Goto four chemist and obtain *
apply of this triad sad trusted medicine
iCIATICA
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BACKACHE
IOIN1 PAINS
RHEUMATIC
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OUR GURANTE!
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ano each of
ingredients i
conforms to tat
moot rigid stan-
dards of parity
"i
DE WITT SPILLS
for Kidney and Bladder Troubles

St.


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