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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01263
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01263
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Sunday supplement
        Supplement 1
        Supplement 2
        Supplement 3
        Supplement 4
        Supplement 5
        Supplement 6
        Supplement 7
        Supplement 8
        Supplement 9
        Supplement 10
        Supplement 11
        Supplement 12
Full Text
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' BRAN1FF
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Nw^Yrk
Oni-jtop
non stop to
Miami!
"Let the people know the truth and the country it safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWISTY-SEVENTH YEAR
*+*
PANAMA, B. P., SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1M1
TEN CENTS
Red Jet Plane Bombs, Guns US Destroyer
~ South Sortie; Hits Nothi
Trygve Lie Says NATO Must
Remain Subordinate to UN
(NEA Radio-Telephoto)
NEW DIKSSIONSUN and Communist lia lion officers, followed by their aides. walk
toward the.checkpoint at Pao Mun Joro, Korea, for discussions on a compromise site for
resumption of cease-fire talk*. In the front row. left to rie*ht.\are an unidentified Chinese;
4U^WEjilW^tdtb Korean Col. Chang Chun Ban. head of the Red dele-
"^ij^jpaoa II; and U. 8., Itfartoe CoL Jamei.C. MMsay. head-^t
,0 ffi'NEA-Acme taff photomPher.''W3aiter Lea.)
the UN liaison team.
TJtMITBb NATIONS, N. T.
Oct. 13 (UP) Secretary-Gen-
eral Trygve Lie declared today
that regional alliances such as
the North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization (NATO) must be
kept subordinate to the Unit-
ed Nations collective securty
system, which had its first test
in Korea.
Lie's assertion was made In
his annual report to the gen-
eral assembly, which opens In
Paris on Nov. 6. His statement
came on the heels of a recom-
mendation by the UN's collect-
ive measures committee strong-
ly suggesting that the UN
should make use of NATO or
other regional alliances In
_____ (NEA Telephoto)
WINDMILL, AIRLIFTHelicopters flew an entire battalion of TJB. Marines into battle on
the eastern Korea front In the largest operation of Its kind In mlltary history. The 160-
tligh$ "Operation Bumblebee" was completed in six hours and 4a nlnutes. Here Marines
wait to board helicopters during a smaller operation three weeks igo. (Photo by NBA-
Acme- staff photographer Jim Healy. )
Sewer Work Closing
Amador Rd.r Empire
Street for 3 Weeks
Construction of Balboa's 72-
lnch sewer across the Inter-
section of Amador Road and
Empire Street will require the
closing of both of these streets
to through traffic for a period
of about three weeks begin-
ning Tuesday morning, It was
announced .Oils weekend by.ine
Partttna Canal's Municipal M-
" During ttfs period traffic to
Fort Amador, the Naval area
and the lower end of Amador
Road will be routed from Bal-
boa Road over Gaviln Road,
Akee Street and that portion
of Amador Road beyond the
construction area.
Access to the Empire Street
area will be over the same route
to the short street which con-
nects Amador Road and Em-
pire Street just below the Boy
Scout Shack on Amador Road.
The necessary detour sjgns
for directing traffic will oe
erected and the traffic rerout-
ed beginning Tuesday morning.
All possible measures will be
taken to aid the movement of
traffic during this, period.
Crops Ruined As Storm
Sweeps South Africa
JOHANNESBURG. Oct. 1J,
(UP) Terrific storms have
swept South Africa in the past 36
hours.
In' the Orange Tree State nine
Inches of ram has fallen.
In the Transvaal hailstones
the size of hens' eggs stripped
fruit trees and ruined wheat
crops.
combatting aggression in the
future.
Lie did not mention NATO,
or any other treaty organisa-
tions by name but he said In
his report:
"There has been a growing
recognition that such alliances
while important and useful as
supplementary measures of de-
fense, cannot be regarded as
substitutes for a l|N collective
security system"
Without rehashing in detail
the UN's effort, under guidance
and impetus of the .United
States, to combat Communist
aggression in Korea, Lie said:
"Despite the heavy loss of
Ufe, the tragedy and suffering
Involved, I consider trjat one
of the most encouraging de-
velopments of the past year for
the preservation of World Peace
has been the UN collective se-
curity action in Korea."
Lie suggested that the Paris
Assembly, In addition to the
problems of Korea, the Middle
East and other long-standing
agenda items, should give par-
ticular attention to:
"1, His proposal for periodic
meetings of the Security Coun-
cil to be attended by foreign
ministers and chiefs of state.
2. "Strengthening the influ-
ence of Hhe organization" by
conferring membership on all
the states now outside it.. ,
3. srttwance of the UN's ex-
-ttrtded program' of technical
assistance.
4. Seduction of armaments.
Reds To Demand
UN Confession
As Parley Price
13 Russian Vessels
Shelter At Shetland*
LONDON, Oct. 13 (UP)
Tnirteen ships, all flying the
Hammer and Sickle ensign of
Soviet Russia; are causing a
stir round Burra Firth, shelter-
ed harbor in the extreme north
of the Shetland Islands, off
Scotland's north coast.
The vessels are believed to
be sheltering from bad weath-
er. They have been at anchor
since yesterday.
Eleven small vessels are in
the harborwhile (he two others
considerably larger and pre-
sumed to je parent vessels, are
lying off&Dore.
Shetlandjflshermen who have
made triaii round the Russian
vessels said today that the
crews Una* the decks but made
no response to shouts and
waves. 2a
A customs, officer attempted
to board dee of the customs
ships last lttght. but was pre-
vented by fila weather.
MUNSAN. Oct. 14, (UP) Early
today the Communists Indicated
that they would demand an ad-
mission of guilt from the United
Nations for the machlnegunning
of the neutral cities of Kaesong
and Panmunjom. as the price for
a renewal of the Korean armis-
tice negotiations when Allied and
Red liaison officers meet again
at 10 a.m. today (Korean time.)
Radio Peiping warned that it
was up to Americans to deal with
Friday's incident "in a responsi-
ble manner or continue inter-
rupting the negotiations with
denials."
This broadcast was a dispatch
from the correspondent of the
London Communist newspaper,
the Daily Worker. Alan Winning-
ton, who frequently reports Red
political decisions before they are
announced officially.
Another braadsast of a dis-
patch, from Wilfred Burchett,
correspondent of the Parisian.
Communist daily "i> Solr," said
that Saturday's investigation, of
the alleged strafing by three
American fighter planes "reveals
even niore clearly the deliberate
nature of the attack."
UN head Quarters-.has pot yet
announcer! the result 'Jr their
two-day Investigation by liaison
officials who went to the scene of
the alleged incident and by the
5th Air Force.
However, the Communists have
not presented yet their official
written protest over the supposed
neutrality violation.
8TH ARMY HQ., Oct. 13 (UP) The U.S. Nary re-
ported that an unidentified but presuumably Communist
jet plane tried unsuccessfully to bomb and strafe the U.S.
destroyer Twining off the Korean east coast yesterday.
The plane dropped two small bombs through the over-
cast and made several strafing runs, but failed to hit the
2,050-ton warship.
The incident occurred north of Kojc, about 65 miles
north of the 38th Parallel.
This is the farthest south that Communist jet planes
have been reported. It is also the first time Communist
jets have been reported in action off the east coast.
On the central front three
battalions of poorly-trained but
well-equipped Chinese offered
light to moderate resistance to
the tank-supported UN troops
who Jumped off at dawn Sat-
urday, i
Three hills' southeast of Kum-
song were taken before noon
and by 5 p.m. other hills were
in Allied hands.
Two Chinese companies coun-
ter-attacked newly-won South
Korean positions late Satur-
day noon, southwest of Kum-
song. Fragmentary reports did
not indicate the outcome.
American. South Korean and
Colombian units who assaulted
Puerto Ricans Now
To Be Posted To Any
Army Unit,Anywhere
6' 6" Sailor Icepicks Wife,
Slugs It Out With 8 Cops
ton BOUND embers of the 43rd Division offer a final salut to the^nlted' States
s they parade through Norfolk. Vs.. before sailing tor duty in. EuropeHlgh-iankta* officers
i 4* the Army and Navy reviewed the 4*00 men of the Divfcfcm before \n eaged. J, ~ "
EL CERR/TO, Calif., Oct. IS
(UP)An alert telephone opera-
tor was credited today with call-
ing police In time to prevent a
hulking Navy sailor from stab-
bing his wife to death with an Ice
pick.
The sailor, Boatswain's Mate
Robert T. Brown. 25, the self-
styled "heavyweight champion of
the fleet." was Jailed for investi-
gation of rssault with a deadly
weapon with intent to commit
murder.
His wife. Frances, 28,. was In
serious condition at Oak Knoll
Naval Hospital with wounds to
the chest, back and arms.
It took 10 policemen to subdue
Brown.
The apartment in which he
and his wife lived was a bloody
shambles by the time the officers
were able to tie his arms and
feet.
El Cerrlto police were alerted
yesterday o.v a long-distance tel-
ephone operator who heard a
male voice railing from El Cerrl-
to to Everett, Wash., shout:
Tm goin* to kill Frances and
then I'll kli. myself"
Two officers rushed to the
Brown apartment.
They heard a woman shouting:
"Go away, go away!'"
A man shouted back: "So,
you've doublecrossed met"
Battering down the door the
officers saw Mrs. Brown lying
, face down on a bed, an ice pick
buried in her back up to the han-
dle. Brown was sitting on the bed
beside her.
Brown wn -s 6 feet 6 inches
tall and wfrigji- 2^0 pounds, made
a lunge for-thp Officers.
Both policemen basned Brown's
head and neck with their heavy
flashlights.
While the fight was going on,
one of the toffleers shouted to
Mrs. Brown to get^help.
She staggered to the tele-
Ehone. The Tame operator who
ad origteal* called police was
still on the fine. She called for
reinforcements.
Eight more policemen soon ap-
peared and joined the fight .
They got Brown down on the
floor where Biey bound his feet
and arms. f\
Mrs. Brown by this time was
unconscious on the floor. She
was rushed to the hospital.
In the cottier of the room po-
lice discovered Earl Isakon, Mrs.
Brown's sixyeV-old son by a
previous masriage.
Later they learned that the
long-distance call overheard by
the operator was from Brown to
Mrs. Brown* former husband,
Henry Isakedn of Everett, Wash
Isakson arrived by plane from
Everett last night to take the
boy back to his home.
Brown toU officers his wife
had been "foing out with other
men."
Neighbor said they quarreled
and drank.
Miami International
Hart To Boost
InterAmerican Trade
ST. AUGUSTINE, lia., Oct. 13
(UP)Development of the in-
ternational mart now underway
at Miami will go a long way
toward increasing trade between
the Americas, the executive vice
president of the Florida Cham-
ber of Commerce said today.
Harold Coleye said in a speech
prepared for delivery In Spanish
over the "Voice of America net-
work" that Florida is the pivotal
commercial center of the Amer-
icas.
Occasion for the address was
the unveiling of a marble bust
in memory of Jose Trinidad
Reyes, founder of the National
University of Honduras.
Dr. Reyes was a theologian
and former member of the
Honduran Congress, but was
best known as an educator.
The bust will rest beside those
of other Latin American not-
ables in the "Orove of Educa-
tors of the Americas."
.SAN JUAN,
PW*,~- The Antilles head-
quarters of the u. 8. Army
announced today a change in
the Army's policy of limiting
Puerto Rican troops to Puerto
Rico or the Canal Zone except
In time of war.
Effective today all Puerto
Rican soldiers who speak Eng-
lish may be assigned Individual-
ly or in groups to U. S. Army
units anywhere they are locat-
ed.
Col. Morton E. Townes, who
made the announcement, attri-
buted the new policy to "out-
standing record of the 65th
Regiment in combat in Korea.
the high ground that overlooks
the Communist winter defense
line in this area reported "un-
usually heavy" Chinese mortar
and artillery fire.
One officer said this was the
heaviest Communist shellfire
he had seen during his 14
months in Korea. His regiment
received 400 rounds of artillery
and mortar fire.
Reports from other units
have not been received.
Chinese prisoners taken to-
day were wearing a new style
winter uniform, comprised of a
coat slightly heavier than the
Amerctan field jacket and a
cap with ear flaps. They wore
regular uniform trousers.
An officer said the prisoners
were the "poorest trained and
lowest In morale and profi-
ciency" yet captured.
Many of the Chinese fought
tenaciously for varying periods
of time and then fled north-
wards, abandoning weapons
nd their dead and wounded.
P. Jt, Oct. * i Tfte_ unsoldlerly qj
Chinese who surrendered
today were not taken as Indi-
cations that the Allies will con-
tinue to face mild resistance
from Communist infantry in
this sector.
"We hit only outpost posi-
tions today;" one officer said.
"If we push on farther we
will hit their Une and there
they probably have very good
soldiers."
Retroactive Tax
Killer Dan Reed
To Visit Isthmus
United States Representative
Daniel A. Reed of New York,
who sponsored the Reed BUI
which killed the retroactive in-
come tax for 1950, is scheduled
to visit the Isthmus in Nov-
ember.
Representative and Mrs. Reed
plan to sail from New York
November 21 on the S. S. An-
cn and to return to the Unit-
ed States December 14 on the
S. S. Cristobal.
Representative Reed Is the
ranking Republiean member of
the House Ways and Means
Committee, and has served In
the House since 1918.
It Is estimated that the Reed
Reed Bill saved Canal employes
at least $2.750,000 In retroactive
Income taxes.
French Bombers
Blast Retreating
Reds In Indo-China
HANOI. Indo-China, Oct. 18
French land and carrier based
bombers swept down with
rockets and napalm last night
and early today to blast retreat-
ing Communist columns in the
Nghialo region of the Red River
Delta northeast of here.
Meanwhile in Paris the week-
ly magazine "Paris Match" re-
ported that the United States
has promised French High Com-
missioner in Indo-China, Gen.
Jean de Lattre de Tassigny.
strategic reserves of material to
hold off 10 divisions of Chinese,
should the Chinese openly en-
ter the Indo-China war.
This material would consist
chiefly of napalm bombs.
The magazine also reported
that if Russian-built Mig figh-
ters show up In the theater,
the United 8Utes wlD provide
De Lattre with Sabre fighters.
Single Worker to Pay $790
Tax On $ 4000 By New Plan
WASHINGTON. Oct. 13 (UP).The tables
below show how annual federal income taxes
would be Increased under the compromise plan
agreed to by a Senate-House conference com-
mittee.
The Income figures listed are annual income,
after the taxpayer has subtracted allowable de-
ductions for contributions, interest, etc. in-
creased tax rates would take effect as of Nov.
1. The figures In the "new tax" column show
the effect of the increase on 1952 Income
the first full year in which the new rates will
be In effect.
SINGLE PERSON
Net Income After
Deductions. But
Before Exemptions
$8.00
1,000
2.000
3.000
4.000
5.000
8.000
10,000
15.000
20.000
25,000
50.000
100,000
300,000
500.000
1,000,000
Present Tax New Tax
t
280
488
708
944
1,780
2,438
4.448
6.942
9.798
28388
69,798
247,274
429.274
870.000
,
$44
89
312
544
790
1.054
1,994
2,730
4,970
7.764
10.942
28.468
69.690
352.166
436.166
80.000
MARRIED COUPLE
1.500
2,000
3,000
4,000
5,000
8.000
10.000
15,000
20.000
20.000
25,000
50.000
100.000
300.000
500.000
1.000.000 v
MARRIED COUPLE
3.000
4.000
5.000
8.000
10.000
15,000
20.000
25.000
50.000
100.000
300,000
500.000
1.000,000...........
NO CHILDREN
60 i
670 847
1.416 1.580
1.888 2 106
3.260 3.648
4.872 5,480
4,872 8.480
6.724 7,512
19.592 21.884
52,776 56,936
222,572 229356
403.548 418.332
858.548 872.332
- TWO CHILDREN
120 13S
330 530 1.152 3
1.592 2.900 M
4.464 6.268 ?:3S
18.884 21.092
51,912 56.036
221.504 228376
402.456 "2
857.45 ... 87lB



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rOETW
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
r it -
""* October ::, 195x|
prr > \ii
r PI
Radio Programs
Your Community Radio Station
HOG-840
Where 100,000 People Meet
Presents


Sunday, Oct. 14
8:00Sip On -Musical Inter-
lude
8:15Newsreel U.8.A. (VOA)
8:30Hymns of All Churches
9:00BIBLE AUDITORIUM OF
THE AIR
9: ISGood Neighbors
9: SOLondon Studio Melodies
(BBC)
10:00In the tempo of Ja
10:30Your American Music
11:00NATIONAL LOT T E R Y
11:15The 8acred Heart Pro-
cram
11:30Meet the Band
12:00Invitation to Learning
(VOA)
PM.
1J:30Salt Lake Tabernacle
Choir
1 00The Jo Stafford Show
1:15The Chorallers
1:30Rev. Albert Steer
i ooOpera and Symph o n y
Hour
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Hurricane In Jama 1 c a
(BBC)
7:00American Round table
(VOA)
7:30Living In an Atomic Age
(BBC)
7:45Radio Varieties U.S.A.
1:008port* Roundup and News
(VOA)
8:15Report from Congress
(VOA)
8:308hnw Time (VOA)
8:45The Letter Box (VOA)
9:00 United Nations Review
(VOA)
9:30The Blng Crosby Show
(VOA)
10:00American Symphony
ll:00-SlgnOff
Monday, Oct. 15


F(
ro
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Stand By For Adventure
9:30As I See It
10:00News
10:05Oft the Record
11:00New
11.05Off the Record (Cont'd)
11.30Meet the Band
13:00News,
PJC
12:05Luncheon Music
13:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:16-JParsonelity Parade
1:45American Favorites
' 8:00American Journal (VOA)
IMSIt's Time To Dance
3:30Afternoon Melodies
3:45Battle of the Bands
3:O0V-A Star Concert Hall
8:The Little Show
8:30Music for Monday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose Show
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Lean Back And Listen
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Kellog Program
7:30Sports Review
T:45Here Comes Loul* Jordan
8:00News and Commentary.
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Platter Parade (VOA)
8:45Youth Talks It Over
(VOA)
i:00-Story USA. (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Dl g e 11
i (VOA)
" :43-Sports and News 10:00The World At Your Win-
dow' (BBC)
11:00-rThe Owl's Nest
MidnightSien Off.
<
>
'2
FOf
I
1
Tuesday. Oct. 14
Clock
6:00sign On Alarm
Olub
7:30Morning Salon
8:15News (VOA)
:30-Craxy Quilt
8:44 i Hawaiian Harmonlei
8:00New*
9:15Sacred Heart Program
9:30As I See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00New*
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:80Meet the Band
13:00News
12:05Luncheon Music
13:80Popular Music
ML
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Rhythm and Reason
2:00A Call From Lea Paul
8:15Date for Dancing
3:30Spirit of the Vikings
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Tuesday
4:00Radio University
4:15Promenade Concert
4:30What's Your Favorite
8:00PANA MUSIC A STORY
TIME r
6:15Evening i. on
7:00Ray's a Laugh (BBC)
7:80PABST SPORTS REVIEW
7:48Jam Session
8:00NEWS (VOA)
8:15What's On Yaur Mind
(VOA)
8:45Time tor Business (VOA)
9:00Symphony Hall
9:80Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:48Sports World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
16:80Variety Bandbox (BBC)
13:60Sign Off
U;00The Owl's Nest _
Wednesday, Oct. 17
AJM.
6:00Sign On
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Stand By For Adventure
9:30As I See It
10:00Nws and Off the Record
10:05Off the Record
11:00News and off the Record
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00Mews and Luncheon Mu-
sic
PJM.
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
3:15It's Time to Dance
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Notes on Jazz
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00 Music Without Words
4:15French in the Air (RDF)
4:30What's Your Favorite
5:30NEWS
5:35What's Your Favorite
(Contd.)
6:00Lean Back and Listen
6:15Evening Salon
7:00The Lady On The Screen
(BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00NEW8 and Commentary-
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Twenty Questions (VOA)
8:45Arts and Letters (VOA)
9:00-Jo Stafford (VOA)
9:15Radio Forum (VOA)
9:30Commentator's D Lg e s t
(VOA)
9:45Sports and Tune of Day
(VOA)
10:00BBC Playhouse
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Off
Thursday, Oct. 18
AM.
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Jerry Sears Presents
9:00NEW8
9:15S ACRED HEART PRO-
GRAM
9:30As I See It
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00NEWS
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
NoonNEW8
PM.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
1:45EXCURSIONS IN SCI-
ENCE
2:00Cajl For Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Debut
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00PANAMU8ICA 8 T O R Y
TIME
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00World News (VOA)
8:15Cross country. U.S.A.
(VOA)
8:45Jam Session (VOA)
9:00Meet Eleanor Roosevelt
K (VOA)
9:30Comments tor's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports Tune of Day and
News (VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Take It From Here (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Neat
12:00-Slgn Off
Friday, Oct. 18
A.M.
6:00Sigh On and Alarm Clock
7:30Request Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Stand By For Adventure
9:30 As I See It
10:00News and Off the Record
10:05Off the Record
11:00News and Off the Record
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
ML
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personantv Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15Songs of France (RDF)
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Friday
4:00In The Home Of The
Three Bears (BBC)
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Lean Back and Listen
6:15Request Salon
7:00Mayor of Caster bridge
(BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Musical Notebook (VOA)
8:45Facts On Parade (VOA)
9:00The Jazz Club (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports and News (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures of PC 49
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m. Sign Off
Infra-Red Radiation
Spots Enemy In Korea
8AN FRANCISCO, Oct. (UF.)
American soldiers in Korea are
using a new version of an old
weapon to discourage nlght-
prowllng Communists.
"Better than cat's eyes." is the
way returning O. I.'s describe the
"snirperlcope" that will show
up the enemy In pitch darkness.
The 'scope was used on Okin-
awa and other battlefields of
World War II. The present model
is an Improved version, details
of which are still secret.
It was develooed by scientists
of RCA Laboratories. Princeton,
N. J.. using the principle of in-
fra-red radiation. The device
consists of an infra-red lamp
mounted below the rifle barrel
and a viewing tube on top. Ob-
jects pinpointed by the infra-
red beam are made visible on the
screen of the tube.
RCA scientists came up with
the 'scope as an offshoot of re-
search on television picture tubes.
WAF ENSEMBLE-WAF Pic.
Blllie Adams of Birmingham,
Ala., models a new five-piece
exercise fatigue uniform adopted
for women In the Air Force. The
outfit includes skirt, shorts and
cap of light blue denim, shirt
of matching chambray and
slacks of dark blue boat cloth.
Saturday, Oct. 20
AM.
6:00Sign OnThe Alarm
Clock Club
7:30Jazz Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30As I Knew Her (BBC)
8:45The Duke Steps Out
9:00News
9:15-*W6men's World
9:30-?AsI See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet The Band
12:05NEW TUNE TIME (PAN-
AMU8ICA)
PM.
12:05New Tune Time
12:30The Football Prophet
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Tour De France (RDF)
2:00Latin American Serenade
2:15Date For Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
3:45Battle of the Bands
3:00March Time
3:15The Little Show
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude
4:00Music for Saturday
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Guest Star
6:15Masterworks from France
(RDF)
6:46American Folk Songs
7:00Gay Parjs Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00Newsreel US.A. (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Battle Report (VOA)
9:00Radio University (VOA)
9:15Stamp Club (VOA)
9:30Radio Amsteurs Program
(VOA)
9:45Sports. Tune of Day and
News (VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.mSign Off
.
Explanation of Symbols:
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp.
RDFRadlodiffuslon Francalse
American Legion's
National Convention
To Open In Miami
The American Legion National
Convention will open in Miami
tomorrow. Headed by National
Executive Commltteeman, N.
W. Mager. the Department of
Panama canal Zone will be fully
represented.
Unfortunately, the Depart-
ment Commander. Leon J. Car-
rlngton is in the Hospital and
will be unable to attend.
Several Items of direct con-
cern In Panama and the Canal
Zone are on the agenda for dis-
cussion and national considera-
tion. Of greatest importance is
the resolution from this De-
partment requesting national
support for a sea level canal.
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ALLEY OOP
A Bad Deal
BY ?. T. HAMUa
PICK OF THE CROP-Flash-
ing a vitamin-packed smile,
pretty Kathy Darlyn does her
best to live up to her title as
Florida's "Citrus Queen." Relax-
ing at Daytona Beach, Kathy
seems to be squeezing a batofe
of sea juice from a sea shell.
Inseparables Finally
Go Separate Ways
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Oct. (UP.)
It's finally a parting Of "the
ways for Milton C. Addington
and Ralph Dubrovner. who al-
ways seem to be doing the same
thing at the same time.
Addington and Dubrovner
graduated from the same high
school together, and started
Southwestern College here to-
gether.
They stopped school and en-
listed in the Marine Corps to-
gether, and managed to serve
together for a year and a half.
They found themselves on the
same ship coming home from the
war.
Back at Southwestern, they got
their Bachelor of Arts degrees
together. '
Both decided on further study
at the University of Tennessee,
where they got their Masters' de-
gree together.
Although Addington stayed on
at U. T. and Dubronver transfer-
red to the University of Iowa,
they were awarded Doctor of
Philosophy degrees at the same
time.
Now, however. Dubrovner has
accepted a position with the Air
Force In Sacramento. Cal., and
Addington has decided to serve
at Kennedy Veterans Hospital
here.
European Kids Cause
Rise In Skunk Exports
WASHINGTON. Oct. (UP.)
Skunks are being exported to
Europe on the demand of chil-
dren, according to the National
Geographic Society.
The European youngsters want
to see them in sops.
Like Its cousins, the weasel and
mink, the skunk owns a pelt
valuable to the fur Industry. It
also serves as an Important killer
of crop-destroying rodents.
The Geographic Society warns
that the day may come when the
government will have to preserve
the skunk, as its mortality rate
is high. Being an unsuspecting
animal, it often roams onto high-
ways where it is run down by
automobiles. It also suffers from
sinus trouble, distemper, and
rabies.
The skunk, by nature friendly,
keeps six repellent charges in two
sacs under its tall and generally
uses them only In self defense.
At moments of great danger It
shoots liquid from both sacs up
to 15 feet In the air. Afterwards,
Its presence can be detected a
mile away.
The skunks sent to European
boos are deodorised.
CAPTAIN EASY
Here, Here, J. P.!
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THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
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Malaya's Workaday War Is For Keeps
L
PAG
Says Tire Exec...
WASHINGTON, Oct. 13 (NEA) "I'H coll for you
at 8 a.m. to go out and have a look at the estqta," the
rubber planter had said.
And promptly on time, he arrived with his home-arm-
ored ear, with Malay driver and Gurkha guard armed with
a Sten gun in the front seat.
The car was converted by the simple substitution of
cast iron for glass windows, and the addition of an iron
windshield, which could be lowered when advisable, and
which had jusf enough of a hole in it for the driver to
see out.
By DOUGLAS I.ARSF.N
WASHINGTON, Oct. IS (NEA).The stork is flying high
this year, and along some new routes. .
If the number of births continue as high for the rest of the
-ear as they have this far, 1981 will set an all-time record for
he number.of babies bom In. the U. S.
Flic of Iron sheetrirere tack-
edW the outside at strategic
points, but somehow It seemed
extremely vulnerable atother
strategic points, such as the
tires. .
JThe estate, was only 18 miles
from Kuala Lumpur (Sir Henry
Gurney's death ambush was SO
miles north ot the Malayan cap-
ital) and I was reassured that the
first eight miles were entirely.
O.K.
After the O.K. bit, we came to
a piece of road with jungle close
by on the left, and as we ap-
proached, the driver stepped on
the gas and my escort said.
"I think we'll Just raise these
windows on the left. This Is a bit
sticky for a few miles here. It Is
perfectly all right on your aide."
With that the Gurkha also
raised his window part way, got
his gun ready, and my escort
opened his briefcase and pulled
out a revolver.
The driver speeded up and a
milt or two later, as we came to
ed the Iron windshield, and I was
advised to raise my steel window
also.
"Probably all right here, but
you never know," I was Informed.
And so we proceeded to the
estate, with raising and lowering
of windowsand more speedas
we passed Jungle patches.
'Just at the entrance to the
estate. I was shown a spot where
a new assistant was ambushed
the previous month, and we
drove up to the office where our
home-armored car joined two ci-
ther real armored cars with a
private "army" of special police
and guards.
81r Henry Gurney had been
traveling with an armored car
escort, too. but It did not prevent
Communist guerrillas from am-
bushing him.)
There was obviously an air of
tension around the place, be-
cause word had been received
earlier that a bandit attack was
expected that morning, and an
unusual number of Tamil tap-
a sharp right turn'ahead, lower- pers had not reported lor work.
*
This eye-wltneas report on the
precarious Ufe of rubber planters
In Malaya Is written by WARR/4
S. LOCKWOOD, director of the
Natural Rubber Bureau, who has
just returned to Washington aft-
er an official tour of Malayan
rubber holdings. While there he
visited with Sir Henry Gurqey,
British High Commissioner, who
was killed by the Reds this
month in ambush. Here Lock-
wood takes yen on a ride very
much like the one on which Sir
Henry met his deathexcept
that Loekwood's host did not ride
in an unarmored Rolls Royce nor
fly a penant to mark his car for
snipers.

Word had been relayed to the
police, and they were waiting
as a surprise reception committee
for the expected attack In the
expected area.
Actually, nothing happened
that day, but something does
happen all too frequently.
We proceeded around the es-
tate, however, aa though every-
thing was In order, and only the
armored car. the guards and the
undersurface alertness of the es-
tate personnel told you that
there's a war on.
It's a war against an unseen
enemy who strikes behind your
back, or from behind a tree, or a
patch of junglewhose purpose
Is to create disorder, to disrupt
production, to upset law and or-
der, to play the Communist game.
Surrounded by chaos, with
constant attack by Red gangsters
within its borders. Malaya has
held and Is holding back the
Communist pressure front which
extends from Indo-Chlna across
Southeast Asia.
It is doing It with more men,
money and morale than we even
begin to realize in the United
States.
LIMOUSINE OF DEATH: Police officers count bullet holes in
Rolls Royee in which Sir Henrv Gurney, British High Com-
missioner in Malaya, met his death in. a Red ambush. He
traveled openly, bnt planters ride in 'ears with cast-iron
windows. *
Fighting Mountbatten
Returns To The Fleet
LONDON, Oct. 13 (LPS) Vice
Admiral Earl Mountbatten of
Burma is to be British Comman-
der-ln-Chief, Mediterranean, in
succession to Admiral Sir John
Edelston. The appointment will
take effect next May.
Beginning World War II as a
Captain In command of a de-
stroyer flotilla, Mountbatten fin-
ished it is the Allied Supreme

On Sideline Korean Airlift
.1
_
US Storks Are Flying Fast, Frequent Schedule
NEW BABY: In 1951's first seven months. 2,3t,Wt births.
US Song Hit Pierce
Iron Curtain Barriers
FRANKFURT, Germany, Oct.
13. (U.P.) Current American
song hits find ways of piercing
the Iron Curtain, despite Com-
munist attempts to suppress
such "cosmopolitan expressions
Of western decadence."
Refugees from Red-dominated
Czechoslovakia report that "Je-
sebel" and "Time For Love" are
as popular in, Prague as they are
ki New York.
Czech jazz fans pick up the
tunes from the American forces
network and other Western sta-
tions, write a slightly different
versson more palatable to Com-
munist ears, and duly Introduce
them to night club audiences.
The Communists have become
so alarmed at their popularity
that they sometimes send their
rret police on midnight raids
obscure night spots specialis-
ing In presenting American song
bits, the refugees said.
Average Czechs, fed on a
. strict diet of patriotic hymns
of praise to Stalin, take to the
SEMriled jan like ducks to
water.
Once heard in the watered-
*" f} version, a tune will make
the round of large private par-
u-s in ine almost-the-orlginal
version, usually after more help
from the AFN.
Although night clubs have
been taken uver from their form-
er owners by the state, their
existence is tolerated by the
Communlat regime for a vary
clear reasonprofit.
They still are frequented ai-
most exclusively by the Impover-
ished middle class, while work-
ers, who have more money, pref-
er to spend their evenings in
smoke-filled beer-houses.
The Communists, however are
going ahead with plans' for
transforming those night clubs
that stin exist.
The once-fashionable Lucerna
bar, In downtown Prague, recent-
ly Introduced floor shows on the
Soviet model, complete with -
crobats and gymnastics. Jazz
bands have been confined to
places which are easier to check
and a constant watch is kept on
all tunes that are played.
Hardest hit were the bars with
"bad" reputations and small,
semi-private clubs in side streets.
While several still carry on a
flourishing trade, most of them
have been closed down and con-
verted Into worker's canteens.
However, .lazz shows no signs
of disappearing. It struggles for
survival In a mutilated legal
form and in full glory at private
and semi-private parties, played
by enthusiastic amateur bands.
Children's Christmas
Treat Group Formed
By Silver City Clubs
A Kiddles Christmas Treat
committee was formed last Wed-
nesday evening to begin work on
plans for entertaining Atlantic
Side children at Christmas time.
Trie ceramittee was formed at
a meeting held in the home of
Harold W. Williams, SUver City
and Is comprised of representa-
tives of the Riviera and Deben-
aire Clubs, the Camp Blerd Field
Day Committee and the Commu-
nity Welfare Council.
For the first even months of
this year there were 2.230,000
births in the U.S.. Including an
estimate for unregistered ones.
If the rate continues for the
last-five months of the year, the
record of 3,876.000 set In 1947
will be exceeded.
Government population ex-
perts give two big reasons for this
marked Increase In female fer-
tility, as they call It.
The obvious one is the Korean
War. All wars cause a quick In-
crease In the marriage rate, with
a consequent increase in the
birth rate along about a year lat-
er on when the men return from
the fighting.
The Korean affair has caused
almost the same pattern of In-
crease In birth rates as has other
wars. ,
The marriage rate has gone
up, but because men aren't rush-
ed overseas as quickly as during
World Wars I and II, the rate
has shot up even faster, accord-
ing to the experts.
With a lot of men beginning
to go to Europe now, however, a
slight drop might be expected in
the rate next year and the year
after.
Then, when the men may re-
turn In large numbers If the
tension with Russia relaxes, the
birth rate should really soar.
Perhaps even more Important
than the effect of Korea on the
bir'.h rate increase, many popu-
lation experts say. is the possl-
bllliy that the country is enter-
ing a long-time baby-boom
treid.
The birth rate has kept con- swamping the
stantly high since the 19473.7 I from now on.
million In 1948. 3.72 million In
1949 and 3.54 million last year.
The fact that It's easier and
safer to have babies now than it
was before the war. due to medi-
cal advances and more medical
facilities, is given as one reason
for the suspected long-time trend
toward more babies.
Commander, South East Asia
Command, with the acting rank
of full Admiral.
When appointed he was the
youngest Allied Supreme Com-
mander of the war.
Now he is serving In the Ad-
miralty as Fourth Sea Lord, a
very young 51.
His success against the Japan-
ese in Burma, where the attacker
was soundly beaten after reach-
ing the western gateways to In-
dia, was a climax to his brilliant
war record.
Until he was made Chief of
Combined Operations, March
1942, Mountbatten was serving
consistently at sea.
Once he had his ship sunk un-
der him.
Four times he brought his ship
home successfully after she had
been severely damaged.
Here is the story: In May 1940
Mountbatten, in command of
H.M. destroyer Kelly, brought his
ship back to port with the bows
almost blown off by a torpedo.
For three days In the North
US Road System Is
Lagging Way Behind
PAUL W. LITCHFIELD, who
wrote the accompanying dis-
patch on the nation's highway
situation, has been associated
with the rubber branch of the
automotive industry since 1909,
when he joined Goodyear. He
has been chairman of the
board of that company since
1930, and also has been a lead-
er in the development of light-
er-than-air craft.
Women are more willing to en-
th0y.A.SLd.rnL3^eaiU."%!: and machine gun attacks by re-
country's prosperity since the
war.
In contrast to the depression,
when the birth rate reached an
all-time low, most peole can
now afford to have at least one
child, and generally have bigger
families.
Another significant fact spot-
ted "by the experts in the current
figures disproves the old saying
that the rich get richer and the
poor have babies.
Women with college educat-
ions, generally in the higher in-
come brackets, have Increased
their production of offspring 77
per cent over their 1940 figures.
Women with grade school or
less education have only In-
creased their production 24 per
cent.
And for no explainable reason
city women have Increased their
birth rates four times as much
as rural women.
About the only persons worried
about this baby boom are' the
country's educators. The World
War II crop of babies hit school j
last year and they will be
school
lays of enemy aircraft, sailing the
ship with a skeleton crew after
transferring the rest of his men
to another destroyer.
Seven months later the Kelly
was at sea again.
Again she was hit and crip-
pled and once more Mountbatten
got her back to port. .
While the Kelly was being re-
paired Mountbatten transferred
to the destroyer Javelin and the
7 Guilty of Running
$1 Million Dope Ring
NEWARK, N. J., Oct. 13 (UP)
Pudgy Martin Cohen and six
other defendants convicted of
operating a $1,000,000 East Coast
narcotics ring were held without
bail today pending sentencing.
A federal Court jury deliberat-
ed almost five hours last night
before returning the verdict be-
fore U. S. District Judge Thomas
F. Meaney.
The judge Immediately re-
voked bail and remanded the
defendants to Hudson County
jail to await sentencing Oct. 26.
The maximum penalty for the
conviction Is five years In Jail
and a $10,000 fine por each.
In addition to Cohen, accused
ringleader, the defendants were
Mrs. Ona Volker, Elizabeth, N.
J., William S. Wright, Roches-
ter, N. Y., Daniel E. Graham
and Roscoe Grice. Fayetteville,
N. c, Michael Read, Brooklyn,
N. Y., and Marion Price, Wood-
ruff, S. C.
Morion Downey Wins
10-Year Court Fight
To Keep Children
BRIDGEPORT. Conn., Oct. 13
. UP) former film star Barbara
same thing happeneda torpedo Bennett today lost a 10-year le-
crlppled the ship and a fight to FaI Bht to obtain custody of
get her home I iour of hsr i,ve children who
Then he went back to the KeJ- &T,e *?." *?, ?SL? .r
ly and the evacuation of Crete,! ^'Jff'.i'^S
where a bomb at last hit the < ?,"" J5 PfJ?" Btnnett were
Kelly fair and square and sank dlvordm 1M1.
her.
WW
Superior Court Judge John T.
Cullinan, a'ter a series of private
"Tnrrt Tni. ,. h i. cuiunan, a'ter a series or private
Illustrious, but scarcely had he
taken over when he was recalled
to direct Combined Operations,
the Commando headquarters.
He planned the Dieppe and
other Commando raids from
which modern combined opera-
tions technique has been evolved.
He was awarded the D.S.O. for
services In battle In 1941, and has
mentioned In dls-
systems twice was
patches.
Williams was elected chairman
of the group, which has express-
ed willingness to accept the; co-
operation of other groups The
next meeting will be held next
|Wednesday.Oct.l7.
Art Exhibit Opens
Al USO-JWB Today
Ihe 18th exhibition of art to
be jponsored by the Canal Zone
Art League and the U.S.O.-J.W.
B. Armed Forces Service Center
opeas today >t the JWB Gal-
len, Balboa, with a showing of
boil oils and water-colors by
Mr; Lillian Davidson.
Ihe subjects are all local and
ver; familiar. As a patient In
Gogas Hospital, Mrs. Davidson
panted the towers and near and
dlsant views to the delight of
doctors, nurses and patients. She
retimed again and again for
otltr compositions. At home she
aBts the members of her fami-
ly, the view from the house, or-
chils, any object that inspires
thi artistic urge.
Cn the golf course where she
spods many hours, she immor-
tal ks a caddie whose portrait
wil be shown at the JWB Galle-
ry Rooftops and sky lines, island
am-Jungle all capture the inter-
est and attention of the artist.
Sor* are done with a light and
air- touch expressing spontanei-
ty nd freedom. Others are exe-
cute with exceeding care
Twlve such paintings will be on
vie/ at the JWB Gallery from
tocay until Nov. 10.
Ms. Davidson began her art
carer In the life classes of the
Artltudents League In New York,
latej studying painting in Baltl-
moa under Marjorle Martinet.
Sine that time she has been on
herown. At present she Is paint-
lngthe decoration for the Christ-
ma Toy Sale for the canal Zone
rhlHren. She Is transforming
the tit Ire stage of the Ancon
Thater into a child's dream of
Chrttmas. using imagination
and fantasy and having: a great
dea of fun.' ---*..
ZJodau 6 djesl Suu I
lv
y
1951 PLYMOUTH
>
Immediate Delivery at
OLD PRICES
partial Custody.
At the same time he denied a
motion of Downey to hold his
former Wlfo In contempt of court
on grounds she spirited fheir 15-
year-old ^on, Anthony, away
from a Maine camp in August
and held him In the apartment of
Mrs. Charles C. Nast In New York
City.
Downey claimed this was in
violation of the original divorce
decree which gave him sole cus-
tody of the children
He regained custody of Antho-
ny after bringing habeas corpus
proceedings in New York Su-
preme Court
GOOD DEED BACKFIRES
KENOSHA, Wis. (UP.) Ray-
mond W. Hamm, 20. spied police
clocking a speeding auto, whizzed
past them on his motorcycle and
warned the pursued motorist.
The patrolmen arrested Hamm.
but not th driver of the other
car whose speed they couldnt
check accurately. Hamm paid
$10.
*AKRON. Oct. 13 (NEA)Ours
is a country that grew great be-
cause from the beginning we
have been a people of broad vis-
Ion and great energy.
We pushed back frontiers and
hewed trails through Impenetra-
ble forests.
We have never waited for a
path to be beaten to our doors;
we have blasted mountains to
make a path to wherever the
product of our Ingenuity could be
used.
Wherever we saw the need, we
cut a wider, a longer, a better
path.
The result Is probably the
greatest mileage of road and
highway in the world.
Unfortunately, great as the
mileage Is, It Is not enough.
As a simple, demonstrable fact,
we do not have half enough roads
today.
If our highways are the arter-
ies that cat: y the lifeblood of our
economic system, our country is
on the verge of a serious illness.
We do not have enough roads
to meet our economic or social
needs today. As we grow bigger,
this lack ot roads will choke us.
Today. i\alf the wage earners
In the United States get to and
from their jobs by highway
transportation.
As our business and Industry
grows it tends to spread farther
beyond residential areas and
there will i>f more people trav-
elling farther to and from work,
over roads that even now can't
carry them.
In every part of our country
the trend Is rapidly toward dis-
persion.
You can see it In towns like Los
Angeles, or Houston, or New York,
or towns too small tc be on the
map.
You can see how fast we are
approaching a crisis from the
fact that 90 per cent of our food
and 75 per cent of all our freight
depend for distribution upon
highway transportation.
What's more, there are more
than 25,030 communities in this
country entirely dependent upon
motor vehicle transportation for
their daily existence.
Not only are we not making
provision for our growth, even
now we don't have enough or
good enough roads to meet our
needs.
We are putting more vehicles
on our roaos and at a greater
rate than a:iy of us ever antici-
pated.
Since the war. new motor vehi-
cle registration has Increased at
the average of 3,700,000 per year.
Our six per cent of the world's
population uses 78 per cent of the
world's passenger cars and 51 per
cent of its trucks and buses.
It Is Incredible that a country
that takes pride in the fact that
the automobile is a casual neces-
sity, allows its highway building
program to lag so far behind that
today 99 per cent of our roads aro
only two isnes wlde-r^or less.
Difficult to believe as it. may
be. about half the principal rural
highways, carrying more than
1000 vehicles a day, are less than
20 feet wMe.
The time has come to do some-
thing about this.
If we are to pass on to our chil-
dren a country with as much op-
portunity ss we haa, we must
now create a broad, eomprehen- .
sive, and Integrated highway
building program.
And once we have such a pro-
gram, we've got to protect It
from politics and keep it out of
the pork barrel.
For years the large sums of
money collected as highway-use
taxes have tempted politicians
and between 1934 and 1948 tha
states diverted $2.393.000,000 of
highway funds to other pur-
poses.
In other words, for that period
we did not get 104,000 miles of
road for which we paid. .
Fortunately, In 21 states tha
constitution has been amended
to prohibit such diversion. To
get the kino of highway program
we need, 48 states will have to
take that action.
That Is some progress, but not
enough. If we are to grow, we
must build our roads according
to our needs, and not to political
expedience
We don't always build or. lm-
frove our roads where we need
hem as we need them.
For Instance, too often multi-
lane roads are built where they
are not needed because of politi-
cal pressure
And that's why you will find
two-lane roads being built where,
the traffic requires two, three, or
four times that width.
Our problem, then is to first
use all the money available to
build the highways we need, and
then prepare for the future by
turning our technicians loose on
the problem of building better
highways more cheaply.
It is a problem of vital Import-
ance to every person In the U.S.
and his children.
Confederate Battle Flag
Gets New Airing All Over
All Models
All Colors

AGENCIAS PANAMERICANAS, S. A.
Across from El Rancho
Agencias Panamericanas
David Chlriani
Tels. 2-0885, 2-0886
Powell's arage
Coln
Dog Tired Dave!
David was a boy fellow,
shopping never left bun mellow!
Worn out. weary, tired and bra**,
WhT net read onr Want Ads. Dave?
By RICHARD KLEINER
NEW YORK. Oct. 13 (NKA)
The Confederate battle flag
and the next guy who calls it the
"Stars and Bars" gets a mint Ju-
lep In the kisserhas risen from
the Appomattox dust and is rid-
ing forward once more.
Only this time it is riding for-
ward once more.
Only this time It is riding for-
ward on hot rods. T-shirts, neck-
ties and decalcomanlas. The flag
shamrock. _.
But let's get one thing straight.
The flag that Is fluttering gai-
ly on car aerials on both sides of
the Mason-Dlxon line isn't the
real "Stars and Bars."
It Isn't even a true flag of the
Confederacy at all.
It's just a modernised version
of the battle flag.
The Confederacy had four of-
ficial flags.
The first, the "Stars and Bars,
had a white bar surrounded by
two red ones. Up in the left hand
corner was a blue field with
seven white stars in a circle.
Then came the battle flag, a
red square with a diagonal cross
of blue and 13 white stars.
The two later ones were both
built around the battle flag de-
The present fad uses the battle
flag design, but stretches it out.
It's an oblong Instead of the
original square. To a true south-
erner, that's like using blue-eyed
peas.
But whatever it is, this flag is
everywhere.
Flag manufacturers say the
banner Is selling better than
anything they make, except the
American flag. And nobody seems
to know quite why it suddenly
revived.
"The Confederate flag." says
one manufacturer, "always sbld
some. Even up north. People us-
ing it for gags and things.
"But we've already sold more
than twice as many as last year.
I can't figure it out."
Another New York firm says it
ON CAR AERIAL, Confederatt
flag may just mean owner
wants to be able to find parked
car.
College students wave them at
intersectlonal football game*.
There have been numerous
theories advanced as to the
cause of the revival
They range from the practical
to the psychotic.
Here are some of the Ideas the
manufacturers advance:
1.) In the south particularly,
the use of the flag Is political.
The anti-Truman Democrats are
flyhio it is a gesture of rebellion.
2) There are very few Confed-
is "selling more than we can ma- |eraie veterans remaining, and
nufacture." One of the bigger
ones says the flags are "going
out a gross at a time."
Like all fads, this one was quick
to spill over Into other fields. T-
shlrts, with the emblem on the
front, are now available.
So are decals. which can be ap-
plied to car windshields. And a
tie-maker has come out with a
battle flag cravat.
But the flags themselves are
the chief expression of the sud-
den urge to display the Confed-
erate colors.
Cars and bicycles in the south
and, to some extent, In the
northhave a flag fluttering
from the radio aerial or handle-
bar.
Stores rent them for openings.
Children find them handy for
playing games.
Hostesses use them for party
decorations.
southerners are displaying the
flag as a gesture of respect.
3) It's a "show-off gesture" on
the part of proud, sectlonallstle
Southerners.
4) Hot-rodders simply like
flags of all sorts. They're also
showing a:. Increased interest in
the plrat/'al Jolly Roger, tha
skuU-and-crossbones emblem.
5) Northerners use them to M
differ--it.
6) Northerners use them be-
cause it helps them find their
cars In crowded parking lots.
Those are some of the theo-
ries. There are others.
But most of the manufacturers
add that It Is probably just a
passing fancy, without any deep-
seated significance, either poli-
tical or psychiatric.
They also add that thev love
that grand old flag, which It
making this a banner year.

, .-



i
PAGE FOUR
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14. 1951
.
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Smorgasbord Supper Is Fun
T^
f< w
omen s
WorU
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Try Peanut Butter Combinations
^remininilij Jr J-^arii ^rainion ~/\eijnote
French ^recent ^rriak (/5uty &5elt S^kirt
BY GAYNOR MADDOX
NEA Food and Markets Editor
The entertaining .season has
begun. How would you like to
Rive a smorgasbord party? Plan
a buffet with many tantalizing;
foods on it. the way our friends
the social Danes. Swedes and
Norwegians do. Give each guest
a plate and let him serve him-
self over and over again to his
appetite's delight.
The hostess, too. ran enioy
this party because all the work
li done in advance. At the last
moment, all she has to do is to
heat assorted rolls and chill the
leverages. The tang of bottled
oft drinks goes well with this
kind of food, pleasing all age
groups. And as carbonated bev-
erapes are relatively low In cal-
ories, they leave plenty of room
for the ble eats.
Herri n Salad
(Serves 6
Two salt herring. 1 cup rooked
elbow macaroni, ? cup cooked
peas. "2 cup cooked green beans,
chopped. 2 tablespoons chopped
chives. 1 cup mayonnaise, salad
greens.
Soak herring in cold water one
hour, then remove skin and
bones and cut fish Into very small
piece*. Combine with remaining
ingredients and serve on salad
greens.
Bologna Mouse
(Serves 8)
One-half pound bolgna. ground.
3/4 cup minced celery. 2 table-
spoons minced green pepper, 2/3
cup minced apple (optional). ?
. cup mayonnaise. 3 tablespoons
I lemon juice, salt and pepper. 1
i tablespoons gelatin. 1/4 cup wat-
er. 1/3 cup heavy cream, whip-
ped.
Blend ground bologna with cel-
ery. green pepper, apple, mayon-
naise, lemon juice and season-
| inga. Dissolve gelatin in water
over boiling water. Add to meat
mixture and whip until stiff.
Fold In the whipped cream.
Transfer to mold and chill. Un-
mold and garnish to serve.
Vegetable-Egg Aspic
(Serves 6)
One tablespoon gelatin, >i cup
cold water. 1 cup boiling water. 2
tablespoons sugar. >'2 teaspoon
salt. 1/4 cup mild vinegar or lem-
on juice. 1 tablespoon grated on-
ion 'optional', lf2 cups mixed
I diced mushrooms, cucumber, cel-
I ery. stuffed olives, 2 bard-cooked
eggs.
Softe-n gelatin In cold water.
Dissolve in hot water. Add sugar,
salt, vinegar or lemon juice and
onion. Chill until thick and slr-
iupy. Fold in the mixed veget-
1 abies. Arrange sliced hard-cook-
ed eggs in bottom of slightly
ereased mold: fill with sclrfin
( ..).n -ni i -1
*>:
Ruth Milleit
Mpiio to 'he college freshmen
who>ould like to join a sorority
bul doesn't have a chance to:
A sorority MIGHT make your
colb'ge life easier and more
pleasant. But yon don't really
need It. If you are willing to stand
on your own leet and go after
what you, want from college Ufe
without any one pushing you.
Instead of having ready-made
friends, the girl who doesn't join
an' organized group usually has
to make her own. But they may
be even better friends because
they are entirely of your own
choosing.
Instead of swapping a home
background for the background
of a sorority house, you'll have
to make your own background.
But that's good training. Once
Sou are through school, you will
ave to do that over and over
again.
Instead of belag pushed by an
organized group Into school act*
ivitie.s. you will have to make up
your own mind where your tal-
ents lie and what use you want
: to make of your time and efforts.
; But if you are capable and wll-
I ling to work, you can make a
' place for yourself in extra-cur-
I rlcular activities on any college
I campus.
Instead o depending on a sor-
ority pin to tell others what you
are. you'll have to be the kind
of person who will win the lik-
ing and respect of others. But
that. too. Is all to the good. For
vou can't wear a sorority pin
through life announcing to the
world that you are one of the
chosen few.
So don't envy the sorority girls
or feel sorry for yourself because
' you aren't one of them. They
l may get off to an easier start.
1 but they can't outdistance you in
the Ion? run unless you decide
' that you haven't a chance to get
1 the b^t out of your college life.
hbtorSm
&h idMi your
own initial!
4*$ignate Teaspoons OnJyft
Mi hite-si* Hi frM Helta s VARIETY m
Yarn iwn aerie* Initial on vary piece!
"Signatura" ia exquieite, heavy
Urerware you'll be proud to own.
Old Company Plata aaade and guaran-
teed by the Wm. Rogeri Mfg Co..
Maridan. Conn With apoona. you
get complete pattern liat and price*
Send today for tbia beautiful value,
offered by .
Kellogg' vabibTTthe pick "n'
chooee package10 generous boxea.
7 cereal favoritas for breakfast.
lunch OS supper.
.
BY ROSETTE HARGROVE
NEA Staff Writer
PARIS1 NEA 1For the aver-
age woman, each... fashion report
from Paris means a new tussle
with budget and silhouette. This
year, while there are basic
changes over last year's fashions,
she'll be pleased to know that
she doesn't have to scratch her
old wardrobe completely.
The basic changes come, first,
in the disappearance of the
tight and slinky skirt. Even suit
skirts show more width at the
hem, a width that Is belled out
over the stiffening provided by
crinoline and taffeta petticoats.
Fullness is mas.;ed at the back,
or the front, or distributed about
the waist, bell-wise, by such de-
signers as Fath, Desses and Pa-
quin.
A second basic change arrives
in the higher, accented bustllne
that is the result of Empire in-
fluence. Collars achive choker
proportions and in daytime dres-
ses, there are bows, jabots, and
shoulder drapery. For evening
gowns, molded brassiere effects
concentrate attention above the
waistline.
The normal waist and dia-
phragm are still molded by high,
shapped corselet belts from Des-
ees and Maggy Rouff. But the
unbelted princess line reappears
in Dior designs. Hips remain
rounded with many of the swing-
ing skirts stemming from deep
hip yokes or graduated gores.
A third basic change comes In
the realm of feminity. Even in
tailored cloths, Balenciaga has
introduced widened, .unfitted
shoulders and very complicated
sleeves. The man-tailored suit Is
temporarily eclipsed. Sleeves are
important in many ways. They
become full Regency with Fath,
start half-crescent with Desses.
are ragln, bishop, modernized
leg 0' mutton or bell. All but the
bell sleeve have one fashion point
in common: they taper off from
elbow to wrist.
The fashlon-conclous, budget-
flattened woman will find many
notions in the new collections
that will help her bring her war-
drobe up-to-date. The use of rib-
bon is one of these. It's seen in
enormous butterfly or bustle
bows with trailing ends on even-
ing gowns by Maggy Rouff and
Balmain. It appears in narrow-
er widths and pastel colors to un-
derline the high bustllne and
eighteen-inch waist In Dior de-
signs. ... ,
Coats offer a wide.choice of
lines. ,Dlor does casual, medium
full, belted ulsters, these some-
times fur-lined. Balmain and Pa-
quln have redingotes with full,
swinging skirts and Desses and
Fath design unfitted coat with
excessive or restrained fullness
starting from the shoulfler-llne.
Balmaln's afternoon coats have
postillion cape collars and shawl
collars are draped waist-deep by
Paquin, in fur or fabric. The
! fashionable, bulky look comes, of
j course, from pebbly or long-hair-
ed woolen;;
Black la once again out in front
for wear around the clock, but
gray, from a deep shade to a
pale pewter. Is a strong daytime
color. And there is a whole new
range of blues launched by Des-
ses and featuring drake and Rear
cock, kingfisher and Brailllan,
butterfly and petrol blue.
Peanut- butter Is a delicious
sandwich spread Just as It comes
from- the jar. It can also be the
basis of many unusually good fil-
lings. Try it In combination with
raisins, bacon, grated carrots,
honey, cheese, pickles and de-
viled ham.
Next time the youngsters want
to fix themselves a special snack
let them try their hand at these
spreads. Peanut butter Is packed
with B vitamins and also sup-
plies iron, proaphorus and cal-
cium.
Peanut Butter Meat Sandwiches
(Makes 4 Sandwiches)
One-quarter cup chunk-style
peanut butter-, 1 2',4-ounce can
deviled ham. 1/4 cup sweet pickle
relish. 2 tablespoons mayonnaise,
8 slices whole wheat bread, but-
ter or fortified margarine.
In a small bowl, blend peanut
butter and deviled ham. Add
pickle relish and mayonnaise;
mix thoroughly. Spread on 4
slices of buttered bread; top with
remaining 4 slices.
Peanut Batter Carnival
Sandwiches
(Makes 4 Sandwiches)
One-half cup creamy peanut
butter, *H cup chopped celery
leaves, 1/2 cup grated carrots, 3
tablespoons of mayonnaise, 1/8
teaspoon salt, 8 slices white or
whole wheat bread, butter or
fortified margarine.
Combine ingredients. Mix well.
Spread mixture on slices of but-
tered bread; top with remaining
4 slices.
Peanut Butter Bacon Sandwiches
(Makes I sandwiches)
Three, slices bacon, 4 slices
white bread, butter or fortified
margarine. 1/4 cup chunk-style
peanut butter.
1
In a skillet, fry bacon slowly
until crisp. Drain on paper tow-
el. Spread bread with butter,
then with peanut butter. On two
slices, sprinkle bits of crumbled
bacon; turn remaining slices
over on these. Cut in halves to
serve.
FOOD NEWS
by hncunUbo
A weekly leKiina el isappiag aeSaa,
*
Kt/urbilh l4onr oLampshadti
our
oLiuina K'c
9
ootn
Tkii offe* food oolj ia Canal Zen*
NEW YORK (NEA1 About
the easiest, least expensive way
to put a new shine Into your liv-
ing room during these days of
mounting costs Is to refurbish
your lampshades. If you're equip-
ped with a little time, a lot of
imagination and some trimmings
vou can buy for a few cents a
yard, you're In business.
For pennies, you can have a
new shade suited to the decor
of any room In your home. If
you've a modern living room, you
may be fond of burlap shades.
Start with your old shade or a
new parchment one you'll get at
the flve-and-dlme store. You'll
want a yard of fine burlap to
Daste neatly over the parchment.
If you paste top and bottom on-
ly, you'll find the burlap is
smooth.
As trimming, pick a wide,
bushy cotton fringe that you'll
buy in the drapery section of
your department store. Twist It.
the wav a rope Is twisted, to make
it bushier. Then tack it. with
needle and thread, to the top and
bottom of the shade as a border-
ing. For the base, you might use
a tall, coiled cylinder In white
ceramic, but this shade is equal-
ly good for any modern base.
Those of you who shun the
sleek and modern way of living
in favor of the cozy and Informal
might like a shade that's right
for contemporary or early Amer-
ican settings, or mixture. The
covering for this shade is cut
from grassgreen shantung and
pasted over a plain parchment
shade. The trim for this is oyst-
er-white gimp, that braid-like
banding that's used In uphol-
stering.
For the top border, four rows
of gimp are pasted directly on
the covered shade, each row
pushed tightly together to create
a solid two-inch-band. Since the
heaviest trim always goes at the
top. only two rows are used to
edge the bottom.
In a traditional room, the feel-
ing of formality must be carried
out. even in lamp shades. Heavy
white silk, used to cover a plain
parchment shade, is trimmed at
the top with gold satin scalloped
ball fringe. For the bottom, use
a narrow gold gimp border. Com-
bined with a formal white porce-
lain base, you've a lamp to brag
about.
If the small fry In your family
inhabit a room with a nautical
theme, there's no problem, in
freshening the shades. On a
parchment shade, paste navy
rope-cord top and bottom and,
at the center, twist and paste the
rope Into an anchor design. Then,
to give the base a salty look,
paint it red. white and blue.
The gleam that you'll get from
your salvaged shades will tempt
you to design your own shades.
You might even find it .fun to
do them as gifts for your friends
or as a means of earninc pocket
money.
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laUMt *. MPT M. W1UMFHI. CMMCTICff
Ptaaaa aaad ata ...... "Signatura'' pallara
taaapoaas rita initial arded.
air aaoh unit eat ef apeona. I aneleat I hite-
atar and free KeUefg'e vabistt faciacs and
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Faltering Philip
f
Philip's life is filled with bruises.
Well-worn steps and rugs he oses
Repairs would leave his home like nen
P A Classifieds, lust the right elue!
OF LEGESD
OE
COTY
Dhlilbuutn: CIA. CYRNOB, S.A.
Tala.: l-USl l-utl.
New Deodorant
Soap Is Aid
For Daintiness
i
DROP COOKIES WITH THE TART-SWEET FLAVOR OF PINE-
APPLE there's a recipe that's sure to empty your cooky lar in
record time! Chewy, light, so good to munch . so welcome
with a glass of milk at bedtime. Cookies like these have anatipetfl
that no store-bought cooky, can match. They come in handy fol
box lunches, and can be whisked out for company at a moment'
notice. You'll be pleased with, their light, fine texture, .because
they're made with Swans Down Cake Flour. Women like it best
for baking because It's soft, delicate, always gives cakes and
cookies a special tenderness. Appropriately named. Swans Down
Cake Flour Is truly soft aa down ... a pastry chef's cake flourl
Keep your cookies in a low, wide Jar; It's better than a high,
narrow one, and use'a tight-fitting cover.
PINEAPPLE DROP COOKIES
*. /? cups sifted Su>an$ Down Cake Flour
1 *A teaspoons Calumet Baking Powder
' teaspoon soda
!
,
1 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup butter or other shortening
Vt, cups brown sugar, firmly packed
2 egos, unbeaten
3 4 cup canned crushed pineapple, well drained
1 teaspoon vanilla

Sift flour once, measure, add baking powder, soda, and salt, aiieJ
sift again. Cream shortening, add sugar gradually, and cream to-
gether until light and fluffy. Add ens, one at a time, beating well
after each. Add pineapple and vanilla. Add flour, a 'small amount
at a time, beating after each addition until smooth. Drop from
a teaspoon on ungreased baking sheet. Bake in hot oven (400"F.)
10 minutes, or until done. Makes about 4 dozen cookies.
In these days of hot-wter
faucets and general bathing jon-
venlence, simple fastidiousness
has become one of the most Im-
portant steps In any won- m's
beauty routine. IUhas become the
expectec" thing-.
Yet, many women find the s Is
more to the problem of kee ing
dainty than simply taking re-
quent baths. vThe problem of
remaining always fresh nd
clean-smelling varies hi In !n-
sity. for different people It
seems, according to body ch m-
Utry.
If you are one of those,wo: en
who would like added 'rea* tr-
ance that your bath freshi M
will accompany you througr Hit
the day, you might find us ful
a new deodorant soap now b< ng
offered by a leading cosmi les
firm.
Not only does It destroy o| >r-
produclng bacteria, maki rs
claim, but It Is also a deter nt
to those that result In skin blfn-
lshes.
Attractive both In color- t's
amber-colored when held be ire
the lightand>'In shape- t's
crescent curved to fit your li id
this soap features a dlstlnc ve
fragrance of its own.
xatfas
PANAMA AMERICA
A DIFFERENT CEREAL FOR
EACH DAY IN THE WEEK Is a
good way to make breakfast
more Interesting. Raisin Bran
[today, Grape-Nuts Flakes to-,
morrow, Sugar Crisp the next
I day, then Shredded Wheat. Post
TOasties, Grape-Nuts and Post's
40% Bran Flakes. You can buy
them all, each In an individual
box that holds just enough for
one serving, In a handy carton
called "Post-Tens." The assort-
ment includes all of the cereals
mentioned, with duplications of
those most In demand Post
Toastles and Grape-Nuts Flakes.
This la a wonderful way to
choose your cereals according to
whim, without having to worry
about how long the opened
eickage will stay fresh. The
Mt-Tens carton Is available In
most grocery stores. .
SATINA IS A PRODUCT that
takes the "stick and pull" out
of starched Ironing. You simply
mix It into hot starch, and it
keeps the Iron from dragging
on even the sheerest pieces. Sa-
tina has lots of other advant-
ages, too. It gives clothes a
smoother, newer-looking finish.
It helps them resist soil, actual-
ly stay clean longer. And It has
a delightful, fresh, faintly-sweet
fragrance. All thisand easier
Ironing tool Ask for Satina at
your grocer's. Comes 4 little
cakes to a package, each cake
enough for 1 quart of starch.
Costf Mere pennies per wash!
NEXT TIME YOU NEED a hot
beverage for breakfast, try Bak-
er's Breakfast Cocoa. It's an ex-
cellent way to make a young-
ster's glass of milk taste twice
as good. A wholesome change
for you, too. Delicious, nourish-
ing, rich In proteins, fats, car-
bohydrates, > and minerals. But
don't }ust buy any cocoa and
expect it to be this good. Bak-
er's has extra food value* al
least 22% cocoa butter In everj
package. In order to use ttu
word "Breakfast" in Its brand
name, a product must meet cer-
tain government standards
Some cocoas contain as little at
8 to 12 per cent cocoa butter,
yet are called "pure" cocoa
That's why we" always recom-
mend Baker's Breakfast Cocoa
for maximum nourishment and
richness. It meets.the highest
standards. It's versatile, too;
makes chocolate milk shake,
chocolate eggnog, sauce and
frosting. Directions are on the
package.
GOOD NEWS ABOUT PIE FILL-
INGS: You can buy a pudding
mix In several tempting flavors
that makes luscious pie fillings,
right on top* of the -jttove. You
just cook the mix wit* milk, let
it cool slightly, and pour it into
a baked pie shell. So mueh easi-
er than measuring and blending
all the ingredients you'd need
to make the same filling; so
much better flavor than you
ever dreamed a filling could
have! The secret of "this new
kind of plei Jell-O Puddings and
Pie Fillings. They come In three
fine flavorsButterscotch, Cho-
colate and Vanilla; They make
grand puddings, too. Creamy
and rich, with a thick soft vel-
vety texture that's really lux-
urious. For glamour desserts,
keep several packages of JelKO
Pudding and Pie Filling on your
kitchen shelf.________- *
everybody Read* Classified*


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1981
rAGI m
pacific *2)ocidu

o, 17, &$~ Del &&- 3521
Fern Room of the Hotel Tivoli
ix.i nedlatety following the wed-
ding.
A reception will be held at 7:00
pjn. at the N.C.O. Club at Fort
Amador. No Invitations are be-
ing Issued. Close friends of the
young couple and of the family
are cordially invited to attend.
MRS. ROBERT CLARK McILHENNY
/
ROBERT CLARK McILHENNY WEDS
MISS LOYCE JOHNSTON IN HOUSTON
Miss Loyce Johnston, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. B.
Johnston of Houston, Texas, became the bride of Robert
Clark Mcllheimy, son of Mr. and Mrs. I. F. Mcllhenay of
Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, on Thursday, October 11, IB
the Chapel of St. Paul's Methodist Church Ib Houston.
Following the ceremOBy a reception was held at the
Faculty Club of the Ualverslty of Houston.
The bride was a June graduate
of the University of Houston in
Texas.
Mr. Mcllhenny grew up on the
Canal Zone and attended Balboa
schools. He Is a 1950 graduate of
Rice Institute In Houston, Texas.
The young Mcllhennys arrived
early this morning from Texas
and will be guests at the Hotel
Tivoli for their week's stay here.
They will leave on 8unday, Octo-
ber 21 for Oak Ridge, Tennessee,
whore they will make their home.
Mr. and MM. I. T. Mcllhen-
ny of Balboa Heights are enter-
taining with a cocktail party in
the- Fern Room of the Hotel Ti-
voli, In honor of their son and
Why spend
months
learning
a few
simple, easy,
basic steps?
I.nm to Dance In COTILLION CLASS
8 leSSMM only SUM!
Refliter NOW Phone Pan. 3-15*5
CLASSES START OCT. M
LLONA SEARS STUDIO
El Panam Hotel
his bride, on Monday from 5:30
p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
General and Mrs. Howse
Entertain with Buffet
Brigadier General and Mrs. Ro-
bert Howze entertained several
of their friends Friday evening at
a buffet supper given at the
Quarry Heights Officers Club.
Mullen Entertain with Dinner
A dinner was given Thursday
evening by Mr. and Mrs., Arturo
Muller at their residence in Be-
lla Vista, for a group of their
friends.
Malsburys Entertain for Nephew
Mr. and Mrs. Omer E. Mals-
bury entertained Informally at
dinner at their residence In Golf
Heights recently for their nep-
hew. Commander Arthur D. Sul-
livan, who la commanding offi-
cer of the U.S. 8. "Lloyd."
Wedding Plans Announce*
for Miss Mary Loiihte Tarawa
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Turman
of Balboa announce the ap-
proaching marriage of their
daughter, Mary Louise, to Cor-
poral Harry Vincent Shonebar-
ger, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
M. Shonebarger of Lancaster,
Ohio.
The ceremony will be solemn-
ized at St. Mary's Church at 10
a.m. on Wednesday, October 24.
Chaplain Hayes will officiate.
A wedding breakfast for the
bridal party will be served in the
Princei Clizabeth. n
Square mDt
rr
}1
>anani
U S. Stje
Party Held in Honor
of Fifteenth Birthday
Master Sergeant and Mrs. John
H. Timm of Fort Kobbe honored
their daughter. Alice Marilyn, on
the occasion of her fifteenth
birthday, with a party yesterday
at their home.
The guests attending were
Clalr E. Denny, Laura Sanders,
June Gibson, Joan Hamilton.
Nancy Conneely, Maureen Klllay,
Martha Klang, Susan. Knapp, Al-
lison Davidson. Nancy Bateman,
Durea Douglas, Jimmy McKeown.
Jimmy Davis. Dick Magoon, Joe
Cicero, Alfred Bruhn. Bobby
Smith. Jess Gooden, Chas. Mor-
rin, Michel Nahmad. Jerry Ow-
ens, Bernard Johnson, Gary Wea-
ver and Billy coffee.
Mrs. Caldern
Hostess for Luncheon
Mrs. Manuel Caldern enter-
tained Wednesday at her resi-
dence with a luncheon for a
group of her friends.
Tower Club to Meet
Tomorrow Evening
The regular monthly dinner
meeting of the Tower Club of the
Cathedral of St. Luke ki Ancon
will be held tomorrow evening at
six thirty o'clock in Bishop Mor-
ris Hall. Dean Ferris will give a
talk on "The New International
Set." .
Gamboa Womea's Auxiliary
to Meet Tuesday
The Women's Auxiliary of the
Gan oa Union Church will meet
on Tuesday morning at nine
thirty o'clock in the Civic Cen-
ter. Mrs. G. T. Darnall will pre-
side and the guest speaker will
be Mrs. B.C. Stevens of Crlsto-
Flnal plans and details of the
Bazaar to be held In the Civic
Center on October 26 will be dis-
cussed at the meeting. The metn-
bers all hope to make this the
biggest Bazaar ever held m Gam-
boa: .
All members are requested to
attend and visitors and guests
cordially Invited.
Needlecraft Classes
To Be Held Thursday
The Balboa Women's Club will
hold Needlecraft Class on Thurs-
day, October 18. at 9:00 a.m. at
the Jewish Welfare Board Center
In Balboa. All members are wel-
come. I
Canal Zone Art League
to Meet Today
The Canal Zone Art League
will resume its activities this af-
ternoon at three o'clock at the
Jewish Welfare Board Center m
Balboa.
Fishers Change Residence
Mr and Mrs. Myron Fisher
have changed their residence to
the Florida Apartments, Calle
44, No. 22, where thev are now at
home to their friends.
Dean's Tea To Be
Held October IS
The Dean of the Cathedral or
Luke, the Rev. Raymond T.
> _.- laeaaaa** i tl XI it !. t \ AIT . if!
KING8TON, Ont., Oct. 13
(UP) Princess- Elizabeth and
the Duke of Edinburgh show-
ed no signs of fatigue from
square dancing today as they
came to the shore of Lake On-
tario to review Royal Military
College cadets.
The Princess and her affa-
ble husband stayed leu than
two hours hei to Inspection Installations at
the tradition steeped military
college.
Cadets put on their best splt-
and-pollsh review for the state-
ly young woman who some
day will be their commander-
ln-chlef and her Navy officer
husband.
Gov. Gen. Viscount Alex-
ander thought the royal couple
needed relaxation last night
nd staged a square dance
American style at govern-
ment house in Ottawa.
"We enjoyed It immensely,"
the vivacious 25-year-old bru-
nette said.
For the occasion the Prin-
cess wore a brown -. ci.ecked
blouse with white Peter Pan
collar and cuffs, a ateel blue
flared skirt with beaded em-
broidery and Cuban heeled
shoes.
The Duke turned up wearing
a white-checkered shirt, a red
kerchief around his neck, blue
Jeans and brown suede loafer-
style shoes instead of high-
heeled boots fancied down Tex-
as way.
Elizabeth and Philip became
so engrossed In their fancy-
stepping they were still dancing
only a few minutes before their
train was scheduled to leave
Ottawa station for Kingston.
They rushed to the station
in their dance costumes under
their coats and were cheered
by several hundred persons who
Jammed the concourse shortly
after midnight
^ftlantic S^ocieL
V
, nu WAm jl tu
& 195, (join Def.pLme QJh* 37$,
CAPTAIN AND MRS. PARSONS ENTERTAIN
WITH COCKTAIL PARTY
The Captain of the Port of Cristobal. Captain William
S. Parsons, and Mrs. Parsons entertained last evening at
their residence with a ccoktail and buffet supper party.
Their guests included the Governor of the Panam Ca-
nal and Mrs. Francis K. Newcomer, Lieutenant Governor and
Mrs. Herbert D. Vogel, Cptala and Mrs. Robert M. Peacher,
Colonel and Mrs. George K. Withers, Captain and Mrs. Mar-
vin J. West, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Morris. Mr. aad Mrs. Eugene
Lombard, all from the Pacific Side of the Isthmus.
Jrl S P.
ei/uw
NEW YORK. Oct. 1. (UP.)
Ours is a hectic age.'Leisure
Is scarce. To counterbalance the
quickening pace of living, many
seek poise and balance in art-
istic activity
"Artist education exist main-
ly in guiding the student to
recapture his original personal-
ity that, in most of the cases,
fades away with childhood,'' said
the painter and teacher Anna
Lesanal-Gergely in an Interview.
"I help them to regain some
degree of spontaneity in see-
ing. This is important. For in
our mechanized world people's
perception becomes hackneyed.
To paint is to rediscover real-
ity.
"A further step Is to show the
students how to become creative;
this Is, how to form the things
seen into a unity that reflects
their own inner rhythm. For
everybody has his own particular
rhythm of life. Finally I teach
my students the techniques that
enable them to express the artis-
te truth that Is given them to
understand.
"This doesn't mean that every-
one of my students is or can be
an artist. Most of them are
neither sufficiently gifted, nor
can they give enough time to
painting. Even so they get great
satisfaction out of it.
They find out that seeing is
enjoying. The learn to love aad
to understand art. Their Uves
are enriched by this exper-
ience.''
Mrs. Anna Lesanal-Gergely has
developed her personal and very
successful teaching method in
the course of a life time ex-
perience here and abroad. At
present her students are having
In Pedro Miguel last Monday
evening.
The next regular meeting;
will be held next month, not f
tomorrow as was reported in.
this column Friday.
St.
St. LUKC. Hie n". "-""------
Ferris has issued invitations
(Be*/ nellert

(Compiled by Publishers'
Weekly)
FICTION
THE CAINE MUTINY
Herman Wouk.
FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
James Jones.
THE CRUEL SEA
Nicholas Monsarrat.
THE CATCHER IN THE RYE
J. D. Salinger.
RETURN TO PARADISE
James A. Mlchener.
THE IRON MISTRESS
Paul I. Wellman.
A WOMAN CALLED FANCY
Frank Yerby.
THE FOUNDLING
Cardinal Spellman.
NON-FICTION
THE SEA AROUND US
Rachel L. Carson.
KON-TIKI
Thor Heyerdahl.
WASHINGTON CONFIDENTIAL
Jack Lalt and Lee Mortimer.
CRIME IN AMERICA
Estes Kefauver.
A SOLDIER'S STORY
Omar N. Bradley.
Bear cubs are surprisingly
small at birth, being about eight
inches long and weighing nine
to 12 ounces. '
LIP-READING COURSE
PROVO, Utah (UP.) Brig-
ham Young University is offering
a course In lip-reading this year
to any students Interested In the
the art. In addition to. teaching
the lip-reading course, speech
Instructor Lorin Jex will conduct
a series of diagnostic tests and
clinics for elementary school
children with defective speech.
a large, colorful and highly per-
ennal show at the Newark Art
Club.
Paul Mocsanyi.
dLadu,
f* ?
This Week
is the best time to buy
your Dresses!
We Have 100
New Dresses
Special Priced:
from
$5.95 to $7.50
On all other Dresses
not
Specially marked we
will allow you a
20% DISCOUNT!
SH SALES ONLY
The French Bazaar
JUAN PALOMERAS
COLON
COLON
is. nas jsaucu ii *""*:"_
the Seventh Annual Dean's Tea
I to be held at Bishop Morris Hall
on Thursday, October 18 at 4:30
The women members of the
Woir,:a's Auxiliary will assist the
Dean.
Buffet Supper Tonight
at Hoiel El Paaama
The regular Sunday evening
buffet supper will be held tonight
in the Bella Vista Room at Hotel
El Panama, beginning at seven
o'clock. ______
Fan Festival
and Cafeteria Supper
The Fern Leaf Chapter. O.E 8.
of Pecro Miguel announces the
Fall Ffstival and Cafetera Sup-
per tobe held Saturday. October
20. at the Ancon Masonic Tem-
le Tiere will be door prizes,
movies for the children and the
Rahibtw Girls will, present a
.short kit. The festival begins at
430 am. Tickets may be nur-
rhaser'Tfrom members of Fern
leaf o E.s. or at the door.
Fern Leaf Chapter
Fert Leaf Chapter No 4
O E S ( met in the Lodge HaU
Zfor ail tupes of 1 nixed eJjtinni, US*...,
- WHITE ROCK Products
HOME DELIVERY Call Panam 3-0996
DIERS & ULLRICH, S. A.
PANAMA COLON
COLD WAVE
Special 7 50
Ym-i be mUMy alaiH with ear
kMiSfully styled) CaM Ware...
lovely law sateeal
aMtment 2-1322
Ancon Beauty Shop
LOUSE HARTMAN. Manager
OH Ancon Theatre Bldg.
For the skin that doesn't like
heavy foundation
A sheer, greaseless base
Hebe's delicate Nailery fur
the Lm-ilut doesn't like
that "made-up" look! A light,
greaacleM foundation cream that
holds powder beautifully, give
a soft, natural finish. Before
powder, amootli on Pond'a '
. Vanishing Cream lightly. It
disappears instantly, leaving
only a alicer, protective film.
You'll love the smooth way
your powder goes on ... the
way it clings for hours'
Whan H'a hapsrtaae to look you.
lovekesta l-MJnute Maek of
Pond'. VanbNnf Cream. Sereod
aaom lavishly over taca, except
ayas. TKa cream's "Keretelylic"
adan dlrservei eft stubborn dirt
and daod skin flakes. Aha ana
minuta, ttaue off. Bight away year
ikin took fresher VBUnaJy san
a touch, partee* far saeke-ap.
"Pmd'$ Vanithing
Cream fives tuck
a smondi,
tattering
make-up, and
keeps my saw
top in any kind
ef weather,"
tayt the Counlrst
Jean de Carama*.
The Ideal Powder Bate Pond't Vanishing Cream
The Atlantic Side guests were
the Governor of the Province of
Colon and Mrs. Agustn Cedeo,
the Consul General of China
and Mrs. Eustace Lee. the French
Consul and Mrs. Marcelle Orln-
golre. Captain and Mrs. 8. L.
Brown with Mrs. Harold Smith
and Miss Barbara Brown, Mr.
and Mrs. William E Adams. Dr.
and Mrs. Wayne Glider, Mr. and
Mrs. James Piala. Mr. and Mrs.
Fritz Humphreys, Mr. and Mrs.
O- A. Dletz, Mrs. Margaret Grlm-
mell. Dr. and Mrs. John Wllker-
son, Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Delsz.
Mr. and Mrs. John Kern irk. Mr.
and Mrs. AnthonyRaymond, Mr.
and Mrs. E. N. Stokes, Captain
and Mrs. E. B. Rainier. Captain
and Mrs. J. J. Schelbeler. Mrs.
Ceclle Winchester, Mr. and Mrs.
Daulton Mann, Rev. and Mrs.
M. A. Cookson. Miss Nancy Gil-
der. Miss Thelma Godwin, Miss
Thora Baublltz and Mr. T. H.
Forsatrom.
The residence was decorated
with a profusion of ginger filies,
which were also used with light-
ed yellow tapers to center the
buffet table. Miss Joanne Far-
sons and Miss Ann West assisted
with the serving.
Captain and Mrs. West and
Miss West were the weekend
guests of Captain and Mrs. Par-
sons.
Farewell Morning Coffee
The numbers of the Fort Gu-
llck N.C.O. Club entertained
with & farewell morning coffee
Thursday to honor Mr. William
Godwin and Mrs. Lowell Parker.
whose husbands have recently
accepted commissions.
The party was given at the
home of Mrs. Mary Lou Tolbert
with co-hostesses Mrs. Ernest
Beck. Mrs. Mil lard Mundkowsky
and Mrs. Sybil Hawkins.
Each of the honorees was pre-
sented an embroirered and cut-
work dinner cloth and napkins
as a farewell gift from the group.
Mrs. Pauline Marsh, the presi-
dent, did the honors for the
club.
The members present were:
Mrs. Jesse Friese, Mrs. Rosalie
Wasuleskl. Sergeant Bea Whyte.
Mrs. David Harshaw. Mrs. Lynn
Hankel. Mrs. Virgil Lucky. Mrs.
Harrv Colbert, Mrs. Arthur
Crandall. Mrs. William Ellings-
worth. Mrs. Austin Tulip. Mrs.
John Cousin. Mrs. David Fogle,
Mrs. Joseph Flores,Mrs. Marga-
ret Bell, Mrs. Gladys Smith. Mrs.
Betty Burkhead and Mrs. Harriet
Johnson.

Club Luncheon Meeting
at Coco Solo
The members of the Coco Solo
Officers Wives Club held their
monthly luncheon meeting Fri-
day at the Coco Solo Officers
Club, with Mrs. W. W. Benils
presiding as president.
The group was seated at a ta-
ble which reflected Columbus
Day. Tiny ship place-cards were
used with the national colors,
red, white and blue, as streamers
down the center of the table,
with driftwood and floral ar-
rangements. The decorations
were done by the hostesses Mrs.
W. N. Horick and Mrs. R. L.
Smith.
Mrs. Bemi.s presented the fol-
lowing new timbers: Mrs. R. P.
Darrow. Mrs. W. L. Hall. Mrs.
W. J. Holtzclaw, Mrs. J. A.
Pease. Mrs E. W. Scott and Mrs.
L. H. Pratt.
Miss Julia Yanquell was a
guest of the club.
Captain L. L. Koepke and Lt
Commander I. M. Rowell ad-
dressed the group on "Disaster
Control." after which the mem-
bers were registered for a first
Aid Course to be given at the
base.
and Mrs. John Fahnestock of
France Field before her depar-
ture for the States.
Mr. and Mrs. Castao
Stopping at Hotel Washington
Mr. and Mrs. Eduardo Casta-
o arrived Tuesday on the Cris-
tobal and are guests at the Hotel
Washington, with their son Ed-
uardo, Jr.
Mr. Castao Is head of the
Parke-Davis offices which haw
recently been opened In connec-
tion with the Colon Free Zone.
(Continued on Page IX)

TAHITI'S
Fort Davis Women's Club
Has Monthly Meeting
The all day bridge and lunch-
eon meeting of the Fort Davis ,
Wqmen's Club was held Thurs-'
day at the Officers Club, with
Mrs Walter Skeistaitis and Mrs.
Ovidio Perez as hostesses.
Cards were played In the
morning with the prizes being
won by Mrs. M. E. King and
Mrs. M. S. Gardner.
Goodbye was said to Mrs. Da-
vid R. Kuhn who Is leaving next
month for the States. She was
presented the traditional souve-
nir spoon from the club.
New members Introduced were:
Mrs. E. H. Mitchel, Mrs. P.
Mascare-Burgos. Mrs. J. T. G-
fillan. Mrs. G. J. Kamptner.
Mrs. W. E. Eyler, and Mrs. M.
E. King.
The group was seated at a ta-
ble decorated with a Hallowe'en
theme by the hostesses. Mrs.
James Bowen. Jr.. was a guest
for the occasion. The door prize
was won by Mrs. G. W. Kenne-
dy.
During the business meeting
Mrs. J. J. Catania was appoint-
ed chairman of the Christmas
party.
Sergeant Howe Visiting Parents
Sergeant David Howe, former-
ly of Gatun, is now visiting his
parents. Mr. and Mrs. David
Howe, Sr.. at their home in
Hampton, N.H.
Sergeant Howe was reared on
the IsthFt'js and called It home
until his parents retired from
service with the Panama Canal,
several months ago. He has been
serving with the Air Force over
Korea, from bases in Okinawa
and Japan.
FRENCA
$30.70
non'i Walarpraaf Walch;
aback, proof.
FRENCA
$35.00
< > Watareraat Watch
twaap'tocond hana";
Visitors on (he Atlantic. Side
Mr. and Mrs. John Shaw of
Panama City crossed the Isthmus
Friday evening to attend the
Femandez-Perret wedding and
spent the weekend as the guests
of Mr. and Mrs. John Kernick
of Brazos Heights.
Mrs. G. Clarke Montgomery is
visiting her relatives, Captain
FRENCA
$33.50
Man't Watoraroaf Watch,
lum.natad dhatj
TAHITI
THE JEWELRY STORE
137 Central Ave. 1J7
I dreamed I went
to a formal in
Maidenette Strapless bra
If a big occasion is on your cal-
endar, this dream of a bra is
designed for you! Maidenette
Strapless i* the most fashion-
able party-goer ever! Wonder-
ful under bare-shouldered
evening clothe or cocktail
dresses, Maidenette* Strapless
gives excellent figure control.
Dainty insets make it extra fem-
inine; feather-light boning sup-
ports your curves from below.
In white or black in >our favor-
ite fabrics.
Cenuine Haidanlurm luj-.inr
art nude onl in the t mini Slalai
of America.
There is a Qflmdm Jam
forever) iye el li.ura.
>
I
JUST FOR YOll
* Never before has a Wurlitxer pian j
offered such tone, beauty and performance. 1
The new Wurlitxer Model 2300 reveal
quality in every line every musical note.
We cordially invite you to
bring the entire family to eur
show room to impact the now
Modal 2300 for y our If. It is
on outstanding instrument in
every detail and its moderte
' put It wall w)thln the
of your family budget.
I ITayawar rasO'Oea a^n^av.
t
I
I
7.11 Bolivar Ave. COLON Tel. 41 13*4
ou A.u.o Auo io MOu,' UH< ""Jet **JrM; *" *lo'ja


i
i
r.*oK six
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
\
SUNDAY, OfiJOBIt 14, 1M1
Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
N*. 4 TlT.ll Ave.
Phonr 2-ttSI
K.10SKO DE LESSEPS
rarqur de LeMtps
t'anami.
MORRISON'S
N*. 4 Peora f July Ave.
rkwi I-M41
BOTICA ( ARI.TON
ie.ee Maltndei Ay.
Phone 255CoMa.
SALON DB BELLEZA AMERICANO
n*. u Wast ink sweet
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
K.. ST "H" StrterPanama
No. 11.171 Central At -Olea.
Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additions!
word.

S=
Atlantic Society...
(Continued "Tom Pin PiTBT
Young CasUno.hu enrolled as a
student at the Canal Zone Jun-
ior College.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE: Mohogony wardrobe
with drawers. $75.00. Mohogany
bor. $75 00. Mohogony bookcase
$40.00. Sofa, $3500. Two trunks.
$20 tach one. Bargain prices. Tel
3-0405. Second Street, Old Golf
Heights. __________
FOR SALE:___Completo set commi-
sory dishes plus extro Pieces
Morning Glory Pat#srn - 9 x
12 figured rug. 0560-A Chagres
Ancon -- Bolboo 3646.
FOR SALE:2 bamboo chairs. New
price. $40.00 eoch. Coll at house
1414-C, afternoon Saturday onJ
Sunday. _____
FOR SALE
Automobiles
Whatever used car you wont to
buy or sell consult first with
Agencia Cosmos S. A. Automo-
bile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-4721.
Easy terms. Opened oil day Sat-
urdays.
FOR SALE:Mahogany diningroorr
table with 6 chair, water heater,
gas range, Guatemalan rope set,
beds, mottresses, chaise lounge,
bookcase, chairs, tables. Reason-
ably priced. Calle 51, Rosa Mori-
no. Apartment 5.
FOR SALE: New Feather weight
Smger machine, ond other house-
hold items. Tel. Balboa 2918. _
FOR SALE: ___ 1 poir Guatemalan
handmade bedspread Crochet)
Tel. 3-4220 until 4:30.
FOR-SALE:Toble model, electric
ironer 60 cycle. $30.00. bargain
Box 52, Curundu. ^____^_
FOR SAL
Real Estate
FOR SAL or LEASE: Property in
the city of anoma consisting of
2,700 squore meters land and
concrete office ond warehouse
building. Principals only. Aparta-
do 1293, Panama.
FOR SALEOn account of trip farm
in "El Volcan 35 hectares with
beautiful well built house, furnish-
ed facing future. International
Highway lots of woter, wonderful
elimote. Borgain. $4,800. See
Jemes W. Thompson. Amodor Rd.
House 0836, Bolboo. Tel 2-2986.
FOR SALE:Lot at Parque Lefevre
600 meters, will occept down pay-
ment. Price $1.450, if cash less
Ancn Ave. No. 6. 2nd floor-Hall
leave address.
? FOR SALE
"rlotorrvole"
FOR SALE:Cheop! Lawson motor
iceot.r. Just overhauled. First $50
00 takes It. 261-B, Gatun.
:
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors

i
FOR SALE 45 foot mohogany
double, plonked shrimp boot, no
engines, could be converted to
sport fishing boat. Phone Dioblo
2-2367.
FOR SALE:19 foot launch in good
condition. Ford V8 motor in per-
fect condition. $500.00. Coll 3-
1268 or 3-1417.
BUICK end CHEVROLET
'rice* Up Frem
$67.20 to $194.35
UT____for (hi, month enly
Wl WILL CONTINUE TO SELL
OFF FLOOR DELIVERIES
AT THE OLD PRICE!
Bitter luy Now!
SMOOT b PAREDES
Your BUICK & CHEVROLET Dealer
MISCELLANEOUS
O. tea bare 4WaUaMj areHaa.
Write Aksasaea Aaeaejaeaa
Baa 2011 Aacea. C. X.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
leva
$250.00
Lake cmara wfrb 1.5 lea
(faavaaej $475.0* list)
$244.50
I *t metis nal Jewelry
l..j. Int. Hotel)
FOR SALE:51 Dodge Coupe "Co-
ronet Diplomatic," two tones ond
white tires, mileoge 3,500. For
information Inversiones Generales,
S. A. No. 38. Jos Froncisco de
la Ossa Avenue.
USED CARS
L0r9.it Selection of
Mod.li in Town-------
ALL THOROUGHLY
RECONDITIONED
See and Compara Our Price!
CIVA, S. A.
Your CADILLAC & PONTIAC Dealer
Tal. 2-0870 Paaami
FOR SALE: 1947 4-door Nosh
Ambassador Sedan, excellent con-
dition. All new tires, $1,100.
Phone 5-126.
Early inspection this year, replace
your shattered glass by our new
expert Mr. De Leon. Tropical Mo-
tors.
FOR SALE:1941 Ford De Luxe
Coupe with 42 engine completely
overhauled. New radiator, battery,
water pumps, clutch, brakes duel
Monifold with twin carbo, 2 new
tires and 3 good, new point and
good upholstery, undercoated, spot-
light and radio. $450.00 os Is.
Phone 88-658.
FOR SALEBargain Brond new 1936
Ford V8 motor 85 HP. Con be
seen at the Lorrinago, Chorrera.
FOR SALE:1950 Cadillac 4 Door
"62", 8,000 miles. Excellent
condition. Call Albrook 3203.
S Frozen Fruit Prices
= Might Remain Iced
DespHe OPS Thaw
ii
I
' (a-
a
11
WASHINGTON. Oct. IS (UP!
Retail prices of frown fruity
and vegetables may stay where
they are despite authorized
price Increases averaging: a
penny a package.
Industry spokesmen said there
la some doubt that the Increases
authorized yesterday by the Of-
fice of Price Stabilization will
' be nut into effect,
i They said orocessors generally
1 fear consumers would not pay
the higher prices for frozen
food.
The OPS authorized processors
of all frozen vegetables and
fruits except orange juice and
\ other citrus products to pass on
i cost increases In raw matarais.
I transportation and storage.
They were also authorized to
fiass on certain Increases In
. abor and packaging costs on all
except major vegetable Unes.
Baptist Boys Brigade
Plans Series Of Plays
> A aeries of entertaining plays
will be staged next Tuesday night
| at 7:30 by the Boys Brigade of
the Cristobal Colon Baptist
Church.
Directed by the Rev. 8yl A.
Scarlett, the Boys will present
"Indian Dance," a play written
by the Reverend himself. "Super-
stitutlon" As A Fake." "The Home
As a Cradle" and "A Donkey on
a Stage."
a> Aiming at the problem of curb-
-lne wayward youths the Brigade
will also stage a play entitled
-"Down With Juvenile Delinquen-
.ey."
A. E. Osborne. Supervisor of
J Canal Zone colored schools, will
preside over the activities.
IMMEDIATELY DELIVERY
P O N T I A C S
4 for New York Delivery
6 for Lacal Delivery
At OLD Prices
SAVE MONEY.. BUY NOW!
CIVA. S. A.
Yaur CADILLAC & PONTIAC Dealer
Tal. 2-0170 Penme
FOR SALE:1950 Studebaker Re-
gol eD Luxe. 4 Door Sedan, per-
fect condition. $1,800. Bolboo
2918.
FOR SALE:Family cor 1946 Hud-
son Commodore. 4 door sedan low
mileoge. economical, excellent con-
dition, priced low, terms. Phone
Albrook 4100 after 1600.
FOR SALE:Bulck Super Convert-
ible 1949 excellent condition,
with long and short wave radio.
$1.650.00 cash only. 52nd Street
No. 8 oportmant 1,8 o. m. to
4 p. m.
U S I D CARS
with
NEW CAR PERFORMANCE
All Types end Models ami
many orders
1951 Ck.vr.let
1950 Ford
1950 Sraaebaker
1950 Plymouth Convertftle
1949 Mercury
1949 Stuaeaaker Cenvertible
1949 Ford
1949 Chevrolet
1949 Lmc.ln
1949 Suick
1947 Para
1947 Packard
1947 OMsawbiie
1947 PeaHec
1946 Chrysler
1940 Baich
AN Cars Recaadleleaed and law
10 Day Oaaraataa
SmaW Daera Payment * Easy Tent
C O L P A N MOTORS
rleaae Of The Bast Used Cars
FORD MERCURY LINCOLN
Oa AatamaHle Raw
T.I. 2-1033 2-1090
FOR SALE:Tropical fishes, plonts,
11 Via Espona, opposite Juan
Franco Stobles. Phone 3-4132.
FOR SALE:4 piece Rotton Living,
room set. Coll Gulick 88-506,
Quorters 127-B.
FOR SALE: GE Record player 25
cycle, 78 RPM, Sunbeam Mix-
master with attachments. 794-X-
B, Tavernilla St.
RESORTS
Gramllch^s Sonto Cloro beoch-
cottages. Electric Ice boxes, gos
stoves, moderate rates. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
Phillips. Ocaonslde cottages. Sonto
Clara. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Panama 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673
Williams Santa Clara Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms, Frlgidalres, Rock-
gas ranges. BalbOu 2-3050.
CASINO SANTA CLARA:Cabins,
food, swimming. No reservations
necessary.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished apart
ment. Contact office No. 8061. 10th
St. New Cristobol. Phone 1386 Co-
lon
FOR SALEFour Green Porch Shades
8 ond 9 foot. $5.00 each or 4
for $1600. Also Framed lottlce
work for Basement including lock-
ing doors, $20.00. Coll 2-3446.
FOR SALE:Speokar cabinet with
G. E. and PermofluK 12" speak-
ers plus single horn tweeter.
Crossmon Air Pistol. Boby Scales.
Boby ffcthlnett Records. Curun-
du 2113-A. Tel. 83-7282.
FOR SALE:Baby carriage and car
bed seat combination. Both for
$10. 474-C. Second St.. Cocolt.
Friends Save Day
As Bad Luck Floors
Former Gl Farmer
ENTERPRISE, Pa., Oct. (UP)
Wayne R. Shoop, an ex-OI
farmer here, had a run of bad
luck.
Heavy rains and hall storms
ruined much of Shoop's crops.
Then Shoop had to spend 26
days In the hospital with an In-
fected apptndix.
When Shoop was released from
the hospital, he was ordered to
keep off his tractor.until his In-
cision had healed. That would
have meant disaster for him,
since he had 40 acres of plowing
to do for his fall planting.
Fourteen neighboring farmers
solved Shoop's problem. They
moved In on his farm with 14
tractors and completed plowing
the 40 acres In four and a half
hours. Shoop estimated that it
would have, taken him 63 hours
to have done the job alone.
NO BED OF JUS OWN
FRESNO. Calif. (UP.! Jesus
Fabella of Madera reported to
authorities that he had been
robbed of $60 and then returned
home to go to bed. Within an
hour he was back at police head-
quarters to report that someone
had stolen his bed
Theater Guild's
laura' Sel For
Oct. 24-25 On CZ
Venom, mixed with vitriol,
will flow on the stage of the
Diablo Theater on the evenings
of Oct. 24 and 25. Wednesday
and Thursday, when The Thea-
ter Guild presents the murder
play, "LAURA," to Isthmian
audiences.
Poison drips from the with-
ering epigrams spoken by the
character of Waldo Lydecker,
the fastidious aesthete, played
In the movie version of "Laura"
by Chiton Webb, and Roy
Gllckenhaus, who Is to act the
role oa the Diablo stage, has
been practicing, for it by sneer-
ing eplgramatically in all di-
rections recently.
Audiences who saw the movie
version of "Laura" and are fa-
miliar with its plot will find
the play la different since it
examines the characters with
a psychological understanding
that the movie hesitated to ac-
quaint the public with. In their
original stage version of
"Laura," Vera Caspary and
George Salar, co-authors, had
no restriction of censorship In
telling their heroine's story in
a frank, adult manner.
In the production to be given
here, the outrageous Waldo,
whose aharp-edged rejoinders
are reminiscent of the late
Alexander Woollcott. will be
portrayed by Roy Gllckenhaus
of Panama City. As Laura
Hunt, the girl who has a fas-
cination for all men but for
whom Waldo can only keep his
love platonlc, Elena Marcella
who u a lovely career girl in
real life, will be playing a hero-
ine whose fame has spread In
a book, a movie, a song, a radio
show, and a play.
Also appearing In the cast
will be Stan ridanque as Mark
McPheraon, the detective, who
finds both love and a murder
and Charles Smallwood, Peggy
Sylvestre. Kathleen Flnnlgan,
Ken Mlllard and William Le-
verett.
Peggy Smith of Panama City
will oe in charge of sound ef-
fects and Bill Wymer of Balboa
will manage the lighting.
FOR RENT:Unfurnished one bed-
room oportmant vary cool, sea
view. Uruguay Street No. 2.
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment
2 bedrooms, Conal Zone govern-
ment inspected, near Curundu
$65. Avenida Jos de Fibrega No.
16, Pasadena. Herrero family.
FOR RENT: De Luxe apartment
with two bedrooms, two both?, hot
water, servants quarters, garage,
etc. Coll 3-2144.
FOR RENT
House*
FOR RENT Bella Visto, fully fur-
nished house: three bedrooms,
maid's quarters, garage, lorge en-
closed yard Attractive. newly
painted Col 43 No. 54. Tele-
phone: 3-3176 or 2-0980.
DONT STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL.
VERTAGREEN
3-Wty Plant Food
it cheaper than water
foi It
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 central Ave. ..Tel. 3-0140
Lt. Commander Diehi
Receives Orders
Lt. Commander and Mrs. C.
B. Dlehl will be leaving on Octo-
ber 31 for the States. Command-
er Dlehl has been ordered to
Corpus Cristi, Texas, after com-
pleting a tour of duty at the Coco
Solo Naval Station.
They will be accompanied by
Mrs. May belle Thomson. Mrs.
Dlehl and Mrs. Thomson have
Lbeen very active In the work of
the Colon Unit of the Inter-Ame-
rican Woman's club.
Civil Engineers Dinner
and Business Meeting
The next meeting of the P;na-
t\\ section, American Society of
Civil Engineers will be a dinner
business meeting at the Army-
Navy Club, Fort Amador, at 7:00
p.m. tomorrow.
Colonel H. D. Vogel, vice-pres-
ident of the Panama Canal Com-
pany and Lt.-Ooverner of the
Canal Zone Government win
speak on the Reorganisation of
the Canal and Railroad.
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
immediate
Delivery.
Tal. 3-1713
22 B 29th 8t
PANAMA BROKERS, INC
Hotel B Piuvi
Wants to buy Stocks from
Panam Forest Products.
Preferred or Common.
Tela, 3-4719, 3-1660
FOR RENT:Recently furnished re-
sidence: livingroom, dinlngroom,
office, pantry, kitchen three bed-
rooms, maid's room, yard, garage.
Rent $250.00. Tel. 3-3143.
ulairWH Position
WANTED:Cook and housekeeper.
Must sleep in. Cell Balboa 2441
3 to 5 Sunday.
Competent cook-housekeeper desires
position with refined family or ba-
chelors. Is willing to travel. Pleas
write S. F. P. 0. Box 129 Cristo-
bal.
Position Offered
WANTED: Experienced American
beouty operator. Apply person-
ally YMCA Beauty Shop.
WANTED:Office clerk with know-
ledge English and Spanish short-
hand. Columbia Pictures 7092.
Justo Arosemtno, between 7th &
8th. Sts. Colon.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTEDPour bedroom house with
garden. Telephone 3-4688, Satur-
day. Sunday or after 5 p. m.
APARTMENT wonted immediately.
furnished, modern 2 bedroom in
good residential section. Phone Mr.
ichultz, Hotel El Ponama. \ '
Help Wanted
WANTED: Cook-housekeeper to
live In. Apply Saturday or Sunday,
Peru Avenue 89.
HELP WANTED Housekeeper, cook
to care for two children. 474-C
Second St. Cocoll, Telephone 4-
180.
Klan Boss Brands
UN. NAACP, NCC
As 'Communistic'
WAGENER. S. 0.,'Oct. 18
(UP)The Crusade Por Free-
dom and the National Council
of Churches today both bore the
label "Communistic" placed on
them by Orand Dragon Thomas
L. Hamilton of the South Caro-
lina Ku Klux Klan.
in a speech from a truck in
the street* here last night,
Hamilton added the two organ-
izations to the Man's long list
of targets.
He warned that the South
mav have to fight another civil
War If people Mont wake up"
to the dangers Of the United
Nations, the National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of
Colored people, the Crusade for
Freedom and tha Council of
Churches. He classified all these
groups "Communistic."
Hamilton maintained that
while be has bean head of the
Klan In South Carolina, the
Klan "has not whipped anyone."
He aid the only whipping the
Klan will do will be at the
ballot boxes In 1992.
The Klan boss complained a*
bout the number of law enforce-
ment officers at the meeting.
About 25 officers were reported
to have attended.
MODERN FURNITURE
custom-built
Slipcover Reupholstery
VISIT OCT HOW-BOOMI
Alberta Ratas
J. *. a> la C-au 77 (Aatomoblle Bow)
Free Bstbaatas Pickup Delivery
Tel. S-attS *:H a.m. la 1M P
ffwti
u
PET HOSPITAL
42 Vie renat (S. Francisco Be.)
aerees 0m krUee en the rliht.
Dr. J. V. Fernandez U Veterinary
Haurai S a. IS aaaa S p.m. S p.m.
Faene MISS PanaaU
P. O. Bex (IS Panam
Doubtful Voters
Claim Attention
Of British Parties
LONDON, Oct. IS (UP)Labor
and Conservative party candi-
dates concentrated their cam-
paign fire today on a doubtful
11.5 per cent of Britain's eligi-
ble votera.
The latest Gallup poll, pub-
lished In the London News-
Chronicle, showed that that pro-
portion had not yet made up
their mindd as to whom to up-
port In the Oct. 29 general elec-
tion.
Most of these, however, were
reported to have shown a ten-
dency toward Labor under per-
sistent questioning.
Taking this tendency Into con-
sideration, poll officials estimat-
ed the Laborltes had made a
gain of 6 per cent since mid-Sep-
tember, altfough they still were
6.5 per cent behind the Conser-
vative In the poll of voter who
definitely have made up their
mind*.
This week's Oahup poll of
those definitely decided gave the
Conservatives 90.5 per centthe
am* as ,wst weekcompared
with 44 per cent for Labor, 4.9
per cent for the Liberals and one
{er cent for others. The Labor
Igure howed a gain of one-half
of one per cent since last week,
while the Liberals had a one per
cent loss.
WE OFFERS
LUMBER
OF ALL SIZES
(Native and Imported)
Complete utortment
of NAILS, etc.
Exceptionally low price.
IS North Ave. Tal. t Ml
No, S Martin Sosa Street
Tel, 3-14X4
Fifth Anniversary of Founding
Celebrated by I.A.W.C.
he Colon Unit of the In tor-
American Women's Club celebra-
ted the Fifth Anniversary of its
founding with a nativa dinner at
the club Thursday evening.
The club was decorated for the
occasion with a profusion of tro-
pical flowers. An illuminated
shell centerpiece with bougaln-
vllla was used on the long buffet
table. This was the work of Mrs.
Marcelle Qrlngolre. She was as-
sisted by Mrs. FrankL. Scott.
Mrs. Samuel Puller was gen-
eral chairman for the affair.
Mrs. Hiplito Fernandos was
chairman of the native food din-
ner. Mrs. Harry Bllgray was In
charge of tickets with Mrs. By-
ron King. Mrs. W. D. King and
Mrs. Manuel Castillo assisting.
Mr. Perclval Alberga, Mrs. Pe-
ter Secaras, Mrs. Walter Hmini-
cut t and Mrs. Enrique Serventl
were In charge of the decora-
tions. Mrs. PL. Balay headed
the salad committee and Mrs.
Fred Bell was in charge of cook-
ies. Mrs. Reginald Armstrong
arranged for the rolls and coffee.
Mrs. Elsie Mohr Sklllmgn and
Mrs. Julia Emillani sold tickets
at the door. Mrs. Fred Knox,
Mrs. William Wall and Miss
Adamary Anderson sold hot dogs,
Mrs. Himlierto Leignadler was
in charge of the drinks. Mrs.
Mary Coffey and Miss Thelma
Godwin took care of the publicity.
Mrs. Anna Fisher, Mrs. Prospero
Melendez and Mrs. Lola Cotes
were the kitchen committee.
During the dinner a program
of tamborita dancers entertained
the guests. The stage was ap-
propriately decorated for the oc-
casion. Miss Yolanda Diaz played
a series of musical selections on
the accordion. Vocal selections
were rendered by Mr. Marguer-
ite Schommer and Mr. Dquglas
Maduro, accompanied by Miss
Anna Fisher.
Mrs. Ernesto Estlnoz had
charge of the dancen and Miss
Teresa Benjamin was In charge
of the games.
RP Flower, Plant
Designing Classes
Offered By YMCA
Flower design which make
use of native plants and flow-
ers common during the rainy
season, will feature tha two
new flower arrangement class-
es by Mrs. Chas. (Pat) Morgan
at the Balboa T.M.C.A.
The new classes are design-
ed both for houaewlves and
women who are employed. The
morning class meets at fl a.m.
and the evening class at 1 p.m.
Classes meet each Monday for
seven weeks and will conclude
with a gala flower show by
class members on Mondajj. De-
cember S.
The classes are conducted
without charge but advance re-
gistration is urged and can be
made over the phone by call-
ing Balboa 2830 or 275,. To
accommodate Spanish-speaking
women, class material has been
mimeographed in Spanish.
More than 800 women I have
taken advantage of asset
which have been conduct d by
Mrs. Morgan.
Women who have cot e to
the Isthmus in recant n inths
will find these classes 01 spe-
cial Interest.
Elks District Depu y
Starts Official Ton
The Pat Exalted Ruler ( >un-
cil "Esperania No. 96," HP E of
W. Atlantic District, will he d its
regular montnly meetln on
Sunday at tha Sliver City odge
Hall, commencing at I am
DUtrStt Deputy Mike 1> irus,
representing the Grand Ej Ited
Ruler of th order, Dr. J.1 nley
Wilson, will make an offleSf visit
to the council acccflVMa- I by
hi Senior District OfrK Bill
Claude A. Mottley andlwtrlet
Officer BUI Albert E Lam rt.
Tha matting will be pn ided
by Chief Antler Edgar 6. I 'art.
According to the Chief I rlbe
for the Council, the
on the afanas will
rtopM' Rom at l_
education end a jhort leitur
from th District Deputy,
Laaaru' via to
Council wlli b th .
official tour of th van
Sr hl Jurisdiction, dun.
will inspect, Itctur
port on th dftUlon
lng fh )Ml Orand !
I ventlon In Buffalo, M
ems
Old
Uon,
Following her recent sensational triumph In Mexico City
where she was obliged to give six rectala at the Palace f Fine
Arts within four weeks Ellabelle Davis who will be heard at
the National Theatre on Friday, October 38, was honored by the
dedication to her of a new song from the pen of Mexico's fore-
most popular composer, Manuel Ponce. Seftor Ponce, whose
"Eatreluta" had long been a favorite of United State concert
and radio audiences, has composed "Alleluja" especially for
Miss Davis, who performed the work for the first time at her
final Mexico City concert from the manuscript Inscribed, "para
la eminente artista da canto, Ellabelle Davis, con la admira-
cin del autor."
Soprano Davis whose voice baa moved audlencea and critics
to tears from New York's Carnegie Hall to Prague's Smetana
Hall, from Mexico City's Palace of Fine Arta to Paris' Salle
oaveau, ha a host of wonderful memories about her moat
tecent conquest in Europe. Highlights of her last phenomenal
tour included her first appearance in tha Netherlands' capital.
The Hague, when the Cultural Attacne' to the U. S. Embassy
remarked: "Never before has a native or foreign artist been so
cheered by the Dutch public!"... and Herman B. Baruch. Amer-
ican Ambassador, attended with his staff... and the audience
would not let her leave the hall until a second concert was
announced... and the singer, by the time she reached her
hotel, was nearly smothered in tulip...
Other highlights: the tima Jn Copenhagen when word of
her genius had spread to the extent that no recital hall could
hold the crowd lined up for tickets-and the Bishop permitted
the concert to be sung in the Cathedra], on the condition that
there be no applause; for a half hour after the concert two
thousand Danta, standing in th square outalde the cathedral,
cheered Ellabelle Davis...
Nerway acclaimed Klllabelle Davis "A New Jenny T4nd, A
Sensation of the Age" Frlheten, Oslo... The Belgian National
Radio staged a special concert to broadcast the European pre-
miere of a work commissioned especially for Miss Davis by the
American League of Composer, Luna Foss' "Song of Songs"...
the time when the lead sentence of an Oversea New Agency
Dispatch from Vienna read: "A young American soprano has
scored a double triumph In Vienna's historic Mozart Hall with
a performance that brought cheers from a highly critical audi-
ence of Viennese muslo lovers and exploded, possibly for all
time, the myth of America's musical Illiteracy"... and Austria's
great composer Joseph Marx was so stirred by Miss Davis'
artistry that he Invited her to visit with him at his home and
dedicated to her a group of his newest Lleder...
Or the time when, following the Festival Concert of Inter-
national Stars arranged by the Association of Swedish News-
papers in Stockholm, the leading Stockholm paper, Morgen-
tldningen. wrote. "One star shone out with greater brilliance
than all the rest Ellabelle Davl. who brought us out Into
the Elysian fields of music...'*
Nor Is Miss Davis ever likely to forget the reception she
got In Bergamo. Italy; after having been thunderously ap-
plauded at her concert*the night before, she was sight-seeing
in Bergamo's famous Cathedral where Gaetano Donizetti is
buried; a giant demonstration of students was going on, students
thanking the Western Powers for glvihg Trieste to Italy they
recognized the singer and shouted, "Bravlsslma Davis I" "Thanks
to America!" and applauded and cheered until Miss Davis
raised her hand for silence and sang "The Star Spangled Ban-
ner". ..
Or that afternoon In Bologna, Italy, at the historic Bologna
Conservatory, where Rossini taught and Mozart studied; Miss
Davis sat at Rossini's spinet and san* from the manuscript
score of "The Barber of Seville'... while at famed La Scala
Opera House In Milan, following; her sensationally successful
debut recital in that world capital of the lyric art. Miss Davis
met with Mario Labroca. Artistic General Director of La Scala,
and Otto Ackermann, Chief Conductor of the Vienna State
Opera, both of whom extended immediate invitations fot her
to appear as "Alda" during their regular operatic seasons...
No, Ellabelle Davis Is not Ukelv to forget the Europe that
recognized her genius in a thousand thrilling ways nor is
Europe likely ever to forget the young Negro singer who "ex-
ploded, possibly for all. time, tha myth of America's musical
illiteracy."
Chase Bank Deposits. Resources
Loans Show Gain. Over Last Year
Deposits, loans and total re-
sources of the Chase National
Bank on September 30. 1091 re-
Slstered substantial gains over
e figures of a year ago. Loans
were nigher than on June 30.
while deposits and total resources
were down slightly in the quar-
ter.
Total resources of the bank on
September 30, 1981 were $8,174,-
410,239, compared with $8,327,-
898,684 on June 30, 1981 and $1,-
884,418,007 on September 30.1980.
Deposits wore $4,747.183,338, com-
pared With $4,793,337,782 and $4.-
448,189,040 on the respective
dates.
Total loans outstanding on
September SO, 1961 amounted to
$1,993,937,310 (a new all-time
high), compared with $1,892,132,-
154 on June 30. 1951 and $1,687,-
141,192 on September SO a year
ago.
Cash and money due from oth-
er banks on September 30. 1951
was $1378,&4S,483, compared with
$l,379,l89,a?2 on June 30, 1951
and $1,308,033,661 a year ago. In-
vestments in United States Gov-
ernment tK-urltles amounted to
$1,199,967.856, compared with $1,-
380,413.671 and $1,493,793.371 re?
speetiveV
The capital of the bank. $111-
000,000 and its surplus, $189,000,-
000 were unchanged. Undivided
profits on September 30, 1951
ware $89,11*3,225 compared with
$57,187,886 on June 30 and $51,-
790,814 on September 30, 1950.
Net earnings and profits for
nine months of 1951 ending Sep-
tember 30 were $15,071,000 or
$2.04 per share, Including profits
on securities of four cents per
share, compared with net earn-
ings and profits for the same
period in 1950 amounting to $15,-
243,000 or $2 06 per share, includ-
ing profits on securities of
twenty-eight cents per share.
Reserves for Federal and State
taxes for the nine-month period
in 1951 were $18,126,000 (or $2.45
per share), compared with $10,-
400.000 (or $1.40 per share) for
the same period In 1990, repre-
senting an increase of $7,726,000
(or 79 per cent).
California. Wont Extradite
1926 Chain Gang Escapee
SACRAMENTO. Oct. 13 UP)
Oov. Earl Warren announced
today he ha refused a request
by the State of Oeorgla to ex-
tradite John W. Brown, 45. who
escaped from a prison chain
gang 36 years ago.
Brown, father of six children.
has been living for the past
several years In Los Oatos. He
la a carpenter and vice-presi-
dent of his local union.
Oeorgla Oov. Herman Tal-
madge said last week that he
did not care whether Warren
would grant the requested ex-
tradition.
Talmadge said lt was "all
right with me if other states
want to harbor criminals, but
that Is not for Georgia."
Warren announced his deci-
sion at a press conference.
"I have determined not to
and that man back," the Gov-
ernor said.
"He was convicted of a minor
burglary IB years ago when tit
was only 20. He escaped 24 years
ago and has lived in California
14 years.
"He has six daughters rang-
ing in age from four to 19. All
of them have been properly
reared and the family has a
good reputation In the commun-
ity. Brown has been both a good
husband and father.
"It would not be in the in-
terests of Justice to break up
that home, put the family on
charity and send him back to
Jail."
Brown was convicted In 1928
of stealing $9 worth of clothing.
He served six months on a
chain gang at hard labor before
he mad his escape.
More than 1,000 Santa Clara
County residents petitioned the
Governor not to return Brown
to Georgia and two ministers,
phis a labor union official, de-
scribed the carpenter as an
"honest, forth-right and com-
pletely rehabilitated man,"
WANTED*
Four Kardex/cabinets
of 16 drawers
Call Panam 2-0860 extension 18


1 SUNDAY. OCTOBER 14. 1951,
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAGE SEVEN


Cary Grant Jeanne Grain Top Cast
Of People Will Talk' At Balboa
Few pictures that deal with
the American scene and the peo-
ple hi it will surpass "People will
Talk." which opened last night
at the Balboa Theatre, tor its
humanneis, comic lnuendoes,
satirical barbs and delightful en-
tertainment. If this be high
praise that is just what it is
meant to be. Of course, one has
come to expect something spe-
cial from Darryl Zanuck and
Joseph Mankiewlc. They put
"All About Eve" on the screen,
remember?
This time with Cary Grant and
Jeanne Crain. two ingratiating
players, as their stars, they have
poked some fun at the medical
precision but at the same time
have expressed a heartening
pholosophy while telling a real-
ly charming love story.
Mr. Manklewicz is a keen ob-
server of contemporary life and
his typewriter must be made of
barbed wire, so keen is his wit.
He wrote the script as well as
directed this bright film and his
dialogue is as sharp as the sur-
geon's scalpel which comes in
for some lampooning in the story.
Cary Grant is the Dr. Praetor-
lus about whom the story re-'
volves and his polished perform-
ance is just what you have come
to expect from such an expert
actor. Women "will love him and
men will find him refreshing. It
would not be fair to detail the
AN INGRATIATING PAIR are Cary Orant and Jeanne Crain
now playing at Balboa Theater in "People Will Talk."
Jolly Girls of a Feather


^^^^^K9 ' 'mX ' w9 L \ anaana^^^LW 4St
i . ^^L ^t^L 1 Jp* TUB iv j
Slot of this unusual film play.
uflice to say that it is a story
of a physician who had some
strange and unorthodox Ideas
about the practice of medicine.
With this idea, Zanuck, Man-
klewicz and Grant proceed to
have a field day. They let Dr.
Praetorius, who in the course of
the story proves that he is a real
human being, interested in min-
iature trains and symphonic
music, expound on "faith, prop-
erly injected into a patient, to be
as effective in maintaining life
as adrenalin," and say boldly
that "the practice of medicine
should become more and more
Intimately involved with the hu-
man beings it treats rather than
confine itself to pills, serums and
knives."
This fabulous doctor even
takes a snipe at the practice of
hospitals waking patients from
a "health-giving sleep" to feed
them to suit the whims of the
kitchen help, and states his con-
viction that patients are sick
peoplenot inmates In the in-
stitution.
All this is done in an atmosph-
ere of serious thought, rare mo-
ments of comedy with a mixture
of suspense in the person of
Shunderson, played with quiet
restraint by Flnlay Currie, the
Scotsman you'll remember from
"The Mudlark." *
The love story part of this
superb picture in which Jeanne
Crain. lovely to look at and giv-
ing a cleverly balanced perform-
ance, adds to much of its charm.
There are also splendid charact-
erizations by Hume Cronyn,
Walter Slezak, whose bass fiddle
playing accounts for much
laughter. Sidney Blackmer. Basil
Ruysdael and Katherine Locke.
These players all seemed to be
having the time of their lives and
they Impart this quality to the
picture, which one mieht say was
a social comedy with serious
overtones.
There are many unforgettable
scenes In this Zanuck-Mankiew-
icz triumph and one that will
enchant every boy from four to
forty is the miniature train se-
quence in which Orant, Slezak
and Blackmer essay the roles of
train dispatchers. Scenes such as
this give the picture its fine hu-
man quality.
"People Will Talk" is two hours
of delightful entertainment and
it cannot be recommended too
highly. See it and you will know
what we mean.
Fancy Pants' Rollicking Laugh-Packed Hit
Co-Stars Bob Hope, Lucille Ball at Central
Barbara Stanwlck is on the RKO lot as a co-star with
Robert Ryan, Paul Douglas and Marilyn Munroe in "Clash
By Night," just placed in producing by Jerry Wald and Nor-
man Krasna. Fritz Lang Is directing, and Harriet Parson Is
producing. This engagement marks Miss Stanwyck's first pic-
ture under the RKO Radio release banner in several seasons.
Story was originally presented on Broadway by the author
Clifford Odets.
~
Fast Moving 'Highway 30V
Blasts Holdup Mobsters
Thursday At Bella Vista
High Seas Sport
.
Do you recognize these Indian Maids? Four lovely Hol-
lywood stars form this quartette of Intriguing Indians sing-
ing and dancing in sequence of RKO Radio's merry Tech-
nicolor musical "Two Tickets to Broadway." Answer: left to
right Janet Leigh, Ann Miller, Barbara Lawrence and Glo-
ria DeHaven. Tony Martin is the singing star who charms
the heroine Janet Leigh In this early release.______________>
Frankie, Jane and Groucho
law. stl a^aw stae*.
m

Three in the "Money"When Groucho Marx Joins the
the cast of a picture the fun is sure to be fast and furious.
Frank Sinatra and Jane Russell get into the rollicking spirit
to make RKO Radio's "It's Only Money" something new In
screen entertainment. Currently, Jane is seen in Howard
Hughes' "His Kind of Woman," and Marx is completing "A
Girl in Every Port" on the RKO.lot.
Mid-Ocean Fishing. Few fish-
ermen are as daring as Thor
Heyerdahl and his companions
who caught their dally fish in
mlc-ocean, thousands of miles
from shore as shown in this ln-
cidmt from "Kon-Tlkl." This
unisual film depicting the ad-
ventures of a 101-day sail across
the wide Pacific Ocean on a
bal raft is presented by Sol
Lesser and is an RKO Radio re-
lease.
Who's Who In N
'Wonderland'
Andrew Stone, who both wrote
and directed "Highway 301,"
Warner Bros.' revealing crime
drama, due at the Bella Vista
Theatre on Thursday, knew very
well that he would need to have
ail his facts assembled concern-
ing the activities of the Trl-
State Gang, a notorious band of
robbers, before their story could
be planned or filmed.
"Any case so thoroughly dis-
cussed in the newspapers and
by the public," he explained,
"can't be re-arranged to suit the
dramatic requirements of a mo-
tion picture story."
When it had finally been de-
cided that Stone would make the
picture based on the Tri-8tate
Gang, he packed his things and
took off qultly for the locale of
the story. There, he spent weeks
on an average of 17 hours dally,
talking to people, police and
newsmen, |trylng to glean every
available scrap of useful infor-
mation.
The principal character In the
story was of no help. Legenza.
the ring-leader, (played by Steve
Cochran), had been executed for
his crimes. But the men. law
officers and newsmen who help-
ed track the gang down and at-
tain tH'e convictions, were avail-
able and they did talk, plenty, to
Stone who took copious notes
and collected great quantities
of newspaper clinplngs. and of-
ficial police reports.
Also, by visiting the prison
where the gang members had
been confined, Stone got a first
hand knowledge of their meth-
ods and about the bandits, them-
selves. Even to the love affair
between Legenza and the Can-
adian girl, played by Gaby An-
dre who was brought from France
to appear In "Highway 301."
After the story and casting
were completed, the months of
patient, unltlrlng research by
Andrew Stone paid off in vivid
characterizations rueged action
and detailed authenticity.
was developing a nervous tic.
"I sat right across from him and
didn't hear a thing!"
"I think he's lying," said the boss.
On The Records
'Rubber-Legged' Leon Errol
Dies After Hospital Checkup
HOLLYWOOD, Oct 13 (UP)
Leon Errol, the bale, "rubber-
leg" star of short comedies, died
today of a neart attack after a
three-week .Ulness.
The 70-year-old "Lord Epping"
of "B" movies entered Good Sam-
aritan Hospital only last night
for a checkup. He suffered the
fatal attacK at 7:20 a.m. today.
Errol was not one of Holly-
wood's headline glamor stars,
and the elite society of movie-
land hardly knew him. But he
was more famous than many a
handsome profile In popcorn pal-
aces around the country.
His comedies produced at RKO
kept movie fans chuckling for 20
yearsthe longest any actor has
worked for a single studio.
Most moviegoers remember
him as "Lord Epping," a satiric
and stuffy English character in
the Mexican Spitfire' series in
which he co-starred with the
late Lupe Vlez.
Last Jun_- h donned his han-
dlebar' muslaehe and pince-nez
to pjay Epping again in six two-
reel comed* s.
In the mrvles Errol often wob-
bled around on his "rubber legs"
when his wife could catch him
with a pretty blonde. It was that
routine that bi ought him fame
In the first Ziegfeld Follies on
Broadway In 1911. *
Errol was born in Svdney, Aus-
tralia, July 3, 1881, of English
parents. At 20 he started touring
Australia as an actor with stock
companies. After 10 years, he
moved to New York to star in
such stage hits as "The Century
Girl," "KlUihy Koo" and "Sally.''
Hollywood lured him west to
appear with Colleen Moore in the
movie version of "Sally" in 1925.
He signed his first contract with
RKO in 1930 and remained at
that studio until his death.
He also appeared In the "Joe
Palooka" movie series and such
"A" films is Hlghei and Hlgh-
Besldes Cochran and Miss An-
dre. Virginia Grey stars in
"Highway 301." which opens at
the Bella Vista Theater on
Thursday. ,
Jeanne Crain saw something
terrible on the Sunset Strip. Act-
or driving a small foreign car
stuck out his hand for a left
turn and tipped over. He for-
got to remove his ring!
Popular Mii'ic
#NEW YORK, Oct. 13. (UF.)
In plenty of time for Christm-
as. Capitol Records has Issued *
hatful of children's albums which
should be popular with the small
fry. All nine of the albums are
packaged in brightly-colored
folders with cartoon Illustra-
tions.
One of the best in the new ser-
ies is "The Sorcerer's Appren-
tice," using Walt Disney's Fan-
tasia adaptation of the Dukas
classic. Don Wilson, radio an-
nouncer, narrates the story of
the apprentice who brought a
broom to life to do his work. The
Brussels INR Symphony Or-
chestra plays the lively music.
Another especially good one
is the "Ferdinand The Bull" al-
bum in which Don Wilson also
tells of the hull who would
rather smell flowers than fight.
Mel Blanc's versatile voice is
featured in "Tweety'si'uddy Tat
Twouble" which tells another of
the stories about the canary and
the pussy cat which are so po-
pular with small children. The
two-record album Includes 19
pages of story and cartoons by
Alfred Abranzs and Don Mac-
Laughlin.
"Casper The Curious Kitten,"
with story and music by Larry
Morey. is presented in a Telle-
Talkle album with a rotating
disk of cartoons by Allen Shaw
which appear as though in a tel-
evision set to amuse the children
while the record is being played.
Mel Blanc is featured in two
other of the Capitol children's
albums, "Henry Hawk" and
"Woody Woodpecker's Picnic."
Don Wilson narrates with mus-
ic by Billy May on three others
"Elmer Elephant," "Three Or-
phan Kittens" and "The Flying
Mouse."
Mr. Robert Hope, formerly
known as Bob, brings hlj inimit-
able talents to the screen of the
Central Theater next Thursday
In Paramount's uproarious co-
medy hit. "Fancy Pants." Lucille
Ball Is co-starred with Mr. Hope
In this hilarious tale of a phony
English gentlemen's gentleman
who becomes a ladies' man in the
wild, wild west.
In color by Technicolor, "Fancy
Pants" is far and away the fun-
niest picture of the year, ac-
cording to preview reports. This
is usually true of any Robert
Hope film, but It seems that his
latest screen effort has drawn
an unprecedented crescendo of
cheerslouder even than those
that greeted "The Paleface" and
"The Great Lover."
A thesplan whose accomplish-
ments are many and varied, Mr.
Hope Is not content with merely
acting in "Fancy Pants." He
sings, also. And since a voice like
his needs help. Paramount went
to great lengths to provide him
with the services of the screen's
top song-writing due. Livingston
and Evans. Composers of "But-
tons and Bows," they authored
two new Hit Parade tunes for the
picture"Home Cookln' and
"Fancy Pants."
Gorgeous Lucille Ball previous-
ly co-starred with Bob Hope In
"Sorrowful Jones," but this Is
the first time she, or anyone else
for that matter, has played op-
posite Mr. Robert Hope. The ski-
nosed comedian insisted on that
billing when he learned his part
in "Fancy Pants" called for him
to wear a full dress suit and a
monocle. And it's rumored that
it won't be long before he'll be
calling himself Sir Robert Hope.
The Imposing featured cast of
"Fancy Pauls" is headed by
Eruce Cabot and radio comic
Jack Klrkwood who makes hls|
motion picture debut in the
film, stage stars Lea Penman,
last seen m the Broadway pro-
duction of "Annie Get Your
Gun." and John Alexander who
co-starred with Judy Holllday in
"Born Yesterday." have import-
ant supporting rtles along with
Hugh French, Eric Blore a.id
Joseph Vtale.
Based on a story by Harry Leon
Wilson, the picture was produced
by Robert Welch and directed by
George Marshall. Edmund Hart-
mann and Robert O'Brien co-
authored the screenplay.
Bob Hope and Lucille Ball seem to be getting on very
well In this scene from Paramount's Technicolor comedv
"Fancy Pants," which arrives next Thursday at the Central-
Theatre. George Marshall directed.
IN HOLLYWOOD


HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Be- sticking to beautiful clothes and
hind the Screen: Esther Williams glamour."
Actor describing a direct-
or: "He has a mind of his
own. But It's on loan-out."
An overworked actor tried to
set. an emergency vacation. He
told the boas his doctor said he
Another excellent story book-
record combination for children
has been released by RCA Victor
with Illustrations and music from
Walt Disney's "Alice In Wonder-
land." The music includes the
tunes "Alice in Wonderland,"
"The Caucus .Race." "How Do
You Do and Shake Hands." "The
"Painting the Roses Red" and
Walrus and the Carpenter," "I'm
Late," "All in the Golden After-
noon," "The Unblrthday Song."
"Very Good Advice," "Twas Brll-
Hg." "In a World of My Own,
"March of the Cards." The tunes
are sume by Kathryn^ Beaumont
and Ed Wynn.
"he March Hare declaims
mich of the classic non-sense of
Lev is Carroll's famous story in
Wdt Disney's all-cartoon Tech-
nicolor musical version of "Alice
in Wonderland." The March Hare
with the Mad Hatter co-hosts an
endless "Un -Birthday Party"
which amazes Alice to no end.
Jeivy Colonna voices this whlm-
Alc.l character.
Panama Canal Clubhouses
Showing Tonight
BALBOA
Alr-Condltloned
!M 4:10 6:2 8M
Cary GANT Jeanne CRAIN
"PEOPLE WILL TALK"
Alto Showlnr Monday!
MARI d HT$ Glwm TOM> f Rhonda FLEMING
"* " ",' "The Redhead And The Cowboy'
. > Monday -A MODFKN MARRIAGE"
C O C O L I Tnd McMUIU'AY Eleanor PARKER
id sot -. "A Millionaire For Christy"
Monday "DOWN TO EARTH"
PEDRO MIGUEL
i* r m
______e_ __
Lex BARKX* Virginia HUSTON
"TARZAN'S PERIL"
Friday "A MILLION At UK FOR CHRISTY"
G A M R D Clirton WEBB . Joanne DRU
im,u "Mr. Belvedere Kings The Bell'
w Wednesday THi V)CND OF FURY"
G A 1 U N
I:Ji T:M
Joel McCREA Shelley WINTERS
"FRENCHie* (Technicolor)
Tuatday "TUB SOUND OF FURY"
MARGARITA
13 1:11 S:25
Fr.nk LOVXJOY Kathleen VIA
"THE SOUND OF FURY"
Moawlay "MUNCF. OF FOXES"
CRISTOBAL
Atr-Caadlttofied
- :! 7|.lt
2:3d
Salo PINZA Janet LEIGH
'STRICTLY DISHONORABLE"
Alao Showlnr Monday!
comes up dry except for a car-
nival "Dunk Me" scene and a
brief ballet routine (swimming
In the sky yet) In "Texas Car-
nival" and her fans are yelling
that MOM shouldn't have dry-
docked their favorite mermaid.
Esther confesses she^'marched
upstairs after the picture was
finished to argue the point." But
here'a the way she sees it now:
"It's Red Skelton's funniest
picture. It's so good without my
swimming I'm not worried."

Katherine Dunham of the
swivel-hips, on the subject of
Hollywood In her backstage dres-
sing room:
"I'm not burning with the de-
sire to make pictures In Holly-
wood after a little mistake called
'Casbah.' But I keep hoping that
the right kind of film may come
along someday."
I asked if Katherine would be
in Rita Hayworth's next picture.
"No." snapped the famed danc-
er, who was linked with Aly Khan
in the gossip columns months
before Rita fled back to Holly-
wood.
0*0
Norman Kerry, the former sil-
ent star, is okay following a heart
attack... Johnny Desmond, who
warbles on Don McNeill's air-
show, is up for a big musical at
Fox.
o o o
Lauren Bacall sounded off,
but good, to the British press
about actors trying to be normal
people. Wailed Bogart's Baby:
"Who wants normal people in
Hollywood, anyway? Too many of
the big names in the film world
are trying to live like the folks
next door. Mrs. Brownwhen she
has put her four kids to bed
doesn't go to the cinema to see
an actress being Mrs. Brown,
putting four kids to bed."
0 0*
Donald O'Connor, who once
wasn't sure whether he wanted
talented wifey Owenn Carter to
have a film career, has now Riv-
en her his blessing. **I even find
myself agentlng for her," he told
me.
"I mentioned her name to a
producer just'the other day. I
sort of sneaked it in, saying I
knew a good actress named
Gwenn Carter. The producer
smiled and said, "That's your
wife. Isn't It?
"But really, we're both serious
about her career."
0*0
The plunging neckline may
have taken its last plunge, but a
Hollywood designer. Ivonne Wood,
says she'll ignore the return to
modest femininity in her movie
wardrobes Bhe told me: "I'm
Ivonne's description of the new
pencil skirts and high button col-
lars for winter and next spring:
"Real feminineand uncomfort-
able."
o
The show Is over but the melo-
dy lingers on. Bill Demarest
couldn't understand why he was
hailed as a hero while making
theater personal appearances
around New York. Then he dis-
covered the reason:
"A lot of people think I really
discovered Al Jolson it in the movie). People kept
asking to shake my hand, saying.
We'll always remember you as
the man who gave us Al.'"
e a
George Raft is out of "Hood-
lum Empire" after an "honest
difference of opinion" on the
screen-play. Luther Adler will
flay his mobster role... Infla-
lon note: Banana splits are now
selling for $1.10 at a Beverly
Hills ice cream parlor.
*
Jack Benny won't be returninor
to the screen in "The Girls Have
Landed." RKO's film aboat th*>
USO. A conflict In commitment
dates is given as the reason.
One-Armed Veteran
Paints Flagpole
LEXINGTON, Ky. (U.P.)
Just to prove there is no such
things as a handicap, a 35-year-
old Pacific war veteran with one
hand missing painted the court-
house flagpole here in an hour,
and a half.
Jesse Mattox climbed the 70-
foot pole with an ingenious de-
vice made of three separate
ropes. Mattox said he has been
painting flagpoles since he was
a shaver of 14.
"I've been hundreds of feet
from the ground once or twice,
painting poles," he said.
Prince
who was
a THIEF
_ *<'

**r**ee**
nwrCURTIS
nntlMUl
LUX THEATRE
t} H.CI S-juMllFIEll
ENCANTO THEATRE
________Air Conditioned_______
THE FIGHT-
SADDLER vs. PEP
Pa: O'Brien, in
"MARINE RAIDERS"
Also: -
"SNOW WHITE"
TIVOLI THEATRE
James Cagney Virginia
Mayo. In
"STORT OF WEST POINT-
"ONLY THE VALIANT"
CECILIA THEATRE
SUPER DOUBLE IN
COLORS!
They wanted to be-
come women oefore
time I
"TAKE CARE of
MY LITTLE
GUU."
Crain
- Alao: -
"The Sword of
Montecristo"
George Montgomery
Lula Cortay
rjuij^rd
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Victor Mature Hedy
Laman-, in
'SAMSON AND D A I. II. AH"
- Also: -
"ISLE OF TABU"
An Attractive Show!
VICTORIA THEATRE
Tyrcne Power, in
RAWHIDE- AH:
"ON THE RIVIERA''
wlt'i Danny Kaye




Tlsll Stretch Figures To The Limit
NT
Name Their Wives
JR. DOAKES" fortuna shrank away almost to nothing In hla
last years, due to taxea and bad investment*. When he died
there was just $1.000. He had directed in his will that hla estate
be divided among three relatives and their wives, and so It was.
The three wives together received $396 Jane got 110 more
than Catherine, and Mary received $10 more than Jane. John
Smith was given Just as much as his wife, Henry Samuels got
half as much again as his wife, and Tom Carter received twice
as much as his wife.
What was the Chriatian name of each man's wife?
'OOOIt !n ii JJ paionooow au paw aaidnon aajqi ,rn pairad iliaajjoo tAwq
m oaqi '(Jin ji *IX > qjnia a toim uui.i inoj. pin 'sill "tawr JI IN
i nrii qjnai at Jlu iianaras *JUH 'tltt aautqia;) II* a BMim n bbaibo
-*t mitas roor ii Map oi 'paAiaoaj emu poo wr "ouooawo >aqi BAitrtjoooo ai >| two|tW|oa
"World Series' Of Baseball Bra in Busters
Puzzling Out '^Nursery Rhyme
Right At Home
IN ONE small Eastern country, camel's hair, which is In demand for export for man-
1 ufacture of rugs, expensive shawls and artists' brushes, is gathered in small quan-
tities by what sometimes are called ordinary folk. They sell it to traveling brokers
who dispose of it in larger lots to merchants or exporters.
It is the custom for the brokers to operate on. a commission basis. That is. upon
receiving an order from a merchant to buy camel's
hair, they find someone who wishes to sell, and
charge two per cent commission to each of the
principals, thereby making four per cent on the
transaction.
Naturally, some are "shady." Ali. by juggling his
scales, managed to add to his profit by cheating
The drawing shows All at work. Upon receiving a
consignment of camel's hair he placed it on the short
arm of his scales, so as to make the goods weigh
one ounce light to the pound. When he came to sell
it. he reversed the scales so as to give one ounce to
the pound. He thus made $25 by cheating.
That being the case, can you deduce how much he
paid for the goods?
Of course, his transactions were not In dollars.
Were using dollars in presenting the puzzle in order
to make your calculations simpler.
Naturally, camel's hair usually is sold in larger
quantities than the picture suggests.
A Quaker once, we understand,
For three sons laid off his land,
And made three equal squares to
meet
So as to bound an acre neat.
twarnm to we jo ooo' ^n pn at fa cenfera of the squares around,
ian| a^aoi w ai| rain oa 'r.'sit i u"P ii mjuq ni. qiq
"eneren wed
ud iaio8 ail quo aqi *iusa si Biaao ,g aa \osj ett lant o| lunotot ill
aSuiiaauj o.vii am rain oa jija os sit am npai lano as 'tu|
-1B01P .id gzt Xiioaxa apcin aq laul Piwa Xjoia aql av *Sunaaq.>
.tq aiaao *ifi rauoiuppa a apvio aau aq oa acf96*t aq ijqo
ajojwaqi pmo. Smiiaa pot SoUnq ioj aaja^oja bih CUlieeit
aaaq aAtq pino.u dbx. aq 01 'ujiu* "aasuno i joj piad
a.taq pnoM u 'Xniaaoq litap paq aq ji 'mon Suiivaip a get
oi uonippa ui atejairojq Rt tu|Mai 'jaBauwnd aql uiojj cr. )t
i 'c'Ct 'ialjaa Bui oigjj luao ltd 7. paAiaoaj aq 'jaAajtof*
'bPooS am jo; pivd aq
ib:(m aq pinoja 'ooiBBiuiuio^ jo ooiisanb oa aa* ajaqi 11 'ipium
'no'iSlt aq Pino 'aioqM aql ic 'Binuaana-uaaijo 'oc'CIt quo.
Oqiaq qiuaaua-auo 'aa^uno ;i aql 101 paSjaqo pqa ait>qw aqi
ioj who aq i*UM ;o aqigi/s luaaajdaj atouno 0*1 aqi qaqi 'lui
-raaqa q ojt annul 01 aa oa 'mi auiaa aqi ra Pioa aja* aaoano
o.i aatqi 11 'ibao aaaqno omi paq pna "punod a ioj aajuno gi
BAal aq iqln 001 aouno auo iqtiaM a iq pjaqi Pioa aq uaqM
pqnod a joj aaouno 11 10 aq 'AVraaq 001 aauno auo iqSiaw
panod a un. apoot aqi paqSiaj* Jaiiajq aql ji -aiiamuilJ
aidoiia qodn paaaq 'p. lianam a. oa 'jainaaa ioia|airaa a ba|S 01 uj <|tuioiaaa non
-JodOJd pqa onaj 10 ajata 0 aoouiiui (jbuipjo :uo|juios
A dwelling for each son was
found;
And in the center of the acre
[see above]
Was found the dwelling of the
Quaker.
Now can you tell by skill or art,
Bow lar from sons he lived
apart f
Uaawn qi 'Bptu s M jo Iff an|d III
I ajanbs jo jajuaa 01 s|Suaui ;o i.nu*>
uioj; jjiiBiBia tpoj zs's io vtv.i jo ,
>l aiMB an 01 arnipa 10 jaiuao ojoij aoon
an ni a|Sua|i| jo iajuas mojj .uanii'
jojajaqj, -apoj ts 1 apmum aql paa
ipoj is ni ai ;Ju|ji a qsna jo ap|i aqx
ajda ub Aiioaxa buibiuoj 11 aoaia 'apoj
jantia otl ai aituaui 10 aauv i*mv
w0?
ORLD SERIES time naturally makes us think
This'll Make You Make A Scene
DOSSIBLY there's enough of the drawing to eft-
* able you to guess what nursery rhyme the
artist had in mind when he started drawing It. In
any case, you'll want to complete it and see what's .
missing. To do so. start with a pencil at dot one
and draw a continuous line from dot to dot until
you reach 48. '
Where rt|p numbers are beside a single dot, use
the Brooklyn Dodgers. It's traditional that
when the Dodgers play baseball, anything can hap-
penand often does. On Flag Day, 1951, the
Dodgers played a game with the St. Louis Cardinals
that was in accordance with this Dodger tradition.
A catcher may pick a man off second once a month.
In Just one inning of this game, the fifth, the
Dodger catcher, Campanella, picked two men off
second! The first five Cardinals got on base with
three hits, a walk and an error, but none scored!
The Cardinals made 19 hits and only one run.
So don't look askance at these baseball brain
bustersthey may happen!
1. How can a team get six consecutive hits in one
Inning without scoring a run?
i 2. A batter is facing the pitcher. Under what
conditions could ten pitches be thrown to him, with-
out putting him out, without walking him. and with-
out having him foul off any of the pitches f
3. The home team la up in the ninth inning with
one out, the bases loaded, and the score 4 to 2
against them. The batter hits a grounder to first;
the first baseman touches first and throws to sec-
ond; the second baseman touches second, then runs
to the dugout with the ball. The runners keep go-
ing around the bases. What la the final score?
4. A batter swings at a strike, and foul tips it;
it hits his 'shoulder and rolls to the pitcher's box.
The pitcher picks up the ball, and throws to first
ahead of the batter. Is the batter out when bit,
or Is he out at first?
What Are The 10 States?
It twice.
..'Baalim jiaqi laoi babo tapuja
lllll aajux.. :b,ou|bs
tsaKRRssKsas a a n % t
a

e
a
9 m m a*
a*aaaaaaa*a*aaa*aa*aaaaaa
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa^
*
%**
aaoaaaaa
llllllll
mm*
eeeeeeeeeeeeee
atfaMialitititl
a-*****
a O
aaaa-S

a a a a
a a a
a a a a
a
e
' '..............
i 7i i i t i i a io ii ii ii u is it
I'll It 7t 71 n n it M 7t 77 7t W 7 JI W M M IS It 77 10 W at
YOU ENJOY making a scene
through this easy-to-do draw-
ing method. If you take a pencil,
start at the first key given and
draw lines according to the suc-
ceeding keys, a scene to be found
around many homes will appear.
When you have completed mak-
ing the necessary lines, color It
appropriately.
Start at Intersection 2-B. pro-
ceed to 3-A, 7-A, 8-B, 7-C. 3-C.
2-B. 8-B. 0-C. 7-D. 3-D. 1-C, 2-B.
Start again from 2-Q to 2-1,
9-E. 0-P. 0-E. 0-G, 20-Q, 15-Y.
15-Z. 10-P. l-<4 5-X, 16-Z, 21-Q.
0-Q. Draw a short line from 1-S
to 2-8.
Now begin from 12-K to 18-H,
12-G. 12-P. 14-Q. 17-Q. 18-P. 18-H.
Next start from 26-F, 27-G.
27-K. 26-L, 26-0. 25-L, 24-L. 24-0.
23-L, 22-L, 21-K. 22-K. 19-H.
22-D. 24-D, 25-F. 27-F, 28-G.
28-K. 27-K.
Now 23-J to 24-J. 23-1. 23-J.
Start over from 21-E to 20-E
19-D. 19-C, 23-D. 27-E. 26-D.
25-E. 2-D. 22-B. 22-A, 27-A,
29-C. 31-C. 33-E. 32-C, 35-C. 38-H.
38-K. 40-N. 40-P, 37-L. 34-L, 31-J.
28-J.
ConUnue from 19- U to 21-V.
22-V. 27-T. 31-V. 32-V, 32-P. 31-0.
32-N. 33-0, 35-0, 34-0. 34-V.
7-X. 37-W. 38-W. 38-V. 40-V
40-U. 37-T, 34-U. 34-S, 40-S.
Draw a line from 20-S to 32-S
Jraw another from 27-N to 37-M
Start again from 24-Z to 27-X.
29-W. 30-X. 30-V. 32-V. J-a
31-Y. 32-X. 33-Y. 34-W. 36-Y.
37-X. 39-X, 40-Z. Finally 1-V to
3-W to 4-V.
TRANSPOSITIONS
AS a test of your vocabulary, see how quickly you
can identify the words indicated by the first
definitions below, and then effect the desired trans-
positions of the letters to spell out other words. For
example, to transpose joined and get separated, you
turn "united" into untied.
1. Transpose CAVE and get COWARD.
2. Transpose BRUTAL and get MONET.
8. Transpose to CONFUSE and get DISPLEASED.
4. Transpose a CHIEF and get a CURRENT
5. Transpose a LANGUAGE and get an EATING
trough.
jatirari 'irauuao '9 'cnauig 'laitajf *f> :paj*Suv
alouafi t llltsn. nauo X :atasj.-> 'tuaAo1 ieee|tig
YOU CAN WIN MONEY
AS A party ice-breaker, challenge friends to name
the common American coin that has a picture
of the President's house, and another common
American coin that has a picture of a perch. You
don't have to be a fisherman to identify the latter.
What are the coins?
, II oodn
ilaa a am* UMe* aoqa q>iq aaaid jst aqi taoaiajjar >op
-laajd jo aooD 'onaonooif am qoiu 'Daid oo aqj, luatHtra/
A. Mavlisted by Noah ark (Ark.) Wonder
1. "Mightier than the sword*
2. "As gtes as a alls"
3. To study Siligsntly
4. Fellows "fa-sol"
5. Two "VU" or Fives
. Chlnoe'-Aatrlen industry
7. Self-seeker's a In eonoern
8. Minors1 yield
9. Letter signifying naught
10. Wt'ro this when ailing
Baivar, Buckayt, Evtrgrttn. Koystone. Mtgnoli, Nutmag,
paiican, pine Trat. "rtirn, Volunteer.
PHOM the clue Unes, 1 to 10.
you are asked to figure out
the abbreviations for certain
states of the Union. A completed
example Is in top line A. Try and
match their nicknames from the
other ten listed under the chart.
tuim mi > id oi
:baonH CO) O "t JUWaa CaJO1 *JS
1 : auk) (*ox> "i !qaaj7Uata
1 W.mi isnut t uaainmoA ( noax)
uji s :atoiiaj fr) 1 'Saannu
(-BBO01 no) ~t :tuooan ruin) alto %
:mtmtm inwi wm l iia>awa/
CR YPTARITHM
ryviDE 50XX by 3, multiply
L' quotient by 7, and get for
the answer, XX7X2.
Hint: To be divisible by 3, the
sum of digits' in 50XX must be
divisible by 3. therefore X plus X
must equal 1. 4. 7. 10. 13, etc.
\ ttoo ai poapiAip aqi
paw t auo t rmN wnai \ anid x oaqi
'Baton <|U tl oil aao> | iaui paw
1 ui auut lwql utpoid aiI |||m i|Uo
t atom t il Saioua I ton\n
vocabulary builder
QUIZ CROSSWORD
By Eugene Bhefjer
ACROSS
1 -What kins ruled over Israel in
Samaria for 22 years? II KL
16:29)
5"I sought the Lord, and he
heard me, and delivered me
from all my -----" (Ps. 34:4>
10"----- men will proclaim ever.
one his own goodness: but a
faithful man who can find?"
(Pr 20:61
14 What is i hi last book of the
Bible?
16Oil: comb. form.
17Sharp mountain spur.
18Who was a great man among
the Anakims? (Josh. 14:15)
19 "The harvest of the earth is
-----" 20Parsonages
22"But God commendeth his
love toward us. in that while
we were ----- sinners. Christ
wkSHISinSBBXMXBM
flHiaaUGlREHFlBFlUDti
?flUH%ffl3EtX'i%t.iFr.H
IOfcHIlG]3[Gi:.F.fcilll..n
IQEQ%lpQ%RRHr:urc
wk
tflyta
mm
i mi.Hiiitii ri //i.t NOI-t'Tloji
died for us" tRom. 6:8)
23Topaz humming-birds.
24What did Moses command to
be used as a burnt offering?
(Lev 9:2)
26Surmounter by climbing.
28What Is the 18th book of the
New Testament?
33 "Bless the Lord. O my tout
and forget not all bene-
fits' (Ps. 103:2)
34"-----of Moab" (Num. 21:28)
38Assisted.
37Fathers.
39 "I no pleasant bread"
(Dan. 10:3)
40With what did the soldiers
smite Jesus on bis head?
(Mark 15:19)
41French painter.
42Charles Lamb.
43A descendant of Asher (1
Chr. 7:38)
44"Let us lay aside ever
weight, and the sin w h I c b
doth so easily us" (Heb
12:1)
45What did God cause to destroy
the earth, with the exception
of those in the Ark? (Gen
7:10)
46Symbol for sodium
47Prefix: under.
48Governments.
50Raccoon-like carnivore.
53"My house shall be called the
house of prayer; but ye have
made it a of thieves"
(Mat 21:13)
>4Roman garment
55Unit of heavyweight.
37In what month was (other
taken Into the house of Aha-
suerus? 'Esth 2:16)
62- Wing-shaped.
63Goddess of discord.
65Bristles
66"Surely the serpent will -----
without enchantment; and a
babbler It no better" (Eccl
10:11)
67"I am not come to call the
righteous, but sinners to "
(Mat 9:13)
69Employs.
70Flat-bodied ray.
71Oriental weight
OOWN
1Fifth son of Shem (Gen. 10:22)
2Queen of the gods.
*"The plain of i" (Amot
1:5)
JKaSS'in the scale.
8Greek letter.
7-Ettiereai.
8"These are they which came
out of great tribulation, and
have washed their -----. and
made them white in the blood
of the Lamb" (Rev. 7:14)
9Seizes hastily.
10Ethics
11From what tree did the dove
pluck a leaf to take back to
the Ark? 'Gen. 8:11)
12Divtslon.
13Pedal digits.
15Looked slyly.
21Man's nickname.
13 Who led the Israelites out ol
Egypt? i Ex 14:31)
27Three-toed sloths
28In what wilderness did lab-
mael dwell? (Gen 21:21)
39A city in which Epaphras, a
servant of Christ, took s great
interest (CoL 4:13)
SOMental concept
81"He was ----- as s sheep to
(he slaughter" (Arts 8:32)
32What was another name for
Simeon, the teacher? (Acts
!S:D
38Peruses.
StClassified.
30Plant of the lily family.
41Arguers.
42Shade tree.
"The -----thall yield no meal"
(Hos 8:7)
45"He maketh peace In thy bor-
ders, and fllletb thee with the
-----of the wheats Ps. 147:14)
47"Thorns and are in the
way of the freward" (Pr. 22:5)
49"----- widom, understand-
ing: forget ii not" (Pr. 4:3)
51-Marble.
52 In what valley did Delilah
Uve? iJudg. 16:4)
54Forbidden (var.)
56Genus of palms.
58 What did
Sosthenes.
menM
59 Apparatus
60Metal plai
rass var.
61Back of f<
64"
above, no
earth" (
68Symbol fi
the Greeks do to
chief ruler of the
before the iudg>
(Acts 18:17)
for heating water
s attached to a cui-
affectlon on things
on things on the
3:2)
neon.
Jtiraq aqi onjn ,|
m pwap ainaatq nao aqi oa tioimai
inoj ui ii m aHautq q -jaqnajj -t
t 0 tun uia.i amoq
am paw tioot Bjaoanj aajqi na 'ptstai
i.uBt tq taota puoott oi tuiot noonj
ten ttojj paAonaj bbm bojoj aqi 'iajq
paqanoi ovOiaama lug aqi aoqjt, t
JWfl )t Ml
I aq poa -tpia aiq ao jaitwa Saiaauaj
Oi n inoqiiAi 0J|q OI OMOjq] own babu
aaqaiid uij, "omi paw aajqi jo lonoo jaqio
ub ial i*naq aniwa aqi tuiaui lxao tqj.
|BiB oi Jai.Ui jo ana jjo laSnwa oaqi
ti laoooJ aawq* tqj, omi pu aauqi jo
lando W ioj aaipiiatAg aaaaoi atcjoi|d aql
ttta ao UB paw ino ott) qi|*A x
-uoew oo ai ajaqi
ino aajin qii ino in toj jaaaru aata
* biiu itiiaa iBuy aqj, waowo aql MB
aaitoia atoao o*x ino ojm joj jjo paaoid
bjw pJiqi paw puoota ao atoa aqj. aataa
aafi no bjiIuib auqx 1 :owor0|os
YOUR MOVE
"I OOK before you leap" Is a
*- players, if you consider leap
synonymous with move. If you
look before you move here, you
can make white win in four
moves. White Is going up the
board and moves first.
'StOS at :oftt
.B -Koc w .'tz11 'siwe At x
-*t aawis : ot i aiiqM iwoitatos
IN A MINUTE
YOU'RE supposed to be able to
answer these in a minute.
1. The ages of two brothers,
Tom and Tim. total 11 years. Tim
was born ten years later than
Tom. What la Tom'a age.
2. Mrs. Bouef bought a roast
for Sunday dinner, tt weighed
4/5 of Its weight and 4/5 of a
pound, so you know it cost a lot
at present prices. How much did
It weigh?
3. If a yogi stands on his bead
with his face to the south, arms
stretched out straight. In what
direction rill bis right hand, be?
-lawa c tpanod n4t X
wiwtt jnm a paw ax 1 lawwitwiea
ENIGMA
First in mouse, not in rat.
Second in dog, not in cut.
Third in house, not in lot.
Fourth in coto, o in pot.
Fifth in otci, not in hawk.
Sixth in flower, not in stalk.
A despot's city am I
You' guess me if you try.
otean Taida a.nirtis looataww/
TRIOGRAMS
PUB puzzle is not a difficult
MATter once you understand
how tt works. Just complete the
words below with the help of the
given definitions: For example.
what's a seven-letter word that
means "riper"? Since you al-
ready know It begins with MAT,
it must be MATURBR. Try the
rest and See bow you make out
MAT.,.. Riper
.MAT... Non- profes-
sional
.MAT.. Pair again
..MAT. Bishop
...MAT Slot machine
eatery
...MAT Portal rug
..MAT. Weather
. M A t Hair oil
MAT. . Piecemeal
learning
MAT.... Afternoon
show
'aaonwBj 'janwoaa *toniwta
OS "aiWBBip 'laoijoop Itnaoin* tiaanid
U01BUWJ 'jnilBBBW 'JBJniBBI :BM|tO|*l>
What He Dug Up
JOSE Is excited. His archelogi-
cal research has Isd him to
the grave Of a prehistoric animal,
a dinosaur perhaps. He has
measured the remains. He finds
that the head is six feat long, the
tail la as long as bis bead and
half his body, or torso, and bis
body is half his whole length.
How long Is Jose's find?
-St ttot vosta-tuoj iwonaiofl
Canorls-kl. IMI. Kin t..tarta j/woioate. law.


*\
;




IIIPIP1PIIPW^WPIPII^^^^


e world in
iisttil:.';':::

A MOBILE TV
corps* engineer
STATION on wheels developed
s, is turned over to the Army
for the U. S. Army Signal Corps by RCA and
at the company's general office in.Camden, N. J.
MORE THAN 200 TROPHIES and 800 ribbons already have
been won as a horsewoman by Bobbie Dormn, 18, of Lemon
Grove, Cal. She is one of the five prize-winning western
DEFT STEPS OF MORRIS DANCERS are an unforgettable sight for autumn visitors to Britain, glamor girls who will appear in the World's Championship
-These six are performing the ancient dance before the Bampton, Oxfordshire, village inn. Rodeo in Madison Square Garden, New York, Sept. 26-Oct. 21.
STORYBOOK GARDEN IS ANIMAL HAVEN
THREE OF THE NAVY'S outstanding aircraft put on a parade Donald Phantom FH-1 (foreground), the Corsair (center)
of fighter progress over Harrisburg, Pa. They are the Mac- and the S-N-J fighter trainer. The Phantom is jet-poweved.
GOOD SAMARITAN of the
animal world in San
Diego, Cal., is Miss Rosalie
Budington, who spends' her
spare time rescuing stray
animals and keeping them
in her "Storybook Garden''
till she can find homes for
them. She has befriended
dogs, pigeons, cats, toads,
rabbits, blackbirds, turtles,
even a donkey The only
help she gets is from friends
who drop pennies in a wish-
ing well, which partly pays
expenses of her hobby. Each
stray she brings home is
given a separate house or
nest of its own until some-
one is found to give it a per- o-^
manent home. Miss Buding- .*
'ton doesn't sell menagerie in-
matesshe gives them away Rosalie Budington helps her animal waifs lo make frionds with each other in her garden.
AN EXCEPTIONAL young lady is Mara Vanags. Most European THE JAPANESE peace treaty, a priceless document signed by
immigiants aio more than glad to reach New York City Sea.- 49 nations in San FYaneisco, is returned to^ Washington by
men Al Ruark and Jack Peterson try to cheer the Latvian. Join Foley, U. S. administrative officer, for storage in vault.
Stray cot ploy cot-ond-moufe gome with figurine en limb. Toy dwarf, oil ready for busy day in front of toy log cabin.
King Feature Syndicate





ftGE TEN

THE SUNDAV AMERICAN
"iii~t n i -i- -
___________ SUNDAY, OCTOBER M, 18ll"
SMU Upsets Notre Dame 27-20
Wins
by
JOE WILLIAMS
Putting one little word after another and whatever became
of Happy Chandler? Evidently the lyrical Kentuckian's affection
for baseball, which he 50 tenderly and tirelessly proclaimed as
-.commissioner, cooled abruptly when his 165,000 pay ceased. No-
bodv's seen him at the series.

1 Just what goes with the Boston Red Sox, the team that can't
win for losing? Rumors are a dime a dozen. Tom Yawkey Is sell-
ing out. Joe Cronin is through as general manager. Lou Boudreau
-has already replaced Steve O'Neill in the dugout. Ted Williams Is
...for sale. There is to be a complete top-to-bottom purge of this
-organization which has known so many years of puzzling dlsap-
-'Pointment and bitter frustration. Just what Is the real situation?
,
I have substantial reason to believe I am In position to sub-
. mit 1111' fact for rumors. (A) Yawkey is more determined to con-
tinue his Boston baseball operations than ever before. (B) Cronin
is to be continued in the front office as general manager. (C) All
that Boudreau's status as field manager lacks is formality of an-
- nouncement. This will come as soon as the series is ended. (D)
For the first time since such speeulation became a hardy annual
for hot stove league chatter the Red Sox will entertain trade
proposals for Williams. .
.
Mrs. Yawkey has become an ardent baseball enthusiast, so If
her husband ever had any notion of closing up shop at Fenway j
Park it no longer exists. Wives have a rare talent for changing
spouse's point of view. Cronin is known to have answered a .
point-blank question of a personal friend to the effect that there
Isn't the slightest doubt of where he will be next year. It will be
- sitting back of the general manager's desk at Fenway Park. So
realistic Is Boudreau's position as the field manager that he Is
already active in revising his staff of assistants. His first move
was to try to lure Muddy Ruel from the Cleveland club as his No.
1 aid. This failed because Ruel is slated to take over a more im-
portant post with another club, the details of which will be dis-
closed at any Mme now.

The most significant development in the Boston situation is
that Williams' contract is up for grabs. Heretofore when word got
around the temperamental slugger could be had Yawkey himself
was quick to apply the squelcher. Not now. Yawkey's admiration
for the slugger's ability is still high and his personal fondness
presumably unshaken, but, he recognises the unattractive future
his aging club faces and the immediate need for vigorous action.
It is known that Cronin is agreeable to any trade that figures to
accelerate the club's reconstruction program and that Boudreau
will readily give up Williams' powerful bat for greater over-all
efficiency. And the fact that both Cronin and the new manager
ee eye to eye on the trading of Williams has helped, it seems
reasonable to assume, to break down Yawkey's resistance.

Where will Williams go? To Cleveland for Larry Doby? You
ean file that one away and forget It. The Indians would make the
traoe in a split second, for Doby's collapse at the bat down the
trctch has made him expendable and he is definitely on the
market. If Williams is evenDually dealt to Cleveland It Is more
likely to be for Bob Lemon. I happen to know there has been talk
of such an exchange. An earlier report that Williams mlght-go to
the St. Louis Browns for their 20-game winner, Ned Garver, pick-
ed up no substance over the weekend.

What chance have the Yankees to get Williams? Very good, Is
Biy guers. As a matter of fact, there have actually been prelim-
inary negotiations with that end in view. The Yankees have indi-
cated at least one player (whose identity I'm not privileged to
reveal) they are willing to give up. This is one of the younger
Yankees, a player of high potentialities who, if used regularly,
might offset the departure of Williams, plus. I doubt however that
the deal could be made on this basis. It would not sufficiently
'. excite the Red Sox fans, though it could turn out to be an ex-
' rellent. transaction.
1
1
Before the Yankee-Red Sox conversations end it is certain Joe
1 DIMagglo's name will be Introduced. As of now It is not known I
what DIMaggio's plans are. In the spring he said this would be
i his last time around. Two weeks back he was evasive. . "I'll
I know better after the series.'' he said. . The Yankees are pre-
. pared to meet the Inevitability of his retirement and since they
face a rebuilding job. too, at least their situation calls for greater
experimentation with younger prospects, they would not be ad-
1 verse to relinquishing DIMaggio's $100.000 contract, even If it
meant giving him his unconditional release. Obviously, the once
, magnificent Yankee Clipper Is no longer a $100.000 ballplayer. On
; the basis of his last two seasons work he wouldn't qualify as
1 a $50.000 ballplayer, and it certainly gives me no pleasure to make
|- such an appraisal.
"" It is not generally known but this is not the first time
>a Williams for DiMaggio deal was in prospect. Several years ago
the Red Sox could have had DiMaggio, Joe Page and Yogi Berra
for the Boston ace. (This was before Berra had proved himself as
a big leaguer, either in the outfield or back of the plate.) The .
conversations never took a really serious turn because in those ;
days Yawkey, who naturally had the last word, could not have
been budged, anvwav. Now the picture is changed. Yawkey is rea- I
dy to deal Williams and the Yankees are willing to co-operate. I
Eager may be the better word.

It is one of the Ironies of baseball that these two great hit-
ters should have found themselves in ball parks where the fences
operate against their natural hitting powers. Fenway Park, with
.Its short left-field wall. Is made to order for DiMaggioeven an
aging DiMaggio who no longer gets around on a pitch as In earli-
er years. On the other hand, Yankee Stadium, with its alluring
right-field barrier, is, or should be, ideal for Williams' left-hand
blasts. For some odd reason, though, Williams has not turned in
many spectacular performances In the 8tadium. Playing there
day In and day out it might well be another cup of tea.

At any rate, that's the lowdown on the Boston situation with
Its Yankee implications. Don't be at all surprised if Williams is
traded and winds up in the Stadium which needs, among other
selling points, a name player to keep the turnstiles whirring. Los-
ing DiMaggio would be hard to take and whether the opportun-
ity, admittedly exciting, to boo Williams in a Yankee uniform in
17 home games would be adequate compensation . well, that's
something only you fans would know about.
Tulane Downs Holy Cross
As Free-For-All Follows
By UNITED PRESS
SOUTH BEND, lnd Oct. 13 Southern Methodist's
Mustangs, who made Notre Dame grab leather in three
previous grid meetings, unsaddled the highly favored, un-
beaten Irish before a capacity crowd of 57,000 in Notre
Dame Stadium today.
The score was 27 to 20.
Fred Ben-ner's sharpshooting
I throws accounted for every SMU
score.
The Mustangs, beaten by seven
I points or. less three times pre-
I viously by Notre Dame's greater
ball clubs, left no doubt of their
intentions today.
Benner's working witlh the
spread formation, from which
the only play was a pass, opened
up through the air at the start-
ing whistle. Not until more than
five minutes had gone by in the
second period did the Mustangs
resort to ground play.
Before the game the Irish were
rated fifth in the national UP
poll.
DALLAS, TexasA determined
Texas team ended its Cotton
Bowl victory drought by cashing
in on two first quarter breaks to
nip once mighty Oklahoma 9-7
in a bruisirg battle before a ca-
paclty crowd of 75.347.
Playing without their top
ground gainer, Gib Dawson. be-
cause of the pie-game death of
the star's father, Texas answered
when opportunity knocked twice
with Oklahoma fumbles in the
opening period and converted
each Into all-important points.
As narrow as was the margin,
the orange-shirted Texan* fully
deserved to win their 30th vic-
tory in this 46-game series with
a mammoth line that snuffed out
all but one Oklahoma running
surge and kept the Sooners out-
side the Texans 46 after Okla-
homa scored its touchdown on a
94-yard second period drive.
victory mav prove costly to Big
Red hopes for the Ivy League ti-
tle this season.
Fleet Boj Engel, one of Coach
George Jumes' best running
backs, injured his left knee on
the second play of the game and
will be ou'. indefinitely.
lat Race F"-l" Natives 1 Mile
Pnrae: S27 "..OftPool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Tap Qiil A. Mena 114
2Canaveral E. Silver 115
3Duque) C. Rula 120
4Torcaz) J. Avila 120
5Rio Mr.r .. R. Visques 110
6 Kl Mao B. Pulido 120
7El Mono J. Baesa. Jr. 106x
8 Luck Ahead V. Ortega 120
9Don Joaqun E. Ortega 104x
10Golden Babe J. Phillips 120
ANN ARBOR, Mich Michigan,
displaying its razzle-dazzle of old,
opened the defense of its Big
Ten footbal- crown with a 33-14
victory over Indijfna before 65,-
000. The Woiverines, blocking and
tackling with the precision that
won them the title, dug deep in-
to their traditional bag of tricks
to score in every period and gain
their first >.ctory of the 1951 sea-
son after losses to Michigan
State and S'anford.
Indiana pushed across its two
touchdowns in the final perlor
after Michigan had built up a
26-0 lead and Coach Bernie Qss-
terbaan had put many of his
Freshmen onto the field for ex-
Iperlence.
MADISON, Wls; Ohio State,
stopped cold by a stalwart Wis-
consin in defensive platoon, came
back In the fourth period to knot
the score at 6-6 m a hard-fought
Big Ten battle before 51,000.
2nd Race "B'' Natives4' ', Fgs.
Parse: S350.M Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1Helen B. B. Agulrre 113
2Don Teml A. Phillips 117
3Batn L. Pena 107x
4Elona E.Campbell I04x
5Lolito C. Chong 102x
6Amazona K. Flores 120
NOTE: Don Teml races out of
the betting.
N.B.A. To Enforce
Six Months Defense
Of 'Titles' Ruling
WASHINGTON, Oct. 13 (UP)
The National Boxing Asso-
ciation, taking- the risk of cre-
ating "dual champions, said
Friday It will rigidly enforce
the rule requiring b e x I n g
champions to defend their ti-
tles every six months under
pain of forfeit.
The system was adopted at a
final conference bet ween NBA
President Dave Rocked of
Montreal, National Commis-
sioner Abe J. Greene et Pater-
son, N.J., and National Execu-
tive Secretary Harvey Miller of
Washington.
*
Final Averages
NATIONAL LEAGUE
(Title layoff figures Included.Cotnplled by
3rd Rsce "F-2" Natives4', Fgs.
Purse: 3275.99 Tool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1Miranda H. Reyes 117x
2Cosa Linda A. Mena 112
3Mona Lisa R. Gmez 112
4Hercules G. Ramos 115x
5Fonseca G. Grael 115
6Aqu Es toy J. Ca donen 111
7Little Lulu B. Pulido 115
8Valeria B .Agulrre 112
9Exlto B.Campbell 117x
NEW ORLEANSTulane Uni-
versity, wltn the helu of two pe-
nalties, struggled through a co-
medy of f't.nbles to a 20-14 vic-
tory over Holy Cross College.
Tulane fumbles put Holy Cross
into position to score its two
touchdowns in the first period.
Holy Cross took the ball on an-
other fumble in the third period I
and narrowly missed scoring
again.
As for Tulane, It might not
have scoreil its second touch-
down if Referee M. J. Bullock had
not. Imposed two successive pe- |
naltles on the Crusadersthe
second because Coach Eddie An-
derson stormed out on the field
to protest the first.
The bad feeling engendered by
these penalties persisted after
the game was over. Four or five
Holy Cross and Tulane players
started a free-for-all. Then they
broke it up voluntarily and went
to the showers.
WACO, Texas An off-angle
fourth quarter field goal by Bay-
lor's by Baylor's CO. Brocato
turned back a rebounding Ar-
kansas team 9-7 and kept the
Bears' unbeaten record Intact.
The bruising conference en-
counter seen by 25,000 frightened
Baylor partisans saw the nation's
ninth ranking team pushed to a
maximum effort by the heavy Ar-
kansas crew, already beaten once
in conference play.
Brocato, a Junior linebacker
from Shreveport. La. booted his
vital placement from the Arkan-
sas 15 early in the fourth quar-
ter. It gave the Bean a 9-0 lead
a tile kl y dim.ned under Razorback
passing.
The ransy, 185-pound Louisi-
ana lad's kl;kseemed only an in-
surance measure until Arkansas
unraveled Its passing game with
Quarterback Lamar McHan do-
ing the pitching.
McHan d.ove the Hogs Into
range and Dean Pryor bucked
over from the two-yard line.
George Thompson converted.


ITHACA, N. Y.- Powerful Cor-
nell smashed to a 42-6 victory
over helpless Harvard but the
MINNEAPOLIS Stocky Full-
back Chuck Hren ground Minne-
sota's line to bits as Northwest-
ern won its third consecutive
game, 21-7.
The Scores
Cornell 42, Harvard 6
Michigan 33, Indiana 14
Northwestern 21, Minnesota 7
Tennessee 42, Chattanooga 13
Iowa 34, Pittsburgh 17
Penn State 15, Nebraska 7
Auburn 14, Florida 13
Texas 9,
Oklahoma 7.
Tulane 20,
Holy Cross 14.
Baylor 9,
Arkansas 7.
S.M.U. 27,
Notre Dame 20.
Dartmouth 28,
Army 14.
Ohio State 6,
Wisconsin 6.
North Carolina 21,
South Carolina 6.
FRIDAY SCORES
Fordham 35,
Boston College 19.
George Washington 38,
Virginia Tech 13.
Temple 47,
Albright 6.
Citadel 41,
Newberry 7.
South Carolina State 21
Clark 13.
Villanova 41,
Alabama 18.
Stetson 21,
Furman 20,
Miami (Florida) 7,
Purdue 0.
Drake 26,
Detroit 6.
4th Race "F-2" Natives414 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1La Prensa J. Chuna lllx
2ton; Catallno A. vasquez 108x
3Cacique 3. Phillips 110
4L. Molly J. Cpntreraa 112
5Singapore O. Crua 110
6Strike Two H. Reyes 107x
7Danubio E. Daro 110
8 Embustero J. Cidogen 110
9Conde A. Mena 110
Little Leaguers Wanted For '52
This year was the first time Little League baseball was
played on the Canal Zone. Nearly everybody knows how pop-
ular it became in the two months of active play.
In order for the Leayue officials to formulate plans for
next year and to afford every eligible boy an opportunity
to play Little Leabue ball, it is requested that each boy
interested fill out and mail the Little League Application
Form shown on this page to Mr. J. S. Watson. Player-Agent.
Box 616, Balboa, C. Z., no later than October 15. 1951. Any
boy who will attain his Sth but not his 13tb birthday before
August 1, 1952. and who is enrolled in any lT. S. Rate school
from Gamboa South is eligible to apply.
NAME ....................................
ADDRESS ............................
DATE OF BIRTH .........................
SCHOOL ..................................
PARENTS' NAME .........................
Please print or type
The Worldagrees$n Gimeysplease
5th Raee (Three-Year-OW Im-
ported)15-1Mb Miles.
Purse: f2.9M.00Pool Closes 2:55
"COMPARACIN" CLASSIC
IS. Domino J. Contreras 126
2Welsh Fex B. Agulrre 129
3High Mount K. Flores 115
4Hit R. Gomes 115
6th Race "G" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: J450.ee Pool Closes 3:35
Pint Raee of the Doubles
1Levadura G. Ramas 109x
2Apretsor K. Flores 112
3Cantaciaro E. Daro 108
4Picn J. ContreraS 112
5Fright V. Ortega 120
6Mon Etoile C. Chaves 103x
7Pepsi Cola E. Silvra 109
8Piragua J. Phillips 120
9 -Scotch Chum A. Mena 106
10-Beduino J. Avila 120
7th Race "H" Imported4'/ Fgs.
Parse: i4flt.ee Pool Closes 4:95
Second Race of the Doubles
1Porter's Star C. Ruiz 115
2Caonazo A. ngulo 1.10x
38un Cheer V. Ortega 112
4Sans Souci J. Contreras 110
6Miss Fairfax B. Agulrre 117
6Silver* ox A. Mena 115
7Lituana J. Phillips 107
8Clpayo R. Vsquez 112
9Pincel A. Phillips 120
Join Franco Tips
By 1El Mao Duque (e)
2Don Teml Helen B.
3Valeria Mona Lisa
4Lonely Molly Cacique
5Silver Domino Welsh Fox
Piragua Apretador
7Clpayo Sun Cheer
8Cyclone 'Malone Bronx
ftStock Bull Tully Saba
!Asembre- (e) Mimo
11Black Sam ho Golden lip
ONE BESTBlack Sambo.
Juan Franco
Muluel Dividends
8th Race "1-2" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: 1375.00 Poo: Closes 4:49
Quiniela
1Cotilln K. Flores 116
2 Costina A. Mena 120
3Baby Betty C. Ruiz 114
4Baby Rol B- Pulido 120
5Cyc. Malone B. Agulrre 120
6Bronx J. Contreras 130
7Danescourt C. Ycasa 118
8 Bartolo A. Enrique 112x
9Novelera J. Cadogen 120
9th Raee "1-2" Imported7 Fgs.
Pursei S375.e* Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Charles S. E. Silver 110
2Black Bull B. Agulrre 120
3Tartufo H. Reyes 107x
4 Zevelania X. Darlo 112
5Gay Ariel J. Baeza. Jr. 107x
6Tully Saba J. Contreras 119
7Navajo Trail B. Pulido HO
8Interlude V. Ortega 117
9Athos J. Cadogen 111
(Ml Race "E" Imported1 Mile
Parse: 8558.90 Poo! Cleees 5:44
1Cherlberlbln J.Contr. 120
2Asombro) B. Pulido 112
FIRST RACE
1Manolete $9.20. $7 .94.20.
2Arqulmedes $5.60. $3.
3Filigrana $2.60.
SECOND RACE
1Almirante $6.20. $2.40, $2.20.
2 La Negr-i $2.20, $2.20.
3Con Valor II $2,20.
First Doubles: (Manolete-Al-
mirante) $54.
THIRD RACE
1Ria Roi $2.40, $3.60, $2.20.
2Politico $9.80, $4.20. $2.60.
3Mueco $2.60.
One-Two: (Rina Roi-Politico)
$25.
FOURTH RACE
1Campesino $11.20, $3. $3.60.
2Opex $2.40. S2.20.
3Avlvato $3.20.
Quiniela- (Campesino Opex)
FIFTH RACK
1Galante II $8.80, $3.60.
2The Dauber $2.40.
SIXTH RACE
1Rondlne !a $6.60. M. $3.
2Prestirlo $4.20, $3.20.
3 Wild Wire $3.60.
SEVENTH RACE
1Lacey 5.60, $5.40; $3.
2Carmela n $4.60, $2.60.
3Chacabuco $2.80.
Second Doubles: (Rondlnena-
Lacey) $23.40.
EIGHTH RACE
1Jepperln $25, $19, $6.80.
2Dona Elelda $6.40, $4.40.
3Betun $V
Quiniela: (Jepperln-Dona Bi-
elda) $179.69.
NINTH RACE
XLa Chata $8.20. $4.60, $6.40.
2Battling Cloud $7.60, $5.
3Sandarin $6.40.
One-Two: (La Chats-Battling
Cloud) $32.29.
TENTH RACE
1-Alabarda $11.80, $5.20, $5.
2 Hanna $3.40. $3. .
3Llm Lara $4.30.
ELEVENTH RACE
12Dallda P. $3.60, $2.20.
2Slxaola $2.20..
3Roadmaster) A. Mena 115
4Curaca A. Enrique 113x
5Mimo K. Flores 116
11th Race "A" NativesW Fgs.
Purse: $375.09
1White F.eet C. Chong 103x
2Blk. Sambo J. Contreras 120
3Golden Tip C. Chaves 104x
4Don Pltin H. Reyes 106x
LIVER TONIC
a taey liver canaM 70* to
uffr from Indication, *. iwart-
burn, conatlpaUon, baadachea, bad
breath, dlKln.M. blliouaneaa and
akin blamlaha. at HldALON
from roir ehamlat toeay.
HIOALON la a real tonto to Ura
11var and IntaaUnaa. Oet HMALON
toSajr and ia.l batter tono*ow.
FLY to MIAMI
for only $100 round trip

on the
FOOTBALL SPECIAL PLANE
leaving Tocumen, 7 a.m., Oct. 18
returning Monday, Oct. 22
See Miami Univ. va. Washington A Lea
en Oct. 19 ^
and aaa
Balboa High School vs. Miami Jackson H.S.
on Oct. 20
fa* Information
A reservation contest
PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICI
Across from the Ancon Bus Stop
Tel. Pan. 2-1655
V
'
Clnb
Brooklyn .. .
St..Louis.. .,
Boston..
New York,. .
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh ..
Chicago .. .,
Cincinnati ..
CLUB BATTING
G. AB. R. H. UR.
158 5491 866 1510 184
155 5316 68$ 1403 95
155 5291 723 .1384 130
137 5862 781 ISM 179
154 5331 .648 1383 108
155 5319 689 1371 137
155 5809 614 1336 108
155 5285 559 1309 88
CLUB FIELDING
Jerry Omleki*

RBI. SB. Pet,
Club
Brooklyn........
St. Louis........
Philadelphia. ....
Cincinnati......
Boston..........
Pittsburgh......
New York.. .. .. ..
Chicago' ., .... v.
A.
1771
G. PO.
168 4270
155 4159 1859
154 4147 1605
155 4172 1671
156 4167 1682
158 4138 1813
187 423ft 1789
155 4154 1825
PITCHING
166 174.
172 ITS
180 159
Player Club
Paine, Boston...../......
Candira, Philadelphia,. *. ..
Roe, Brooklyn.......... ..
Lablne, Brooklyn........ ..
Corwln, New York........
Mage, New York........
Hansei., Philadelphia .. .. ..
Spencer, New York.........
N-iwcombe, Brooklyn......
Jensen, New York........
King, Brooklyn...........
Brecheen. St. Louis......
Byeriy, Cincinnati .. .... ..
Hearn, New York .. ------ ..
Kelly, Chicago .. .. .. .. ..
PresKO, St. Louis. .........
Leonard, Chicago........
Spalin. Boston..........
Staley, St. Louis..........
Roberts, Philadelphia......
Nichols, Boston..........
Church, Philadelphia......
Ersklne, Brooklyn........
Wrrle, Pittsburgh.........
Chlpman, Boston........
Dlckson. Pittsburgh........
Blckford. Boston .... .'. ....
Lanler, St. Louis...........
Brazle, St. Louis........
Chambers. Pitt.-8t. Louis.. ..
Koslo. New York .. :.......
Branca, Brooklyn .. ,.....
Blackwell, Cincinnati......
Wilson, Boston.....<....
Kllppstein. Chicago.......
Smith, Cincinnati .; .. .'. .
FOkelman, St. Louis .. ....
Podblelan, Brooklyn......
Dublel, Chicago.. ...... *.
Raffensberger, Cincinnati. ..
Bush, Chicago..........
Meyer, Philadelphia .. ,...
Qaeen, Pittsburgh J; .. s. ./
turkont, Boston .. ., ....,,
Wehmeier. Cincinnati......
Law, Pittsburgh........
Munger, St. Louis .. .. .'. ..
Fox, Cincinnati..........
Johnson. Philadelphia......
Friend. Pittsburgh .. .. ..
Wilks, St. Louis-Pittsburgh ..
Jones, New York........
Poholsky. St Louis........
Ramsdell, Cincinnati......
Hiller, Chicago .. .... ..
Hejitselman, Philadelphia. ..
Thompson, Philadelphia ....
Hatten, Brooklyn-Chicago. ..
Perkowskl. Cincinnati......
Cole, Boston............
Kennedy,New York.. ..
Pollet, St. Louls-Plttsburgn..
Lown, Chicago.........
McLlsh, Chicago..........
Boyer, 8t. Louis .. .. ." ,.
Konstanty. Philadelphia ....
Mlnner, Chicago.. .. ....
SchmltE, Chicago-Brooklyn ..
Pallca, Brooklyn..........
Walsh, Pittsburgh........
LaPalme, Pittsburgh......
Estock, Boston..........
Haugstad, Brooklyn........
Koskl, Pittsburgh........
G.
20
15
34
14
\l
24
57
40
39
48
24
39
34
35
15
41
39
a
33
38
46
59
33
45
26
31
56
31
39
42.
38
20
35
49
i
22
42
37
38
39
3?
30
26
23

41
3ft
31
24
35
29
34
36
23
29
i
30
19
58
33
24
19
38
2ft
37
21
IS
272 164
279 14
204 ,U8
233 121
168 123
237 afta
5!
R
(Continued en
CONRAD SAfcCEANT
Sports Editor
3 DAYS ONLY From Oct. 15th
PRE XMAS
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Tremendous Savings
i
BEFORE WOW
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CASA FNIX
155 Ave. Central . TeL 2-2490




tm
"dUJXDAT, OCTOBER 14. 151
im------.....r
v-adH
y,ii i------r.TTv.Nrr
rat- SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAGE ELEVEN
Hornsby Insists Veeck's Side Show Ends When Browns' Games Begin
Midgets And
Clowns Out
With Rajah
-?: By JOHNNY Met ALU M
NEA Staff Correspondent
if,
f*4 NEW YORK. Oct. IS. (NBA)
Tris Speaker once paid Rog-
ers Homaby, new manager of the
Browne, one of the finest compli-
,menU one baseball man could
pay another.
After the sev-
en-tlme Nation-
al League bat-
ting champion
and Hall o f
Fame ilcond
base man had
been shoved
down the chute
as generalissimo
of the Browns
In 1937, Speak-
er was asked
If he would
hire the Rajah
were he at the
'head of a club.
. U "Maybe not as manager."
poke said, "but I'd pay him well
..Just for sitting around and keep-
"lng me from making mistakes."
"> After successful runs to the
A-wlre at Beaumont and Seattle
-\he past two seasons. Hornsby
'returns to the big tent bent on
'' jnaklng people forget the man
"who was fired by the same St.
,;%ouls Americans for betting on
the hosses.
The New 55-year-old Hornsby
can be counted on to expedite
Bill Veeck's building Job at
-.Sportsman's Park If he sticks to
*>'l Fronx all early appearances, he
?$m going to do Just that."
'* He already has had an under-
standing with Stunt Man Bill
'-Veeek -that the side show ends
l.^shen the game begin. Mean-
-lng the Little Brownies have seen
-the last of midget* and clown-
':lrur coaches.
HORNSBY TOP APPRAISER
No one can appraise a ball
"''player quicker or more accurat-
ely than The Rajah, He Is a mas-
ter with recruits, having dev-
'eloped Oil McDougald of the
"' *yankes, among others.
'*! McDougald, who helped the
.'erstwhile Bombers to their third
^straight pennant with a .306 bat-
k 'ting average In his first b*
'league campaign, and hit trw
home run with the bases full in.
.-'-World 8erles. has the most un-
,, .orthodox batting style seen since
-.iU 81mmons..The rookie second
,,,baseman keeps his hands far a-
,-rpart, the bat held off his hip an
changing as limp as a rag.
:M' "The first time Oil showed up
vein Beaumont," says Hornsby. "I
^.suggested he change his stance.
rHe appeared disturbed.
n i 'Mr. Hornsby, I batted this
rr;wav ever since I got out of high
>.('school,* he told me. 'and I dont
til'think It matters how fanny it
'-"'looks as long as I get results.' I
Met him keep the stance and he
'"'hit .337."
>'N casv Stengel Is In agreement
"with Hornsby.
"> "Sure. Oil holds ^the bat cockr
?reyed." the little funny man of
' 'Yankee Stadium admits; "but
there ain't a thing wrong with
'/.".the way he swings it. Lots of
;;":plavers make It with unorthodox
"""Tricks."
Hornsby Is higher than an
angry, cat's back on Jim Rivera,
" "The phenomenal Seattle outfield-
er purchased by the White Sox-
for $50.000 and four, players.
"A great prospect," says The
I Rajah. "He's 28. but wild about
I the game, and that's why he'll
I make the big leagues:
Y~~ "I first saw Jim playing wlnt-
*r ball In Puerto Rico, and what
I saw I liked. When I discovered
BIG POINTRogers Hornsby, left, the new manager, and Presi-
dent Rlfl Veoek point straight anead building the St. Louis Browr...
The Rajah, whowen pennants and developed stars the past two
Seasons in Beaumont, Tex., and Seattle, returns to Ms old stamping
grenade with a three-year contract. (NEA)
his name on the draft list, I grab-
bed him for Seattle. He led the
Coast League in Just about every-
thing but pitching and he
might have done that, too, if I
had let him pitch.
"Rivera- is aggressive, anxious
to please.
"This was only his third year
In organized ball. He was green
as grass In some spots when he
came to me: I taught him to time
slow pitches and not to be caught
off stride. He learned to bunt
and drag the change-up so pitch-
ers will oe less eager to tnruw It."
Rivera Is a sparkling prospect,
and nobody knows It better than
Rivera. Early last Summer the
Bronx, N.Y., boy asked a Seattle
newspaper photographer to give
him a print of a certain picture
so he could send It home to his
family.
"Oet It quick as you can," Jim
Rivera urged. "I might not be
here long. I might go to the big
leagues."
Michigan Broke
Losing Streak
By Showing Up
ANN ARBOR. Mich., Oct. 13.
(NEA) While on a tour through
the east, the Michigan football
team of IS dropped games! to
Yale, Harvard and Wesleyan,
about which a Wolverine re-
porter wrote;
"The trip brought gratifying
results. Although losing to Tale
and Harvard on successive days,
Michigan received a forfeit when
It showed up willing to meet
Harvard again on the third day/'
...... I |
Aiken Had Nothing
To Worry About
EUGENE, Ore. Oct. IS (NBA)
When Jim Alken. who resigned
as Oregon's football coach last
June, heard that a cracker jack
Portland high school star was
thinking about enrolling at
Washington, he wasn't a bit a-
larmed.
Asked why. Alken said: .
"I've sworn that boy will go out
of this state-only over my dead
body, and If Washington gets him
I won't be alive to worry about
it."
PJS.The kid went to Oregon
SUte.
T{oyal
.//efherlandr
Steamship
Company
Dale Morey Outplays
Slranahan, Maxwell
To Become Medalist
FORT SMITH, Ark, Oct. 13
(UP)Dale Morey of Dallas, Tex.,
showed his- heels to such out-
standing amateurs as Frank
Stranahan and Billy Maxwell to
cop medalist honors In the Wll-
lard Memorial Amateur Oolf
Tournament here with a scorch-
ing 67 In the qualifying round.
Morey fired a four-under par
round on the tough Hardscraoble
Country Club course. Maxwell,
the New Orleans sharpshooter
who Is National Amateur Cham-
pion, was forced to settle with a
73. Stranahan, a former Nation-
al Champ, shot a 74.
Two other Texans were high in
the running. Joe Conrad of North
Texas State College and L. M.
Crannell o Dentn, Tex., shared
runnership honors with George
Blgham of Stlllwater, Okla. All
there shot 70's.
Morey was paired against Louis
Whltfleld of Monroe, La., m the
first round of match play Friday.
Conrad was matched against
Vince Allison of Fort Smith, and
Crannell teed off against Bill
Smith of Tuisa.
Stranahan, from Toledo, O.,
"drew John Doggett of Memphis
and Maxwell took on Roy Moore
of Memphis.
Stranahan Is a two-time win-
ner of the tourney, copping the
crown In 10S7 and 1M8,
The defending champion, Bo
Winninger of Stlllwater, Okla.,
was not competing this year.
On The Alleys...
CURCNDU MEN'S OPEN
BOWLING LEAGUE
Budwelser continued their win-
ning streak on Wednesday when
the open league resumed activi-
ties at the Curundu alleys. This
time the American Club were the
victims of a 4-0 washout. With
Hovan, stahl and Walker all
bowling in the "Top Ten" of the
averages Budwelser are. the team
to beat. Coffey was again top
man for the club and with a bit
of luck will soon roL that covet-
ed 600 series.
Balboa Brewers beat V. F. W.
Post 3522 2-1 and took the extra
point for olns. The Vets were 101
Sins behind on the first game but
ought to lose by the narrow
margin of only 36 pins. Despite
their continued losses the Vets
are In there trying all the time
and their v.'4 total in the second
game gives some Indication of
what can be expected when they
really find their length.
Another close game was that
between Carta Vieja and Canada
Dry. The Sodamen took this 3-1
winning two games and the total
pintail by 32 points Despite a
flying start by the VIejans they
fought back to win the last two
James and just edge ahead on
he pins. The Issue was In doubt
right to the last game but Allen
with a very strong finish Just
edged McCarragher to put the
Canada Dry men on top.
Acme Palnten beat the Angel-
lnl five 2-1 and by virtue of a 107
third game took the point for
Sports Briefs
By UNITED PRESS
The final composite box score
for the 1951 Series shows that
rlghtflelder Monte Irrln of the
Giants collected the most hits
11and wound up with the
highest average .458. Shortstop
Al Dark of the Giants got 10 hits,
good for the second-high mark
of .417. Third baseman Bobby
Brown of the Tanks was third
with a .357 mark. Outfielder dene
Woodllng of the Yanks scored the
most runssix. Inflelder Gil
McDougald of the Yanks batted
In the most runssevenDark
had the most total bases16...
and Irvm stole two basesthe
only ones swiped during the en-
tire Series. Allle Reynolds of the
Yanks struck out the most men
eightand walked the most
11.
DETROITA 28-year-old Army
private from D e t r a 11Ray
Barneswen a unanimoui II-
round middleweight decision over
Terry Moore Of Baltimore. Mary-
land, Wednesday night. Barnes-
rated fourth among Middle-
weight contenders before enter-
ing the service in Aprilhewed
that he hadn't lost any of has
ring savvy.
LINCOLNUniversity of Neb-
raska Chancellor R. G. Oustav-
son has urged a de-emphasizlng
of college football at an all-uni-
versity convocation in Lincoln,
Nebraska. Oustavson's talk fol-
lowed on the heels of a directive
from Cornhusker Football Coach
BUI Glassford who warned his
players that they must stop miss-
ing classes.
NEW YORKThe National In-
ter-Collegiate Rowing Regatta
will be held at Syracuse, New
York, on June 21st. Previous re-
gattas have taken place at
Ppughkeepsle, New York and
Marietta. Ohio.
Gomez Broke First
Bat With Une Drive
NEW YORK, Oct. 18. (NEA)
Lefty Gomes, a notorious punk
hitter in his day as a star pitch-
er for the New York Yankees,
was bragging to old-timers how
he finally broke his first bat.
"How'd ya' do it, on a curve
ball?" somebody Inquired.
"New," said the man who
won seven World Series games,
"my son left it In the driveway
and I backed my car over it."
pins as well. Studebaker was high
man for the Llquormen and Rose
made the top spot for the Paint-
ers. The Acme five have been
finding their form and so close Is
the race for points that next
week they can jump from sev-
enth to second place If they win
only two oolnts separate these
positions.
A. O. Grimas, General Manager
of Carta Vieja, and R. Courtney
of Budwelrer were present to
cheer their teams and to present
the all-Important Sponsors
Checks. We were very pleased to
see them and look forward to
meeting the rest of our sponsors
whenever they can spare the time
to visit us.
Here are the standings and the
averages >t the Top Ten:
Final Averages
(Continued from Page II)
INDIVIDUAL BATTING
TEAMS
Budwelser.
Amerlc'n Club
Balboa Beer. .
Carta Vieja. .
Angellni. . .
Canada Dry- .
Acme Paint .
VFW Post 3822
W.
12

8
8
7
6
7
4
Pts.
16
11
11
10
10
9
9
4
Aver.
12780
12448
12341
12695
12478
12557
12403
12099
No. 7BALBOA BEER
Stanley.
Cain. . .
Schock .
Smith. .
Carpenter
Handicap.
Totals. .
129
187
148
127
137
184
119
144
120
155
13S
154
148 396
120 421
127 395
138 420
140 412
154 462
852 827 8272506
No. 1VFW POST 8822
Mashburn. 114 177 Hi 422
Hannberg 106 128 112 341
Billings ... 112 112 112 336
Wltiig. ... 128 133 125 386
Mom .... 100 176 184 412
Handicap. 191 191 191 573
Totals.
751 914 8052470
No. 4CARTA VIEJA
Mynarcik . 188 142 161 491
Norrls.T. . 161 128
Torlan ... 148 152
Kelsey ... 142 IN
McCarr'gher 149 186
Handicap. 88 88
122 411
177 477
113 394
162 496
88 264
Totals.
876 834 823-2533
No. 6CANADA DRY
Hicks. .
Murdock .
Henry. .
Lane .
Allen . .
Handicap.
Totals. .
121
161
132
150
134
140
126
124
166
145
187
140
103 350
165 460
133 481
132427
166 487
140 420
838 888 8392565
No. 8ACME PAINTS
Lavalee ... 135 127 170 432
Corn .... 159 122 127 408
Yarbro ... 146 106 158 405
Casten ... 146 -40 130 416
Rose ... 167 136 166449
Handicap. 171 171 1171 513
Totals.
914 802 907-2623
McConnell
Colston . .
Woner . .
Balutls . .
8tudebaker.
Handicap. .
Totals. . .
No. 8ANGELINI
124
139
163
102
182
127
170
139
151
149
133
127
158 452
139 417
134^- 438
116 426
169- 454
127- 381
867 869 842-2568
FlayerClub G
Mtnon, Pittsburgh 11
Muiill. St. Louis 152
Chill, Chicago
Cola, Boston
Aahburn. Phi la.
Law, Pittsburgh
I
23
1S4
28
No .5BUDWEISER
Hovan 161 151 181 493
Steuwe . 115 145 157 417
Bryan . 159 140 144 443
Stahl. . 149 149 149 447
Walker. . 154 190 125 469
Handicap 105 106 106 315
Totals. . 843 880 861-2584
No. X-
Vale. . .
Hell wig. ,
Prltchard.
Coffey .
Relchert .
Handicap.
Total*. .
AMERICAN CLUB
126
146
136
162
112
140
129
96
100
178
181
140
150- 405
ISO 372
140 376
105 446
139 432
140- 420
822 824 8042450
K
N
S
M
TO EUROPE:
BENNEKOM .................. .....Oct. 18
HECUBA........................k..Oet. U
WILLEMSTAD ......................Oct. 29
i ii i iii
TO THE CARIBBEAN:
BENNEKOM ..
HECUBA .....
WILLEMSTAD
..................Oet. 16
.................Oet. 25
,.>...............Oet, 8#
TO COLOMBIA and ECUADOR:
Sfft:::::::::::
...O-t.
.............MO.
TO PERU and CHILE:
BREDA .............
Not. If
-K.N.8JI.* CRISTOBAL, 8-1818, J-12I8 1-121
(Passenger And freight)
BOD BROS, PANAMA CITY. I-S4M
(Passengers Only)
BLOK AGErCIES BALBOA: 3-171 (Prrtght)
jan
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service
Arrive*
Cristbal
S.8. Chirlan! ....................................Oet 14
S.S. Comayngua.................................Oet. 17
g.S. Inger Skew........................%........Oet 87
S.S. Chlrieui ....................................Oet 88
ChUM aaS gftsgssj Caff
New York Freight Service
Arrives
Cristbal
22 SSfif**..................
8.8. Tivtvee ...................
21 -if* Ab" ...............
SJ. auaras .........,,......
8.1. Cape Avinef ...... ......
'.....'......
i...........
Oet 14
Oct. 84
Oct. 81
Oct. 27
Oet 28
m&*^^.%'
(Ta.
Catasbal a Waat
Cristobal to New Orleans via
Teta, Honduras
Sails from'
Cristbal
S.8. Chirlaaf......(Passenger Service Only)......Oet 1
8.8. Catriaal .......T/TIT.......................Oet M
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 8131 PANAMA I 28*4 COLON St
Easy Way To
Reduce Injuries
HOUSTON. Oct. 13 (NEA)
Fruit Juices and crushed ice
greatly reduce football injuries.
Or so says Eddie Wojeckl, vet-
eran trainer of the Rice Owls.
"After long experimentation, a
couple of French physicians dis-
covered that drinking Juices
helps to prevent chances of mus-
cular Injuries. We are trying it
this Fall and our injury list Is
way down,'' be asserts.
It didn't take the French to
show Wojeckl how crushed Ice
helps the conditioning program.
"Rice players eat It only after
workouts. Water is not touched
until after dinner. It keeps the
kids from tilling up on water.
They eat better, maintain their
normal playing weight"
Hoblnson, Brook. 183
Srtna, Chicago 13
Campanella, Bui. 143
Clark. Phtlad'lphts 10
Dusak, S L.-Plll. M
Yvars. N. York SS
Cooper. Boston 109
lrvln. New York 111
Wyroslek, Cinn. 142
Cavaretta, Chi. SI
Kiner. Plttaburgh 1S1
Walker. St. Uuis
Podblelan. Bkn. ST
Dark. New York 1U
Lowrey, St. Louis 114
Werle, Pittsburgh 59
McCuUough. Pitt SI
Edwards. Bk.-Cin 76
Richards. Chicago 10
Purlllo, Brooklyn 1SS
Metkovich. Pitt. 12"
Thomson, N. Y. 141
Blackwell. Cinn. 39
Wehmeier, Cinn. 46
Schlendlanst. S.L. 13S
Gordon. Boston ISO
Staler. Phlla'phla 123
Reese. Brooklyn 154
Jonas. Phlla'phla 141
Elliott. Boston 134
Baumholtz. Chi. 141
Lockman. N. Y. 1S3
St Claire, Boat. 72
Marshall. Boston 13*
Hemus. St. Louis ISO
Slaughter. St. L. 113
Jethroe. Boston 140
Abrams, Brooklyn S7
Cox. Brooklyn 141
Surtl. Boston 113
Wllber. Phlla'phla S4
Ball. Plttaburgh 14S
Snider, Boston 1SS
Mueller. N. York lit
Addis, Boston 85
Lltwhiler. Cinn. IS
Mays. New York 121
Jsckaon. Chicago 145
Herm'skl. Bx.-Ch. 1(4
Dlckson. Pitt. 4*
Hartsfield. Boat. 130
Jeffcoat. Chicago 111
How'fn, S.L -Pit. 104
Reiser. Pittsburgh 74
Hodges. Brooklyn 1M
Ennbi. Phlla'phla 144
Role*, hu -s I. SS
WaatUke. Plt.-SL. 123
Adams. Cln'natl 12S
Williams. N. York 2
Mlksls. Bk -Chi. Ill
Thomas. Pitt. 3
Torgeson. Boston 155
Johnson. St. L. 114
Sauer. Chicago i41
Benson. St. Louis 13
Jones, St. Louis SO
Klustewski. Cln. 154
r-iutigllone. Pitt lit
Dieting. St. Louis 4
Waitkus, Phils. 145
Burgess, Chicago 84
Bridges, Brook. 82
Church. Phlla. SS
Hamner. Phila. ISO
H. Rica. St. Louis 88
Hstton. Cincinnati 8*
Mlnner. Chicago 38
Pafko, Chi -Bkn 133
D Rica, St. Louil 132
Howell. Cincinnati 77
Hamauotl. Chi. 73
Siankv, N. York 145
Nicholson. Phils. 85
Adcock, Cln'natl' 113
Merrlman, Cinn. 114
Stallcup. Cln'natl 111
Gar glola. S.L.-Ptt St
Connors, Chicago M
Walker. Chi.-Bkn 73
Ryan. Cincinnati 136
Schefng. Cln.-S.L. SI
Thompaon. N.Y. 17
Edwards. Bk.-Ch. SS
Young. Phlla'phla IS
Pellegrini. Phils SS
Noble, New- York 45
Rigney. New York 45
Smalley, Chicago 78
Phillips. Pitt. 70
Pramesa. Cln'natl 71
Thompaon. Brook. SO
Meeke. Cincinnati 33
Terwllf r. Ch.-BK 17
Cole. St L.-Pltt. S7
ritrGerald. Pitt. SS
Seminlck. Phils 101
Newcombe, Brook 40
Post. Cincinnati IS
Strickland. Pitt. 138
Westrum. N. Y'rk 134
Logan. Boston 62
Brechean. St I. 24
Chamber. Pt.-S.L. 31
Brown. Bk -Phil 88
Schema, Pltt.-N.Y S3
McMillan. Clncl. S4
3asgall. Pitt, IS
Poholaky. St. L'uU 38
Usher, Cincinnati 113
Hartung. N. York 31
Saffell. Plttaburgh 49
Williams. Brook. 33
town. Chicago 31
Lohrke, N. York 23
Murtsugh. Pitt 77
M4rq.ua?. Boston SS
Rush. Chicago 37
Snahn. Boston 42
Kerr. Boston 89
Caballero. Phlla. S3
Owen. Chicago SI
Glavlano. St. L. 54
Wilson. Boston 30
Cualck. Chicago 85
Branca. Brooklyn 4?
Sarnl. St. Louis 34
Smith. Pittsburgh 12
Roberts. Phi*. 44
Holmes. Boston 27
Mauro. Chicago 13
Presko. St. Louis 15
Stalev. St. Louis 47
Mueller. Boston 28
Hoam. H York 34
Borkowskl. Chi. 58
Ramedell. Cln'natl 31
Maalle. New York 4?
Surkont, Boston 37
Bloodworth. Phil. 31
Johnson. Phlla. 38
Nichols, Beaton 33
Hiller. Chicago 34
KaHensb rger. Cin 41
Fox. ClncinnaU 40
Roe. Brooklyn 34
Koala, Naw York 39
Janeen. New York 39
Russell. Brooklyn II
Leonard, Chicago 41
I
62
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185 IS
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156 3
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YES, YOU
CMIttTTffi
Wka- alano*, days ah light tor-
Staart r*Q with atimg and hura W
amf6-^iaSaJiiyWt.oraivtia,e.
Ktm thane aiaariaa with Maaaaaa,
tit asMthing aaadicatod powder.
MsniaasaotUaklyaaaaa and cools the
anawt,haie^bwnc leT.lae.S49S and many .mint* akin
ItsssMS. en Wabiee end ayowaagna,
tea. MiI rsele eoot wian ran
4n*9nkla Han Irritate .U. It knlp.
anoiature, often aha
%ISsla6spSJftrV4s>4
Oalrt .Whanii
Seventh of a series of key plays
diagramed and written by famous
coaches for NEA Service
By DR. EDDIE ANDERSON
Holy Cross Coach
^WORCESTER, Mass. Oct. 13
NEA i Holy Cross' Jump pass
was constructed around and for
Quarterback Charlie Maloy and
-. ->,Right End Tom
McCann..
Maloy fakes
to Halfback
I Johnny Turco
1 going into the
line and then a
shuffle to Full-
back Bob Doyle
and Half ba c k
Mel Massucco.
He then Jumps
j high, turns and
' passes to Mc-
Cann about 10
prJSd Anderson ytr* down and
out on the flank.
This play was successful all
last season and worked every
time against Harvard and Ford-
ham this Fall. The Crusaders
use it very often in tight spots,
when they need a sure first
down.
Maloy was Holy Cross' sopho-
more standout last Autumn,
passed for 1560 yards. McCann
was thre east's number four
yardage-gainer among receivers
In 1950. Supplementing Maloy s
passing are Captain Massucco
and Turco. Massucco reeled off
723 yards last year, was the
fourth best punter In the east.
Tnrce is the speedy one, and
with Doyle, a driving runner,
rounds out a nifty first-string1
backfleld.
Clearing the way for our ball
carriers is a big. fast-charging
gang of linemen, headed by vet-
eran Tackles John Feltch and
Vic Rimkus. Gurd Chet Millets
spearheads our drop-out play
like a torpedo.
NEXT: Bob Volghts of :\)rth-
western.
JUMP PASSCharlie Maloy fakes to Ha'ffcaek Mnany T
goingTinto fSTsSS and then a ahorno to rollback Bob Doyle
Mel Mansueto. The quarterback then Jump* high, tntwasul.-
to Right End Tom McCann oat on the lank. (NEA)
....Your Wife ?
How long did it take
you to court your wife?
It's the same with advertisinf !
You can't win customers with
one ad. ..you've got to "call
on 'em" over a period of time.
Consistent advertising in The Panam
American wins customers for you!
*;
fpwcfe
Buy
National City Bank
Travelers Checks
If you're wise you'll make reservations for
hotels, train berths, ships, planes to avoid a
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money ? Carry Nations! City Bank Travelers
Checks snd protect yourself against theft or
loss. Your money refunde,! if lost or stolen!
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NATIONAL CITY BANK
Isthmian Branches:
Balboa Panama Cristbal
aaajas


-.
S.M.U. .......27
Notre Dame 20
I
Michigan ....33 Dartmouth .. 28 No. Carolina 21 Baylor ....... S
Indiana......14 Army........14 So. Carolina 6 Arkansas .... 7
Texas
Oklahoma
9 Tulane
7 Holy Cross
. SUNpAV
Jtmerican
'Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.

TWENTY-SEVENTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P.,
OCTOBER 1ICJ951
w
TENCENT8
Boom Tourist Season Expected
As US Vacationers Look South
' By HARRY W. FRANTZ
WASHINGTON, Oct. 13 (UP)
Travel authorities here pre-
dicted today record tourist tra-
wl to Latin America during
the Winter season which will
start next month with unpre-
cedented dollar' earnings for
neighboring republics.
Travel during; the Sum-
m*r formerly regarded as
the "off-season" boomed in
the Caribbean area, and the
trend was upward In Mexico,
Central America and South
America.
Department of Commerce
statistics showed that in the
first five months of 1951, tra-
vel to all countries south of
the United States Increased
Q.7 per cent over the same
period In 1950.
JO. S. citizens departing by
tea or air to various areas in
January, 1951 compared to the
tame period of the previous'
year were as follows:
To Central America and the
West Indies, exclusive of Puerto
Rico168.955 against 140,131, a
gain of 20.0 per cent.
To South America 14.813
gainst 12.060, up 22.8 per cent.
'.'Total 183.778 against 152,198,
r gain of 20.7.
The above figures do not in-
clude tourist travel to Mexico.
Statistic."; from Mexico City re-
ported tourist entries not
Including border crossings
in sample months as follows:
June 1951, 34.486, against 39,-
188 in June 1950 and 23,399 in
June 1949. March 37,231 against
27,650 and 22,621.
^Official optimism concerning
TBe expansion of inter-Ameri-
can tourism In the coming
winter season is based on the
following facts:
Firstly, heavy travel in the
past summer reflected a gene-
ral improvement of transpor-
tation facilities and hotels and
a concerted drive by all travel
agencies for a bigger tourist
movement. A trend has been
established that should con-
tinue Indefinitely.
Secondly, United States
"disposable income" figures
are high In this period when
consumer goods are becom-
ing scarcer, owing to the de-
fense program. People with
spending money, therefore,
are more inclined to travel.
This helps the general eco-
nomic situation because tour-
ist expenditures are to a
large extent anti-Inflationary.
The U. S. government, thru
the Commerce Department
and other agencies, Is giving
strong encouragement to
tourism.
Thirdly, U. S. travel to Flor-
ida during the coming winter
is expected to break all re-
cords. This will create a large
reservoir of tourists which will
overflow Into many other Re-
publics and Caribbean Islands
not now served by airlines ra-
diating from the great inter-
national port of Miami.
The* American republics
have learned from European
travel commissions the great
possibilities of tourism ex-
pansion through systematic
promotion and governmental
encouragement.
Diplomatic groundwork has
been laid for the establishment
of an Inter-American Travel
Congress at Lima next June.
U. S. tourist expenditures in
Latin America have Increased
since the war, as follows:
In Mexico from $15,000,000 In
1947 to $145,000,000 In 1950.
In the West Indies and Cen-
tral America, from $55,000,000
In 1947 to $60,000,000 In 1950.
In South America from $8,-
000,000 in 1947 to $22,000,000 In
1950.
These large dollar earnings
by other republics have be-
come an increasingly important
factor in International balances
of payments and a stimulating
Influence on the general econ-
omy of the Western hemis-
phere.
(NEA Telephoto)
BOWLES TO INDIAChester Bowles, former governor of
Connecticut, was sworn In Washington as U. S. ambassador
to India, to succeed Loy Henderson, who retired, John
Simmons (right), chief of protocol of the State Department,
administered the oath as George C. McGhee (center), as-
sistant secretary of state, watched.
Mrs. Frankie Boy
Clears Love Path
For Sultry Ava
HOLLYWOOD, Oct IS (UP)
Mrs. Frank Sinatra said to-
day that she will file suit for
divorce Monday, leaving Fran-
kie free to marry sultry actress
Ava Gardner.
Mrs. Sinatra said she would
charge mental cruelty, the
same grounds as she used to
obtain separate maintenance
more than a year ago.
The divorce will climax a
long marital tiff between the
two, and allow the torrid inter-
national romance that has
built up between Frankie and
voluptuous Ava to end in mar-
riage.
Britain To Open
World's Strongest
TV Transmitter
LONDON, Oct. 13 (LPS)The
world's most powerful television
transmitter Is being opened In
Britain tonight.
This new station, near Man-
chester, will bring television
within the range of another
11,000,000 potential viewers.
The 750-ft. mast which sup-
ports the aerials has been built
to withstand winds up to 130
M.P.H.
Las Cumbres Residents
To Meet On Monday
Members of the newly formed
Las Cumbres Civil Council will
hold a meeting at 8 p. m. Mon-
day at the home of Las Cum-
bres resident, William Vlolette.
Several matters affecting the
welfare and conveftence of
dwellers In the Panama City
suburb are to come before the
gathering.
Army Giving Aid
To Community Chest
Starting Today
The United States Army Ca-
ribbean will conduct a Com-
munity Chest Fund beginning
Sunday October 14 in coopera-
tion with the Panama Canal
Community Fund drive. The
campaign will be continued
through November 14 and all
military and civilian personnel
have been urged to contribute.
In a memorandum announc-
ing the drive, Brig. Gen. Ro-
bert M. Bathurst, Acting Com-
manding General, tliARCARIB
indicated that a three man
committee would be named at
each of the major posts to car-
ry out the 1951 Community
Chest drive. These Installations
include Forts Amador and Clay-
ton and the Post of Oorozal
and Fort Kobbe on the Pacific
side and Forts Davis. Gulick,
and Sherman on the Atlantic
side.
In his announcement General
Bathurst pointed out that the
Community Chest plan for help-
ing support welfare organiza-
tions eliminates individual soli-
citations by various groups. The
following named organizations
would benefit from contribu-
tions of USARCARIB person-
nel.
Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Army
Emergency Relief Army Re-
lief Society, International Boy
Scouts, Canal Zone Recreation
Council, Balboa and Cristobal
Armed Forces YMCAs. Jewish
Welfare Board Armed Forces
Service Center, General Com-
mittee of Civil Councils, Coro-
zal Hospital, Salvation Army
and National Catholic Com-
munity Service.
Jamaica Relief Fund
To Close Tomorrow
The British Consulate in Colon
announced that the Jamaican
hurricane relief fund will close
tomorrow.
The consulate released this
latest list of Atlantic Side con-
tributors.
Seidron Optical Company, $10;
Farmacia Darien, $10;
The Royal King George Lodge;
No. SI, $5;
Loyal Success Lodge No. 10186,
Loyal Victory Lodge No. 2828,
$6;
Pride of Colon Lodge No. 2771,
$5;
St. Ludan Welfare Friendly
8oclety, $5;
Three Sisters Lodge No. 2477,
IS;
Colombian Patriotic Club. $2.50;
Mr. McGrowder, $1;
British Consul, Colon, $10;
St. Veronica-Lodge No. 5. $5;
Barbadian Progressive Society,
20;
Previously reported, $1.350.87;
Total, $1.439.37.



Sports Pages:
10 Cr 11
i
Biggest-Ever American Legion
Convention In Miami Tomorrow
jt/z and Philip: Royal but Real
prince and Princess 'Move in

With the In Laws'
By ARTHUR J. MATHERS
NEA Special Correspondent
LONDON, Oct. 13 (NBA).Steeped in British tradition
and in love with England's Princess ElizabethPhilip was in-
structing naval cadets at Corsham in 194$, a lieutenant In the
, .Royal Navy.
Yet he was still a Greek citizen. And he was still just plain
Philip to the butcher, the baker, the barman and the "regulars"
At the Corsham village pub with whom he spent a couple of
nights a week drinking beer and playing darts.
EDITORS NOTE: This
month North America will get
its first glimpse of Princess
Elizabeth and Prince Philip,
whose royal romance captured
the hearts of the world. Here's
! the fifth of six dispatches that
I give you an intimate and hu-
I man closeup of the royal
couple.
But a few weeks after Eliza-
beth had sailed for South Africa
-fa January 1947, Philip became
a naturalizad Briton and got
himself a s.imame. He shed his
titles, took the name of his un-
cle, and became simply Lieut.
Philip Mountbatten.
Meanwhile. Elizabeth was tak-
ing South Atrii n by storm.
Her terrific natural charm, her
absorption of history and the
general training on which Queen
Mary had placed such emphasis
in Elizabeth's education were,
.paying off in a big way.
. .

^Bluntly asked by an old Boer
farmer whrn she was going to be
-married. Elizabeth, with a beam-
4b you'll have to wait and see."
Even the aged Boer joined the
laughter which resulted. "And."
as the Soutn Africans themselves
fty, "to make a Boer laugh is
somethine "
'.At anotherceiemonv Elizabeth
noticed a loaded bus standing
?ell away from the crowd. She
was told It contained a Girl Guide
troop from a leper colony.
Without r.esitatlon the Prin-
ces walkeri across to the tragic
vehicle and gave each of the lep-
ar children an individual wave
And smile. Neither South Africa
pr Elizabeth have forgotten that
"jBcldent. toon after her first
hild. Prince Charles, was born
"XUzabeth adopted" a leper on
,111b behalf.
_lut the real highlight of that
South African tour came three
rs before the Royal Family re-
id borne. In Capetown, on
121, Elizabeth celebrated her
birthdiy and made a "sol-
dedication" to the British
JBmmonwealth in a world-wide
radio broadcast.
Said the Princess: "I declare
Jaafore you all that my whole life,
whether it he long or short, shall
be devoted to your service and
the service uf the great Imperial
family to which we all belong.
But I shall not have the strength
to carry out this resolution unless
70u join in it with me..."
To a tall, blond Navy Lieuten-
ant, listening to her clear, girlish
voice 5000 allies away, that last
SHE GETS A BOUQUET: Princess Elisabeth receives a bou-
et freso two little girls dufag the royal tour of South
rica ka 1N7. King George and Queen FJfeabtUi watch fa
. ,------___'_ Pa_ckff*in(l
sentence carried a deep personal
message.
Shortly after the Royal family
returned to England a distin-
guished, gray-haired woman
slipped unnoticed Into the office
of a famous jeweler. Without pre-
amble she produced a magnifi-
cent antique ringthe history of
which is also part of the history
of Oreeceand gave directions
for certain alterations.

'For Princess Alice of Greece-
mother of Philip and now a.
member of a semi-secluded rell-
&lous order caring for the sick on
ip Greek Inland of Tinosthat
was a supremely happy moment
shared only with her son.
A few weeks later Philip, by
Royal consent, slipped that same
ring on the betrothal finger of
Elizabeth and, lor both of them,
the world rejoiced. The long
months of waiting to declare
their love were over.
On their wedding eve, Philip
had been created Duke of Edin-
burgh, Baron Greenwich. Earl of
Marloneth and had his right to
the title "Prince" restored to him
by the King.
Their wending was celebrated
before the assembled royalty of
Europe and a great host of no-
bles and commoners in Westmin-
ster Abbey on Nov. 20, 1947. It
was a wedding the whole world
watched.

As yet without a home of their
own, Elisabeth and Philip re-
turned from their honeymoon to
hve for a while in the Princess'
old apartments In Buckingham
Palace. Philip told his friends:
"We're moving in with the in-
laws."
However Clarence Housejust
across the Mall from the Palace
was being restored for them
and much of their first month*
of married life was spent In plan-
ning the way they wanted their
home to look and feel.
While Elisabeth selected the
furniture and supervised the dec-
orations, Philipa gadget-fas
from way backspent hours at
home exhibitions looking for
modern labor-saving devices.
He's said to have fixed so many
handy gadgets in the kitchen
and service quarters that the
staff call it Luna Park, after the
HE GETS A NAME: Prince
Philip, here saluting at Cors-
ham In 1947, became a British
, citiien and plain PhUip
Mountbatten
laboratory of Thornar . Edison.
Before their home was ready
for occupation, Phliip was re-
called to sea-going duty with the
Mediterranean Fleet based at
Malta. He returned from that
three-year tour of duty last
month. .....
They were a mighty Important
three years for Elizabeth and
Philip in more ways than one.
Their two children were born:
Prince Charles (Nov. 14. 1948)
and Princess Anne (Aug. 15,
1950). Philip got his first com-
mand (the destroyer Magpie),
and, against a spate of ill-direct-
ed crlUcUm, Elizabeth, like many
other navy wive went out to live
with her husband in Malta.
' They were rewarding/ them-
selves In some measure for those
long, unhappy months otaepara-
tion.
A new role for
Tomerrow:
PhlU. "
By FRANK EIDGE, JR.
MIAMtFla., Oct. IS (UP)
The world's largest convention
turned callous Miami into a
bun ting-draped house party to-
day as some 50,000 ex-servicemen
and their families swarmed over
the.Florida "Gold Coast" for.the
33rd annual meeting of the A-
merlcan Legion."
But behind the noisy knots of
gaiety at every street corner, bar
and hotel, the Legionnaires were
hammering out tough-worded
recommendations on how they
think the nation should handle
foreign policy, dope peddlers, vet-
erans and civil defense.
These important commission
and committee actions began
Friday. .
The main convention sessions,
with some 6,000 accredited dale
gates attending opens today and
continues through Thursday.
The official Legion opinions on
the nation's problems carry the
weight of a 4,000,000-membership
doubly significant this time on
the eve of a Presidential election
year.
National Legion Commander
Erie Cocke, Jr., of Dawson, Ga,
eredicted Lovett's speech on
[onday, his first major address
as Defense Secretary, will be of
International importance.
Lovett will bring greetings
from Legionnaire and President
Harry Truman who could not at-
tend.
The 30-year-old Cocke, young-
est commander fa the Legion's
history, will make a detailed re-
port to the convention on his
worldwide travels of the past
year.
Cocke considers the halting of
the illicit traffic fa narcotics,
particularly as it affects the na-
tion's youth, to be a prime field
for Legion endeavor.
Most colorful figure at the
convention will be Gen. MacAr-
thur who arrives Tuesday -with
Mrs. MacArtbur in time to lead
and review the Legion's annual
paradean. eight-hour colossus'
of bands and marching units.
Police are prepared to handle
a crowd ud to 300,000 in down-
town Miami.
The former Pacific war chief
will make the principal conven-
tion address Wednesday.
He as vat has given no
of what he will say. But his re*
resents a good opportunity for
1* general to indicate hi pref-
erence or the next President.
Although most of its World
War War I members are now
graying "old soldiers," the Legion
proved it till isa fun-lovtng-or-
ganlaatlon..
"Horse p:ay" rampant on the
streets for the past two days will
be organised Into the annual pa-
rade .of the 40 and 8 Sunday
night at Miami Beach.
The'whUtie-toothv Honor Bo.
clety Isn't what It used to be, said
its secretary. Charles Ardery..
"We. used to be the drinking
branch of the Legion, but now
we're too old for that," he said.
Despite the Inviting prospects
of the flashing bare arms and
Si of Miami's womenfolk, Le-
tt officials, as in-the -past few
years, ordered the white-helmet -
ed organisation police to seize all
water pistols, electric canes and
buzzers.
But the revelers still serenaded
pretty gins with impromptu
band conceits and wolf calls.
Miami, which entertained the
convention to 1948,: had better
facilities available this time for
the mammuth get-together.
There were two new city au-
ditoriums and the Inner Key con-
vention hall, once a big seaplane
base, was expanded to handle up
to 15,000 people.
There, in a scene similar to a
national Party convention, the
Legion will elect officers Thurs-
day to close out its affairs.
Two Priests Admit
Knowing of Polish
Officials' Murder
WARSAW, Oct. 13 (UP) Two
Polish Catholic priests admitted
today that they knew of the
murders of Communist officials
who had sheltered anti-Commu-
nist underground members' and
cached arms in a monastery.
Fathers Josef Plonka and-Jan
Ryba .and another priest among
the defendants, were charged by
the Lublin Military Tribunal
with underground anti-state ac-
tivities.
Plonka and Ryba, who have
been guardians of the Radecani-
ca Monastery told of meetings at
the mppaatarx at which the mur-
ders of communists had been
plotted.
They described the meetings
aiipartlea of men"who only kpew
aw to dfjak vodka: and talk
eleesly about murdering peo-
markTwilfb.- can&T >'^'P1^ hni oi t^^rk-BemaT-
dine Order, AndrzeJ Kczelak de-
nied the charges.
dio networks and the occasion
Solon To Insist
On Cross Markers
For Military Dead
WASHINGTON, Oct. 1 (UP)
Rep. W. F. NorrelL D., Ark.
said today White crosses should
be restored to the graves of
American war dead In the Ha-
waiian National Cemetery
President Truman notwith-
standing. >
Norrell. who helped locate the
cemetery on the "Hill of Sa-
crifices" overlooking Honolu-
lu, objected to Mr. Truman's
Sapproval of Army action in re-
lacing the crosses with flat
eadstones.
"If those in charge fan to
take the necessary action to
restore the crosses immediately,
then Congress should pass a
law requiring it," he skid in
a speech Inserted in the.Con-
gressional Record.
Rep. Edith Nourse Rogers, R..
Mass., has introduced a bill
which would force the Army
to restore the crosses. Heated
Congressional criticism foBow-
ed the Army action and one
veterans organization said re-
noval of the crosses made the
cemetery look like a "vacant
lot."
When the Army removed the
crosses from the graves of 13,-
000 American war dead It said
its policy is to remove white
crosses in all national cemeter-
ies and replace them with flat
or upright stones bearing either
crosses or Stars of David.
US Railroads Claimed
$1 Billion Belter
COLUMBIA, 8. C. Oct. IS--
(UP)Ernest E. Norrls. presi-
dent of the Southern 'Railway
system, said here today that the
nation's railroads have spent a
billion dollars a year since the
end of the -war on improve-
ments.
President Is
1-Man Panel
At Press Quiz
WASHINGTON. Oct. Is (UP)
President Truman never knows
what reporters will think of next
to ask at a press conference but
he appears to be ready with
some kind of answer for all ques-
tions.
Mr. Truman showed that yes-
terdayon the subjects of:
LOVE He thinks it's here to
stay. /
FRIENDSHIP He doesnt
like people telling him1 what to
do about his appointees.
TRUMAN LIBRARY He
wants one to house his papers
and letters but doesn't approve of
Sen. Clinton P. Anderson's re-
minder to prospective cash don-
or that their contributions will
be tax deductible.
Mr. Truman also told news-
men:
That he believes the controver-
sy over the removal of white
crosses from graves of war dead
In the Hawaiian National Ceme-
tery' will be solved to the satis-
faction of all concerned. He said
the Army treats all soldiers ex-
actly alike, and has arranged to
treat the dead from Korea in the
same manner as they are treated
In other places.
He has no intention of. with-
drawing his nomination of Earl
Wayne Beck for the $7,800 a year
job of Recorder of Deeds for the
District, of Columbia. The San-
ate District Committee was un-
impressed by Beck, a Negro, al
hearing earlier, this week.
The subject of love came up
when he was asked about a grant
by the Federal Security Agency
to Dr. Robert F. Winch of North-
western' University to study "the
unconscious factors in courtship
and mate selection."
Re was asked if he could tell
what it means.
The President said he couldn't.
"When yon find out what is
this thing called love," a report-
er asked, "what are you going to
do about it?"
Mr. Truman laughed and said
that it had been going on ever
since Adar.a and Eve and he
guessed it always will be.
Barking Baldy Banished;
Family Follows Faithfully
BIRMKOHAM, Ala., Oct. 18
(UP) A Birmingham family
searched for another home to-
day because a city judge ruled
that their barking dog must
go,
"We're going to sell our home
here and move somewl,ere else
to a place where people love
dogs," Mrs. W. D. Foote said.
Mr. and Mrs. Foote and their
son, Billy, found a temporary
home for their 5-year-oltJ Eng-
lish setter, Baldy, when City
Judge Ralph Parker ruled that
the animal must be moved.
Neighbors complained that
Baldy annoyed them with his
barking
Baldy is staying with a fam-
ily in suburban Homewood.
Ala., since the court decision,
but the Footes said they will
take him back as soon as they
can find another home.
"We've lived here 10 years,"
Mrs. Foote said
"We hate to leave the place
where Billy was born and has
his friends, but we hate to
part with Baldy Just because
of a couple of neighbors."
She said the phone "has been
ringing all day" with calls from
persons offering a home for
Baldy.
"We got him when he was
eight weeks old," she said. "My
husband, who drives a Grey-
hound bus, is away from home
every other night and he
thought Billy and I needed a
watchdog."
Mrs. Foote said Baldy has
kept away the prowlers and
is a "friendly, lovable dog."
"He's too good a friend to
give up," she said.
Legionnaire Urges 'Secret'
Weapons Use to End Carnage
s &
MIAMI, Fla., Oct.
Donald R. Wilson
burg, W. Va who is slated to
be the next commander of. (he
American Legion, said today
the United States should)-ise
every weapon Including any
"secret" developments to
wipe out the enemy in Ko-
rea.
Wilson said this counfry
should not withhold any n w
weapons It has for fear of 1 )-
tsllatlon In kind.
"If we are to carry out or
publicly-declared intention
'punish the aggressors' we. 0 'e
it to our national honor to io
so," the 34-year-old atton >F
and former law partner of *-
Secretary of Defense Lou s
Johnson said.
Wilson spoke before a lofal
civic club shortly after settl ig
up campaign headquarters *t
the Roney Plasa hotel n '-
ml Beach. Although opposed V
five other candidates, WllJ m
was believed assured of election
as National Commander next
Thursday at the final session
of the Legion's four-day nation-
al convention here.
"Tints is short," Wilson
said.
"If toe have the weapon
to destroy the enemy in
Horth Korea, toe art moral-
ly obligated to uva Ame-
rican blood. Let as sofa thit
mar in Korea, let us tola it
beyond any measure 0/
doubt.''
He advocated bombing Man-
churia and blockading Red
China.
Walter Alessandronl of Phi-
ladelphia, another candidate for
national eommander, criticised
the Legion's lack of "proper-
interest in "stamping out sub-
versive activity." He spoke .at
a meeting of the Legion's Ame-
ricanism commission.
Other candidates are Lewis
Dough of Pasadena, Cal., Lee
Ward, of Paragould, Ark.. Sea-
born Collins of Las Cruees, N.
M, apd Arthur Connell of
Mlddleton, Conn.
The legion's legislative com-
mission approved a resolution
urging Congress to exempt the
servce pay of all members of
the armed forces from federal
Income tax
This commission also
adopted a resolution that
would lower the voting ape
of members of the armed
forces to the minima*1 aae
of draftees.
All resolutions approved at
the pre-convention meetings of
committees will be subject to
adoption by the Legion as a
whole next week.
The Legion opens formal ses-
sions Monday when Secretary
of defense Robert Lovett win
speak. General Douglas MacAr-
thur will arrive Tuesday for the
Legion parade and will speak
Wednesday. "


V
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Sunday American Supplement




:jJ
EVERYBODY BENEFITS ... EVERYBODY GIVES
COMMUNITY ^CHEST
MANY CAMPAIGNS IN ONE

'
I



-; Review
WORLD-WIDE
ee
ISTHMIAN
SPORTS
THE UNITED NATIONS did little better than break
even In last week's lighting In Korea.
General James A. Van Fleet's 8th Army took a few
peaks, gained a few miles here and there, and tost
a pile of men for an operation lp a world still offi-
cially at peace. '
It could scarcely be said that tbe Reds, soldiers
fifhtinf withoat irrf IW,'W(R acting
particularly dispirited ahoat this.
The way things went along the ridge crests, a Chin-
ese who turned to with a spade and dug a good bunk-
er was doing about as much for hU side as a United
Nations taxpayer who dug Into his Irouser pockets for
$200,000 or more te buy a. fighter bomber, complete
with trained pilot and napalm.
The thick Chinese-dug bunker, did not have too
much trouble shrugging off fighter bomber attacks.
The United Nations soldiers are new fighting in the
area once selected by United Nations Supreme Com-
mander United States General Matthew B. Rldgway
as a ceasefire Une, because of the ease of defending
In the role of attackers, the United Nations
troops have probably by now decided Rldgway
knew what he was talking about.
Bloodiest fighting of the current campaign has
been for Heartbreak Ridge, on the east central front.
The 23rd Regiment of the United States 2nd In-
fantry Division, with a French but talln attached,
seems to have shed all the blood, earned all the glory.
The ridge was declared finally captured Friday, af-
ter changing hands frequently In t 30 day set-to.
Early in the week, !n west Korea, the British Com-
monwealth Division and the United States 1st Cavalry
Division made a brief forward move, secured their
objectives, then settled down to ho!d on to them a-
gainst counterattacks.
Yesterday, what seemed to be the" next phase of
Van Fleet's plan to keep the Red commanders on the
jump, a 70,000 man United Nations torce struck along
the Eastern half o*f the front, chiefly towards the big
Red base of Kumsong.
""he. attack moved forward smartly till the Red
commanders had time to get their forces Into defen-
sive positions. "
At last reports yesterday It looked as though the
big six-division attack was going to find its oppon-
ents just as obstreperous as did the one Yank regi-
ment on Heartbreak Ridge.
If ever the United Nations break through Into open
country, their mechanical and technical advantages
may let them away for a Patton gallop.
Bat mountain warfare is man against man.
There are as many Reds in the Korean line as
United Nations troops. And the war is still in the
" mountains.
If it was any consolation to he guys on Heart-
break Ridge, and likewise spots, the liaison teams
were still talking about getting the truce talks going
age in.
t seemed as if some resumption might be made
si Panmunjom, near Kaesong but rot so wholly Red-
controlled.
When the negotiators came though with some re-
suits they would get an eager audience. But hardly
until.
The campaigning season bjpke '.i Indo-Chino, where
the top Red Chinese Communists reportedly feel their
armies would reap an easy dividend In rice-rich con-
trast to the sterile peaks currently being disputed in
Korr.
French General Jean de Latir de Tassigny'a
forces sent the first tentative Vletmlnh (Indo-
Chinese Communist) thrust scuttling home, en-
. couraged by Foreign Legion paratroopers and US-
made Hellcats, Bearcats and B-26's.
But it was only the. opening game of the season.
Tli' Reds were certain to return
.-v Paris magazine reported de Lattre's recent visit
to i he United States netted him a promise of plenty
more US material should the Chinese openly join In
his sector of the all-Asia anti-R'd war being fought
by the West.
Ciem Attlee's Labor Party and Winnie Churchill's
Tenes were each trying to earn the British elector-
ait's nod, due to be awarded Wedntsday.
-ne Winner of this brief but brisk contest will have
the pleasure of: 1) Trying to stop a heady Arab bloc
(bundling the British out of all the Middle East as
they were bundled out of Abadar.:
2" Persuading the country (six ounces of meat per
pt -on per week since 1839. thret years to wait for
the delivery of a new car) that the way to meet re-
armament costs is to buy less fooc, overseas and sell
more cars (upplng the waiting period in Britain to
mryoe five years):
3) Account for the fact that 'here will not be
enough coal In the coming winter to provide enough
electricity for industry, let along heat the domestic
hearths.
It is for this gleaming prize thbt Clem and Winnie
ar? clutching.
------o-----
The United States Senate and House, whose fin-
ancial discussions have lately been ;-uch that the tax-
flayer hardly knows whether they're talking about
Ight years or the number of air ins in an orange,
dropoed momentarily to a layman'* plane.
Income tax up lip per cent effective Novem-
ber, declared a joint committee of both Houses,
before disappearing again into the billion-dollar
clouds.
The Defense Department also announced that the
draft was going to dig deeper, to Me tune of 500,000
more men.
Australia announcea It was seining another bat-
talion to Korea (bringing her Ko.can contribution up
to about 6,000 men. from a popu'utlon of 7,000,000).
Uruguay announced two of her destroyers were
available for United Nations service if called upon.
There seemed aome implication that this service
would have to be in defense of the Western hemis-
phere.
o JUST WHEN PAY raises for ZonUn civilians seem-
ed "in the bag" discouraging news leaked out of Wash-
ington via the government employes' bible, "Tbe Fe-
deral Diary," penned by Jerry Kluttr. Seems Congress
Is holding up the works until a new and higher in-
come tax bill is passed *nd goes into effect. Woe U
the poor civil servant when insult Is heaped upon m-
jury
Even if the pay raise bills are passed, they would
be subject to the new tax-rate (although they would
be retroactive to July l, 1951), and a real big chunk
might be chopped out of the first allegedly higher
paycheck.
there's been a'lot of grumbling and growling re-
cently a ever since the Panam Canal Company n-
nounced doubled rental rates for non-Canal employes.
Protests in the form of mall-box letters poured In ail
week. The big beef being the injustice to UA gov-
ernment employes who do not work for the Canal .
forced to pay twice as much for the same government
quarters.
They clalra,and rightly, that they are VS. citizens,
that they pay the same Income tax and should be
entitled to the same rentals as Canal'ers. Also effec-
tive Nov. 1, would be doubled rent for members of the
Armed Forces from puck private to master sergeant,
if they occupy Canal quarters. This group, resents the
fact that the heaviest bite falls on the lower grades.
Most of the upper grade have military quarters. ,
A little Panamanian girl and a sick serviceman were
grateful to aviation for saving their lives thia week.
The child, critically 111 with appendicitis was ttown
in by a private (Atlantic Aviation Club) plane from
the Isolated town of Nombre de Dios. Latest reports
indicate she is doing fina_after an emergency opera-
The serviceman, from the Cape Mala Light Station
was flown In by a 1st Air Rescue, Flight "B' helicop-
ter and taken to the Fort Clayton Hospital. After a
severe malaria attack he is already 'up and around.
Not so lucky w*s 4i-year-old Dwight M. Kersh
for whom a ten-day extensive search was suspend-
ed this week. The worst was feared as the Darin
area and territory closer to Tocumen was combed
for traces of the American pilot and two Pana-
manian businessmen that were in the AGSA Piper
Clipper. Pieces of fabric definitely identified as
coming from the plane were found near the shore-
line village of Punta Bruja by a native woman.
Despite river dragging operations, no sign or tne
men has been uncovered.
A ten-year penitentiary sentence imposed upon
Ezequiel Labiosa for raping a 13-j ear-old girl will go
to a higher court, it was decided this week by new
defense counsel Ramirez and De Castro. Taking over
the case after the sentehce was Imposed by Judge
J. J. Hancock In the UB. District Court, Labiosa s at-
torneys said It would be sent to the 5th Circuit Court
of Appeals in New Orleans for a decision.
Meanwhile the Puerto Rlcan, who was found guilty
by a Jury Sept. 27 was free on $5,000 bail which was
posted. Although the defendant's attorney pointed out
that Labiosa would be deprived of his monthly Navy
pension If sent to'the pen,.the Judge said he must
follow the verdict of the jury who nad found Labiosa
guilty, and who had recommended a penitentiary
term.
It was a small world for two Zonlans In the ser-
vice who bumped Into each other In Korea. Lt. (J.g.)
Fred E Whlpple of the destroyer USB. Stormes met
Electrician's mate, 1st Class Robert Quinn who is on
duty with the destroyer UB.S. Isabel last week dur-
ing a routine Journey. Whipple who comes from New
Cristobal, and Quinn who Is from Gatun are both
due home for leave the end of this month.
Meanwhile Mr. and Mrs. Carl P. Hoffman of Pedro
Miguel can be mightly proud of their daughter. Ma j.
Kathleen E. Hoffman. She's the new CO of the WAF s
Squadron at Pepperell Air Force Base in Newfouna-
land.
Death seems to strike In three's. Marie Ryan, Pedro
Miguel telephone operator, Mrs. Lydia Ackerly of Dia-
blo and Defmar McAllister, of Costo Rica passed away
this week.
This week the Republic of Panam moved one
step nearer the completion of Its sector of the
Inter-American Highway, as a $ 130,00s appropria-
tion to carry on work already staited in the Chi-
riqui Province, was voted by the Assembly and
immediately ratified by President Akibiades Are-
semena.
President Arosemena suffered a setback about mid-
week, however, when his plan to have already-cam-
paigning political parties scrap their present can-
didates and give their support to one national can-
didate was flatly rejected. .....
Nor did any of the three Presidential hopefuls
Police Chief Jos A. Remn, Roberto F. Chlarl and
Norberto Navarro give any Indication that they ap-
proved the President's plan to avoid bitter political
conflicts, which he said would help to deplete the
country's already-sparse financial resources.
Of the three candidates Remn has come In for the
bitterest criticism from purportedly "peace-loving"
polticos. Biggest blast against Remn came from the
young, stormy leader of the Frente Patritico, Deputy
Jorge Hlueca. Illueca, speaking before the National
Assembly, said Remn does not have the ability of a
statesman and only has the support of "police bayon-
ets."
On the cultural side of the news. Panama's No. 1
young baritone. Emilio Cadet, lost to the younger Mn-
rlo Farrar from El Salvador In the "Great Caruso" con-
test to choose Central America's competitor for tbe
Mario Lanza scholarship in the finals at Rio de
Janeiro next Thursday night.
Another U.S. firm contributed financial and tech-
nical aid to a Panamanian firm during the week.
PAGE TWO
SU*** MC3
THE AGE OF baseball miracles ended fS:M (B6T)
Wednesday.
The New York Yankees deadly and efficient as
ever saw to that. They beat tb- New York Giant
"miracle team" 4-3 in the sixth and deciding (tame of
the World Series. .
Thus, on a gloomy, chilly day at Yankee Stadium,
did the-New York Giant bubble burst. Millions who
thrilled to their amaxlng stretch, drive during the pen-
nant season were disappointed because'they couldn't
make a second miracle come true. But It just wasn't
In the cards, and the Yanks proved for the 14th time
that they're the best in baseball.
There was deabt about in after the sixth
inning Wednesday. Outfielder Bank Bauer's triple
with the bases loaded in the sixth was the pay-
off for the Yanks. And Johnny Sain, an ex-Na-
tional Leagaer, eame throngh With seme super
relief pitching 1st the top of the seventh to save
the win for the Yanks and righthander Vic
Rasehd.
The Giants loaded the bases in. the top of the
ninth with none cut. Stanky singled to left. Dark beat
out a bunt between the pitcher's mound and third
and Lockman dropped a single to right, loading them
up, Irving, trying for his 12th .World Series hit to tie
a record, filed deep to'left, scoring Stanky and send-
ing Dark to third and Lockman to si-cond. Bob Thom-
son also filed to left and Dark scored with the third
run of the game. Sal Yvars batted for Hank Thomp-
son and on the first pitch lined out to Bauer In right
and the Yanks had won the Serle.?.
Former Heavyweight King Ezzar.1 Charles floored
Rex Layne twice to win a technical knockout in the *
11th round at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh "Wednesday.
The time was two-32. Layne was saved by the bell at
the count of nine In the 10th round. When Charles
dropped the chunky heavyweight from Utah again in
the lth. referee Buck McTlernan halted the bout.
Layne suffered at severe battering and was bleeding
from the nose, mouth and at the corner of his left
eye.
Charles weighed In at 1M for the bout' the
heaviest of his career. It was Charles' first show-
ing since July when he dropped bis title to Jer-
sey Joe Walcott. The 24-year-oW Layne scaled in
seven-and-half pounds heavier than Charles.
Layne suffered his second consecutive K.O. the
last was against Rocky Marciano in New York last
July 12tb.
The Charles-Layne bout was the first ever televis-
ed from coast to coast. It's estimated that 40-millioa
persons saw the fight on television. But only 62-hun-
dred fans showed up for the clash at Forbes Field.
The old Rajah Is coming back to the Majors.
Early Monday morning colorful Bill Veeck, presl.
dent Of the St. Louis Browns, confirmed that Rogers
Hornsby will try to get the Brownies out of the cellar
next season.
There were plenty tf rumors that the 55-year-old
Hall-of-Famer would replace Zack Taylor. But this
was the first official word on the switch.
While the announcement didn't surprise base-
ball men, the timing of it did. Ordinarily, the pub-
licity-conscious Veeck waits until he can get the
last gasp of surprise from a move. This time BIU
announced it whUe the emphasis was on the World
Series. And baseball men are wondering.. ."Why?
This much is known. Hornsby. who was batting
champion of the National League for seven years and
had a lifetime average of 58, sinned a three-year
contract with the Browns. Veeck isn't saying what
Hornsby Is getting, except to call it the highest salary
ever paid by the club.
"I'm tickled to death to be back in St Louis again."
Hornsby otld newsmen in New York where he watch-
ed the Series. "We'll hav ean Improved club, you can
count on that. We intend to keep the best players we
have now and get rid of the worst '
Hornsby says there's a real re-bunding Job to be
done. And the Brownie president agrees.
"Any resemblance between the old Browns and the
new ones," grinned Veecks, "will be strictly coinci-
dental. Hornsby was cur number one choice all the
way... the guy we saw first and the guy we really
wanted."
Hornsby has had four other stretches as a Major
League manager. In 1925 and . Hornsby bossed the
St. Louis cardinals and won the world series in 1926
Then he managed the Boston Brave, in1928. He took
over the Chicago Cubs In 1930, '31 and "32. And he
ran the Browns from 1933 throufiV. 1937.
Last year Hornsby managed Seattle In the Pacific
Coast league._____________________m
The TJA Plywood Corporation completed ar-
rangements Thursday with Panama Forest Pro-
ducts Co- Inc. to furnish management and dis-
tribution facilities for the local plywood **'
a long-term option to purchase a half Interest In
TtaMlw closed by L. O. OtUnger Resident of
the US Plywood Corporation, who visited here and
stoyed long enough to meet President Arosemena.
Panam court news revealed that the well-known
American contractor Louis *mtBMiM ammw a
number of people swindled out of more than 1.300
by" forme/Italian resident of Panam City who Is
"ThTv!ATthVThh-d District has requested that
the Italian, Alberto Soldalnl, be tried In absentia.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1951


Twi^SwSv Cross-Ward FuzzuT\
jDCAiriwr. AND ENTERINGThat might be the charge against
Into a basement apartment In Chicago. No one was nurt ne e
Vincent Krauth and his daughter, Karen. neighbor! of thr. apart
ment owner, survey the damage. __________
rwotlT.H TO SQUASH YOU"Not bad for a'lity farmer1" was
toe^menVafthe Westirn Washington State Fair In Puy.llup
n Carpfnilo, of Seattle, displayed these two squashy
* The.H eombined weight u is5 pounds
MONARCH
W fAHULY FAVORITE FOR
AMOST100 YEARS
Monarch finer foods
re today the stand-
ard of quality all over
the world. They afe pre^
pared in the most modem
'manner... but retain all the real
old-fashioned flavor. Five generations
have proved Monarch finer foods... the
BEST by TEST. There are over 500
Monarch finer foods. Ask for them in your
grocery store. If your dealer does not
stock Monarch finer foods, inquire of:
MOYVK( II
World's Largest Family of Fmw Foodf
Distributor* in the Republic:
COLON Tagaropak, S. A. Tel. 1000
PANAMACi. PaMmerkaiu de Orange Crash
HOME DELIVERY Tal. 3-3219
1Insect
' 5O the
Sallan
Franks
10Plot
15Wind
over
Adriatic
IPPartner
20Market-
place
21Trum-
peter
22Of grand-
parent*
23Raise
24Candle
25Charge
28--Cotton
fWric
27Not
positive
2Simian
SIAlienate
33Simple'
34 Exhaust
36Noted
3TNauti-
cal
40Subdue
42Flower-
cluster
46 Escape
47Weatern
shrub
48Solemn
promise
50Waxy
sub-
stance
51Japanese
Ash
HORIZONTAL
52Sovereign
power
54Diffident
56Emmet
57Borough
in
Pennsyl-
vania
59Allay
60Revolve
61To-do
$2Freeee
together
again
64 -Untwist
65Dismal
67Plexus
68Wharf
Issue
70Out-
cast
73Delay
74Cotton
cloth
78S curve
79Number
of
"* men
on a
football
team
81Word
of
compari-
son -
82Head
88Peruke
84 Maker
85-Nap
87Cast
metal
mass
Avene* Usse
VERTICAL
88Gladden
90Mean
person
91Skirmish
92Drudge
94Yield
96Regain
98Older
9Blemish
101Sot /
102Be
full
103Private
107Through
108Infirm
112Broad-
topped
hill
113One-
masted
sailing
vessel
115Baby-
lonian
*>ero
(Myth.)
117Ore
. rein
118Stulm
119Unique
120Legisla-
tor
121Lounge
122Counter-
part
123One
"unclean"
* (Bib.)
124River
in
_England
125Region
..1U.: n'sstaate*
1Caution
2On shielded
side
3Dross of
metal
4Geometri-
cal figure
5Lampoon
GCentury
plant
7Slow,
easy
gallop
8passion
9Upper shell
of turUe
10Having
rhythm
11LifeUme
12Infant
13Wrong
14Disorder
15Poise
16Drying
chamber
17Pealed
18Agave
28Dogma
30Spanish
dollar
32Respond
toa
stimulus
34Gleam
35Ardent
partisan
37Rhythm
38Having
broad
expanded
lip
(of shells)
39Repenting
40Singled
out
41Pertaining
to nodes
43Muse of
lyric
poetry
44Half
note
(music)
45Ingress
47Case of
slats
49Rainy
53Shrub of
Scotland
54Proposer
55Part
58Hawk's
nest
60Jet
black
61Yuccalike
plant
63Meadow
64Have
recourse
66Brightened
68Young
hare
69Blot out
70Potency
71Brisk
72Stately
73Object
74Inspirit
75Country
between
Tibet and
India
76Ingenuous
77Saw for
squaring
log
80Varnish
gum
81Door- *.
keeper
84Barrier
85Sternest
86Star-
flower
89Having
made
and left
a will
91Brood
93Thin
plate
95r-Of the
ankle
97Conductor
of heat
98Une that
cuts
another
100Narrow ,
valley
on moon <
102Part of- .
mortise
103Ancient-
kingdom
104An alkali
105Neglect
106Confine
108Vale
109Needy
110Vain
111Tissue
114Individual
116Craggy
hill
-DIMMH by Kins r~i (Answer U. be found elsewhere to the Sunday America!
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 196J

Gorillas Go Begging
On U.S. Zoo Market
ST. LOUIS. Oct. (UP.) This
will be good news In the Cam-
eroon* and the Congo. Gorillas
are a drug on the market.
Director George Vlerheller of
the St. Louis ioo said at least10
were brought Into the United
States last year and the Import-
ers are finding few takers,
Formerly. Vlerheller. said, only
one or two were brought in each
ye"Most of the big aoos already
have all they can handle, he
said, "and the smaller ones
can't afford them."
He said "once you've got a
eorllla on your hands you've got
a headache." The animals are
hard to care for in captivity and
most aoos that can afford the
big apes can hadle only one or
two>The St-LouU zoo has three.
4U liJW 111*"
Secret Compartment
Saves Owner Large
Amount ol Money
EAST ST. LOUIS. 111.. Oct.
(UP) Walter Dickens of sub-
urban Signal Hill says those
secret compartments in some
wallets "really work."
Dickens left his wallet on a
counter at First National Bank
when he went to the teller s
cage to make a deposit. When
he remembered It. the wallet was
gone. ,
Later the wallet, deposited in
a mall box. showed up at the
post office. Dickens said $30 in
the regular section was mUwing.
but he recovered $150 he had
placed in a secret compartment.
Railroad Bells Go
To Southern Church
LOUISVILLE. Ky. (UJ?.) The
Louisville t Nashville railroad Is
converting its locomotives from
steam to diesel power and at the
same time giving a helping hand
to churches in several southern
states.
The railroad has sent 47 of
the steam locomotives' bells to
churches In Kentucky, Tennes-
see, Alabama, Virginia, Illinois
and Georgia.
Each bell weighs 300 pounds.
/\
ONE MAN'S FAMILY
COVENTRY, R. I. (UPr) Mr.
and Mrs. Alphonse Dlttmar en-
tertained 76 of the 98 living des-
cendants of John Martin this
year at the Martin family's 15th
reunion. Martin was a Oerman
immigrant who settled In Nattck,
PAGE THREE



THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWMS3 AND PUSLISHIO V TUB PANAMA AMSRICAN PRESS, INC.
POUNOSD SV NILSON NOUNMVBU. In IMS
, HARMODIO AMIA*. iOHO.
7. H STPit7 P O Box >34. Panama, r. or P.
telohoni Panama no 2-0740 CASLI AODRISS- PANAMJSNICAN. PANAMA
COIOK Or FICI. 12 ? CCNTRAl IMH SITWSIN 1TN AND ,ISTH TI.EIT
FORIISN RlPPISINTATIVIS. JOSHUA POWERS, INC.
S4S MADISON AVI.. Nrw YORK, ll/l N f.
or* i PT All
PIP MONTH. IN *""" S '70 2.BO
POP SIS MONTHS. IN """ SO I3.0O
POP o . yiap IN """ IB BO tS.OO
POETS' CORNER
SUNDAY
SCHOOL FOR PARENTS
And now the bus. The season has
begun.
The children press a hurried
"first-day kiss,"
The older two blase, the younger
one,
Sc wildly proud to be a part of
this,
Departs with one brave leap be-
yond my eyes,
Beyond much more, into the
world anew!
The moment stabs, twists once,
then passes by.
I wave and wave. I think they're
waving too.
How strange this door. This room
so empty-wide.
The oeace I vowed all month to
greet with cheers
Comes swooping down from each
uncluttered side
To make a horrid silence In my
ears.
The lessons written on their
black board wall
Arc nothing to the one I learn
each fall!
From the high deck aft?
North, the high tors cut the sky;
Starboard, the green hills plunge
to shore;
Portslde. the shaggy crags stand
high; I
Astern, the waters reach away
Too snug to explore.
Storm King, did you see him go?
Somewhere over the streams of
time
A lookout waits for his mast to
show,
While down the years we watch
each bend
Where empty spaces climb.
Charles Malam.
SMALL BOY TO BED
Something Is coming up the
stairs.
Something that creaks a step,
and waits.
And knows I forgot to say my
prayers!
I'd better slip under as far as
can be; ,
Miriam Hemmendinrer. Then if it comes and lifts the
_------ blankets
NOT LOST I it won't find anything here but
I me!
This is the hour when swallows ; Charles Malam.
dart away -----------
Under the eaves, when slowly on
the far, THE RETURN OF THE
Smoldering brazier of dusk a star I CABALLEROS
Flashes, and evening comes again (Legend of old California)
to lay Fasten your door when the north
winds cry.
Cool winds on fields acquainted
1 with the sun. Lest the Caballeros come riding
Now in the silvery dimness we by,
^an sense I And you hear far down the
A darkly weaving shuttled lm- moonlit street
minence The clatter of palomino's feet.
Of t*iat which ends and, ending,
ll begun.
National Pastime
Tho"h eyes no longer see the
s lape of things,
Asiu the world fades and leaves
\ us here to keep
The involuntary covenant of
night,
We are not lost among the glim-
merings
Of moonrlse. or bemused by time
or sleep.
Knowing the East will wake
again to light.
Leslie Nelson Jennings.
Roses-of-Spain on a casa wall.
Roses-of-Spaln blossom and
fall.
HUDSON EXCURSION
(Henry Hudson: 1609)
Storm King, did he pass this
way?
A bearded man In a stubborn
craft.
Sail'1 batched and weathered
gray
And a tattered flag to taunt the
winds
Lest you elimpse through sha-
dows that shift and move.
A spur of silver, the fringe of a
glove,
i A plumed hat raised with a court-
ly bow
While a soft light flushes a noble
brow.
Roses-of-Spain on a casa wall.
Roses-of-Spain blossom and
- fall.
>Jever burden your pretty head
With dreams of a lover centuries
dead.
Dark eves that flash and a smile
soon gone. *
He has ridden on. he has ridden
on
Roses-of-Spaln on a casa wall,
Roses-of-Spain blossom and
fall.
Beaulab May.
Herewith Jind solution to 8unday Crossword Puz-
'-, No. 394, published today.
W A S PMS a i 1 IcHc A 1 A LBI 0 t L A
ALL yHa GO hIaBa g V M i|a V \ I
T E I jfl TAP TlT V I eIrmd e aFpIe \ i r\ L E 1 i 0
N E G Al A|A N < i b
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M A A 1 INIEHC H A S[T]E owl AC E 1 At
ELUD^ Ele y 1 colv C E A N
T A 11 TIH A C NEl|M0 > Elil TMA sTt 11
ETNA] L ATI EpO T ajJe, 1 A
p. E G H U A V E IMP EM L plo 1 tji Ml V
mmkIf i n IL E V E g 1
P A A 1 A Hffl eil 1 E F 6 * C A E Ton 1 t
OGEE v e Nirr H" A NILE \ 0
w i 6l FJaIa 1 1 E 5JI* I e s tJaIp 1 G
E I AT Mc.i 1 RIME I E EBS L A VE
ULE NTll E CO V E S TAL t A
H C AM E A 1 < TOP I A W E E m| 1
E S OT m? e Mi JOPT D EC ll* 1 T
LOMA Is I. AN ABL 0 D E
T 0 1 T a l 5N EHS 0 l onIl O L L
UATEll E E KIT A E NT A A[ k AJ
ni.in*u< to kmc nsM 1 tfk
DREW PEARSON SAYS: FIVE PRCENTE
LOSES ON LAVISH DINNER- FLOOD
SKELETON RESTS IN CONGRESSIONAI.
CLOSET; GOP AND DESIECRATS RE-
LUCTANT TO REALIGN.
WASHINGTON.Free hams and TV sets are
supposed to be the way to get Government bus-
iness these days, but one five-percenter lost an
Air Force contract recently by throwing a lavish
He'd FTed T. Bridges, who traveled all the
way to Dayton. Ohio, to meet the right pro-
curement officer; paid the full expenses for a
friend to come from Denver, Colo., to make trie
Introduction; then threw a $342.92 dinner party
to dazzle the Air Force. '
Five-percenter Bridges figured he could im-
press both his fcllents and Brig. Phillip W. Smith
bv staging therextravagant dinner: so he rent-
ed a suite at Dayton's Hotel Blltmore, hired a
three-piece string orchestra, and had exotic
foods especially flown to Dayton.
To make sure the guest of honor would show
ud Bridges palfl the round-trip fares for Mr.
and Mrs. J. V. Chamberlain, friends of General
Smith, to come all the way from their home
Despite these carefully laid plans, however.
General Smith left town and sent his regrets.
This left Bridges with a $342.92 dinner cook-
ing, but no guest of honor. ,,, ..
So he asked the Chamberlains to Invite Mrs.
Smith and her children. r ,
At first, Mrs. Smith declined because she had
a house guest, but Chamberlain persuaded her
to bring both her children and her house guest.
When the $342.92 dinner was finally served,
five-percenter Bridges sat at the head of the
table. Chamberlain at the foot and between
them sat two ladles and three children.
Instead of winning a new contract for Bridees.
however, the abortive affair cost him an order
he had already negotiated In Washington.
For the storv of the dinner got back to rne
Air Force, which promptly canceled his earlier
contract. ___,_
DEMAGOG UING
Texas' elder statesman Tom Connally, De-
mocrat listened impatiently to a long-winded
objection to the Foreign Aid bill by Mtenieans
sllver-maned Sen. Homer Ferguson, Republican.
After the Michigan Senator sat down. Con-
nallv leaned across the aisle and growled: "Of
all the damn demagogulng I ever heard, that
was the worst!" __ ,
Later, both Connally and Ferguson privately
cornered the official Senate reporter to make
sure the remark didn't get Into the public
record.
FLOOD SKELETON
While Congress races toward adjournment, the
biggest skeleton In its closet of unfinished bus-
I iness Is the Missouri flood disaster.
The flood left tr>ov-""Hc f demolished homes,
PAGE FPUR
Sunday AawncM jurimmdU
Mtsflffi. ii chenches, schools and small business firms which
for years cannot be rebuilt.
While Congress voted some direct relief. It
was only enough for temporary food and
shelter.
Meantime nothing is being done about erod-
ed farm lands. Thanks to the Army Engineers'
projects to protect big cities along the Mis.
sourl, the water backs up and floods farms In
the other areas.
Congress has done even leas about the key
problem to stopping floodsthe Missouri Val-
ley Authority programwhich would provide a
network of flood control dams paying for them-
selves through Irrigation and low-cost electric
The' Army Kngineers and the private util-
ities, however, are opposed to this. t.
The Immediate problem of relief for flood
victims is the most pressing of all.
More than 25,000 homes were damaged or
destroyed in the Missouri basin.
Some flood-hit families are living In tents,
others In trailers, attics and basements.
The few who can afford better accommoda-
tions are paying high rents because of the
housing shortage.
Many homelesss widows have become charity
pases, without even a county "poor farm" to
go to.
Many business firms whose properties were
wiped out by the flood hesitated to rebuild be-
cause of inflated costs, building controls or
the lack of bank credit.
Meanwhile, only a few Congressmen, as Ma-
gee and Boiling of Missouri, are sincerely try.
ing to find the answer. The rest are too ad-
journment-minded to bother.
GOP AND DIXIECBATS
"All dressed up with no place to go" pre.tty
much describes the new "bipartisan committee
to explore pollt'cal realignment," a brain child
of dynamic Sen. Karl Mundt of South Dakota.
Though Mundt stanchly believes Southern
Democrats and Northern Republicans should
team up in 1962. practical politicians of both
parlies are avoiding the committee as though
it were the pl?gue.
Southern Democrats, who were counted on
for support, real ae that the movement would
throw them out of power in the Senate where
they hold nine of the 15 committee chairman-
ships.
And Southern Senators expect the Democrats
to retain a Senate majority in 1952. even
though the Presidency and the House might
fall to the GOP. , .
Temporarily headed by former Sen. EJ Burke,
the ex-Democrat from Nebraska, the commit-
tee hbs held a few lackluster meetings in Wash-
ington.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1951
.< tI II . i :'

Pearsons Merry Go-Round


Labor News
And Comment
By Victor Riesel
HEARD ON THIS BEAT:
They took a holiday from calling strikes Inside the usually
teeming national CIO headquartersand watched strikes being
called against their favorite team, the Giants.
It appears that there was great sadness among the base-
ball-craza, crowd in the CIO citadel until the Giants atom-bombed
Brooklyn in that final inning and nabbed the pennant.
Usually the CIO chiefs, including Alan Haywood who some-
times is spoken of as Phil Murray's successor, would have been
for the proletarian Dodgers because Branch Rickey signed up
the first big league Negro ball player, Jackie Robinson. But had
hte Bums won, the CIO addicts couldn't have seen a good part
of the World Series.
Apparently, the CIO crowd was the only one aware of the
fact that the Yankee and Giant ball parks are handled by CIO
ushers, while fOrlom Ebbets Field is an AFL bailiwickon which
the CIO elder statesmen won't poach.
The CIO ushers are in Local 366 of the Public Utility Work-
ers of all things, since they're recruited mostly from among
Consolidated Edison employes. So the boys went to the ball
game.
*
Those mysterious, little-publicized T-men. who have more
investigatory power than any other Federal police, have com-
yfleted their survey of mob money in legit business.
Now they are probing the incomes of hundreds of mobsters,
among the nation's 30.000 big time thugs, goons and gorillas,
who moved in on labor tn the past few years.
Some union chiefs are frightened and are frenziedly clean-
ing house, fearing indictments next year. Mob bombs in this
undercover war were thrown as recently as last week.
.
I Our own atom bomb general. Leslie Groves, the man who
put together the Manhattan project, doesn't believe the Rus-
sians can mass-produce the A-thing for another five years. Not
even with the entire MVD Gulag (slave labor camp) system.
A highly responsible American businessman has a letter
from a friend in Santurce. Puerto Rico, saying he can prove
that a central committee of Communists there originally plan-
ned Mr. Truman's assassination back in 1946and that the
Commies then had high conections In the Island government.
It's worth probing.

It will be Cardinal Spellman who'll open the CIO conven-
tion in New York next Nov. 5, much to the pleasure of CIO
president Philip Murray, one of the most devout of labor lead-
ers. Later. Asst. Secretary of Defense Anna Rosenberg and Con-
gressmen Roosevelt and Javlts will speak.
Incidentally, when the AFL convention meets In New York
next year, it will hear personally from both the Democratic and
Republican presidential candidates, barring any serious conflict
in dates.
It was for this specific reason that the AFL braintrusters
moved their annual convention date from late November to
mid-September.

In Detroit this week the CIO decided to settle Its own civil
wars from now on In this fashion:
When two of its unions start to fight over some, territory
the national office will see to It that they meet on a local level.
If that peace parley falls, the flght will go to a special "court"
held by, executive vice president Alan .Haywood. If he falls, he'll
call In an outside arbiter, just as you do In a tough strike. The
outsider's decision will be final.
Sounds good enough for the AFL too. Could save evervbodv
millions of dollars.

The whole country has the job jitters.
In Hollywood, some technical craft leaders are worrying a-
bout the effect oh employment of two startling new develop-
ments.
... 7he flrst te the substitution of wire for celluloid in the
filming of a picture. The movie actually will be recorded on
wire spools, just as speeches are today. The process Is com-
pleted and sooner or later will be used.
At the same time there Is now talk of taking the film, or
the wire eventually, flashing it on a central screen from which
the picture will be televised Into a string of movie houses, el-
iminating Individual projection machine booths which have come
down from the nickelodeon days.
Meanwhile, there's actual suffering In many cities.
New England's textiles fields are hit by a still unrecognized
recession. In Lawrence. Mass.. half the textile workers are job-
less, and the textile force makes up half the city's gainfully
employed. "
The other day. the CI men's clothing workers chief. Jack
Potofsky (also spoken off as a possible successor to Phil Mur-
ray) asked President Truman to help his people, among whom
there s heavy unemployment because men are just not buying
clothing as thev did.
On the New York waterfront, wildcat strikes are threatened
because of the idleness of certain piers. Altogether, some 250 000
new Jobless have been recorded In the past few weeks. And the
figure grows.

Dont overlook the action of one of the smaller CIO Unions
In Cleveland the other day.
There, the Utility Workers spoke out sharply against the
governments sale of electric power coming out of Federally-
owned dams. Private companies can do better than the govern-
ment in the sale of such energy, said the union.
This reflects a powerful, but unrecorded, revolt of scores
of AFL and CIO unions against government ownershl of big
enterprise*.
And It's In sharp contrast with the attitude of the polit-
ically successful British Laborltes.
Apparently the American .unions, speaking for almost 1.000,-
000 members-, can't bargain as well as with the government as
Uiey can with big business. So. they want the government to
unload
So Intense has this behind-the-scenes battle become that
Oscar Chapman. Secretary of Interior, who handles many of
these projects for the U.S. has hired a trouble shooter.
He's ex-Congressman Andrew Blemlller of Milwaukee who
makes the rounds trying to learn why the workmen don't like
Uncle Sam as a boss.
(Copyright 1961, Post-Hall Syndicate. Inc.).
WalterWinchelllnNewYork
BROADWAY HEARTBREAK
We watched the neon fires scorch the sky
With names that lent new brilliance to the
Street,
We took our bows and all our hopes were high,
The Town was OursSuccess could not
. retreat.
"We're moving up," we cried, "there'll be no
end
Of all we planned"we knew we held the
dice.
It didn't matter if we snubbed a friend.
Replacements hurried to us in a trice.
We scanned the headlines in Variety
And cursed the colyums for their lack of
space;
Our promise filled us to satiety
And wine and music spurred the merry pace.
We'd strut up Broadwaywhen success was new,
But nowwe shuffle down Sixth Avenue.
CHARLES J. HACKETT.
Silhouettes About Town: Frank Sinatra, who
hit the town, the same dav as Redbook's me-
mory-story or. Nancy. Both ought to read it to-
gether. .. Playwright Geo. S. Kaufman, the man
with the colffurious hairdo... Champ Sugar
Ray and Champ Jersey Joe at last night's pre-
miere of "Smart Affairs" (Beige Beauts) at the
new Sugar Hill... Hopalong Cassidy In the Cub
Room blushing furiously when trapped between
Martha Raye's and Ethel Merman's raplertee.
Girls! Please remember (here are gentlemen
present... Arnold Reuben, the 58th St. Bll-
lingsley. who still finds time for philanthropy.
James Durante (being mobbed near the Hotel
Astor by autographunters) shouting in mock
indignation: "I didden tink dey'd rettlnlze me
in my new hat!"... Olivia De Ha vil land paus-
ing on Park Ave. to put a pair of bootzees on
her kitten's tootzees.
Greco saw a stranger bother his kid sister
backstage. He calmly took a long blade from
bis pocket and flung itmissing the guy by a
uarter-of-an-inch... 83-year-old Dinty Moore,
the famed restaurateur, is seriously ill at St.
Clare's Hosp... The Bram Fletcher report All
Is Honky-Dooly and wih False Friends would
d.d___ Millicent McKean appears on Channel
7's new series tonight with Thomas Mitchell
in Eugene O'Neill's "Ah, Wilderness!"... Add
wise observations: Critic Dick Watts note about
the actors in Hollywood who suddenly decide
to return to B'way, "their real love," after the
studios drop their options... Overheard whisp-
er: "I love you"... "I love your love for me".
Sophie Tucker's press agent items that she shed
28 lbs. for her Latin Quarter premiere today
"when she will be Sylph y Tucker"... Diss 1
gotta see.
Bigtown Sideshow: The Robert Ruarks (of
the newspapers) loaned their handsome apart-
ment to a vacationing celebrity and his wife...
The Ruarks then went to Africa... The celebs
said they planned staying only a few days ..
They parked nearly three weeks and hosted a
continuous party which raged Day & Night...
They got scads of food and liquor at neigh-
borhood shopscharging It to the Ruarks...
Good manners, though... Before departing they
left a note reading: "Your hospitality over-
whelmed us!"
Sallies in Our Alley: All eyes turned when
Dagmar floated into The Brown Derby wearing
a sweater... Is Elinson greeted: "Look at the
way she pulls our eyes over her wool!"... Jack
(Falxo) Leonard, the glib comic, who weighs
328 lbs., waddled over to Sugar Ray and got
a howl with: "Hi, Sugar. Meet the Lump!"
Mid town Vignette: Fred Marlnl. the Coq
Rouge prop., swears he heard it... A Shubert
chorus boy drove through a red lamp and the
cop at the corner nailed him... "What's the
Idea?" barked the law... "Oh." said the Swish,
"don't be such a meanle. Officer Entratter al-
ways let m drive right through the red lleht
here"... "Is that so?" boomed the cod. "Of-
ficer Entratter's been dead six months!"... "I
know." was the Haughty Retort. "Im his wi-
dow!"
Times So. Ticker: Warren Wright's lovely
widow was clipped for $188 by a stranger. On
the phone he told her he was a veteran horse-
man, collecting for the Ruhyon Fundand she
mailed it to him. Poor man. When you get
That Lowyou are Low... Linda Darnell's real
love arrives here from Zanuckville the day she
does... Bob Leavitt and wife Eth Merman had
the elite at Nicky's Biair House wondering...
(The elite?)... The mid-Sept. "Radio Audien-
ce*' survey (by Pulse, Inc.) lists the leaders
this way: "Pres. Truman (all stations); Lux
Radio and WW"... It's a girl, their third, for
the Peter Armquists in Chicago. She's the ex-
Penny Warren of the Paradise and Hollywood
chorus lines... Robert Lee Is making Deccas
between shows with Ben Blue at the GUded
Cage... The "Top Banana" ads read: "Staged
and Directed by J. Donohue." Wot's the diff
between stared and directed. If yes'll be so
kindly?... Mac Q. Williamson (Ok la's Alu-
den.) has a neat way of leaving. He says: "I
hope your parachute opens for you."
Memos of a Midnighter: Spanish dancer
Vie Big Time: The album music from "Two
on the Aisle." plus Dolores Gray, a new disc
star... Burt Taylor's platter of "Long Ago'
(Columbia)... BiUv Daniels' version of "Love
Is A Gamble"... Judy Johnson. Sid Caesar's
U lark... Doorthv Sarnoff's wonderful some-
thing as she sings "Something Wonderful" in
"King and I."
-T-------
Peter Edson In Washington
NEA Staff Correspondent
WASHINGTON (NEA) Increasingly ser-
ious strikes In key defense Industries are slow-
ing up rearmament effort, worrying arms pro-
ductions officials.
Number of new strikes In August425was
same as number of new strikes In July, accord-
ing to Bureau of Labor Statistics.
But the total of man-days Idle increased by
a million in August to 2.750,000. -All strikes in
effect In August, new and old, numbered 625
and involved 350.000 workers.
September figures will be considerably higher.
Principal defense strikes In effect In Septemb-
er weer:
Machine toolsBrown and Sharpe, Providence.
5000 employes. International Association of Ma-
chinists, AFL.
Jet enginesWright Aeronautical, two plants
in New Jersey. 9800 employes. CIO auto workers.
AirplanesDouglas Aircraft, Long Beach. Cal-
if., 10.000 employes. CIO auto workers.
Tanks, tractors for European airport construc-
tionCaterpillar Tractor, Peora. 22.000 employ-
es. This strike has Just been settled after two
months' Idleness, by 13^-cents-an-hour In-
crease. CIO auto workers.
CopperAll major U. S. producers tied up. In-
volving 58.000 miners. Strike settlement now-be-
fore Wage Stabilization Board. Mine, mfll and
smelter workers. CIO.
Atomic energyConstruction workers at Pa-
ducah, Ky., and Dana. Ind.. 2500 employes in
AFL craft unions. AFL President William Green
joined AEC officials In request for return to
work.
As all strikes have Involved pay Issue, gov-
ernment's wage stabilization program Is ser-
iously menaced.
Showdown on a new wage formula at possibly
higher level will probably come In CIO steel-
workers' demands for pay Increases. AFL an-
nual convention In San Francisco also served
notice of further pay demands.
ON YOUR SIDE. MR. PRESIDENT
Just befpre retiring from his job as Secretary
of Defense. General Goerge C. Marshall had an
occasion to Introduce to President Truman the
Defense Department's director of Public Infor-
mation. Clayton Fritchey. He was formerly edit-
or of the New Orleans Item.
To make talk, the President asked Fritchey
how he liked Washington. Fritchev said he liked
it fine. Always, something new. Nice people to
work with. Much more interesting than any Job
he ever had.
Well, what had he been doing before, the.
President asked.
"Oh." said Fritchey, "I was editor of a pro-
Truman newspaper In New Orleans.
CANT DO EVERYTHING
Atomic energy Is sure wonderful, but It can't
do everything.
For Instance, there's an Inconspicuous little
sinn on the wall of the Atomic Energy Com-
mittee's office In the Capitol. It says:
"Do not vacuum clean these carpets, and do
not remove ant powder from around edges of
room."
HARRIMAN IS BUSY MAN
First "coordinator" of the present defense ef-
fort is going to be W. Averell Harriman. Pre-
sident Truman's foreign policy adviser and
trouble-shooting ambassador-at-large.
Mr. Harriman will coordinate the Department
of State. Department of Defense and extended
Marshall Plan economic add to foreign countries
under the new MSAthe Mutual Security Agen-
cy established bv Congress.
He will also be American representative on
the so-called "wise men" or "12 apostles'' who
will pull together all defense plans for the 12
North Atlantic Treaty countries.
They must prepare a report by Dec. I. If pos-
sible. It will be submitted to the NATO Council
meeting in Rome In late November.
These two jobs will keep Mr. Harriman In
Europe until after the Rome meeting.
His work as mediator of the Anglo-Iranian
oil dispute will be handled by others, principal-
ly Asst. Secretary of State George C. McGhee
and the new U.S. Ambassador to Iran. Loy Hen-
derson.
DIPLOMATIC SOLDIER
French General "DDT" de Lattre de Tassigny
was sped on his pav way after his Washington
visit with an honor guard-a band and full cer?
emonlal at the National Airport.
High brass and striped pants were there to
see him off.
After the final salutes had been exchanged.
General de Lattre was escorted to his plane,
the door was closed and the loading steps were
pulled away.
Then somethln- went wronc Inside. The ram
was pushed Into place again and the door
opened.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1951
Sunday American Supplement
PAGE FIVE


J
Albrook NCO Mess Finest On The Isthmus
by M-Sgt. W. P. Fitzgerald
The finest NCO Mess on the
Isthmus." That was the con-
sensus when- the last chair was
finally placed, the last drape
adjusted and Albrook's NCO
Mess opened Its door for a
grand opening recently.
Since last March workmen
had been busy on the club's
Interior and exterior, adding
here, taking away there, until
the finished Job, superb In
every detail, made each Al-
brook NCO a proud member
of the new club.
Work still progresses on the
low white and green trimmed
building situated on a Can-
field Avenue knoll overlooking
the Albrook runways.
A new driveway will soon lead
to the spacious glass doors of
the main entrance opening to
a broad stairway which as-
cends to the main ballroom
through a tastefully appointed
foyer. Here one gets a first
impression of quiet modernity
from the careful arrangement
of the tables to the broad glass-
louvered windows, each flank-
ed with multi-colored drapes.
Probably the most striking
first Impression Is the lounge
which extends from the foyer
along one side of the ballroom.
Suggesting restfullness and re-
laxation, the lounge invites
with comfortable sofas, setees
and casual chairs in soft shades
of rose and chartreuse.
Prom the farther end of the
ballroom with Its new band-
stand and dark red backdrop,
one traverses the dance floor
leading to a newly decorated
bar.
Softly shaded green walls
and a gay mural, painted by
Guatemalan artist Jose Aranda
Klee, overlook a 75-foot maho-
gany horseshoe refreshment
bar mounted on a base of glass
blocks. The entire room Is sep-
arated from the main ballroom
by a circular, lattice-work brick
wall.
Prom the bar or the ball-
room an entirely new 100 cap-
acity modern dining room
beckons to all tastes. Natural
wood tables carry over the
theme of the lounge.
The dining room overlooks
the Albrook runways through
wide louvered window* dressed
with attractive drapes...A mir-
rored wall at one enij of the
room separates the dining room
from the kitchen.
With the future addition of
a paneled game and card room
In the downstairs portion, Al-
brook's NCO Mess will com-
plete all the requirements for
a well equipped club truly be-
fitting the title "The finest
NCO Mess on the Isthmus."
The relaxing atmosphere of the lounge forms a natural setting On good fellowship or a
quiet tete-a-tete. '
Another view of the diningioosa. A mirrowed wall, natural wood tables tan leatherette seats
a pictnre of uiet good taste.
The dinlngroom. Beyond the mirrored wall, a kitchen com-
plete with the latest in modern equipment.
-
For the Best in Fotos & Features
....It's The Sunday American
A full Tiew of the main ballroom. On the left is the lennge and dinlngroom. Beyond the
brick wall one eatres the mewly decorated bar aad refreshment room.
'AGy SLX
,H'
Vnfc
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1951

- ......i,


Prickless Pifa Picking
(Text and pies by Ralph K. Skinner)'
Down by Palmas Bellas on the Atlantic Side, we saw
a chap picking Pifa nuts. He was doing It differently than
anyone we'd ever seen.
Upon inquiry, he stated that he had his own invention
for getting ap to the top of the tree. It certainly looked
rig
friglnaL
There were two long sticks
placed in the form of an "X,"
secured" at one end with a
crossbar and apparently with
a rope at the other. There
were two seta of these sticks
In operation.
Standing on the lower set
for support, he would raise the
upper sticks high and get a
purchase on them. Then he
would raise up and sit on the
top set while he released the
lower set, lifted them up, and
cot a new bite.
Much more quickly than it
appears through description
this Panamanian fellow was
up In the top of the tree. With
a knife he cut a large bunch
of the pita nuts and with a
rope he carried, he lowered
them to the ground carefully.
These nuts he sells for $1
a bunch ai Palmas Bellas. They
must be much higher In Colon.
Incidentally we have seen many
recently In Cermeo, and some
In Campana.
Americans who have eaten
the pifa nuts three times,
like them, we were told. They
taste dreadful the first time,
almost as bad the second
time, bat if you last through
the third eating, you can
never' get enough of them
thereafter! "
Commonest way to serve
them is to drop In boiling wa-
ter and cook for about 20 min-
utes. Then serve hot with but-
ter and seasoning. In the cen-
ter of each pifa nut Is a tiny
seed or nut which Is terrifi-
cally hard. If you value your
teeth don't bite it in half.
Getting back to my pifa pick-
er at Palmas Bellas; I took
pictures of him to try and re-
cord his unique device for
climbing.
I thought that he used It (a)
for Increased safety In climb-
ing, or (b) to save muscle,
shlnnylng up the trunk of the
tall pifa palm.
It remained for my observant
wife to point out to me why
the man had built the climb-
ing platform.
Because the pifa palm has
long, sharp stickers all over Its
trunk! To climb It would be
like shlnnylng up a telephone
pole studded with 10 penny
nails with the points out.
Once, In the jungle, I trip-
ped and started to grab a
tree for support. It was a black
palm, and in time I saw its in-
crustation of spines, or thorns,
or needles, or whatever you
want to call them but they all
mean OUCH I
Well, the pifa palm is the
same. O. K. to look at; O. K.
to harvest by remote control,
but not so to climb.
Ill stick to photographic pifa
picking!
Rose By
Any Other Name...
A pejlbaye by any other
name would taste the same.
That is our conclusion af-
ter trying to find the correct
name for the. nuts which we
have called "pifa" on this
page. That's the name used
in Chiriqui and Veraguas
provinces, we learned.
In Panama City, the name
is pizba, pisba, pixbae, peva
or plva, depending on whom
you ask. Some Americans in
. the Zone call them "peevey
nn's."
For the final authority we
asked Dr. James Zetek who
is the foremost natural scien-
tist in Latin America. His
answer was(and it's offi-
cial) PE JIB A YE. But we bet
no native that picked them
ever knew It!
This kid to hard put to hold the heavy pifa nuts with
ene hand, as some kibitzer tries to "steal the scene." This
dump of pifa nuts sells for one dollar where it's picked,
and mueh more in town probably.
Faltering Philip
i
Philip's Ufe is filled with bruise
WeB-worn step and rags he ases
** agalia won id leave his home like new
P. A Classifieds tost the right clue!
Far up the trunk of a pifa tree, this inventor adjusts his special apparatus for getting
and down safely, easily and without getting stuck!
up
Perched up in the- top of the tree, the reaper lowers the cluster of pifa nuts by a rope so
that they will not break apart failing to the ground. Not* how confidently he perches
on Mi hams-made cllmbling device.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1961
,m, mr. PAGE SEVEN


\i~
I
flationJ(ottem Jrawina to IW5 every SUNDAY MORNING
J
Your Community Station
'9
HOG-840
Kcs.

PAGE EIGHT

Sunday Ameritan Suppi
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1951



i lationcu iotterif di
y drawing to 11/5 every SUNDAY MORNING
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Kcs.

I ASKING FATHER^T /certaiMlV.'take
1PocKet!

I



SUNDAY, OCTOBEK 14, 1951
Sunday Aaericui SuppliM
FAUa NINE


w
1JU, U
our
\jravori
1 99 ? Phone Panama 2-3066
------1 and ask for your favorite recording?

L
4:30 to 6 p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station -J Qj (j Q Ktt.
Jacc
cques-vjacouk opens mis conceb with
a concerto that brandy recognizes ac
king famous for its crashing finale/
ac she tells johnnv that tme fortissimo
woulp make a perfect cover for a pktol
wot, me spots mr. major in a box, avidly
REAPING...
I 1 J
RELAX, BASE, HE'S ONLY
REAPING SOMETHING/ VOO'RE
LETTING \OUR IMAGINATION
RUN AW*Y WITU VOU /
y.
SURE, BUT WHAT HE'S
REAPING K THE MUCICgCORE
TO THIS CONCERTO... ANP I
POUBT IF HE'S TMAT MUCH
OF A AAUSIC LOVER/
-r,'.
[ IF ONLY WE V r PONT LOOK NOW, V
jCOULP WARN BABE, BUT EEAA
UACOUES^IACQUES// WE'VE JUST CAUGHT 1
1 CATCH MIS l-A SOME ATTENTION / J|
f ATTENTION/ (L^
l
^Y^S
I yill fl
I2\v^ 331
MOW LONG*
BEFORE TMAT
CRASHING
FINALE,
BRANDY?/
AnP HIS MUSIC ROU ON, EVER
NEARERTME FATAL FINALE...
NP IN MIC BOX, MR. MAJOR
NEVER TAKES UK EVE FROM TWE
CORE / HIS FOOT EATS TIME ANP
MK WHOLE BODY TENSES TO KEEP
TME CORRECT RHYTHM OF THE
MUSIC..-
WE ENTIRE ORCHESTRA RIVETS ITS
ATTENTION ON THE SWEEPING BATON OF
TME CONPUCTOR AS HE RAICES IT TO
SIGNAL TME ...FINALE/ I
sAOAWAry/
How/mts
KIT/
cort ii. kimh rr*TiiKi SYxnirAT* h*.
ffrii]
CONTINUED-...
PAGE TEN
Sundav Amenim Supplement
fl i

SUNDAY, OCTOBER
g t


vUitaV l4ourZ}t
avon
2 99 f Phone Panam 2-3066
-----1_ and ask for your favorite recording?
4:30 to 6 p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station
HOG-
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1951
Sunday American Supplement
"!"
PAGE ELEVEN


i
aport rS
99


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PAGE TWELVE
Sunday American Supple*
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 195J.