The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01264

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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AN INDEPENDE^
DAILY NEWSPAPER


NOW DAILY
Service to V. S. I
Seagrams V.O.
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\ "Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
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TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. r., MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 151
FIVE CENTS
Mossadegh Will Not Slack
When TV'd From Security
On Abadan
i
HUMBLE SITE FOR HISTORIC TALKSThis is Pan Mun Jom. Korea, the site proposed by.
the Communists for the resumption of cease-fire talks. United Nations and Communist Ualson
officers have been meeting; In these buildings, and were scheduled to do so again today. Yes-
terday's forthright admission by United Nations Supreme Commander General Matthew
Rldgway that some of his let planee had strafed the territory near here, killing a 12-year-
old boy, removes the Reds moat strident objection to resuming the cease-fire talks. Now the
chief point of issue is the size of the neutral zone to be established round Pan Mun Jom.
Red jeeps are seen parked by the buildings here.
w '".* .
U N Drives Ahead
8TH ARMY HO., Oct. 15 (UP)
Five tank-led United Nations
divisions svrept ahead up to three
miles in Korea today, capturing
at least eight strategic hills
against flagging Communist re-
sistance.
In one four-mile section of the
30-miJe attack front, demoralized
Chinese Rc'ls abandoned stock-
pile of guns and ammunition in
a hasty retreat towards their
main base at Kumsong.
Red resistance along the re-
mainder o the, east central as-
sault front ranged from light to
stiff. Two counter-attacks were
beaten off.
More than 6,000 Red troops
have been killed or wounded in
the past three days.
The main 8th Army drive was
aimed at Kumsong. 29 miles
north of the 38th parallel, and
biggest Communist buildup base
In Korea.
It lies atnwart the two main
Communist invasion routes into
South Koreasouthwest to Seoul
and south to Woniu.
The UnltceTfirtates 24th Infan-
try with t^.e'Colomoian battal-
ion attached and the South Ko-
rean 2nd and 6th Divisions have
advanced six miles and captured
17 hills since ttftjy launched their
offensive or. avalrmile front be-
low Kumsong Saturday.
Dispirited Chinese on one
narrow sector of the front gave
up without a fight and fled to
positions closer to Kumsong
when tw, United States regi-
ments resuman the attack at
dawn.
These Reds were green troops,
and poorly trained. South Ko-
reans on the GPs flank reported
capturing three- 105 mm. pieces
of artillery from the retreating
Reds.
Ceylon threw high explosive* at
them and their fortifications.
Then the Ceylon steamed north
into the Yellow Sea to Join, the
British destroyer Cossack In
pounding two Communist gun
positions mar Stnarrju. '
The heavy cruiser Los Angeles
battered R.d railroads and fac-
tory support btalldlngs between
Songjin and Tanchon yesterday.
Heavy black smoke came from an
ammunition dump which had
been hard hit.
The destroyer Hulohan an-
swered a call for fire support
from UN troops in the field, arid
blasted Communist positions
near the front Unes. The war-
ship's guns blazed away at
Pay Bill Conferees
Heeling Tomorrow;
Agreed On Leave
Word received today from
Washington by Rufus B. Love-
lady, president ot Local .14, Am-
erican Federation of Government
Employes' indicate that the pay
bill conferees will meet tomor-
row morning.
Sen Olin D Johnston, Chair-
man of the Senate Civil Service
Committee scheduled the meet-
ing at which conferees will first
take up the Postal Pay Increase
BUI (S.355), which will be. fol-
lowed on the agenda by the Clas-
sified Pay Raise BiU (S.022).
While the conferees same to
be at odds over the major pro-
visions of the Postal Bill, they
Storm Hits
Troopship;
All Rescued
TOKYO, Oct. 15 (UP) The
United States Navy transport
Kongo Maru, with 500 Korea-
bound United Nations troops a-
board. was driven ashore yester-
day by a uphoon.
Raging waves pounded the
chartered transport all night as
she lay helpiess on an island Just
south of Sasebo.
The storm prevented rescue
ships approaching the vessel,
chartered to carry United Na-
tions troops between Sasebo and
Korea.
This morning the United
States Navy attack transport
George Clvmer, started taking
men off the grounded ship.
Though heavy seas were run-
ning the George Clymer two
landing craft got alongside the
stranded transport, pat com-
munications equipment aboard,
and started ferrying the 500
United Nations fighting men
safely to the Clymer.
AU were safe.
The Japanese master of the
Kongo Maru and 40 of his crew
remained aboaid.
The typhoon which claimed the
Kongo Maru also heavily dam-
aged United States service in-
stallations as It crossed Okinawa
^Jfe&JaSr.-H
Already an estimated 80 Jap-
anese have been kiUed asth ty-
phoon rushes up'the west coast,
of Japan.
___ (NEA Telephoto)
RESTING UPMohammed Mossadegh, Iran's aUing 72-year-
old premier, sits bundltd in a wheelchair in a New York
hospital, resting up for his appearance before the UN Se-
curity Council. This afternoon he will give Iran's side of the
oil crisis between his country and Great Britain.
UNITED NATIONS, New York, Oct. 15 (UP) Irori
closed the door today on further negotiations with Britain,
except on the question of the sale of oil and the amount
ot indemnity for the nationalized Anglo-Iranian Oil Com-
pany.
Iranian Vice Premier Hossein Fatcmi at the sama
time announced his government's desire to enter imme-
diate negotiations with former customers to resume the
flow of oil to the free world.
Premier Mohammed Mossadegh will go before a tele-
vised session of the U.N. Security Council at 3 p.m. today
to answer Britain's "threat to peace" charges in the An-
glo-lranain oil dispute.
In Teheran last night, it was reported that Mossadegh
will ask the U.N. to create an international corporation to
sell Iran's oil and recruit technicians to run the huge
Abcdan refinery.
to be pretty much in
di
are said
agreement on a graduated sys-
tem of leave, favoring the Sen-
ate Plan Tor 13 to 26 days of
leave, based on seniority.
It was also learned wat the
APGE Is asking conferees to
agree to a 3400 pay raise as a
compromise between the Senate
and the House pay proposals.
The Senate endorsed a flat 10
per cent raise for classified
workers, wJth an $800 ceiling
and a flat $400 raise for postal
workers..
The House voted:a $400 in-
crease for all postal classified
employes.
Communist resistance was stiff
only south-southeast of Kum-
song, where about 1.030 Reds
launched a counterattack. They
were repulsed without loss of
ground.
.Six Marine helicopters started
dropping ammunition and sup-
plies to tauth. Korean units
southeast of Kumsong today,
when the South Koreans reached
terrain difficult to supply by
road.
The heilcopters brought out
South Korean wounded on their
return Journey,*despite heavy
enemy mortar and artulery fire.
Destroy!r and cruisers from A* Cnn4n C\nrn
Task Force B5 continued to bom- ** 301110 I, IO TO
bard both ae-asts qf Korea yester- Canal Zone Police today re-
day, ported the drowning yesterday
afternoon of a 28-year-old La
United States > Marine planes, Bfecan at Santa Clara,
from the light carrier Rendova Tb body, cf Fit*. Albert Davis
attacking points 'between Chin-' was sent, to the Gorges Morgue
nampo. Inchon and Haej, de- for an autopsv
stroyed m.re tbkn 80 storage
buildings, 18 boxcar and one
railroad bridge
Reds all night and successfully
broke up two Red attacks.
Sea Furies and Fireflies from
the Austrian aircraft carrier
Sydney struck at Red troops on a
ridge south ot Kojo. Ah estimat-
ed 200 Redfe were destroyed or
vounded oy the attack.
The United States destroyer
Renshaw dueled with four con-
cealed enemy gun positions lo-
cated on a high bluff overlooking
the sea of Japan.
As .the destryer approached
the bluffs, sheets of green cam-
ouflage dropped from the con-
cealed batteries and the Reds
opened, fire. Of more than SO
rounds fired only one landed
near the Renshaw.
** '
In counter tire the Renshaw
sharpshooters placed several
salvoes d-rectly in the mouth of
a cave 'housing one of the guns.
The exploding shells blew the
6lece and the gun crew out of
ie cave and into the water be-
low.
Siege forces at Wonaan conti-
nued hammering the harrassed
port, while UN frigates patrolled
the Han river approaches on the
west coast
5 ''------. "
Surgeon General's
Offke Consultant
Visiting On C2
Dr. Bruce P. Webster; civilian
consultant In internal medicine
representing the Office of the
8urgeon General, will visit Gor-
gas Hospital from October 16
through 2i in connection with
the residency training program, soster Control organization.
i-------------------------------------------------,---------------------,----------
Red Alertr Test
Set For Thursday
Announcement is made by the
Joint military services of a com-
bined "Red alert" and Disaster
Control Command Post Exercise
on Thursday. This is the sec-
ond such practice alert which
will involve all Army, Navy and
Air Force installations- in the
Canal Zone.
At an undisclosed time, raid
sirens on all military Installa-
tions will sound the Red alert
which wUl be foUowed IS min-
utes later by the "all clear"
signal. CWiuan personnel in the
Canal Zone and the Republic
of Panam will not be involved
in the proceedings.
During the alert period It
will be assumed that ap ato-
mic bomb has been exploded
in the Canal Zone.

The Army-Navy-Air Force Dis-
aster Control Center will be
placed into immediate operation
to cope with the many rescue,
medical, refugee and radiolo-
gical problems presented by
such an occurance. .
The Joint military services
emphasize that this Is a prac-
tice alert, involving mUltary
Kersonnel only. The problem is
naglnary and is scneduled sole-
ly for the purpose of training,
testing passive defense meas-
ures and the operation of Dl-
i
'Jaw 'Virgin Ma
Times
iry
Cardinal
VATICAN CITY .Oct. 15 (UP) Father lifted his eyes In the Vat-
Pope Pius XII saw the Virgin lean gardens toward the sun and
Mary on t'iree successive days
last year, according to an Itali-
an Cardinal, Just at the time he
proclaimed as a dogma her as-
sumption Into Heaven.
The'semi-offlelal Vatican pub-
lication "Osservatore Romano,"
quoted from an address delivered
Saturday by Cardinal Federico
Tedeschini to pilgrims at the
shrine of Our Lady of Fatima In
Lisbon.
It was there that three Portu-
guese chUdren once reported see-
ing the Virgin.
"I wlU ttU you that another
person also saw this miracle,"
Cardinal Tedeschini said,
"...he saw it in Rome. The
Pope, our very Pontiff, saw it."
Cardinal Tedeschini said the
Pope saw the Virgin at 4 p.m. on
Oct SO, Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 of last
Etar On Nov. 1 the Pontiff es-
ibUshed the dogmathat no
Catholic can questionof her as-
sumption.
Tedeschini said: "The Holy
Several Dead
Of Mystery Fever
In Chiriqui Town
A number of sudden deaths
resulting from fever which kills
:ts victim In less than 12 hours.
then the Fatima vision was re-
peated before him. Who Is cap-
able of fixing his eyes on the
shining sun? But he was able to
do so an.i during those days
could witness the life of the sun
under the band of Mary.
"The agitated sun convulsed
and was transformed into a pic-
ture of the Ufe spectacle of the
heavenly movements and trans-
mitted sUent but eloquent mes-
The report was promptly de-
nied here by Fatemi, who said no
such plans had even been con-
sidered by Mossadegh and his
delegation.
The Premier has prepared a
40-page speech, which his aide is
scheduled to read to the council
m French.
Sir Gladwyn Jebb, chief Brit-
ish delegate, is expected to get
the floor at the outset of this af-
ternoon's meeting.
In bringing the case to the Se-
curity Council Britain warned
that the cdl dispute constituted
a threat to peace. However. Iran
contends that the U.N. has no
Jurisdiction to intervene in the
dispute arising from the nation-
allzatlon of the $800.000.000
AIOC.
Fatemi dashed hopes for fur-
+'*-t t-frfr gillie negotiations
at a news conference si BJ
headquarters here.
He conceded that unemploy-
ment and poverty are increasing
In Iran as a result of the stop-
page of oil production.
However, he warned that
continued economic pressure
by Britain would not bring
Iran to her knees.
Mossadegh is expected to pres-
ent his corporation plan to the
council with the proviso that na-
tions interested in buying Iran-
Ian oilnotably Britain and the
U.S.can become members
sages to the Vicar
the Pope."
Christs
La Bocan Drowns
Reds on the Changsangot pen- Electrital Division since 1940
nsula ran /or cover as the guns
from the British light cruiser
He was porp In Ancon, and
was ffciployed by the Panama
Canal as an of tice helper for the
Circumstances surrounding the
drowning,were-not known.
Magic Rhythm Touch Shakes
Coins From 1 Armed Bandits
LEWJBTON. Idaho. Oct 15 says there's a "rhythm" in slot
(UP) MoK-iolks try tb hit the machines that have been "fixed."
Jaekpot, but sometimes a soft so they wont pay off toe much,
touch pays off mora. and that's about 70 par cent of
At least it does for three for- the devices,
mar slot machine repairman And Pugh says the 'proper
working, the one-armed bandits handle stroke" wUl send the
hare. coins tumbling down the chute.
Johnny Pugh, Danny Foster Pugh reasons: "If It's legal for
and Bob Black have been scoop- the machines to take the players,
tag up Jackpots from the oblig- it's just as le-jal for the players
tag slot machines in the, town to take the machines."
for weeks But the tavern keepers don't
And Police Robert Flood says like it.
There's nothing he can do about Pugh says "You have never
seen such expressions on a face
fay fkwa. "I watched it and as those on the operators when
all legitmete." we win on a machine we've got
And profitable, too. In one them completely insane."
half-hour of lay, a tavern own- But the secret isn't for sale.
*r watched the'trio pocket more The gambling repairmen pian to
than $200 fn corns from the lack- go Into business with it.
pots. They say: "We're going to fUe
The trio says the success is the income taxes es professional slot
'magic rhythm touch." Pugh machine players."
'Gong Kicking' Sets
Off Hubbub On CZ;
Disorder Costs $25
A 23-year-old resident of Bal-
boa discovered today that play-
tag practical jokes can prove to
be expensive.
William B. Andrews, a radio
technician employed by the
Army at Fort Amador, was ar-
rested last night for sounding
a loud gong from the window
of a car on Fourth of July Ave-
nue. He started a wave of alarm
and excitement among the
drivers of other cars he passed.
Andrews was fined $25 this
morning In the Balboa Magis-
trate's Court for the "disorder-
leportedly have occurred recent- j ly act." He has a long traffic
ly in the Chir.qul town of Tole. \%**S> _*n.d.1J?a_?__al80. been.5.n:
According lo the report two
Indians. Marcelino Hernndez
and Felipe came down with
lever during the early evenine
and by next morning they were
sea.
The strange deaths have been
reported to medical authorities
in Ohlrlqui and an Investigation
Is said to be underway.
the proposed corporation, but
Iran would hold the controlling
51 per cent of the stock.
Corporation members would,
have first call on the available
oU. Supplies remaining after
the members' needs had been
met would be sold by the corpor-
ation to buyers throughout the
world.
Satellite Railways
Changing Gauge
To Russian Width
VIENNA, Oct. 15 (UP)Re-
liable sources here said todav
railways In Eastern Slovakii
and Hungary are being changed
tx Ru*sia,Jx(Td. gauge to fseif.".;*
the movement of goods and
troops to and from Russia.
These sources said work on
the Unes from the Soviet fron-
tier town of Csop to the hug*
iron mines at Reblsov. Slovakia,
and from Csop to Mosolc. Hun-
gary, had already started and
that preparations are being
made to extend the Csop-Tre-
visov line to Roznava.
On the Prague-Moscow Uno
the transfer will be avoided by
jacking up the rail cars and
changing the wheB tracks to fit
of the gauge.
Hillbilly Champs Due Today
To Twang for Armed Services
Panamanian, 26, Held
For Ancon Robbery
Camilo Parson, a 28-year-old
Panamanian waived preliminary
hearing this morning in the Bal-
boa Magistrate's Court on a
charge of petty larceny, and the
caw Ii bound over for trial in the
U.S.. District Court at Ancon.
Parson Is being charged -with
stealing property in Ancon be-
longing to Cordelia Ditto a
white cap. a box of .35 calibre
ammunition and a 25 calibre
cartridge clip amounting to $315.
vlcted previously on a battery
charge
The driver of the car In
which Andrews was a passenger,
Burnice Alderman Herring, 20
also an American, was acquit-
ted of a charge of disturbing
the peace. Herring is employed
by the 31ectr,lcal Division Qf the
Panama Canal.
American Rate
Craftsmen Win
1 to 6c Raise
The quarterly review of
craft rates in the Canal
organization based on na-
val shipyards has been
completed and rote ad-
justments from one to six
cepts upward have been
made effective Oct. 14.
THE CONNIE B. GAY HILLBILLY TROUPE which will enter-
tain Army. Navy, and Air Force personnel on the Isthmus
this week. Kneeling, left to right. Smlttv Smith, guitarist,
harmonica player and vocalist: Smoky McClenny. hillbilly
singer and guitarist: standing, left to right, Jimmy Dean,
hiUbillv accordlanlst-comic: Ralph Case, sauare dance caller;
Betty Bean. Western vocalist, Connie B. Oay, owner of ra-
dio ranch and foremost hUlbUly lmpressarlos BUly Gram-
mer, champion guitarist and Chubby Wise. National Cham-
pion Fiddle player.
Connie B. Gay. hillbUly im-
pressario and his troupe of Na-
tional Championship hlllblUles
were scheduled to arrive at Al-
brook Air Force Base this after-
noon on the second leg of their
entertainment tour of service in-
stallations in the Antilles and
Caribbean areas. The troupe Is
returning from Puerto Rico after
entertaining personnel at Army.
Navy, Air Force posts and bases
in that area.
Fresh from stateside television
and radio engagements over
WMAL-TV. Washington.DC. and
Radio Station WARL. Arlington.
Virginia, the troupe will open to-
night with a show at Fort Clay-
ton at 8:30 p.m.
The schedule calls for ap-
pearances tomorrow afternoon
at the Fort Clayton Hospital;
Wednesday afternoon Army
field positions on the Atlantia
side and a show at 8:30 p.m. at
Fort Sherman.
Thursday afternoon the troupe
wlU visit the Atlantic side Naval
Hospital and give two shows at
the Coco Solo Naval Station that
evening at 7 and 8:30. Friday the
troupe will return to the Pacific
sMe and play two shows at Fort
Kobbe at 7 p.m. and 8:30 pm
Saturday night the Hillbillies
will climax their tour with a 7
p.m. and 8:30 p.m. show at Al-
brook Air Force Base in Hangar
3. The first show will be for ail
enlisted personnel on the Isth-
mus and the second show will bo
open to all officers, dependents
and government employes.



PAGE TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
...... rrsaamatiMagiaasS
MONDAY. OCTOBER ,
Cargo and Freight-Ships and PlanesArrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine News
KLM PUs Largest Shipment
of Horses Across the Atlantic
A few days ano a KLM plane
flew from Amsterdam' to New
York with the largest consign-
ment of horses ever to cross the
Atlantic by air. Seven valuable
racehorses (each worth about
2,400 pounds travelled In the
KLM. freight plane "Zeeland."
which had seven horse-boxes spe-
cially designed for this purpose
Installed in Its cabin.
'. On arrival at New York this
precious cargo was forwarded by
air to Sao Paulo. Brazil,
The horses, which are all de-
scended from famous thorough-
breds, were transported from Pa-
ris to Amsterdam by rail. With
the aid of>handfuls of hay and
lumps of sugar they were pre-
suadcd to board tr-* p'"" "f
Schiphol Airoort Pinre K I...M.
flrct enaased in this form of
transport six months aeo. the
Comoan" has already flown a
total of 34 rare horses.
r.race Line Ship
Transited Yesterday
Aboard the Santa Margarita
yesterday when it arrived in
IN THEIR PRIME
PLYMOUTH. Ind. Donald Calhoun changed his
classified ad in the Plymouth
Pilot-News when it brought
chuckles but no buyers The first
dav it read: "80 veir-old leghorn
hens for sale, still laving." Cal-
houn altered it to: "80 leghorn
hens, year old. still laying."
Cristobal from Valparaiso, Chile,
on its way to New York, were the
following prominent passengers:
Stanley M. Zolnier of Kodak
Co. with his family. Commander
Albert Coffin of the U.S. Naval
Mission to Chile with his family
and Bernardino Toro, manager
of the Sociedad Abastecedora de
Oleaginosas, of Chile.
Senator Turns Down
'Materials Booklet'
Request for Soviet
WASHINGTON, Oct. 15 (UP)
Sen. Burnet R. Maybank. D.,
S. C, and chairman of the Sen-
ate Bank'ng Committee, said
today he refused to furnish a
New York book shop wi'.h a
booklet on scarce materials It
attempted to buv for a Soviet
Economic institute in Moscow.
Mavbank said the document,
a printed, but heavily-edited,
record of closed hearings held
by his committee last December.
Is available only by permission
of the committee. The Govern-
ment Printing Office called
Mavbank when It received the
order from the Four Continent
Book Shop of 38 West 58th St.,
New York.
The order asked that a cooy
of the hearings be sent to the
Institute Ekonomlke, Akademll
Nauk SSR. Volchonka 14, Mos-
cow. 19. USSR.
"I'm not going to furnish
them with a-iv kind of a docu-
ment." Maybank declared.
LET US GET YOU
THERE IN A HURRY
By aaranginf your complete trip
by the most efficient route possible
Accredited
Travel
Agents
V
OYD MOTHERS, INC
De Lesseps Park
Tel. 2-2008, 2-2009
Members
IATA
ASTA
BARBER LINE
r
ACCEPTING PASSENGERS for
SAN FRANCISCO ',
BY
M.S. "TANCRED"
SAILING OCTOBER 18th.
(Every room with private bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Te!.: Cristbal 1781 Balboa 1065
MAERSK LINE
accepting passengers for
NEW YORK
BY
m.s. "GRETE MAERSK"
SAILING OCTOBER 20th.
(Every room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., Inc.
Tel. Cristbal 1781 Balboa 1065
TODA YS FIRE SAFETY FLASH
HOT-ROD HARRY
DOES THINK OF
HIS NECK...
YA SURE YA CHECKED
THOSE BRAKES, LEO?

BUT IF HE DOESNT v FTJIfT E^^^if
GET RID OF THAT Wh$^
STOGIE HE WONT '" \jr'
NEED ANY BRAKES... Afcg
EVER?
TIOMAl SOAIO Of MI UNOBWilTBU
l JACOIY ON i&jDg
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
WEST
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Opening lead? 9
When the national bridge
championship began in Wash-
ington, D. C. late in July, sev-
eral hundred residents o the
capital city dropped in to take
part In the one-session events.
One unusual partnership in
these non-champlonshlp events
was that of a Democratic con-
gressman playing with a Re-
publican congressman.
In the hand shown today, the
two congressmen earned a fine
score by bidding and making a
grand slam. There was nothing
to the play, since there were
at least 13 tricks In top cards,
but only one other pair was am-
bitious enough to bid for all the
tricks.
Aa a bridge player, I must
point out that the congression-
al bidding was not exactly in
the classic tradition. The other,
pair got to the grand slam In
more orthodox style. The first
two bids were the same, but
South's first rebid was a raise
to three diamonds. He knew
that his two honors in that suit
were bound to solidify North's
suit, and that the immediate
raise would tell the story as
nothing else could. He was right.
for his partner's very next bid
was seven no-trump.
Nevertheless, the congressmen
got to the right spot. When Con-
gressman Page Belcher (Rep.)
of Oklahoma, Jumped to four
no-trump, he Intended to Issue
a general slam Invitation. Con-
gressman Carl Albert (Dem.),
also of Oklahoma, accepted the
invitation in no uncertain way
'Fells PardaHs
Femeninus' 1952
Sought By 65th
The 85th Antiaircraft Artillery
Group, Fort Clayton, has begun
the search for a young lady to
act as Miss Ocelot of 1952. She
will be crowned at the Group
anniversary festivities, January
15.
Applications for the role of
Miss Ocelot of 1952 should be
forwarded to the 65th AAA Group
Public Relations Office, Fort
Clayton, prior to December 1. A
photo should be Included with
other vital statistics.
Miss Ocelot of 1952 will be se-
lected by a committee made up
of officers and enlisted men of
the group.
Since the 65th AAA Group now
owns a real Ocelot, this year's
Miss Ocelot will have lively com-
pany as she reigns over the
Group on Organization Day.
Miss Ocelot of 1951 was Ser-
geant Irene Pearman of the
7448th Army Unit, WAC, Fort
Clayton. She has since been dis-
charged from the Army.
The Ocelot Is a tradition hand-
ed dow nto the Group by the 65th
AAA Reglrisnt upon Its deactl-
vation in 1943. A live Ocelot was
the Regimental mascot and
shoulder patches with the figure
of an Ocelot were worn by all
personnel.
SILENCE IS NOT GOLDEN
by lumping to six no-trump this
an overbid. North naturally
went on to seven no-trump, ex-
pecting to find at least 19 tricks
In the hand.
As the play of the hand end-
ed, Congressman Belcher co-
mented wryly. "Wouldn't you
just know that there'd be a De-
mocrat diving overboard and
relying on a Republican to see
him through?" To which Con-
gressman Albert replied. "When
the smoke clears, you'll find a
Democrat playing the hand!"
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INDUSTRIES, S.A.
Phones:
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FRESH BUTTER
RICH ICE CREAM
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inspected by the'
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HOME DELIVERY
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ACCEPTING PASSENGERS for
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BY
M.S. "GRETE MAERSK"
SAILING OCTOBER 23rd.
(Evary room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
1fcl.i Crlatbal 1781 Balboa 1065
BOTTLE FEEDIXC AT TS BEST
There' no need to worry over
bottle-feeding if milk a modi-
fied with Robinson'* Patent'
Barley. Baby will than ditctt
it *o easily and deep
contentedly after
every feed:
M*k** fRf.CKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
'V.
HATHBONG
SPtNK.
OF THE
6GNCYOF
li GAMAtOl,
i GLBON
AND SPfNK. '
W*S ISS/A/&-
THKOU6H
SHADfSlOB
IN
OCTOBCK.
V OF
I*
Stranger In Town
I MERRILL BLOSM,
*? /*:
ALLEY OOP
Ods Are Against
t ?. t. n\mrn
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
Careful Now
BY EDGAR MARTI.'
wiv ttt\t-A>ao-vow{.*va'
NtV> IN50QMOBV '
OUK p, SVifc'fc MOOT* VWH
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CAPTAD) ASI
Diplomacy
n LESLm nRNEI
^* -


/ Iat, ^totP^nr'
82 Registered Voters, 82
Candidates In Ohio Village
BENTLBV1LL1, O., Oct. 15
(U.P.) Thit fall's election
Doses a problem here. There are
only 82 registered voters and all
82 are considered Unible for of-
fice that will be filled through
raarkmn blank ballots.
The law of the state of Ohio
reads, that each registered vot-
er Is eligible to hold office.
Therefore, since there aren't
any names appearing on the
ballot, and. a mayor must be el-
ected, each voter is eligible'for
the office. Names will be writ-
ten In. .
When the voters report to the
abandoned district schoolhouse
on November 8, they'll be con-
sidering the 82 candidates fbr
nine positions mayor, clerk,
treasurer and six councllmen
in the village of four square
miles, part of which is taken
up with a metropolitan park.
On the map there are eight
streets, but actually there are
only four, and all 40 families
live on these streets.
-"I'm too busy taking care of
TMUgn.". three-time Mayor Rich-
ard Hladlk said.
"This also happened back in
'<* and "29 when It was made
a village," Hladlk added, "but
then it was because election of-
ficials threw out the petitions
because each one was signed by
the same people.'.'
"I came to Bentleyvllle for
peacenot politics. I'd rather
work In my garden," said Mrs.
Faynetta Eggleeton, the village
treasurer.
Mrs. Julia Clerk, the clerk ad-
ded, "I wouldnt run for office
again. It isn't worth the trou-
ble."
In regard lo the mayor's Job,
It's a matter of foisting it on
someone," replied W. A. Griff-
horn.
..w'^0*1" 8tePhen Hriczo said,
hadnt given the election idea
much/thought. It rolls around
aorta quick."
"Hadn't gotten around to dis-
custo elections." R. o. Beat-
tle said, "but come to think of
it, a write-in election is more
democratic. No power machines."
< T?ei dtiIy greeting when Bent-
leyvllle people meet each other
in neighboring Chagrin Falls
J2wrVthey buy cocerles is,
JLlK\ how,sthe next mayor of
Bentleyvllle,"
.And the comeback usually Is
why, I'm not going to be may-
or, you arel"
The member of the former
council have given the same ex-
cuse that Hlkdik cave concern-
ing too much business pressure
but they're still runrunR for
office whether they like it or
not.-
Meanwhile, it's reported that
relations among Bentleyville's
citizenry is the most cordial it
has ever been, for no one knows
who's going, to be mayor.
'I Pledge Allegiance"
Insurance Policy Is
Put To Immediate Test
ROBINSON, 111. Oct. (UP) A
Farm Bureau insurance agent
told farmer Loren Clements,
"You can never tell when an ac-
cident will happen." "That sold
Clements and he signed a policy.
Clements walked.away across
his flld, hooked a truok to his
stalled tractor and started to pull
away..
The tractor overturned and 17-
year-old Grendal Staley, who was
rlidng it. was thrown off and suf-
fered a fracture of his right leg.
The ink was hardly dry on the
policy.
To Welcome Methodist
Superintendent Tonight
At Colon Trinity Church
COLON. Oct. 15 A public
welcome meeting will be held in
the Trinity Methodist Church to-
night for Rev. William Arm-
strong, new .superintendent for
the Methodist Churches.
Speakers will include ministers
of the various denominations of
the city and a representative of
the community.
Items will be rendered by the
choirs of Trinity and Ebeneser
churches.
Thli IHrl* girl in Brownie. She
in being taught to love our flag
and the freedom for which it
stands in these United States.
Many more youngsters like her
want to be Girl Scouts sometday.
Let's give them the chance!
The moat direct way to help
keep American traditions strong
and growing through the Girl
Scouts and other youth services
is to pledge your generous sup-
port in our united Red Feather
campaign.
Lady's 2-Diamond
BIRTHSTONE RING
rr
How T Hold
FALSE TEETH
More Firmly in Pface
Do your false teeth annoy and em-
barrass by slipping, dropping or wob-
bling when you eat. laugh or talk? Just
sprinale a little FASTEBTH on your
plates. This alkaline (non-acid) powder
holds false teeth more firmly and more
comfortably. No gummy, gooey, pasty
taste or feeling. Does not sour. Checks
"P">' odor" (denture breath). Get FAS-
TIETH today at any drug store.
iCi*1
s'
Choice of lovely simulated
birthstone enhanced by ?
glowing sidt diamonds.
PR\S

V3.S>.
S A L E !
-
remendous savings
on brand new
SUITS
We've been gelling suite right along at much higher
prices, but now we want you to take advantage of
these special prices to greet the coming holidays
with a brand new Suit I
\ NOW
r" 50.00 45.00 & 35.00 24 5
Fro- 30-00 & 25-00 2|.50
Frost 25-00 & 21-95 17-50
SLACKS
From 12.00 & 10 00
From 8-00 & 7.50
From 6 95 & 5 95
NOW
650
5.50
4-50
CASH SALES
ONLY!
"Quality Suits'*
PANAMA
34 Central Ave.
Santa Ana Plaza
COLON
Nth Street
Opp. P.R.R. Commissary
College Dormitories
Named After Alumni
PROVIDENCE. R.I. Oct. fUP)
Five new dormitories and two
older buildings on the Brown
University campus have been
named for prominent alumni.
Men honored with their names
on the new quadrangle buildings
were a clergyman and editor. Je-
remiah Lewis Dlman; Prof. Will-
iam Giles Ooddard; a former
cabinet member, William Learned
Marcy; former Secretary of
State Richard Olney; and Prof.
Brnas Sears.
Brunonla Hall has been re-
named Richardson Hall for a
former dean of the Brown Grad-
uate School. The former Psl Up-
sllon fraternity house has been
named Angel Hall in memory of
the late editor, diplomat and
eollege president."
iamiimit*dmmmmimamtmmU
ACOBi
CANASTA
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written lor NEA Service
If the opponents meld before
your side does, you and your
partner should be aware of the
advantage you may have if .the
right person melds for your side.
Sometimes It Is best if you
meld; and sometimes it is best
if you just play along and wait
for your partner to meld.
This Is not entirely a matter
of luck and guesswork. There is
a regular principle to follow In
this situation. It is up to you
to meld from your hand if your
partner has a better chance
than you to get the discard
pile later on.
However. If you have a better
chance to get the discard pile
than your partner does, it Is
tin to you to play along with-
out melding; and it is then up
to your partner to meld (if he
can).
Let's take an example or two
to see how this works out In
practice. Both sides need 50
points for the initial meM. and
nobody melds for two or three
rounds of play. Finally the play-
er at your right picks up the
discard pile (which, by this
time, contains about a dozen
cards) and melds four or five
cards. Should you meld at your
next turn, or should you wait
for your partner to meld?
It is up to you to meld at
once. The player at your right
holds more than 20 cards, and
should therefore be able to
chance to get the discard pile
no matter what you do.
Your partner is not oulte so
badly off, since a normal hand
Is discarding to him. Therefore,
let him keep his full hand; help
him by melding from your own
hand. -
r Let's try another case. Both
sldes need 90 points, and no-
body melds for some time. Pin-
ally, the player at your right
melds Joker-ace from his hand
and makes a safe discard. Is
It up to you or to your partner
to make the first meld for your
side?
It Is up to your partner. You
are now behind an eight-card
hand, so you have an improved
chance to get a useful discard.
Your partner is behind an el-
even-card hand, and Is not In
such a good spot to get the
pile.
Well try one more. Both sides
need 90 points, and nobody
melds for some time. Finally the
player at your right melds three
aces and three kings. Is It up
to you or up to your partner
to meld?
Neither one of you should
meld In this situation. If you
can spare a wild card without
giving up the count, discard It
to freeze the pack. Otherwise,
discard safely and hope that
your partner can freeze. The
meld advertises a good play for
out, but if his partner cannot
(or does not) cooperate, a freeze
will help you win a large pile
very soon.
Never neglect
a scratch!
BfTWBil
The tiniest injury can become in-
fected. Never take a chancel
USE
BAND-AID'
ADHESIVE BANDAGES
a*oa*unendd by mora doctora thaat
any ochar brand.
They come toyou sterilehelp keep
out dirt and germs. Mercurochrome
or tyro-thii-cin pad.
Have tome always near at hand.
ga auia.A.0 a taM. 1.1,1
S.L
0. K. BROTHER
THIS IS YOUR

LAST CHANCE

TO BUY
BUICKS

and
CHEVROLETS
*
at the OLD PRICE!
JACK WEIR
UNTIL NOVEMBER 1st.
WE WILL CONTINUE TO SELL
OFF FLOOR CANAL ZONE DELIVERY
BUICK Special 4-Door Sedan....$ 2,439]
BUICK Special RIVIERA.... 2,513l
BUICK Special Convertible Coupe 2,815.
BUICK Special Coupe...... 2,427.
BUICK Super 4 Door Sedan.... 2,678.
BUICK Super Sedanette...... 2,504.
CHEVROLET w m s*w... 1,969.
CHEVROLET m* do* seda.....1917.
CHEVROLET Deiu.eBei Ar.....2J97.

COMPARE these prices wilh ALL other Off-Floor Deliveries
DRIVE all other makes
-----------------
BUY BUICK CHEVROLET
u
YES...WE TAKE TRADE-INS!

SMOOT & PAREDES
BUICK CHEVROLET
We Sell THE BEST in USED CARS!


fc
E FOUR
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN 1NDE* >'OENT DAILt NEWSrAPEK
MONDAY. OCTOBER 15. lltl
THURSDAY I
TUX-CECILIA
\SIMULTANEO^,o ; T!ie youth .. Lie navor...
"The "magic of Caruso's ma-
ic era lives again In this
' greatest Metro Goldwyn -
Mayer production!...
America's
Hew
Singing
Sensation!

UGM,
"The Great
VARUS
TtaiMCOLOR
MARIOT "_ ANN
Lanza Blyth
DOROTHY JARMILA
KirstenNovotna
bjancheTHEBQM
i ru TERESA CELLI
Richard Hageman
Carl Benton Red
4 Distinguished
British Doctors
To Visii Panam
The British Legation has an-
nounced that a group of four in-
ternationally well-known British
specialists will visit the Republic
of Panama snd the Canal Zone
from Oct. 29th tu Nov. 1st.
The doctors, who are on a
ffooriwill tour of six Central and
South A.- 'ran countries, are
now in Br.izil. In addition to
Panama, .hey will also be visit-
ing Venezif'a, Guatemala, Mex-
ico and Cuba.
The group consists of:
Dr. T. Holmes Sellors, F.R.C.S.,
thoracic surgeon to the Middle-
ac:: Hospital, London.
Dr. A. L. I'irry Brown. M.B.D.A.,
anaesthetist to the London Hos
pital and 'he London Chest Hos-
P'tal- ~ ^
Dr. Francis Bach. M.D., D.
Phvs. MeJ.. physician to the
Rheumatic Unit. St. Stephen's
Hospital. Lcndon; Consultant in
Physical Medicine to the Nation-
al Health Service.
Dr. Thomas Ling. M.D., M.K.-
C P.. Medical Director of the Rof-
fey Park Rehabilitation Centre,
and Consultant Psychiatrist in
the National Health Service.
During their stay here, the four
doctors will be the guests of the
Medical Association of Panama
and the Canal Zone.
JOIN BROTHER
MUNCIE. Ind. Muncie man was jailed on an In-
toxication charge when he cal-
led at the city police station to
bail out his brother who was be-
ing Held for a similar offense.
Filmtown Shoptalk \Heat Scorches GOP's Gabrielson
Bv BEN COOK
HOLLYWOOD (U.P.) The
I gossip columnists are missing out
on one of the juicletst items of
the year. The new man in Jane
i Wyman's life is (Shh-h-h-U
* Charles Laughton.
She admires his brain.
The Academy Award winning
actress and the Academy Award
winning actor never had met un-
til they were cast in "The Blue
Veil,'' made by Jerry Wald and
Norman Krasna at RKO Radio.
But when I did meet him, it
was an experience." Miss Wyman
gushed. "He has a phenomenal
brain. He is the most learned
man I have ever met.
Gives One-Man Show
To sit and talk with him is
an intellectual bath. I learned-1
.more about acting from him In
110 days than I had learned be-
fore in 10 years."
Canal Clubhouses
[Panama
Showing Tonight
BALBOA
Mt-( ondltloned
iU Hit*.
Carv GRANT Jeanne CHAIN
"PEOPLE WILL TALK"
Tuesday "INSIDr: STRAIGHT"
DIABLO HTS.
1:15 ':"
Margaret FIELD Reed HADLEY
"A MODERN MARRIAGE'
Tueaday "S1NGIM. GINS"
r r\ r n I I R"i hayworth Larry parks
C ?,-C ?J- "Down To Earth" (Technicolor)
'" Tundsv THK BEWIKAD "d THE COWBOY"
(Tuesday)
G 4 1 U N
tm r M
"THE SOUND OF FURY"
,.inriBiT, Tyrone POWER Orson WELLES
MARGARITA prince 0f Foxes" (Technicolor)
SIS S.la Tuesday THE VNDKKWORI.il STORY"
rnirmoil E'io PINZA Janet LEIGH
CflgOMi STRICTLY DISHONORABLE"
*.'ft i i" Tuda> -imlde The Wall* of M* Fri-n
Prince
who was y
a THIEF

* yufs Senaduiil
TDwCURTIS
LAURIE
LUX THEATRE
( iiriCRI US-JwMlinil
CECILIA THEATRE
SUPER DOUBLE IN
COLORS!
They wanted to be-
come women before
time!
"TAKE CARE of
MY LITTLE
' GIRL"
with Jeanne Craln
- Also: -
"The Sword of
Montecristo"
George Montgomery
Paula Corday___
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air Conditioned
THE FIGHT
SADDLER VS. PEP
Pai O'Brien. In.
MARINE RAIDERS'
- Atoo: -
"SNOW WHITE"
TIVOLI THEATRE
James Cagney Virginia
Mayo, in
'STORY OF WEST POINT"
"ONLY THE VALIANT"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Victor Mature Hedy
Lamarr. in
'SAMSON AND DALILAH"
- Also: -
ISLE OP TABU"
An Attractive Show!
VICTORIA THEATRE
Tynne Power, in
RAWHIDE" Abo:
"ON THE RIVIERA"
with Danny Kaye
THURSDAY AT THE
CENTRAL
Paramount'* Hilarious
Successor To
uThePaleface"L
w&
IMLEMLL
The Release of this Pic-
ture is sponsored by the
Junior Chamber of Com-
merce of Panam. Who
will present at 9 p. m.
Thursday a Big Stage
Show of Variety.
When they first met to discuss
the script. Laughton took com-
plete charge. Jane sat spellbound
as Laughton analyzed each role
in the script. Including her own.
apparently oblivious to the fact
that she was in the room.
' "Then." said Jane, "ht gave
the most amazing performance I
have ever witnessed. He enacted
the entire screenplay without
once looking at the script. He
had memorized every line of
each role. He gave each line a
distinctive reading."
"The actress .aid that perfor-
mance gave her an Insight never
before experienced Into the
character of another human be-
lng.
"Then and there I knew I had
been privileged to meet and see
a great man and artist, but it was
not until the days began to pass,
one by one. that the'full reality
of the man's artistry dawned on
me.
"This realization hit when I
found myself before the cameras
using little tricks and devices he
had used in his one-man per-
formance of the script. He had
indoctrinated me subconscio-
usly."
Hamming It Up
Miss Wyman said she also
learned that Laughton's famed
"readings" are not reading at
all. He memorizes the book he is
to "read." then sets the book
before him to use as a "prop"
while performing.
"And he can be so terribly
cute." she sighed. "We had Just
finished a love scene on the sec-
ond day of the picture. He called
me aside and asked if I thought
he had hammed' it a little. I ad-
mitted he had. His eyes lighted
and his lips curled in a smile.
"He said. 'Well. Janey, that's
one way to get to do it over. It
isn't often they let me make love
in a picture'"
Following Boyle's

ignation
WASHINGTON, Oct. 15.(UP) Republican
demands for the scalp of GOP National Chairman
Guy George Gabrielson increased today amid specu-
lation that the resignation of Democratic Chairman
William M. Boyle, Jr., was not entirely voluntary.
Simultaneously, Sen. Richard M. Nixon, R.,
Calif., a member of a Senate subcommittee check-
ing into the RFC activities of Boyle and Gabrielson,
said Boyle's resignation will not halt the inquiry.
He predicted future disclosures will make those
to date "seem insignificant"
"The Boyle case already has produced many new
leads, indicating that a number of political figures
may have received fees in payment for their in-
fluence," Nixon said in a statement.
QdbyUdu
STARTING
THURSDAY!
The Whole BlazmoStor
or the Tri State Gam
slew wwHrfi mm
While asserting that the cir-
cumstances in Qabrielson's case
are far different, Nixon urged
the GOP chairman to step down
also so "this investigation can
continue without any false issues
being raised by those under in-
vestigation."
Several other Republi can
lawmakers also said Gabriel-
son should resign for the good
of his party. While It seemed
almost inevitable that Gabriel-
son too eventually will resign,
it was generally conceded he
will choose the time.
The question of whether Boyle
umped or was pushed was raised
after the White House clamped a
strict Information lid on all de-
velopments m the resignation.
Reportera who called the exe-
cutive mansion were told that
none of the three regular mem-
bers of the White House press
staff was receiving telephone
calls although one normally is on
call.
"That's orders." the switch-
board operator said.
In predicting a continuation of
the RFC inquiry, Nixon recalled
that Committee Chairman Clyde
R. Hoey. D.. N.C., had said pre-
viously that Boyle's resignaUon
would not stop the investigation.
Nixon predicted that "all the
facts will be disclosed."
Boyle's letter of resignation
was reelased by the White House
late Saturday without comment,
raising speculation that his re-
tirement was not entirely volun-
tary .
In such cases, the White House
normally issues an accompany-
ing statement or letter of accep-
tance by the President.
Boyle notified both Mr. Tru-
man and the National Commit-
tee he was stepping down because
of failing health. He said he will
call a meeting of the committee
soon to"choose his successor.
IN HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent
tioned for the post were New
York State Democratic Chair-
man Paul Fitzpatrlck. former
Secretary of the Navy John L.
Sullivan of New Hampshire, Se-
cretary of Labor Maurice J. To-
bin of Massachusetts and former
Democratic Sen. Francis J. My-
ers of Pennsylvania.
Mr. Truman will have the
final say, but Fitipatrick and
Sullivan appeared to have the
inside track.
Boyle, who has been accused
of "Influence peddling" on RFC
loans, asserted that he had con-
ducted himself with "honor and
propriety."
He expressed confidence he
will be cleared by the Senate In-
vesUgation Committee which
has been looking into his con-
nections with the American Lith-
ofold Corp. and Its $565,000 RFC
loans.
The committee is drafting a
report which is expected to level
some sharp criticism at the re-
tiring Democratic chief. Gabriel-
son also may come in for censure.
Republicans who had demand-
ed the resignation of both Boyle
and Gabrielson renewed their
war on the GOP chairman in the
wake of Boyle's action. Like
Boyle, Gabrielson has denied
charges that he used improper
Influence to get an extension of
RFC loans to the Carthage Hy-
drocol Co.. which he heads.
Rep. Patrick H. Hillings, R.,
Calif., one of 12 young Republi-
can Congressman who issued a
statement Oct. 3 calling on Ga-
brielson to step down, summed
up the position in which the GOP
now finds itself.
He said Boyle's resignation
"makes it imperative" that Ga-j
brielson quit, and gives "added
emphasis" to the Oct. S state-
ment.
While stressing that the Boyle-
Gabrielson cases are dissimilar.
HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Hol-
lywood's sUll smarting over Rab-
bi Edgard F. Magnin's theory
about curbing the rash of short-
lived Hollywood marriages. The
Rabbi hit the nail right on the
head with:
Marriage certificates are-not
Intended to be used like street-
car transfers."
oOo
A legal tempest Is brewing In
Nevada over Hollywood stars
who complete necessary resid-
ence and accept out-of-stat*
work before getting around to
filing for divorce. ,
The boys in the black roles in-
sist that Rita Hayworth mulllfled
her legal residence by rushing
to Hollywood to prepare for her
Columbia picture and will have to
start all over again as a Nevada
dweller before she can file her
divorce suit against Aly Khan.
The same legal point prompt-
ed Frank Sinatra to record, his
divorce action from Nancy before
taking off for the New York for
his TV show.
oOo
Danny Thomas, who hit the
TV jackpot when Hollywood
couldn't recognize his talents,
Just nlzled a long-term Warner
contract. He promised to think
about it again after he sees the
public's reaction W-hls Gus Kahn
role with Doris Day in "I'll See
You in My Dreams."
A week after Al Jolson's death,
It now can be told, Warners were
after Danny for a remake of
"The Jau Singer." He's still stal-
ling 'em.
It's wonderful to be rich. The
Bop Hopes are redecorating their
home. For a place to live while
painters swarm over the Hope
homestead, the comedian bought
the house next door.
Add the name of lanky, loose-
Jointed funnyman Gil Lamb to
the list of comedy birds who ara I
coming back to roost in Holly-
wood now that exhibitors are
screaming for lay-'em-in-the-
alsles movie fare.
Wowing audiences at Wilbur
Clark's lush Desert Inn at Las
Vegas, Gil told me that he'a
movie-town-bound to take up the
emoting career he dropped after
scoring in "The Fleet's In" and
other comedy hits of the early
'40's.
The Lam nose?
And the legend that Para-
mount decided %e had lost his
comedy sip after plastic surgeons
whittled down his beeser?
"It's not true," said Oil. "I
never worked with my nose, any-
how. I was careful about the
operaUon and I made rare that
they wouldn't make me beauti-
ful. I spent a fortune on plaster
casts just tp see how I'd look
with a new nose."
A Hollywood scenic postcard
arrived by airmail today from
Farley Graager and Shelley Win-
ters. The message: "Dear Er-
sklne. In Paris and who has
timo to buy French postcards?'/
oOo
Despite the lack of a will, then
will be no legal dispute over Ma-
ria Montez' estate. Her daughter]
and mother art well taken care J
of by insurance policies.
Among those prominently men- he said it must be clear that no
/
ofriors -telk aboirf- f buf-
HIERlURY
a-WAY CHOICII Mercury
offers a laving Toucli-O-
Matie Overdriveoptional al
extra costand ailent-eaae
standard transmission.
OFFICIAL U. $. A. WGISTIATI0N
FIGURES SHOW 92%
OF All MERCUIVS BUILT
STILL ON THE ROAD I
Here's the proof: Official regia-
tralion figures, in the most
recent annual reporting of all
ear* in service, (bow thai 92%
of all Mercuryt bulh are till in
registered operation. Here it
proof of durability through the
yearsand the 1951 Mercury it
the greatest of them alii
natnonal Party chairman has a
"conflict f Interests."
Sen. Homer E. Ferguson, R.,
Mich., said much the same thing
as soon-as he learned of Boyle's
move. Both partv chairmen, he
said, "should be like Caesar's wife
above suspicion."
Some Republicans said pri-
vately that GabrielsoaVs days
are numbered for one big poli-
tical reason the Democrats
cannot be allowed to say in the
1952 election* that they clean-
ed house and the Republicans
did not.
This is a political fact of life,
they said, regardless of how free
Gabrielson might be of any ac-
tual misconduct.
Rep. Kenneth B. Keating, R..
N.Y., another who signed 'the
GOP Oct. 3 statement, said the
Boyle and Gabrielson cases are
"entirely different, but I feel
that Gabrielson should resign
for the good of the party," Rep.
Glenn R. Davis. R.f Wis., agreed.
Others calling for Qabrielson's
resignation included Sen. John
J. Williams, R., Del., who first
told the Senate that the GOP
leader was trying to get the RFC
to extend terms of the Hydrocol
loan. He said it was wrong for
either National Chairman to "re-
present persons before govern-
ment agencies."
Boyle toldMr. Truman he plans
to take a three-month rest be-
fore announcing his future
plans.
The 49-year-old lawyer-politi-
cian And one-time Kansas City
policeman underwent abdominal
surgery in Septer.loer, 1950, to
correct an appen d e c t o m y.
Friends also said he suffers from
high blood pressure.
, A longtime friend of the Presi-
dent, he joined the national
committee as executive vice
chairman on a part-time basis on
Feb. 8. 1949.
He took over on a full-time sa-
laried basis on April 21.1949, and
was elected chairman Aug. 24,
1949, to succeed Attorney Gen-
eral J. Howard McGrath.
At one time,Sen. Clinton P.
Anderson. D., KM., had been
mentioned as Boyle's successor
when and if he stepped down.
That possibility just about dis-
appeared when It was disclosed
that Anderson was soliciting
funds for a "Truman Memorial
Library" and suggesting that
contributions deduct the gifts
from their Income tax. Mr. Tru-
man disavowed the scheme.
Susan Peters, now a TV star J
Is hatching plans to. return vf
Hollywood and follow In Ida Lu
plno's footsteps as a producer.
oOo. *
There's a howl coming up ova
the duet sung by Gary Cooper;
and Phil Harris in "Starlift." PhiJ
sings Ruby Raxsln's "Look Oul
Stranger, I'm a Texas Ranger'
and at every pause hi the lyriwl
Gary sings out a "Yep."
It may or not be in answer to
exhibitors' yowls for comedy
fare, but Eddie Bracken is riding
the crest of the wave in Holly-
wood with a three-picture con-j
tract at RKO and a two-a-yea
deal at Paramount..
And there's talk of star
him in a musical version of '
Galla had," the old Wayne Ma
hit, at Warners.
It's all baffling to Eddie, wr.
was Mr. Discouraged until
agreed to star for his old frleni
Preston Sturges in "Room 8eH
vice" at the Players.
"It was an explosion when th<
play opened," Eddie says. "Sud^
denly everybody wants m
Brother, I never realized thai
you have to get up at bat in How
lywood.
. "I thought I had talent and
Hollywood couldn't see it that!
was too bad. Now I know better.)
You have to keep proving your
talent."
oOo
Red faces in the sunset dept:
Greer Garson and Mickey Roon-
ey, top MGM boxoffice stars five
years ago, -are double-billed in
their current films on the first
run circuit.
oOo
Janet Leigh is the next star
due for an RKO billboard strin
tease. The ads for "Jet Pilot" will
be in the same peek-a-boo leaau
with. Jane Russell and Shelley
Winters.
American Society
Holds Business
Meeting Tuesday ]
The American Society an-
nounces a business meeting to bt
held tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. at
the Paamna Golf Club.
Members who have not recelv- i
ed their official notice of thij
meetin tare requested to accept
this as their notice. ,
It is believed that the meeting
will prove interesting to_thoi j
attending,
served.
Refreshments will bal
ACID INDIGESTION?
Here are the facts n
Eno relief for acid indigestion
Standard eauipaxot. ecassork sad trim illuiiialrd
a/a aotuect to cause without notice
When von buy a new car. chances are you want
assurance it will serve you- faithfully for a long time.
With Mercury you are surebacked by proof, not
claimsthat your Mercury is built to last for more
years than you may ever need. That's because every
Mercury is designed and built for your local driving
condition. And that meant extra strength,extra safety,
and unbeatable economy of operation and upkeep!
Acid Indigestion of a temporary
nature frequently occurs when the
acid-alkaline content in your gas-
tric tract (chemically known as
your normal pH) is out of balance.
Each teaspoonful of Eno con-
tains approximately four grains of
free Sodium Bicarbonato and fur-
nishes, in solution, approximately
fifty grains of complex Sodium Tar-
trates. These two very important
elements tend to restore your nor*
mal gastric pH. In addition, Eno
acts as a mild laxative. Thus Eno
fights acid indigestion in two ways:
it helps neutralize excess atomach I
acids, and furnishes mild taxation.
Don't wait until acid indigestic
hits. Get a bottle of Eno today :
quick flM. Used by millions.,
fix it at all druggists.
Ty rt--today-fflEHOIRY rV-ffie buy of yout life.1" TakeGood-Tasting
yU^a^^JMM
.


f
u
MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1981
THE PANAMA AMERICAN -
INDEPENDENT
NEW8PAP1
racific J^ocietu

Bo, I?: &&. 31 &/U 3521
DIPLOMATIC CORPS TO HONOR PRESIDENT
AND MR AROSEMENA AT BANQUET
Invitation! are being limited for a baaguet to be fiven
in honor of hii Excellency, the President of the Republic,
and Mrs. Alcibiades Arosemena on Thursday, October 18th,
at S:M p.m. by the Honorable Diplomatic Corpe accredited to
Panam and their ladles.
Chilean Ani'-aiisador Ii ,^
Host Por Cocktail Party *
Mr. Manuel Hidalgo Plaza; the
Ambassador of Chile to Panam,
was the host for a cocktail party
gven Saturday evening at the
nbassy ui honor of General
Gregorio B'squettt, the Chief of
the Air Forcea of Chile, and Gen-
eral George Gana, of the Chilean
Air Force, who arrived by plane
from Santiago Friday for a visit
to the Isthmus.
They are the guests here of
Brigadier General Emil C. Kiel,
the Commanding General of the
Caribbean Air Command.
Governor and Mrs. Newcomer
Return Today on S.S Ancn
The Governor of the Panam
Canal and Mrs. Francis K. New-
comer returned today from New
York on the S.S. Ancon, from of-
ficial visits to New York and
Washington, DC.
vrd*y by the Consul of Great
Britain in Panam and Mrs. Al-
exander Kcnry B. Hermann at
their resldrnce. These honored
at the buffet were the First Sec-
retary of the United States Em-
bassy and Mrs. Albert Garter and
the Attache to the United States
Embassy and Mrs. William V.
Caldwell.
'Mr. and Mrs. Philip W. Payne
Announce Birth of Son
Mr. and Mrs. Philip W. Payne
of the Paitilla Area, Panam
City, announce tr birth of
their first son, third child, at
Ban Fernando Clinic last night.
Mr. Payne Is th* "Time"
Magaiine burean chief for
Central America and northern
South America. He is currently
on an assignment in Caracas,
Venezuela, but makes his head-
quarters in Panam.
Sophomore Women of Junior
College to be Honored
The members of the Canal
Zone Collepe Club will give a tea
in honor of the Sophomore Wom-
en of the Canal Zone Junior Col-
lege, on October 20th, from 3:30
to 5:30 p.m. at the home of Mrs.
Lawrence Johnson of number 156
Quarry Road, Balboa Heights.
The hostesses who will assist
Mrs. Johnson will be Mrs. Frank
Naughton, chairman, Mrs. Subert
Turbyfill, Mrs. Harold Zlerten,
Mrs. Mable Andrews. Mrs. Wayne
Foscue, Mrs. Sigurd Esser, Mrs.
H. R, Johnson, Mrs. E. C. Jones,
Mrs. Wesley Townsend, Mrs. Wal-
ter Lindsay, Mrs. Amy Wright,
Mrs. Albert Kaska, Mrs. Delmer
Wltver, Mrs. George C. Lock-
ridge, Miss Dorothy Moody, Miss
Gladys Elkins, Miss Elolse Mon-
roe, Miss Mary Brlgham, Miss
Florence Peterson, Miss Eunice
MUavetz. Miss Hazel Matthews,
Miss Bernadlne Hanna, Miss
Halite Beavers and Miss Julia
Guense.
Bruce Ba teman Celebrates
12th Birthday
Miss Nancy Bateman was host-
ess at a party Saturday honor-
ing her brother, Bruce, on the
occasion o' his 12th birthday.
Bruce will oe remembered as one
of the members of the Little
League baseball team.
Those attending the birthday
party wen; Pedro Salas, Ralph
Leisy, Johnny Hamma, Danny
Winklosky, Billy Hatchett, Jim-
my Crowder, Richard Hayden,
Lem Kirkland, Harold Sorrell,
Bobby Barnes, Bobby Kielhofer,
Brent Borip. James Levallel,
John Bateman and Lewis Bate-
man.
merican Society of the Republic
of Panam will be held Tuesday
at 7:30 p.m. at the Panam Golf
Club. Refreshments will be serv-
ed.
Fletera are Hosts
For Cocktail Party
Mr. and Mrs. William DeNeale
Flster entertained Friday eve-
ning at their horoe in Bella Vista
with a cocktail party for a group
of their friends.
Costa Rican Ambassador
And Wife Have Guest
, Mrs. Maria del Carmen Chavez
Nez arrived recently by plane
from San Jos, for a visit with
the Ambassador of Costa Rica to
Panam and Mrs. Alfonso Guz-
man Len.
Consul of Great Britain and Wife
Entertain With Buffet Supper
A buffet supper was given Sat-
' i II i
Garden Group to Meet
At Morgan Greenhouse
The Garr.cn Group of the Bal-
boa Woman's Club will meet
Wednesday at 12:00 m. at the
Morgan Gieenhouse In Ancon.
Members attending are to bring
their luncnes and enjoy a social
hour followed by a talk on plants
by Mr. R .T. Nelson.
Gibllns to Live in Maryland
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh F. Glblin,
accompanied by their three chil-
dren will sail Friday on the S.S.
Ancon to make their home in
Baltimore, Maryland Mr. Glblin
has been employed with the Nav-
igation Division.
Mrs. Harold Rose Honored
With Gift Shower
Mrs. Helen Rae McDougall, of
Balboa, complimented Mrs. Har-
old Rose, of Oxnard, California,
with a gift shower at her home
Sunday afternoon.
Those attending were Mrs. L.
W. Hearn, mother of Mrs. Rose,
Mrs. Mary Nelson, Mrs. Ruth
Cherry, Mrs. Aurelia Jalmlson,
Mrs. Thelma Camby. Mrs. Kath-
erlne Hall, Mrs. Terry Glblin,
Mrs. Carol Kocner, Mrs. Kather-
lne Wilde, Mrs. Barbara O'Con-
ner. Mrs. Ann Dolan, Mrs. Fred-
die Wlrtz, Mrs. Laura Clinchard,
Mrs. Ann Rausis, Mrs. Adele Holt
and her daughter Ruth.
Mullers Honored
At Farewell Party
In farewell to Mr. and Mrs. Ar-
turo Muller. who are leaving soon
on a vacation trip to the United
States, Colonel and Mrs. Harry
D. Schelbla entertained with a
buffet sup;ier and card party re-
cently at their penthouse apart-
ment in P.inam City.
Card Party to Benefit
Malambo Orphanage
The Inter-American Women's
Club will sponsor a card party
and tea on Wednesday afternoon
at two o'clock, at the Union Club
for the benefit of the Malambo
Orphanage. Tickets are one dol-
lar per person. A children's style
show will be presented at five-
thirty o'clock.
Bridge Tournament to be Held
This Evening
The weekly duplicate bridge
tournament will be played this
evening in the Card Room of the
Hotel Tivoll at seven o'clock. New
members and visitors are wel-
come.
ISTHMIAN DATA
American Society to Hold
Meeting Tuesday Evening
A. general meeting of the A-
.*
NOTICE
All Members, of the Congregation Kol Shearith Israel
are hereby notified that an EXTRAORDINARY GEN-
ERAL MEETING will be held at the Community Hall
on Tuesday, October 16th, 1951 at 8:00 p.m. with the
purpose of considering several changes in the By-Laws.
RENE DE LIMA, Secretary
BEAUTY and COMFORT
IN RICH TROPICAL MAHOGANY
A college teacher asks: "Can't
you write something for parents
who try to discourage their
daughters from marrying young
men slmoly because the young
couple will have to start out by
living on a shoe string?
"I have heard well-to-do par-
ents brag about how little they
had when they started out and
then worry and fret over a
daughter who wanted to marry
a young man making a small sal-
ary.
"The mistake parents tend to
make, I think, is In comparing
what their daughter will have at
the beginning of marriage with
what they have after years of
effort. They seem to want their-
daughters to start out with what
theythe parentshave worked
years to achieve."
She Is right, of course. Even
though parents themselves start-
ed out with nothing, they often
hate to see their children marry
on little more than youth, health
and hope.
They don't seem to have the
faith in their children being able
to make a go of It that they had
in themselves. They want so ma-
ny material thlncs for their chil-
dren. Yet when they were young,
they too, were sure those things
were not Important at the start.
LOOK FOR THINGS OTHER
THAN POSITION
Actually parents would be wis-
er to worry over the character,
educational background and am-
bition of a young man. than over
the (ob he holds at the present
moment.
If he has character. Intelli-
gence and ambition, their daugh-
ter is getting a prise.
She should be made to feel she
is, too. instead of being discour-
aged or made to feel It Isn't right
for her to have to struggle along
while he Is making his way In
the world.
It is fine to be ambitious for
vour children, but not to the ex-
tent of not wanting them to take
any chances or expecting them to
start out with the things it usual-
ly takes years to gain.
HTLLSBORO. Tex. (U.P. A
"dollar for a nickel" plan of pay-
ing overtime parking tickets has
met with' considerable success
here. Motorists mav pay their
tickets with a nickel, instead of
$1. provided they drop it into a
parking meter at the city hall
within an hour after the ticket
is received.
FOR BRONCHITIS
COUGHS, COLDS
It's Triple Strength
Loosens Things Up
It's dilferenlIt taster In OCtlon
it's compounded on superior, medical
fact findings never before heard of
in this country.
dueklty's ConodioJ Mixturo tripit
itrangth) Is the name of this emot-
ing cough and cold prescription that
"oers like o flash" yet Is so pure and
free from harmful drugs that o child
son take it. .end tap coughing.
One llrtla sip end the Ordinary
cough It gone a few oooM and
that tough old hang on cough
hoard rto more If really won-
darful to watch he speedily bod
lingtnni cold ora put out Of busi-
ness.
Right owey that MgrHnen loosen;
up. .th* bronchial rmiingoi clear.,
you're on your toes ogoin. .happy end
breathing oslar. Gat o bottle of
Buck lay's Conodioi Mixture today.
i r -
^Mtlanlic ^ociet
AGE
12
MISS JEANINE NIX CROWNED FOOTBALL QUEEN
At a colorful ceremony In the beautifully decorated gym-
nasium of the Cristobal High School. Miss Jeanine Nix. lovely
young daughter of Mr. and Mis. Carl Nix of Gatun, was
crowned queen of the Football Frolic Saturday evening.
FOLLOWING THE MARRIAGE ON SATURDAY of Mr. and
Mrs. Elmer Bowles, above, Mrs. Bowles' parents. Mr. and
Mrs. C. O. Evans, tin, of Curundu, entertained at a large
- ---- inn. M". Bowles Is the former Miss Ernestina
Evans: Mr. Bowles is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Bowles
Ui WmUu., OHIO.
Today is
PROYIPES AKXIT TO TU* AvEME PAIty fOOP gfQUREtMTS
Gropo-Nuta Flakes, another one 7 varieties of aingla-asrving
of the delicious POST'S CKRR- packages keep the family hap-
ALS in the POST-TENS carton! py, from Grandad to Junior!
7 varieties
10 packageI
'Ps/-rjrjirs
Blue and gold, the school col-
ors, were the color motif for the
evening. The gymnasiumi had
been transfermed with stream-
ers In the two colors. The throne
was covered with blue velvet
and stood under a canopy form-
ed by the streamers.
The Varsity girls formed a
guard of honor for the queen and
her court and formed an aisle
with ribbons in the two shades,
through which they passed. The
girls were: Misses Mary Ann and
Alice Hannlgan, Margaret Ridge,
Nellie Holgerson, Edna Jenkins.
Nancy Karlger, Lois Scheidegg,
Arllne Lim, Ann Thomas and Ne-
dia Oliver.
The members of the Court and
their escorts preceded the Queen.
They were announced by James
Doyle. The attendants were Miss
Ardls Willoughby, Miss Dora
Welch, Miss Nancy Ramsey and
Miss Jacqueline Boyle. They wore
strapless, ballerina dresses and
carried nosegay bouquets made
of blue and yellow flowers. Miss
Ramsey and Miss Willoughby
wore blue lace dresses and Miss
Boyle and Miss Welch were in
gold net. They were escorted by
Messrs. Talmadge Salter, Dick
Reed. Robert Bailey and Walter
Kuhrt.
The crown was carried by Judy
Palumbo and she entered with
Donald Humphrey.
Miss Nix was escorted bv the
football captain, Mr. Paul Whit-
lock. She wore a strapless, balle-
rina dress of white net over taf-
feta and carried a sheaf of yel-
low calla Hiles and blue hydran-
geas.
The Captain placed the beau-
tiful floral crown upon the queen
and gave her a congratulatory
Box 195, (*U* D$lpkon, Q'tlmnSJl
and individual cakes ice- in ^
ange marked the children* pi
es.
The hostess was assisted'
Mrs. Ramon Vale, Mrs. H
Hankel, and Mrs. Raymond 1
trlcio.
The members attending were:
Mrs. Robert Berger. Miss Jean
Dough, Mrs. Willard Huffman
and Mrs. Max Welch.
Art Exhibit
at Hotel Washington
Miss B. Steurtevant Gardner,
of Balboa, is exhibiting oil and
water color paintings in the
lounge of the Hotel Washington.
The pictures will be on display
for the next two weeks.
The oils were hung at the
J.W.B. art exhibit In Balboa,
but the water colors are more
recent work.
These pictures may be purchas-
ed by Interested visitors.
kiss. Coach Luke Palumbo was
then called upon for a few re-
marks and he congratulated the
Queen also.
Following the coronation the
Queen and her court opened the
frolic by dancing the first dance.
Visitors Entertained at Luncheon
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Maher, who
arrived Sunday from New Or-
leans, were the luncheon guests
of Mr. and Mrs. William E. Ad-
ams at their Brazos Heights
home up on arrival.
Later in the afternoon they
crossed the Isthmus for a stay at
the Hotel El Panama and will
leave early In the week to conti-
nue their cruise.
Brother and Sister Celebrate
Birthday Anniversary
Orrln and Mary Clement, chil-
dren of Mr, and Mrs. Caleb Cle-
ment of Gatun. celebrated their
fourth and third birthdays with
a party and luncheon at the
home of their parents, Saturday
morning.
Games were played on the
lawn and the prizes were won by
Michael Williams. Andra Lee
Nash. Henry Shirk. Beverly
George, Donna Wertz and Frank
Townsend.
Each of the honorees had a
large birthday cake. Orrin's was
topped with a cowboy and had
four clown candles and Mary's
was centered with a doll with
little girl candles. Favors of bal-
loons attached to horns, crack-
ers and candy baskets were given
the guests.
The children who enjoyed the
njrnlng were: Sally and Beth
Smith, cousins of Cleveland,
Ohio, Frank and Cindy Town-
send of Balboa and Katherine
Games were played and",
prizes were won by Robbie Me*
Don Laiche and Pepo Vado,.
The young guests also tWr*
ed: Raymond Patricio, S
Mndez. Bobbie Meeks. H*gi
Guiot. Raymond and Allen'I
tricio. Mirlarrf-Marquez, Rosef,
ry Montgomery, Roale Vasal*
Butch and Joyce Wllkerson. %
and Papo Vale, Amelia Qusea
Janice and Don Laiche, T
Thompson. Bill Hankel. Nai
Antonsen. Jackie Demlco. Rut
Noll, Don Hemann, Paulette F
rest, Georglanne Miller. Arc
Lee, Karen Davidson. Lepnir
Ricardo. Helda Sanchez sssd
honoree's brothers, John sffld J
and sister, Jan.
Gatun Star Club Meeting
The Gatun Star Club will m
Tuesday at 7:30 pm. at the ho
of Mrs. Joseph Irving In Gaj
with Mrs. Fred Newhard as-
hostess.
Sorority Meeting
The Beta Chapter of the Beta
Sigma Phi Sorority met Friday
The rushees who were present
were: Mrs. Jerry Whyte. Mrs. H.
L. Kooiman and Miss Carolyn
Rockwell.
and Billy Egolf of Gamboa, with
Kitty and Jimmy Boggs. Helen
Marie George, Freddie Ann Ser-
geant. Kathy Pennington, aKte
Llnton, Judy Gray. Chris Poole,
Tommy Tobin, Bobby Thomas.
James Arnold Hudgins. Freddie
Newhard. Denny Me N a m e e.
Butch Pennington. Michael and
Larry Williams. Eric Daniels and
Gary Irving.
The adult guests included the
erandnarents. Mr. and Mrs.
Leon Egolf and Mrs. Alice Cle-
ment and the following uncle
and aunts, Mr. and Mrs. Wesley
Townsend. Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Egolf and Mrs. Lyman Smith.
Emblem Club Meeting .
The Cristobal Emblem Club*
52 will hold its regular so
meeting Tuesday, at 7:SB p.m-
the Elks Home.
The hostesses will be k
Margaret Muxtain, Mrs. Thel
Walnio and Mrs. Jean Sandert
Mrs. David Kaplan, one of j
active members of the club,
leaving to make her home in
States in the near future.
Jeffrey Hipson
Celebrates Fifth Anniversary
Captain and Mrs. John C. Hip-
son of Fort Gulick. arranged a
party at the Fort Gulick Officers
evening at the home of Mrs. Da- fiM, Saiurd4v_,tor their son Jef- Mrs. Rafael DeBoyria j
vld Coffey of Margarita. ffey on the occasion of his 5tfT to 5:0^^.'Dctooer 1%.
Duplicate Tonight
Duplicate bridge will be plaj
this evening at the Marges
Clubhouse. All Interested AtU
tic Side residents are cordlf
Invited to join the group.
The winners of last we
games were: North and
Mr. Julius LoeB and Mr.
Gibson; 2. Mrs. Garland
Miss Jeanne Doble; 3.
HA. Greene and Mr. Hei
Delgado.
"!
East and west. Mrs. 6H
McHan and Mrs. Sam Rowlyt
Mrs. J. A. Cunninghant!
Mrs. R. B. "Ward and tied fitl
place Mrs. Walter Skeisttr
with Mrs. James Scarboto
and Mrs. Joseph Catania;
Mrs. George Poole. Jr.
Silver Tea at Mrs. Dei
The ladies of the Brazos
cjjuntry Club are enter1
with a silver tea at the hi
blrthdav anniversary-
A Hallowe'en motif was used All members of the club, wi'
with an orange and black color j of members and friends of_i
scheme. A large birthday cake club are cordially invited to*
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Buy jour ticket for the monumental raffle of the Lions Club at Propaganda,
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AGE SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
'|*-|Tli
MONDAY. OCTOBER IS, 1151
You Sell em ... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICl
tfe. 4 Thrall At
em Mat!
MONKo DK I.ESSEPn
fiqn ae l.aaaeee
Hmm.
MORRISON'S
91*. 4 Feurth of July Avt.
Plieat :-'14l
BOTHA ARLTON
IMH Mlla'ai Ay.
rh.n. :h-cMb.
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
M. M Rat 121k Slrrrl
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
N. 57 "H" StreetPkMaBa
No. 11,17 Central At.Cola*.
Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobiles
OR SALE.Venetian blinds, set
for 12 fomily house end. Apt
0429-A. Frongipani Street, otter
12 noon.
OR SALE:One dimngroom table
comp-top. Six dmlngroom choirs
One Buffet, metal. 1515-D Akee
St. Bolbco. Telephone 2-2738.
JR SALE.Livmgroom furniture.
bobv stroller, Venetian blinds. ice-
cream mixer, olurtiinum rootser,
sttel pon, electric milk posteurlz-
-. girls bicycle and other items.
Jjs'c Arosemeno Avenue No. 88
TrTSALE
Real Enlate
3R SAL or LEASE: Property In
the city Of anoma consisting of
2.700 square meters land ond
concrete office and warehouse
building Principals only Aparta-
do 1293 Panam. _______
Help Wanted
Whatever used car you want to
buy or sell consult first with
Agencia Cosmos S. A. Automo-
bile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-4721.
Easy term. Opened oil day Sot-
urdays.
UICK an. CHIVROLIT
fricai Ue Fran.
$7.20 $I4.JS
IUT____far tkil me nth .nly
Wl WILL CONTINUI TO SILL
OFF FLOOR DILIVIRIIS
AT THI OLD PRICII
Her Buy New!
SMOOT PAREDES
Yaur BUICK CHEVROLET Dealer
MISCELLANEOUS
O* "ava e!rir.ktfl| problem?
Writ Altatioliti Anymua
x 2011 Anean. C. Z.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Save
$250.00
Laica camera with 1.5 lam
(mtt.ee $475.00 lietl
$244.50
International Jewelry
la!,, la. Hotel)
/ANTED:-English speaking maid
to live in. Light housework ond
katert of smoll child. Apptv Crow:
f:.-d Agencies No. 18. "J" street.
F.-ctrri 3 to 5 or 7 to 10 p. m.
WANTED:Cook to sleep in. seme
Fhrusawork. Must like children. Re-
,frences required House "455
L. P-cios Height-. Phor.e 3-1849.
FOR SALE:51 Dodge Coupe "Co-
ronet Diplomatic/' two tone and
white tires, mileage 3.500. For
information Inversiones Generales.
S. A. No. 38. Jos Francisco de
la Ossa Avenue.
FOR SALE:Seun. Proyectar Re-
ver 16 mm. flirt erice $325.00)
fer enly $255.00.
INTERNATIONAL JEWELRY INC.
edieinine. International Hotel1
FOR SALE: Bicycle ond various
mechanically good frames, one dol-
lar up. Seots, hondlebars, etc., dirt
cheap. H. T. Leisy, 4-479.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
'raining Starts
Tomorrow For Cirl
icout Instructors
! Training for Pacific District
irl Scout Leaders planned at
le -Girl Scout Adults round-up
I st Thursday morning is as fol-
"For inexperienced Brownie and
vit:rnediate Leaders, beginning
ue-c'i". from 8:30 to 10:"0 a in.
- the Balboa Girl Scout office
7 se sslons.
L, For all Leaders a program
* alls course in native arts and
aft*, conducted by volunteer
h'SKf, Mrs. W. N. Pence and
r.*. K. B. Roche Among the
aits will be. calabash work,
jt'.l work, palm mat work, mak-
er of "temblequea" and clay
e i. This three session course
111 be on Thursday morning,
ting October 18 from 8:30 to
,::0 a.m. at the Ancon Scout
toiise, Ancon Blvd.. Ancon.
FOR SALE: 1947 4-door Nosh
Ambassodor Sedan, excellent con-
dition. A" new tires, $1,100.
Phone 5-126.
FOR SALE- Light Pick-up truck.
0429-A Frangipani Street, ofter
1 2 noon.
Couple desires to rent vacation $trs.
Coll 87-3281, 7:30 o. m. tO'4:00
p. m.
Early inspection this year, replace
your shattered gloss by our new.
expert Mr. De Leon. Tropical Mo-
tors.
WANTED:To buy. house in Santa
Claro. Reply to Box 1620, Bolboo
giving location and price.
WANTED3 -way standing lamp.
good condition, coll office hours
Panama 2-2388.
I7. Physicians
*Attend Medical
I Tigresses in US
"Tire* physicians of the Health
artmen. of the Panam Ca-
' are at.ending medical eon-
rr ;ses in the United States or
i"- leave soon for such confer-
ices.
Col. Norman W. Elton. Chief of
ic Board of Health Laboratory
: Gorgas Hospital, will be in
hicato from about Oct. IS to 20.
e will attend a meeting of the
oilege of American Pathologlits
nd the American Society of Cli-
K-al Patho'oglsts. returning to
M Isthmus about Oct. 25. He
f Saturday by air
J t. Col. Horace W. 8hreck. As-
mt Ch'ef of the uve. Ear. Nose
nd Throat Service at Gorgas
r^eeting of the Academy of Op-
N 'mology and Otolaryngology
e '.eft the Isthmus Saturday by
ir and will return In about 19
4.
I*. Col. R. W. Sattherwalte.
h'.ef of tne Urology Section at
e-xas Hospital, will leave the
;t-mus aoout the first of No-
jriber for San Francisco. He will
t'nd a meeting of the Ameri-
m College of Surgeons there
c-n Nov. S to I and will return
) the Can"! Zone about Nov. 15.
nmnrroii i
BUSINESS MAN'S
. LUNCH .75
Celery Heart in Aspic
r Onmn Soup
VIENNA MEAT LOAF. Garni
French Frieel Tara
Bavarian Cabbage
Koll Jr. Batter Salad
Vanilla lee (ream
Coffee Tea Beer
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
P O N T I A C S
4 tor New York Delivery
I Beat ancua te increase I
< lar Lecal Delivery
A OLD Price
SAVE MONEY BUY NOW!
CIVA. S. A.
Yaur CADILLAC t> fONTIAC Dealer
Tel. 2-0870 Peaemi
FOR SALE: 1941 Ford De Luxe!
Csupe with 42 engine completely
overhauled. New radiator, battery,
water pumps, clutch, brokes duel
Manifold with twin carbo, 2 new
tires and 3 good, new paint ond
good upholstery, undercoated, spot-
light and radio. $450.00 os is.
Phone 88-658.
FOR SALE1950 Cadillac 4 Door
"62". 8.000 miles. Excellent
condition. Call Albrook 3203.
FOR SALE--Family cor 1946 Hud-
son Commodore, 4 door sedan low
mileage, economical, excellent con-
dition, priced low, terms. Phone
Albreok 4100 after 1600.
USEDCARS
wirii
NEW CAR PERFORMANCE
All Tyaet .a. Me.eli .
many ether*
1951 Chevrolet
1950 Fare!
1950 Stuoooike.
1950 Plymouth Convertible
1949 Mercury
1949 So.eeb.ke. Ceavorti.l.
1949 Far.
1949 Chevrolet
1949 Linela
1949 Buick
1947 FarJ
1947 Peck.,a
1947 OMamebne
1947 Peertiec
194. Chrysler
1940 Buick
AH Can Racene'rrienea' ana' law
arico).
10 Day Guarantee
Small Dawn Payment aV Easy Term
COLPAN MOTORS
Name Of Tea Bart U,.. Can
*ORD MERCURY LINCOLN
Oa Automobile Row
Tel. 2-IOJi 2-IOJB
USED CARS
L.r|.it Selection of
Maxell In Town....
ALL THOROUGHLY
RECONDITIONED
See and Carneare Oar Price!
CIVA. S. A.
Yaur CADILLAC V PONTIAC Dealer
Tel. 2-0870 Peaemi
FOR SALE:1949 Cadillac Convert-
ible, groys excellent condition, all
accessories. WAV tire, 27.000
miles. E. M. Cox. phone 380 Co-
co Solo. "Duty Paid" if desired
FOR SALE:1951 Pont.oe Coralino
Hvdromotic. W-S-W tire, Saturn
geld color, extras. Owner must
tall Phone 6-200 or write Box
195. Gamboa. C. 2.
MARTINIS MANHATTANS
HAIQUIRIS
4
to < DA
25
ON I HE HOUSE.
AFPETIZERS a la R.Hnlah.
Wanted Position
Competent cook-housekeeper desires
position with refined family or ba-
chelors. Is willing to travel. Please
write S. F. P. O. Box 129 Crirto-
WANTED TO BUY:-Electric grass
mower. 60 volts. Tef. 2-2359.
CZ Scouting
Early in 1S49, Jack P. Whitak-
er. Scout Commissioner of the
Kansas City Area Council, Boy
Scouts of America, conceived the
idea of maikng a copy of the
Statue of Liberty available for
the 40th Anniversary Crusade.
This beautiful copy of the or-
iginal Statue of Liberty is eight
feet, four inches tall from bacr
to torch. It is stamped out of
sheet coppeT and is braced and
cross-braced inside.
Through Whltaker'a efforts, a
copy of the Statue was donated
to the Canai Zone Council, Boy
Scouts of Air.erica, bv Mr .Morris
H. Hoffman of Kansas City, Mis-
souri.
For hi? v.ork In promoting the
erection of these replicas of the
Statue of Liberty in all 48 States
and U. S. territories and posses-
sions, Whitaker was awarded the
Silver Buffalo Award By the Na-
tional Council, Boy Scouts of A-
merica, at the annual meeting
held hi Chicago last May. The
Silver Buffalo is the highest
award made by the Boy Scouts
of America for outstanding serv-
ice to boyhood on a national lev-
el.
The Pacific District Advance-
ment Committee. Boy Scouts of
America, will hold a District
Board of I'.evlew, Tuesday. The
Board of i'ovl=w wll! be held at
the Scout office in the Balboa
Elementary School at 7:30 p.m.
Ebner stated.
All Pacific District Scouts and
Explorers who wish to apply for
either Sta: Scout. Life Scout or
Eagle Scout. Awards should be at
the Scout cilice, in uniform, and
with the official application for
the award.
Eagle Scout applicants must be
accompanied by their fathers.
"Friendliness and helpfulness
of campers from around the
world bridged the gap in lan-
guage and customs," Joan Baron
told 30 Gii i Scout adults at the
Girl Scout Council Round-up on
Thursday in Balboa, when speak-
ing of her experiences at the Girl
Scout World Camp as represen-
tative of ine Canal Zone this
summer.
Attending the meeting were
the following newly recruited
leaders: M-s. Glenn Doan and
Mrs. M. Handrlcks, of Brownie
Troop No .20, Albrook; Mrs. V.
Thompson cf Brownie Troop No.
15 Albroolr. Mrs. H. C. Simpson
and Mrs. Cf-.rmen Howe of Troop
No. 14. Diablo; Mrs. R. Motion of
Brownie Troop No. 25. Balboa;
Mrs. Stanley D Holbiook of Sen-
ior Troop No. 7. Curundu; Mrs.
Diana Clanton of Brownie Troop
No. 46. Clayton; Mrs. Barbara
Free of Brownie Troop No. 37.
Cocoll and Mrs J. 8pain of In-
termediate Troop No. 12, Gamboa.
Miss Mary L. Patton. director,
reminded the women present
that the Girl Scouts are a mem-
ber agency of the Community
Chest whose campaign for funds
starts tomorrow.
RESORTS
Phillip. Oceanside cottages, Santo
Clara. Box 435 Balboa. Phone
Ponamo 3-1877. Crijtobol 3-1673
William Santo Cloro Beach Cottage.
Two bedrooms. Frigidolre, Rock-
gas ranges. Bnlbou 2-3050.
CASINO SANTA CLARA:Cabin,
food, swimming. No reservations
necessary.
FOSTER: Cottages tor rent by
day, week or month between Santa
Clara and Rio Hato. Tel. 2-3142
or tee care taker.
Gramlich's Santa Clara beach-
cottages. Electric ice boxes, gas
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
DR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Vtodern tumished-unfurnijhad eport
ment. Contact office No. 8061. 10th
St. New Cristobal Phone 1386. Co-
FOR RENT:Available November 1,
De Luxe apartment with two bed-
rooms, two bathrooms, hot water,
servants quarters, garage, etc. Coll
3-2144.
FOR RENT
Flo uses
FOR RENT:Bello Visto, fully fur-
nished house: three bedrooms,
moid's quarters, garage, large en-
closed yard Attractive. newly
painted Ca.'l 43 No. 54. Tele-
phone: 3-3176 or 2-0980.
Women i
IVJ.
By GAY PAULEY
NEW YORK (U.P.) The
wedding ring, says O. M. Resen,
is a sure barometer of our times.
Resen, whose jewelry firm
makes wedding circles of all
kinds, said that when people
start tightening their money
belts, wedding rings are the first
to show the effects. They get
simpler and less expensive.
However, he said, "let money
flow freely...as It seems to be
now...and wedding rings get
more elaborate. Right now, our
fancy-engraved Jobs are in top
demand.'*
"Put us In a war." the ring-
maker added, "and everybody
getting married seems to want a
double-ring ceremony. At least
the brides do."
He thought maybe during war-
time women like to have their
husbands away from home con-
stantly reminded that they are
tied to the one-and-only.
Resen said ring designs get
more sentimental during a war.
One of his best sellers In World
War II was a fancy palladium
job with the words, "I love you,"
engraved on the circlet.
"Sailors bought them by the
thousands," he said.
Another wartime favorite is a
band made either In palladium,
gold or platinum. Miniature pla-
ques around the band carry the
inscription, "I thee wed."
Right now, Resen said, bride-
grooms favor either of two de-
signs. One features a heart,
pierced by an arrow, and set on
a wide band. It's called "Love on
the wing." The other, more el-
aborate one. has wedding bells
framed by orange blossoms. The
frame is of gold, the design of
palladium.
Growing In popularity, Resen
said. Is the "re-pledge ring with
service stripes." It's the ring a
husband gives the missus to show
that even after five or 10 years
of marriage he still loves her.
Its design Is a series of diamond-
studded strips set on a plain
band. The number of strips, or
stripes, depends on the number
of years of marriage.
Resen said there are two sec-
tions of the country where he
can't sell ornate wedding bands,
either to men or women. One is
New England, the other the deep
south. .
But he added, the more elabo-
rate the design, the better it
seems to please the men of the
southwest and the far west. One
poDular number is multi-faceted
with palladium-set diamonds
sprinkled around. Another bursts
forth with- bouquets of rubles.
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
Far
AUTOMOBILE
INSURANCE
SEE
V
OYD U0TNUS. INC
De lessen* Park
Tel: l-MOt -2H9
DON'T STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL.
VERTAGREEN
N| 3-Way Plant Food
it cheaper than water
foi rt~
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ave. ..Tel. 3-0140
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. S-1713
. 22 E 291 h St
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel El Panam
Wants to buy Stocks from
Panam Forest Products.
Preferred or Common.
Tels. 3-4719, 3-186
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM BUILT
Slipcover Reupholstery
VISIT OUR SHOW-ROOM!
Alberto Here*
J. P. ele la Otea 77 (Automobile Roar)
Free estmales Pickup Delivery
Tel. 3-4S28 8:M a.m. la 7:0* p.m.
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
TfWEa, SKRYrfrr
18 Tivoli Ave. Pan. 2-2006
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Where 100.000 People Meet
Presents
Tonday, Monday, Oct. IS
P.M.
3:30 Music for Monday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose8how
4:30What's Your FavorKe
6:00Lean Back and Listen
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Kellog's Program
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary,
(VOA)
8:15Plattei Parade tVOA)
8:45Youth Talks It Over
(VOA)
9:00Story UB.A. (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports Tune of Day and
News (VOA)
10:00The World At Your Win-
dow (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidnightJBlgn Off
A
6:
7:
8:
8:
8:
9:
9:
9:
10:
10:
11:
11
11:
12:
12:
12:
1:
1:
1:
2:
2:
2:
2:
3:
3:
3:
4
4
4
6:
6
7
7
7
8
8
8
9
9
Tomorrow, Tuesday, Oct. 18
.M.
00Sign On Alarm Clock
Club
30Morning Salon
15News (VOA)
30Crazy Quilt
45Hawaiian Harmonies
00News
15Sacred Heart Program
30As I See It
00News
05Off the Record
00News
05Off the Record
30Meet the Band
00News
05Luncheon Music
30Popular Music
00News
15Personality Parade
45Rhythm and Reason
00A Call From Lea Paul
15Date for Dancing
30Spirit of the Vikings
45Battle of the Bands
00All Star Concert Hall
15The Little Show
30Music for Tuesday
00Radio University
15Promenade Concert
30What's Your Favorite
00PANAMU8ICA STORY
TIME
15Evening Salon
00Ray's A Laugh (BBC)
30PABST SPORTS REVIEW
45Jam Session
00NEWS (VOA)
15What's On Your Mind
(VOA)
45Time for Business (VOA)
00Symphony Hall
30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
45Sports World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
00 HOTEL EL PANAMA
15Musical Interlude
30Variety Bandbox (BBC)
00The Owl's Nest
00Sign Off
Explanation of Symbols:
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp.
RDFRadiodiffusion Francalse
Red Feather Aid Enables Salvation
Army to Donate Food. Teach Blind
More than 1.000 pieces of
clothing were collected and dis-
tributed to the poor and needy
of the Isthmus last year by the
Salvation Army, one of the or-
ganizations which receives a
part of Community Chest funds.
Between June 20.1950 and June
20, 1951. 104 persons were given
weekly financial aid by the sec-
tional headquarters. At Christ-
mas time last year 320 parcels
were distributed and 600 chil-
dren were entertained at Christ-
mas parties. Approximately 172
homes are visited weekly.
The Salvation Army also oper-
ates the Panama School for the
Blind, at which sightless Individ-
pals are taught to read Braille
and to make belts, hats and oth-
er things. The Colon Soup Kit-
chen Is also operated by the Ar-
my.
Both of these units also re-
ceive financial and other aid
from the Community Chest.
Weekly classes conducted by
the Salvation Army emphasize
character bulldin gand are at-
tended by some 211 children.
Subjects such as temperance and
kindness to animals are includ-
ed The children are also taught
to do embroidery and other
crafts.
Weekly Home League meetings
also are conducted by the Salva-
tion Army. At these meetings In-
struction is given on child care,
home hints, domestic problems,
prevention and cure of disease.
Flexible South Snares Industry
From Conservative New England
COLUMBIA. S. C. Oct. 15
(UP)Director Charles N. Plow-
den of the State Research.
Planning and Development
Board said today a study of New
England's economy points up
South Carolina and the South'
attraction for new industry.
Commenting on a recent re-
port to President Truman on a
study of the economy of the
New England states, Plowden
said the advantages which are
enabling the South to draw
vast Investment away from other
areas are indirectly underscored.
He said the report shows that
the favorable labor situation in
the South is one of the major
reason's for Dixie's attraction
to industry.
The report said labor was not
onlv more plentiful In Southern
states but Is more readllv adapt-
able to new methods and new
machinery as well.
"Since World War I. New
England has lacked the steady
flow of new Industrial workers
from the farms or Immigrants,"
the report said.
"Consequently, the labor force
has tended to become old and
inflexible in Its working habits.
N.P' TODD- senior representative of Pan American
World Airways, exchanges Pan American's $100.00 donation
check with Mrs. Joyce 8ebastian. volunteer representative
of the Canal Zone Community Chest, for a "Red Feather"
which is the Community Chest's 8ymbol of Service. Pan
American World Airways donation is the first unsolicited
gift to this years campaign which started today
MUCHOS NMEROS Calculations recently 'co^ett'by
two Salvadorean cartographers at the Inter-American Geo-
detic Survey base at Balboa, took a sHeet of paper 24 feet
long for recording Shown, holding the lengthy record, are.
it 2. riRnt' Jose Aioer'o Gonzalez G., chief computer of
the Oficina de Cartografa y Geografa of El Salvador: na
assistant, Gustavo Adolpho Canas V.. and W. L. Newrta, chief
of the IAOS engineering services branch. The two Salva-
doreans were at work 13 weeks at the IAGS here, folnr
through a 13-weeks practical training cycle, with the espe-
cially designed mathematical calculators used by the IAGS.
The data they compiled will be used In mapping the city
?, San alvador ana 1* regarded as a substantial contribu-
tion to the IAG3 long time project of mapping the Western
______ Hemisphere.
Record Peacetime Spending
Bill Gets Senate Approval
"In the South, however, the
migration from farm to city has
kept labor more alert because
of the competition for available
jobs," the studv said.
Plowden said the report shows
that the South has eagerly gone
after new bulldlnga, new mach-
ines and new ways of working
while New England has resisted
them, not only In labor circles
but In management as well.
"But trade union leaders and
management have stressed to us
the unwillingness of workers
accustomed to given work-load
to adjust that work-load to new
technologies, even when greater
output mav not require greater
physical effort." the report: said
It said the South has "young
and aggressive managements,
with a labor force uninhibited
by traditional methods, with the
most modern plants, and with
Drospects and locations geared
to a *250-$300 billion national
economy."
Plowden said other southern
advantages brought out by the
report Included more favorable
tax structures, lower costs, bet-
ter access to markets and lm-,
proved educational training
methods, **
WASHINGTON. Oct. 15 (UP)
The Senate has completed
Congressional action on a record
peacetime ?56,939,568,030 military
spending bill which Includes a
billion doliars for a start on the
140-group Air Force.
The measure, passed by voice
vote .provides funds for the Ar-
my, Navy and Air Force In the
current fiscal year ending next
June 30. It was approved by the
House a week ago and now goes
to President Truman for signa-
ture.
The appioprlatlor. is about
$750,000,000 less than President
Truman requested, although the
Senate originally voted more
than he asked. The Senate bill
carried $5 000,000,000 for Air
Force expansion, from the pres-
ent 95 groups, but Senate-House
conferees trimmed It to $1,000,-
000,000 because the Defense De-
partment made no formal re-
quest for the fund.
The bill le the largest military
appropriation In any peace-time
year, and Congressional experts
estimate thj Administration will
request another $8,000,000,000 be-
fore next June as ine armed
forces continue their build-up.
The measure does not Include
combat costs of the Korean war
and Congress will be asked to
provide additional sums for that
conflict next year.
Sen. Joseph C. O'Mahoney, D,
Wyo., who steered the bill to pas
sage, was questioned during de-
bate about funds provided for re-
cruiting volunteers for the arm-
ed services, He admitted it la dif-
ficult to get volunteers because
"our manpower Is not particu-
larly Interested in going to Ko-
rea."
As drafted by the Senate-House
Conference Committee after
each chamber passed different
versions, the bill carries $20,600.-
000,000 for the Air Force: $19,-
800,000,000 for the Army; $15,800,-
000,000 for the Navy and $529,-
000.000 for tne office of Secretary
of Defense
The Senate originally voted
about $59 ii'0,.ooo,ooo and the
House $58,034,000,000.
In Insisting that the $5,000,-
000,000 Air Force fund be trim-
med. House conferees said the Air
Force still would have enough
funds to get started on the 140-
group air arm until further study
can be given to the program.
Rep. George Manon, D.. Tex.,
chairman of a House Military
Appropriations Subcommittee,
said another $5,000,oo,000 to
$10,000,000,000 "Inevitably" will b
required for the program.
Actually, not all of the $1.000,-
000,000 slated for alrpower ex-
palslon In the bill will go to the
Air Force for planning the 140
groups. The Navy will be given
part of the money to build up Its
air arm.
WANTED
i
Four Kardex cabinefs
> of 16 drawers
Call Panama 2-0860 extension 18
Everybody K&* Classified*


MONDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1951
anask
TOE PANAMA AMEK1CAN AN INDEPENDENT DAJLT NEWSPAPER
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWN.D NO eukl.aHSO 8T VHB PANAMA AMCRICAN 'Mil. INC.
rouNBto ar NELSON ouniivill in imi
HARMOOIO ARIA*. rniTOB
T. H Strut P. o. Box 134. nw. n or f
TiLIRMONl Panama NO. 9-0740 'B LINISI
CaBIS ADORM. I>ANAMIHICAN. PiNM
Colon ofici, 12 7 Cinirai avinui betwcen 17tm anb Htm iikiiti
FoaiiAN Ripaiiii-'iivii. JOSHUA S P&WIBS. INC
1 Hi MADIiriM AVC. Niw YORK. I 17 I N. V
LOCAl T HAIL
"" MONTH. IN 8 I 70 a.90
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W-lter WincheH
In New York
THE BROADWAY UNE
Eddie Cantor's dghtr Marilyn and Cuba's top teevy fcnius
Carlyle (that's hla only name) may five Daddy a surprise...
I.ana Turner's upcoming ex (Bob Topping) and model Ruth
Woods are on the N. Y.-Bermuda phones... F. Sinatra's ail-
ment floored him during a conference. He is not a well man...
Robert Preston, who was itemed as Percy Lee's next, has Join-
ed bis wife... The Peter Llnd Hayes-Mary Healy act is their
best yet. Show-stopping at the Waldorf... Georgette Dupont of
the French clan got a merger proposal from moTie actor Steve
Mitchell at Coa. Rouge... Marj Truman refused to appear in
a sketch (on Durante's toevy show) with the lad who imper-
sonates her father in the finale of "Call Me Madam." She will
not do anything political or be stooj for Washington comment.
Wm. Cagney's contract with Barbara Pay ton (before that brawl)
calls for $7,50 per film!
Labor News
And
(eminent
Harper's makes the season official with a scolding for crit-
ics. The crltlclsm-lsn't-cricket theme argues that they are ruin-
ing the theater. Tell that to Rodgers t Hammerstein... Fem-
inifiy Janls Paige (co-starring in "Remains to Be Seen." her
first B'way show) had only one week's stage experience before
making The Big Apple... Trade paper reviewers chucked poetry
at the film version of "Detective Story," In which Horace Mac-
Mahon and Lee Grant (of the stage hit shine again... The
upcoming film, "Angels in the Outfield." has the Pittsburgh
Pirates winning the pennant... A fantasy, of course.
The Peters Sisters, the hefty gal trio, are featured at the
Folies Bergere, Pare They'd like to come back home if they
could figure oat some way of paying their 1946 tax arrears. No
sympathy from the rest of us who pay on the line... The Taft
Hotel barber shop (where many well-knowns get beautified)
lest Its cashier (Ida Sherb), who had a sweet way about her.
Passed suddenly the other night... Teddy (No. 1 chair there)
is mending after 8 Big Scare... Bess Truman is delnged with
requests for invites to the Presidential reception for Princess
Elizabeth and Philip. Up to here In social climbers... Movies
must be getting better. MGM's junior veeps now have their own
penthouse eatery, with eight of them being served by five wait-
ers. -As a topper, the lighting in the room comes from lamps
covered with rose-colored glass!
If the scenarios are big-time, you need no stars. "The Well"
ana "The River" are a pair of film clicks without a Name in
them... The Chaplin-Coogan classic. "The Kid," is reprised at
The Museum of Modern Art on 53rd. After 30 years it retains
its gilt-edge entertainment value... Earl Wrlnghtson. the "At
Home" star (ABC-tv), started his CB8-radlo operettas on the
6th. He's been starred on every major network except NBC
where he was a page boy a decade ago... The next project by
Rodger & Hammerstein will be a musical version of "Trilby."
Have you bought your tickets yet?... Newsweek's movie man
said Capra and Crosby have been Involved in better films than
"Here Comes the Groom," and then hailed it as sure-fire en-
tertainment. What's better than surefire entertainment?... MGM
paid Danny Kaye $200.000 when it called off "Buck Finn." And
Mark Twain, who wrote the famed original, died broke.
Martha Raye tells chnms she invested in some oil wells
(1 miles south of St. Louis) and that they "came in" the
other night... When Georgle Price premiered on "The Big
Time* (CBS) the other eve it market his first program since
1932almost M years. Besides being prexy of the actors* vaude
union, be owns a brokerage In The Street... The hinterlands
appear Interested in Jndy Garland's Palace booking on the 16th.
The Minneapolis Star Trlb assigned confrere Will Jones to cov-
er the premiere perf... The Saturday Review of Literature
critic praised a novelist for using the Une: "He knew 27 lang-
uages and had very little to say in any of them." Thet line
was In the old song, "Jennie," in which Gertie Lawrence thrash-
ed: "In 27 languages- she couldn't say No!"
From TV Show for November: "TV can do much towards
providing a better understanding of good literature. A step in
this direction is the highly rated 'Mr. I. Maginatlon'. Let's hope
we will have more of this type of show"... Now look, fellas, the
show isn't on tv any more; the sponsor didn't renew and CBS
lust ain't bothering... The Boston Record's tv editor is named
Tony La Camera... There's a new fad at parties in Hollyburg.
They call it "The Psychiatry Game." One person leaves the room
and the others decide on what delusion he or she suffer un-
der. When the missing one returnshe asks questions and finds
out... The Broadway hits which give the Runyon Fund choice
tickets (to sell) enriched the fund by $280.000 to date. "South
Pacific' is responsible for'over $100.000 and "Guys and Dolls"
over $80,000... Muchas Gracias. Multo Obligado!
The Big Radio-Teevy debate revealed the following the other
day... Networks execs agreed that the antennas had cut heavi-
ly into many radio familiars... As high as 40% for nearly II
l\*m?-*ittlc2?n' "iou were 0,f the ,st-" W ABC's Pre-
sident Robert Kintner. "Two-and-a-half per cent"... Frank Stan-
ton, the CBS prexy. checked the Nielsen figures and memo'd "At
any rate, one thing Is certain. Your share-of-audience has not
5B558?l,"'?*nUTJ?Ter tB s *" ""* 1M8-4I you
had 43.t7e of the audience, whereas last season you had 416"
Oil I YOU fOtltm Wjj RtAOHS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
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I r.u t..tr*ui. Ian ,,, ^ IsapaMeat H Soasat asoaei tat
8 Sey. Letler. e>8 publr.... Hi. .,.., 888*8*' "^
MM, ., fan*. wrtNr. ..I. hi strictest co-...n..
o apewrbllitv fe> .i.i.m*T.t. M eeieieai
Tab
mi.*- in fetter. Iran rasters.
Mail Box
Dear sir:
OF BUSES AND BOOKS
Curundu Heights
Firs? if*!?! I'tiL*,1^ ""V1 Jnterest the articles on the library.
First of all I want to say there are many things In favor of the
present location. It is quiet, restful, spacious' and well equlnwd
The personnel employed are always gracious and helpful
-,.ii we> ?? very fortunate to have so close at hand such a
aoyTWursbneTeWlth "*** "* I *"^S$
i* s,nce the only problem seems to be transportation it seems
believe"?, heVT1 "J"1?.01 ana money S ^
Tanmn ^eniost central location on the Pacific Side. It is close
to Ancon, Balboa. Curundu. Albrook, and Clayton **
I think the Inconvenience Is caused by the bus routed The
u\UgSarn?wheKrerefUl"rly thlUgh CUrundU U < "nltent for E
annJttSbHuS 'i U wU*ed malnli 5* the malda who m order to
Curundu tag make a wriM *" **<* DO eventually reach
A.u'JR.ny of "" tono *VBl1 have tr,ed t 'hnilnate the tour through
iVM? n?hlJrii2.urn,wA0.?alboa durln* the dav- n< the Ancon
PJ? n*nl because di the locked gate.
___.AFJ99V. "ngement causes the children attending Balboa
chopta to miss many extra currlcular activities and the eve. social
affairs unless special chauffeur servlve is provided.
i.*,. !fia^,,lfi he S5nal '"c1*1- *'ho have more influence than an
individual woud try to have the Curundu bus pass the library at
regular intervals with the bus plainly marked
.k ., ,k /howed they didn't need the bus when they locked
the -ate at p. m and they thereby created a hardship for ouv
rh< .n and the adulU without cars. I think two very annoying
problems would and could be solved, that U, If anyone is interest
cO enough to try.
Always hopeful
By Victor Riesel
Along witli "fantastic wea-
pons" we're producing fantas-
tic unemployment.
So disturbed. are national CIO
chiefs over the unrest among
their jobless followers, and the
weakening of their organiza-
tions, that they have been ap-
pealing personally to President
Truman to help save whole sec-
tions of their Industries from
actual bankruptcy.
In a recent private talk with
the President, who has never
been more sympathetic nor clos-
er to the CIO than he is now,
one CIO leader outlined a ma-
jor, multi-million dollar pro-
ject, reminiscent of now almost
forgotten WPA days, to revive
the clothing industry.
Mr. Truman's guest -that af-
ternoon was the soft-voiced-
Vandyke-bearded Jack Potofs-
ky, Sidney Sidney Hillman's
successor, now facing collapse
of the men's clothing industry.
Potof8ky's project; called for
reclothlng the freezing Korean
cvlllan population, whose Geth-
semane has left them almost
naked in the face of an evil
oncoming winter.
Mr. Potofsky, leader of the
Amalgamated Clothing
Workers' Union, would have
the V. S. government pay
for this clothing which would
be sewn in idle and almost
bankrupt American shops.
Mr. Truman immediatey ar-
ranged for the CIO chief to
confer with Defense Secretary
Lovetta meeting to which Po-
tofsky went remembering that
81dney Hlllman once prevailed
on Franklin Delano Roosevelt
to purchase $10.000,000 worth of
new clothing for needy relief
clients and .WPA workers. That
saved the industry and the
union.
After talking with Lovett, Un-
der-Secretary Archie Alexander
and their liaison with the
Quartermaster Corps, the CIO
leader came away with the pro-
mise that plans would be de-
veloped for Defense Dept. pur-
chases to revive the clothing
industry.
It was also promised that a
Federal or Liilted Nations a-
gency would be sought to make
the purchases for what was left
of Korea's blitzed humanity.
Understand what's happened
to the men's clothing Industry
and you know why, in the
midst of plenty, there are now
1.600,000 Jobless and why there
soon will be over 2.100,000 out
out of work across the land.
The clothing industry is no
longer a high prioe industry. A
new suit brings just a few dol-
lars more today than In past
years. And prices will go even
lower next Spring.
It's just that millions of young
men are no longer buying suits;
Uncle Sam's giving them the
pants with coat to match.
And the families of millions at
home are paying more for food
and other necessities, leaving
little for clothes.
AH this is hitting the CIO
harder than anyone fn its
high command will admit
or perhaps realizes. The
bigger the unions, the hard'
er they're hit. Auto Union
leader Walter Reuther has
been speaking all over De-
troit, trying to calm his
men. who are being provok-
ed into angered attacks on
him and the government by
undercover leftists.
But the odds are against the
red-head, whirling though he is.
It can be revealed that .despite
the huge military appropria-
tion less than 11 per cent
of the Arsenal City's factory
workers were in plants with
war orders when I passed
through a few weeks ago. And
this Includes all sorts of tool
and metal work.
Actually, less than 7 per cent
of Reuther s Auto Union follow-
ers are on war work.
Result is that within a few
weeks there will be 95,000 Job-
less in the city whl:h is third
in manufacturing in this coun-
tryand which has one out of
every 20 American factory work-
ers.
// will get worse. By early
next year there'll be 125,-
000 looking for any sort of
job. And as soon as the gov-
ernment take: enowh me-
tal from Detroit for other
war work, in other cities,
and as soon as higher liv-
ino costs convince more fa-
milies to go in for fewer
luxuries. Detroit will drop
below the 4,400,000 automo-
biles-a-year line.
Then, the Auto City may
have as many as 200.000 un-
employed, or about one out of
every five CIO union members.
Another CIO chief who has
aoppaled to the President is
Emil Rieve, Textile Union lead-
er.
Mr. Truman was told, In
Rleve's characteristically out-
spoken style, that only a series
of heavy government textile
orders now would save whole
sections of the industry.
. Rieve, too, saw Defense Se-
cretary Lovett, who promised
that the government would
move fast. Now the Defense
Dept. is asking for bids on 30,-
000.000 yards of cloth.
All this will help for a while.
But what happens when pea?e
breaks out, as It must and
should, sooner or later
(Copyrtpftt iJSf Post-Ball
Syndicate, Inc.)
PAGE SEVEalt
^nily WSHINGTOH
MERRY-GO-ROND
y BMW PEARSON
Dressing Down
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK. Fellow named Perkins Bailey
has Just come up with some conversation on
what the men will be wearing 1,000 years hence,
and bne sentence especially intrigues me. We
will have at it in a minute.
Mr. Bailey is the he-fashion editor for a
couple of magazines, Look, I believe, and its
stunted brother, Quick.
He also designed the gentlemen's wear for
a new movie called, "The Day the Earth Stood
Still," having to do with what happens when
the Martins scramble out of a flying saucer.
This would make him an expert, but since
I am inclined to be dubious about what necktie
I am wearing next Tuesday, if there is a next
Tuesday, I can't quite reckon with what occult
power keeps people, hep about the next up-
coming thousands annums.
Brother Ballev figure that the gents' fit-
tings of the future will be the ultimate in sim-
plicity, "reduced to the basic common denomin-
ator."
I suppose by that he means any of us who're
left will probably be running around raw, or
at beat accouttered In a G-string.
That seems to make some sense, because there
are bound to be a few simple pygmies, Austra-
lian bushmen and the odd cannibal left when
civilization has rid us of Rogers Peet, Christian
Dior, and each other.
Our expert figures we have become a more
realistic world, and that clothes are always an
expression of people's way of thinking.
If this be true I do not have to wait until
2951 to describe the national costume. It will
consist of a pair of patched pants, a fraved
shirt, shoes with cardboard in lieu of leather
for the soles, and no watch in the pocket. No
wallet, either.
Actually, I despair of the efforts to reform
the male animal in terms of clothing.
Each tribe has figured out what best becomes
it and is pretty apt to stick with it.
The advertising man is lost without the
Brooks Bros, grav flannel, black knit tie. and
button-down shirt.
The Australian abbo thinks that nothing at
all is an ideal costume.
My old African skinner, Katunga, was a sym-
phony in ragged khaki shorts, a secondhand
sweater that reached his knees, and a toothless
grin.
If we had any sense at all we would wear
shorts and docked-sleeved shirts in the sum-
mer in cities, but we save this array for the
beaches and mountains, where it's cool.
Where it's hot we still stick to the necktie,
the double-breasted blue, and the choker collar.
If you sauntered down Fifth Ave. in a pair
of sensible walking shorts the cops would grab
you as indecent, but if you go to the resorts
the dames show up buck-nekkid in Bikinis and
the guys are simply clad in a breechclout.
The male has always figured out some way
to torture himself.
If it Is not a stiff collar and a necktie it was
a ruffled neck-cloth, a powdered wig. or. in the
case of savages, filed teeth and self-inflicted
scars to make him pretty.
You cannot change him, once his mind is
made up, because the man. not the woman, is
the real slave to fashion.
You will see the dames parade publicly in
awful-awfuls or dress and decoration that would
make a man recoil in horror.
In New York they take away your citizenship
If you wear brown shoes at night, which is one
reason I may be deported back to North Caro-
lina, where they don't care what color the
shoon are. or even if you have 'em.
The double-breasted blue has become the sym-
bol of self-respect, although it attracts lint,
dog hairs, and stray wisps of illegal blond locks.
It is. with us for at least half of the next
thousand years, for sure, despite the efforts of
Hollywood and the, he-fashlonists to change
over to something more violent In color and
design.
The male of the species 1 real sot in his
ways, as any wife who ever gave away on an-
cient husbandly garment can tell you.
Sell the sofa honey, but leave that tattered
tweed, that battered hat. alone.
Drew Pearson soys: Southern solons squabble over taxes;
Senator George bitterly opposes increases; Toft-Eisen-
hower maneuvers engage GOP forces.
atesWnefe^1Sfolntmheead,li^,e M ** Congressional deb-
adulMn'th. -: '. dwbae a"ectln$- the rwketbook o eveiy
tfl. .!? e nation took plac* ^tween confeiees from the Se-
mfttd Ver taxe*- Newsmen and the public were not ad- j
-H .Ih chief debates were two distinguished and highly respectr"
tnri uie,mn.i.rr0In fe! South-Sen. Walter F. George of Oeorgi*
and Rep. Bob Doughton oi North Carolina. *
usiy dlaTgVee specto they are *** hut on taxes they vigor-
n. ?.re elderlyGeorge 73 and Doughton 88.
fvnturl Xe sevecLm Con8reM for a largj part of the 20U* '
CenturyGeorge for 29 years, Dougton 40 yeai
i, i255? irom rural backgrounds, though George of Uta
amonngUh5emendsme f ^ natin"8 CapU1S 0 hlgh lnanc^
mD>.,U:h0^ des^lte nls age' hM lon* bwn the first Congress*"'
stn?J EhJS? ln the mo_rnln He used to open his of flea *
by getVngVworV^ oTm"' ^ ^ **** he "promised
miPmSLJL*!?* Carna, Doughton used to ride a big white
SfftffSSuJS 'mMuU,neyalB0b^t,n8 "*". -& ft
OS FJS&Z B,ob 5*S been hls most stubborn opponent in try-
m bill loopholes in the Senate's so-called "Millionaires-
.,, .v "CCS! CUTS! CUTS!"
*1'01 fhe Senate: amendments are for tax relief in one form
JL11,"'' Srumbled the big North Carolinian at one stormy
committee session, "Cuts!cuts!cuts'"
h.ia'Jiiet^ehdHnt."kTe uior uxtten bUhons m new taxes to
Balance the budget, Doughton continued, aiming his remark
can get by with only $5.4 billion cf the new taxes Is beyond m""
n?6^'^"8"" o W bu** is the maximum our eco-
nomy can stand," argued Senator George.
"If you tax business any more you will cunail production and
destroy the incentive of free enterprise "
"Cuts!cuts!cuts!" roared Doughtor
guage you fellows know."
Rep. John Dlngell of Detroit supported Doughton
"For every dollar the Senate bill saves in i lose ten dollars ln the resulting depreciation of our currency "
Dingell argued. -A
"Taxes don't hurt the people when their aollars have a high
purchasing power," continued the Detrolter. J
"It's when their dollars depreciate that thev feel the taxJ
pinch, worst Yet this Senate bill would create more Inflation by
deficit spending and adding to the National DeDt. For we'll slmnlv
hove to borrow money to meet expenses instead of raising it by-
Doughton. "That s the only Ian-
Matter Of Fact
By JOSEPH ALS0P

SIZE OF THE SWAG


An envenomed struggle is now going on in the
White House for the chairmanship of the Fed-
eral Power Commission, Just vacated by the
President's poker crony, former Gov. Mon C.
Wallgren of Washlngtbn.
Wallgren, wbo turned the power commission
over to the industries it is supposed to regul-
ate, wants his tradition carried on by Irvin
Hoff, a member of his own West Coast crowd
now serving in the office of the Washington
Senator, Warren Magnuson.
The man who captured the power commis-
sion for the natural gas producers. Sen. Robert
S. Kerr of Oklahoma, and the brains of the
Kerr faction on the commission. Nelson Lee
Smith, are backing William Tarver.
Tarver is an official of the Defense Petrol-
eum Administration who Is both reliably symp-
athetic to the oil and natural gas people, and
so discreetly obscure that his nomination will
pass unnoticed.
Meanwhile the few people ln the government
who still believe the President meant what he
said about the Fair Deal are struggling to per-
suade Truman to select what might be called
an antl-Wallgren, anti-Kerr nominee.
They are being obstructed, of course, by the
usual inhabitanst of the White House wood-
work. But the President, also as usual when-
ever the issues are made clear to him. is said
to be leaning the right way.
The Immensity of the stakes in this contest
for a Federal Job few Americans have ever
heard of. can best be gauged by the stakes
that have changed hands already.
"I hear a lot of these big corporation directors say that the *
hats Communism, but they apparently don't hate It enough !
C U*m SOmf eitra taxe6 t0 keeP ur Government solvent" ;
Neither Doughton nor Dingell, however, could move George* '
HiyiS 20use. cnierees in effect that they could argue
unti they were blue in the face without changing his position.-
X fiT* t?.,ay furthermore," the Senator added wlthan icV-...
Klare at Doughton, "that this is the iast tax bill I'll bring Si u2-
less we get into an all-out war." ^?.
ttaSriTm:V,alIy JSJ lhe duty of the House of Represent--
in ,iLto.nLt,nte,?r iln&ta U5 fcfUtatton. The Senati passes '
on the tax bill after the House adopts It T
George, as chairman of the Senate Finance Committee. ca*
exercise powerful Influence over any tax bill, but its doubtfti
if he could block one altogether. *
TAFT VS. EISENHOWER V
,. ? MBe*versA secret strategy meeting of Taft-for-Pre-,.
sident leaders was held in Washington last Thursday night Prji
sent was John Hamilton, the Kansas-born OOP chairman for Alf 1
London who now works for oilman Joe Pew ln Philadelphia; also !
i art s cousin, Dave Ingalls, who was assistant Secretary of War
ln the Hoover Administration. .
Ingalls, who has been scouring the 48 states for Taft deleg-"
ates, reported to the meeting that if the convention were held '
today. Taft would pull 500 of the 600 GOP delegates -
Others present were more conservative, estimated Taft'a '"
strength nearer 350.
Ingalls also announced that the onlv thrept to Taft was Ki-
senhower, but that GOP leaders figure he will not make a suf- "
tlcianUyaggressive fight to get nomlanted.
NOTEDuring the session, merchant-inanufacturer Tom* '
Cowman, chief Taft leader in Wisconsin, telephoned in from
Manlson that he never expected to get Cyrus Phillips, GOP na- i
tional eommitteeman and head of Union Refiigerator Cars to*'
sign the Taft pledge, but Phillips finally did so to support John .
Hamilton.
.v. .Efe*5h,w.f.r M*>"veraAnti-Taft forces sensing the danger
that.Taft.will definitely pledge OOP leaders before they know
whether Elsenhower is available, have now decided to take the
bit in their teeth.
.They..wU1 D,ut out *" announcement fairly soon that Sen. J.
Duff of Pennsylvania will head the Eisenhower forces
Following this, they expect to get a personal statement from
(he general around Christmas time, possibly before. He will state
that he will be avaUable for the GOP nomination.
Reason for the early appointment of Jim Duff as Eisenhow-
er leader is the current hemmlng-and-hawing among the gen-
eral's supporters. B
As between genial ex-Senator Harry Darby of Kansas, Gov-
ernor Tom Dewey, and Senator Duff, no one has known who was
boss.
(Copyright, 1951, By The Be!I Syndicate. Inc.)
As soon as Wallgren was named chairman of
the Federal Power Commission, he enacted bv
simple administrative ruling Sen. Kerr'a hill
to free natural gas producers from commis-
sion regulation, which the President had Just
vetoed.
This was in the case of the giant Phillips
Petroleum Company, with its total gas reserves
of 14 trillion cubic feet, and its contracts with
five maior pipeline companies distributing gas
fuel to homes and Industries all across the
nation.
The effeet of the Wallgren ruling, of course.
was to permit the Increased gas prices being
demanded by Phillips.
In his minority opinion. Power Commissioner
Thomas Buchanan estimated that these gas
price Increases would cost the customers of tart
one pipeline company, the Michigan-Wisconsin,
a total of $5,000.000 annually, or $125,000000
for the life of the contract.
For the people of Detroit alone, the bill was
put at $1.770.000 a year.
Former Power Commission Chairman Leland
Olds has also estimated that the price Increases
,alsed,,A, value of the natural gas reserves of
ffij rajlg Company alone by no less than
$700.000,000.
The author of the Phillips memorandum re-
marked that "if the 100 wells (on the Tascosa
acreage) were drilled In the normal manner."
these handsome profits would be "kept with-
in the Phillips Petroleum Company." This seem-
ed to puzzle the poor man.
Meanwhile the Phillips case also has still
larger meanings for the future.
i The. "Integrated" Pipeline companies, includ-
ing Panhandle Eastern, employing as counsel
John Scott, an ex-law office associate of De-
mocratic National Chairman William Bovle.
have now come before the Federal Power As-
sociation.
These companies own their own gas wells as
well as pipelines. They lsay "If Phillips can
charge whatever the traffic will bear for gas
at the wellhead, why can't we?"
The question seems logical. But if it Is an-
swer in the affirmative, the chances are that
this, will be the entering wedge for a return
to the Harding era standard of "fair value" for
natural gas rate-making.
If this happens, ln turn, it will also be the
entering wedge for abandonment of the great
Louis D. Brandei's standard of "prudent invest-
ment" for electric power rate-making.
Thus the process that began with Mon C.
Wallgren can end. not with a mere additional
annual bill of a couple of hundred millions for
.natural gas consumers, but an additional bill
of maybe $1.000.000.000 or more for electricity
users.
Such are the stake, such Is the background of
the contest ln the White House, which makes
any R. F. C. Influence peddling downright timid
by contrast.
(Copyright. 19*1. New York Herald Tribune
Inc.)
Silent Screen Star
HOEITONTAJL
lDsplcbMf
silent screen
star,------
RawUnson
t He new is
tTlCAL
1 Fealty
aCUek beetle
I Plexus
4 The soul
5 Volcano
1$ Esters of oleic SBambooiike
add -grasa
14 Smells 7 Former
15 Entangle Russian ruler
18 Approaches lower
IS Novel ,PW notice
19 Goddess of 10 Finished
infatuation 11 Peaceful
20Guinea rush "City h New
21 Compass Point,.^
Ir-poctor Mhln.part
gonor.l (ab.)
24 Therefore
27 Crazy (8lang)
10 Chief priest of
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42 Gems
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.


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----PAGE EIGHT
fHE PANAMA AMERICAN m AN INDEPENDENT DAII.T NEWSPAPER
MONDAY. OCTOBER 15. Ml
Grid Favorites Play True To Form Over Weekend
Only One Team Of Top 10
Loses; Four Others Close
By Unirsd Press
NEW YORK, Oct. 15.There were more calls
than upsets this weekend. Only one of the top ten
teams in the United Press coaches ratings went down
to defeat, but four others came dangerously close.
SUMO FUNOnoumi, left, and Fujitayama, two of a group of
Japanese Sumo wrestlers touring the United States, strain to throw
each other off balance in a New York hotel gymnasium in a locked
position called Ken Ken. The 300-pound-plus mat men study their
sport for years before engaging in matches. (NEA). **
I*
-i
t

tr
it
BOTTOMS UPJockey John Cotter hangs on precariously as
Monterey, after leading the field at the three-quarter mark, slips
in the mud at Belmont Park and sends them both spinning. Though
it of running, the rider remounted and finished the race. (NEA)
-
)
Carry Thit Handy
fedrM mox AH Thm Tim*



.;

X53tr /tr Ae*e cowvm& roemywe
ENNDS
Southern Methodistunrank-
ed In the top 20 by the coaches-
turned In U-e surprise of the day
with a 27-20 win over Notre
Dame, the sixth rated team. Fred
Benners turned the trick, almost
by himself, passing for all four
Mustang touchdown.;. Southern
Methodist pets a chance to im-
prove its ratina next week when
it goes against a Rice team which
beat Navy Satuiday night, 21-14.
Notre Dame has a good chance to
bounce ba. k on the winning side
against Pittsburgh.
Californiathe to pplck of the
coacheshad a real scare. The
Golden Bears were held to a tie
in the first half and then man-
aged to rutscore Washington
State, 42-37 in the last half. Cal-
ifornia's scoring power has al-
ready been established, but this
Is the first time that the Bears'
defenses have been severely tst-
ed.
Another West Coast Rose
Bowl hopefulSouthern Cali-
forniahad a tough time. The
Trojans squeaked past Oregon
State 16- H by scoring 10 points
in the third period.
Washingtonrated a pre-sea-
son power in the Pacific Coast
Conferencelooked the part
once again uy storming over Or-
egon, 63-6 The Huskies appar-
ently felt they needed every bit
of that score to offset last week's
upset loss to Southern Califor-
nia.
Next week's program may give
a better line on the West Coast
teams because Southern Cal goes
against California while Wash-
ington tangles with Illinois In
an intersectional battle.
The Mini looked good in their
intersectional same with Syra-
cuse Saturday, whipping the Or-
ange, 41-20.
The key point In the Big 10
Conference was at Madison, Wis-
consin, but the game between
Wisconsin ^nd Ohio rftate decid-
ed little. Wisconsin scored one
touchdown in the second period
and Ohio State came back with
one in the last quarter to wind
up in a 6-8 tie. Both teams play
Conference games next week,
with Wisconsin meeting Purdue
and the Buckeyes playing India-
na.
Michigan Statethe second
rated team in the coaches poll
stayed on the whining side,
but once again it was close.
The Spartans had to come
from behind to get by Mar
quette, 20-14. Penn State is the
next foe ou the Michigan State
calendar.
Tennesseer a n ke d third
looked every bit a powerhouse
with an easy 42-'3 win over
Chattanooga The Vols get a
sterner test next week against
Alabama.
Elghth-nted Georgia Tech
turned in a workmanlike Job by
dumping previously unbeaten
Louisiana State, 25-7 It's the
fourth straight win for Coach
Bobby Dodr. s engineers who take
on Auburn next. Auburn turned
in a surprise 14-13 win over Flo-
rida.
Texas Ls another of the top 10
teams who ame through with a
close victciy. The Longhorns,
ranked fourth, topped Oklahoma,
9-7, scoring ail theii points in
the first D?riod. Texas plays Ar-
kansas next.
The Bayior Bear* could give
Texas an idea what to expect
from Arkansas The Bearsrat-
ed 10th by the coachesbeat Ar-
kansas, 9-7, on a last period field
foal. Bayloi goes against Texas
'ech next.
Maryland added luster to its
position as me ninth ranked tsam
by crushing Georgia. 43-7. Mary-
land plays North Carolina this
week end.
Kentuckya preseason pick
as one of the nation S' top teams
.got on i he winning side with
a 27-0 win over Mississippi
State. The Wildcats tackle a
tough Villanova team next.
In the East, powerful Prince-
ton kept its unbeaten record In-
tact with i 13-7 win over Penn-
sylvania. Once again It was Dick
Kazmaler who sparked the Tig-
ers, this time by passing for one
touchdown and scoring the other.
Princeton may have It a little
easier next week against Lafay-
ette. Pennsylvania goes against
the scrappy Columbia team
which drooped Yale. 14-0.
Dartmouth confirmed what
many experts had been suspect-
ingthat Army is In for a poor
season. The Big Oreen from Ha-
nover scored in the tirst two mi-
nutes and' went on to beat the
Cadets, 28-14. Army salvaged
something irom the game when
Bob Mlschak turned In the long-
est touchdown run In Michie
Stadium n i s t o r ya 97-yard
sprint over the goal. Army has a
chance to get a win next week
when It goes against a Harvard
team that was smothered by Cor-
nell. 42-6. Dartmouth plays Sy-
racuse.
The Soutneastern Conference
has a key game on tap next week
end when Vanderbilt plays Flo-
rida. Vandy turned the tables on
Mississippi Saturday by scoring
four times in the final quarter
to gain a 34-20 win.
Now here s a quick rundown of
some of the other top games next
week end. In the Skyline Six
Conference the Colorado Aggies
meet Utah State, Mississippi goes
against Tulane in another South-
eastern Conference game, Yale
plays Cornell in the Ivy League
and UCLA meets Oregon in the
Pacific Coast Conference.
Sports Shorties
BY UNITED PRESS
New Yorit police are Investi-
gating an anonymous letter mail-
ed to New York Giant Manager
Leo Durocher offering him a
bribe to 'ose the World Series.
Police refuse to reveal all the
contents of '.he letter, but it's be-
lieved that it contained a threat
against Dur; cher's wifeactress
Laraine Day.
BOXING Middleweight box-
ing king Ray Robinson says he's
ilannLng to quit the ring and go
nto show business. RobinsonIn
a radio Interviewwould not set
a date for his ring abdication,
but he said he now Is rehearsing
a song and dance act. Robinson
said he had received numerous
offers to go on the stage from
theaters and night clubs.
Rancher Thomas Peppers has
succeeded Movie Executive Jo-
seph Scheiu'k as president of the
Del Mar, California, race track.
Schenck recently sold his con-
trolling imprest In the track.
Juan Franco
Muluel Dividends
Children Will Be Admitted Free
To 'Panama-Colombia'Series
"' _
Disability Pay Could Increase
Pressure Football Problems
High School Pressure Football
In Worse Shape Than College
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Spurts Editor
NEW YORK. Oct. 15 iNEA)
So you think pressure foot-
ball in the colleges in a rat
race, eh?
Well. then, you ought to dig
into it In the hign schools.
There, too. everything is done
to hide the facts and figures in school the entire day teach-
Irom the public. Those who at- lng.
the tools with which to work
for better coaching.
High school coaches spend
half their time fighting off col-
lege scouts making propositions
to their stars, and frequently
spoiling them.
SHORT-TERM CONTRACT
AT $1.1* AN HOUR
High school coaches must be
tend the games haven't the
slightest conception of how bad
things' are.
Hurdling many an obstacle,
the coach of a high school play-
ing steamed-up football must
turn out a winner regardless,
even more so than at most col-
leges.
The coach of one of the sup-
erior teams in the coal belt and
the swift Pennsylvania league
appeals for help that he is sure
all high school coaches would
welcome. Naturally, he does not
want his name used because he
would be fired immediately.
This coach lists only a few
of the things with which he
and his boys have to contend.
It's mighty serious, for he
lists gambling as number one.
Coaches and their families
are threatened when Coaches
ind players actually have been
beaten up for losing.
Downtown Clubs and other
organizations associated with
high school football are more
demanding than the most rabid
college alumni, real or synthetic.
TEAMS OVERMATCHED FOR
FAT GUARANTEES
To collect fat guarantees,
school boards schedule games
away out of the class of thelr
enrollment.
All games are played at night,
the youngsters arriving home
sometimes as late as 3 am.
That's Just fine for a growing
boy.
The political set-up of school
boards and their dictating of
the athletic policv ls a constant
headache to coaches.
Rartntal interference is mighty
annoying.
School administrators do not
Rive coaches to time properly
prepare their teams for games.
Coaches are unable to
The pay of practically all high
school coaches ls $1.10 per hour.
Teams play to 65,000 and 75.-
000 a season. Washington High
of Massollon. O. played to 152.-
000 people in 10 games last Fail,
outdrew every college in the
state save Ohio State and may-
be Cincinnati.
Most high school coaches get
only a one-year coaching con-
tract. Their teaching, of course,
is under state tenure.
This coach from the anthrac-
ite area Isn't beefing because of
his own situation. He speaks for
the boys and his profession.
Coaches of colleges playing
pressure football at least are
well paid and the hired hands
well taken care of.
In that, and every other sense,
the high school pressure foot-
ball business is deplorable.
FIRST RACE
1Riomar $14.80, $4.80, $4.80.
2Tap Girl $4. $3.80.
3Canaveral $6.80.
SECOND RACE
1Don Teml (Excluded from the
2Helen B. $3.40, $2 80 (betting.
3Batan *:\80
First Donbles: (Riomar-Helen
B.) $21.41.
THIRD RACE
1Valaria $2.40. $2.30, $2.20.
2Fonseca $3, $2.20.
3Little Lidu $2.20.
One-Two. (Valaria Fonseca)
$5.80.
FOURTH RACE
1Conde $15. $8.40, $5.
2Cacique $16, $7.40.
3La Prensa $8.20.
Quiniela: (C n d e-Cacique)
$116.
FIFTH RACE
1Welsh Fox $2.80. $2.20.
2Silver Dumlno $2.20.
SIXTH RACE
1Beduino $13.40, $10.60, $6.80.
2Fright $9.80, $5.80.
3Levadura $13.
SEVENTH RACE
l^Sun Cheer $9.60, $3.80. $3.20.
2Porter's Star $3.80. $2.80.
3Clpayo $2.80.
Second Donbles: (Beduino-Sun
Cheer) $0.*0.
EIGHTH RACE
1- Cyclone Malone $10.40, $6 40,
2Baby Betty $12.40. $8. ($3.60
3Costina $39.20.
Quiniela: (Cyclone Malorie-
Baby Betty) $92.40.
NINTH RACE
1Black Bull $5. $3 60. $2.40.
2Charles S. $12.80, $6.40.
3Zevelania $6.
One-Two: (Black Bull-Charles
S.) $65.
TENTH RACE
1Cherlberfbln $7.80. $8.80.
2Mimo $8.60.
ELEVENTH RACE
1Don Pltln $11, $2.40.
2Black Sambo $2.20.
WHERE THE WILD GOOSE
GOES
OXFORD, Mass. (U.P.) A
30-pound goose graced Mrs. Jo-
seph F. Black's dinner table after
It crashed through the wind-
shield of her automobile as she
was riding with her son.
It was a. inounced today that
children 12 years old and under
who are accompanied by adults
will be admitted free of charge
to the Panama-Colombia three
game baseball series which gets
under Way Wednesday night at
the Panam National Stadium.
All games will begin at 7:30
S.m. Admission prices have
ave been set at $1:50 for re-
served seats, 75 cents for the
covered stand and 50 cents for
the bleachers. Tickets will go
on sale tomorrow morning at
the Stadium and the "Cantina
Chesterfield."
The Colombia team"Los
Indios'' o Cartagenaconti-
nued their winning ways over
the week end in Nicaragua by
again trouncing the Managua
All-Stars.
Meanwhile, the players of the
Panam All-Stars have been
going through their drills daily
and are expected to be In top
shape for the series.
Local fans will get the op-
portunity to compare some of
the best Colombian Pro League
players with the cream of the
crop of the local professional
baseball players.
CAN YOU STOP THIS?"
the Forest High School team of
Lima, O., runs to touchdowns
as it runs to extremes, it has
the local championship tied up.
Forming a good part of the line
all by himself Is the six-foot
two-inch, 300-pound tackle,
Norman Hayes. The other ex-
treme is the four-foot nine-inch,
90-pound freshman halfback,
Raymond Wooley. BY HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK, Oct. 15 (NEA)
Ernest E. Nemeth winning
disability pay from the Univer-
sity of Denver's insurance com1
pany may further complicate the
bookkeeping of high pressure
college football foundries.
Ernie Nemeth, a guard, suf-
fered an injury in Spring pract-
ice of 1950, underwent an oper-
ation, and his back ls still in a
brace.
Referee David F. How. Jr., of
the Colorado State Industrial
Commission decided that, In ef-
fect. Nemeth was hired to play
football.
The next steps all around easi-
ly could be disability insurance,
social security and withholding
tax.
Didn't the University of Mis-
souri announce a $100.000 yearly
program to pay athletes?
Some seats of higher learning
may have to put on as many as
three new bookkeepers.
Nemeth's disability pay and its
threatened nation-wide reper-
cussions bring up the question
of accident insurance for amat-
eur athletes.
Daniel Francis Rene is'making
this a personal crusade. He is
the young man who, while re-
presenting Springfield, Mass.,
College in the National Collegi-
ate Athletic Association's gym-
nastic meet at Ann Arbor last
Spring, fell from the flying rings
and broke his back.
S5M TO COVER $3500
BROKEN BACK
Rene's estimated medical bill
was $3500, and his college would
pav only $500 of It.
The University of Michigan
ordered the best for Dan Rene.
But then up came the question:
who was going to pay for all
this? Secretary-Treasurer Ken-
neth L. Wilson put the NCAA on
record. "The NCAA doesn't con-
template taking care of the bill,"
Ralph Martin In Redbook Maga-
zine, anotes him as having said.
"The NCAA doesn't carry insur-
ance on such meets."
"We assume obligation for our
own athletes only," announced
the University of Michigan.
"Springfield College maintains
its own Insurance policy, but the
limit for coverage for any ac-
cident is $500," said Athletic
Director John Bonn.
"Our hearts were wrung by
Rene's situation," said Vice-
Presldent Francis C. Oakley, but
we couldn't help him more, be-
cause then we wouldn't have kept
faith with all those who came
before."
MANY CARRY NO
INSURANCES AT ALL
An Insurance put it this way to
Writer Martin:
"A lot of schools don't carry
any insurance. Lots of them in-
sure only varsity players. That
means If a substitute gets hurt
It's his tough luck. Some schools
Insure only certain teamsmay-
be the football and basketball.
"Big schools with attached
medical centers take care of their
injured boys without trouble.
Most of the others have alumrri
doctors to take care of the kids.
"But even those those who do
carry insurance, carry the min-
imum, from $250 to $500, wont
give the kid a dime more."
An exception ls the rare case
of Yale, where in addition to
group insurance, athletes are In-
sured up to $12,000.
NO SCHOOL IS LEGALLY
RESPONSIBLE
No school accepts legal respon-
sibility for a boy injured in ath-
letics, but those playing big-time
football are financially In posi-
tion to feel morally committed to
his welfare. A number of the
larger universities, including Col-
umbia, carry no Insurance.
Dan Rene, doing the best he
can with his broken back In a
cast, has three suggestions:
1Two per cent of gate re-
ceipts to be allocated to a fund
to care for the more serious in-
juries.
2Establishmer, of a set year-
ly appropriation within a col-
lege's budget, to be cumulative.
3A fund based on alumni and
student contributions.
Something should be done a-
bout this shocking condition.
They .charge admission, dont
they?
Along The Fairways
The Panama Women's Oolf As-
sociation will hold the next tour-
nament at the Fort Amador Golf
Club on Saturday morning, Octo-
ber 20. 1961. Starting time will
be at 8:00 a.m.. or as soon teere-
after as possible.
Please submit the names of
those who wish to participate, not
later than Friday. October 19. to
Mr* B. Tyrell. telephone 2-1343.
Current handicaps are required.
All lady golfers and/or duffers
are cordially invited to come, see,
play and join our Golf Associa-
tion.
For all those who prefer to play
nine holes, members or non-
members, come on out to Amador
and there will be a special nine-
hole tournament.
CONRAD SARCEANT
Sports Editor
"DITTO"
THE DUPLICATOR THAT DOES NOT USE INK
PRINTS IN 4 COLORS
COMPLETE STOCK OF ACCESSORIES ON HAND
ASK FOR A DEMONSTRATION!
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Tel. 2-2010
Vanderbilt Sets
Alabama Record
TU8CAL008A. Ala.. Oct. IS.
'NEAi Vanderbilt* 22-20 up-
set victory marked the fifth
straight season that the Com-
modores kept the Crimson Tide
from the win column.
They are the first team to
keep the Tuscaloosa crew from
inning for such a long period
since the early part of U ,
century.
BEES DISCOWUOED
GRAND PRAIRIE, Tex. A newly-enacted law pasaM
by the eity council here carne*
a sting to R. It provide a fine
. up to $200 for beekeeping or b**-
obtaln 'hive* in the city Umita,
CIA. DULC1DIO GONZALEZ N., S. A.
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I* it free from upkeep east of waxing, polishing, varnishing or painting? V TBS
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Is It eaay to keep stoau? Is It* IruUliatlon vermin-proof? V ? XBS
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Dees It have low saalsitenance e**U? V YES
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*kk_


pbp^ih
PipiPflppim^^H
Cv
MONDAY, OCTOBER. IW ^T^~ "^ ". *" j! "
Weekend Football Results
TOE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART N1WSFAPEB

Jetiklne & it i 11 getting in knock-
out punchethi time at the
Communist Force in Korea.
The formar lightweight cham-
pion wears a broad mile after
jeceivint the Silver Sur for hi
| prowew at the front (NEA)
Veteran sftcut Bill Essick of the
New York Yankees died In his
sleep Thursday at Los Angeles.
The 70-year-oid Esslck signed
such stars as Frank Crosetti, Joe
Gordon and Bob Meusel to Yan-
kee contracts.
ne TKKr^
By UNITED PRESS
BY UNITED PRCAS
(Sunday Scores)
Great Falls 0, Kalispell
ArkanaM SUte College 7, South-
ern University 7
Louisiana College 27, Northwest-
ern Louisiana College I
Buffalo 13, Alfred
Lacrosse Teachers SI, Oskosh
Teachers
Arizona 19. Texas Western 15
Hardin Simmons 39, Arlsona
SUte 14
Pacific Lutheran !5, Central
Washington I
Denver S New Mexico 17
(Saturday Scores)
Hofstra 38, Moravian It
Colorado A. A M. 14, Wyoming 7
St. Joseph 13, Indiana State
Teachers 0
Wheaton 6H, Carthage 0
Morehouse 9, Alabama State
Friends Univ. 1 .Tarkio I
Dekalb Stc. 35. Michigan Nor-
mal SI
Wilson t, Gallaudet 12
Texas Southern 7, Grambllng
College 7
Idaho 12, Montana
Idaho State St. Colorado Coll. IS
UA Coast Guard Acad. 28, Wes-
leyan 14
Highlands UnW 28, New Mexico
Military Inst. 7 ,
Huron Coll. 28, Dakota Wesleyan
IS
Unir. Dubuque 27, Iowa Wesleyan
19
Wllberforoe State 14, Bluefleld
State
Heidelberg 34, Wittenberg 0
Indlanatowngap Military Reser-
vation 28, Wash. Military Dis-
trict Rifles Fort Meyer 7
Buena Vista 26, Wartburg 7
Tougaloo SI, Dillard Univ. 0
Concordia tf, Augsburg 21
Colorado State 24, Montana State
' College 0
Xavier South 28, Flsk IS
Franklin 29, Rose Foly 8
Pop Out Your Check Book
And Join Coaching Staff
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK, Oct. 15 (NEAJ
Special pressure football funds
are raised In numerous ways, but
Ed Merlck used the direct ap-
proach at the University of Rich-
mond.
Nothing subtle about Coach
Merrlck. If Richmond alumni
wanted something other than an
abused team, someone would
have to pick up the tab. 80, com-
ing In from Fork Union Academy
of Virginia, the one-time Spider
center up and let them have It.
< MerricJc's method was making
all the Old Blues, real end syn-
thetic, coachesat a slight fee,
of course.
He addressed this letter to
members of the Red and Blue
Club:
""Deaf* Coach':
"I hope yoir don't mind me call-
ing you coach. I'm used to It. As
a matter of fact, I like It. There's
nothing I would rather do than
coach a football team, particu-
larly a winning football team like
we're going to have at the Uni-
versity of Richmond.
. "Some people think you have to
fall on your head to be a foot-
ball coach. That's not so.
"All It takes to be head football
coach at the University of Rich-
mond Is a gift of $100 or up to the
Red and Blue Club. That will
give you the right, to Join me In
taking alt those bows for the
James our boys are going to win.
Also space In the cave In which
I am going to hide those week-
ends when the opposition gets
lucky.)
"If you dont have $100 handy,
don't let that worry you. For the
sum of $50, you can be a back-
field coach and take credit for
diagraming those plays which go
all the way.
"For $25 you can be a Une
coach, and can loudly say after
each victory, 'All right, let the
glamor backs get the credit, but
that game was won right up
there in the line.'
"If you haven't but 10 bucks to
invest, put it on the line, it will
buy you a Job as end coach. Ev-
ery time an end takes a pass, ev-
ery time a play is turned Inside,
you may smile smugly and pat
yourself on the back.
"You'll find'there are a lot o
advantages connected with being
a coaoh of the University of
Richmond team. The advantag-
es are listed on the back of a lit-
tle booklet which Is enclosed.
Read the booklet from cover to
cover.
"Then pop out your check book
and Join the coaching staff.
. "Cordially yours,
EDWIN J. MERRICK."
Merrick even gives it the chain-
letter pitch.
Under the heading, "please
Lend Us A Helping Hand," mem-
bers of the Red and Blue club
are asked to give the names of
three non-University of Rich-
mond alumni whom they believe
would be Interested.
A statement from President
George M. Modlln In the booklet
assures all hands that everything
will be done according to the
book.
"We know that our high edu-
cational standards will never be
lowered because of athletic expe-
diences," says the educator. "It Is
gratifying to have the support of
the Red and Blue Club In this
athletic policy and program."
Bob Neyland of Tennessee was
told of Ed Merrick's unique cam-
paign.
"He'll never get it that way,"
commented the General. "You
have to go out and see those peo-
ple."
OUR jFURNITURE is the best.
If you need easy payments and if you belong
to the Armed Forces or have a steady job .
you may choose your own terms!
Alcorn College SS, Miss. Indus-
trial
St. Lawrence 43, Middlebury 35
North Carolina Coll. 20, Virginia
SUte 7
Thlel IS, Clarion State 13
North Carolina A. ft M. 33, Shaw
Univ. 7
Swarthmore 20, Wagner 15
Tulane 24, Holy Cross 14
Kansas M, Utah 7
Vanderbilt 34, Mississippi 20
Davis Elkins 33, Glenvllle State 7
Bethune Cookman S5, Benedict
College 15
Baldwin Wallace 20, Mt. Union
21
Kntstown Tehrs. 60, Montclalr
Tchrs. 21
Wash. Univ. St. Louis 25, South-
ern Illinois *
Tout State 28, West Virginia
SUte IS
Lebanon Valley 14, Upaala
Hanover 21, Earlham IS
Mass. Maritime Aead 19, New
York Aggies 0
South Dakota SUte 21, North Da-
kota 12
Seranton Univ. 40, St. Francis 19
William ft Mary 7, Wake Foreat 6
Ft. Jackson 21, Juantico Marines
13
Williams 14, Mass. 7
Morris Brown 20, Florida A. ft M.
College 13
Baylor 0, Arkansas 7
Texas 9, Oklahoma 7
Oklahoma A. ft M. 43. Wichita 9
Muskingum 20, Slippery Rock
Tchrs. 7
Penn SUte 15, Nebraska 7
Wabash 21. Knox 6
St. Augustine 48, St. Paul 0
Johns Hopkins 20, Hampden
Sydney 20
Hiram 20, Grove City 18
Central Michigan 59, Eastern Il-
linois Tchrs. 27
Iowa SUte 32, Kansas State 6
Butler 20. BaU State 14
Aaburn 14, Florida 13
California 42, Washington State
35
Stanford n UCLA 7
Washington 63, Oregon 6
Texas 9. Oklahoma 7
Princeton IS, Penn 7
Southern Methodist 27, Notre
Dame 20
Colorado 84, Missouri 13
Dartmouth 28, Army 14
Georgia Tech 25, Louisiana State
7
Wisconsin 6, Ohio SUte
Northwestern 21, Minnesota 7
Michigan, SS. Indiana 14
Columbia 14, Yale 0
Cornell 42, Harvard 6
Geneva 27, Washington Jeffer-
son 16
Lake Forest 35, North Central 7
Claflln 26, Florida Normal Und.)

Arkansas A. M. 27, Hendrlx Col-
lege 7
Shippensburg Mate SS, East
Stroudsburr SUte 7
California Tchrs. Peon SI, Con-
cord.
Maryland IS, Georgia 7 -
Kentucky 2? Mississippi State 0
Tennessee 42, Chattanooga 13
Auburn It, Florida 13
Vanderbilt 34, Mississippi 20
North Carolina 21, South Caro-
lina 6 ,
Duke 27, North CarolimvSUte 21
College of the Pacific 21, Clem-
son 7
Morehouse 9, Alabama SUte 8
Morris Brown 20, Florida A. and
M. IS
Presbyterian 14, Davidson 12
Florida State University 36, Del-
ta State 0
Pacific Twilight
League News
At a very successful meeting
of the Pacific Twilight League
held Wednesday evening the fol-
lowing officers were elected:
Wm. R. Carlln, 8r president;
John Hunt, secretary-treasurer.
The vice-president and the
Board of Trustees will be elect-
ed at a later meeting.
The league now consists of
three teams. B. H. 8. the Work-
in (t Boys nnd the Balboa A. C.
There is still one spot open for a
service Uam. So ho about you
servicemen getting into the
Plans were made to play games j Thl,*!
on Monday and Wednesday
nights with a twi-nlght double-
header on Sundays.
page mm
Northwestern Quarterback Spins;
Fullback Gains Ground Off Tackle
PASSING FANCY__Kentucky has been shaded three times already this Fall, but it was no fault of
Babe Parllli, left. Southpaw Harry Agganis, center, is a Boston University 60-minute man. Holy
Cross' attack spins around -Charlie Maloy. (NEA)
. mm1- -
WINGED VICTORY Grant
Golden throws his racket high
into the air and apreads his
arms out like an eagle ready to
take off after beating Gerald
DeWitts, New York, in straight
aeU to win the Pan American
Tennis title at Mexico City. The
22-yesr-old_ new champion Is
A,
Lima Bullfight Season
Will Open November 4
, A from Chicago. (NE
i)



Rugged Ray mona !
saga of Rugged
Any organisation or company
wishing to sponsor a club In this
league contact Bill Carlln 2-3320.
Next meeting Wednesday, Octo-
b5r1!- 7:J P-m- at th Knights
of Columbus Hall, Balboa.
Raymond,
torn 'n tattered ill-clad lay.
man!
LIMA, Oct. 15 (Special) The
1951 bullfight season will have a
brilliant opening here on Sunday,
Nov. 4, with five programs sched-
uled during the month, it was
announced, by Panagra.
Some of the top "toreros" of
Spain. Per and Mexico will be
featured In the events which will
take place in the Plaza Monu-
mental, with a seating capacity
fOT 25,000 spectators.
The leading attraction will be
Carlos Arruza. known as the
"Mexican Cyclone," who has had
a great success this year In
Spain. Arruza has his own breed-
ing farm in Spain, and has also
appeared in a Spanish motion
picture.
Another star will be 20-year-
old Jos Maria Martorell, a na-
tive of Cordoba, Spain, birthplace
of the great Manolete. Martorell
has won for two consecutive
years. 1950 and 1981. the Mano-
lete Trophy offered during the
Cordoba seasons and his tech-
nique is said to bear a marked
resemblance to the late Spanish
master.
Manolo Gonzales, 22 years old,
of Seville, is also on the program.
Even at his relatively tender ge
Gonzalez is an "old-timer" In the
ring, having had his first fight
in Seville when he was IS years
old.
Antonio Bienvenida, another
torero who will appear in Lima,
cornea from a bullfighting fami-
ly; his father was a famous
fighter and all of his four bro-
thers are either it>w or have
been well known in the ring. He
has twice been awarded the Sca-
pulary of Our Lord of the Mira-
cles in Lima, the most prized a-
war* of South America and is a
great fighter of the classical 6e-
villan school. On June 11 of this
year m the Plaza de Madrid, he
achieved what has been called
the most perfect performance In
modern bullfighting and was a-
warded every conceivable trophy
by the Judges.
Two Peruvians are scheduled
to appear. Raul Ochoa "Rovira,"
considered one of the top fight-
ers of today, has had notable tri-
umphs in Mexico and Spain. The
second Peruvian, Alejandro Mon-
tan!, who Is returning to the
ring after a recent absence. Is
called the "Sun of Peru." '
Jesus Cordova, one of the fa-
mous "Three Musketeers" of
Mexican fighters, and Rafael Or-
'"", a Spaniard, are also on the
bill.
' Although the fights will take
place this year in November, they
will still be known as the Octo-
ber Fair, the name by which the
traditional Lima season has al-
ways been called. The gold scap-
ulary of Our Lord of the Mira-
cles will be awarded to the out-
standing fighter of the five pro-
grams.
The bulls this year will come
from the Yncala farms, with the
famous 8panish strain from Par-
lada and also from the Huando
farms with blooded stock from
Santa Coloma and La Punta.
Panagra officials here predict
that the bullfight season will at-
tract an even greater Influx of
fans from other countries than
It has in past years.
It is probable that In addition
to the five "corridas" planned
for the official season there will
be at least two or three addition-
al programs offered.
Eighth of a series of key plays
diagramed and written by fam-
ous coaches for NEA Service.
oOo
By BOB VOIGHTS
Northwestern Coach
EVANSTON. HI.. Oct. 15.
(NEA) Northwestern's full-
back offtackle play has been
highly successful.
Art M u r a -
k/iwski scored
with It in the
1949 Rose
Bowlgame a-
gainst Califor-
nia. Dick Athan
used it to romp
07 yards for a
touchdown
against Colora-
do in our open-
ing game this
Fall.
Sob Voigto
The play de-
mands expert
ball-handling.
While faking a pitch-out to
the left halfback, who runs
wide, the quarterback spins and
hands the ball to the fullback.
Athan makes this play oper-
ate as though It were Invented
for him. He led the Wildcat* in,
scoring and ground-gaining last
Autumn, rolled up 888 yards la
170 carries for a 4.1 vence to
rank fourth among Big Tea
irroundgainers. His power plunge
and sweeps figure largely in our
offense.
Sophomores are packing the
bulk of the load here this year
as a result of the loss of 18 let-
termen from the 1950 roster, 12
of whom were regulars either
offensively or defensively.
Freshmen are eligible, but this
has not helped to fill the weak
spots.
We could use a few more
soned performers.
NEXT: Gaynell
Louisiana State.
Ttasley as-
n ITS PAY DIRTNorthwestern'! quarterback fakes a ptica-eostj
to left halfback while .pinning and banding ball to fullback. (NEA) J
Little Leaguers Wanted For '52
This year was the first time Little League baseball was
played on the Canal Zone. Nearly everybody knows how pop-
ular it became in the two months of active play.
In order for the Leeyat officials to formulate plans fee
next year and to afford every eligible key an opportunity
to piar Little Leabue ball. It is requested that each bey
Interested fill out and mall the Little League Application
Form shown on this page to Mr. J. S. Watoon, riayer-Agant,
Box (IS, Balboa, C. Z-, no later than October 15. 1951. day
bey who will attain his 8th bat net his 12th birthday befare
August 1, 1952. and who is enroUed in any TJ. I. Bate school
from Gamboa South is eligible to apply. j
NAME .................
ADDRESS ,*

-1
BATE OF BIRTH
SCHOOL
PARENTS' NAME
Please print or type
ft P. A. Classified he did spy,
And sold his rags for riches
high I
We also offer you
EASY WASHERS SIMMONS SPRINGS
ZENITH RADIOS AND MATRESSES
tnd
A WONDERFUL CLUB SYSTEM
The Store Whore You will Find the Lsrgest
Assortment of Glass and Linoleum.
86 Central Avenue
Telephone 2-2465
FLY to MIAMI
for only $ 100 round trip
on the

FOOTBALL SPECIAL PLANE
leaving Tooumen, 7 a.m., Oot. 18
returning Monday, Oct. 22
So* Miami Univ. vs. Washington ft Lea
on Oot 19

and aea
Balboa High School va. Miami Jackson H.8.
on Oot. 20
for information
A reservations contact
PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICE
Across from the Ancon Bus Stop
Tel. Pan. 2-1655
OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
Complete Prize-Winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1701, Sunday, October 14, 1951
The whole ticket* have 48 pieces divided In two series "A" at "B" of 24 pieces each.
First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize
8401
98 14
8346
$ 48,000.00
$ 14,400.00
$ 7,200.00
eiei
SMI
SMI
MSI
SMI
MSI
STS1
MSI
Ml
"I
144.00
IUM
1MM
IUM
Mtt.M
144.00
144 Ml
144 M
144 00
144.M
No*. FrtM 1
1M1 U4M
urn 14.M
1M1 144.0
IM1 144.M
1M1 2.4MM
Ml 144 00
IM1 1440
1TSI I44.M
1MI IUM
1M1 1410 1
No.
MSI
Ml
SMI
SMI
Mil
2501
Mtl
srti
2M1
2M1
M4.M Mtl
1M.M Sltl
1*4. M SMI
144.M 13 1
2.4M.OO
144.M
144.M
1M.M
144. M
144M
I Mtl
SMI
Ml
I 3711
Mtl
Ml
f
144 M
1*4 M
144 00
114 0
1,400.00
144.00
Not.
Ml
1(1
Ml
301
4401
4501
14400 Ml
144.0(1 47*1
14400 Ml
144 00 Ml
t
144 00
144 M
1U.M
144 00
2.100 OO
14* M
1M.M
144M
144.00
144 0
NM.
SMI
M01
IM1
SMI
Mtl
Htl
Mtl
STtl
Mtl
SHI
rita*

1M.M
144.M
144.M
1M.M
2.4M.0O
144.M
144.00
144 M
144*0
144.W
MM
Mtl
till
SMI
SMI
Mtl
Mtl
Mtl
STtl
Mil
Mtl

144.N
1M.M
144 00
144 00
1.4MM
14400
144.00
144.M
144M
IUM
NH Mm* 1 Mm. PHaet
TMI 114.M Mil 144.M
Till 144 0 till 144 00
TMI 1*4 00 |M SMI 144M
TMI SMI 144.M
TMI 2.4MM Mtl M.MI.M 1
TMI 144 00 Mtl 144 00
TMI I44.M Mil 1M.M 1
TTII 144 00 mi 1M.M '
TMI 144 00 SMI 144.M 1
TMI 144H Mtl 1M.M 1
MM
lltl
'l
H
MSI
a
i
I
Mtl
a
144.M
1M.M
1,M.M
1M.M
Approximations Derived From First Prin
SMI MM! SSM
IS MM I SMS
*3M
13*7
I.M I3M
f
4*0 00
MM
SM MM
MM MIT
MM MM

MM MM MM
MM Mil
Approximations Derived Prom Second Prixe
1M.N
1M.M
lll
Mt.M
1M.M
1M.M
Mil SM.M 31
S
Mt.M
MIS
1M.M Mil
1MM I HI*
IM.M
120.W
MM
M1J
MM
1MM
MM
SM.M
Mlt
MIT
1M.M
1M.M
M14
MM
Mlt
1M.M
1M.M
TI14
MSI
IUM
1MM
114
MM 1M.M
I
1MM
Approximations Derived From Third Prize
37
11*4
f
IM.M
MM MM
MM SMt
MM
MM
144M
SMI
342
MM
MM
1M.M
3*3
SMt
MM
MM
I
1M.M
SMT
M.M
M.M
a
144M
MM MM
MM SMI
5
14U.M
mm em
mm aw
TMI
I
1MM
MM
MM
1M.M
PrlM-winning numbers of yesterday's Lottery drawing were sold: first and second In Panam; third In Colon.
The nine hundred whole ticket endine; In 1 and not Included In the above lint win Petty-Etght Dollar < 41.90)
The whole tickets have 48 pieces which comprise the two series "A" and "BM
Signed by: HOMERO VELASQUEZ, Governor of the Province of Panam.
HUMBERTO PAREDES C. Representative of the Ministry of Treasury.
W1TNE Wlincased. Beraldo ZapatelroCdula No. 30-19S
JOSE GUILLERMO BATALLA
Notary Public, Panam,
pablo a. rara.
Secretary
faMaMlBttaMBl



GRID FAVORITES STILL
EMV
AN INDEPENDEN!^
h
DAILY NEWSPAPE
PanamaAmmcati
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P.. MONDAY, OCTOBER 15. 1951
VIVE CENTS
Twisfer Threatens To Disrupt
American Legions Miami Meet
MIAMI. Fla.. Oct. 15
An 80-mlle-and-hour hurricane
boiled northward In the Carib-
bean todav and the weather
bureau warned smith Florida
and Its 50.000 anxious American
Legion guests to stand by on the
alert.
Navv hurricane hunter planes
reported at 4 a. m. today that
the storm was 330 miles south-
southwest of Miami and moving
slowly northward.
Few of the legionnaires at-
tending their 33rd Annual Con-
vention had heard of the tropical
blow, while making rounds of
their pre-sesslon meetings and
the "Gold Coast" bars.
Thev crowded the sidewalks,
huddled around pranksters and
tooted'he horns o their track-
less trains, echoing ihe senti-
ment of Robert Cuthbert of
Snooner. Wise: "What's the use
of worrying?"
"1 don't know what it mieht
be like to he in a hurricane."
B. E. Shelor of Floyd. Va.. .
said. "But I'm staying to find
out."
Bu' manv legionnaires had
their wives along and they were
listening to radio reports from
a more sober viewpoint.
To take care of them, the 500
hotels in the area were assur-
ing guests thev should have lit-
tle fear of the storm until it
gets much closer.
Legion officials feared that
the storm migh' make hundreds
leave town before the conven-
tion gets underway.
"The weather and the conven-
tion are two things we can't
change," said Erie Cocke. Na-
tional American Legion Com-
mander. 'We are going right
ahead."
The storm, small in area but
with a well-defined center of
whirling winds, was of near
hurricane strength when found
by a Navy plane this morning.
It was 100 miles south of the
Isle of Pines, part of Cuba.
"It is moving northward a-
bout seven or eight miles an
hour." storm forecaster Allen
Marshall said. "It is much too
close lo home for comfort."
The ninth tropical blow of
the year was expected to reach
the south Cuban coast about
80 miles southeast of Havana
Phony Air Force Hero Bilks
Wives, Hotels, U-Drive-Its
ATLANTA. Oct. 15 (UPA
Gainesville. Ga.. man who im-
personated an Air Force hero
has been arrested by FBI agents
in Atlanta. And he has admitted
today he bought his uniform
and many decorations with a
bad check and used it as a front
for passing other phony checks
to finance three weeks of "high
living."
Robert Samuel Martin was
turned in by his fifth wife whom
he abandoned after a three-day
honeymoon in the Tennessee
mountains. When picked up he
was wearing an Air Force of-
ficer's uniform complete with
captain's bars and pilot's wings.
He had ribbons representing the
Distinguished Flying Cross, tne
Silver Star, the Purple Heart
with two clusters, the Air Medal
and the European. Pacific. Asia-
tic and Korean campaigns.
Martin readily confessed he
impersonated an air hero to
victimise stores, hotels and
You-Drive-It concerns in
Georgia. Tennessee, Kentucky
and Ohio.
Special FBI agent. John Bills
said Martin was a "professional
Impersonator." He said the 28-
year-old Georgian had a record
of Impersonation, check forgery
and auto theft stretching back
to December 1941. He has served
two federal prison terms since
then.
Bills said Martin started his
latest "spree" on September
26th when he purchased the
uniform and decorations In At-
lanta with a bad check on a
Gainesville bank.
From there he went through
Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky
and Ohio. Rills said Martin
stayed at the best hotels
leaving a trail of had checks
behind him.
Martin's checks weren't ques-
tioned, the agent said, because
people thought he was a war
hero.
Before he began his imper-
sonation of the captain, Bills
said, Martin married for the
fifth time on September 22nd.
He took his bride in a You-
Drive-It automobile rented in
Atlanta with a bad check on a
honeymoon to Tennessee. He
abandoned her in Chattanooga
on September 25th. He left the
automobile in Athens, Georgia,
when a garage refused to ac-
cept a check for repairing it.
When arrested yesterday he
was driving a car rented in
Augusta. Georgiaalso with a
phonv draft.
Bills said Martin had rnar-
ried four times previously.
The matches lasted from four
days to six months and each
ended in divorce or annul-
ment.
He was sentenced to 18 months
In federal prison in 1941 for im-
personation and to five years
In 1947 por auto theft.
Martin will be arraigned in
Gainesville. Georgia, tomorrow.
and cross to the Cardenas
area.
"This is flat country In
Cuba," Marshall said. "It won't
slow the storm down much
when it crosses."
Hurricane precautions were
advised for the Cuban provinces
of Camaguey, Habana. Matan-
zas and Santa Clara, where
huge plantations of sugar,
pineapples, tobacco and coffee
are operated. The Isle of Pines,
a Cuban resort, was expected to
get a stiff blow.
"AH interests in the Western
Bahamas, the Florida Keys and
Southern Florida should make
preliminary precautions and
stand by on the alert," the
Weather Bureau warned.
If the main brunt of the
storm misses Miami It was
feared it would still deluge
the American Legion con-
vention with rain.
An eight hour long parade of
bands, drum and bugle corps
and military units is scheduled
tomorrow afternoon.
One of the biggest cloudbursts
ever to hit Miami fell on the
Legion parade here three years
ago.
Hotel managers were busy ex-
plaining they hold "nice" hurri-
cane parties during each blow
and that there is little to fear
inside the well constructed
buildings.
W. Kennedy, a New York City
retired policeman and legion
delegate, said he was not leav-
ing Miami.
"You can die only once," he
said.
SODA POP BONANZA
SOAP LAKE,' Wash. (.P.)
Ten cases of full and empty soft
drink bottles slid off a sldeswlped
truck and the youngsters cashed
in. The driver told the neighbor-
hood youngsters they could have
the full bottles if they helped col-
lect the empties. They did.
Legion Holds
Memorial;
'40 & 8' Meet
MIAMI, Fla., Oct. 15 (UP)
The American Legion honored
its dead at a solemn memorial
service here last night on the
eve of its 33rd national conven-
tion.
Shortly after an address by
the Rabbi David Lefrkowltz, Jr.,
Shreveport, La., national chap-
lain, legionnaires resumed their
fun-making at the annual "40
and 8" Society parade on Miami
Beach.
Come hurricane or anything
else the regular convention ses-
sions begin today with some
50.000 legionnaires on hand,
6,000 or them voting delegates.
Secretary of Defense Robert A.
Lovett will deliver today's prin-
cipal address, his first ma'or
speech since he became head
of the Defense Department. Ac-
companying him will be Mrs.
Anna Rosenberg.
The Rabbi Lefrowltz told the
memorial crowd in Bayfront
Park that Democracy "is not a
here answer to Communism
it is a vital, vibrant movement
of its very own."
"So long as we are motivated
by the Communist reaction to
the issue of democracy, we have
missed the real lesson American
history should teach us." he
said. "Democractic practice is its
own rich, full reward."
Lefrowitz said America's
citizens must practice Demo-
cracy "without regard to what
our enemies might have to
say."
Meanwhile, the convention
committee on child welfare con-
sidered a stronglv-worded re-
solution to fight the increased
use of narcotics by juveniles.
The proposed 15-point pro-
gram calls for strengthening
laws on the Federal. State and
local levels to prosecute nar-
cotics peddlers and users more
severely and to Increase appro-
priations so that responsible of-
ficials are able to enforce the
narcotics laws.
Legion commission and com-
mittee activity has been under-
way since Friday for the world's
largest convention which Is ac-
tually four conventions in one.
As the Legion's Honor So-
ciety, the 4a and 8, "steamed"
its locomotives before a crowd
of some 100.00() on Miami
Beach, hot campaigning got
underway for the national
commander elections to be
held Thursday.
Earle Doucette of Augusts,
Me., reported the Maine delega-
tion was the first to caucus and
decided to support Donald R.
Wilson, of Clarksburgh. W. Va.,
for national commander.
Liz and Philip: Royal but Real
Elizabeth is Queen to Be, But Philip Rules Home
EDITORS NOTE: This
month Nortn America will get
Its first glimpse of Princess
Elizabeth and Prinre Philip,
whose ro:-al romance captured
the heai ts of the world. Here's
the las' of six dispatches
that give you an intimate and
human coseup of the royal
couple.
By ARTHl'R J. MATHERS
NEA Special Correspondent
LONDON. Oct. 15 (NEA 1.Before they returned to England
f.-om Malta in August, the British government sent Princess
Elizabeth and her husband. Philip, on a goodwill visit to Greece
and Italy. They traveled aboard the destroyer Magpie, Philip's
own command.
A news storv from Rome revealed that the Royal pair were
tc have a private audience with the Pope and Elizabeth "would
conform to the dress regulations laid down bv the Vatican."
From Scotland there came
howls of protest. "Remind the
Princess she will one day be 'De-
fender of the (Anglican i Faith, *
cried some. "Encouraging Pop-
ery." yelped others.
But Elizabeth, determined to
pay normal courtesy to a head of
state, ignored the protests and
she and Philip talked with the
Pope for more than an hour. Ev-
ery reputable national and pro-
vincial newspaper in Britain sup-
ported her action and the critics
were silenced.
In making decisions for herself
on matters which affect both her
public and private life. Elizabeth
showed that her preparations for
Queenshlp do not Include a fear
of personal criticism.
She already knows from her
Biling father that the job of a
constitutional sovereign Is no
sinecure,nor just a matter of pa-
rades, processions and ceremo-
nies.
Elizabeth will have a constant
finger on the nation's political
pulse when, with the support and
undoubted guidance of Philip,
she will act as Regent for the
King during his visit to Austra-
lia next year.
As Consort to Elizabeth, the
quickly maturing Philip also
faces a difficult and delicate
task. In each there has emerged
an independence of personality
which, fortunately. Is comple-
mentary each to the other.
SHE'LL RULE BRITAIN: England's future Queen acknowl-
edges the cheers of Londoners as she rides to the oweiiinc
of Parlamente.
ther gifts of toys to Charles until
Christmas.
These facts do not mean that
there is or has been any clash of
wills between Elizabeth and
Philip. In his own right Philip
has already assumed a real im-
portance In the public life of
Britain.
Most Britons hare noticed an
added confidence and decisive-
ness in Philip's demeanor since
he and Elisabeth returned from
Malta. Naval friends say it really
dates back to the day he assumed
command of his own ship.
i HE'LL RULE THE HOUSEHOLD: Prince Philip and his ton
Prince Charles, have a hand-to-hand reunion at the Lon-
L. don airport. \r-------
But while Elizabeth must al-
ways be in the forefront of af-
fairs of state, there has never
been any doubt who Is the leader
of their domestic life and master
of the home.
Philip Is directing the up-
bringing of their children and
has firmly insisted that his son.
Prince Charles (second in line of
succession to the Throne), shall
not be spoiled by a predominant-
ly feminine household. For in-
stance, he has forbidden any fur-
It is hardly more than a month
ago since Philip really assumed
his full stature in the public af-
fairs of Britain and set the stand-
ard by which he will always be
gauged in the future as both
Consort to Elizabeth and an in-
di vidual personality.
Invited' to deliver the Presi-
dential address to the august
British Association (of Scien-
tists), ht startled several thou-
sand top scientists with a self-
written (on the back of Navy sig-
nal tonne)-46-minute discourse
of cogent scientific knowledge
and research.
With a familiarity that sug-
gested he had lived in a labora-
tory all his life, and with the easy
delivery of a real orator. Philip
caused domed heads to nod and
Impressive beards to wag approv-
ingly.
But after warning his Illustri-
ous elders that they (the scien-
tists) "could either set the world
free from drudgery, fear, hunger
snd pestilence or obliterate life
Itself," he left them with a ques-
tion that millions of men and
women are asking. Queried Phil-
ip, "Of what use Is science If man
does not survive?''
Britain has always prospered
when ruled by a Queen. The
Elizabethan and Victorian eras
are historic proof of that. And
todsy Britons are confirmed in
their belief that when Elisabeth
U comes to the Throne she and
Philip will usher In a great ren-
aissance of British prestige and
achievement.
INSIDE AN ATOMIC PLANE (HOW IT MIGHT LOOK) This phantom sketch shows
how the world's first atomic-powered plane might be built It would be a sky giant that would
dwarf the B-36. Wide, thin wings that permit great speeds will probably require the flying-boat
hull. Huge size is necessary to accommodate the very heavy engine. The world's first atomic-
powered plane ordered by the U. S. Air Force, Is now taking shape on the drawing boards at
Consolidated Vtiltee Aircraft. Fort Worth, Tex. Flight-testing is not expected until 1955-56.
(Sketch copyright, 1951, by Popular Science Monthly, from NEA-Acme.)
I
(Last of a
>-1
US Ground Troops
Hay Leave Europe
In Two Years
ROCQUENFORT,' France, Oct.
15 (Ij'iA A high_Allled official
said today the United States
plans to begin withdrawing all
ground forces from Europe
within the next two to two and
a half years-and leave the de-
fense of the continent to the
non-Communist poweift on the
west side of the Rhine.
The import of the official's
remarks ws* that the three
American divisions already In
Germany and the fourth now
underway, can probably be
home by Christmas 1954.
'Baby' Jimenez
Hurt In Accident
Faulty brakes were responsible
for an automobile accjdent near
Cerro Azul yesterday afternoon
that landed J. Euriblades
(Babyl Jimenez in the San
Fernando Clinic suffering head
and body injuries.
Jimenez- is a prominent mem-
ber of the Liberal party (M^
l adero i and a real estate opera-
tor.
He had left his property In
Cerro Azul yesterday afeemoon.
accompanied bv his brother-in-
law. Aurelio Macias. He was
driving towards the city when
his brakes failed him, and the
car ran off the road and down
a steep embankment. The car
turned over several times.
Jimenez although badly hurt,
Is not in serious condition. His
passenger escaped with only
minor injuries.
Newcomer, Rice
Return On Ancn
Governor Newcomer returned
to the Isthmus today on the 8. S.
Ancon. accompanied by Mrs.
Newcomer.
He has been In Washington
since Sept. 12 where he took part
in the Budget Bureau hearings
on budget estimates for the 1953
fiscal year and attended a meet-
ing of the Board of Directors of
the Panama Canal Company on
Sept. 17.
Also arriving on the Ancon
were: Major Oeneral George W.
Rice, Health Director; Captain
E. O. Swinson. Assistant Port
Captain at Balboa; Dr. Arthur
N. Springall, Assistant to the Su-
perintendent of Gorgas Hospital;
and J. H. McNamara. Assistant
Chief of the Postal. Customs and
Immigration Division.
Mrs. J. Mueca
Attending World
Health Congress
Mrs Luzmfls Arosemena JJlue-
ca, wife of Panama Assemblyman
Jorge niueca of the Youth Front
Party, has been chosen as a
member of the committee of ex-
perts on nursing by the World
Health Organization.
Mrs. Illueca is head nurse at
the Santo Tomas Hospital. She
has been In the U.S. attending
the Teacher's College of Colum-
bia University on a scholarship.
The committee, comprised of
10 experts from as many differ-
ent countries, meets In Geneva,
Switzerland, today and will be la
session until Oct. 30. Meeting in
the Palace of Nations there, the
group will study education and
nurslne problems,
Mrs. Illueca. was eapetoed to
arrive In Geneve todav. fa Mae
for the first meeting, m ,,.
Egypt Acts To Oust
British From Suez
CAIRO, Oct. 15 (UP) The
Egyptian Chamber of Deputies
today approved the abrogation
of the Anglo-Egyptian treaty of
1936, under which British troops
are stationed In the Suez Canal
Zone and in the Sudan.
The government followed this
up shortly after by rejecting a
joint proposal by Britain, the
United States, France and Tur-
key, that the defense of the Stra-
tegic Suez Canal be placed under
international supervision, with
Egypt as an equal partner.
Britain has also suggested self
government for the Sudan, under
international supervision. The
Sudan is presently an Anglo-
Egyptian condominium.
Egypt, demanding outright sov-
ereignty over the Sudan, is ex-
pected to reject this proposal as
well.
In the disputed Suez Canal
Zone the British garrison has
strengthened its outposts. Large
warning posters, in Arabic, have
been put up warning. Egyptians
that force will be met with force.
British army authorities in the
Zone, denied a report that ail
transports carrying the wives and
children of British soldiers now
had armed escorts..
The same authorities said a
security precaution banning any
phone calls from Zone military
Installations in anything but
English was nothing new, but
had been in operation some time.
In London a reliable source
said Britain. France. Turkey and
the United States will offer uni-
fied resistance to any warlike
move to hamper plans for Mid-
dle East security against Com-
munist aggression.
La Boca Building
Attracts Vagrants
From All Countries
Building 905-E in La Boca
might well be named The In-
ternational House. This morn-
ing's session of the Balboa Ma-
gistrate's Courtr revealed that
during the week, en different
occasions about six men of dif-
ferent nationalities were found
lotering In the building.
The countries represented wera
Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Salva-
dir, Colombia, East China, and
Panam.
The building, which is a labor
ramp used for living quarter
was found to be an ideal "rest-
ing place" for the vagrants.
The Costa Rlcan, Rafael Ro-
jas 29, was sentenced to a $15
fine, while a $10 was Imposed
upon Bernardo Porte, 22, Her-
berto Castro, 29, David Marti-
nez, 37, and Santa Singh. The
Salvadorean. Marco Antonio
Guarlado, 18 had no previous
record and received a suspend-
ed sentence. ,
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