The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01262

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
1MB
^BRANIFF
AN INDEPENDENT^
D>ILT KIWSPAFE*
NOW VIA
Miami
OR
Houston
Panama American
ScftfivawVsV.O. !'
CANADIAN WHISKY
K
Zef */ people know the truth and the country Is gafe** Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY SEVENTH YEAR
PANAMA, S. P., SATURDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1W1
PITE CENTS
70,000 Smash Red Chinese Lines Along
50-Mile Front Of To
Resistance
Moslems Gird
For 'Holy War
At Suez Zone
(NEA-Telephoto)
RtOYAL WstEATHRrincess Elbsabeth, aided by her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, place*
FT wreath on Ottawa's War Mettorlal Monument. Grouped at thef eeremoriy^are the Dom-
inion's military chiefs of staff aw .3,000 >ld soldiers. The crowd exceeded/that which wel-
r corned the King; and Queen in 1930. | }
T
(NEA Telephoto)
LX OTTAWAContinuing their Canadian tour. Philip and
Jfzað meet dignitaries In Ottawa. Prom left to right, at
The ifiand Park Drive landing, are the Prince and Princes;
Prima Minister Louis St. Laurert; and Canadian Sen. Wishart
Robertson.
;-_. (NEA Radio-T?lepb,oto)
TREATT AJWLMENTNahas Pasha.'Egyptian
iprlme minister, asks hie parliament in Ca.ro to approve the
vunibnoft of the 1916 Anglo-Egyptian Treaty, undar which
Irltlah tropa are stationed in the Suei C*"al Zone. Britain
ay* it will not-pull its troopa out o the- Sum.
teron Grafifl}
Month's Leave
BUENOS AIRES, Oct. 13 (UP)
President Juan D. Peron has
been granted ah unprecedented
six-month leave of absence
"from office by a special session
of the Argentine Congress.
The leave, granted "for any
purpose he sees fit," will extend
five months beyond the Nov.
11 elections in which Peron Is a
candidate for re-election and
another six-year term.
Congress yesterday voted un-
animouslyafter Radical Party
opposition deputies had walked
out of the lower houseto grant
Peron the leave he requested.
Perones desire for a leave of
absence was made known Tues-
day. Neither at- that time nor
during 'yesterday's approval
{irocedure was any reason given
or the leave.
Tuesday's announcement said
Pern had requested the leave
so that the elections next month
would be held while someone
else headed the government.
Dr. Angel Miel Asquis, presi-
dent of the Peronista parlia-
mentary bloc, said Peron's yield-
ing of power during an election
was unique in Argentine his-
tory.
Peron's request for the leave
of absence was made lees than
two weeks after the five-hour
abortive revolt of Oct. 28. Led
by Army, Air Force and Navy
officers, the revolutionaries
were said to have threatened to
assassinate Peron and his blonde
wife. Eva.
Following the announcement
Of the suppression of the revolt,
the government announced Mrs.
Peron was "rather seriously HI"
of anemia. Many persona here
today were speculating that Pe-
ron's long leave of absence may
be connected with his wife's
Illness. Mrs. Peron has received
at least four blood transfusions
In the past two weeks. Last re-
ports said she was improving.
2 Bombs Exploded
In Buenos Aires
BUEN08 ATRBS. Oct. 13 (UP)
The 19th Police Precinct of Pa-
lermo said today that two bombs
exploded, at 2:30 a.m., the
first at the headquarters of the
Supreme War Council and the
other at the home of Council
president Qen. Francisco Rey-
nolds.
There wen no casualties.
The Council had Just finished
trying the chiefs and officers of
the Armed Forces who supported
retired Qen. Benjamin Menendet
in the abortive Sept 21 revolt.
CAIRO, Oct. 13 (UP)Millions
of Moslems were urged by their
priests today, In fiery speeches
from Mosques throughout Egypt,
to prepare for a "Holy War" as
the government was exported
making plans to starve the
British garrison out of the Suez
Canal Zone.
Moslem priests told the faith-
ful they must be ready to lay
down their lives, If necessary.
In Holy War "for the freedom
of Egypt and the victory of
Islam."
In one Cairo mosque, fanatical
followers of the Mohammed
tradition, heard their leaders
demand the Immediate pro-
clamation of a Jehad, or Holy
War..
. The inflamatory appeals were
made before prayerg began oh
this Moslem Sabbath.
The Imam a (priests) told the
3.000,000 faithful throughout
Egypt that, the time has come
when they must be ready to
fight.
British troops in the Canal
Zone have been ordered to sabot
to kill, in the event of attfcek.
Guard post* have been streps,-
thened, and killer dogs have
been assigned to duty with out-
post units.
A detachment of British para-
troopers from Cyprus Is expected
shortly to reinforce the Canal
Zone garrison.
The SOUth Lancashire Regi-
ment has been alerted to leave
Trieste lor Khatoum. capital of
the Sudan, Oct. 25. Egypt Is also
laying claim to the Sudan.
. The British service chiefs yes-
terday told British Foreign
Secretary Herbert Morrison that
all steps have been taken to
see that an Egyptian blockade
of the Canal Zone garrison would
not Interfere with the garrison's
supplies and fresh water.
Plans have been made for a
large scale airlift.
Venezuela Blames
Reds For Abortive
Columbus Day Revolt
CARACAS, Oct. IS (UP)
Authorities today blamed the
Communists and the outlawed
Accin Democrtica elements
for an abortive revolt during
the Columbus Day festivities,
whkh resulted In two deaths
and five wounded.
The government claimed that
all was quiet throughout the
nation today, and che country
awaited a radio broadcast at
noon by the Minister of the In-
terior and Jurrta member Col.
Luis Felipe Llovera Paez, in
which he expicted< to reveal
further details of the "terrorist
and insurrectionist activities by
the outlawed Accin. Democr-
tica and the Venezuelan Com-
munist parties," according to a
communique.
One communique said that
the discovery of the pfot thwart-
ed its outbreak In Caracas, but
in Rio Caribe and Tuna Pul-
vito and Saucedo,. all in the
state of Sucre, armed groups of
Accin Democrtica assaulted
and seized offices of the civil
authorities.
During the brief'r-occupatlon
the groups seized arms and am-
munition. El Universal said at
least 80 persons had been ar-
rested In connection with the
plot to bomb the Junta as it
participated In the "Da de la
Raza" celebrations.
Others were arrested In the
Sucre state.
US, Britain
Seek Egypt
Aid vs. Reds
CAIRO, Oct. 13 (UP) Police
proclaimed a state of emergency
in Cairo today as the United
States, Britain, France and Tur-
key asked Egypt to Join them In
a new defense system against
Communist aggression In the
Middle East.
A high Egyptian sourte has al-
ready said that anv proposal
which did no accept "in princi-
ple" the evacuation of the Brit-
ish garrison from the Suez Canal
Zone would be rejected automa-
tically.
Egypt ha.s announced plans to
Junk the Anglo-Egyptian Treaty
of ISM under which British
troopr guard the vital waterway
linking the Mediterranean with
the east..
in London it has been an-
nounced that Britain would hand
her Suez Canal bases over to
Egypt O that country agreed to
work as An equal power with the
Western Allies in Middle East de-
fense.
If Egypt rejects the proposals
the four powers presenting them
are likely to go ahead anyway
with their plans for Middle East-
ern defense.
Australia. New Zealand, and
South Africa have reportedly un-
dertaken to contribute forces for
Middle Eastern defense.

Liaison Talks
On Despite New
Red Accusation
MUNSAN Korea, Oct. 13 (UP),
United Nations and Communist i
liaison officers today agreed to1
try again to arrange the resump-
tion of the Korean truce talks
Anglo-Australian
Meat Agreement
Spurs Production
LONDON. Oct 13 'UP) The
full details of the new long-
term Anglo-Australian m e at
agreement was announced of-
ficially today by Food Minister
Maurice Webb.
A.statement said "the Aus-
tralian government will do
everything in its power to en-
courage the expansion of pro-
duction.
"Plans for an expanded pro-
duction have already been
drawn up and further plans are
In preparation."
despite the Red charge that Un-
ited Nations planes had strafed
the conference area.
A UN spokesman said the liai-
son officers will meet tomorrow
to settle administrative matters
deemed essential before the main
delegations resume their plenary
sessions at the new site, Pan-
munjom.
He said yesterday before the
allaged strafing Incident that
liaison groups had agreed on all
the "ground rules" for the re-
sumption or the ceasefire con-
ference, except the extent of the
neutral area around the Commu-
nist truce camp at Kaesong.
Liaison officers spent all morn-
ing and part of the afternoon In-
vestigating two Communist
charges: first that three UjS. let
planes lat night strafed the
Panmunjon-Kaesong' Road, 900
yards north of a conference tent
killing a 12-year-old Korean'boy,
and wounding his baby brother.
Second, that the same Jets, or
three others last night strafed an
abandoned Communist hill posi-
tion three miles north of Kae-
song, but within the five-mile
Kaesong.
However, Lt. Col. Norman B.
Edwards, wr.o made the prelim-
inary investigation at Panmun-
Jom, said that 30 caliber machine
gun slugs In the road had not
been there last night when a UN
team made a preliminary in-
spection in the dark.
At the hill'positions north of
Kaesong, Edwards said he was
satisfied that the area had been
strafed, but said he couldn't tell
when.
Army Employe, 20,
Dies at Coco Solo
Imogen* Lawson, a 20-year-old
American Army employe, died
last night at the Coco Solo Naval
Hospital after an illness of two
weeks. She suffered from acute
brain fever.
Miss Lawson had lived on the
Isthmus for two years with her
sister and brother-in-faw, Capt.
and Mrs. Archie B. Davidson of
Fort Qullck.
She was employed for several
months at the Corozal Ordnance
Depot and later was transferred
to the; Atlantic side when Capt.
Davidson was assigned to Head-
quarters Atlantic Sector Miss
Lawson worked for the USARCA-
RIB School at Fort Oulick until
two months ago.
Burial services will be held at
Clintoa. Indiana, as soon as ar-
rangements can be made.
Besides her sister, the deceased
Is survived by a father and step-
mother, Elza and Jenny'Lawson
of Indiana, another sister, Mrs.
Irene Evlnger of Illinois and five
brothers all In the States.
8TH ARMY HQ., Korea, Oct. 13 (UP) Six United
Nations divisions 70,000 or more men hit the Com-
munist lines along a 50-mile front in central Korea toda/
and blasted out initial gains of more than a mile.
The attacking force comprised the United States 2nd
and 24th Divisions, with Colombian forces attached, and
the South Korean 2nd, 6th, 8th and Capital Divisions.
Increasing Chinese resistance slowed down the at-
tack early this afternoon. Earlier the defense had been
light.
The United Nations attack threatened Kumsong, 29
miles north of the 38th parallel on the east centrol front
where there is believed to be the biggest offensive concen-
tration of Communist troops and armor in Korea.
This concentration lies athwart
the main Communist Invasion
route toward Seoul In the west
and Wonju in the south.
The Americans and South Ko-
reans lumped oft at dawn against
Initially feeble resistance.
United States Marine and Air
Force planes flew close support
missions and knocked out sever-
al bunkers.
To the east United 8tates and
French troops of the 23rd Regi-
ment of the United States 2nd
Infantry Division finally secured
for good, they hopedall of
Heartbreak Ridge.
They waded In with bayonets
and again seized the northern-
most peak of the six-mile-long
ridge.
The regiment first took the 3,-
000 ft. peak early yesterday, but
a Communist counterattack la-
ter drove them from the crest.
The 30-day battle for this ridge
has been the bitterest and one of
the bloodiest of the Korean war.
^sJdtffaVti1
Cavalry Division and the Brit-
ish Commonwealth Division
mended their defenses after
beating off a series of savage
counterattacks du r I n g the
night.
One United States battalion
was overrun during this fighting,
but was rescued before dawn.
The lost battalion suffered
heavy casualties.
United States Sabre fighters
prowled Mig alley for signs of
Mlgs today, but the Red fighters
failed to put in an appearance.
United Natiqns fighter-bomb-
ers therefore concentrated their
attention on the Red rail system
round Pyongyang, Sariwon. Sln-
anju. Hwangju, Kanuri and
Chaeryang.
In the Kfjo area, on the east
coast, Sea Paries and Fireflies
from the Australian carrier
bombed and rocketed Red
troops in the early morning.
Then United States and Brit-
ish destroyers, along with the
United States battleship
New Jersey, moved inshore and
continued the bombardment work
started by the Sydney's planes.
The attack was directed by
Rear-Admiral 8cott Moncrleff.
Royal Navy, from the British
cruiser Belfast.
Mine sweepers had cleared the
area before the bombarding ships
moved In close to hit enemy
trenches, gun emplacem e n t s,
co m m a n d posts and supply
dumps.
Spotter planes from the Syd-
ney said these targets were
"blown to smithereens."
The Sydney's planes made al-
most 90 sorties during the Kojo
attack. This is believed a record
one day's operation /or a carrier
in the forward areas.
United States Marine pilots,
flying their Corsairs from the
carrier Rendova, hit warehouses
in the Haeju and Chlnnampo a-
reas.
Panther jet fighters from the
United SUtes carrier Essex hit
fortifications and rail lines south
of Kllchu, while Skyraiders from
the Essex helped out with the
Navy's eight-month bombard-
ment of the Red's east coast port
of Wonsan.
The United States cruiser Los
Angeles led the surface bombard-
ment m the Hungnam area.
Changing Ways
BRUSSELS. Oct. 13 (UP) A
Baby Park will be operating
near Brussels' Heysel Stadium
tomorrow during the saccer
game between Belgium and
Austria,
Parents who want to see the
game can park their babies far
five francs.
In Korea Increase
By Some 21,700
WASHINGTON. Oct. 13 (UP)
The Defense Department re-
ported today that the enemy
suffered 1.346,728 casualties in
Korea up to Oct. 2.
This is an Increase of 21,787
over the last report which cov-
ered the period from the start
of the war through Sept. 20.
The new totals Include 966.698
battle casualties, an Increase of
15.073 over the last report. Non-
battle casualties were estimat-
ed at 214.092, an increase of
5.673. Enemy captured were
placed at 163.935, an Increase
of 1,021.
The cattle casualties included
550,551, Chinese Communists
and 416.145 North Koreans. The
non-battle casualties Included
105,298 Chinese Communists and
108,794 North Koreans while the
captured were 18,217 Chinese
Communists and 147.718 North
Koreans.
Doctors Revive
Belgian Mother
Dead 5 Minutes
CHARLEROI, Belgium, Oct. IS
(UP> A Belgian woman who
"died" yesterday was today hug-
ging her new-born baby.
Just after Mrs. Berthe Mahaux
gave birth to a nine-pound bov
yesterday, her heart stopped
beating.
Doctors at the Queen Astrid
Maternity Hospital massaged her
heart for five minutes before it
began working again.
'Scottsboro Boy' i
Gets Six To 15
Years In Prison
DETROIT, Oct. II (UP) Hay-
wood Patterson, one of the
"Scottsboro boys" was sentenced
to six to IS years m prison today
for tabbing Willie Mitchell In a
tavern brawl here Sept. 16,1950.
The Negro's conviction follow-
ed two earlier mistrials.
Patterson escaped Alabama In
1948 where he was/sentenced to
death for the rape of two whits
women. Oov. Q. Mennen Will-1
iams refused to extradite him
when he was found here. I
Rose Denies "Undressed Activity"
Charges Eleanor Wants Huge Payoff
NEW YORK. Oct. 13 UP)
Billy Rose, the little showman
who produces big spectacles,
was quoted today as denying
that there were any "undress-
ed activities" or anything lurid-
ly spectacular going on when
his wife raided his theater
apartment.
Louis Nlzer. attorney for Mrs.
Rose, who is former Olympic
Swimming Champion Eleanor
Holm, said a "very vivid story"
would come out "when the
papara are filed" in the Rose
marital rift.
place" at bis apartment last
Sunday night when his wife and
private detectives broke In.
Through his lawyer. Arthur
Garfield Hays. Rose contended
that reports that Mrs. Rose
allegedly found he was not
alone in the theater-top apart-
ment were aimed at parting him
from "a huge monetary sum."
The Sunday afternoon doings
at his theater apartment where
last Julv 15 blonde Joyce Mat-
thews, ex-wife of Milton Berle.
Locked out of the town house slashed her wrists and threaten-
he usad to share with Mrs. Rose, ed to leap from a window,
the short showman told the brought the following explana-
~New York Journal-American" tlon from Rose, as told to the
that the story of his domestlr Jour nal-American
trouble had been "muddeld up"
and that nothing "awful tock
Sunday, but he wouldn't identify
her.
"There's no use bringing any
more Innuendo into it than al-
ready has us muddled up. and
it's not because anything awful
took place here Sunday." he was
guoted as saying. "Quite the op-
posite."
The girl was up there, he told
the Journal-American, to help
him straighten out things fol-
lowing the suicide attempt of
Miss Matthews.
It seems the girl he summon-
ed had told Mrs. Rose that a
certain other girl had provided
some information on the basis
of which Mrs. Rose accused her
husband of -misconduct."
The girl he called agreed to
Yes, there was a young wo- come and arrived "dressed auite
man in his theater apartment properly,' (he showman said.
They talked it over.
"She told us none of the things
Eleanor said were true." he told
tlje Journal-American. "I pre-
viously had talked to the other
girl who was supposed to be
Eleanor's source, and she denied
lt. It all looked to me as lt
rumor mongers were at lt again.
And we decided to let it go at
that."
He took the girl downstairs
in the elevator 30 minutes later,
let her out of the lobbv door
and started back upstairs when
he "heard a lot of yelling and
screaming."
He came back in the elevator,
opened the door "and saw one
man I later found out was a
private detective, and Eleanor
and the girl I'd Just let out,
standing In a mad little circle."


PAGE TWO


THE PANAMA AMERICAN an INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1951
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
=
IP::
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED BI ROYAL CHARTER ISM
Royal Nails Lines Ltd.
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COASTS
OF NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA_________
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "SALAMANCA" ..............................Oct. 22nd
M.V. "REINA DEL PACIFICO".....................Oct. 24th
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA,
HAVANA, NASSAU, BERMUDA, CORUA,
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
M.V. "REINA DEL PACIFICO" '18.000 tons).!----Nov. 17th
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
S.S. FLAMENCO"" ..............................Oct. 14th
M.V. SALAVERRY' ............................-Oct. 14th
ROYAI MAIL LINES LTD. HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
~o korth pacific forts
S? "DAI FRDVK"**.............................Oct. 14th
8.3. "DIEMERDYK"............................Oct. 31st
~ TOGTCONTINENT
M.V. "LOCH RYAN" ..............................Oc'. 22nd
8.S. "LCCH GARTH".............................Oct. 29th
AcceptinR passengers in First. Cahln and Third Class
Superior accommodation available for passengers
All tailings subject to change without notice.
PACIFIC STEAM NAV. CO.. Cristbal. Tel. 1654 1655
FORD COMPANY Inc.. Panam Tel. 3-1257/1258: Balbom 1950
Remember THE BOSTON BAR
r'VILIANS
i
'RICE
& ZJkurAdaif
from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Z SERVE THE FINEST LIQUORS.
GIVE THE BEST SERVICE
..LS.'TAKE A MANS
ADVICE ABOUT YOUR
COMPLEXION
"Castora nunca ant Cattasn
Xeep your akin cleai
and smooth with Cuticura
Soap and Ointment Thia
famous combination ease
at blackhead?. Relieves pimples. Buy!
SSACSAHJ. fcUDtr-rtMMIC4R**
CUTICURA ,S5f?
TACA
ffy io COSTA RICA (
TACA
3 ROUND TRIPS WEEKLY 3
J/ew DeLuxe DC $$ Aiamiamed by
CCA. Licensed Mechanics.
FIR6T CLASS SERVICE -TOURIST RATES.
*ONE WAY 30.>WtW/> TRIP
See Your Travel Aqewt or TACA for details
TELEPHONE 2-2146 PANAMA CITY- 20 TIVOLI AVE.
THE SAVINGS BANK
institution Guaranteed by the State
Pays 2% Interest Annually on Savings Accounts
INITIAL DEPOSIT $5.00
We make loans with guarantees on first mortages
or other securities.
CHRISTMAS SAVINGS
25c. 50c. $1.00 and $5.00
deposits are accepted thru a period
of 48 weeks.
Individual safety deposit boxes, for jewelry and
documents, in 4 different sizes.
OFFICE IN PANAMA:
1M Central Afe. at
corner of "1" Street
COLON BRANCH:
Trout St. at corner
of 7th St
Q. R. De ROUX CARLOS MOUYNES V.
Manar" Sab-Manager.
BODRS:
'rom I 00 a.m to 12:30 p.m
SATURDAYS: from 8:00 a.m. to IZ:M p.m
Shopping & Airline New:
Braniff New Daily
Service Links Panama
With S-:o Paulo, Brasil
Further expansion of Braniff
Internrtlonal Airways' service
between the North and .South
Americas is being achieved by
the airline's inaugural flight to
Sao Paulo. Brazil, which left Mi-
ami la^t night.
The inaugural flight also marks
the beginning of dally Braniff
service linking the Americas
throug'i Panama the North-
bound flights entring the Uni-
ted Stiles through the twin air
gateways of Miami and Hous-
ton.
The DC-6 "El Conquistador"
aerial connection with Sao Pau-
lo.
"A city of two million people.
and the industrial capital of
South America, Sao Paulo is very
important to international trade
and commerce and particularly
to Panama as the crossroads of
global commerce," he said.
"Sao Paulo accounted for
44.8% of the value of Brazil's to-
tal exports during the first six
months of 1951. naif of Brazil's
large agricultural production and
a majority of its commercial ac-
tivity is centered in this region of
more than 30 million persons."
Braniff Inaugurated service to
Stassen Says State Department
Weaseling On Jessup Charges
WASHINGTON, Oct. 13. (UP> Harold E.
Stassen yesterday accused the State Department of
making a "false and deceptive" reply to his charges
that Ambassador-at-large Philip C. Jessup backed
policies favoring the Chinese Reds.
He'testified before the Senate Internal Security
Committee as informed sources predicted that the
Administration may side-step a Senate showdown
on Jessup's nomination to be a U.S. delegate to the
United Nations.
One Democratic
flatly that Jessup
leader said
cannot be
making the inaugural flight to Latin America in June, 1948. and ', confirmed, and that it would be
the larsert industrial city In
South America landed at Tocu-
men p.irpori this morning, ac-
cording to William Taylor, the
airline's msaager for Panama.
who vps r* l*a airport to wel-
come the flight.
The dlEtinguished guests who
are making the flight with Tom
Braniff. the airline's founder and
president and Mrs. Braniff. stay-
ed in Panama only about an hour
before proceeding on to Lima.
The croup Includes:
U.S. Senator Edwin Johnson,
Dem. of Colorado; U.8. Con-
gressman Frank WUson, Dem.,
of Texas; the Honorable John
Wanner, Associate General Coun-
sel of the Civil Aeronautics
Board; R. J. Potts, head of the
Kansas City advertising agency
I of R. J. Potts-Calkins and Hold-
en. Inc.: Wm. Blakely, Fred Mc-
Cabe: Cliff Jones and Walter
iHenshel. Director of Public'Re-
lations for Braniff Airways.
is the only airline flying ncn- j better to avoid Senate action on
stop schedules across the heart | the nomination. That would
of the South American contin- leave the way open for Mr. Tru-
The new airline service was
Inaugurated with new DC-6
sleeper-liners recently deliver-
ed to Braniff from the>Douglas
aircraft plant in California,
Taylor said.
Th" airline's new non-stop
flights over the 1300 miles from
Miami to Panama will be made
1 in four hours, and will run three
round trips per week.
Sao Paulo will be added to
Braniff's present coast-to-coast
non-stop trips between Lima
and Rio de Janeiro. Stopping hi
Lima for an hour's layover and
breakfast at the Limatambo ter-
minal, the "El Conquistador" ex-
press flights will make the 3700-
mile run from Panama to Sao
Paulo in a total elapsed time of
16 hours and 20 minutes.
The fUghts will then conti-
nue to Rio, arriving in the Bra-
zilian capital an hour after
leaving Sao Paulo. Service to
Sao Paulo has been delayed up
ft alow pesjdln* completion of
airport facilities adequate to
handle the four-engined equip-
ment.
In announcing the new serv-
ice, Taylor emphasized the im-
portance to Panama of the new
ent..
The airline has worf Inter-
American Safety Council awards
for flying without fatalitv to pas-
senger or crew member for every
year it has operated m Latin
America and has won National
Safety Council awards for safe
flying In the United States for 18
of the 19 times they have been
given by the Council.
Panama also is connected by
Braniff with one-stop servirr- to
Buenos Aires. The airline's DC-4
"El Intercontinental" tour 1st
flight has fare discounts up to
25% and also flies from Tocumen
to Ecuador. Peru. Bolivia, Para-
guay and Argentina and North-
bound to Havana and the United
States.
Two German Ships
Transit Canal
to Join Whaling Fleet
Local agent Fernie and Co.,
revealed that two German ships,
the Olympic Arrow and the Ex-
plorer arrived yesterday morning
in Cristobal and will transit the
Canal on their way to the Antarc-
tic. Thev are the last of the
whaling fleet that transited the
Canal last week>
Pigeon Pie-Eyed
SYDNEY. Oet. 18(UP)
A local temperance leader to-
day opposed a suggestion that
rum-soaked wheat be placed
In parks here to help catch
destructive pigeons.
He feared young persons
would pilfer the bait.
He explained that a similar
plan, featuring whisky In-
stead of rum, recently failed
in Scotland.
The Scotland pigeons mere-
ly became livelier, and harder
to capture.
The City Council here ar-
guess that Sydney's pigeons
would become drunk on the
rum-soaked wheat, and easier
to catch.
man to give Jessup a "recess ap-
pointment" after Congress ad-
journs.
Stassen took sharp Issue with
the State Department's com-
ments on a secret October, 1949.
round-table conference on Far
Eastern policy, at which Jessup
presided.
The former Republican gov-
ernor of Minnesota contended
that the official transcript,
made public Thursday, "con-
firms" his previous charges
that the "prevailing group" at
the conference advanced a 10-
point program calling for re-
cognition of Red China and
other "soft" moves generally
favorable to the Chinese Com-
munists.
The State Department had
said the transcript shows that
Stassen's charges were-"factual-
ly Incorrect."
It said the record demonstrates
that there was no "prevailing
group" at the round table, and
that no one advanced a 10-polnt
program of any kind.
In his third appearance before
the Internal Security Committee,
Stassen quoted excerpts from
the transcript to show that all of
the 10 points he mentioned were
"actually discussed" during the
three-day meeting by various
members of the panel.
He also asserted that six of the
25 members "never dissented
from any of these 10 points."
The State Department said
Thursday that the transcript
showed that the conference was
called to get "all points of view"
on all issues affecting the Far
East and that no "concrete" po-
licy proposals were sought or ad-
vanced .
Stassen said the transcript "de-
finitely pins" on Jessup the "re-
sponsibility" for starting a dis-
cussion M the aflvliahlliiy of re?
cognizing Communist china."
The transcript indicated that
Jessup. as chairman of the con-
ference, introduced the subject as
one item on the long agenda.
He did not participate in the
ensuing discussion in which 14
of the panel members indica-
ted they favored eventual re-
cognition or at least considered
it an "Inevitable" necessity.
Stassen reiterated his charge
that Jessup told him there was
"logic" in the pro-recognition ar-
guments.
But He said this remark did
not appear in the transcript be-
cause It was made during a brief
recess In the conference.
Jessup has testified that he ne-
ver favored recognition of Red
China and that the State Depart-
ment "never considered" such a
move, despite the sentiments
voiced by the invited private ex-
perts at the round table.
Stassen previously had charg-
ed that Jessup and the State De-
partment "implemented" the al-
leged 10-polnt program after the
round-table conference.
He said yesterday that Jessup
did nothing "Inconsistent" with
the program..
Famoui Statue
Answer to Prtvloua Punier"
I 1 J'.' J III i\m
WESTCLOX-frave/% alarm clo\
l -' i--------------- *
TRAVALARM
1
Travalarm, mad* by the makors of world
famous "Bio ben", fit easily into a comer of a
pocked suitcase. Sliding front thutter and hinged
osel back give complete protection for travelling.
Ho luminous dial, non-breakable crystal. Every
minute count while you're on a trip and for the
right time all the time, be sure to take along the
deper dable, attractive Travalarm. See it and the
other fine clocks and watches by Wettdox at your
retailer's now!
WiSTCLOX
famous*family Name of f
rn-jFirmiZ'yPZig- =W>BT COS.
rranctM* c la Ow Calle "" N. raeaesa CKr B P
Wo. MSI St Strew ana BalbM Cales, a t.
M-O-M
MARIO LANZA I
NEW IDOL I
-says Time
Magazine I
&&CARV9
c*t> TfCHNKOLOR
f erring
mark) Lanza awBlyth
iSSmi NOVQTNA TrffiSw
OPENING THURSDAY
LUX & CECILIA
8IMULTANEOU8LYI
HOEIZONTAL
I Depicted
famous statue
by Praxiteles
7 Copies are In
almost every
large
II Waken
14 Puzzle
15 Cistern
16 Titled
II Choose
19 While
20 Reduces in
rank
22 Pronoun
21 Roman
emperor
25 Peel
27 First man
28 Passage in the
brain
29 Mixed type
30 Negative reply
31 Preposition
32 Decimeter
(ab.)
81 Mirth
35 Wild beast
38 Unusual
39 Unbleaohed
40 For example
(ab.)
41 Slices or-
be con
47Not (prefix)
48 Eternity
50 Musical
Instrument
51 Goddess of the
dawn
52 Covered
54 Mere
58 Whole
57 Whirls
vertical
:-i -.'-'t-it :imic i ; t.
i ju 'msjuji-ji jui :' ra
I-...I tLXJBH.csn.'.'iias
1 Capital of
Cuba
2 Expunged
3 Decay
4 Greek letter
5 Domestic slave
6 Juncture
7 Encounter
ICWnesehriver Mandar *** ** aelamatloo
10 Self esteem Kind of bomb 45 Otherwise
11 Arbiter I* la in------ 46 Incursion
12 Concern 34 Body of water 49 Burmese
17 Month (ab.; 36 Bird < wood sprite
20 Tyrannise 37 Cares for 51 Upon (prefix)
21 Spinning 42 Sute SI Palm lily
wheel rods 43 Lateral part 55 Doctor (ab.)
<
Colombian Troops In Korea
Lauded By Itinerant Brass
CLOYCK J. TTPP1T, Central
and South American represen-
tative of the International Ci-
vil Aviation Organization ar-
rives In Panama from his head-
quarters in Lima, Peru, to join
several other members of the
ICAO for a conference that will
be held here in connection with
international civil- aviation
matters.
Photo El Halcn
A GIFT FOR YOU
THE SCOn SPOON
Made of Durable Plastic :
in Beautiful Colors
NO IXTRA COITI Ask for the
Isrge Scott's Emulsion package
containing s beautiful tablespoon.
Obtainable in six attractive colors.
Then give your family this scien-
tific, vitamia-rich food-took every
day, as aoaoy doctors recommend.
\ou'll soon have a stronger and
n't**'** family. \
^ SCOTTS EMULSION
High Energy food tonic
WITH COLOMBIAN BATTAL-
ION, Korea, Oct. 13 (U8I8) The
blue and white flag of the Uni-
ted Nations is flying today be-
side the Colombian national flag
over the front line of the Colom-
bian troops fighting; with the
United Nations forces here. ,
Below them files a smaller-
pennant, presented to the Colom-
bian battalion recently-hy the
soldiers of a nearby U.S. reet-
ment and which bears the le-
gend:
"To the Colombians brave
soldiers and companions In the
fight for freedom."
TThe U.N. flag was turned over
to the Colombian battalion by
Colombian commander-ln-chlef
General Gustavo Rojaa Plnllla.
who flew to Korea a few days a-
go to make the presentation.
Rojas reminded the battalion,
which has already won high
praise for its actions against the
enemy, that Communists had
cast early doubts on the bravery
of the Colombian soldiers.
"There was an attempt'to east
shadow on the sincerity of your
actions and-on your valor, by
means of unworthy rumors.
"But your strong will met
without flinching the running
attacks of subversive propagan-
da and have carried you to these
lands where lies the germ of the
Third World War."
Rojaa told the men:
"Never forget, soldiers of the
Colombian battalion, that In this
tremendously Important cam-
paign you are answering for the
worthiness of the Latin Ameri-
can soldier, Unce Colombia is the
only Latin American nation thus
far engaged In defense of the
continent.,
"We fight alongside the United
States, a nation that is the stan-
dard bearer of liberty and that,
like our government, has been a
victim of Soviet propaganda.
3 CIs Face Hanging
For Killing Cabbie
FT. LEONARD WOOD, Me,
Oct. 13 (UP)A nine-man mili-
tary court yesterday found three
soldiers guilty of first degree
murder in the death of a Way-
nesville, Mo., taxi driver.
Pvts. James L. Rlgglns of
Tallahassee, Fla., Louis M. But-
tles of Chattanooga. Tenn., and
Chastlhe Beverly, Balky, Va.. all
Negroes, faced execution, prob-
ably by hanging.
The court martial ended af-
ter a four hour retirement by
the nine-man court. Just three
weeks to the day after the fatal
aaaault on 61-year-old Harry
Langley who died Sept. 21 in an
ambulance u .he was feeing
moved to a Springfield. Mo.,
hospital.
He had been beaten and rob-
bed of $156.
"GOTTA-HAVE IT"GETS IT
FORTH WORTH, Teg. JUJ.>
A man picked by police gsve
his nickname as "Gotta-Have-
It." He "got it" when a rand
Jury indicted him on a dope
charge.
Distributora: CIA. CYRNOS, So A.
u 'i i ^^is
t,
w- *


SATURDAY, CTORITR .19, IVR
TsTB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPFR
PAGE THREE
^rtianlic S^ocieh
i

W. Wilton Joe flU
Box 195, QaUn "DMpho*, (jalun 378
MISS PERRET WEDS MR. JAMES FERNANPEZ
' Before the fla.wer decked alUr of the Coco Solo Naval
Chape), Misa Dora Mavis Ferret, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Perret, Sr., of Coln plighted her troth to Mr. James
Fernandez, son of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Fernandez of Mar-
garita. The double ring ceremony was performed by Chaplain
E. X. Pralno. Lleut.-Commander. 8. N., Friday. October
IX at 7:00 p.m.. In the presence of a large gathering of Isth-
mian society and members of both families.
White gladioli were used in va-
ses on the altar and in standing
baskets flanking the prle dleu.
They also filled nail cornuco-
pia baskets whici^lsked the
chahcelTail and were tied with
mallne bows to the pews.
Mrs. Angela Castillo, organist,
played the traditional wedding
marches and accompanied Mrs.
Ligia Pretto, who sang Shubert's
"Ave Maria" and "Panis Angell-
cus."
Mr. Perret escorted and gave
his daughter in marriage. She
was beautiful. In her wedding
i gown of white satin and Chan-
; tilly lac. The fitted lace bodice
had a yoke of nylon which form-
ed a high-rounded neckline with
| the pattern of the lace outlining
i the yoke. The long, pointed, flt-
terj sleeves were also of lace,
i Graduated lace Insets trimmed
L the full gored skirt and extend-
\ ed to the end of the long train.
I Her fingertip veil of illusion was
Iheld In place by a white satin co-
[ronet embroidered with pearls.
[She carried a sheaf of calla lilies.
Mrs. William A. Cardoze was
the matron of honor. She wore
in orchid gown of nylon net and
taffeta. The fitted taffeta bodice
__i strapless and finished at the
jp With a pleating of matching
ylon net. The bouffant, balle-
ina length skirt was formed by
n oversklrt of nylon net over
Jtatfeta. Three bands of taffeta
f trimmed the oversklrt at the
hlpline. She wore accessories and
a tafleta bandeau In her hair,
outlined with pearls. Her flowers
were a bouquet of yellow rose-
buds with touches of bamboosa
orchids.
Miss Margaret Dagnal, Miss
Lilia Lelgnadier and Miss Hercl-
11a Herrera were the, bride's
maids. They wore dresses of yel-
low nylon net and taffeta with
gold accessories to match the
matron of honor. Their flowers
were nosegay bouquets of bam-
boosa orchids.
Mr. Paul F. Karst, Jr., was
test man for Mr. Fernandez.
The groomsmen were: Messrs
William A. Cardoze, Thomas C.
, Barnes and George Splotta.
L An elaborate reception was
kheld at the home of the bride's
parents. Villa Omega on 11th
Street in Colon following the
9 ceremony. The residence was de-
corated with a profusion of pink
' anthurium lilies from Trinidad.,
Regal lillas and a shell arrange-
ment centered the buffet tables.
The parents of the bride and,
. worn received with the-^ metn-
- be* of the wedding party. The.
.mother of the bride chose for the
occasion a wine taffeta strapless
evening gown. She wore a
matching stole and a corsage of
orchids.
The mother of the groom wore
a Nile green evening gown. It was
fashioned with a bodice and
short peplum of lace over a chif-
fon skirt, with a foundation of
matching taffeta. Her gloves
and slippers were yellow and she
also wore orchids.-u
The elaborate wedding cake
centered a tabla flanked by bas-
kets of lilies. It was three-tiered
with an inset colonnade which
contained the miniature bride
and groom. The top layer was
decorated with an intricate con-
fection ornament. After the bride
and groom cut the first slices the
cake was cut and served by Mrs.
David Mcllhenny, Mrs. Gunther
Hlrschfeld, Mrs. Peter Foster and
Mrs.- Charles Perrett, Jr.
Mrs. Worden E. French and
Mrs. Gilbert Solas had charge
of the bride's book.
Later in the evening the bride
and groom crossed the Isthmus
to register at the Hotel El Pana-
ma. They left this morning by
plane for Medellln. Colombia,
where they will spend their ho-
neymoon .
The bride's going away costume
was an aqua linen suit, with
which she used a white nylon
blouse and brown accessories. Her
flowers were a corsage of minia-
ture authurlum lilies.
Upon their return they will re-
side at Quarters 7019, Mount
Hope.
Mrs. Fernandez graduated from
La Chatelaine in Nouchatel,
Switzerland and the Canal Zone
Junior College and has been em-
ployed by Wllford and McKay.
Mr. Fernandez graduated from
Castle Heights Military Academy
at Lebanon, Tenn., and attended
the Citadel at Charleston, S.C.
He is employed by the Texas
Comnany in Cristobal.
Mrs. Mann Honored
With Shower
Mrs. Joseph Gormley enter-
tained with a shower, at her Ft.
Gulick quarters, Wedn e s d a y
evening, in honor of Mrs. Rus-
sell Mann.
A pink and blue color scheme
with a stork theme was used In
the, geenral decorations. A large,
wheeled, stork pulled the pink
and blue bassinet in which the
gifts were presented.
The buffet table was centered
with a layer cake decorated in
the two colors and topped with
the symbolic bird.
Games were played and the
prizes were won by Mrs. Mann,
Mrs ^ William Elllngsworth and
Mrs. Ernest Beck.
The hostess was assisted by
Mrs. John Cousin. The other
guests were: Mrs. Austin Tulip.
Mrs. Pauline Marsh, Mrs. Arthur
Humphrey, Mrs. William Godwin,
Mrs. Arthur Crandall, Mrs.
Ralph Johnson, Mrs. Harry Co-
pare and Sergeant Bea Whyte.
Mm. Knox Guest at Shower
Mrs. Robert Knox was the
honoree t surprise shower glv
en' Thursday evening by Mrs.
William Knox at her New Cristo-
bal home.
The gifts were presented in a
blue and white bassinet topped
with a stork carrying a baby in
its beak. After the opening of
the gifts, games were played.
The prize winners were: Frank
Kollman. Mrs. A. R. Geddle and
Mrs. Wlnnard Parsons.
Buffet refreshments were serv-
ed from a table arranged under a
canopy of pink, blue and white
streamers. Clusters of blue hy-
drangeas, yellow and pink car-
nations and baby's breath mark-
ed the ends of the table which
held a cake topped with blue
confection bootees as the center-
piece.
The other guests were the mo-
ther of the honoree, Mrs. Chas.
Harrison and her mother-in-law,
Mrs. William Knox, Sr.. of Bal-
boa, Mrs. Glenn C. Dough, Mrs.
Joseph Smith. Mrs. Thomas Ous-
ter, Mrs. Wlnnard Parsons, Mrs.
Kenneth Daly, Mrs. Allen Arnold,
Mrs. Alexander R. Geddle, Mrs.
Earl Turner, Mrs. John Rice,
Mrs. Francis Lee, Mrs. John
Dwyer, Mrs. Robert Walnio. Mrs.
Austin Cullen, Mrs. Roger Ha-
mor, Mrs. Percy Washabaugb,,
Mrs. Jack O'Donald, Mrs. Frank
H. Kollman, Mrs. Daniel Zitz-
man, Mrs. Alpha Kenyan. Mrs.
Jacob Marchosky, Mrs. Jack Ran-
dall. Mrs. Leon Egolf. Miss An-
gle Rellley and Mrs. Carlos Ga-
llardo.
Flashlight pictures were taken
of the group.
Auto Production To Be Cut
Another 10 Per Cent Jan. 1
o----
First Birthday Celebrated
by Christopher Workman
Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Work-
man entertained at their New
Cristobal residence Friday after-
noon with a party to honor their
son, Christopher John, on his
first birthday anniversary.
Carnations and hydrangeas
were used to decorate the resi-
dence and a circus birthday cake
centered the table.
The young guests included the
honoree's cousins, Christian li-
lies and Andrea lilies, and his
rack, pmI and bite* m> sad tta.r arty
drive joa crujrr Te real mum .r thta
ailment, watch I* called Athlete's Foe*,
(Allpntira) Sln.-a.por. Itch, alo., la a
fuiurua. arm or paraalle that burrowa
dee down la tha akin. Dra't werry a4
dea (suffer other day without iryfe*
Nlx.d.rm. Thla great medletne rata
right down through the akin and tat*
rid of tha raal oauaa of yew trouhla.
*t's why Nlxeder werke a* feat la
% frota year dt-aavtst todag

x stop worrying..
start tinting!
Don't worry about that
first gray strand! Let it be a
"'blessing in disguise" a
signal to you to take action
and do something about ob-
taining lovelier, natural-
loking new haircolor! So
relax and let Roux take
over! For Roux Oil Sharn-
*rTint treatments conceal
visible strand of dull
o, gray hair, give sparkling
highlights and lustre, adds
subtle, natural-looking color
that changes your worry to
delight!
ROUX OIL
SHAMPOO TINT
|CO0S CONDITIONS
CLEANSES
Caution,- us only is directed
on label
JULIO VOS
* I "A- Straw.
| Taleahana I-W71 Panam
GINWT0NIC!
If oren dipt dont nip old
Sol's heat, call on tha cooler
that's a favorite from Kenya
to Hong Kong for thirst-
quenching, heart-squelching
refreshment. Mix a tall Gin
and Tbnlc and wrap yourtelf
around a glacial flow of
frosty pie ature.
HIKE'S HOW:
A jigger of gin In aa I 01
flees, plenty of Ice, ill
with Cenada Dry Qui-
nina Walar, add a erke of
lemon or lima... and
turn ofl the alectrk tea.
''!; '

CANADA DRY
QUININE WATER
WASHINGTON. Oct. 13 (UP)
Production o consumer dur-
able Roods will be cut another
M) per cent beginning Jan. 1
and automobile output will be
slashed somewhat more, it was
announced today.
The defense-dictated cuts
were announced by Defense Pro-
duction Administrator Manly
Fleischmann who said there
also will be further, pinches In
other-civilian output.
Fleischmann and Defense
Mobllizer Charles E. Wilson told
a joint session of four Con-
gressional committees that
civilian production in the first
three months of 1952 will be
aunt, Andrea Oreblen. with Irda
Kuhrig, Catherine and George
Lake, Iteo Madison, Mary Ellen,
Sarah Jane and Baby Carter.
The adult guests were: Mr.
and Mrs. Clifford Russell, godpa-
rents of the honoree, Mr. and
Mrs. Hans lilies, Mrs. Anita
Neff. Mrs. Richard Neuman,
Mrs. Mary Carter. Mr. and Mrs.
George Lake, Mrs. David Madi-
son and Christopher's grandfa-
ther, Mr. Ferdinand Grebien.
Mr. and Mrs. Cookson Celebrate
Wedding Anniversary
Rev. and Mrs. Milton A.
Cookson celebrated their six-
teenth wedding anniversary with
a progressive dinner party Thurs-
day evening.
Courses of the dinner were
served by Rev. and Mrs. Arnold
Waldrock, Rev. and Mrs. Mam-
ert Peterson and the final course
at the Cookson's residence.
Football Frolic Tonight
The Football Frolic will start
this evening at 7:30 with the co-
ronation of Queen Jeanine Nix
at 8:30 p.m.
All friends, parents and Alum-
ni are cordially invited to attt\d.
Morning Coffee and Meeting
The Lydia Link of the Wom-
an's Auxiliary of the Gatun Un-
ion Church met at the home of
Mrs. W. C. Smith in Gatun, for
their business meeting and morn-
ing coffee.
The ladies attending were: Mrs.
Gilbert Lee, Mrs. Ralph Graham,
Mrs. Leslie Croft, Mrs. Martin
Sawyer. Mrs-. Sam Mauldln, Mrs.
Walter Watts and Mr* C. V.
Scheldegg.
"moderately lower" than In the
last quarter of this year because
the rearmament program Is
"beginning to hit its stride."
Fleischmann also warned that
the nation will be lucky if sup-
plies of steel, copper and alu-
minum for the first three
months of 1952 come up to
estimates.
And Wilson said that the
first half of next year will be
a period of "acute shortages"
in scarce metals. But he ex-
pressed hope that the "sharp
squeeze will not extend for
too long a period."
Fleischmann said the con-
sumer durable goods industry
will get about ll'A per cent
less steel than In the last quar-
ter of 1951. The reductions in
copper and aluminum will be
even more drastic, he said.
But he said the supply of re-
frigerators, stoves, TV sets and
other home appliances "should
be sufficient" because of ample
Inventories on dealers shelves.
He confirmed that the auto
industry Will get enough mater-
ials to produce 930.000 to 950.-
000 autos. But he added that
with Inventories of materials on
hand, the industry should be
able to produce 1,006.000 cars in
the first three months of 1952.
Fleischmann also said there
will have to be a further slow-
ing down in less essential civil-
ian building because of the need
for structural steel to set up
more aluminum and steel plants
and for other essential con-
struction.
He said allocations for schools
and hospitals construction
should provide for needs of
elementary schools in defense
areas, for replacing condemned
structures and for completion
of projects already underway.
But, he said, there probably
will be delays on unfinished
projects. He also said there will
not be enough materials for
"any substantial amount" of
new starts on hospitals.
And. he said,- allocations of
materials for the petroleum in-
dustry will require some defer-
ment of proposed natural gas
transmission Unes.
Fleischmann said direct mili-
tary demands for steel, copper
and aluminum in the January-
March period will be increased
"substantially more" than the
prospective increase in supplies
of the metals.
New Plastic Rails
Planned To Replace
Steel For Tieplates
CLEVELAND. O. Oct. (UP)
Steel railru.-.d rails may be a
thing of the past If the new plas-
tic "dynakon" is put to commer-
cial use.
The substance is the latest de-
velopment of an engineer, Harry
Raech. Jr., who said the plastic
Is "three times as strong as steel.
Raech has made some railroad
tieplates of the plastic and they
have been placed at several
points in Cleveland switchyards
to observe their reaction t o
weather and wear.
Raech believes the new plastic
tieplates will outlast their steel
cousins. They weigh one-fifth
as much as steel ana are unaf-
fected by r.iiny weather or salt
brir.e that drips from refrigera-
tor cars and deteriorates steel.
ISTHMI/ V DATA
BIRTHS
PALMA, Mr. and Mrs. Luis of
Panam, a daughter, Oct. 8 at
Oorgas Hospital.
LAWYER, Mr. and Mrs. Robert,
W. of Balboa, a daughter, Oct. 9
at Gorgas Hospital.
CLARKE. Mr. and Mrs. Dennis
of Silver City, a son. Oct. 9 at
Colon Hospital..
SHEPHARD, Sgt. and Mrs.
Chester of Panam, a son, Oct.
10 at Gorgas Hospital.
BARRIOS, Mr. and Mrs. Con-
cepcin, of Panam, a daughter,
Oct. 10 at Gorgas Hospital.
DEATHS
LAYNE. Kleazar. 8?. of Camp
BI-m-h. Oct. < at Gorgas Hospital.
RYAN, Mr.rl eM., 57, of Balboa,
Oct. a> Oorgas Hospital.
STEWART, William U., 59. of
Colon, Oct. 10 at Gorgas Hospital.
St. Peter's Women's
Auxiliary Celebrates
36th Anniversary
Services commemorating the
36th anniversary of the Woman's
Auxiliary of St. Peter's church,
La Boca, will be held this Sunday
with the Rev, Lemuel B. Shirley,
priest in charge, as officiant and
preacher.
The membership will make a
corporate communion at the 7
a.m. celebration, which will be
choral. Auxiliary members from
other parishes have been invited
to attend vespers 7:30 p.m. with
the group
The social side of the anniver-
sary observance will take form
of a reception to be given in the
parish hall 7:30 Monday evening.
Youth Week
Activities observing youth week
October 15 to 21 in the parish of
St. Peter's include vespers 7 p.m.
Monday: visit to St. James'
group. Tuesday; acquaintance
party, with Robert Beecher. guest
speaker, Wednesday; recreation-
al night, games. Thursday; no ac-
tivity Friday; field day. La Bo-
ca ball park. Saturday and com-
pline 7:30 p.m.
Sunday the 21st will be youth
corporate communion 7 a.m.;
attendance at dedication and
cornerstone laying of Christ
Church Academy 3 p.m.; vesper
service 7:30 p.m.
HANDY WRITER
I.EVELAND, Tex. (UP.) Jan
Hofacket, who writes with either
hand, got through twice as fast
as other students at a junior
high school yearbook autograph-
ing party.
I DON'T
LIKE
CERVEZA
BUtlookWHOiam/
MARIO LANZA I
NEW IDOL I
-ays Tim*
Magazine I
M-O-M presents
, "MheGreai
^CARMim
mm d TECHNICOLOR
tlorring
mario Lanza- annBlyth
DOHOTHT MJUBU BLAWM
KlRSTEN-NOVOTNA -THEBOM
OPENING THURSDAY
LUX b CECILIA
SIMULTANEOUSLY I
NOW AVAILABLE:
High Compote
Low Candle Sticks
Salt and Pepper Shakers
Low Compote
Mayonnaise Bowl
Bon-Bon Basket
Candelabra Arms
(flSII fflSTLKH*
DUTy-FREE SILVER (ENTER
PANAMA
Wilbur Sftaw- ttfafa SO nitron / this rum Chrysler, he Aas selected tt a* Paco Car (or the 1951 IndiaStpblia 500-mile rao. \\sm/
a^wwepMpn i -y/ n'-f-r. '- j- i-.- -- 11p#. .' 9TSrrrap*i;"-'hi asi -v '

driven the


most

powerful
caria
theUSJ
WILBUR SHAW, AMERICA'S MOST FAMOUS DRIVER, DRIVES NEW 1951 CHRYSLERREPORTS TO YOU
ON REVOLUTIONARY FIREPOWER ENGINE AND HYDRAGUIDE POWER STEERING
Honr aro Wilbur Shaw's reactionsin his own
wordaa fa*en down by a rocording machino
ill the car:
"The '51 Chrysler has it! With this new engine and
power steering., the first on any U.S. car, it's a whale
of an automobile.
"I'm completely bowled over by the ease of steering!
"This steering combined with the automatic trans-
mission ... is the nearest thing to an automatic
pilot for a car I can possibly imagine.
"This engine... I can't get over the amount of power
and snap in this engine it's incredible!
"I drove 111 miles with the feeling I had expended
no more effort than in driving around the block.
"When Mrs. Shaw drove, her comments just about
squared with mine. Here's what she thinks of the
1951 Chrysler ."
inspect a Fire Power, the greatest new
engine In 37 yean.
Smartly styled Chrysler convertible to paoa
Indianapolis 5O0-r-\ile race.
Mrs. Shaw: "At first I could hardly believe the ease
with which I could turn the wheel. That's important
. especially in the summertime.
"Often after I have parked a car in the average park-
ing space, I feel I should taxi home, shower and get
dressed again. But with Hydraguide Power Steering
I parked it with one hand. It practically drives itself."
Wilbur Shaw: "It's hard to describe this new Chrys-
ler without going off the deep end ... it has it in every
department.
"In fact, I think so much of this car, I've selected it
as Pace Car of the 1951 Indianapolis 500-mile race!"
(Mr. Shaw's comments are reprinted through the
courtesy of Popular Science Magazine.)
Mr. Shaw refers of course to standard passenger
carsnot racing cars or special models.
CHRYSLER
finest engineered can in the world
AGENCIAS PAN-AMERICANAS, S. A.

IRYSLER FARGO PLYMOUTH Dealers
(Across from El Rancho Garden on Estudiante Street)
M. A. POWELL
COLON
AGENCIAS PAN-AMERICANAS
DAVID CHIRIQUI




PAGE FOUR
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEK
SATURDAY. OCTOBER 13, 1051
ISTHMIAN CHURCH NOTICES
i KICKY AND THE PIRATES
THE EXPENDED EXPENDABLE
Methodist
lilt Ml IIIOlllSI IIIIKCII
i Brit:~h Conference i
Minister Hev. tj. HtrDerl Moon
9:00 a.m. Morning Prever and Sermon
3:00 p.m. Sunday School
4:00 Men' Met ling.
7:15 o.m Cvenine Prayei and Sermon
TRINITY METHODIS1 CHLHL'H
7ili Street and Melende? Avenue.
Colon. R.P
Rev. Norman Pratt, Mlnulet
Sunday Services at 9:30 a.m. and CIS
p m.: Sunday School (or all sges at 3
p.m.
Monday 7:30 o.m.. Weekly Prayei
Meeting.
EBENEZMt METHODIST CHURCH
Siver City. CZ.
Rev. Norman Pratt. Mlnlstoi
Sunday Service 8 a-m. and 6:15 p.m
Sunday School (or all ages at 8:30 o m
Tuendey 7:30 p.m.. Prayer Meeting.
Salvation Army
Pandilla cuy. Cane i> de ternero
Services at 11 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. (Maj-
ar Wilson); Sunday School at I urn.
La Boca: Services at 11 a.m. and 7-JO
o.m. Sunday School at 3:30 p.m.
Red Tank: Service at 7 JO o.m Sunday
School at 3:00 pjn.
Services at........ 11 a.m. 7:30 p.m.
colon. isth Street
Sunday School at...........3:00 p.m
Colon. 3rd Street
Services at ...... 11 a.m. A 7-JO o.m
Silver City
Service at ......<
Sunday School at'.......
Churches of the many faiths in the Canal Zona, and the
terminal cities of Panamo and Colon, Republic of Panamo, al-
iens! welcome ot all time to man and woman of the armed
services, and fa civilian neighbor), friands and strangers
As a public service, (he Panama American list* below, by
danaminationt, notices of hours of worship and other regular ac-
tivities.
Listings of largor danominations ara in alphabetical order.
which is rotated from tima to tima. Danominations having only
ana or two congregations aro listad undar "Other Churches And
Services." A special listing 8 included for services at Army pasts.
Air Parca basas and Noval stations.
Ministers, church secretaries and chaplains are asked to in-
form Ihe naws desk by Wednesday noon at the latest of ay
changes for the coming Saturday's church poge
"Tour Invitation Ta Worship
Bible School ............... :45 am
Worship ................... 11:00 am
Training Union ............ 8:30 p.m.
Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Prayer Meeting iThurs.i ... 7:30 p.m
Catholic
Seventh Day
Adventist

Pacific Side
Sc*do Verde. Panama City. No 1 J. A.
TsTgynard, Panama City No. I Jamaica
Society Hall (Sabbath Service onlyi;
Adolphu Lawes. Chorrillo. P. A. Henry:
Ro Abalo, C D. Abrahams; Gamboa, A.
A. Brittle, and Spanish City Church. E-
duirdo Ruilobo
Atlantic Side _^
Colon Third Street, Joseph Bryan; Cris-
tobal Englh.fi New Church. X. A. Cruck-
shank; Cristbal Spanish Church. B. J.
Maxon. (No Sunday night arvice at
oresent t
Sabbath school each church Saturday
g:30 am. Divine worship 11 ajn. Sunday
night service at all churches except
otherwise indicated. _____
Union Churches
When- all Protestants cooperate with
ally In essentials, liberty tai awn.
easentlsl and charity In all things
THE ATLANTIC SID1
Cristobal .
The Rev. PhlUlp Havener. Pastor.
Phone 3-14*3. _
10:43 Worship "ervtco and Church-timo
urserv
6 I Young People's Meeting
Galuu
The Rev. J William L. Graham. Pastor
Phone 5-355.
t.00 9:30 Broadcasi on HOK; HPSri
an HON.
9:43 Sunday School
11.00 Worship Service.
5:00 Christian Endeavor.
pfoneS^4*aV W. V /
- r30 Bible School.
'10:45 Worship servico and Church-time
nursery.
g.GO Youth Fellowship
IHE PACIFIC SIDE
.""italboa Road at Son Pablo
Rev. Alexander Shaw. PssVor
Phone 2-1480. Ofc. Phone 2-323
9-3U Church School, free bus service
10:30 Worship ervlce and Chureb-Umc
nursery.
10:30 Youth UongregaUons.
S:00 Chi Rho Senior Hi fellowship-
C:00 Post HI Fellowship-
7:30 Service 'Centered On Song
nLuoameao in Gamboa Civic Center
The Rev Raymond A. Gray. Minister
Phone (-130.
g:00 Sunday School.
7 J0 Worship service
fedro Mlgael
0:30 Church School.
10:45 Divine Worship.
1:30 Evening Vespers ^^^^^^
Street
(Listed below are Uie cauiouc Churcho
in the Canal Zone and those in the ter-
minal cities of Panama and Colon whose
congregations are primarily English
speaking Besides these, the Cathedral in
Panama City, the Cathedral of the 1m
maculate Conception In Coln, and num
erous parish churches in both cities, wel
come English speaking visitors, though
their congregations are primarily Span
Ish-spes king.)
ST. MARY'S
Balboa
Sunday Masses: 5:j5, 8:00. 10:00, 11:00.
12:00 a.m.
Benediction: 5:00 p.m.
Holy Day Masses: 5i53. 8:00. 11:10, 11:55
a.m.
Confessions: Saturday3JO. S:00 pjn.
7:00, 8:00 p.m. Thursdays (or first
Fridey-7:00, 8:00 p.m.
Miraculous Medal NovenaMonday at
7:00 p-m.
Rosary every evening at 7:00.
SACKI U HEART
An con
Sunday Manee: 3:3. 7:30, 9:30 a.m.
Holy Days: 5:55. 7 JO ajn.
Confessions: Saturday3:30, 5:00 pjn.
. 7:00, 8:00 p.m. Thursday (or first
rrlday7:00, 8:00 p.m.
Sacred Heart DevotionsFriday at 7:00
p.m.
ST. TERESA'S
Cocoll
Sunday Mass: 8:30 ajn.
Holy Days: 0:00 a.m.
CURUMDU CHAPEL
Curundu
Sunday Mass: 830 am.
Holy Days: 5:43 a.m.
Confessions: 3 JO, 3:00 p.m. Saturdays.
ASSUMPTION
Pedro Miguel
Sundsy Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Holy Dsys: 6:30 a.m.
Confessions: Saturday7:15, 7:43 p.m.
Rosary: Monday, Wednesday and Satur-
day at 7:00 p m.
Catechism Cli
o.m.
sea: Sunday10:30. 11 JO
ST. JOSEPH'S
Paraso
Sunday Mass: 7:00 a in.
Holy Pays: 5:43 ajn.
Confessions: Saturday3:30, 4:00 pjn.
Rosary: Tuesday7:00 p.m.
Catechism Classes: Sunday10JO. 11 JO
a.m.
.'. VINCENT'S
Panama
Sunday Masses: 8:00. 8:30 a.m.
Holy Days: 6:00, 8:30 a.m.
Confessions: Saturday3:00. 540. 7:00,
8:00 p.m
Before Holy Days: 7:00.
Rosary 4*017 evening: "
*
:".
P*
Unitarian

THE
UNITARIAN
SOCIETY
10:30 a.m.
JWB Armad
Forces Service
Center Library
Balboa. CZ.
Your invitation
to liberal
religion.

Baptist
NATIONAL etAPTlST CMuKCHaJ.
Panama Baptist Prayer Meeting 3v
' am. Divine Service, 9:30 ajn. Divino Ser-
vice 7:15 p-m. and Serving of The Lord s
Supper st both Sorvleo Sunday School
3:00 p.m _^
Moya Baptist. La Boca. C, Divino
Services 11:00 a.m. and 7 JO pjn. Serving
the Lord's Supper at both Service- Sun-
day School at 3:00 OJO.
New Hope. Cbiva-ChWa. OZ, Divine
Services HUM am Sunday School at
1:00 p.m ... ,_
Rev. S. N. Irswa. Minister
Gamboa. Ut, Divme Service at 11:00
am. and 7JO p.m. with Sunday School
t,:%%?A.W.ttrlLlltatal
Rio Abaio R.P- Sunday School si
** COCOLI APTIST CHURCH,
Building 311 Bruja Road
W. Y Pond Jr Pastor
Sunday School .............. 9:4 am.
Preaching Service ........... 10:45 am
Spanish Service ............. 3:00 p.m
Training Union .............. 8:00 p.m.
Preaching Service ........... 7:00 pjo.
Brotherhood 7:00 p.m. Mondays.
Prayer Meeting 7:0 Wednesdays
ST. JOHN BAPTIST OB LA SALLE
Rio Abalo
Sunday Masses: 8:30, 8:30 ajn.
Benediction: 4:00 p.m.
Holy Day Masses: 5:43 am.
Confessions: Saturday3:30. 4 30 p.m.
Friday after Miraculous Medal No-
vena.
Miraculous Medal NovenaFriday 7:00
p.m.
Rosary: Monday and Wednesday740
p.m.
ST. THERESE'a
Sunday Mass: 740 a.m. Holy Day Mass:
8:43 a.m.
Sacred Heart Devotions: Friday 7*0
Confessions: Saturday3:30. 8:09, T:00.
8:00 pjn.
Rosary every ovanlng except Tuesday at
7:00 om.
COCO SLITO PLAYSHED
Pastor, Rev. Wm. J. Finn. CM
Sunday Mass ............... 1:45 ajn
Holy Day Mass .............6:00 am.
Sunday School............. :** a.m.
Services Thursday nights ... 7:43 om
Confession before Mas
CHURCH OF THE HOLY FAMILY
Margarita, CZ.
Rev. William J. flnn. CM.
Baptisms Sun, 4:00 p.m.
Confessions Sal 3:30. 3:00 pjn A 7:00
to 8:00 p m.
Instructions (or adults. Tuee. A Frl.,
7:30 pan.
1st. Sat Devotion, every 1st. Sat. after
Mass.
OUR LADY OF GOOD COUNSEL
Gamboa. CZ.
Pastor. Rev Charles Jacobs. CM
Sunday Masses, 7:00 & 8:30 am.
Weekday Masses, 6:30 am.
Holy Day Masses. 5:45 A 8:30 a.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena service
Tues. 7:00 p.m.
Sacred Heart Novena service. Frl., 7:00
p.m
Confessions Sat. 7:00 p.m.
1st. Sat. Devotion, every 1st. Sat. after
Mass.
Christian Scientist
CHRISTIAN st'lKNCh CIIUMCHejt
First Church ot Christ. Scientist. Ancor
580 Ancn Boulevard.
Sunday 11 .-00; Wednesday 8:00 om
Sundav School 9:30 a.m
First uiiurcn ot Christ, Scientist, Cristobal
13th Street A Bolivar Highway
Sunday 11*0 a.m. Wednesday 7 JO cm
Sunday School 9:30 a.m
Christian science Society, O as do
Civic Center Building
Sunday 11:30 am First A Third Wed-
nesday 7:30 p.m.
Sundav School 10:15
Morning Prayer ........... 8:45 am
Holy Eucharist and Sermon 740 am
Church School ............. 340 p.m.
Solemn Evensong ......... '%M n m
Woman's Auxiliary. 2nd Moriojaya,
Order of St Vincent Acolito Guild,
Tuesdays.
Vestry Meeting 2nd Thursdays.
Holy Communion, 7 ajn. Thursday,
Evensong 7:30 p.m. ,
Morning Prayer. 9 ajn. Friday. Choir
Rehearsals 8 p.m.
RIO ABAJO
St. Christopher's Church,
1 St., Parnur Lefevre
Rov. Antonio Ochea 8.
Phone Pedro Miguel 4-338
Holy Communion.......... 7J0 a.m
Sunday School ............ 10:30
Baptisms, 5 to 6 pjn. 2nd A 4th Sun-
days.
Evening PrayerBible Study p.m ,
1st and 3rd Sundays.
Woman's Auxiliary 2nd A 4th Sundays
1:00 p.m. ^^
Holy Communion, Wednesdays, 7 a.m.
Jewish
Jewish Welfare Hoard, ttidg. iVK-X, La
Boca Road, Balboa. CZ Rabb) Nathan
Wltkin director.
Services on Friday. 1:30 pirai
(Sea also listings ot Jewish sabvtces
under Posts. Bases and Sudona 1
Congregation Kol Shearlta Israel, Ave-
nida Cube and 38th Street, Bella Vista
Panam City. Rabbi Harry A. Merteld
Services on Friday. 8 o.m


ran
Episcopal
m ,riipnqp]i3'
SUM! H.ir-liDI CHURCH
Balboa Heights. C-Z
(27 Ancon Boulevard
Drawer "B" Balboa Heights
Phone Balboa 1727
Testr Church oway (ress home
-eu. a welcome tost as friendly"
William H Booby. Pastas
Sunday School............. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 10:45 cm.
Baptist Training Union .... 8:30 pjn.
Evangelistic Service....... t-m n.m
Prayer Meeting Wednesdays 7:30 am
W.MS Bible Study
Thursdays................... 9 a.m.
Men's Brotherhood
(Last Monday In ment > i.M ojn
,. ATLANTIC BAPTIST CHilRCM
Bolivar Avenue at I2tb Street
Cristobal. CZ
Rov Fred L. Jonas. Pastor
MIRACULOUS MEDAL CHURCH
New Cristobal. 4th. a G St
Pastor. Rev. Vincent Rysn. CM
Sunday Masaos. 7, 9 A 10JO am
Weekday Mass, 8:30 a.m.
Sat.. 8:00 ajn. __
Holy Day Masses, ;00 8:00 ajn.
Confessions. Rosary, nightly 7:00 p.m
Sunday School after the 8 a.m. Mass.
Miraculous Medal Novena services -
Mon 5:00 A 7*0 pjn.
1st Sat Devotion, every 1st Sat after
Mass.
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH
Bolivar Highway, Gatun. CZ.
Pastor. Rev. Francis Lynch, CM
Sunday Mass. 8:00 ajn.
Weekday Masses. Tburs. 8:30 ajn.
Sat 7:00 ajn.
Holy Day Masa. 7:00 a.m.
Miraculous Modal Novena service
Mon. 7:15 p.m.
lot Friday, Confession. Communion,
7:15 pjn.
Confessions Sat. 8:30 A 7:00 p m.
ST. THOMAS' CHURCH
Gatun, Near Locks
Pastor, Rev. Francis Lynch. CM.
Sunday Mass, 8:43 s.m.
Weekday Mssose, Tuso, at Frl. 6:00 ajn.
Holy Day Maes. 40 a.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena service
frl. 7:13 pjn.
Confessions Sat. 7:13 A 8:00 p.m.
lat Sat Devotion, ovary 1st Sat after
Has.
HOLY FAMILY CHURCH
Margarita. CZ.
Pastor, Rev. William J. Finn. CM
Sunday Masaos. 7 JO A 9:30 s.m.
Holy Day Mass. 8:00 ajn.
Miraculous Medal Novena service
Mon. 7:00 pjn.
Instructions (or adults FrL 7:00 p m.
Confessions Sat 4:90, 8:00 A 7:00 to
1:00 pjn.
ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH
Colon. 10th. A Broadway
Pastor. Rev. J. Raymond Maohate. CM.
Assistant. Rev. Robert Vignola, CM
Sunday Masses. 5:45 A 9:00 ajn.
Weekday Mam. 5:45 am.
Holy Day Masses. 5:45 A 8:00 ajn.
1st. Frl. Masses. 3:45 A 8:00 am.
Communion. 840 a.m.
Baptisms Sun., 4:00 p m.
Miraculous Modal Novena services
Wed. at 8:13 A 7KM pro.
Novena of the Sacred Hesrt. Pri. 7:15
om.
Confessions Sal.. 4:00, :00 p.m A
7:4 to 8:00 pro.
Sunday School. 3:00 pjn.
Discussion Club. Young man of Parish
Sun. 340 pjn.
Instructions for adults seeking know-
ledge of the Catholic Church. Man. A
Thurs. at 7:15 p m
1st. Sat Devotion, every 1st Sat sfter
AMI, I../.
THE CATHEDRAL Or S'l LUKE
The Rt. Rev. R. Heber Gooden, Bishop
The Very Rov. Raymond T. terns. Dear
7:30 a.m. Holy Communion
9:3U a.m. Cathedral School.
10:45Morning Prayer and Sermon.
(First Sunday of the month Holy Com-
munion and Sermon.)
7:00 Dm.Evening Prayer ana Sermon
CRISTOBAL, R.P.
CHLKCH OF OUR SAVIOUR
3rd St. near G, Navy
Rev. Milton A Cookson, Pastoi
Holy Communion 7:30 ajn
Church School 9:30 s.m
Morning Prsyer-Sermon 11:00 a.m.
(H.C. first Sunday in the month.)
Young People's Vesper Service 4:3li
o.m.
Wednesdsy. Holy Communion 8:30 p.m
Choir Rehearsal 7:30 ajn.
A House of Prayer for all people
COCOLI
Church ol St Andrew
The Rev Gideon C Montgomery.
Rev. M. A. Cookson. Chap. USNB
Holy Communion 7 JO a.m
Sunday School 9:30 ajn.
Public Worship 10:43 ajn
(H.C. first Sunday In the month.)
Young People's Fellowship 4:00 pjn.
Choir rehearsal Wednesday evenings
it 8:30 pjn. __,
Housd of Praitxvand Fellowship tot oil
oooplo. %^ *
>' COBOHAL
Good Shepherd
The Van. A F. Nightengale
g:00 a.m. Every Fiidsy, Morning Pray-
r.
(H.C 1st Krldov.) i
GAMBOA
St. Simon's Church
Rev. Antonio Ochoa S.
Pedro Miguel 4-338
Holy Communion .......... 10:30 am.
Sunday School............. 3.00 pjn.
Youth Organizations 3:00 A 8:00 p m.
Evening Prayer A Blbble
2nd A 4th Sundsy ........... 7:30 pjn.
Women's Auxiliary ........ 7 JO pjn.
2nd and tin Thursday.
LA BOCA
St Peter's Church
Rov. Lemuel B. Shirley. Priest
g a.m.Holy Communion.
7 a.m.Choral Eucharist and Sermon.
10 ajn.Moraine Prayer and Cburch
School.
5 p.m.Holy Baptism.
7:30 p m.Vespers and Sermon.
Communion Tuesdays and Thursdays,
7 am.. Wednesday* and Fridays 9 ajn.;
Cirl Friendly 8 and 7 p.m. Monday. 8
p.m. Tuesdsy, Vespers nightly at 7, ex-
cept Saturday Compline 7:30 p m
saABOAJUTA
St Margaret's Chapel.
Margarita Hospital.
The Rev. M A. Cookson
Sunday School 9 a.m Evening Prayer
/ 00 pro.
stfcOEEMMt LUTHERAN CHURCH
"The Church or the Lutheran Hour'
H. T. Bernthal. Pastor
830 Balboa Road, Balboa.
Sunday School and Bible Class 9 a.m.
Worship service lOJft ajn., "Coma Thou
With Us and We Will Do Thee Good." A
friendly welcome awaits all visitors. Pol-
luck supper second Sunday each month
JO p.m., game night, fourth Sunday
1:30 p.m. The Service Center, open Wed-
nesday through Sunday, extanda a cor-
dial welcome lo all military personnel
Posts, Bases
And Stations
PACIFIC SilDk
Protestant
TORT AMADOR
Sunday School '................ .. 9:15
Morning Worship ............. .. 10:39
fORT CLAYTON
Sunday School, Bldg. 154 .... .. 9.40
Morning Worship............. FORT KOBBE .. 10:15


ST. VTNCENTS CHURCH
Silver City. CZ.
Pastor. Rev. Raymond Lewis. CM.
Sunday Masses, 5:45 A 849 pjn.
Weekday Maas. 8:00 a.m.
Holy Day Masase. 949 A 8 X a in
Sunday School. 1140 am.
Miraculous Medal Novena sorvleo
Tues.. 7.40 pro.
PALO SECO
Chuck ot The Holy Comfort
The Van. A. P. Nightengale
Evory Mondap 8:30 ajn. Holy Com
couniou-
PARAJSO
Rev. D. A Osborne
:00 a.m. Holy Communion 2nd Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday School.
8JO p.m Evening Prever: 2no end 4th
Sundays.
Monday: J40 p.m. Youth Moating
Wednesday: 8:30 Dm Girls' friendly
Society.
RED 1A.NR
Rev. D.A. Osborne 4k Rev. C A Cragwot!
11:00 sun. Holy Communion and Sor
mon 1st. and 3rd. Sundays.
1140 a.m. Morning Prayei and add-
ress: 2nd. and 4th Sundays.
340 p.m. Sundsy School and Baptism
7 JO p.m. Evening Prayer and address:
2nd. and 4th. Sundays.
PARARA Cm
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH
A. P. Nightengale, b.d. MBX
and The Rev. Rltx Basing Id Atwell
Venerable Archdeacoo
8:00 ajn. Holy Communion 940 ajn
7.49 tun. Evensong and Sermon
CHBISI CHURCH BY-THE-SEA
Colon, R do P.
(Opposite Hotel Woanlngton)
The Rev. Malnert J Peterson
STB. Rector.
SUNDAYS:
a.m Holy Communion.
9 a.m. Choral Eucharist and Sermon.
10 JO ajn. Church School.
7JO Dm. Solemn Evensong A snBsWtB
WEDNESDAYS:
C a.m. Holy Communion.
7:30 pm.,Evensong and Sermon
8 JO om Adult Confirmation Cla
i-HURSDAYS:
I pjn. Prayer Guild.
fRIDATB:
8 p.m Children's Eucharist
7 JO o.m. Chota Practice
SATURDAYS:
10 am. Children's Confirmation Clam.
7 JO om. Complina and Meditation.
_ GATUN
St G see go's
Gatun. CZ.
Rev Solomon N Jacobs
8:48 ajn. Church School.
9:45 ajn. Morning Prayar.
10:00 ajn Holy Eucharist and Sermon
Tuesdays:
7:00 ajn. Holy Communion (Also Holy
Oaya and Saints Days.)
Wednoodsys:
140 pjn Evening Prayar.
848 o.m St Vincent's Guild
140 o.m Cheer Bah serial
rhuredsw
Church of St. Mary The Virgin
Archdeacon Waldock. Priest in Charge
Morning Worship
12th Station Hospital ...........
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Bible School ...................
Morning Worship ...............
Youth Group ...................
Servicomen's Hour..............
U.S. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Morning Worship...............
Protestant Sunday School ......
Coroza I Chapel .....,...........
Catbene
FORT CLAYTON
Daily Mass............ 7:30
Sunday Masses ......8:00, 9:00 A 2:i5
12TH STATION HOSPITAL
Sunday Mass................... 7 SOS
COROZAL CHAPEL
Sunday Mass ................... 10:30
FORT KOBBE
Dally Mass ..................... 7:30
Sunday Menos......... 8:00 A 9:00
U.S. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Sunday Moos ................... 9:30
ALBROOK AIR f ORCE BASE
Dally Moss..................... 4.30
Sunday Masses ..........7:43 A 1:4*
Jawtatt
ALBROOK AIR FORCE BASE
Saturday ....................... 84*
TORT CLAYTON
Saturday ...................... 84*
FORT KOBBB
Thursday ...................... 740
JWB. Balboa. CZ.
Friday ......................... 7J9
ATLANTIC SIDE
Protestant
FORT DAVIS
Protestant Worship Service...... 9:00
FORT GUI4CK
Sunday School ....<............. 9:00
Morning Worship.............. 10:00
COCO SOLO NAVAL STATION
Sunday School........... 930
Protestant Worship Sorvleo ..... 11:11
Cathode
TORT DAVIS
Sunday Macs ................... 10:00
fORT GULICK
Sunday Mass................... 9:00
COCO SOLO
Sunday Mass.................... 9:09
Jowtsb
FORT GULICK
Tuesday ........................ 7:00
Other Churches
And Services
tsAHA'l CENTER
Apartment I Lux Building. 3th Street
Panam Monday: Lectures and Dis-
cussions 940 OJo-
Church at Jasan Christ ot Letter Ua>
Saints (Mermon) Balboa CZ.
Sunday School 9:30 am.
Services 10:30 ajn
At JWB Armed Forcer- Sarvice Center
or La Boci Road
Evening Sorvleo at I p.m. at a placa
of meeting announced at morning ser-
trlca.
CHURCH OF CtUtlbT
0851 Balboa Road. Balboa
W Harland Dllbeck. Evangelist
Telephone 2-9802
SUNDAY SERVICES
Bible Clases tor oU'tges .... 1040 a.m
Preaching and Communion ... 10:45 ajn
Preachine and Communion 740 o m
MIDWEEK SERVICES
Bible Study...... Wadnaaday 7 :uu p m
Ladle' Blbls Class Thursday 1:45 tun
CHURCH OP CHRISTOld Cristobal
SUNDAYS:
We meet in the American Legion Han
In from ot the Clubhouse
Morning Worship 10.45 a.m
Visitors welcome
Ladles Bible Study ot Gatun
Phone Gatun 41* or ft Oullck 309
CURUNDU PROTESTANT
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Chaplain William H Blaii
Sunday School ................ 94
Morning Worship............... 1140
Young People's Sorvleo ......... 5:48
Evening Worship ............... 740
Prayer Meeting Thursday ....... 740
Choir Practico, Wadnesday at
740 om. and Saturday 13) tm
OLD CATHOLIC CHURCH
04. Raphael The Archangel
13th St West No I
Holy Eucharist: Sunday at (JO a.m.
Tuesdays. Wednesday and Ihursdavs
8JO a.m.
Sacrament ot Unction (Healing Ser-
vice) First Sunday of ooch month at
7:30 om
Hanwctn Chrlstlsr. Church
Panama. RP
Rt Rev T James. D D Bishop
offlcisnUng
Morning worship at......
Holy Communion at.......
Fellowship Wc***spo.....
Bible Reading at .........
Divine Service at ........
Sermon al ................
Hoiv Communion at .....
Baloaa-AswdM Bead USO Club
CAPTAIN EAST
To Csn't Win
I LCSLU TUKNQ
VIC FLINT
On Ico
S MICHAEL U'MAIXEl
5HS MAX Tr-H'
wmols iouriiH fLook. tax
KJNOMIA AID
JUcVT OSoTT TMlaV WHO UP>
ANO TWorrvJ WOaUWI OUT WOW.
TO OlsttaOdsa Of HIM
PCAMAMmNTLY.'
Service at 8:18 o.m Sundays



SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1951
ANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEMMDENT DAJLT NWMMB
rAGE nvi
J^acihc Society *{

&, n, BJlo* VI &tU 3521
ROCHE-SHOBE NUPTIALS SOLEMNIZED
IN THE GAMBOA UNION CHURCH -
In the recently completed Gamboa ^L1**
evening, Miss Noralie Roche, daughter of Mr. *ob" .
Roche, of Ancon. and of Mrs. Helen Mae Roche of Locona.
was married ot James William Shobe. son of Mr. and Mrs.
8- ReV/en^^ond A. qra, eUted at the double
ring candlelight ceremony before an altar decorated with
baskets of white MUies and ferns.
A nroeram of nuptial music I era *ere Laura Diaz, Luchila
SSSfjfe C=e!acrwo?enda S?
^.rtonr^a^la^:.
and Raul A. Gasteazoro, Jr..
carried the rings and she
"arras."
Mr. and Mrs. Arango gave a
reception, immediately follow-
ing the ceremony, at their re-
sidence for close friends aad
relatives of the two families.
The young couple have gone
to Miami, Florida for their
Betsy Pittenger, Mrs. Ruth
Daniels, Mrs. Jo Zeese. Miss
Marielena Brassfield, Miss Joan
Powell, Mrs. Reggie Smith, Mrs.
Shirley Derrice, Miss Naomi
Paddock, Mrs. Mary Soby and
Sergeant Pat Halloran, W.A.C.
lolsts.
Escorted to the altar by her
father, the bride wore a gown
of white eyelet embroiflereu
swlss organza styled with a
fitted bodice, peter pan collar,
puffed sleeves and a bouliant
skirt of ballerina length. Her
Juliet cap was made of white
gardenias and she carried a
bouquet of white dahlias. ,
Miss Hazel Griffith was the wedding trip and on their re-
mald of honor. She wore a bal-1 turn will be at home to their
lerlna length gown of blue or-1 friends In El Cangrejo.
aanza and will carry a bouquet--------
of vellw dahlias. Hail and Farewell Party
Mr William cWk was the Held Yesterday at Albrook
best man and the ushers were | The monthly Hail and Fare-
Mr. Richard Shobe, brother of, well coffee party was held in
the main lounge of the Offi-
cers Club at Albrook, A.F.B.
on Friday morning:
Each new member was given
nome \oi iwr. ana ran. /"" corsage of orchids gardenias
Hearn, of Gamboa, follow- an^Orfafnll0tiOns a7 'they were
introduced. The new members
the iioom, and Mr. Andrew
Van cien.
A reception for relatives and
close irlends was held at the
home \ot Mr. and Mrs. Julian
ing the ceremony.
Mrs. Roche, the mother of
the bride, was dressed In rose
beige crepe and wore an or-
chid corsage.
The mother of the groom
was dressed in plaid pastel voile
and wore a corsage of phut
rosebuds.
The newly weds left for a
short wedding trip to the At-
lantic side where they are
Ottingers Honored With
Luncheon
Mr. and Mrs. Roy 8. Mosher
entertained Thursday wlt'# a
luncheon in the Balboa Dining
Room of El Panama Hotel in
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Law-
rence Ottinger of New York.
Also present were the Coun-
selor to the American Embassy,
Mr. Murray M. Wise and Mrs.
Wise and Mr. and Mrs. Rich-
ard Thompson.
Guests At El Panama Hotel
Mr. Brynolf Eng, the Minis-
ter of Sweden to Panama, Co-
lombia and Ecuador, arrived by
plane Thursday from Bogota
and Is a guest at El Panama
Hotel. ^
Mr. J. Pinna, a Brazilian dip-
lomat, arrived Thursday by
plane from Peru and is a guest
at El Panama Hotel.
Be Sure To Bring
Your Knitting...!
Canal Zone Girl Scouts turned
out 40 strong Monday night to
express their willingness to be-
come certified baby sitters under
the tutorship of Mrs. John Mall.
The large number of students
who showed up for the first class,
sponsored by the Girl Scout
Council, has resulted in the next
meeting of the class being moved
to the Balboa Junior College
Building, Room 102, next Mon-
day night.________^^
are Mrs. Lawrence Pearson,
Mrs. Herman Wagner, Mrs. Wil-
son A- Miles, Mrs. James Cas-
selberry, Mrs. Daniel R. Ands-
ley, Mrs. James R. Clcrelli, Mrs.
Zera H. Patterson, Mrs. Bert
P. Lagard. Mrs. Jaime Penne,
and Mrs. Harley Brb.
The departing member, Mrs.
antic Siae- wnere uiey ie Paul Unhfrlnn mM firi>-
6taying at the Washington Ho-, ul Robertson, received a rare
On their return they, will | "^".teases for this occa-
be at home to their friends at
House No. 95-A in New Cris-
tobal.
Miss Rita Arango Becomes
Bride of Mrs. Carlos Sosa
Miss Rita Cecilia Arango,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raul
Arango, became the bride of
Carlos A. Sosa, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Jose A. Sosa, at eight o'-
clock last evening at the Cristo
Rey Church In Vista del Mar.
The Reverend Father Jesus
Serrano officiated at the cere-
mony.
slon were Mrs, Charles Bixel.
Miss Joan Mayforth, and Mrs.
Billie Jones.
Cardozes are Now At Home
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Car-
doze, returned by plane Wed-
nesday from their wedding trip
of two weeks in Jamaica and
Miami, Florida. They are now
at home to their friends In the
Franconia Apartments on Calle
40, Bella Vista. Mrs. Cardoze
is the former Anne Rose Leigh.
boa. No charge will be made
for the classes.
Dance to be Held
At Golf Club
The Panama Golf Club will
hold a dinner dance for mem-
bers and their guests this eve-
ning.
*
Former Residents Visit Here
Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Do-
novan, former residents of
Panama who have spent the
past year in France, England
and the United States, arrived
Thursday aboard the 8. 8.
'Santa Maria" from New York
en route to their home in Lima,
Peru. During the stay of their
ship in port they were the
guests of Captain and Mrs.
Clifford Payne, of Bella Vista.
--------
Miss Heurlematte
With Tea
Miss Cecilia Heurtematte en-
tertained Thursday afternoon
at their residence in Bella Vista
with a tea and card party for
a group of her friends.
1.
2.
3.
4.
I.
KLIMis
KLIM sees vHMet rafrlfrett
KLIM eeeHty Is always umnmtm
KLIM Is eassNeet for ir.wi. fclMrea
KLIM meet a.ar.sha.eat U seeks* aJIsbe*
KLIM is recommended
for infant feeding
Of coun* you want ihe finest, purest and mo
aourithiBK milk for your baby. KLIM give*
you all this and more.
KLIM milk is ALWAYSjure, fully nouriao-
ing aod easier lo digest. That's why it is rec-
ognized by doctors.. preferred by mothers.
Mrs. Brln and Daughters
Return to Panama
The wife of the former Am-
bassador of Panama to Peru.
Mrs. Ernesto Brln, and their
daughters, Mary and Ramona,
returned Thursday from Lima.
Daniels Leave for Santa Clara
Mr. and Mrs. George V. Dan-
iels, of Balboa, left yesterday
for a two weeks vacation to
be spent at their beach cot-
tage in Santa Clara.
Mrs. Abbie de Linares, or-
ganist, played the traditional
wedding marches, and accom-
panied soloist, Mrs. Olga Wil-
son Uance, as she sang Schu-
bert's "Ave" Maria."
Escorted and given in mar-'
rlage by her lather, the bride.,
wore a gown, of white nylon
tulle and lace made on classic
lines and a lace headdress to
which was fastened -a 'doubter
vefl' of illusion. She carried'a
bouquet of white orchids.
The sister of the tide, Miss
Irma Arango, was the maid of
honor and she wore a gown
of blue nylon tulle with which
she carried a bouquet of pink
roses and wore a matching
headdress. '
Bridesmaids were Miss Nlta
Icaza, Miss Maruca Sosa, Miss
Rita Jimenez Miss Clarlta A-
rango and Miss Marcela Estri-
peaut. They each, wore a gown
of white nylon tulle -and car-
ried bouquets of blue hydran-
geas and wore matching head-
dresses.
Mr. Eduardo Stagg was the
best man and those serving as
ushers were Mr. Alfredo Ortl-
lac. Jr., Mr. Manuel J. Cuca-
ln, Mr. Lawrence Maduro, Mr.
Gabriel Jimenez and' Mr. Juan
A. de la Guardia.
The flower girl was Nalr de
la Guardia and the tralnbear-
No-Host Luncheon Held Friday
The ladies of the office of
the Inter-American Geodetic
Survey held their monthly lun-
cheon at the home of Mrs.
Dorothy Beauchamp.
Those present were Mrs.
Betty Fontaine, Mrs. Kay Ful-
ton, Mrs. Lucy Mllley, Mrs.
Mrs. Morgan to Start New
Flower Arrangement Classes
Mrs. M. K. Morgan will be-
gin a new series of flower ar-
rangement classes on Monday,
October 15th. Floral arrange-
ments for the rainy season will
be stressed. The series will last
for seven weeks ending on
December 3rd with a flower
show by members of the class
to which the public will be
Invited.
Registration for either the
9:00 a.m. class or the 7:00 p.m.
class on Monday may be made
by calling the desk information
clerk at the Y.M.C.A. in Bal-
M A RIO LANZA I
HIWIDOLI
-says Time
Magazine I
SMARMJ90
^TECHNICOLOR
iiamoIaNZA-a^BlYTH
KIRSTEN NOVOTNA THMOM
OPENING THURSDAY
LUX & CECILIA
SIMULTANEOUSLY!
7.
t.
KLIM I. safa la the sMcially-P'tkea' tSS
KLIM Is pes ese1 seeer sfriatott e.atr.l
KLIM K MILK
HIST IN rHIFIMNCI TNI WORLD OVER
M MS* pea 0*. I*urin eat. SmiwiI
|7um1
the lipstick that goes where you go... -.
but doesn't tell where you've been

\
,*..'
~y

v
\
/
AYEIFA5T..
"J
\
by HARRIET HLBBARD AYER
Won't lesve lip-prints ... won't dry...
won't smear! Ayertast is s wonderfully
different kind of indelible lipstick. A
completely new ingredient makes it non-
irritating, non-drying... leepe lips moist,
bright, inviting. Nine luscious shades.

AGENCIAS ADOLFO SAMUDIO
55 PERU AVE. TEL.: 3-1286


(Be aioveue.
than

Svr (Before! \ ___I
It' easy! Let us analyze
your hair and your make-
up to see that you're doing
complete justice to your
looks!
SEE OUR EXPERTS
Balboa 3677
Armed Services
YMCA Beauty Salon
(VMCA Bids.) Balboa
NOTICE
All Members of the Congregation Kol Shearith Israel
are hereby notified that an EXTRAORDINARY GEN-
ERAL MEETING will be held at the Community Hall
on Tuesday, October 16th, 1951 at 8:00 p.m. with the
purpose of considering several changes in ihe By-Laws.
RENE DE LIMA, Secretary

Only New ODO-RO-NO
Cream gives you oW
these advantages!
1Slops perspiration quickly
ssfely-
1Banishes odour instantly.
SIts protection last! for one to
ihrit days.
4Dos* net irritate normal skin
use it daily
Absolutely harmless to all fab-
ta.
*Never dries up, never gets gritty
or hardens in the jar ss ordinary
deodorants often do. -'
MUliom f sttitfai uomtn *ir


TAHITI'S
CHALLA

*
mi i
with ANYTHING
offered ANYWHERE
at ANYTIME!
'!" 1.11,1 i ".------ i 'i ii .'i'. .


.rf ATTRESS
WILL REVOLUTIONIZE YOUR IDEA OF
EASE AND COMFORT
Once you sleep on a Dunlopillo mattress, you will
set a new standard of comfort. Even in the hottest
weather, a Dunlopillo mattress will afford you a cool,
luxuriously refreshing sleep. The secret lies in the
millions of tiny air tunnels which breathe with your
every movement and endow the Dunlopillo mattress
with air-conditioned coolness. For comfort, there's
nothing as good as Dunlopillo.

MATTRESSES AND PILLOWS
Complete with handsome Damask Covers




\
Panam Canal Zone*
4" TWIN MATTRESS...................(39"x75"x4">..........
4" DOUBLE MATTRESS ................(54"xJi"x4n)..........
6" TWIN MATTRESS ...................(39"x75"x6")..........
6" DOUBLE MATTRESS
PILLOWS ........
a*\^^ X/D XO laeeeeeeeed
Ctl'SMSIIJIIMillMIMMItll.,, i,,lti.l
$66.80
85.30
90.50
119.45
7.50


$53.45
68.25
72.40
95.55
7.50
Reduced Canal Zone prices given when Free Entry Permit is secured.
L00KCOMPARE

ui,

1
EiquisttV n-diamond
Bridal Ducttc: 2 beau- .
tiiully matching rings-
*"-- $225.-
.
Prism-Lite
Perfection*
.diamond Bridal Set*
A crowning achieve-
ment in amart styling.
Prism-Lite Perfection*
--aiamunu Hnitii
Pair. A brilliant cre-
ation of breath-tak-
ing beauty, Both ..'
COOL
HYGIENIC
SUPREMELY COMFORTABLE
HARDEST WEARING
NO SPRINGS TO BREAK
RESILIENT SUPPORT
ODORLESS
DUST FREE
GERM RESISTING



AGENCIAS W. H. DOEL, S. A.
No. 14 Central Avenue Tel. 2-2766




.

!
Stunning diamond soli-
taire in beautifully sculp-
tured mounting.
ft- $125.-
3-Diamond Enstagement
Ring of rare beauty and
enduring charm.
On
$175,
Ret. Trade Mark
TAHITI
T M f
157 I T 0
I U V t A*?
Buy your ticket lor the monumental raffle of the Lies
Club at Propaganda. S. A.. Ne. t East lsth Street, or freos
any member of the Liens Club.



x

age six
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
-;
SATURDAY. OCTOBER
35
- *#
1
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices


i>:wIS SERVICE
No. 4 Tlvolt Am
Phone 2-TI8I
KIOSKd DE LESSEPS
raraue e> l.emeaa
Panam.
MORRISON'S
No. 4 Fourth of July Ave.
Phone :!' 11
BOTHA < ARLTON
II.05* Melenoet Ave.
Phone 5JColon
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
No. 55 Weal 1Mb Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
No. IT "H" Streetr.,nan
No. 12.171 Central Ave Colon.

sot

Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SALE-Solid mchcgony dining-' Whotever
room. Modern American style.
Reasonable price Apply Mexico
Avenue No. 69, Apt. I. Phone 3-
1509.
FOR SALE: One stondmg radio
w.th pick up. RCA. Cofe Cuba.
. Rio Aboio No 2208.
FOR SALE: Mahogany wardrobe
with drawers. S73.00. Mohcgany
bor. S75.00. Mohogany bookcase
"'$40.00. Soto. $35.00. Two trunks
S20 each one. Bargain prices. Tel
.3-0405. Second Street. Od Golf
He.ghts. ______ ___
FOR SALEComplete let commis-
sary dishes plus extra pieces
Morning Glory Pcttern 9 *
12 figured rug. 0360-A Chagres
Ancon Polboa 3646. ___ I
FOR SALE 2 bamboo chairs. New
pnce. S40.C0 each Call at house
1414-C, afternoon Soturdoy and
Sunday
~Q1 SALE:Mohogony dinmgroom
. table witli 6 chair, water h-oter.
aas rcrg*. Guatemalan rcpe set.
beds, mottresses. chaise lounge
b?:' care, chairs, tables. Reason-
cb!y priced. Colle 51, Roso Mari-
no. Apartment 5.
used car you wont to
buy or sell consult first with
Agencia Cosmos S. A. Automo-
bile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-4721.
Easy terms. Opened all day Sot-
urdoys.
MISCELLANEOUS
*vS?.
bay* drinking
rite Alcoholici
o. 20SI Ancon, C. Z.
reeteeaf
IUICK and CHEVROLET
Price Up From
S67.20 re $194.35
BUT..., lar thii month only
WE WILL CONTINUE TO SELL
OFF FLOOR DELIVERIES
AT THE OLD PRICE!
letter Buy Naw!
SMOOT t> PAREDES
Tour BUICK V CHEVROLET Daalar
FOR SALE:51 Dodge Coupe "Co-
ronet Diplomatic." two tones and
white tires, mileage 3.5C0. For
information Inversiones Generles,
S. A. No. 38. Jos Francisco de
la Osso Avenue.
DANCE Zez Bennett's quintet "All
Star Jozx Combo," now available
for donee dotes. Phone 2-1282,
RESORTS
Gramlich's Santa Clara beach-
cottages. Electric ice boxes, pos
stoves, moderte rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
MOTHERS, for children's weor
Intents to 4 years visit BABY-
LANOIA No. 40. 44th Street.
Bello Vista. Tel. 3-1259.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:1937 Chevrolet Coupe.
New battery. Mechanically perfect.
I54C-B. Balboa, after 6 p. m.
FOR SALE: 1947 4-door Nosh
Ambassador Sedan, excellent con-
FC^ SALEHousehold effects, bom- j dition. All new tires, $1.100.
K-o set; sofo. chairs, end tobies I Phone 5-126.
birrbeo card toble. with choirs
child's chest of drowers. twin bed
f:-'-e<. 2 springs and mattresses
two overstuffed chairs. Bsndix
wo-h'-iq machine. G E. refriqer-
0*3: Tel. Ponomo 3-0562.
PC SALE: New Feather weight
5 naer machine, and other hcuse-
h:ld items. Tel. Bolboo 2918.
Sere
$250.00
Leice cerner with 1.5 lens
inrtead S475.04 lie)
$244.50
Intametleael Jewelry
______ lea;!. It. Hotel r
FOR SALE:Tropical fishes, plonts,
11 Via Espaa, opposite Juan
Franco Stobles. Phone 3-4132.
FOR SALE:Two portable porce-
lain. Laur-div tubs. Drain hoses at-
tached. Forfan Qtrs. 44, 828 -
3745.
nilliei. Oceonside cottages, Santa
Clara. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Ponomo 3-1877. Cristobol 3-1673
MOTIL PANAMERICANO. IL VALLE
Special Rates for this month, rooms
$2.00 per person; children $1.00.
Phone 2-1112 Panama for re-
servations.
Williams Sonto Clora Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms, Frigidoires, Rock-
gas ranges. Bolboo 2-3050.
FOSTER: Cottoges for rent by
day, week or month between Santa
Claro and Rio Halo. Tel. 2-3142
or see core taker.
CASINO SANTA CLARA:Cabins,
food, swimming. No reservations
necessary.
LESSONS
FOR SALE:1947 Ford 4 door se-
dan, in excellent condition with
radio for $850. La Boca Road,
795 XB. Phone Balboa 3296.
FOR SALEGos refrigerator Servel
6 ft., good condition, reol bargain
75.CO 0306, Cable Heights. C
Z. ___________
FOR SALE: We;t nghoute Refri-
gerator. 7 cubic feet, new mo-
tor. Apply hou-e 0582-B. Ancon
FOR SALE
Real Estate
POR SAL or LEASE: Property in
the city of onomo consisting of
'"2.700 squore meters land ond
contrete office and warehouse
buildir-o Principals only. Aparta-
Vo 1293. Ponami.
POR SALEOn account of trip form
in "El Volcan" 3i hectares with
beautiful well built house, furnish-
ed facing future. International
Highway lots of water, wonderful
climate, Bargain. $4.800. See
James W. Thomoson. Amodor Rd.
, House 0836. Bolboo. Tel 2-2986
FOR SALE:1948 Oldsmoblle Fu-
turomic Sedonette series "98"
Hydromatic rodio, new tires, seat
covers undercooted, original own-
er. Best offer. Phone Balboa 2-
3703 or 2-1433.
Early inspection this year, replace
your shattered gloss by our new
expert Mr. De Leon. Tropical Mo-
tors.
FOR SALE:Sound Proyector Re-
vere 16 mm. (list erke $325.00)
for only $255.00.
INTERNATIONAL JEWELRY INC
(adjoining International Hotel)
FOR SALE:A piece Ration Living-
room set. Call Gulick 88-506.
Quarters 127-B.
FOR SALE: GE Record plover 25
cycle, 78 RPM, Sunbeam Mix-
master with attachments. 794-X-
B. Tovernillo St.
FOR SALEFour Green Porch Shades
8 ond 9 foot. $5.00 each or 4
for $16.00. Also Framed lattice
work for Basement including lock-
ing doors. $20.00. Coll 2-3446.
FOR SALE:1941 Ford De Luxe
Coupe with 42 engine completely
overhauled. New radiator, battery,
water pumps, clutch, brakes duel
Manifold with twin corbo, 2 new
tires and 3 good, new paint ond
good upholstery, undercoated. spot-
light and radio. $450.00 os is.
Phone 88-658.
FOR SALEBoraain Brond new 1936
Ford V8 motor 85 HP. Con be
seen at the Larrinoga, Chorrera.
FOR SALE:1950 Studebaker Re-
gal eD Luxe. 4 Door Sedan, per-
fect condition. $1.800. Boiboa
291 S.
FOR SALE:Speaker cabinet with
G. E. ond Permoffux 12" speak-
ers plus single horn tweeter.
Crossman Air Pistol. Baby Scales.
Baby Bbthinette. Records. Curun-
du 2113-A, Tel. 83-7282.
Learn to play modern piano. Guaran-
teed instruction. Bennett's Piano
Studio. Phcno 2-1282.
FOR RENT
Apartment*
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnisheo^unfurnbhext _
ment. Contact office No. 806. lOrh
St. New aistoboL Phone 1386 Co-
lon.
FOR REFIT:One small two
opartment. Mariano Arosemeno No.
54.
FOR RENT:Two bedroom opart-
ment with garage. Recently cons-
tructed "D" Street El Cangrejo
near Hotel El Ponami. Tel. 2-
0313.
DON'T STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL.
VERTAGREEN
3-VVfty Plant Pood
is cheaper than water
foi it
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
179 Central At*. .Tel. 3-0140
altar* agBJ .. .
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
H.t.i B Paaasai
Wants to bay Stocks from
Panam Forest Product*.
Preferred or Common.
Tela. 3-471, S-MM
MODERN FURNITURE
cuaroM built
Slipcover upholstery
tout oca mow-boom:
Aloerto aioroa
ML
14*
* Posh-ear
to 7:e p.m.
MAYOR JOBS D. BAZAN of Coln meets officer* of the Cristbal Cadet Battalion T*n t
right are Cadet Lt.-Colonel Talmadge Baiter, Battalion Commander; mU Nanev"'
Sponsor of "F" Company: Mayor Bazn; MlssJeanlne Nix, Sponsor of "E'
Mlas Jacquie Boyle. Battalion Sponsor.
Ramsey,
Company; and
Red Feather' Leaders Analyze
Needs of Each Chest' Agency
FOR SALE:Boby carriage and car
bed seat combinotion. Both for
$10. 474-C, Second St., Coco
Help Wanted
00.
FOP SALE:Santo Cloro. 5 room
cement cottaae fully furnished, on _A -.,-'
2 lets 130 Ft bv 250 Ft. with r
srroll buildirq in back of proper-
ty suitable for Maid or Handy
man. severol voung fruit trees,
beoutifully landscaped and fenced,
electricity ond water. Tel 2-2612
Or Box 934. Ancon.
FOR SALE:Family car 1946 Hud-
scn Commodore. 4 door sedan low
mileage, economical, excellent con-
dition, priced low, terms. Phone
Albrook 4100 after 1600.
WANTED: Moid to cook, wosh.
ond house cleaning. Do not op-
ply without references. House 10-
063 in back on Roosevelt, between
10th and 11th Sts. Zeimetz. Co-
lon.
WANTED: Cook-housekeeper to
live in. Apply Saturday or Sundoy.
Peru Avenue 89.
FOR RENT:Unfurnished he bed
room upiat tmeiit very cool, set
view. Uruguay Street No. 2.
FOR RENT: Furnished opoitrnant
2 bedrooms. Cano! Zone govern-
ment inspected, nee* Curundu
$65. Avenida) Jos de Ffaregn No.
16, Pasadena, tier reto family.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT:
nice
No. 49.
Fumaabed room in
4th O .Jury Ave.
FOR RENT
Houses
40 Studeboker $200.-
2C68-B, Curundu.
HELP WANTED:Housekeeper, cook
to core for two children.
FOR SALE
^lorcvclV
FOR SALE:Cheop! Lowson motor
' sccoter. Just overhouled. First $50
00 takes it. 261 -B. Gotun.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE 45 foot mohogany
double, planked shrimp, boot, no
engines, could be converted to
sport fishing boat. Phone Diablo
' 2-2367.
FOR SALE:19 fcot leunrh in good
condition. Ford V8 motor In per-
fect condition. S500.00. Call 3-
1268 or 3-1417.
FOR SALE:Buick Super Convert-
ible 1949 excellent condition,
with long ond short wave radio.
$1.650.00 cash only. 52nd Street
No. 8 aportment 1,8 a. m. to
4 p. m.
Second
180.
St. Coeoli,
474-C
Telephone 4-
U
R S

our
t
iconomical lunjl"!
SUNDAY
SrECIAL LUNCHEON
Fruit Supreme au Kirsch
or Antlpasto
Philadelphia Pepper Pot
or Consomm Etolle
Chop Suey a ('Oriental.. .UN
Whole Fried Baby Corbina 1.50
Steamed Rice
Fresh Oreen Beans
Salad Coconut Delight
Coffee Tea Beer
COCKTAIL^
Emy SUNDAY
II s.m. to 2 p.m.
25*
S E D C A
with
NEW CAR PERFORMANCE
All Types ead Medals end
many ethers
1951 Chevrolet
1950 Feed
1950 Studebaker
1950 Ply mouth Can vert Me
1949 Mercery
1949 Studebeker Convertate
1949 Feed
194* Chevrolet
1949 Linala
1949 Beick
1947 Ford
1947 Packard
1947 OWimabile
1947 Paatiac .
1946 Chrysler
1940 Buick
AH Cert Recanditieaied ond lew
aricad.
'30 Day Guarantee
Small D" n Payment fir Eery Terms
COLPAH MOTORS
Heme Of The Sett Used Car*
FORD MERCURY LINCOLN
On AoHo.se lie Rew
Tel. 2-1033 2-1036
WANTED:Housekeeper and cook
good solory. Apply house 0582-B,
Ancon, on Sundoy 8 to 10 a. m.
WANTED
Automobiles
WANTED: To buy 1940 or 41
Ford or Chevrolet ear or pick-up.
Coll Army 83-7162.
Am. Societv Meeting
To Be Held Tuesday
The Board of Directors of the
American Society will hold a bus-
iness meeting Tuesday at 7:10
p.m at the Panama Golf Club.
Suggestions of the members
will be heard aa to the better-
ment of the organisation. Re-
freshments will be served.
Members who have not yet paid
their dues for 1991 are asked to
please fot ward theae to the
Treasurer, Box 154B, Panam,
without further delay. Or hand
them to the treasurer at the
meeting.
SPECIAL
25 CYCLE
MOTORS
Sears, Roebuck and
Company has a limit-
ted number of heavy
duty, single phase,
General Electric and
Leland Electric
Brands, 1425 RPM
Motors, suitable for
Power Tools, Shop,
etc
1/3 Horse Power $35.00
1/4 $25.00
Orders mutt be placed
through our offices.
AN FOR RENT:Cello Visto, fully fur-
nished houso: trasto bedrooms,
meed's quarters, oarooe. large en-
closed yard. Attractive, newly
painted. Co.I 43 No. 54. T.le-
3-3176 or 2-0980.
FOR RENT: Furnished concrete
chalet, one bedroom, oil modem
improvements end focilit.es. in
Arroijen. 6 1-2 miles to Navy
Bose, sign ot driveway. Johnson,
Radio Programs
Vour Community Station
HOG-840
Where 100.000 Peeele Meet
Presents
Saterday, Oct. IS
3:30McLeans Program
3:45 Musical Interlude
4:00Lei's Dance
4:30What's Your Favorite
00Ouest8tar
6:ISMasterworks from Franc*
(RDF)
44American Folk Songs
7:0Cray Parts Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sporta Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00 Newsreel USA- (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Battle Report
:00 Radio University (VOA)
: 15at amp Club (VOA>
1:30Radio Amateur Program
(VOA)
t:4fSporta and Tune of Day
(VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
11:30The BOO Hit Parade
11:00The Owl's Neat
1:60 a.m.Sign Off
Wanrpf, Position
WANTED:Cook ond housekeeper.
Must sleep in. Call Bolboo 2441
3 to 5 Sundoy.
Competent cook-housekeeper desires
position with refined fomily or ba-
chelors. Is willing to travel. Please
write S. F. P. O. Box 129 Cristo-
bal.
Position Offered
WANTED: Experienced American
beouty operator. Apply person-
ally YMCA Beouty Shop.
WANTED:Off fee clerk with know-
ledge English end Seonish short-
hand. Columbia Pictures 7092,
Justo Arosemena, between 7th 6
8th. Sts. Colon. -
WANTED
Miscellaneous
Across from Ancn Pest Office
Tenth ft Melender Col
WANTEDFour bedroom house with
Borden. Telephone 3-4668, Sotur-
doy. Sundoy or after 5 p. m.
APARTMENT wonted immediately,
furnished, modern 2 bedroom In
good residential section. Phone Mr.
Schultx. Hotel El Ponami.
FARMER, foreigner, experience poul-
try management, vegetable and
fruit cultivation, wants farm to
rent or share basic, if possible
later purchase. Preferoble Pro-
vince of Panama or El Voile. Letter
with description ond conditions,
send Lewis Service. Ponomo.
faplanatien of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish B r o a d c a s 11 ng
Corp.
RDFRadlodlffusion Francalse
FOR RENT y
MiHrrllaneon*
FOR RENT:Office Spoce < 1.300
Sq. Ft. I available October 15
Ground floor, corner Estudiante &
H Street. Telephone 2-1941, for
appointment.
Sends, Oct. 14
8:00Sign On Musical Inter-
lude
8:15Newsreel U.S.A. (VOA)
8:30Hymns o All churches
9:00BIBLE AUDITORIUM OF
THE AIR
9:15Good Neighbor!
9:30London Studio Concerts
(BBC)
10:00 In the tempo of Jazz
10:30Your American Music
11:00National Lottery (ftmoot
and Paredes)
11:15The Sacred Heart Pro-
gram
11:30Meet the Band
12:00 In vitatlon to Learning
(VOA)
FJL
13:80Salt Lake Tabernacle
Choir
1:00The Jo Stafford Show
1:18American Chralas
1:30Rev. Albert Steer
3:00Opera and Symphony
Hour
4:30What's Your Favorite
7:00Opera Concert
7:00American Round table
7:30Story of the Christian
Church
7:45Radio Varieties U.S.A.
8:00Sporta Roundup and Haws
(VOA)
8:18Report from Congress
(VOA)
8:30Almanac from America
(VOA)
8:00United Nations Review
(VOA)
9:30The Sing Crosby Show
(VOA)
10:00American Symphony
11:00Sign Off______________
A BIGHT OUT
MILWAUKEE (UP.) The
teacher couldn't believe it When
the youngsters said on the first
day of school that his name waa
Oooey." "Oooey?" she quiaaed.
"Are you sure that isn't your
nickname?" "Nope,'' replied the
voungater. "It's Oooey!" Later
the teacher called the por*a
nother, who replied: "Oh. it's
Oooey, all right. It's spelled
Before setting the goals for
member agencies as detailed
in The Panama American yester-
day the Community Chest
Committee weighed carefully the
current needs and missions of
the organisations the public is
asked to support.
A detailed analysis follows, as
released by the cheat:
ARMED FORCES SERVICE
CBNTERS-USO These organi-
sations are directed, in their USO
activities, toward the armed
forces personnel. In rendering
such services, however, they also
Erovide facilities and services for
e civilian population of the Ca-
nal Zone inasmuch aa one of the
first purposes of these organiza-
tions la to bring the military and
the civilian together for the so-
cial benefit of the military. All
of these organisations are affil-
iated with the USO-Unlted De-
fense Fund with funds channell-
ed to them through parent head-
quarters. The funds derived
from continental United States
sources are insufficient to sup-
port their complete programs
and the local Community Cheat
supplements their funds from
the local campaign. The Canal
Zone Community Chest cannot
provide the whole of the balance,
and the USOs raise the difference
through gift, other income or
headquarter sources-
The USO organizations, as a
whole, present particularly com-
plete services to the armed forc-
es personnel and the programs
directed to them are apparently
energetic and diversified. Thty
offer such services as: movies,
dances, tours, games, magazine
or library facilities and concerts.
Educational services such as
Spanish and English language
classes, classes in ceramics, radio
code and theory, oil painting and
flower arrangement are also
provided. In addition, services
are extended to on-post enter-
tainment and dock-aide enter-
tainment for visiting military
ships and transports; visits to
hospitals and some outside serv-
ices to military personnel are
free: some carry small fees. The
YMCA's also operate lodging
services, gift and restaurant ser-
vices; and maintain athletic
programs.
BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
The funds allocated to the Boy
Scouts are for use at council le-
vel. The budget submitted cov-
ered such items as office expens-
es, supplies, leadership training,
publicity, awards; and the main-
tenance and operation of camp
El Volcan. Thla camp is on a site
some distance from Balboa and
at present not too large a portion
of the scout membership can
take advantage of the many f a-
clUtles there. The camp is, for
the scouts, a necessity; though,
regret ably. maintenance costs are
high. The committee believes
that the quota of $3,000.00 should
suffice for the coming year.
GIRL SCOUTS OF AMERICA
This organisation presented a
rather tight budget. The Girl
Scouts of America has assumed
the responsibility of the Inter-
national Oirl Scouts of the Ca-
nal Zone for the coming year.
and will assist in organising and
launching that organisation. 313
local rate Oirl Scouts will be re-
gistered by October 1. 1951. The
committee understands that the
Panama Canal cannot provide a
director for an Independent In-
ternational Oirl Scout group for
perhaps two years and that this
will necessitate the International
Eup remaining under the Oirl
uts of America sponsorship
for that time. The quota of $3.-
800.00 is recommended at thla
time to provide for both organl-
itions.
INTERNATIONAL BOY
SCOUTS With one exception,
the items presented on the bud-
get of this organization were felt
to be Justified. This one item was
an amount of approximately
6275.00 to 8300.00 to be placed fci
a fund.towards the purchase of
a camp site. Worthy as such a
project la, the committee, regre-
fully, eliminated this item from
the budget of 62.025.00 Inasmuch
as community chest funds are
for operational purposes of the
activity and not for capital ex-
Kenditares. The following is quo-
id from Bulletin No. 155. Com-
munity Chests and Councils of
America; "In budgeting, as in all
other phases of Community Chest
operation, policies are not hand-
ed down from on high, but are
worked out locally as each com-
munity ttta fit. However. 30
years of Community Chest expe-
rience have developed certain
generally accepted principles, a-
mong which are the following:
1. The annual budget which the
budget committee approves usu-
ally covers only funds for current
operating expenditures. However,
minor repairs and normal re-
placement of equipment are In-
cluded." Paragraph 3 of the same
bulletin says "Capital funds.
The agency Itself geenrally Is re-
sponsible for raising funds for
capital purposes such as new
buildings or capital improve-
ments.'' The committee recom-
mends a quota of $1,750.00 for
this agency.
SALVATION ARMY This
organization maintains perman-
ent activities in five Canal Zone
towns rendering character build-
ing, social and charitable serv-
ices to the Canal Zone primarily
among the local rate groups. It
does a large amount of charita-
ble work, distributing according
to its funds, food and clothing,
and in some cases of necessity,
small amounts of money. Its ed-
ucational program Includes
teaching home manageme n t,
child care and crafts-. It main-
tains three nursery schools for
pre-school age children of work
mothers. It provides house visi-
tation and counselling services
also. The committee recommends
a quota ot $4,500.00,
COROZAL HOSPITAL This
agency has been successively
over-subscribed in the past and
the committee recommends a
quota of 61,000.00 as requested.
CIVIC COUNCILS The Pe-
dro Miguel Civic Council is In-
cluded for the first time as a
member council participating In
the Community Chest and 6250.00
has been allocated to each of the
five councils as a minimum
amount.
The Budget Committee inter-
-}uatjdj oi jo eoo paa|A
tlves of each of the activities in
order to permit them to acquaint
the committee fully as to the ser-
vices they render to the commu-
nity and to Justify their request
for funds. These representatives
were questioned at length and
invited to submit any material,
oral or written, that they desired.
o*
The Executive Committee ap-
proved the quotas as established.
Lmcoby on mpe^
BT OSWALD JJACOBY
Written for NEA Service
L
NORTH l
AK1087
WJ
? 888
? AQ84
EAST
?52 ft64
? S2 /AKQloe
? KS871 OAQ104
1083 d>J5
SOUTH (D)
ftAQJSB
174
? J :.,.?
t eK782
Boih aides vuL
Wee* North
Pass Pass
Paos lev
Pass jga
Pass
1*
34
Pass
sa
Paso
Opening leadW j
SCRAMBLE TWO
BROCKTON, Mass. (UP.) A
prlse-winnlng bantam pullet
caused a stir among poultry men
at Brockton Fair by laying two
eggs at one tim. The poultry
building superintendent. A. J.
Bolado, said it was only the sec-
ond "double laying" be had beard
of In 35 years.
"'Please write something withJ
eriqg about my partner," request
Teader. "I've been married tol
him for 30 years, but he never
listens to me.
"H* was East on this hand.
I ve been telling him for about
as long as I can remember not
to open fourth hand unless he
can see game in the hand. He
Insists on opening mediocre
hands and Just laughs when they
old and make a game against
him.
"They made four spades this
me, or'course. South lost two
hearts and one diamond and
chuckled ilke an idiot. My hus-
band laughed with him, like a
bigger idiot, can you say some-
thing to show him the error of
his way?"
If I said anything. It would be
"Three cheers for trie husband!"
A man who can laugh at misfor-
tune is a philosopher; and If he
also chuckled at an angry wife
he's a hero.
I suspect that my correspond-
ent is just spoofing me to see how
much I'll say about men having
to stick together. Forgetting a-
bout that side of it, there's the
bridge point to think about. Is It
wise or unwise to open the East
hand in fourth position?
Every good player that I know
would open that East hand.
When you have a hand as good
as that you expect to make a
profit. Why give up that profit by
passing the hand out?
East has no way of knowing
how the rest of the strength is
distributedexcept that nobody
has enough for an opening bid.
Suppose his partner has the
South hand: East can then make
four hearts. Suppose, his partn-
er has the North hand: East then
has a good play for three no-
trump. If those changes were
made, the bidding would still
begin with three passes. How is
East supposed to know?
Twenty years ago some good
bridge players advised you to
pass fourth hand unless you bad
a really fine hand. We've learn-
ed a few things In 20 years; and
nobody believes that particular
theory any more.
So, my dear lady, don't scold
Sour husband at the bridge table.
[aybe he's right after all.
r<
WANTED
Four Kardex cabinets
of 16 drawers
i
Call Panam 2-0860 extension 18


WHv
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEN
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
SWNin no UlilllllC > TMt Mil AM CHICAN iNC.
fWNND *V NIUON OUNHVILL IN III*
HAOMODIO ARIAS. roi.O"
67 H amin I O Son i4 '> n or P
TrilPMON 'I1IMI NO 2 0T40 ff LiNf* '
Cl 00r "ANAMCOICAN. WN1
SOLON OFFICk '2 179 CiNTRAI Av>NUI CTWCCN l?TM NC UlM ilHtlT
FOAII8I. I1*SNTTIVS JOSHUA K.WIM. INC
S4B Mniio AvK. N(W voK. 117' N V
" *.**! HAIL
A MONTH. IN ""--T '0 1.10
MONTH* IN ""- *0 IS O0
O ON VIA*. IN *"" SO 14 00
MAN* ABOUT TOWN
Judge Crater* wife (bored waiting 2 years for his return)
ad her new groom have parted. The 8. Renicks (of the tracks)
have the Blues awful.. .The John Carridines (actress Soni Sorel)
played a maaad scene in O'wlch Village, wihth ended in recon-
ciliation instead of murder___The Sailing Buruch, jrs.. whose
splituation isn't news, are in a new hassle. Over the Root of All
Evil... Bob Schuy ler, the candy heir,. is why Patrice Munsel Is
tardy for her Met rehearsals... The Horace Dodge-Gregg Sher-
wood bustup was over a U. of Chicago undergmd. Barbara Stan
wyck meeting ex-husband Robert Taylor in Vurrop for a return
match?...Tom Neal (Mrs. Tone's recent friend) has a new uh-
huhnev, Yvonne Rlvero... Billy Van, featured dancer of "Dia-
mond Lil." lost his job for losing his head and kicking the star
In the youknowhero
Salute to U. 8. Senator Herbert Lehman fur Insisting on W.
Averell HarHman-s "Inside Story of Yalta" goi.nB into the Cong.
Record, Aug. 27th.. .This is the official report (by the President's
.special emissary* of our wartime relations with Russia... It de-
bunks forever the myth that F. D. R. sold us .ut... The reprint
from the Cong. Record is significantly marked- "Not printed at
gov't expense".. Write Sen. Lehman for your free copy.
Paulette Goddard and London actress Nancy Ethane are
meowing at each other over Erich Remarque who must be in
stitches.. Brian Donievy and Pamela Duncan are melting ice-
bergs___Elizabeth Taylor's mater is depressed because Michael
Wilding (whose wife won't divorce him) keeps phoning Lis.. .The
Jonker Diamond (biggest of all) will be sold soon for a million by
H.Winston. A gov't is involved Gloria Green has retained bar-
risters far an action against a madcap Interior decorator. Alleges
he beat her up. She has the black orb and blue bruises for "evi-
dence"... Don't trv kissing your wife in the Statler foyer. They
throw you oat .. Baseball Trade winds: Einer to Phllly for Walt-
kns and Roberts?
Nancy Kelly and tv actor W. Klnsella were Little Clubbing
when Cy Howard, one of her old flames, took the adjacent table
(he means next and hogged her ears. Wei.ll y'shoulda heard
her escort's lungs...T. Neal's lawyer says Tom will "accept only
leading roles.".. .Scndra Ward (who was to wpd Mickey Rooney)
keeps showing up at Armando's mit anudder Mickey. Last-tag
Jelke...H. Taylor, listed as "heir" to a Pittsburgh coal fortune,
stage-adores tevvy 2 ayem Virginia Poe, the brunetchlng in the
Iceland revue... Mrs. Harrison Williams dwel:s on Capri and he
teptes here. Big Understanding. No divorce Motor car mfrs
expect still another price raise by Spring.. .Will Truman run a-
gsin? He's taking lessons on how to appear before vaudlences.
i.
The Colyum urges you to read "Watch out for Cancer Frauds"
on page 4 of the new Look. Then thank the aathor and editors
for publishing it and saving yon money... We are especially hap-
py because it confirms every word we've yelled bout these ghouls
.. The Driiaan. Inc., of New York get it good. too. What mad*
the expose tougher for this eolyum was that Detroit's Lorettamary
Gibson wore the garb of a nun (which she never was) while
mulcting gnillible donors.. .These are the rats who "took you" and
your ioHr- bi"s rl the niaIN "i fight cncer" while hitch-hiking
onto the Kunyon Fund's publicity., .Next Stop Alcatraz.
Jack ("Top Banana") Donohue's real love 1* Basha Regis, who
ulnas in the snow... J. Sterling told chums his secret bride (for 1
months) Is show gel Eleanor Bently.. .Nose-candy sleuths are
nmortlng W. 8Mid> Street' again because some pusheM are nuts
enough to return there peddling the stuff.. Stock-broker Roger
Vaafelais and his social wife (after a long estrangement) have
cached agreement for the divorce. His pals report he will next
wed model Pert Dlxon.. The Gaien Draks are imaging again.
Godfreys music ollot (Arch Bleyer and Bethe Douglas are in
r.Ermov. Mrs. Bleyer walked long ago ..It's a girl doll for the
Dr G. H. Bandes at Polyclinie.. Add Alibi C!nb memos: Johnny
Jelke and Betsy Stiner. teh, ten.. Velma SmPh (social resistente
who took gas and died) was once wealthy. Tcld friends she quit
her Job as dance-school instructress) because she got tired of
being pinched by middle-aged bores.
Music Corp. of America has a mystery. A long-time female
employee (in the foreign dept.) disappeared eight months ago
justlikethat. The Runyon Fund was enriched by about S5.0M. Ed
I.oewv. the textile man. gave SLOOo for a Giant box and $75 for
some'Yanks pewa.. Fannie Ward, stage star of yesteryear, reporta
a "find." A youth who thrushes in 4 octaves. He's Jack Small, the
lad vou see with her along The Midnight Circuit.. .Real estate*
Buntv Lawrence and WAC Lt. Winnie Price blend next month in
Hawaii.. Communist chief Eugene Dennis, working aa a florist at
the Atlanta Federal pen, picked up poison ivy...Underworld chatter
savs the Moretti murder was done by Imports from the midwest
and howjadoo, Mr. Grand Jury.
The Sir Alexander Korda-Orson Welles fed can be heard aU
the way from Yurrop. Their raplertee at a party almost got to
the socklng-stage ..Next month the new Yes tissues will be on
the market. Deadens cold germs so" they won t contaminate the
air An electronic system (corresponding to tape recording for
radi) will soon revolutionize the teevy blfby doing away with
kinescopes and possibly film. Records both sight and sound\..
Despite the Series competlsh Josephine Baker opened to a packed
Row house.. The Allan Mclnoahs (Jeanne Hoffman only femme
sports writer) will b 5 about Nov. 1st... Ezsard Charles cabt
shake the blues since losing his title.__________________________
Labor INews
And
Oimmeiit
By Victor Riesel
fHIb l TOllS ORUM THI RtADIR* OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
, s. M..I toa i oa os ** '* e tU aaaoio A*orkaa
Lett. ... ..;..< .r.t.Mly .* or* hooOHto **> eoafloooho'
mann'i
It *cu COM.**!. Mta> doiit b. .m.at,..! 1 MM) lb*
at a*. UlNn at* ybl.)itd m h* ores* rOcaWed.
Pteatt try lo >* Hi* lortara limit** to ont MS' l*t"
Identity *t lttri wnUn .1 hM In ttilct*t confidtne.
Tab n.wip.M" *" taaoiHlll re. rt.tm*H H*
niid la letton rreo raaoara.
Do you recall any case where
a dog betrayed his master for a
handful of Inedible coins?
DOGDOM BITES BACK
Balboa, panal Zone
Mail Box Editor:
I nan a dog.
Lately. I have been aware of
some unkind remarks in your
Mall Box about my. kind. This is
a poor reward for the valuable
service we have rendered our
masters, their children and even
our country.
It seems that some of our hab-
its are objectionable to you hu-
mans. -Did it over occur to you
that some of your habits might
be equally objectionable to us?
Well, they are. However, our in-
grained sense of loyalty prevent-
ed us from openly criticising your
tortures, your greed, your selfish-
ness and your inhuman cruelties
even toward one another.
Have vou ever heard of a mr>- -
her of Dopd-om giving vo Ms
rightful bone to another r"o- for'
the purpose of curris; f-vor1
and promoting himself to a bet- I
ter position in the pack?
I believe the answer Is negative
In either case. The same cannot
be said of humans.
In conclusion, we of Dogdom.
consider ourselves superior to
some of you humans who even
now are embarked on a death
struggle which will ultimately
erase you from the face of the
earth because in your crash greed
you neglected to Justly consider
the rights of others. Including
us.
Perhaps, then, we shall have
peace because you. like the stu-
pid dodo, will have ignomlnously
departed.
0
Not wishing to suffer reprisals
I shall not paw my true name but
ather that of my former milita-
ry unit where, if I do bark it. I
srved with honor (unknown to
most of you) and distinction.
(pawed) K-t
WASHINGTON Mr. Repub-
lican wants to be Mr. President
Within a week, with his usual
candor, he will say so and thus
become the first political lead-
er to declare himself a candi-
date.
Even aa this Is being written,
the senior Senator from Ohio,
Robert A. Taft, is completing
his plans and his statement
calling for the O.OJ*. nomina-
tion for the presidency of the
. S.
By doing so. he will defy the
most powerful coalition of labor
leaders ever to band together
against a political leader.
But behind the big oak doors
of his private office. Mr. Taft
has told his colleagues he be-
lieves he, not the labor lead-
ers, will carry the labor vote.
The Senator hjts indicated
that much, of his. decision
to campaign openly for the
presidency now is based on
the labor reports from his
tico field strategists. They
have just told him that in
their travels over SO.000
miles in 40 states they
found "areat strength" in
rank-and-lile labor circles,
for his candidacy.
This report came from Taft's
two most intimate lieutenants.
Ben Tate of Cincinnati and
David Ingalls of Cleveland, both
of whom, of course, have found
their travels well publicized
.inee thev. began sounding out
Taft sentiment last December.
Thev backnd their statements
up with a pile of "several hun-
did" telegrams from labor neo-
ple. all of which, lt has ben
said, will be disclosed as the
camoaira rolls on. .
They revealed that the Labor
League for Taft has begun
reaching out of Ohio for na-
tional coverage.
Then reported that, even
in labor circles where the
Senator was a bitterly con-
troversial and unpopular
personality, there was the
feeling that Sen. Taft was
a sporting winner, who,
without rancor, had sat
down with several national
labor chiefs to discuss aid-
ing them in Congress
but never once threw at
them the fact that thev had
campaigned againxt him in
Ohio last year as their Pub-
lic Enemy Number One..
Taft's travelling team told
theSansjtor, ajwmfl'l'her.tnlnis
that they believe the Taft-Hart-
ley law is a dead Issue that
manv workers feel the unions
have gained membership, mo-
re* and strength during the
vear the law has been on the
books that labor has used lt
more than the. em "lover.*: that
it hs been the biff stick in
shaking the left-wing loose
from the CIO: and. Ironically
that it was the extreme left in
the Ho'lvwood s+rike *ome years
back which first exploited the
loiW
There vou have the over-all
strategy for the tactical assavlt
on the labor leaders who will
opDose Mr. Taft.
These are the things he will
gav as he matches his ffctory
gate campaigns against Presi-
dent Truman's whistle stop
technique. ......
The Senator will go rlam in-
to the olanU and stump the
heart of the country's tense
and concentrated industrial
sectors.
He will hit the TV lanes to
get Into the working class liv-
ing rooms as h pnneal* for
labor votes over the hads of
the AFL and CIO high com-
mnr).
While there wl'l he T->'.t sn-
norters In the A"T.. the CIO
leaders will be relentless.
. TT"ke their tactic tn the
Ohio Senatorie.l cornoal-n when
Mr. Taft singled them out as
the soerhead of labor opposi-
tion fo him r>d thev avoid-
ed retorting to his charges lest
thv mn>e it a oersoril fend
h-tween Teft a"<* the CIO'* Po-
litic*! Aet'or Commtftee lead-
er. ja;k K'oH CTO strate-nr
th's ver will be to hit him with
everything th*y have.
There is rtsantment in-
side ClO over the AFVs
subtle, bt't. rertai^l" obrfnti*.
nei'tlme-t. thntH'O is a po-
iiticrl linb'Htv. This serU-
mrit was there during the
Ohio labor camiaion to
dump Taft from th* Senate
las' year so the CO *i-
dom spoke for if v ally throvnh the joint
Jnbor committee. No more,
then snv From now on thev
tal" Taft on rte.rsonaH'i
and have in the past few
weeks.
As reveled In aorld speeches
during all rer*nt CIO regional
oorleys. the CIO line will be to
label him an enemv of the
working man by tying him up
with the "big money interests."
The Senator believes his oer-
sonal anoeareneea at the plant
ga**s will offset these charges
fo. aopa'entlv. there'll he a
hot time in man" a factory
or neat "er if the Senator
', nominated.
(Copytght ItSl. Pom-Hall
Syndicate. Inc.)
HOME STUDY VIA TVAmong the first to use television for home study college courses is Rich-
ard W. Wallen. associate professor of psychology at Western Reserve University, Cleveland, O. The
telecourse offers full credit toward a degree. After the first broadcast, the college switchboard
was ao overloaded with calls that extra operators had to be assigned. Here Professor Wsllen do- i
scribes an equation used to measure human traits as the TV floor manager at right signals "Two
minutes to go," *
*
Harrying The Foe
By BOB RUARK

NEW YORK.I should certainly never hint
that our President has become unbalanced by
*he rigorous demands of his office, but he's been
acting mighty durn peculiar for the last Couple
of years.
All of us are testier than we used to be. though,
and I guess a President has % right to get crank-
ier than anybody else.
In past months since his re-election, he has
lived from quarter to quarter with his foot al-
most perpetually in mouth.
His firing of Gen. MacArlhur was as dumb a
deed, politically, as any executive has ever com-
mittednot so much for the removal of Mac-
Arthur as for the sneaky, sulky way MacArthur
got the can.
He had to back down hard on his petty crack
about the Marines, and spent the next week apo-
logizing.
His attitude in favor of friends, such as the
enterprising Mr. Willie Boyle and that bumbling
clown, Harry Vaughan, has been the pugnacious-
ly unintelligent action of the fraternity brother
covering for another.
His blind allegiance to Dear. Acbeson as State
Department head and many of his appointments
to high and vital office make it easy to under-
stand why he was somewhat inept in the necktie
business.
What eally set me back and I suppose I
could qualify for the title of 8. O. B. for saying
so, since the President made the term immortal
in reference to newspaper peoplewas the vari-
ous letters he dashed off.
H penned one almost unbelievably childish
scrawl to Bernle Baruch, and another so violent
to Frank Kent of the Baltimore Sun that Frank
graciously sent it bank to him, embarrassed to
have it In his possession.
Of course, the masterpiece was his tirade In
personal-letter lorm to the Washington news-
paperman who had the temerity to hint that
daughter Margaret did not have vocal chords to
equal Adelina Patti's.
In this masterpiece of Juvenility, I recall he
threatened_to kick the critic In the groin, a ra-
ther un-Presidentlal approach to a problem,
when other and more serious problems confront
him,
His latest piece of wondemaking has been his
effort to muzzle the press, and then his awkward
attempt to back out from under when people
started shooting at him.
The incoherence of his press conference was
almost marvelous in its bewildered double-talk-
ing, issue-dodging lneptness.
Harry had another hot potato on his hands
and got lost trying ot get rid of lt.
Mr. Truman does not contlde his hopes and
fears Into my shell-pink ears, but I would rather
Imagine that he set up his original hue and cry
for government censorship io take some of the
heat off the hearings that have been showing his
boon political buddies in rather baleful shades.
No true pro politician likes an honest press,
because an honest press does not forever praise,
cover up or distort. It occa.ionally comes up
with an unpleasant truth. .
Truman has no reason to* like the newspaper
business, because it has been busily engaged in
pointing up the imperfections of a man and a
regime that compares favorahiy to the reeking
reign of Warren G. Harding.
There have been lots of rascals round Mr.
TTuman, and he has largely refused to cast them
out.
Harry was a meek and rather pathetic little
fellow before he rabbled-rou&ed his way Into of-
fice. I have seen him publicly on the verge of
tears as he attempted to alibi the errors of his
office.
But since he drove uphill to become the he-
coon of his party, instead of its chief liability
great personality changes have been made, and
great arrogance assumed.
His hatred now of the American press seems
almost psychopatic in its intensity.
It* almost as if he blamec! us.for the defec-
tions of his associates, the incompetence, the
scandals, (he food freeze-mliik-coat-RFC odors
that emanate constantly from around the throne.
We cannot be held responsible for the quality
of Margaret's high C.'nor the thieving instincts
of some of Harry's friends, nor the incompetence
of his associates.
We may only eomment, on the offchance some
of the rascality may be driver, into the open and
amputated from the body politic.

Matter Of Fact

By JOSEPH ALSOP
. THE BIG POTATOES

WASHINGTONIn the RFC-Bill Boyle-Lithof-
old Investigations. Congress has been rootmg for
peanuts as usual, while Ignoring the giant Idaho
potatoes. __f
RFC loans are small stuff in the business-
politics-government game.
The big stakes are government decisions
often obscure decisions wfcich transform the
profit pictures of whole industries, and cost or
save the American people quite literally billions
of dollars.
This reporter has been conducting a neces-
sarily somewhat string-halted private inquiry
into what has been happening to the big stakes
in the Truman administration.
The fairly hair-raising results are typified by
the story of how the Federal Power Commis-
sion has been quietly captured by the lnaustriea
lt is supposed to regulate.
If any one man can claim to be the general
of the long fight to take over the Power Com-
mission, with as Immense authority over el-
ectric power and natural a >. that man is Sen-
ator Robert 8. Kerr of Oklaiioma.
Senator Kerr, a pious man who teaches Sun-
day school, Is said to have made his first big
step upwards on life's ladder fty getting permis-
sion lor the Phillips Petroloum Company to
drill oil wells on tne lawn ot the Oklahoma
state captol.
From this promising beginning, he has never
looked back, becoming many times a million-
aire, the owner of vast oil and gas properties of
his own, his state's governor, them Its Senator,
and the close crony of the l-resldent ot the U-
nited States.
Senator Kerr's not wholly disinterested aim
was to relieve the natural gas industry of Fed-
eral Power Commission rate-making.
When he began his long fight, back in 1845,
he had one allyex-Dartmouth Professor Nel-
son Lee Smith, named to the commission as a
progressive Republican in 1941. who had Joined
the industry side almost as soon as he was ap-
pointed.
Smith and Kerr no doubt found a link in
Smith's friend and New Hampshire neighbor,
Ross Gamble, who represents the Texas East-
ern Gas and Transmission Commission Com-
pany in the Washington lobbies.
While still Governor, Kerr scored his first
triumph, persuading President Truman to give
a vacant place on tne commission to the bleary
Harrington Wimberly, manager of a Kerr pol-
itical campaign.
Then another place on the commission open-
ed, and Kerr got that one for another friend
of his. Burton Balling, who used to be known
around the commission as "the gas lobbyist."
Bailing. Wlmberlv and Smith briefly added
up to a Power Commission majority.
But the incorruptible and determined Com-
mission Chairman. Leland Olds, organized pro-
test deputations to the White House, and Pre-
sident Truman recalled Bailing's nomination
from the Senate before he could be confirmed.
The temporary setback did not discourage
Senator Kerr.
Old's term as Power Commission chairman
expired, and his nomination had to be ap-
proved.
VKerr, now transferred to the Senate's larger
sphere, organized an Intense attack on Olds
as a sinister Socialist, offering in evidence the
more foolish utterances indulged in by Olds
as a very young, excessively Idealistic Congre-
gational minister.
Outraged by the threat to free enterprise,
the Senate rejected Olds.
Meanhwlle the Oklahoma Senator also of-
fered the Kerr Bill, giving the natural gas
producers legal protection against Power Com-
mission rate-making. *
initially, the Kerr Bill was supported by the
Senate majority leader, and was authoritative-
ly said to have White House approval.
Unfortunately. Senator Paul Douglas of Il-
linois stirred up an inconvenient row on behalf
of the gas consumers in great urban centers,
whose gas prices were about to be inflated.
The President then sent the Kerr Bill back
to the 8enate with a pious veto, but added,
as an after-thought, the nomination of his
poker-crony, former Governor Mon C Wall-
gren of Washington, to succeed Olds on the
Power Commission.
Wallgren is a poorer than average member
of the Fair Deal's Elks bar set.
His record is dubious, his intellect feeble;
and in his background loom such peculiar
character as the West Coast fishmonger-ty-
coon, Nick Bex, and the Seattle big operator.
Saul Haas.
The Senate, which had been unable to sto-
mach Olds, and had found Wallgren too sec-
ond rate for the National Security Resources
Board, now confirmed Wallgren for the Power
Commission with alacrity and delight.
According to report. 8enator Douglas re-
marked that it was like hiring a nurse to
murder the baby."
At any rate, Wallgren gave Kerr what he
wanted, control of the Power Commission.
In a case started bv Kerr's old friends, the
Phillips Petroleum Company, the Wallgrentzed
commission immediately reversed itself, bris-
kly enacting the vetoed Kerr bill bv simple
administrative ruling.
What the President may have thought of
the curious, spectacle of his own veto being
over-ridden by his own appointee, history does
not record. Presumably he was consoled by the
large profits promised by the Bhilllps case rul-
ing to Senator Korr and all the other gas
producers.
The manv tens, even hundreds of millions
of profits for the owners of natural gas prop-
erty are also added costs, of course, for the
ordinary citizen-gas consumer.
But the story does not end there, bv any
means. The stakes in this Power Commission
struggle are really almost incalculable, as will
be shown in a further report.
cfceWiY W4SHIH0TON
MERRYGO-ROUND
If DM W PtAISON
Drew Pearson says: George Allen predicts Ike will run;
Censorship is necessary to protect U.S. secrets; Sen.
Nixon deserves credit for San Francisco tax probe, j
WASHINGTONGeorge Allen, the former White House
Jester, is now about the closest man to general Eisenhower.
It was Allen who acted as liaison between Truman and
Eisenhower to make sure Ike didn't get into the race as a De*
mocrat In 1948.
Today, Allen, though a Mississippi Democrat, says that Uro
is sure to run as a Republican.
Talking to a friend recently. Allen predicted:
"What Ike will do will be exactly what Roosevelt did at
Chicago in 1832. He'll hop on a plane and fly straight to the
convention."
"How's he going to ply from Paris to Chicago when he
under orders from his Commander-in-Chief to do a job in Pa-
ns?" asked the friend.
, ,. "Don't be foolish." shot back the former White House jester,
what a the Commander-in-chief going to do about it?"
CENSORSHIP
Inside fact about the President's long press conference lecture
about protecting U. 8. secrets was that his immediate advisor*
didnt want him to make lt. They knew public reaction *would
be bad.
However, the Defense Department. Central Intelligence and
others in charge of military secrete urged the Prsident not only
to issue his censorship ordei but back it upin part to keen
the n-llitarv from setting U. S. policy.
Time after time, high generals or admirals have barged in
on civilian policy or disclosed secerts which caused serious
damage.
Most important was the release of the Smythe report on
atomic energy by General Leslie Groves.
A few hours after the report was sent to several thousand
newspapers, horrified scientists protested to the Army that the
report contained vital secrete by which an astute scientist
could piece together the know-how for making the,A-bomb.
Hurriedly. Groves demanded that the report be recalled
"That," replied a member of his staff, "would be like
trying to put an egg- back into a chicken."
Newsmen, not being technicians, had no way of knowing
the significance of the 8mythe report's complicated wording
Another military boner which played into Moscow's hand
was the statement by General' Orvil Anderson, commander of
the Air War College at Montgomery, Ala., that the United States
wanted a preventatlve war.
It was necessary for the Air Force to relieve Gen. Anderson
in order to demonstrate this was not our real foreign policy
NOTE w On Mr. Truman's desk this summer was one
of our newest secret weapons, a guided missile. Proudly ho
Demonstrated it to many callers, told about its accuracy against
enemy planes. No restriction of secrecy was placed upon those
with whom he talked.
INCOME TAX PROBE
Alert Senator Richard Nixon of California had a lot to do,
backstage. wRh the cleanup of the income tax mess in 8an
Francisco.
Some time ago he received letters from those close to the
Federal Grand Jury which was trying to investigate the long-
rumored Internal Revenue scandal but which was suddenly
called off by U. S. Judge Lewis E. Goodman.
At that time, young assistant U. 8. Attorney Charles O'Gara
was endeavoring to present evidence of Income tax Irregularities
to the Grand Jury.
But suddenly the probe was stopped by Judge Goodman,
who, incidentally, had been appointed to the bench on the re-
commendation of ex-8enator Sheridan Downey.
Collector of Internal Revenue Smvihe. now under investiga-
tion, was Downey's campaign manager.
To remedy the situation. Senator Nixon introduced a bill
which. If passed, will permit Grand Juries to hire counsel of
their own and dig into a smelly situationregardless of whether
the U. 8. Attorney or the judge gives the green light.
Nixon also phoned the Justice Department in Washington
to inquire about voung O'Gara. the assistant U. 8. Attorney:
who waa pushing the tax probe.
"He's a psycopath." was the reply. j .
- In the end. however, O'Gara won out.
_, He was brought to Washington as a witness before Senator
Williams Income Tax Committee, while, many of the tax col-
lectors in San Francisco he was gunning for have now been
removed.
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
Ex-Secretary qf War Robert Patterson has notified the Sen-
ate Judiciary Committee that he has withdrawn his endorsement
of Miss Frieda Hennock to be a U.S. Judge. Since Patterson once
sat on the US. Court of Appeals, his word counts heavily with
the Senators. He informed them that when he originally endors-
ed Miss Hehnock. he had not realized all the facts now brought
out by the New York Bar Association.
Free hams, TV sets. etc. can certainly get people Into trouble
these days. In fairness to Commander John Paul Floyd, however,
the $200 silver set being given him by members of the Civilian
Orientation Conference was a surprise. Floyd didn't know it wa
coming. ...
Ex-Senator Tydings of Maryland has now sold his prize pigs,
including "the Shamrock," once Illinois grand champion Hamp-
shire bottr:
Some of the boys around the White Houte are really sore at
Stuart Symington, new head of the RFC. In sweeping out RFC
closets "Stew" has let the chips fall where they may even if
they hit Democrats.
For the first time. Senate spectators who once cheered Mc-
Carthy have begun to titter.
Justice Stanley Reed is not resigning from the Supreme Court.
His health Is now excellent, despite reports to the contrary by a
Broadway columnist.
Justice Hugo Black is still playing three sets of tennis daily,
aftei which he rolls his own court
MAIL BAG
E.P.A., Hollywood After careful checking. I am convinced
that there.was nothing irregular about Constance Bennett's trips
to Europe on Air Force planes. While it is true that her husband.
Col. Theorn Coulter, has been stationed in Germany, the four
trips she took to Germany is the past three years were all order*
ed bv Special. Services .which, arranges USO entertainment.
One was March 28, 1949 when she flew to Germany with th*
cact of "Over 21."
Another was May 27. 1949 when she flew to Frankfurt with
"John Loves Mary." .-
Another trip was Dec. 14, 1949, with her travel orders signes!
by Col. E. W. Duncan of Special Services; and the last trip was
June 13. I960.' to Weisbaden with a group of USO entertainers.
Twice, however, she paid her own way home from Europe on
commercial planes.
G. K., San Francisco Jiggs Donohue. now mayor" of the
District of Columbia and the man who prosecuted Harry Bridges,
nays tribute to Robert McMillan, chief assistam U.S. Attorney in
San Francisco, as a great public servant and an important help
in securing the Bridges conviciton.
NOTHING IS REALLY LOST ...UNLESS
A Panama American
classified ad
cant find it!
Every month every week every day
THE PANAMA AMERICAN carries MORE CLASSIFIED
ADS than all other daily papers in Panam combined!




u
FC
r

Sr'T.



\
PAGE EIGHT
"
i
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NIW8FA
SATURDAY. OCTOBER 13, 1S51
baseball To Go On Congressional Carpet Monday
*>V. ~~ ~~ "."
pe DiMaggio, Phil Rizzuto
f9Fo Be Called As Witnesses
n
will <>
WASHINGTON. Oct. 13 (IT).Professional baseball
the congressional carpet ajain next Monday.
A House sub-Committee will resume hearings to determine
whether baseball should be exempt from anti-trust laws. Officials
from the bush leagues to the majors and players, including Joe
DIMaffio and Phil Rizzuto of the World Champion New York
Yankees, are expected to testify.
The committee probably will continue looking into the con-
tsovenlal reserve clause and the Pacific Coast League's demand
-Tvr major league status. Those points were discussed last sum-
mer
The major leagues have taken a step to head off a possible
anti-trust suit involving the broadcasting and televising of
games. Four days ago. the owners repealed a rule which stopped
major league games from going into a minor league city when
Hn> minor league club played at home.
Investigations have indicated the committee will reject a
,*woposal by Senator Edwin Johnson of Colorado to exempt base
ball and other organized sports form the anti-trust laws. John-
-dmlts he doubts the legality of the reesrve clause which
<)laver to a team for life once he signs a contract.
.-. sue problem of makfrrr the Pacific Coast Circuit a major
"league Is a touchy one. Minv owners claim the time isn't right
"for a third major league. But Subcommittee Chairman Emanuel
..Oiler of New York predicts eventually there will be four major
"lea-rues.
Margarita Sports
MARGARITA VOLLEYBALL
Faculty Upsets 761 AAA;
Margarita Still On Top
STANDINGS
rcarita I
TEAM
TEAMS
Margarita...... 9
7M AAA........ 7'
Cristobal........ 7
Coco Solo...... 1
Faculty....... 1
Shore Battalion .. I
Won Lost Pet.

2

S
I
9
1.000
.778
.778
.333
.111
5wtn ad
Join'"-
?. The
Russian Football Is Rougher Than
'American Brand, Says Norwegian
, (EDITOR'S NOTE: Herslem
Walnum. staff writer for Arbeid-
rrbladet of Oslo, one of Norway's
J*adinr newspapers, is in Knox-
jflle, Term., for a study Of TVA
Joatallation.v He witnessed Ten-
nessee's 26-S victory over Dk.
eeinr American-style football
played for the first time, t'
following story was prepared for
NEA, the Knowille >vs-Senti-
nel and hb own paper.)
? oOo
T By HERSLEM WALNUM
* NEA Special Correspondent
' KNOXVILLE. Term.. Oct. 13.
(NEA) If I not have had mv
8wedish friend. All Holmbenr,
Trith me on my first American
football game. I wouldn't have
understood anvthln? that was
going on at the field.
To me It looked like the play-
ers were running around more
or less without any nlans. Some-
Smes I saw that they had the
ill with them, but usually it was
.'komeone else carrying the ball
; ot-er than I had thought.
* It was also surprising to me to
', tee the players In the huddle
wi'h their heads close together.
,. First I thought one of them
',")iad lost his trousers and the rest
.were standing around to protect
; ,pim from the crowd while be
. was putting on a new pair. But
;; then I understood later on that
they were discussing how to car-
ry on with the game.
I heard before that American
football is tough and I also saw
that it could be tough, perhaps
a little more than I had been
told. In that way. it looks very
much like our ice hockey.
In mv country we can some-
times hear Russian broadcasts
translated Into Norwegian of
their football games, and the an-
nouncer said that Americans play
football so as to make tough sol-
diers of their young ones.
I have seen the Russian dyna-
mos playing in my country lust
after the war was over, and they
played much rougher ball than
what I snw here.
I think it would take much
time before Norwegians could un-
derftanH the game well enough
to t>Iv it.
If the Tennessee Vols had not
executed their plays so well. I
think I would not have known
who won the game.
STYLISH SOBRIQUET
Durham. N.C. (NEA) Ace
Parker, who starred In the back-
field at Duke* and as a profes-
sional and now is his alma ma-
ter's backfield coach, uses his
nickname In preference to bis
real one, Clarence.
The opening match at the
Margarita Gymnasium Wednes-
day evenir.t proved a distinct
setback for the strong 784th team
when they dropped the last game
of the matoh to a hustling Fac-
ulty aggregation. Since standings
are based oo the total number of
games won rather tnan on the
number of matches won. even
the top teams cannot afford to
lose any of Mie three games com-
prising the match.
In the first game the 764th
trampled the Faculty, 15-3. In the
second game the Faculty improv-
ed with the score at 18-6. In the
hard played tlnal game, however,
the Faculty battled It out to a
17-15 victory.
The second match between
Cristobal and the Shore Batta-
lion of Fort Davis went to Cris-
tobal. 15-6. 15-9. 15-8, Although
Cristobal took all three games,
each of them was strongly con-
tested by the engineers.
Margarita retained first place
In the league by defeating Coco
Solo three '-'ames straight, 15-2.
15-6. 15-8. The Navy team Is im-
proving steadily in their spiking
and team ing some if the top teams a run
for -their money before too long.
Next Wednesday'* Games
6:30Margarita vs. 764 AAA.
7:30Coco Solo vs. Cristobal.
8:38Faculty vs. Shore Batta-
lion.
Large Field To Participate
In Amador Scotch Foursome
The first game listed, between
the league leading Margarita
team and the 764th AAA may be
one of the outstanding matches
of the season. The public is in-
vited to attend any arid all games
at the Maroarita Ojrlnnaslum ev-
ery Wednesday night at the times
listed above No admission is
charged.
The Margarita Gymnasium is
your gymnasium. Enjoy it.
SCOTC H FOl RSOME TOURNEY
(SUNDAY, OCT. 14)
Mrs. Nancy Brown, jadies' tour-
nament chairman, and the assis-
tant pro, Cud Hammond, have
made all arrangements for Sun-
day's Scotch Foursome Tourna-
ment at the Amador Golf Club.
The pair'ngs are listed below:
(No. 1 Tee)
12:00Nancy Brown, R. M.
Thiel, Clara Walters Maj. Wal-
ters.
12:05Ruth Lincoln, Lt. Leh-
man, Pat Williams, Lt. Col. Wil-
liams.
12:10Bcv. Dllfer, Col. Dohley,
Bart Ellch, Ruth Ellch.
12:15Millie Hammond, Maj.
Halllgan. Mis. Hillebrand, Lt. Col.
Hlllebrand.
12:20Peggy Falk. Col. Nuss-
baum, Mrs. Davidson. Mr.Meth-
eney.
12:25AUda Lehman, Capt.
Essen, Coni'le Thompson, Lieut.
Thompson.
12:30Alice French, Fred Hun-
sicker, Pauline Klevan, Maj. Kle-
van.
12:35 QMce Dehlinger, Bruce
Carpenter, Dot Gordon,. Capt.
Gordon.
12:40 EHen Kenna. Col. Le-
Clalr, Mollv Vandergrift, Major
Donovan.
12:45Doris Hamilton, Bill
Hinkle. G'au Morris, Comdr.
Holcombe.
12:50 Eileen DeLuca. Mr. Pe-
rantie, Doris Donovan, Col. Le-
land.
12:55Sheila Shriek, Col. Os-
senfort, Alice Deems. Perc Gra-
ham.
13:00Sylvia Carpenter, Mr.
Hause. Capt. Eason, Mrs. Eason.
13:05Ruth Lei and, Col.
Brown, Mary Thiel, Comdr. Ftoh-
' 13:10Kay Withers. Col. With-
ers. Mrs. Klnts, Col. Klntz.
13:15Mrs. Holcombe, Mr. Ty-
rell Jane Simpson. Capt. Jones.
(No. lt Tea)
12:00Eloise Monroe, Archie
French, Mtz. Sawyer, Lt. Sawyer.
12:05Marge Jones, Maj.
Walsh, Connie Gerrans, Pat Mo-
ran. '
12:10Ethel Perantle, Maj.
Waters, Mr.. Foulds. Maj. Foulds.
12.15Bea Tyrell, Col. Shreck.
Mrs. Johnston. Dr. Gerrans.
12:20Lucille Essen, Col.
Grebe. Jo Donley, Lt. Col. A. Dow.
12:25Rebecca Peacher, Capt.
Peacher, B. Hewitt, Col. Hewitt.
12:30Vie Ossenfort. S. Grls-
wold. Bobble Grebe, Geo. Dilfer.
12:35Rayna Anderson, Lt.
Col. DeLuca, W. Walters, Col.
Bidwell.
12:40V. Prince, L. Prince, Do-
die Dow, Capt. Jones.
12:45Mrs. Jorgenson, Sam
Jorgenson, Betty Jones. Jim Des-
Londes.
12:50Mrs. Fisher, Capt. Jones,
Erna Hause, L. Fleming.
12:55Connie Bishop, Charlie
Vandergrift, Lee Munden, Cecil
Munden.
13:00Mrs. G. A. Reynolds, C.
R. Howe'l. Mrs. C. R. Bowell, O.
A. Reynolds.
TWILIGHT OF A GREAT. CAREERThe lengthening shadows at home plate symbolize-the dusk of
a magnificent career, that of Joe DiMaggio, who joined the Yankees in 1936. DiMaggio has been wi
the New York Americans ever since, except for three years spent in the Army. Still an imprei
figure at bat and in center field at 36, this could be DiMag's last World Series. It is his 10th. which .
Babe Ruth's record. The catcher is Wes Westrum of the Giants, the umpire, Jo* Paparella, (NEA)
On The Alleys...

TOO MANY FODJTS
University, Miss. (NEA -i
Queried concerning the Kentuc-
ky-Tennessee Tech game, QV
Miss line coach Bruiser Kinard,
who scouted the fracas, when
asked to rate the Wildcats said:
"Too many points." The score
was Kentucky 72, Tennessee Tech

I *
I
>
THE CHASE
NATIONAL BANK
OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
STATEMENT OF CONDITION, SEPTEMBER 30. 1951
RESOURCES
Cash and Due from Bank
s .
U. Governmcpt Obligations
State and Municipal Securities
Other Securities ....
Mortgages
Loans.
Accrued Interest Receivable .
Customers' Acceptance Liability
Banking Houses .....
Other Assets ......
$1,378,828,483.85
1,199,967,856.09
255,997393.36
\ 266,859,704.24
52,686,035.09
1,953,537,210.05
10,976,998.16
23,176,02979
28,391,794.22
3,988,734.69
$57174,410,239.54
LIABILITIES
Deposits................$4,747,263338,58
Dividend Payable November 1, 1951.......
Reserves Taxes and Expenses.......,
Other Liabilities.............
Acceptances Outstanding..........
Less: In Portfolio............
Capital Funds:
Capital Stock.......$111,000,000.00
17 480 000 Sharaa-lli Par i
Surplus.........189,000,000.00
Undivided Profits...... 59,198,225.74
2,960,000.00
24,677,613.26
15,398,603.84
26,978,212.61
2^65,754.49
5
'
.
359,198,225.74
$5,174,410,239.54
OnltoS Statat Covnun oubllr am tm dux-It. and tar other ninwr a. .,.r*d ot oarmlttad to law
Fuerxa y Lu Keglers Hold Lead
In Major League Bowline;
Stempel, 74 1st Follow
The Gashousers from the Fuer-
za y uz held their own in the
Major League bowling tourna-
ment last 1 uesaay evening at the
Diablo Hei&hLs bowling alleys
when they defeated the Boyd
Brothers team for three points of
four while the Max R. Stempel
team was a'so losing one to An-
gelina which protected the one-
point lead of the powermen in
the fifth week of play.
The powerhousers won the first
two games, the first by a score of
903 to 803. -nd the second by 913
to 797, but dropped the third
game by a score of 853 to 844.
Fuerza y Luz had a total of 2680
for pintail, compared to 2453 for
the inaurancemen from Boyds.
For the winners, Howard En-
gelke had 2:6.215 and a low third
Same of 157 for a total of 598 for
igh man. followed by Thomas
with 588 and Stephens with 534.
Neither A'len or Norria hit 500.
For the losing Boyd Brothers
bowlers, Lulu Zebrock had 530,
Crecelius 526. and Melanson 507,
while neither Dailey or Schneid-
er hit 500.
In the meantime, the Max R.
Stempel team won the first game
from AngeUnl by a acore of 883
to 822, but dropped the second
though scoring higher. Angelini
won the second game by a score
of 935 to 911 when Andrews and
Bates hit over 200 each. The
Stem pe leer,- came back in the
third game however, with a score
of 964 to 8<5, and also took pin-
fall by a score of 2185 to 2602.
Bud Balcer was high for the
winners with 169, 201 and 232 for
602. followed by Blljy Coffey with
569. MarabeUa with 561, Yar-
brough with 531 and Wllber with
505. For the Liquormen from An-
gelini, Harry Klumpp was high
with 550, fallowed by Andrews
with 532, Bates with 529 and Jen-
ner with 531. Ray Walker had a
poor night and wound up with
but 467.
The 1951 jhamplon H. I. Homa
team took but one point from the
7461st AU Signal team, winning
the first game by a score of 894
to 830. The 7461st took the second
by a score of 934 to 865. and the
third by 90S to 853 The 7461st
scored a total of 287? to 2612 for
Homa to take the fourth point
for pin fa 11.
For the fumy unit, 8am Made-
line was high with 184, 205 and
203 for 592, followed by Saylon
with 551. Cooley with 522, Hudak
with 522 and Nelp with 491. while,
for the Homa team, Fllebark was
high with 211 170 and 183 for
565. followed by Sartori with 553.
Best with 548. Neither Fronheiser
or Payne hit 500.

Humberto Robinson To Start
Game Against Cartagenalndios
In the final match of the eve-
ning, the Local 595, NFFE took
three points from Almacenes
Martinz. The Local 595 took the
first game by a score of 921 to
793, but the Martinz boys came
back to take the second by a
score of 895 to 799, and then
dropped the third by a score of
869 to 821. local 595 also scored
the extra point for pinfall by a
score of 2589 to 2509.
For the winners, Eady was high
with 564, followed by Nolan with
550, and Kelsey with 614, while
neither MuCarragher or Oleich-
man, who has taken Dillon's spot
as relief man, hit 500. For the
losers, Owesne hit 629, followed
by A. Damin with 516, J. Damin
with 509. and Presho with 505.
Burrell had a poor night and had
451.
The standings of the teams af-
ter the play:
TEAMS Won Lost
13 7
Max R. Stempel & Son 12 8
7461st AU Signal .... 12 8
10 10
Boyd Bros., Inc..... 9 11,
Local 595. NFFE .... 9 11
Angelini.......... 8 13
Martins.......... 7 13
The ten n'ghest averages of the league after the play were as fol-
lows: a


3Best...... .. 184- 7
4 Saylon........ ., 184- 6
5Stephens...... 6Madeline..... 183- 3
183- 6
7Andrews...... 181-10
8 Thomas...... 179- 7
9Filebarlr...... 178- 5
10Wilber....... 177-10
Bum Coif Instead
Of Grid Practice
Kept Harder Tough
DETROIT Oct. 13 (NEA) AU
you have to do to stay in condi-
tion for football Is play a duf-
fer's brand of golfthat's one
professionals opinion, anyway.
Pat Harder, who was a hold-
out from his Cardinal contract
before being traded to the Lions,
says the fact he missed pre-sea-
son practice doesn't mean a
thing.
"My golf kept me In shape."
the big fullback confides. "I
don't play the fairway. The
rough, the gullies, through ditch-,
es and woods takes strenuous
walking. My scores aren't so bot,
but my legs are in great condi-
tion."
Little leaguers Wanted For 52
This year was the first time Little League baseball waa
played oa the Canal Zone. Nearly everybody knows how pop-
ular It became In the two months *t active ptay.
In order for the Leayne officials to formulate plans fot
next year and to afford every eligible boy an opportunity
to play Little Leabue ball, It Is requested that each boy
interested fill out and mail the Little League Application
Form shown on this page to Mr. I. 8. Watson. Player-Agent.
Box 1. Balboa. C. 7... no later than October IS. 1951. Any
boy who will attain his 8th but not bis ltth birthday before
August 1, 1953, and who Is enrolled in any V. S. Bate school
from Gambos South is eligible to apply.
NAME
ADDRESS
...
DATE OF BIRTH
SCHOOL .........
PARENTS' NAME
Please print or type
Humberto Robinson, a star
with the Cristobal Mottas last
Sear and one of the top hurlers
i the Canadian League this sea-
son, will be the opening pitcher
for Stanford Graham's Panama
Stars Wednesday night at the
National Stadium when the local
lads tackle the "Los Indios" team
of Cartagena.
Leon Reliman, the best local
catcher, will be behind the plate.
Reliman and Archie Brathwaite
returned from Mexico last night
after helping Veracruz cop the
Mexican League pennant. Brath-
waite, wbo drove in the game-
winning run In the deciding con-
test of the championship will al-
so be in the lineup for tbe Pan-
ama team.
The Indios finished second In
this year's Colombian League be-
hind the "Hita" team which was
managed by Gil Garrido. The
one-time star lafielder will be in
charge of the visitors.
The Indies yesterday opened
their series against the Nicara-
AU-Stars .with a -1 victory,
will wind up their Mana-
gua series with tingle games
against the same team today and
tomorrow. Tuesday the Indios
will arrive in Panam to begin
theb- three-game series bere
Wednesday night.
Among the playera on the In-
a A
7
dios roster are Petacas Rodri-
guez, Fantasma Cavadlas, Chita
Miranda, Armando Crirsn, Pipa
Bustos, Tetelito Vargas, Papi
Vargas, Andrs "Venao" Flores,
Quique Hernndez, Cipriano Her-
rera and Antonio Noel.
Hernndez bested the great
Conrado Marrero, 1-0, last year
when the Havana Cubans visited
Cartagena.
The Panam team's opening
lineup Wednesday will be as fol-
lowsHumberto Arthurs, rf; Al-
onso Brathwaite, 2b; Archie
Brathwaite, if; Clyde Parrls, 3b;
Frank Austin, ss; Leon Kellman,
e; Harold Gordon, lb: Pepe Oso-
rio, cf, and H. Robinson, p.
SHORTS
COLUMBUS, OhioA key man
In the Ohio Htate backfieldBer-
nle Skvarka may miss today's
game with Wisconsin be-
cause of a charley horse. Buck-
eye Coach Woody Hayes says he
may use Fred Bruney In Sfcvar-
ka's place:
CHAMPAIGN, Illinois Coach
Ray Eliot of Illinois says he won't
use quarteroack Tom O'Connell
against Syracuse today "unless
absolutely necessary."
O'Connell suffered a bruised
heel against Wisconsin last week.
Football Schedule
FRIDAY SCORES
By United Press
Fordham 35,
Boston College 19
George Washington 38,
Virginia Tech 13.
Temple 47.
Albright 6.
Citadel 41,
Newberry 7.
South Carolina State 21
Clark 13.
Villanova 41,
Alabama 18.
Stetson 21,
Furman 20.
Miami (Florida) 7,
Purdue 0.
Drake 26, ^
Detroit 6.
Help Your Piles
Don't auttar from painful, ltchln
Pllaa another hour without trying1
Chlnarold. Upon application Chlnaroll
tarta curblus Pile mlaarlai S wan: 1.
Caaos pain and Itching, a Halpo ahrlnk
oro, awollen Ilaauaa. I. Halpa natura
al Irrlutad mombranao anfl allay Pll
Serrouanaa. Aak jour DrussIM M
way
Call for "Black & White" whenever you ask for Scotch
Whisky.
There is no better way of indicating that only the best
will do for you.
Genuine product of famous Scottish distilleries, this
fine Scotch has no superior.
*9b
li
Distilled and Bottled in Scotland
BLACK&WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKY
m hm. aim o*** vi.
tt
fecu* WNakr DMtfan
Jama aWckaw CO. lf
JAMiS BUCHANAN CO. LTD., OLASOOW.
tt.tr but or i: AENCIAS W. H. DUEL,
No. 14 Central Avo. Tl. 2-27i
icon
S.A.


SATURDAY, OCTOBER IS. 1M1
VT PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDE ~*DENT DAILf NEWSPAPER
--------------- .---- .-^ ..--------. .... ...
PAGE NINE
Radio And Television Killing Minor Leagues, Stresses Giants' Hubbel
Majors Must
Find Way To
Get New Blood
By TOM SIXER
NBA Special Corretpondent
NEWiYORK. cfa 13 Ctrl
Uubtxinla of the fir opinion
that the minor league fanthat
la, the fellow who ticks loyally
by the local clubIs rapidly dis-
appearing;.
''Television is the answer," saya
tht director of the New York Gi-
ants' farm operations.
'Tana everywhere are becom-
ing more bit; league conscious.
"Those dally radio broadcaata
weaned them away from the lo-
cal club.
Gun Club Soles
Bobby Thoauoa
"TV, which la just getting
started, will make an even more
drastic change la their loyalties.
It'i only a matter of time until
you alt m your living room, or
office, in Knoxville. or Kansas
City, or Paducah. and see all the
big league stars. That'll be the
en a of the minor league fan.
"Thtfs baseball biggest prob-
lem. The big leagues have to
fiad a way to keep the minor
leagues alive.
"I think we'll have less leagues
in a few years, but all of them
will be run by the mejora.
"We must keep the flow of
ytiun players coming along.
"Who will foot the bill? Who
knows? Phonovlalonyou insert
a quarter or a half dollar in a
slot and see the gamemay be
the answer. The dough to keep
the minors going must come from
aOmewhere. Everybody in base*
ball would like to know the an-
swer. One thing Is certain: you
can't stop progress, and TV, for
better or worse, is with us to
atay. I think, in the long run. It'll
be the most wonderful thing that
var came along "
NOT UNTIL GAME BEGINS
Jim Turner, who was In sole
charge of Yankee pitchers
tralnine. drilling, starting them
and taking them outfor Casey
Stengel, takes no stock at all in
hear a pitcher look warming up.
"I've heard managers and
coaches say, 'Walt until I see Joe
throw a few.'" he eayt.
"That's the bunk. At least,
that's the way I look at it. No-
bodv knows whether a pitcher is
right' on a certain day until the
game begins. And that goes for
the pitcher himself."
"Hey. Allie", come here," he
salri, beckoning to Reynolds.
"What about that first game?
Did you know you'd be in good
shape or not?"
"You're right," said Reynolds.
"You never know. I felt great
before that first game began, but
I doubt if I ever pitched worse in
t big game. I've felt lousy some
dtys warming up, but went great
when the thing sterted. Some-
times you got nothing for tn in-
ning or two, then 'find it' and
really mow 'em down."
"That's what I mean," reiter-
ated Turner. "You can master -
4 POSITION SMALLBORE RIFLE
TEAM MATCH SET FOR OCT. SI
CZSA ANNUAL MEETING TO BE
HELD AND OFFICERS ELECTED
The monthly team shoot of
the Canal Zone Shooting Associa-
tion for October is the annual
four position 22 rifle team
championship. It will be heldVt
the Balboa Gun Club's Far Fan
range on Sunday, October 30,
with firing to start at 9 .m.
While the match was originally
scheduled for October 14, the
date has been changed to avoid
conflict with several events
which the Balboa Oun Club had
planned for that date.
The four position smallbore
match consists of forty shots
bvred by each competitor at a
distance of 100 yards at the stan-
dard NRA target for the distance;
ten shots are to be fired prone,
ten sitting, ten kneeling and ten
standing and any sights may be
used. This match has been do-
minated- for the past three years
by the Balboa Juniors, who have
been consistent winners. How-
ever, this year it is wide open, as
time, personnel changes arid oth-
er factors have combined to dis-
integrate what was one of the
finest smallbore rifle aggrega-
tions ever to compete here.
While the present Balboa Jun-
ior team cannot be counted out,
they are nevertheless long shots.
The Balboa Seniors, with former
Junior star and local smallbore
champ Dick Dillman, must be
conceded to have an edge on the
other competitors. However, the
Cristobal Juniors are highly dan-
gerous over this course and Al-
brook-Curundu and the Marine
teams cannot be counted out un-
til all the targets are scored.
Teams will four or five shooters, with four
scores the count for team record.
Entry fees will be $1.00 per com*
petitor.
The annual meeting of the ca-
nal Zone Shooting Association is
scheduled to take place Wednes-
day night. October 17. at 7:30
p.m. at the Club house of the Na-
tional Federation of Federal Em-
ployes on the Chiva Chiva road.
The clubhouse is on the right
hand side of the road Just a lit-
tle less than a mile in fromthe
corner of Galllard Highway'.
All member clubs should have
at least three members present
as voting delegates and It is re-
commended that as many mem-
bers attend as possible. Officers
for the coming year will be nom-
inated and elected and several a-
mendmenta to the constitution
are expected to be proposed. All
others interested in competitive
shooting are also Invited to be
oresent. This is one of the Impor-
tant meeting! of the yetr for the
shooting frtternity. No shooter
should miss it. tnd no member
club should ftil to be represent-
ed.
The schedule for next year will
be discussed, and It is also re-
quested that all Gallery League
Officers be present so that a
meeting to organize the league
for this year may follow the reg-
ular CZSA meeting, while repre-
sentation from as many clubs as
possible is present. Organization
of the Indoor league will depend
upon the support received at this
meeting.
The handicap match for the
.38 Combat Mtsterpiece was end-
ed last Sunday when the gun
was won by Fred Wells of the
Balboa Gun Club with a score of
807 out of 000. This match was
so well received that another
will be held in a few weeks. The
Drlze for this match will be a .22
Hi-Standard automatic pistol.
Listed below are the scores of
those shooters who fired the en-
tire match.
Frtd Wells 807
Major crumpackar Sgt Wolchlck 894
892
irvin Krapfl 888
Col. Turton 886
Sgt Peterson 883
Wayne Lucas 882
Capt Gorder Ml
Jake Bernson 880
William Jaffray 880
Archie Turner 878'/,
Lt counselman 886
8gt Tucker 864
Sgt Richer 854
Vernon Brlsson 794
Sgt Breckon 785
out what the pitcher can do for
yoi> on any given day when the
game beginsnot before."
HIT IN SELF DEFENSE
Bobby Thomson has a novel
explanation of his hitting surge
at the season's end.
The Giants' play-off hero hit
377 during the stretch drive, ex-
ploding at the plate after moving
from center field to third base
"I was too busy defending my-
self agtinst bttted balls to worry
about my poor hitting," Thom-
son said.
"When Leo (Durocher) moved
me to third. I knew I had every-
thing to learn. I worked hard at
it, watched for those hard smash-
es to keep from getting killed.
Hitting Just had to take care
The Balboa Gun Club will hold
a center, fire match on Oct. 14
at 10:00 a.m. Course of fire will
be 20 shots st 50 vtrds. Bngry fee
$1.00. Reentry 50i'2. All shooters
are welcome.
Silver City Sports
Under the direction of the Phy-
sical Education and Recreation
Branch of the Division of Schools,
our three volleyball leagues for
Senior High Junior High and El-
ementary School glri have been
terminated.
In the Senior High bracket, the
Mannings and Laynes were forc-
ed into a playoff due to a 0-1 tie.
The Mannl.igs too* two straight
games of the three-game series to
cop the championship.
Theresa Manning, Rosita San-
dlford, and Cynthia Melbourne
Keatly assisted in the winning of
e series not to mention Sylvia
Webster's powerful a e r v i c e.
Gwendolyn Layne, Pearl Timm
and Marlon Thorns are to be
highly praised for their athletic
ability and spirit of competition.
The standings are as follows:
TEAMS Won Lost Pet.
Manning. .. .....V
Laynes....... ..I
Warners. .. .. ..4
Julians., .. .. ..3
Parks.........2
Fortes. ......i
Thorns........1
Alleynes........1
mind all you want, but you find of Itself, and I guess lt did."
tyfcbenr6-
ASK FOR
Haig
SCOTCH WHISKY ^W
In the Junior High section
which comprised of a nine-team
league the Stoutes came came
out victorious to wal* away with
the winning honors. The stand-
ings are listed below
TEAMS Won Lost Pet.
Stoutes........7 1 .875
Shirleys.. ...... 0 2 .750
Crearles.......o i .750
Joseph........0 2 .750
Cragwells.......0 2 .750
Lewises........3 S .375
Millers........2 0 .250
Fortes.........1 7 .125
Duncans........1 7 .125
The honors of the Elementary
School Girls Volleyball League
went to the Alphonses. captained
by Pauline Alston while the
Oockburns, captained by Bever-
ley Surez drew second place.
The standuigs are:
TEAMS Won Lost Pet.
Alphonses......0 1 .857
Cockburns......5 '2 .714
Morrisons......4 2 .067
Phillips........3 3 .500
Holders........3 3 .500
Andrews........3 3 .500
Osbornes.......0 0 .000
Browns........0 0 .000
S
Junior High Boys Soccer
Cragwells crashed the winning
column at the expense of the Le-
wises defeating them 1-0. The
victors outplayed their oppo-
nents In respect of the game de-
fensively and offensively.
Outstanding^ players are Wil-
fred Erskine Guy Alexander and
Theophllus Laurie for the win-
ners and for the losers, Albert
Hlnkson, Conrad Boyd and Reg-
inald Denny.
Standings of the second half
are:
GW
. 3
. 4
. 4
. 4
TEAMS
Duncans
Fortes. .
Stoutes .
Cragwells
Millers v.
Lewises\
T
1
]S
2
1
SITTING THIS ONE OUTChuck Dsesaen didn't give up base-
ball despite the oft-voiced sentiments slamming off Brooklyn bars
and lamp posts. The Dodgers' mantger took in the World Series
from the stands of parks where his team wasn t. And hi only
protection wat the camouflage of Mrs. Dreeten'i corsage. Thin;
wouldn't have been to easy In Flatbush. (NXA)
LUX
Air Conditioned '
NOW PLAYING'
SHE 18 THE ANSWER TO
THAT LONG, LOW
WHISTLE!
Gorgeous
At
8:30
Tonight
A BIG FASHION
SHOW
Featuring:
PANAMA'S
"GIRL OF THH YEAR-
MISS DORITA BORRELL
- and -
12 OTHER GLAMOROUS
_____YOUNG LADIES I
Feeling Miserable?
%SAl HlttTICA!
mj
Sal
M* need to feel heododiy. m obi., become yev 1 ifiPU*Sff
need W.v. SAI HTICA br.no, y* .J \*&i&
.peed r.l.,1 SAI Hft-ATICA ,,., .IOul '-
fomoch bring yov the tm.lt o health'
Ul HEPTICA Th. MM |.MH#%
MARIO LANZA I
NEW IDOL!
-saya Time
Magaxlne I
"eWw*""*! presera
:t, TECHNICOLOR
$torrm
mar lanza annBlyth
HUSTEN NOVOTNA -THESCM
OPENING THURSDAY
LUX & CECILIA
SIMULTANEOUSLY!
Sania Cruz Sports
By GILBERTO THORNK
The Canal Zone Lawn Tennis
Promotional Association held Its
third board meeting at the Santa
Cruz Gymnasium last. Sunday.
While President W. Arthurs
and his co-workers planne dfor
the group's Invitation. Tourna-
ment on Nov 25, 80 (eighty) ten-
nis players irom every local-rate
community on the Canal Zone
divided the hours between 0:00
a.m. and 6.00 p.m. between lawn
tennis (on tne Santa Crui courts)
and table tennis in the gymna-
sium. All expressed complete sat-
isfaction with Sunday's activities.
Physical Director Jos French
has his twin squads all prepared
for next week's all-school volley-
ball games at Paraso.
The elementary grade team
will be comprised of Roma Jean
Grant, T. Malcolm, E. McFarlane,
C. Nurse. M Wilson. C. Palmer, I.
Chambers, A Baxter. G. Myrie, L.
Allen, and F. Robinson.
The Junior High team roster
carries D. Grant Smith, J. Cham-
bers, N. Vlgier, G. Woods, Sonla
Ramirez, J. McFarlane, V. Welsh,
S. Daniels. Marge Eaaton, and O.
Joseph.
French is sure that these teams
will come home with top honors.
Elimination tournament for
the Santa Cruz School's repre-
sentatives in the Junior High and
Elementary Schools table tennis
tournament will begin on Wed-
nesday, Oct. 24.
Elementary grade students will
be classified in A, B, and C groups
while Junior High grades will be
represented by one entry. One
person will represent his respec-
tive school !n each ot these clas-
sifications. Interested students
will please contact Mr. French at
once.
The Santa Cruz Student Club
announces that the Kindergar-
ten students will be treated to a
party on October 31. Students In
this grade are requested to come
attired in the most colorful cos-
tumes they can possibly get for
the occasion.
mi NEGLECT LITTLE BURNS
THI THING TO USI IS '
UN6UENTIN
No. half -way meaiurai can
da what roottuno. anrlieptk
UNGUENTINE M do i
tiurvi pain
man inmcuon
etOMOTI HI AUNO
TflejsHBj
IMM
PANAMA CITY
TODAY JTHEATRES
Present
BiTT
CENTRAL
1:1*, 2:35. 4:. :, t:M
What do you know about lt?...
"THE THING"
Sensational .. Electrifying!..
what is rr?
BELLA VISTA and TROPICAL
I'KM-
Prince
who was
THIEF
JnkuT v**'
Tk fur's Stnatmtt
* HaVJ ttsctnrits
ranrCURTIS
waLJIIIRIE
LUX THEATRE
CECILIA THEATRE
SUPER DOUBLE IN
COLORS I
They wanted to be-
come women Defor
time I
"TAKE CARE of
MY LITTLE
GIRL"
ENCANTO THEATRE
_ Air Conditioned __^_^
_ THE FIGHT
SADDLER vs. PEP
, Pat O'Brien, In
"MARINE RAIDERS"
- Also: -
"SNOW WHITE"
TIVOLI THEATRE
James Cagney Virginia
Mayo, In
"STORY OF WEST POINT*
"ONLY TBE VALIANT*
with Jeanne Craln
Also: -
"The Sword of
Montee rltto"
George atoatfemerj
Paula Cortar__
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Victor Mature Hedy
Lamarr, In
'SAMSON AND DALILAH"
-Also: -
"ISLE OF TABU"
An Attractive Show!
VICTORIA THEATRE
THE BLACK SPIDER'* ~
14 is Alan:
thV: LADY FROM
SHANGHAI
and TOTAL BRIDGE"
Weak-Side Guard Leads Volunteers'
Choice Offensive-Guard Power Play
Sixth of a serie* of key plays dia-
gramed and written by famfout
coaches for NEA Service
By BOB NEYLAND
Tennessee Coach
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Oct. 12
(NEA) An offensive guard
power play is one of Tennessee's
outstanding maneuvers.
The weak side
guard leads it.
The strong
tackle and end
use a gate-pott
block on the
strong defensive
guard.
The strong
rfuard and
blocking back
trap the strong
tackle.
^ The weak-aide
Hj offensive end
Knh Ne.land throw CUt-Off
BobNeyland block on the
backer. 1 cmfywdhlr
weak-side linebacker.
The weak-side tackle check-
blocks on the defensive weak-
side tackle.
The wlnghack puts a brush-by
block on the strong-side line-
backer.
The play, like all of Tennes-
see's, is run from what has come
to be known as the antiquated
single wing.
In what practically amounted
to a conspiracy, the Volunteers
were rated the nation's top col-
lege team this Fall, and hope to
make a saltsfactory showing.
ill tell you more about that
afterand Ifwe get over Ala-
bama In Birmingham, North Ca
rolina at Chapel Hill. MlWttflapt
at Oxford, Kentucky at LextCaf-
ton and Vanderbllt. -r
They can be tough, too.
"*a :
km
STRONG MENlaw
teaeag tackle at* atad taw
peat block a the atreekg
feast raarat (NEA)
NEXT: Dr. Eddie Andonea oj
oly Crocs. ,.,
[Panama Cana/ Clubhouses
Showing Tonight <
BALBOA
Alr-Coridltlenee
4:11 *:M 8:J
Car* GRANT Jeanne CRAIH
"PEOPLE WILL TALK"
Alao Showing Sunday Monday I
DIABLO HTS.
:!-:
Kathryn GRAYSON Ara GARDNER
"SHOW BOAT" (Technicolor)
Sunday "Tffit REDHEAD AHD TBE COWBOY"
COCOLI
*:1S t:tt
Frank LOVEJOY Kathleen RYAN
"THE SOUND OF FURY*
Hunda? "A MBXIONAIBE FOB CaUUBTt"
PEDRO MIGUEL
Glenn EORD Rhonda rLEMING
'The Redhead And The Cowboy".
Sanear "TABZAn"S PERIL''
GAMBOA
aja
Dan DURYEA Herbert MARSHALL
'THE UNDERWORLD STORY"
Sunday "MR. BELVEDEBT RINGS TBS BOX"
G A T U N
1:M P.M.
Loretta YOUNG a Barry SULLIVAH
"CAUSE FOR ALARM"
Sunday "FRENCHIE"
MARGARITA
:1a a <:(!
Bette DAVIS Barry SULLIVAN
'PAYMENT ON DEMAND"
Saaday "SHOW BOAT"_________
CRISTOBAL
Alr-Condltloned
ti a :ia
Ello PINZA Janet LEIGH
STRICTLY DISHONORABLE"
Alas Showing Sunday 4t Monday!
DUNLOP
FORT
CAR TYRES
.>
Ail Sixes tor
British Built
Cm
DISTRIBUTOBS:
AGENCIAS W. H. DOEL, S. A.
No. 14 Central Ave. Tel. 2-1786
Alte available at:
HELRTEMATTE A ARIAS, I. A.
Panam
( C. O. MASON S. A. Colon
ARISTIDES ABADA A CIA. LTDA. Da*d
IMPORTACIONES REVILLA David
ESTACIN VIRZI Santiago
BODEGA INTERNACIONAL Chitre
:



FO
8*
FOf
c
1
LL 'CLAUSE' UP FOR HEARING
_

M'i
AN INDEPENDENT^
DAILY NEWSPAPER
PanamaAmmcan
''Let the people knoiv the truth and the country is sa/e" Abraham Lincoln.
rWENTY-SEVENTH ZEAS
PANAMA, R. P., SATURDAY, OCTOBER IS, 1951
EIVE CENTS
*f i
a
w
V

*d -^ -J-itsW Bsasasb. i^l 1
1 J
> *,____'

%lfeJ KsU **\ <^T
J3wsi HI 7*
JSV *C yi.jmjL^ma .T"

' :' k/ 1 f sai (' It r BBS; '^ vQbBbI "** .*M0^
US Attacks
Soviet Stand
On Italian Pact
frig
K/'c/s, Brass En/oy F/re Show
>^s AF Wins, Clowns Perform
The kids cf the Panam area
who weren't at Fort Clayton yes-
terday sure missed a swell time
firemen, clowns and soldiers; all
In their respective roles.
Anyhow, the Air Force nosed
out the Army and beat a gallant
Navy team In the annual Inter-
service Firetighting Competition
while 5.000 spectators cheered on
their favor.tes. Final point score,
after five special hose-handling
tests, was Air Force 508; Army
601, and Navy. 467.
Along with the many young-
ters who ??ggle-eyed at the va-
rious demonstrations and the
bright, sparkling equipment,
were Acting Canal Zone Govern-
or Herbert D. Vogel, Lieutenant
General William H. H. Morris.
Commander-in-Chief Caribbean
Command, Brig. General Francis
A. March, Chlef-of-Staff United
States Army Caribbean, and a
host of other Panam area dig-
nitaries, ln:;udlng the main of-
ficials of t.';e Republic of Pana-
m Fire Department.
The affau got off to an aus-
picious start under skies that
threatened ill afternoon. Army
sold Air Force bands joined In
the procession of red and w" Ite
ftte apparatus and business-like
firemen.
The five competitive events
maintained spectator interest
throughout the afternoon. Fans
of the Arm\ buffs gave vocal en-
couragement, but their volume
was not too great for the Navy
and Air Force adherents.
Midway .'nrough the program
a serio-comic skit was staged by
he Army It drew actual belly
laughs. A false-front two-story
building haa bren built and from
this suddenly erupted smoke and
flame. A prtty girl .and an eld-
erly woman rent the air with
their cries for succor.
Two drunks, clad for an eve-
ning, at El Panam, let us say,
showed up and proved of no help
at all to the two ladies in dis-
tress. In fact, to the amusement
of the aud'ence, they replied to
the distress calls, "Aw. shaddup."
Finally, a detachment of
WACS and the real-life fire-
fighters of the 536th Firefighter
Co., Fort Clayton, arrived, to put
out the fire and save the women.
Brigadier General Francis A.
March presented the winner's
prize to Statf Sergeant Roy Pen-
son of the Air Fofce.
As the p-ogram ended, and ev-
erybody went home hoping that
Fire Prevention Week, which
ends today, would be a success
and determined to attend next
year's show. .
Any boy or girl from six to 12
who was not there definitely
missed a good time.
6 DP Kids En Route
To Colombia For
New Foster Homes
MUNICH. Germany, Oct. 13.
(UP). A group of six home-
less children arrived today by
air from Berlin en route to Co-
lombia.
The children will be sent later
in October to Colombia for
adoption there through the
help of the Colombian Minister
to Scandinavian countries, Jose
Herrera Uslar.
Frau Jeanne Bauer, head of
the West German Municipal
Office for Adoptions, who ac-
companied the children on the
trip said that most of the
youngsters were abandoned be-
cause they were born after the
mothers were raped by Soviet sol-
diers in the early days of the
German occupation.
Crack Red Surgeon
Claims Record 4,000
Cornea Transplants
MOSCOW. Oct. 13 (UP) The
noted Odessa eye surgeon V. P.
Filatov has restored the sight
of some 4,000 persons during
the past few years more than
has been done in all other coun-
tries combined during the past
century according to a Soviet
press report.
Filatov, using an instrument
he invented, cuts a small hole
In. the pupil of a blind eye.
where he transplants part of a
healthy cornea taken from a
living person, a fresh corpse, or
a Pig.
He claimed his method was
invariably successful.
Reportedly, Filatov himself
has performed about 1200 of his
operations, and his assistants,
1,000.
After, yesterday's annual
FIRE PREVENTION WEEK
how at Foit Clayton, the bom-
beros of Colon and Panam,
above, left, got together with
Army firefighters at Fort Clay-
ton's 536th Firefighter detach-
ment headquarters to talk
things over and have a cool
brew. Note the two Fort Clay-
ton WACS who donned fire
laddies' costume for the day
and even helped put out a sim-
ulated fire. Right, some of the
Air Force equipment used In
the firefignting competition
gets under way in the parade
preceding the contest.
tU. S. Army Photos.)
Old Flying Crate
Creates Flurry
At Unplanned Stop
BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Oct. 13
(UP)An Air Force major fly-
ing a 3,000-mile junket in an
ancient plywood and linen bi-
plane created a flurry of ex-
citement here late yesterday
when he failed to make a
scheduled stop.
The disappearance of MaJ.
Ewell K. Nold, who is flyinr.
from Camden, N. J., to El Sal-
vador, touched off a two-state
search by Civil Aeronautics Ad-
ministration officials and the
Alabama Highway Patrol.
The flyer and his 1920 am-
phibious plane were located at
Selma.
Nold said he was bound far
Birmingham when he left At-
lanta at 2:50 p.m. But the Ma-
jor changed his mind and land-
ed at the Selma Field. His only
companion is his husky dog,
"Towreel."
WASHINGTON, Oct. 13 (UP)
The State Department accused
Russia yesterday of using "false
arguments' against revision of
the Italian peace treaty and pre-
dicted early Big-Three rejection
of the Soviet stand.
A note, containing Russia's
"price" for changing treaty re-
strictions Imposed on Italy after
World War II, was handed to
representatives, of the United
States, Great Britain and France
in Moscow Thursday.
In a special statement, the
State Department said the note
"does not In a single sentence
recognize or acknowledge that
the spirit of this treaty no long-
er accords with Italy's present
status as an active and equal
member of the Democratic and
freedom-loving family of na-
tions."
The Soviet note, denying Big-
Three charges that Russia con-
sistently has blocked admittance
of Italy to the United Nations,
offered to consider revision of
the Italian treaty If World War
II peace treaties with Russia's
satellites a>e revised at the same
time and if Italy withdraws from
the North Atlantic defense trea-
ty.
In rejecting both Soviet points,
the State Department noted ac-
San Jos Excursion
Planned By Coln
Tourist Commission
COLON. Oct. 13 A series of
tours to neighboring countries,
starting with an excursion to
San Jose, C. R. have been an-
nounced by Roberto Ellis, Jr.,
Tourist Commissioner of Colon.
The Excursion to San Jose
will leave Tcumen Saturday,
Oct. 27 at 8 a. m. and will re-
turn Sunday evening. The cost,
covering all expensesi will be
$47 includlnu visas, plane fare
and chartered bus tours to Ojo
de Agua, Catalina Holiday Ca-
bins, Moravia, the Irazu Volca-
no and Cartago.
The second trip will be to
Medelltn, Colombia, on Satur-
day, Nov. 24 and will cost $50
per person.
Other excursions will be held
to Lima, Peru Cartagena. Co-
lombia and Quito, Ecuador, de-
pending on the number of per-
sons who expres their desire
to make the trips.
Further information may be
obtained from Fted Busch.
Tour Director, at Cristobal 1901.
or from the Travel Department
of the Colon Chamber of Com-
merce.
Liz and Philip: Royal but Real
Romance Wasn't 'All Roses
By ARTHUR J. MATHERS
NBA Special Correspondent
LONDON. Oct. 2 (NEA'i.The romance of Princess Elizabeth
lira Prince Philip was not .iust roses all the way once thev had
discovered they were in love.
At first, there was the war. Philip went back to battle ser-
vice, this time in the "little ships." At 21 he was first lieutenant
on a destroyer, one of the youngest men In the Royal Navy to
hold down such a responsible wartime job.
There were letters, but Eliza-
beth wanted a bigger share in
the war. Finally, she broke down
her father's opposition and. at
18. went to camp in the Auxiliary
Transport Service.
Without ballyhoo, she learned
to take apart, repair and drive a
three-quarter-ton truck. Under
a liberal coating of grease smud-
ges. Elizabeth thoroughly enjoy-
ed her new role and felt she had
honestly earned the right to her
uniform.
For Royal Couple
EDITOR'S NOTE: This
month North America will get
its ^first glimpse of Princess
Elizabeth and Prince Philip,
whose r.yal romance captured
the hearts of the world. Here's
the fourth of five dispatches
that give you an intimate and
human closeup oft he royal
couple.
To celebrate the finish of her
driving test, she drove her truck
, to, London with her instructor.
After circling Piccadilly Circus
tWice, she roared down the red-
macademed Mall and through
the main gates of Buckingham
Palace with the klaxon blaring
full blast.
The armed guard didn't know
whether to shoot or salute.
"He did a lovely double-take
before he presented arms," the
Princess recalls.
Elizabeth and Philip had seen
ach other fairly frequently1 in
Philip had acquired a fast black
automobile, referred to by his
American Navy friends as "The
Roya] Hot-Rod." and whenever
he could wangle leave from his
temporary duties as Instructor, he
would burn up the road to Lon-
don or Windsor to visit with the
Rval Family.
. ->.% obvious to the familv
tha Kzabsth and Philip were in
leve tut the subject of possible
mai ,Jia?e between them was ne-
ver onenly discussed
The King and Queen admired
PRINCESS STEPS OUT: Elizabeth was It before she was
allowed out in the social whirl. Here she dances with Lord
Rupert Nevill at a London ball in 1946, When Philip as
overseas.
"PRINCE WITHOUT-A-NAME:" Whil. Elizabeth was having
her first social season, Philip was in Asia on the staff of
his uncle, Lord Louis MountbatUn (right), who Inspired his
naval career.
In 1946, due for three years of
shore duty, he knew a new hur-
dle had to be faced before he and
Elizabeth could openly avow their
love.
Philip for his achievements as a
Naval Officer, for his keen mind,
and perhaps most of all for his
integrity in maintaining strict si-
lenceeven among his closest
friendsabout his feelings for
Elizabeth.
Nevertheless her parents were
conscious that Elizabeth had ne-
ver had a real date like any nor-
mal girl of her age In any other
country. They felt she was too
young and bad too little oppor-
tunity to met people of her own
age group on common ground.
It waa not until after Vj-Day
when she was 18and Philip had
been reassigned to duty m South-
east Asia that Elizabeth was
allowed to take part in London's
social whirl. She waa able, for
the first time, to dine hi a public
restaurant. Even so, wherever
she went, her lady-ln-waitlng
was with her. .
When Philip sailed home early
Since prolonged royal be-
trothals are traditionally frown-
ed upon ("A change of mind
would be bad for everyone con-
cerned") Elizabeth and Philip,
head-over-heela In love and
longing to tell the world about It,
had to behave as mere acquain-
tances.
Acting such a part had been
tough enough for them when
Elizabeth was In the public view
only on official occasions. Now
that she waa in the social whirl
it was worse. Only as Individu-
als among a crowd of young, so-
cialites could they be together at
all.
At- that they had to appear
completely disinterested. Even a
privately shared Joke had to be
treated with decorum. For a
couple to whom laughter was as
natural as breathing, this, In it-
self was a major problem.
On the rare occasions when
they dared dance together Eliza-
beth and Philip Would fix-it
through one of their closest inti-
mates for the band to play the
"Oklahoma" hit tune. "People
will Say We're in Love."
That lyricwhich both knew
by heartbecame the theme song
for. the sad little Princess and
her Prince wlthout-a-name.
Tomorrow: "We're moving In
with the ln-lawa,"
idly that the United States al-
ready has accused Russia's sat-
ellites of violating treaties by
building armed forces In excess
of treaty limits.
The State Department said
Hungary, Bulgaria and Roma-
nia .had not been found qual-
ified for U.N. membership, as
proposed by Russia, because "of
their aggressive conduct to-
ward their neighbors and dis-
regard for human rights."
The. department said the So-
viet note disregards all Italy has
accomplished since the war and
"attributes to that honorable
and peace-loving nation inten-
tions aa unfounded as they are
absurd."
Then It continued:
"With specious and false ar-
guments the Soviet note at-
tempts to Justify as a condition
for revision of the peace treaty
the separaton of the defense of
Jtaly from that of the free
world," it said.
"Presumably by such argumen-
tation the Soviet Union would
contemplate for Italy a status of
subjugation comparable to that
of its- satellites In Eastern Eur-
ope," the department continued.
The 1947 treaty limits Italy's
armed force? to 300,000 men, bars
it from having battleships, air-
craft carriers, submarines or
bombing planes and restricts the
air force to not more than 180
transport planes and 200 fighter
planes. It also bars major forti-
fications along the former ene-
my nation's northern frontier.
Gen. Dwl?ht D. Eisenhower 1
eager to draw on Italy's surplus
manpower.for his' new Western
European defense force. If ef-
forts to revise the treaty should
be blocked, U. S. planners may
try to device soma way to getj
around its terms. One way would
be to let Italians enlist In Elsen-
hower's force.
2W f??V?-r,nke5 ?nana*er with joy with the hero of the last series game, Hank Bauer;
to the dressing room after the Yanka downed the Giants.
4-8, to win the series Bauer's slxth-lnnlng triple drove in
three runs to send the Yanks In front for good and his
_________catch in the ninth Inning saved the game.
Plummer-Allen
Bout Postponed
The scheduled ten-round bout
between Federico Plummer and
Baby Allen at the Panama Gym
tomorrow night has been post-
poned because of an injury suf-
fered by Plummer during his fin-
al workout yesterday.
Plummer was cut over an eye.
The fight date has been set back
one week, until Oct. 21. The sup-
porting program wlfl be the same
and the bout will be held at the
same locale.
Claim Pirates Beat Columbus
In Discovery Of New World
LONDON. Oct. 13 (UP)
French and British piratas may
have beaten Christopher Colum-
bus to the draw In discovering
the New World, antiquarians
suggested yesterday.
Tnls challenge to Columbus'
Claim, on the 459tn anniversary
of his great feat, only added to
many that nave been raised
since Oct. I?, 1492.
The case still is circumstan-
tial. It depends somewhat on do-
cuments of 1535 found in the
high court of admiralty, over
and termlner records. These
show that by ,1540 pirates long
had been trading with savages
of South America.
Since piracy was .a formidable
crime in Britain even before Co-
1 u m b u s started westward, a
search is uncerway for records
of still earlier trials that might
sMOw Just when the bloodthirsty
15th Century pirates first hit the
New World.
British explorer Sebastian
Cabot visited Braajl in 1526.
Bat the crew of the prate ship
Barbara, out of London, indi-
catad It was a routine Journey
for them as early as 1544 when
they anchored off the coast in
a eiga of murder and plunder
scarcely equalled in fiction.
Since pirates of 1840 were
neither overly literate nor ima-
ginative their exploits of firing
upon, boarding and' capturing
several. French and Spanish
ships during that marauding ex-
pedition are dismissed in casual
sentences.
"We went to the Kenny Bailes
'cannibals) land and boughtcot-
ten wolle, popinjays, monckeys
and dyvers other strange beasts
of that country," Seaman Geor-
gius Moon said.
i*,*" emissary of a Frenchman
living among .he tribes, "Mon-
sher de Rochepott," arrived and
warned off the Pirates. Boats-
wain John Podde and 17 others
grabbed cutlasses and set out in
pursuit of the emissary, who
shrewdly led them Into an am-
bush by cannibals.
Ryeharde Everton, only sur-
vivor of the 18, said laconical-
"I did see Podde slayne.
eutte up, cooked and eaten."
After this incident the savages
attacked the Barbara for thre
days, killing dozens. The ship's
captain, a Frenchman, swung it
about but it struck upon a rock.
By constant pumping the men
were able to reach "Spanyall"
(Haiti) land of. Emperor Inges."
There they fought a Spanish
galleon that iaked them with
two .broadsides. They reached
England again by a virtual mir-
acle. John Phellyppes, captain
of the. ship, wat one of thosa
who might have known when
the first pirates went to the Am-
ericas.
Although the records are in-
complete, he probably was hang-
ed and his body cast out to rot.
Pirates' got that kind of treat-
ment In those days whether they
discovered America or not.
* Yes, I always ask for it"
There ate definite reasons why Scotch whisky can only
come from Scotland; and why none is finef than White
Horse. The reasons lie in the barley, the climate and
crystal-clear water of the Scottish hills; in methods of
distillation hardly changed through centuries; in men who
have made a loving art of their slow, unhurried work in
bringing White Horse to final perfection. Always choose
Scotch whisky ... and ask first for White Horse.
WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky
A pleasure to remembera joy to til again
StJ, DiOrOtemit COMPAA CYMNOS &A..COLON* PANAMA
_


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ELEFQH0T0_3KJU68 INGEST_TIME 2012-08-21T14:03:57Z PACKAGE AA00010883_01262
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES