The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01261

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


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^BRANIFF


AN INDEPEND


TO
CHICAGO
ONE WAY... ..$14*.00
BOUND TRW.. $266.40
O^lLT.NIWSPAPBl
Panama Amanean
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
-//onourwiiAe, M/t&OtKt,
r-sfcvE:
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
"\ '


PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, \951
riVE CENTS
11 3-4 Per
Increase Agreed On
To Be Effective Nov. 1

UN Mops Up
[Diehard Reds
As Ridge Falls
8TH ARMY HQ., Karea. Oct. 12 (UP).^-United Nation, forces
mopped 'up the last Communist diehard on Heartbreak Ridge
todaTsefaed two nearby hill, and sent another strong tank
force rampaging into Red territory. mUmA c,,. e.hr*.
At 35*00 ft. over northwest Korea 32 Unite* s^ ^'if*8
ripped into a formation of about 100 Mir. In a 20 tout og-
fitht the Sabres hot down one enemy fighter and damagea
six more. All the Sabre returned safely to base.
The nerthernmost and last Red held peak on the east cen-
tral front Heartbreak Ridge fell to *he United Btatatod DW-
don after 29 day of the bitterest fighting of the KortHWu,
On the western front the united State lt Cavalry Division
suffered in it* attempts to close a plncer movement on savagery,
resisting hiese Red eight mire northwest of Yonehan.
The advancing Americans ran
Into a fleree Banzai counterat-
tack, and Here forced to with-
dr&w
United States and French
txpeps of the nd Division's 23rd
Rhg i m e nti won Heartbreak
Rime's northernmost peak after
one of the most prolonged and
costly, battles r% the 17-mohth-
old war. .
FighWng still goes, on, with Iso-
lated Reo; defenders determined
to die in "their bunkers on the
the Royal Navy gave military in-
stallations at Koko a heavy
working over.
Thick black smoke rose from
Communist oil storage areas
near the Korean City after Sea
Furies and Fireflies from the
Royal Australian Navy carrier
Sydney delivered a heavy
punch.
The British cruisers Concord
and Belfast softened up the area
previously by shelling anti-air-
craft gun positions.
were withdrawing-to avoid en-
circlement by othfr 2nd Division
troops pushing deeper into Red
territory.
West of Heartbreak Ridge a
.arce United States tank-Infant-
ry task force began a third deep
foray into the Mundung Valley
in as many days. .:.... -
Sherman tanks bombarded
Communist positions on both
sides of the valley as they rum-
bled north of their mission of
destruction.
But the column later came
under heavy fire from Commu-
nist mortars and artillery.
Planes from four carriers in-
flicted heavy damage and cas-
ualties on the enemy during
strikes over North Korea.
Heavy bombardment from war-
ships on the east coast harraas-
ed the Hungnam area.
Navy fMcyralders and Corsairs
from the Unite dStates carriers
, Bon Homme Richard and Essex
strafed and bombed the Wonsan
Area north to Songjin. They de-
stroyed 60 rail oars and killed1 an
estimated 75 troops.
East of Kapsan, Panther lets
destroyed or damaged 65 supply-
laden oxcarts and wiped out, 35
Communist troops escorting the
convoy. t > .
Surface units concentrated a
heavy bomoardment on Hung-
. nam. The cruiser Los Angeles led
the attack. f..
Enemy railroad yards, bridges
and factory buildings suffered as
the big cruiser poured *^er 120
ight-lnch shells Into them
A task 'init commanded by
up the Han river to Pungdongni
and shelled Red gun positions. ,
The British destroyer Cossack
dueled with enemy'shore guns
near Ullyl.
U. 8. Marine planes from the
carrier Rendova smashed enemy
warehouses and barracks north-
west of Haeiu.
On the east coast the United
States destroyers Twining and
Shields continued the siege of
Wonsan by scoring hits on mar-
shaling yards and exploding a
fuel or ammunition dump.
Gl's Clank To War
In Armored Vests
UJ3. 7TH INFANTRY-CIV., Ko-
rea. Oct. 12 (UP) Military his-
tory completed a cycle In Korea
today when United Nations sol-
diers rode into battle wearing
steel armor like knights of yore.
Tank and half-track crewmen
of the 17th "Buffalo" Infantry
Regiment of the United States
7th Infantry Division are wear-
ing steel-lined vests designed to
halt a .45 caliber bullet at point
blank range.
The Buffalo Regiment is test-
ing these recently designed
lightweight armored suits against
Red small arms fire.
The vests, lined with thin lay-
ers of steel, will also be dlstrlb-
Use Of A-Bomb
In Korea Urged
By Sen. Lodge
WASHINGTON. Oct. 12 (UP)
Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., R.,
Mass., today urged use of tac-
tical atomic weapons against the
Communists ir: Korea if prac-
tical and said a "strong argu-
ment" can be made for dropping
the A-bomb Itself:
Lodge said there could be."no
possible objection" on moral
grounds to using tactical atomic
weapons since they would be
directed against enemy military
personnel alone. There would be
no "reasonable" objection to the
A-bomb, he eald. if all civilians
were moved out of the target
area.
He spoke out during Senate
debate on a bill which would
permit the United States to share
with friendly nations now-secret
information on the refining and
production of fissionable mat-
erials. The bill later was passed
by the Senate and -sent to the
House. *
There has been considerable
speculation in Congress that
this country may be getting
ready to use atomic weapon In
Korea. Informed sources aid
Labiosas 10-Year Rape Rap
To Be Appealed; Bail $7000
Ezequiel Labiosa, 49-year-old
Puerto Rican. found guilty by a
jury Sept. 27 of raping a 13-year-
old Panamanian girl, was today
sentenced In the US. District
Court at Ancon to ten years in
the penitentiary.
A notice of appeal was then
made. The case will be sent to
the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals
In New*Orleans for a decision.
An additional' $5,000 ball was
imposed on Labiosa, bringing his
total ball to $7,000.
Labiosa Is free on bail pending
his appeal.
After the defendant was sen-
tenced by Judge J. J. Hancock,
defense counsel William J. Sher-
idan, Y, requested the appear-
ance of a representative of the
law firm of Van Slclen. Ramirez
and DeCastro, who would take
over the case in Labi osa's behalf.
Before sentence was passed
Sheridan called Dr. Joel Shrager
of Gorgas Hospital, who testified
under oath that when he exam-
ined the girl shortly after the in-
cident, "there was no evidence
of any force."
His conclusion after the gen-
eral examination of the girl was
that she had relations with men
before this occasion.
Sheridan said that although he
realized a ten-year sentence
(which the government recom-
mended) was only one-fifth of
the maximum, he wanted the
court to consider the fact that
Labiosa, a retired Navy chief,
would be deprived of his pension
of $225 per month, if sent to the
penitentiary to serve a sentence.
commended a penitentiary term.
their use probably would de-
whether current truce
pend on
effort* collapse and on
wfee-
lapi
Britlsh-frigatee again Tenturc^Jj.^, *!&?,**
targets.
up goo*
Lending emphasis to this spe-
culation was an unusual meeting
Mid East In New
Demands On Britain
Fears Increase
As Pay liaise
Bills Delayed
. -a
In his Washington column
"The Federal Diary"' of Oct. 9,
Jerry Kluttz while referring to
the current pay raise bills now
up before Congress, made the
following observation:
''Employes seem to be grow-
ing restless over the delay by
Congress in approving the pay
raise bills. This fear was raised
yesterday by an official that
The Judge. In his sentence, .,,' ,
said that he must follow the ver- bill won t be signed, and
diet of the Jury who had found back pay to July won't actually
"Ibe made until the new and
higher income tax bill goes into
effect.
"In that event, the back pay,
to be given in a lump sum
would be subject to the new
rax bill. And the new tax rate
would take a big bite out of
at tfie Defense Department Wed-
nesday. Defense Secretary Ro-
bert A. Lovett conferred with
Chairman Gordon Dean of the
Atomic Energy Commission, two
other Atomic Commissioners and
ABC general manager M. W.
Boyer. They would say only that
they discussed "atomic energy."
But Dean fold In Los Angeles
last Friday tnat the time has
tome for the United States to
consider using atomic weapons
stop such "nibbling" Commun-
aggressions as the Korean
t. And Rep. Carl T. Durham,
JN.C, a member of the Con-
gressional Atomic Committee,
said the U. S. atomic stockpile
now is big enough to do it.
lodge suggested that the ato-
rle bomb mlr.ht be used to blast
a "defensive line" across the
Korean peninsula. He apparently
referred to subsurface explosions
which would leave crates charg-
ed with radioactivity for a long
time.
-----o | your first paycheck under the
LONDON. Oct.'13 Light- the. Royal Air Force to provide salary bill."
nlng struck the British Empire an airlift to the garrison should i
for the third time today In.the;Egypt try to.starve it out. \
ssme plnee the powder keg Al Mterl, a Cairo newspaper'
of the Middle East. i with Jose ties with the Gov-'
Iraq Joined Iran and Egypt ernrorat, reported yesterday I
in making new demande on j that jfcrpt was considering a
Britain. non-aggression pact with Rus-
Iraq's demand was for a re-' sla, and that such a proposal
vision of the 259 25-year treatyj was discussed yesterday in a ae-
between Britain and Iraq nder | ret meeting of the Chamber
which Britain was granted the.of Deputies. COCOA, Fla., Oct. 12 (Up-
rights for two of her most lm- in Washington, Egyptian For- i The motor vessel Sam D. carry- -
portant Middle East air bases ejgn Minister Saleh Eddrne Pa-ilng guided missile supplies to J^^vnsen^Kaie^angesliomW
Guided Missile
Supply Ship Turns
Turtle; 2 Lost
WASHINGTON, Oet. 12 (UP) A House-Senate
Conference Committee agreed today to increase most per-
sonal income taxes by 11% per cent, effective Nov. 1.
The size of the increase in individual income taxes
had been one of the biggest roadblocks in the way of the
conference in its effort to adjust differences between the
$7,2000,000,000 House tax bill and the $5,500,000,000
Senate measure.
The final compromise bill is scheduled for House con-
sideration Tuesday and may be, taken up by the Senate
the same day. It has the full backing of the conference
committee and is certain of approval.
Coupled with Increases In ex-
cise (sales), corporation and ex-
cess profits taxes, the hike in
personal levies would yield the
Treasury about $5,750,000,000 In
additional revenues.
This is only about half the $10,-
700,000,000 In new taxes urgent-
ly requested by President Tru-
man.
He said the huge Increase was
needed to finance the expanding
defense effort and help curb a
dangerous '.hreat of further in-
flation.
Under the new schedule, sin-
gle persons who earn $28,800 a
year will nave their taxes In-
creased nine per cent, and mar-
ried couples with an tocme of
$57,800 a ear will have their tax-
es Increased nine per cent. Other
increases will be roughly 11.75 per
cent.
In addition to the Individual
Income tax Increases, excise tax-
es on many items such as clgar-
ets, liquor, beer, and gasoline also
will go up. These excise Increases
will cost taxpayers about $1,020,-
000,000 a year. ,.-
The increase In else tsxee
also will go into effect Nev. 1 If
President Truman signs the bill
into law by Oct. 21. Otherwise,
they will not become operative
until Dec. 1.
Under the new schedule, the
tax rate would range from 22.3
per cent on taxable income under
$2,000 up to 92 per cent on tax-
able Income of $200,000 and over.
Hnbbaniya and Shaibah. i sha, in an interview with the a Dase l/i the Bahamas, over-
Official sources here believed magailne I'liited States News turned and sank in rough At-
thls was a new move in the and World Report, said Egypt lantlc waters and two of six
Arab states' avowed plan forjwouW apt cooperate with the
uted to combat medics who go to
Rear Admiral Scott-Murlcrief of the front lines with litters.
Truce Talks Near
Resumption At New
Pan Mun Jom Sile
(NBA Telephoto)
LANDMARK FIRERaginir flames destroy the Saeger Mill,
along the old Lehlgh-Canal, in Alien town. Pa. The fire wa*
so intense it could be seen for 30 miles. The 60-year-old
landmark, was demolished in lets than an hour.
MUNSAN, Korea, Oct. 12,
(UP^ Liaison officers have
tur tpe resumption of the Ko-
rean armistice talks, except
the size of the neutral zone
nd the Communist base of
ong.
ilted Nations and Commun-
llai.sun .teams will meet again
orrow to tackle this prob-
lem.
Pan Mun Jom has been
creating a east neutral bloc In
the East-West struggle.
The new demand is expected
to hold up the four-power (Bri-
tain, US, France and Turkey)
proposals for an international
defense organization in the
Suez Canal Zone to replace the
1936 Anglo Egyptian treaty
which Egypt proposes to abro-
gate shortly.
France reportedly feels Egypt
will have no part of these new
proposals anyway.
Western world unless British
troops withdrew from Egypt
and unless the West modifies
its attitude towards Israel.
2 Noval Vessels
Dock In Balboa
From San Diego
A Naval Task Unit, composed
of the UBS McNalr (DD 670) and
French officials report that I the.WForxnoe D 509) r-
renresentatlves at the o^^o.XmSa'nVego7
They will berth at Pier 1, Naval
Station, Rodman until Monday
when they will transit North and
proceed to Newport, R. I.
The USS McNair is command-
Egypt's
U n it e d Nations Conciliation
Commission in Paris are show-
lne increeslne ifuculence, nd
resentment of "foreign interfer-
ence."
000 man British garrison in the Ueutenant Commander H. H.
. n, uw.cc.a uvc Sez Canal Zone ><"**?? Res, USN. The combined com-
on all the ground rules vital waterway linking the West nlement of ^th vesseis is 35 of-
with the Far East, the Middle |flcers Vi 516 men.
East oilfields, and the East coast
of Africa.
Egypt also plans to start col-
lecting customs dues on all
British army Imports to the
Canal Zone, and to deny the
British the use of native Egypt-
Ian labor.
British military sources say
agreed upon as the site for the that though the garrison has at
resumption of the ceasefire least a 90-day supply of food
conference. 'Egypt's proposed sanctions would
" It Is a dusty village of four De serious.
While in Fnlboa, the officers
and men of the ships will be
ranted shore leave and liberty.
crewmen aboard were believed
lost, the Coast Guard reported
today.
Four men, including the mas-
ter of the ship, Lee M. Dutton
of New Orleans, were rescued
after floundering tor more trvn
24 hours in shark-infested wa-
ters some 200 miles east of
Miami. The four men were pick-
ed up by a barge, the Crusta-
cean, and then transferred to
an amphibian plane from the
guided missile base here.
The 107-foot Sam D, a con-
verted LCT, was en route from
the missile base to Mayaguana
Island in the Bahamas with
supplies for an Aviation En-
gineer unit being set up to aid
in tracking guided missiles
launched from Cocoa.
The coast guard said nne of
its planes was searching for
the other two men but woth
were believed to have drowned.
The owner of the vessel, the
American Coastal Lijes of Jack-
sonville, Identified the two mis-
sing me nas Lester Jones of
the British West Indies and E-
than k nit, of Jacksonville.
to 91 per cent. Both are after de-
ductions and exemptions.
In the excise field, the federal
tax on liquor would rise from $9
to $10 per 100-proof gallon, an
Increase of 30 cents a fifth. Beer
taxes would go up from $8 to $9 a
barrel while wine levies would be
Increased an average of 12V4 per
cent.
The corporation tax rate will
go up from the present 47 per
cent maximum to 52 per cent.
Excess profits taxes also will be
boosted slightly.
Cigaret taxes would be raised
from seven to eight cents a pack
but pipe ana chewing tobacco
and snuff taxes would be cut
from 18 cents to 10 cents a pound.
Gasoline excise taxes would
rise from H4 to 2 cents a gallon.
In addition, the present seven
per cent manufacturers' excise
tax on new automobiles would go
up to 10 per cent.
Other Increases:
Electrical Appliances The
present 10 per cent tax on elec-
tric, gas and oil appliances would
be extended to many appliances
not now taxedmangles, dish-
washers, clothes driers, floor pol-
ishers and waxers, home-type
motion picture projectors and I
would be Increased to 8 per cent.
Automobile Parts and Accesso.
rlesThe present 5 per cent tax
would be increased to 8 per cent.
present 25 per cent tax on photo-
graphic equipment would be cut
Photographic EquipmentThe
It
En
. and the present IS
per cent tax on film would be
aised to 20 per cent.
Baby Oils and PowdersBaby
oils, powders and lotions woujd
be exempt from the present 20
per cent retail tax on toilet prep-
arations.
Kind Old Ladles
Steal Jewelry.
Help Charities
PARIS. Oct. 12 (UP)TWO
kindly old mistresses of a state-
ly French chateau, who con-
fessed to robbing the rich to
help both the poor and tnem-
aalMs jrere^back where they
first met ach other today In
prisoni
The two female "Robin Hoods"
are Marie Emilienne Riffaut, 58,
and Anna Contlnsouza, 49.
Their attorney urged leniency
on the grounds of their good
deeds.
Both were convicted by a
Paris court yesterdav for a series
of 16 domestic robberies since
1948 which netted them about
$60,000 in Jewelry, sliver and
other household goods.
Neighbors of the two women
knew them as respectable owner
of an old chateau La Gentillade,
about 50 miles north of Tou-
louse in southwest France.
Local charities were more
than grateful to the two for
their generous and frequent
contributions.
Servants in the chateau said
the two were Ideal mistresses.
All, however, wondered why
the two women took such long
trips from time to time.
The explanation came out in
court.
Following their release from
jail in 1948 where both were
serving time for theft, the two
joined resources to purchase
the chateau, apparently with
money hoarded from previous
thefts.
Once established, they made
themselves false identity and
work cards, and then set out
for such cities as Paris. Lyons
and Bordeaux where they had
themselves hired as domestic
servants In wealthy homes..
It was never long before they
power lawn mowers. I disappeared along with jewelry.
Track, Buses and Truck Trail- silver nnd other valuables found
ersThe present 5 per cent tax in such households.
------- '--------------------------------------"
Plans have been made for
mud huts, six miles southeast
of Kaeaong .where the truce
talks were held till ruptured
by the Jteds Aug. 23.
The present agreement be-
tween tie liaison teams is that
the talks will be held la a
elreus type tent at Pan Man
Jom which had been used tor
the lialsen talks.
A neutral zone for a radius JACKSON. Miss., Oct. 12 (UP)
of 1,000 yards round the tent Samuel McClure Walker willlw
will be policed jointly by Red resume his Ufe sentence for mur- barrel "
and United Nations military der tomorrow. vfter 10 years of
Man Back In Jail
At Own Request
After Ten Years
Military Ups Manpower Goal,
Needs 500,000 Men Monthly
BY ROBERT BARKDOLL
police, who will be
tarry mall arms.
allowed to
Missing
RP Girl
Located In David
A 17-yaar-old Panamanian
girl. Raquel Bene Lefevre, who
vas reported missing from her
home in Pnama City by her
lather Enrique Lefevre was
located toda y in David.
i ghe had been missing from
her home ame* Oct. a.
ri^lfrVSnt Ee^*l%s& *his.
freedom, at his own request.
Walker petitioned Oov. Field-
ing Wright to cancel the suspen-
sion of sentence granted him In
1941.
"I just realized that I have
become
Walker said
commit some act which would
make me dangerous to myself
and others."
Wright granted the request.
Ptate Troopers were Instructed
to pick up Walker tomorrow at
W1 n o n a and take him to the
SUte Pennitfntlarjr at Parch-
man.
In the early days of the Korean from volunteers. But no matter The accomplishment of this ob-
war as many as 80,000 men a where the new men come from, Jeetlve will eliminate entirely the
WASMNOTON, Oct. 13 (UP) month were being drafted and they will cut down on the overall pool of 1-A's now available."
Defense Beartment officials dls- they will have to be replaced next manpower pool from which selec- Herahey estimated that selec-
closed today that the armed fore- summer. This almost certainly uve service draws draftees. tlve service.will have to find an
eiMBpower goal has been rals- will lead to demands for a fur- Selective service officials said average of 50,000 men a month
edIromS 500,000 to 4,000.000 men ther tightening of the draft law. they thought It would not be ne- to replace men now to service,
in a move that will "scrape the cessary to ask Congress for a re- and said the difficulties inner-
bottom of the draft manpower Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge. Jr.. vision of the drsttt law "at pre- ent In this problem "are appar-
R., Mass.. disclosed last week sent." ent
that the joint chiefs of staff had ,, "ls *u"et,n.was tesued bef0w*
Thev said a build-up of the agreed to expand the Air Force While these officials would not the Joint Chiefs agreed on the
Air Force to about 140 groups, to- from 5 to about 140 groups. The oermlt use of their names. Draft expansion program,
sether with planned expansion of chiefs also decided to call up Director Lewis B. Hershey said About 1.2O0 000 men become
the Army and Navy over the next three more National Guard dlvl- much the same thing In, a hlth- eligibleJorthe draft each year,
three years, means that at least slons and one Marine division, erto unpublished bulletin diste!- About 400,000 are disqualified for
another 500.000 men will be nvd- The Navy will be given more buted throughout the Selective physical or mental reasons and
Service System !art month. another 100,000 are lost through
Hershey said that on Jury 1 se- deferments,
lective service had a "potential" Selective Sendee hopes to get
600.000 1-A's "who were or would about 200,000 draftees from mar-
be acceptable." rled men without children and
"These estimates would indi- about 50,000 from those now clas-
cate that enough men will be a- sifted 4-F. Both groups are be-
Most will go to the Air Force vallable to meet the foreseeable ing reclassliled under fetulaUona
which unlike the Army and Ma- demands of the armed forces signed recentlyjjy President Tm-
rlnea. has been getting Its men during the period July 1, 1952. man.
provide them only by drastic
tightening of deferment policies.
Selective service expects Its
bifrest problem to come next
July. At that time, It will have
to start) replacing members of
the armed services who have
erved 14 months, the legal
limit under present law.
The defense department ne-
ver has said officially how ma-
ny atore men this expansion
program will require, but offi-
cials placed the number today
at 5O0.0M.


_f \GE TWO
Tne PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
*

Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
.rcal White Fleet
Arrives
New Orleans Service __________________Cristobal
S.S. Fiador Knot ...............................Oct. 14
S.S. Chiriqui .................................Oct. J*
S.S. In*er Skou .................................Oct. 27
S.S. Chiriqui ....................................0ct- 28
(Handllna ".Mrtterat.d Chin**' and QsfMfal Caraoi
Arrives
New York Freight Service______________Crist6bnl
S.S. Santo Cerro ................................Oct. 13
S.S. Cape Cod...................................Oct. 14
S.S. Tivives .....................................Oct. 20
S.S. Cape Ann .................................Oct. 21
Week!) Sailing- lo New York, La* Angelo, San rtanrlsro tlMttlt
Occasional Silln" In Nttv Orlr.N- ind Mobile
(Th* Steamer in ihr tan-Ice are limit* lo rwStvi passenur)
Frequent crelfhl Sailing from 1 rumnal M Weal I'm'I Central menee
Cristobal to New Orleans via Sails from
Tela, Honduras___________________Cristobal
S.S. Chiriqui......(Passenger Service Only)......Oct. 16
S.S. Chiriqui ....................................ct- 30
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON 20
Canine Breed
HORIZONTAL
1 Depicted dog,
the Italian
8 It is a -
canine
of
House Ok s Funds For USAF's
World Wide Airfield Network
WASHINGTON. Oct. 12 (UPi
The House yesterday approved
a whopping S4.440.559.42U sup-
plemental Hopropriations bill.
earmarking most of the fund for
new and expanded air bases
throughout fie anti-Communist
world.
The measure was passed after
the House re,ected a last-ditch
effort to ded'ict $12.821.000 for
un Air Force base at Grandview,
Mo., near President Truman's
home town o." Independence.
Rep. H. R Gross. R., la., con-
:ened the Grandview project
would enrich Mr Truman's fa-
mily and friends because they
own 394 acress of farmland near
Grandview.
The House rejected Gross' pro-
posal to send the measure back |
to committee by a vote of 182 to
127 and then passed the bill it- ,
self by a vot of 300 to 19.
The meas'iie now goes to the1
Senate where swift action Is ex-
pected.
The bill incudes $4.198.523.203
lor construction and improve-
ment of baser in this country
and abroad, including some $1,-
000,000.000 fur secret overseas
fields within fasy striking dis-
tance of Russia.
The Air Force also will build
fighter-interceptor bases near
most large American Industrial
cities to guar.l against possible
enemy air attack
Congress has been warned re-
fieatedly that Russia now has
he ability to launch A-bombs a-
gainst this country.
The balance of the money will
go to the Atomic Energy Com-
mission, the Federal Security
Agency, Congress, the Agricul-
ture Department and the Inte-
rior Department.
The Air Force will get the
lion's share )l the military lunds
$2.112.172.550 to increase to
309 i he 232 *ur bases now In use
in this country and abroad
The bases will be coordinated
with an already established
radar warning system around
part of the United States and
Canada.
The Army wag voted $1.159.325,-
198 and the Navy $927, 024,460.
Most funds will go for military
construction and improvement.
Chairman George H. Mahon,
D., Tex., o the appropriations
Subcommittee told the House the
Air Force picked Grandview as
the best site for an interceptor
tighter base u protect the vital
Kansas City tall yards.
Grandview was the President's
^cyhnod hoi, r
His brother V an and sister |
Mary Jane still live there and
own property there.
13 Aerial
14 Papal cape
15 Born
16 Shrink
quivering
18 Light brown
19 Accomplish
20 Going by
22 "Empire
State" (ab.)
23 Sun god of
Egypt
24 Indian
mulberry
26 Westphalian
river
28 Communists
31 Outburst
32 Female horse
33 Broad smile
34 Paradise
35 Let it stand
36 Triton
37 Ambarr
8 Transpose
(ab.)
39 Spain (ab.)
41 Pantries
47 King's bench
(ab.)
49 Small child
51 Lariat
52 Lubrfcint
53 Irregular
55 Eyeglass for
one eye
.17 Iron
58 New member
VERTICAL
lGrit
2 To breathe
(comb, form)
3 Goddess of
infatuation
4 Compass point
5 Quechuan
Indian
6 Son of Seth
(Bib.)
7 Statute?
8 Brought into
being
d Railroad (ab.)
10 Dine
11 Enthusiastic
ardor
12 Repudiate
17 East Indies
(ab.)
20 Pertaining to
parents
21 Clothing
23 Depended
25 Conductor
Answer ti Previous Puula
[^PlHBWBtJMW! li a
BJKi: us
[JfclHfcJ
r^ WMF1PWWMM i* jm
[iraizwfc.ii JKii'iu w -i
i j:-jMHiyuniurj;'K]i. 4
bJaJUUldUItlBJUf 1. 11 :
26 Hen products
27 Short lance
29 Sketched
30 Dispatched
39 Pace
40 Young salmon
42 Greek god of
war
43 Musical note
44 Lady
45 Famous
English school
fruit
46 Rave
47 Oven
48 Internal
decay
SO Female rabbit
52 South
American
wood sorrel
54 Steamship
(eb.)
56 Correlative ol
either
TKKRY AND THE PIRATES
sWAITING TOR RETURNS
FRECKLE! AND Rift FRIENDS
Digging in
BY MERRILL BLOMKR

We'U-WAWA'iOUUP
ON THE POLE VAULT.
Y f f HAM1.HI
Shipping & Airline News
59 Enlisted Men
Selected For Duly
As Army Officers
Fifty-nine warrant officers
and enlisted personnel have been
selected for active duty as offi-
cers in the Panam Area, a
spokesman ior the United States
Army Caribbean's Office of the
Senior Army Instructor announc-
ed today.
Of the total. 25 reservists are
from Puerto Rico. Thirty-four
were selected from the Panam
Area. 18 of which are already on
orders for active duty. The re-
maining 18 are awaiting active
| duty, pending physical examina-
tion.
The officers were selected for
recall und?r a recent Department
of the Army program for order-
i in- into active service those war-
; rant officers and enlisted per-
I sons holding reserve commissions
in company grades.
Personnel selected under the
new program must not exceed
! the age of 20. 35 or 40. In the
'. arades of 2nd lieutenant, 1st
lieutenant and captain respec-
j tlvelv in the Infantrv. Armored
"rtillerv or Engineer branches of
| the service. The ase limit for
I other branches has been set at
38, 41 and 45 In the same order
of rank. Members ot the Wom-
en's Army C.irps fall into the sec-
ond category.
It is anticipated that those se-
lected for active duty here will
be given initial assignments
within the United States Army
Caribbean command.
Colon Chamber of Commerce
Offers New Series of Trips
The Tourist Commissioner for
the colon Chamber of Commerce
has announced a new series of
trips to nearby countries. The
first, a two-day trip to San Jbee.
Costa Rica, will leave Tocufnen
Saturday, Oct. 27 at 8 a.m., and
return the next day. This all-
expense-paid trip for $47 will in-
clude visa, plane fare, bus trips in
San Jose and holiday cabins in
Catalina Island.
The second trip scheduled will
be to Medellin. Colombia. It will
leave Tocumen Saturday. Nor. 24
at 8 a.m. and return the next
day. Pasaporta, or tourist cards
are needed forthis trip.
Further information may be
obtained by calling Fred Busch
at Cristobal 1901. or the Tour De-
partment of the Colon Chamber
of Commerce.
Maersk Line Ruling About
Children May be Revoked
Local agent for the Maersk
Line, Fenton and Company, to-
day revealed that the ruling not
to permit children under 12 to
travel on Maersk Lie ships may
be revoked very shortly due to
heavy demand.
Pre-Columbian Relics
Firing to St. Croix
Exactly 459 years to the day
from Columbus' discovery of the
New World, a Pan American
World Airways Clipper is wing-
ing south from Miami today (Co-
lumbus Day) with six crates of
rare Indian relics from tribes
that inhabited the Virgin Islands
Really White!
that's because they are
U. S. ROYAL
MASTER
PANAMA AUTO S. A.
Apartado 1913, Panama
Most Tolls-Paying
Transits 60 Thru
'anal Since 1929
More ocean-going, tolls pay-
12 vessels transited the Pan-
-ma Canal in September than
In any 30-dav month since
* pill 1929, aci'^drng to monthly
raffle statistics from the Man-
-"ement Division.
There were 516 transits dur-
ing Stentember. an average of
17.2 dally. The transits In April
1920 totaled 532.
The heavy traffic last month
was due primarily to Increase
In the number of tankers in
the trade between Australasia
and the East Coast of the Unit-
ed States and the West In-
dies.
September traffic was the
highest of anv mouth since
July 1950, when there were 513
transits, an average of 16.5 dai-
ly. One of the other high points
in traffic since the war was in
in March 1950. when there were
522 transits, the most since
March 193S.
Total tolls last month amount-
ed t^ $3.911.3Ai 84. which In-
cluded a credit of $122.719 12
for government vessels Total
tolls, for flentember 1950 am-
ounted t> $' 982.477.9''.
Tran:lts during Sept. 1950
totaled 444. a daily average of
14.86 vessels.
when the great nsvlgator made
his landfall in 1492.
The pncelesj .vuls, religious
objects and implements comprise
the famed Folmer Anderson col-
lection of nearly 15,000 artnacis
which the Danish engineer exca-
vated during the decade from
1920 to 1930 when he managed a
sugar mill in the historic Carib-
bean islands.
Destined for St. Croix. the An-
dersen relics will be exhibited in
the new St. Croix Museum sec- |
tion of the Christiansted Libra-
ry. The Museum Is having a for-
mal opening in connection with
the arrival of the Andersen col-
lection. #
Weighing more than 2,400'
pounds, Andersen's unique ar-
cheological finds have been In
New York. Virgin Islands Gover- |
nor Morris F. de castro arrarfged
for the entire collection to be re-
turned to St. Croix as an exhibit
of the islands' early Indian cul-
ture during the days of Colum-
bus' historic voyages.
MIAMI
NOW... THRIFTY
TOURIST SERVICE
EVIRT PAY
These PAA "El Turista"
flights to Miami offer you
convenience at well as econo-
my'- now you may leave and
return any day of the week.
Remember, too, the very
moderate fares:
$83 ss
On* Way
$08S
Round Trip
See your Trostl Afent at
MORE PTA GROUPS
CHICAGO (UJ".> The Na-
tional Congress of Parents and
Teachers announced that local
PTA groups In the United States
increased to more than 37.000.
compared with 36.000 a year ago.
The total Includes PTA groups
. In Hawaii and "unorganiaad Ter-
ritories."
WOSLD'I
NKMf IXMSMNCIO
HUM
Pan American
H'fMtiO /t/XHItY
PS***.: L Street No 5,
. Tel. t-M70
ColoF,:.S.Iti Bid)., Tel. 109?
XY-J7.SU1 .
CAPTAIN EASY
Tell Us About Him
00 AMONG
YOUR UNCLE
OLEANDER'**
MINOR6 HAUPI-
CAPS IS tONG
STRETCH IN THE
ASYLUM'.
'BUT HE'S OT.PN M0W.AC.0A.T *|"'
FfcR A UtrtE HARDENING DA WAN
CELLS. WHICH PLAYg. HOB *V1> T ****%
BY MWI,|T TI'IIWO
TO WT IT CUMtlTNSLV. TUM**. ^ ""."gj? I

.
P
\

.


.



FRIDAY, OCTOBER It, 19S1
TOT PANAMA AMRRICAM AN DEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE THREE

Britain Faces Chilly Winter
No Matter Who Wins Election
LONDON, Oct. 12 (BIS) One
of the first problems facing- the
new Government which win be
formed after the British general
election on Oct. 26, wlU be the
serious fuel shortage.
Severe winter weather, It Is
feared, will increase demands for
electricity beyond the capacity of
Britain's generating stations.
Already these stations are op-
erating at near maximum capa-
city in order to service Industrial
needs plus the expanding pro-
duction of armaments.
Lacking major hydro-electric
resources, Britain's power system
depends mainly on coal-operated
generator!.
Much of the coal tomes from
seams three times as deep as the
average In the U.S.
The British coal miners' output
per man shift has risen every
year Ince the war and electrici-
ty output has been doubled m the
last ten years. .
In pite of this, the demand Is
still above the probable supply
this winter, for industrial output
is some 48 per cent hlgherthan
prewar and there are 2,000,000
more inhabitants.
There Is a danger of power
black-outs because of the short-
age of coal.
Manv steDs are being taken to
meet the crisis. Here are a few:
In The Minea /
The need for more miners is
being met by deferring them
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
WW.f. 100.000 Peosle Ms*
Presents
Today. Priday, Oct. 12
*3-Muslc for Friday
00The Home of the Three
Bears (BBC)
30What's Your Favorite
00Knights of Columbus Pro-
from national service In the arm-
ed forces.
The shortage of houses in min-
ing areas (one of the deterrents
to recruiting) Is being met by the
building during 1951 and 1952 of
an additional 10,000 houses for
miners.
A large scale mechanization
program in the mines is being
pushed.
The National 'Coal Board's sci-
entists are developing new meth-
ods of utilizing fine coal and
waste coal.
Technical specialists from Brit-
ain have visited the U.S. under
the auspices of the Anglo-Ameri-
can Council of Productivity.
The use of various forms of
central heating is being urged on
local authorities for their build-
ing programs, to save the coal
which, In most British homes, Is
at present burned In open coal
fires.
Electricity .
National output of electricity
has been stepped up from 41 bil-
lion kilowatt hours In 1946. to an
annual rate of 60 billion kilowatt
hours in the first seven months
of 1951.
New generating stations are
being built.
Schemes for relieving the peak
load of generating stations by
staggering working hours of fac-
tories are being worked out on a
large scale. The whole popula-
tion is being urged to curtail the
use of electricity at peak hours.
'Golden Hour' Concert
Definitely Cancelled
COLON, Oct. 12.A "Golden
Hour" concert planned by the
Lorelei Choral Ensemble for
next Sunday, has been definitely
cancelled, It was announced to-
day by the director of the group.
The concert was to have been
sponsored bv the Women's Aux-
iliary of St. George's Church.
Gatun, but arrangements fell
through after two postpone-
ments.
NOTICE
The Panam Canal Lodge of Perfection,
Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry
INVITES
All Resident and Sojourning Scottish Rite Masons
to attend
FEAST OF TISHRI
Scottish Rite Temple, Balboa,
6:30 p.m., Saturday, October 13, 1951.
SECOND FLOOR
WE ARE UNPACKING
Half-Linen Dish Towel..
Cotton Dish Clothes.....
Cotton Towel Pot Holders .M
Magnetic Knife Racks..
Stainless Steel Kltctae
Knives ........... *
Plastic Revolving Laiy Susan
Trays .............."; ***
Rubber Door Entrance Mats
., .1.95 Z-5
Dish Drainers................ **
Plastic Cannister Sets:. .... 2.
Plastic Refrigerator lee Trays 9M
America
P.C
gram
6:15Evening Salon (request)
7:00Mayor of Casterbrldge
(BBC*
7:30BLUE RIBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00NEWS and Commentary-
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Radio In .Review (VOA)
8:45--#acts on Parade (VOA)
8:00-re Perry Como Show
(VOA)
:1#-Cornmehtator's Dlgt
0:45Sports world and Tune of
flay (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade of
(VOA)
10:30Adventures of
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
Saturday, Oct. 13
AM.
6:00Sign On
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Jazz Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30 As I Knew Him
8:45The Duke Steps Out
9:00NEWS
9:15Women's World (VOA)
9:30As I See It
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00News in ,.,
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00NEWS
P M. *
12:0-NEW TUNE TIMEPAN-
AMUSICA
12:30The Football Prophet
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
lt45_Tour de France (RDF)
2:00Latin American Serenade
2:15Date For Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Band concert
3:15The Little Show
J:30McLean's Program
5:45Musical interlude
:00Music tor Saturday
: 36What's Your Favorite
:00-^-Guest Star
6:15.Masterworks from Faroce
(RDF)
6:45American Folk Songs
7:00G*v Paris Music Hall
K&P),
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00NeWsreelUS-A. (VOA)
g:15_Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Battle Report (VOA)
9-00Radio University (VOA)
9:15Stamp Club (VOA)
9-30Radio Amateur Program
(VOA) ._.
9;4_8ports and Tune of Day
(VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
THERE is No Substitute
fo- Quality
.
GENERAL PAINTS
Folding Picnic Tables. .... VIM
Metal Picnic Sets with Th" ..
mon and Plates. ..........UM
Hamburger Grills for Bar-B-
Cue....................... !
Metal Hooks for Barbecuing
Chickens.............. sw
Small Bar-B-Cue with S Ac-
cessories ...................'*
Baby's High Chairs, Plastic,
Upholstered................*
Auto Baby Seats. ........... **
Plastic Brooms for Kids and
Grown-ups ......., L*5 Sfi
Plastic Toilet Seats (6 colors) S.50
Martex Towels In 7 colors.. 1-W

.
Bu\ NOW
Second Floor 5a. Avenida
11 :-------:-------------"
THIS IS
NO FISH ST0RY.3
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting,
RDF Rdiodltfuslon Francaise
Worry of
FALSE TEETH
Slipping or Irritating?
Don't b embarrassed by loose felss
teeth slipping, dropping or wobbling
whin you at, talk or laugh. Just sprin-
kle lUU FASTDCTH on your platea
Thla plnnt powtUr gira a remarkable
unte nl added comfort sad security by
holding platea more firmly. No gummy.
fooey. peaty taste or feel lo. It alkaline
nsn-acld). Gs* rASTBrTB at say drug
toast
THERE IS NO FINER WATERPROOF* WATCH
THAN4 LAMONT
WATER CAN'T GET IN TO RUST ITS PARTS...
DUST CANT GET IN TO MAR ITS BEAUTY

Wear it In the water,
plunge it Into the sand...
your Lamont waterproof
watch is sealed against
moisture and dust. The
handsome face stays
handsome; the remark-
ably accurate movement
stays accurate. In or out
of the water there's no
finer watch than a
Lamont waterproof!
fiRCa/a fa/Ulch
JEWELRY HEADQUARTERS
PANANA
STORE
i
?
I
I
REMENDQUS SAVINGS
ON BRAND NEW
Here's really smart appearance ... light-
weight comfort. long wearing fabrics.
We've been selling suits right along at
much higher prices, but now we want you
to take advantage of these special prices
to greet the coming holidays with a brand
new SUIT! *

NOW
From 50.00 45.00 &
35.00 24
50
From 30-00 & 25-00
21
50


.

From 25-00 &
21" 17
50
NOW
From llOO & 10 00 Q^
From 8-00 & 7-50
From 6 95 & 5 95
5
50
450
.
PANAMA
34 Central Ave.
Santa Ana Plaza
"QUALITY SUITS"
CASHS.ALES
ONLY!
COLON
llth Street
Opp. P.R.R. Commissary





.. 4'?r FOVR
, IMfcRICAN AN fNnEPFNDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
'' i
FRIDAY, OCTQJWHt U,' INI
1951 PLYMOUTH
Immediate Delivery' at
0/.D PRICES
All Models All Colors
AGENCIAS PANAMERICANAS, S. A.
* Across from El Rancho
Agencias Panamericanas
David Chiriqni
Tels. 2-085, 2-0886
Powell's Garage
Coln
BALBOA
Alr-Condltioned
4:30 6:25 8:20
Rod CAMERON Audrey LONG
"CAVALRY SCOUT'r
Saturday "PEOPI.E will. TALK"
DIABLO HTS.
CIS 849
Trink LOVEJOY Kathleen RYAN
"THE SOUND OF FURY"
Saturday "SHOW BOAT"
COCOLI
ill 8:35
"bodyhoCd
and "CHAIN GANG"
Saturday "THE BOUND OF FURY"
DC/1 DO kAiri IF! QlftOB WEBB Joanne DRU
PEDROMIGUEL Mf Be!vedere Rings The Be||"
a Saturday "The Redhead And The Cowboy"
GAMBOA
(Saturday)
'THE UNDERWORLD STORY'
G A 1 U N
a> Jeanne CRAIN
"Take Care of My Little Girl"
(Technicolor)
Saturday "CAUSF FOR ALARM"_____
MARGARITA
:U :
Mickey ROONEY a Terry MOORE
HE'S A COCKEYED WONDER'
Saturday "PAYMENT ON DEMAND"
CRISTOBAL
Air-Condltionad
CIS CM
Gofdon MacRAE Julie LONDON
"Return of The Frontiersman'
Saturday "STRICTLY DISHONORABLE"
fewrybwjy. feaefe Ossified

CENTRAL
1:1, 2:35. 4:3. C43, 8:5*
What do you know about It?.
"THE THING"
Sensational... Electrifying!..
WHAT IS IT?
BELLA VISTA and TROPICAL

- Smutionil
"w itntil Disconrii:
TomCURTIS
LAURIE
LUX THEATRE
/ -
b mifTi CIMMiRGS Jia CAILHELB
*>
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air CondHUned
CECILIA THEATRE
SUPER DOUBLE IN
COLORS!
They wanted to be-
come women before
time I
"TAKE CARE of
MY LITTLE
GIRL"
with Jeanne Craln
Alio:
"The Sword of
Montee risto"
George Montgomery
Paula Corda
FaHh Domergue, In
"VENDETTA" Also:
Dana Andrews
Farley Granger, In
"WALK SOFTLY
STRANGER"
TIVOLI THEATRE
Bank I $100 Bank!
At 5 and 9 p.m. Also:
"A NIGHT IN THE OPERA"
"THREE GODFATHERS"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Victor Mature Hedy
Lamarr, In
SAMSON AND PALILAH"
- Also: -
"ISLE OF TABU"
PjAnAttractlveShow!
VICTORIA THEATRE
Jo* Crespo, In
"LA I I.TIMA CITA"
Maria Flix, in
^La Noche Del Sbado"
Truman-Appointed Tax Official
Tagged With Bi be Indictments
ST. LOUIS, Oct. 12. (UP) James P. Fin-
negan, whose activities as Internal Revenue Collec-
tor for Eastern Missouri touched off Congressional
investigations into "influence," was indicted here
yesterday on charges of bribery and violating the
Internal Revenue code.
Finnegan, political crony of President Truman,
was accused in a five-count indictment of taking
money "directly and indirectly" from a St. Louis
garment firm for reducing taxes and for represent-
ing films engaged in litigation or negotiations with
Government agencies-while serving as collector.
Britain All Set To Try
Nuclear Power Station
The Indictment climaxed sev- The indictment charged Fln-
eral months of investigation by negan violated section 302 of the
COLONEL HENRY F. TAYLOR, Atlantic Sector Commander,
Is shown above 'congratulating 8gt. Robert W. Ross, 33rd
Infantry, honor graduate of the Non-Commissioned Officer
Leadership Course.
s
[Panama (^anal (clubhouses
Showing Tonight
BALBOA
TOMORROW MORNING
MATINEE 10:00 A. M,
EXTRA SPECIAL
A Real Puppet Show Comes
To Life On The.Stage!
Also: Screen Attraction!
' FRONTIER INVESTIGATOR"
ond "ZORRO'S BLACK WHIP
Regular Matinee Admission!
the Grand Jury, which began
shortly after Finnegan resigned
as collector la?t April.
The Grand Jury immediately
resumed its session and special
assistant Attorney General Tho-
mas de Wolf,' said it would go
into "other aspects of the Fin-
negan case."
It was the Inquiry into Ftnne-
gan's activitiej that resulted in
the Senate investigation Into
charges that William M. Boyle,
Jr., Democratic National Chair-
man, had accepted $8,000 from
a St. Louis printing firm for ex-
erting influence on the Recons-
truction Finance Corporation
and for a House committee in-
quiry into Internal Revenue af-
fairs.
Finnegan was appointed by
President Truman 4n 1948 as a
reward for '.oag service In Mis-
souri politics and especially on
behalf of Mr. Truman during his
Senatorial campaign.
BALBOA
STARTS TOMORROW!
-;th FINLAT CUMIE HUME CIONYN
WAITS SUZAK SIDNEY ILAGKMEP
ratta. by DAMYl F. ZANIKK Written mi HnOti by JOSEPH L MANWWKZ
Fram th* May "Of. Preelarhn" by CUT GOCTZ
TODAY!
SIMULTANEOUSLY!
AT THE
BELLA VISTA
1:30, 3:33, 5:13, 7:10,9 p.m.
----------- AND
TROPICAL
Frjm 1:30 p.m.
THEODORE DREISER
^Prince
who was
THIEF
COlOU 6

YOUR
SOCIAL
CENTER
\ ;.:::
cernen sunk jfcoky
CAfTU
m
'::::
:::*

EVERYDAY...
. ...the cocktail hour in
the airconditioned Balboa
Bar, with the melodic music
of Avelino Muoz and tempting
tidbits on the house to
complement El Panamj'i
perfectly mixed drinks...
from 5:30
AND SUNDAY...
Our famous buffetwhere eatlnf
Is really a pleasure. Chff
Douth will await you and
your friends in
the BELLA VIS!A ROOM
from 6:30 p.m.
JMlc for lancing
by Kan Detaney'a orchestra
and Avelino Muftoz at the orean.
U. S. penal code, which covers
bribery of a Federal official, by
accepting payments totaling
more than (1.000 In 1649 from
the Karol Kill Garment Co., to
"influence his decision" on the
firm's tax case.
He violated section 281, the
Grand Jury charged, by ac-
cepting $5,0OD for acting as at-
torney for the Warwick Hotel
here In settling a damage
claim against the Government,
and for accepting $3.090 from
the American Llthofold Corp.,
for "services rendered" in ob-
taining $65ooo RFC loan for
the printing firm.
It was the Llthofold firm
which also hired Boyle as an at-
torney to handle its affairs in
Washington. Doyle told the Sen-
ate committee, however, he quit
the firm after he became Demo-
cracy national chairman.
Finnegan said last April he
quit as collector because he could
cam more money in private law
oractlce and not because the
Treasury Department was look-
ing into his conduct in office.
He testified before the House
Ways and Means Subcommittee
in Washington Tuesday that he
resigned only after repeated re-
quests by President Truman to
stay on the job 'or political
reasons.
But Treasury Secretary John
jW. Snyder told the same com-
mittee later he had urged Fin-
negan to resign several times be-
fore he finally quit under fire.
Maximum penalty on each of
the bribery charges tn three
years in prison and fines three
times the value of money re-
ceived.
For violating section 261 the
maximum penalty is two years
in prison and a fine of $10,000.
Finnegan's* Fiddle*
Promptly Provokes
President's Frown
WASHINGTON, Oct. 12 (UP)
President Truman said yes-
terday he disapproves of Intern-
| nl Revenue collectors having out-
; side jobs and particularly frown-
I ed on activities of former St.
Louis collector James P. Flnne-
igan.
I Mr. Truman made his statement
during a news conference dis-
cussion on the case of Finnegan.
indicted yesterday by a Federal
Grand Jury on charges of tak-
ing bribes and violating the In-
> ternal Revenue code.
Finnegan was a personal friend
of the President and, tin til he
, resigned last April, always head-
ed official greeting parties that
{met the President on his fre-
1 mient visits to his home state.
1 Finnegan was appointed by Mr.
Truman in 1948.
Asked about testimony by Fin-
negan before a House Subcom-
mittee that he had tried to re-
sign but had remained in office
at, the urging of the President,
Mr. Truman said his recollection
was hazy on the point.
But he recalled that "tey"
i had asked Finnegan to resign
| 'n apparent reference to testi-
mony by Treasury Sec r e t a r y
ohn W. Snyder that he had ask-
?d Finnegan to step down eight
months before he finally quit
under fire.
BY HARRY KERLY
LONDON. Oct. (UJP.) A
mere matter of Just under 1,000.-
000 ($2,821,000) may be all that
is required to set Britain on the
road to providing the world's first
experimental nuclear power sta-
tion.
Technical problems have been
solved, officials said. Provided
the British government supplies
the capital, unofficially estimat-
ed at 900,000, work can begin
on the plant at Harwell, Berk-
shire, headquarters of the Min-
istry of Supply's atomic research
projects probably this year.
A ministry spokesman said
work had been carried out In
conjunction with research ex-
perts on a design for a miniature
prototype power station at Har-
well which will be entirely In-
dependent of coal supplies. Brit-
ain is short of coal.
It is expected that a small
atomic pile can be built which
will provide just Enough energy
to supply electricity to a group
of small houses.
Apparently, there is nothing
mysterious about the method for
producing power. The consider-
able heat produced by nuclear
reaction in the atomic pile will
be led off to boll water. That in
turn will provide steam to drive
turbines, which will motivate
electric generators.
The Supply Ministry official
said:
"If the work Is successful, we
hep to make important ad-
vanees, not only in supplying-
fuel for power and heat, bat
also in ship propulsin.''
He added that after a design
for the power station is selected,
it would take four to five years
to complete a building to house
the atpmic pile, and a further
five years for the atomic pile to
be built up to set the station
working in experimental form.
"It would probably be 15 years,
however, before we had a station
supplying power to townships,"
the official added.
A British government white
Eaper on July 31 pointed out
hat ft would cost three times as
much to build an atomic station
than a regular coal-power sta-
tion capable of generating pow-
er for a medium-sized town. But
over 30 years, the white paper
said, coal would cost the sta-
tion 16,000,000. The atomic sta-
tion would cost only 4,000,000
a net saving of 12,000,000.
Civil and naval experts, It wa:
learned, have been working or
the problem of adapting ships to
take an atomic power unit. A
ship's atomic "engine" would be
in the form of a miniature ato-
mic pile, small enough to go into
a ship's engie room.
A thick protective jacket of
concrete would be essential to
protect the crew-from deadly
radio-active rays. The engine
would work, under a principle
similar to the atomic power sta-
tion.
HOG To Broadcast
Firsl-Hand Report
On Jamaica Storm
A heart-breaking, flrst-hana
report on the devastation and
tragedy experienced by the peo-
ple of Jamaica after a hurricane
laid waste to the Island last Au-
gust^ win be aired over station
HOG next Sunday at 6 p.m
Entitled "Hurricane In Jamai-
ca, the program tells a vivid
story of a people whose homes
and means of livelihood have
been cruelly laid waste, but who
are already working hard to
build on the ruins and planning
t>r the day when Jamaica will
stand on its own feet again.
The program, recorded by the
BBC immediately following the
hurricane, also recounts stories
of speedy help by the British
andU.8. fighting forces.
Mount Olympus Lodge
IBPOEW Meets Tonight
Members of Mount Olympus
Lodge Nb. 559, Improved Benevo-
.ent and Protective Order'of Elks
of the World, were surprised with
a buffet supper given by their
Exalted Ruler A. A. Blackett-
Forde at their last monthly reg-
ular session.
Members will meet today to
make plans for the initiation of
neophltes Into the order and the
regular "surprise refreshments."
The meeting will begin at 7:30
p.m. precisely.
^P Private Teacher
To Hear Instructions
Private school teachers of
Panama City were scheduled to
receive special Instructions to-
day at a regular meeting of
the Private Teacher's Associa-
tion.
The nature of the instruc-
tions was not disclosed.
FEELING DULL?
... due to temporary sluggishness
Relieve that dull feeling... let
sparkling, good-tasting Eno help
you (wo wmjri: At b.tUlm. Eno
quickly helps neutralize excess
stomach acid; ease, that upset, full
feeling. B.far. br.akfa.t Eno
works as a quick-acting, gentle lax-
ative.
1. FLEAMNT as a glass of spar-
kling, bubbly soda water!
2. ANTACID-relieves sourness, gas
and heartburn promptly.
S. LAXATIVE relieve, temporary
sluggishness quickly. (Take be-
fore breakfast when needed.)
Used by millions. Sparkling Eno is
also good for SICK HIADACHI, ACID
INDIGESTION, CONSTIPATION and
OVERINDULGENCE.
At all druggists-Get Eno today.
I
Mama
A Kb-kebr Hold
-------------1
LOOK YOUR BEST
fea
V
aw,
iUMs oi
CIANT1.05
LAME M
VI rUSMULl*
aseline
TMAOS MAHR
f ASEUMt k aka aataMraJ ama> ,
f Oanln.at Mia. Ca. Omit
HAIR
- iQN/C
TAKE GOOD-TASTING
Tests prove Mew-type
Johnson's Cream Wax makes your
furniture.___
PAR
LONGER
The on cream polish that retains its
shine for weeks is Johnson's Cream
Wax. Recent teats prove it! If s because
Cream Wax contains no oil to catch dust
and get foggy. So the protective shine
lasts for weeks! Cream Wax is far easier
to use, as it clean and polisnee in one
operation. Give your furniture shine
that lasts! Get Johnson's Cream Wax.
JOHNSON'S Gima** WAX
Distributors:
TROPIDURA "




!

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
\
JOE PUTATURO'S
AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALS
OCTOBER 13 to 19
BRAKES RELINED
the '"Barrett" way
only 9-99 Plus I*"75
A small investment tor so myc/i SAFETY!
*
MOTOR TUNE-UP
Your motor
analyzed by
expert craftsmen
who will correctly
adjust, syncronize or
replace worn parts,
clean carburetor, ignition system, tighten head
and manifold!
8.99 "^
Sjr f- (oarts extra)
Check Confirms Atom Plant
Workers Take Things Easy
,j|.-i i.^iH

We will CROSS SWITCH
tires, BALANCE ALL
FOUR WHEELS, ALIGN
FRONT WHEELS, CHECK
CASTER, CAMBER and
TOE-IN.
1 1.99 (Plus weight

OIL CHANGE & LUBRICATION
with 5 QTS. of 40t OIL Ogg
ALL FOR ONLY Zm^y

AUTHORIZED
STEWART WARNER
Speedometer and Instrument Service
_
O PUTATURO'S
WASHINGTON, Oct. 12 (UP)
Rep. W. M. Wheeler, D., Ga told
the House yes;erday than an in-
vestigation by the Comptroller
General has backed up his
charges of 'gross waste," "fea-
therbedding," and labor "racket-
eering" at the Savannah River,
S.C., atomic project.
Wheeler read a report on a
6rellmlnary investigation by
omptroller General Lindsay C.
Warren in which investigators
reported that they saw:
1) Five men changing a spot-
light on a pick-up truck. No ex-
planation by the contractor.
2) Twenty-three men in a 10-
by-10 yard space "obviously"
too many In such a space .to be
efficient. No explanation by the
contractor. m -re
3) Seven men to cut a 6-by-10
piece of timber, with only four
actually engaged on the Job.
Contractor's explanationsafety
rules and union requirements.
4) "Many" persons standing
around "apparently supervising"
explanation union rules and
Service
15th & Be I isa rio Porros
(Golf Club Road)
NEXT DOOR TO
CALL 3-0035 for ROAD SERVICE

Local Thunderstorm
Ups Otherwise Normal
September Rainfall
September rainfall was gen-
erally below normal except at
Balboa Docks and Balboa
Heights, where a localized
thunderstorm raised the
monthly total two inches above
average, according to the
monthly report of G. E. Mat-
thew, Chief Hydrographer of
the Canal organization.
At Gamboa, the monthly
rainfall was, 4.15 Inches which
is the lowest September total
since 1898. when the total was
4.10 inches, the minimum of
89 years of record.
The mean air temperature at
Balboa Heights for the month
was 80.4 degrees, which was .5
degrees above a 48-year aver-
age of 79.9 degrees.
The mean air temperature
at Cristobal was 80.6 degrees,
which was .2 below the aver-
age of 80.8 degrees.
The lowest temperature dur-
ing the month was 71 degrees
at Balboa Heights and Madden
Dam and the highest was 93
at the same stations.
Austria To Oust
Officials of Reds'
World Labor Union
VIENNA, Oct. 12 (UP) Aus-
tria will attempt to expel mem-
bers of the Communist World
Federation of Trade Unions from
Vienna, and force the organiza-
tion to cease its operations here,
Minister of the Interior Oscar
Helmer said
He explained that residence
permits were required of all for-
eigners remaining In the coun-
try for more than three months,
would not be Issued to the 44
.nembers of the WFTU secret-
ariat officials are Western, in-
cluding Losses Salllant, Secret-
ary General of Prance. Pour are
Britons, and three are Amer-
icans. ^^
He added thit the WFTU never
has applied for permission to
operate within Austria.
company policy require one
supervlser for each 12 workers. A
check of the payroll revealed one
supervlser for every 10 workers.
Wheeler, who visited the pro-
ject recently dressed as a worker,
charged that employes are for-
ced "to pay tribute to certain
labor union racketeers."
The House Appropriations Com-
mittee prevlonsly knocked 8284,-
000,000 out of a money bill for
the Savannah River project be-
cause of WKeler's charges and
ordered a full Investigation.
Volumes On Culture,
History of Americas
Go To U.S. Library
ITHACA N.Y.. Oct. 12 (U8IS)
A valuable library from Bra-
zil, containing what Is con-
sidered to be the first book on
South America printed in the
English language, has been pre-
sented to Cornell University
here, according to Deane W.
Malot, President of the Univer-
sity.
Library officials her say the
collection, which arrived recent-
ly, was known in Brazil as that
country's finest private library
from the standpoint of com-
pleteness and value and condi-
tion of its 400 volumes. It was
the personal collection of Col-
onel Frank Hull of England, who
lived in Brazil for many years
and was British consul at For-
taleza during World War Two.
The books were purchased for
Cornell bv an alumnus in the
United States who was a friend
of Colonel Hull.
The library Includes works on
the history and culture of the
Americas, some of it printed at
the time of ths great Portu-
guese and Spanish exploraitons
of the Sixteenth Century. Dis-
covery and travel In the Amer-
icas is described In a number of
first editions in Portuguese.
Spanish, Latin, French and
English. One volume, a collec-
tion of travel descriptions, ap-
peared in London in 1555 and
is considered ^he first book in
English on south America.
Most of the books concern the
hlstorv and development of
Brazil.
Colonel Hull went to Brazil
as a young engineer and worked
for-British railroads and public
utilities.
Imported
Canned Hams
PER
DREWS
KRAKUS&
ATALANTA BRAND
, re offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Coln
HOME DELIVERY
F Available at your favorite store! B
L
O
R
E
C
I
T
Made in New Zealand

Distributed by the Swift, Co.,
Panam.
u
T
T
E
R
That good to of
Cream
Wheat
Gives you
CALCIUM AND
PHOSPHORUS FOR
STRONG BONES
AND TEETHI
Excellent for children. Good
for grown-ups too! Delicious
Cream of Wheat give you
minerals end vitamina neces-
sary to growing children and
adults. Try it today.
AT

spec/Ais
'

SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY


;
Stewing Veal .......25
Beef Brisket v ...........23
Corned Pork Tail ...................43
Baked Meat Loaf .49
Sirloin Steak ...........................49
Heinz Soup .10
Heinz Worcestershire Sauce .16
Heinz Peanut Butter 39
Kennel Ration tin < .24
Circus Peanuts ;25
Quaker Enriched Flour 2.29
5-.64
Pyrex Casseroles .....52
Swift's States Pork Loin *........89
Swift's Oriole Bacon ,...%,.....35
Swift's N. Z. Cheese *.31
Swift's Imperial Cooking Oil 2.99
Swift's Arrow Flakes....................37-
Swift's Arrow Laundry Soap .. .101
Swift's Pard Dog Food................24!;
Swift's Florecita Butter................69 j
Monarch Juices Aa.-t.ia.14:;!
Kraft Miracle Whip............... 311
Kraft Mayonnaise....................591
Dish Towels.........................* .291
KILL m All JpL> S2I
Hilt MniontTmci / JV !*"
TbaMhrbae
* spgpasl
jbytfcolteMo*
C... IRC.
with
COOK KILL
8UG- KUL&
MOteWTQItl
KILLS MOM THAN 300 KINDS
Of HOUSEHOLD iUGS! B WOK/ML
CONTAINS ACTIVATING "IXTANI"! M^ui** i
UARANTIID L "S HMH
T. WMn o^ ^ ^ ^
bofl kilUryouvf w^...
OR YOUR MONIY IACK
.85 pint,
wMfxansivi
NfOftfNf
UMMMHMm:
i ***;
Poppy Seed Rolls '..;. *.24
Coconut Cake..................... .59
PINEAPPLE CAKE
.41
Chocolate Eclairs.................2 *r.lij
PlumBunz.....................................0$
l
M
]l
+
AGEWOOD Lire. 2.80 JOHN HAI6 3.9S Imported Hallan CHIANT11.25


Chilean WINES .95
ARMOUR'S
CLOVERBLOOM
Jr. Grade
7.49 lb.
about S lbs. each

ROYAL
DESSERTS J|
Ml;
Better Buy

i
Frosted Food
PEAS
and
CARROTS

r*c
SPECIAL
r
:

Call 3-0034 FREE HOME DELIVERY Call 3-0034
PANAMA'S ONE STOP SHOPPING CENTER
Under New Management
OPEN DA1LT7 a.m. to S p.m. SUNDAYS: JB. to 1 a.m.
15U A Via HeUsarto Porras San Francisco Golf Chtb Road
PLENTY OF PARKING SPACE

1
-*



rAGE SEX
THB fANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, Uel
FOR SALE:9 Ft. Westmghoust re-
frigrotor. $150.Q0. G. E washer
$75.00. Motors 1-4 1-2
3-4 H. P., rocking chairs, com-
plete living set, 6 pieces. 361 -B.
New Cristobal. 6th. and G St.
FOR SALE;60 cycle
Frigdaire, $135.00.
2-3746.
oil porcelain
Cell Bolboo
Whatever used car you want to
buy or sell consult first with
Agencia Cosmos S. A. Automo-
bile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-4721.
Eisy terms. Opened all dey Sat-
urdays.
FOR SALE- -Solid mahogany dining-
room. Modern American style.
Reasonable pnce. Apply Mexico
Avenue No 69 Apt. I. Phone 3-
1509.
FOR SALE:Frigidoire, 9th. St. 60
cycles, excellent condition. Mitaf
washing machine 60 cycles. Used
only 3 months. Estate gs Range
good condition. House 177-B, Pe-
dro Miguel. Tel.. 4-484.
FOR SALE: One standing radio
with pick up. RCA. Cote Cuba
Rio Abajo No. 2208.
iUICK end CHIVROLIT
'rice* u> Frem
$7.20 H $194.35
UT------far rail m.nth aaly
WI WH.L CONTINUI TO SILL
OFF FLOOR DILIVIRIIS
AT THI OLD MIC I!
Her Ruy New!
SMOOT (V FARIOIS
Yaur IUICK ft- CHIVROLIT Dealer
yea have a drialtiat
Write Alc.helict
a 2031 Aecea, C. Z.
We offer you any kind ond size of
lumber, imported or native, noils
and screws of ony description.
Lowest p.-ict?. ALMACENES MAR-
TINZ, S. A. North Ave. Tel. 2-
0610 Mortin Sosa Street^ Tel. 3-
1424.
CASINO SANTA CLARA:Cabins,
food, swimming. No reservations
. necessary.
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
DANCE Zez Bennett's quintet "All
Star Jozz Combo," now ovailoble
for dance dates. Phone 2-1282.
FOT? SALE:1950 Thor automatic
washer with dish washer, 60 cycle.
New Cristobal 122-D.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE:Lot ot Pirque Lefevre
600 meters, will occept down pay-
ment. Price $1.450. if cesh less.
Ancn Ave. No. 6, 2nd floor-Hall
leave address.
FOR SAL or LEASE: Property in
the city of anama consisting of
2.700 square meters land and
concrete office ond warehouse
building. Principals only. Aparti-
do 1293, Panam.
DIAPHRAGMS: We hove ust re-
ceived a. other fresh shipment of
these for all makes of cors. TRO-
PICAL MOTORS INC.
FOR SALE:949 Ford V8 Custom
Sedan, excellent condition, only
14,000 miles. 361-B New Cristo-
bal 6th ond G. St.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:51 Dodge Coupe "Co-
ronet Diplomatic," two tones ond
white tires, mileage 3.500. For
informotion Inversiones Generales,
S. A. No. 38, Jos Francisco de
la Ossa Avenue.
Save
$250.00
Leice cerner with- 1.5 lens
(mrt.ee $475.00 lie)
$244.50
latarnetienel Jewelry
_________'dj. wt. Mate
FOR SALE:Tropical fishes, plan*,
11 Via Espaa, opposite Juan
Franco Stables. Phone 3-4132.
Gramlich's Sonta Clara beach-
cottages. Electric ice boxes, gas
stoves, moderte rates. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
October Specials. B. 1 500 week end.
Shrapnel!, phone Balboa 2820 or
see Caretaker.
Phillips. Oceanside cottages, Santo
Clara. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Panama 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673
FOR SALE:House 2 bedrooms sit-
ting am' diningrooms, well built,
concrete base, ill screened, zinc
roof, 2 t-2 miles beyond Chorre-
'ra, pump and well. Already planted
pineapples, com. beans, yuca, ba-
nana etc., oronge grove produc-
five. Municipal land 10 hectares
^^retejll fenced, right on main hlgh-
way. Lond ideol for chickens or
cottle. Price $2,750.00. Down
payment $400.00. Balance $60-
00 o month plus 6 'o interest.
Telephone Balboa 1583.
FOR SALEOn account of trip fdrm
- in "El Volcan 3 hectares with
. beautiful well built house, furnish-
' ed. facing future. International
. Highway lots of water, wonderful
Jclimate. Bargain. $4.800. See
James W Thompsen. Amodcr Rd.
'.House 0836. Balboa. Tel 2-2986.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
USED CARS
Largest Select iei af
Meeele in TewH....
ALL THOR0U6NLY
RICONDITIONID
' ene" Campera Our Price*!
CIVA, S. A.
Yaw CADILLAC a- FONTIAC Dealer
Tel. 2-0170 Panama
Sea
FOR SALE:Airline Rod* Vietro-
la combination and one MW 5
foot. 60 cycle, refrigerator. Boyd
Brothers Inc. 3 L Street, Panama
R. P. Telephone: 2-2008.
FOR SALE:$550.00. Baby Grind
Piano. Sweet tone. 3rd of Nov-
ember St. No. 5, downstairs, Pon-
oma.
HOTEL PANAMERICANO, IL VALLI
.Special Rates for this month, rooms
$2.00 per person; children $1.00.
Phone 2-1 I 12 Panama for re-
servations.
Williams Santo Clara Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms, Frigidalres, Rock-
gas ranges. Bolboo 2-3050.
DON'T STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL.
VERTAGREEN
3-Way Plant Food
is cheaper than water
foi it
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ave. ..Tel. 3-0}40
LESSONS
Learn to play modern piano. Guaran-
teed instruction. Bennett's Piano
Studio. Phone 2-1282.
FOR SALE:Two portable porce-
lain. Laundry tubs. Drain hoses at-
tached. Forfan Qtrs. 44, 828 -
3745.
FOR SALE:Brjick Super Convert-
ible 1949 excellent condition,
with "long and short wave radio.
$1,650.00 cash only. 52nd Street
No, 8, apartment 1, from 6 a
m. to 8 p. m.
FOR SALE:Bargain! Bissel carpet
sweeper. Ccrono portoble type-
writer 6 tires. 550 x 15 ad-
justable dressformlibrary table,
odd chairs, garden tools 2
1-2 carat white Zircon ring.
Phone Bhlboa 3143 after 4 p. m.
FOR SALE1941 Lincoln; Ice Box;
2 couch beds; Dower Saw 6" blade.
New Cristobal 6-B, 7th, Street.'
FOR RENT
Apartment
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished apart
ment. Contact office No. 8061. 10th
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386. Co-
lon.
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hotel El Panama
Wants to buy Stocks from
Panam Forest Products.
Preferred or Common.
Tel. 3-471, 3-1660
FINAL EVENT in a Fire Prevention Week program held at Ft. OuK We^ndSv l 1
water curtain" demonstration with a ladder company of Coln Bomberos DaxtirirHnr with
the Ft. Gulick Fire Fighting Team which won the USARCARIB toe ul%arturtath?wirt
The bombero atop the high extension ladder is directing a high stream towardTan &
Among the distingulshec1 guests present at the demonstration were The Hnnnrahi. jam
Dominador Bazan, Mayor of Coln; Commander Luis J. A. Ducruet Chief Sm' Y>.
partment: Lt. Colonel Robert E. Humphreys. Quartermaster. Atlantic Area-' Canton wu.
Thompson. Commanding Officer. 536th Fire Fighting Platoon; Captain ThomaS w rirti
wood, Commanding. France Air Force Base; Lt L. J. Ducote, U8N, Fire Marsha r'JZ l
Naval Station; and Justin H. Patrick, Fire Prevention Engineer, u. 8 Army Cartbbtan
FOR SALE:1937 Chevrolet Coupe
New bottery. Mechanically perfect.
1540-B, Balboa, after 6 p. m.
FOR SALE: 1947 4-door Nash
Ambassador Sedan, excellent con-
dition. All new tires, $1,100.
Phone 5-126.
FOR SALE:1947 Ford 4 door se-
dan, in excellent condition with
radio for $850. La Boca Road,
795 XB, Phone Balboa 3296.
FOR SALE:Smoll Canvas Dinghy
soil and oors, $25.00; small Evin.
rude motor. $35.00. Groy Diesel
starters. Phil, Saturday morning
Cristobal Yacht Club.
OR SALE: 22 1-2 ft. Cayuco
Life Belts. Lights. Top Paddle
Ftc. included Can be seen It
Pedro Miguel liat Club. No.
209-X, Apt. B, Pedro Miguel.
WANTED
Miscellaneou*
WANTED: Wood working ma-
chines; one band saw, minimum
< 12 inches. One circular saw. minl-
num 10 irwhe. Tilting arbor. One
spindle shoper, minimum 5-8 inch
i spindle. Coll Curundu 83-6294
from 4 to 6 p. m.
IMMEDIATELY DELIVERY
P O N T I A C $
4 far New Yerk Delivery
( fer Lecal Delivery
At OLD Price.
SAVE MONEY, BUY NOW!
CIVA. $. A.
Year CADILLAC ft PONTIAC Dealer
Tel. 2-0170 Paean.
Position Offered
WANTED: Experienced American
beauty operator. Apply person-
ally YMCA Beauty Shop.
FOR RENT: Laree modera com.
aletely screened three bedroom
apartment with two bathrooms
large livinfroom, porch, dining-
room, kitchen, servant's ream with
bath, hat water, Venetian blinde,
helcenies, garages, etc. Located
in hast residential section, rent
..$150.00. Phone Panama 2-0027
ar 3-0763.
FOR RENTVacation quarters. Wil-
liomson Ploce, October 20th thru
December 19th. Call Ptilboa 2441
from 9 to 4 Saturday or 3 to 5
SuncVy.
*------ --W. i,,IH.u
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM-BUILT
Slipcover Reupholstery
VISIT OUR SHOW-ROOM!
Alberta Herea
J. r. de la Ooa 77 (Automobile Row)
Free estimate. Pickup & Deliver
Tel. 3-4(28 s:o a.m. to 7*S',*
Chest Budget Group Studied
Community Needs In Detail
New Books
Help Wonted
WANTED: Moid to cook, wosh.
and house cleaning. Do not ap-
ply without references. House 10-
063 in back on Roosevelt, between
10th and 11 th Sts. Zeimetz. Co-
lon.
WANTEDCook to sleep in, some
housework, must like children, re-
ferences required. Call house 7455
Brazos Heights, afternoons or
phone 3-1849 evenings.
WANTED: Cook-housekeeper to
live in. Apply Saturday or Sunday,
Peru Avenue 89.
WANTED:English speaking maid
for housework and care of child
Must live in. No. 18 J Street,
Agendas Crawford Ponomo.
FOR SALE:1948 Oldsmobile Fu-
turomic Seda net tf series "98"
Hydramatic radio, new tires, seat
covers undercooted, original own-
er. Best offer. Phone Balboa 2-
3703 or 2-1433.
FOR RENT
Houses
AVANTED: 2 bedroom furnished
apartment or house. Coll Sgt. Mor-
ris. 86-6174 'Albrook).
WANTEDFour bedroom house with
garden. Telephone 3-4688, Sotur-
doy, Sunday or after 5 p. m.
We Are
Headquarters for
Vienein-Williamn
Paints
We invito you to visit
our Stores to inspect
our huge assortment of
colors. We have a paint
fer every purpose.
BEST QUALITY
LOWEST PRICES
* Nerth Are. Tel. ?-Ml#
Martin Sen Street
Tel. J-1424
FOR RENT:Bello Vista, fully fur-
nished house: three bedrooms,
maid's quarters, goroge. large en-
closed yard. Attroctive. newly
painted. Coll 43 No. 54. Tele-
phone: 3-3176 or 2-0980.
FOR RENT: Available December
1st. Beautiful, spacious 4-bedroom
residence in La Cresta, excellent
view. Will show by appointment.
Phone Panama 3-3564 or write
Box 165, Bolboo Hsights. Canal
Zone.
UN Committee Hears
Indictment of Slave
Labor In Russia
FOR RENT: Furnished concrete
cholef. one bedroom, all modern
improvements and facilities, in
Arraijn, 6 1-2 miles to Navy
Base, sign at driveway. Johnson.
FOR RENT:Recently furnished re-
sidence: livingroom, dinlngroom,
office, pantry, kitchen three bed-
rooms, maid's room, yard, garage
Rnt $250.00. Tel. 3-3143.
FOR RENT
Ifiseellaneou*
FOR RENT:Office Spaee < 1.300
Sq. Ft. I available October 15
round floor, corner Estudiante Cr
H Street. Telephone 2-1 Ml, tor
oppomtment.
GENEVA. Switzerland, Oct. 12
(USIS) The United Nations
Special Committee on Forced
Labor held its first session In
this city Monday.
The International Confedera-
tion of Free Trade Unions is ex-
pected to brine before the com-
mittee an indictment of slave
labor in the Soviet Union. The
indictment, in the form of a
written accusation addressed di-
rectly to Stalin, provides the
foreword to the evidence the
ICFTU will present to the com-
mittee. The evidence has been
published in a pamphlet entitled
"Stalin's Steve Camps."
Tesming Stalin "the most ruth-
less slave-master of all time,"
the ICFTU report declared that
with the establishment of a U.N.
investigation body "the struggle
to abolish modern slavery moves
forward to a more advantageous
position." The report lists as "the
accused" Joseph Stalin "and all
persons supporting his political
system and his party machine hi
Soviet Russia, in the Russian sa-
tellites and throughout the
world."
The committee, which was set
up on June 87 of this year under
an economic and social council
resolution, consists of three
members:
"Yangtse Incident." by Law-
rence Earl, is one of the new
books placed in circulation
during the past week by the
Panama Canal Library. It Is the
story of the occasion in April
1949 on which the little British
frights H. ,M. 8. Amethyst
steamed up the Yangtse on a
legitimate, peaceful mission and
was fired on by Red guns.
For 101 days she was immobil-
ized under heavy guns, while
the entire Far Eastern Station
of the British fleet tried to res-
cue her. Then she made a dar-
ing, dramatic and successful run
for it.
The complete list of new books
at the Library follows:
Science Animal blolosv.
Guyer; The standard natural
hlstorv from amoeba to man.
Pycraft.
Petroleum World geography
of petroleum. Pratt,
i English Poetry Nones'
Auden.
Travel. Biography. History
White man returns. Keith: A
few buttons missing. Fisher: Mv
patients were Zulus. McCord-
Yangtse incident, Earl.
Fiction The loneliest girl in
the world. Fearing: Killing Kin,
Hocking: The cruel sea. Mon-
sarrat: The road to Bithvnia.
Slaughter: o, the brave music.
Smith; The Iron mistress, Well-
man.
Gift Replacements Joshua,
leader of a united people. Mac-
Veagh; The- technlc of the
baton, stoessel: As vou were.
Woollcott; Poems in praise of
practically nothing. Hoff en-
stein; Writings. Plutarch: The
royal road to romance, Hali-
burton: With Perry in Japan.
MacCaluley: Brazil under Var-
gas, Loewenstein. Karl.
Panama Canal Periodical
Article Canal Zone essays and
proofs. Brett.
Panama (Republic) Per-
iodical Article Panama Uni-
versity planned like a modern
Acropolis,. Architectural forum.
Added to the Reference Col-
lection during the past week __
American library directory, 1051,
Modern plastics encyclopedia
and engineer's handbook.
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
TRAVEL SERYICr
IS Tivoli Ave. Pan. 2-2006
ALADDIN
KEROSENE Mantle lamp
f? 5*ndle Power ot Modero White
Light. Burns 50 Hours On 1 gal. of
ios*ne v%m **% Only ,
KEROSENK Absolutely Safe fi
cannot Explode Requires no gener-
ator or pump No Smoke nr Odor.
So Simple a Child Can Operate It
$9.95 Lowest Price
ever Offered la Panam.
All Parta Available.
Oa Sale In All RARDWAfir and
HJKNITURE Slorea
- Olitrlbutorai -
WONG CHANO, S. A.
Colon 9th St Balboa 4ve
Tel 3*3
r-an.m |3 Central Ave.
TeL 1-MS7
-3 a n a la c
INSTANT
MAKES WORK EAST
MEMPHIS. Term. (UP.) Bil-
ly M. Aven. 23-year-old para-
plegic, mows his lawn with ease
despite his paralysis. He hooked
irJl.tJ- nder hU wheelchair.
9PJted by a small motor and
mowing Is no trouble.
Paal Berg. former chief Justice
of the Norwegian Supreme Court;
Sir Ramaswami Mudallar of In-
dia, former president of the Eco-
nomic and Social Council and Fe-
lix Fulgencio Palavlcini, former
Mexican Ambassador to Great
Britain, Frasea and Italy.
They were appointed Jointly by
the U.N. Secretary-General and
the) Director-General of the in-
ternational Labor Organization.
Salvation Army Honors
New Commander in Colon
COLON, Oct. 12 Major Gor-
don Barrett, new Salvation Army
commander for Panama, and
Mrs. Barrett were honored last
night at a welcoming reception
given in the Salvation Army hall
here.
Capt. Moonsawmy was the
chairman of the reception and
the address of welcome was de-
livered by E. R. MacVlttie. pres-
ident of the Cristobal-Colon Ro-
tary dub. Barret came here from
his last assignment in the Baha-
mas Islands.
Fat-Fret
Powdered
Milk
(fortified with Vitamin D)
WHEN PROPERLY DILUTED
CONTAINS:
Protein.............. 36.9*
Lactose ............. 5i.o%
'' ................. 1.0%
Calcium ............ i.2%
Phosphorus ......... 1.02%
Sodium Oxide........7%
Potassium Oxide ___ 1.75%
Niacin .. 4.2 mg. per lb.
Thiamine .. 1.6 mg. per Hi.
Riboflavin 9.2 mg. per lb.
Calories ....... 360 per qt.
Vitamin D 400 units per at.
Oa Sale la PC. Ce. Comnbsarlee.
""^"
Preliminary to consideration, of individual quotas, the Budget
Committee for the 1951 Canal Zone Community Chest studied
drives of prior years to determine the probable maximum funds
the present campaign would develop, and which the committee
could pre-allocate to the agencies.
It is of the utmost importance, in the views of the com-
mittee, that the maximum funds for each agency be anticipated
accurately so that the over-all goal of the Community Chest
be approximated as nearly as possible with the actual funds
subsequently raised.
To exceed the goal by a large sum of money, while welcome,
tends to cool the generosity of the public in a succeeding cam-
paign. To fall short of the goal discourages everyone.
The campaigns should strive for an ever higher goal
each year to increase in amount, and extend in scope, the
services rendered to the people of the Canal Zone by Com-
munity Chest activities.
It is also important that the agencies of the Chest be en-
couraged in their work; and never discouraged through up-and-
down annual fluctuation of their quotas. Once the position of
an agenor has been well established as to its merit, its needs
and its value to the Canal Zone public, lt should cease to suf-
fer a decrease in allocated funds, unless unavoidable through
campaign failure or abridgment of the agencies," present ser-
An annual or bi-annual Increase In funds would encourage
the agency (l) to more extensively publicize the Community
Chest participation in,-their *Renc_v and I2J to assist more
Vigorously in the annual drive, fpr *mds. '
f'4**01*' tne committee feund it impossible this year
to avoid decreasing the quotas of some of the agencies.
Fortunately, this affected only three of the agencies and
<*mount e*cn was "tecreased is small.
This committee found that the Cristobal YMCA,' USO is
clearly rendering full services to the military and civilian pub-
lic, and that the facilities available, and personnel making use
lr08.6 a,lu,ef;.,are comparable to services, facilities and
trame in other USOs.
In the opinion of this committee, it is equitable that the
Cristobal YMCA. USO should enjoy a parliy in funds wi?h
other Community Chest USO agencies: an over-all increase in
a.iocated funds to armed forces service centers is MOOJW. The
& tn.e, "."f?' *>>***( to the Summer Recreation
Program is reflected In their budget request. "'>
-ii- Afencle no* UMlted to the amount of funds as
allocated by the Budget Committee. Pledges and cash dona-
tions may be designated by the donor to a particular agency,
and whnn he goes so that money Is ear-marked for that
!f SSLJm Kat??cy then11'*ce'* the amount of the' quota
tat?. wli* f comm'Uee or ount of the snbscrlp-
whichever is greater.
Chiriqui Catholics
Plan High School
In Cuy of David
Rev. J. J. Cusack, CM., M.A.
His xc
tion.s.
hut I??*6 LSt Sme queson M bP Vnn^L1^"^ thDe P""11"' And the effects of it must
^.rS'ofVcampffi. Cmmlttee determta,n* the
uota^of Th'rhff ^"vl0^L Daleais show that the over-all
, the Chest as set by the committee is. in actual prac-
tice not the camoaign goal. To fulfill the commitments to all
Siten* .^S^f the Commun'tv Chest must ratee^n its cam-
a'ffipaVd^am^^^ .*. plus the
tttse'ist SaSWi^aaSsa? *&$$&&
SkS?. T,Ted rom Varlous soecesTn the tetter two cam-
S estabufh^tha^vT ft ^e over-subscriptions: and endeavored
to estaoiish that over-all quota for the Community Cheat ram-
of in ohf1CthhherTm,,?K d?v,e can- with eff0 obtain in vtew
of the above the following activity quotas have been

tea? i*. ,?Uested <*not Q0U
eWSfn1951"195* 195-1951 1949-1960
W.250.00 $3.500.00 $3.333.34 $3.000.00
3,250.00 3,500.00 2,500.00 2000.00
3,333.32
3.333.34
3,569.00
3,503.36
2,025.00
3,500.00
4,500.00
1,000.00
Total,of Act,v-Ity"frour" MSSS s&Kfl 30\S BS
established.
Activities
Balboa YMCA. USO .
Cristobal. UMCA, USO .
JWB, USO .
NCCS, USO ....'"
Boy Scouts of America'
Girl Scouts of America .
International Boy Scouts
Summer Recreation Program Sisoff.oo
Salvation Army......4,500.00
Corozal Hospital......1,000.00
Zone Civic Councils 1.250.00
3,390.00
3.250.00
3,000.00
3,500.00
1,750.00
3.333.32
3,333.34
3.000.00
3.000.00
1,500.00
4,000.00
4,500.00
1,000.00
1.000.00
3.000.00
3,000.00
3,000.00
3.000.00
1,000.00
3,000.00
4.500.00
1,000.00
4.000.00
SAFES
DESKS
FILING CABINETS
ALL TYPES OF
OFFICE CHAIRS
REMINGTON RAND
SYSTEMS
SEE
V
OYBitOTHMS.IliC
Ave. Tiroll No. 16
Tel. 2-2010
Panama Baritone Took Part
In Contest Despite Illness
9J,ose frtenth of baritone Emi-
lio Cadet revealed yesterday that
the singer chosen to represent
Panama In the contest for the
Mario Lanza scholarship, was
reavily drugged with aspirins to
ease a nagging heaaach* when
he sang in the Central American
eliminations at the Lux Theater
Wednesday night
They said they were not mak-
ing an excuse for Cadet, who lost
out to 24-year-old Mario Farrar
of El Salvador, btu they felt that
his slight illness did have some
effect on his performance.
Cadet himself admitted that
he had a touch of influenza last
Tueadav and ran a high temper-
ature throughout the day and
night until early Wednesday
morning.
The outstanding -year-old
baritone inger said he felt
slightly ill and somewhat weak
when he sang against the five
singers from Central America,
but added that he felt the judges
gave a fair decision when they
voted El Salvador's Farrar ks the
winner. "Farrar is a yery good
nger and has an exceptionally
fine voice," Cadet adaed.
?v,Ye!,erda? Si1 alx contestants in
the Great Caruso contest for
S5nUal Amlca were guests of
the Panama Rotary Club at Ho-
tel El Panam. They sang for
their hosts to the piano accom-
paniment oi Mrs. Olga Moya Ca-
det, wife of the Panamanian
singer.
Here again the range and re-
sonance of Farrar's voice drew an
enthusiastic ovation from the
Rotarlana and their guests.
Farrar will leave for Rio this
week end to compete in the fin-
als of the contest to choose the
best voice in Latin America. If
he wins he will go to the famous
La Scala Opera House in Milan,
italy, for one year's training un-
der the Mario Lansa scholarship, of the new school.
Fr,nuxcle^y- Mo n s i g n o r
wew1 TC!P*D. CM., Arch-
bishop of Panam City, an-
nounced yesterday the estabhah-
wh2,hi '"Me Boy's School
which will be conducted by the
American v;ncentlan Fathers in
SSrga f *** l*"*
rPnatCC?Etin,?.the Archbishops
SffiPS tf}?, Vincentian Fathers
will be fulfilling the long await-
ed dream of parishioners of Chi-
riqui to have a Catholic Ma-h
school in their territory. ^^
At the same time, his Excel-
. ai? announced the arrival
of the Rev. John J. Cusack. CM-
M.A formerly of St. John's UnP
Ker?ity'r*New4York Cltv' "ho will
be the Director of the new school.
Father Cusack arrived Monday
on the 8.S. Panam. mm^'
Born In Philadelphia, Penna.,
on August 7. 1915. he graduated
Sorfii ,fi,l2*beth's school in
,. a.ndJarer ir0m Roman Cath-
olic High School in 1933; both
schools are in his native Phila-
delphia. He entered St. Joseph'*
?01 !?$?.' Prnceton, New Jersey,
Kl 19?tot begin his studies for
Hlf^ ?7lMth0Od .and graduated
with honors in 1939. His priestly
education ccntlnued at St Vin-
cent's Seminary, the novitiate of
the VIncentian Fathers, in Ger-
m.a??.wnvPenna from 10S9 un-
til 1941 when he was sent by his
Superiors to Mary Immaculate)
Seminary, Northampton, Penna-
to complete his course in Philo-
sophy and Theology. Father Cu-
sack was ordained to the Priest-
hood. May 28, 1945, at the Im-
buate Conception Church in
Philadelphia by the Most Rev.
Hugh L. tomb, D.D., Auxiliary
Bishop of that diocese.
Following his ordination, th
young priest was sent to the mis-
sions la Opelika, Alabama, but,
because of his evident skill in
the educational field, he was soon
transferred to St. John's Prepar-
atory School, a part of St. John's
University, in time to begin the
fall term in 1941
He worked zealously with the
students under his care not only
in the classroom but also in th
field of extra-curricular activi-
ties. He was Director and Coor-
dinator of Activities and Moder-
ator of the St. John's Prep. Band
which two years won the Cath-
olic Championship. During these
years, he also managed to find
time to teach in the School of
Social Action of the University
and to stuv for his Master's De-
gree In History. The degree was
conferred on him at Commence-
ment time. 1949.
Father Cusack, who is at pres-
ent residing temporarily in St.
Mary's Mission, Balboa, will leave
for David in the very near fu-
ture to direct the plans for build-
ing the school and to assist th
people of David with the other
details of the project. It is un-
derstood that lh plot of ground
has already been selected by the
people and that they have mad
plans for financing the bundhsg
i
'dlaBBBBBBBWeaVi
a-ii


FRIDAY, OCTOBER M, 1H1 _

THE PANAMA 4MUCAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILf NEWSPAPER
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNID NO puIliihid TMI PANAMA AMtmCAN PSISS. ,NC.
tOUNDID BY NILSON ROUNSIVILl IN It
HARMODIO ARIAS, I0ITOII
7 H IIWIT p. o So ISA. Mnama. R. o* P.
i" TILIFHON1 PANAMA NO. a-0740 '0 LlMU >
casli Aoonsss, panamcrican. Panama
50tN OfFlCk. 18 17 CfNTRAl AVENUI IPWIIN lTH AND ISTH tTHISTS
FOMHN niPIIKNTlTIVMi JOSHUA POWERS. INC
34 MADISON Av.. NSW YORK, It N. V
LOCAl
I* MONTH. IN """"" $ 1 7o)
' MONTHS. IN '"" SO
'6 ONf TSAR. IN """* IS.DO
V HAIL
a.bo
1-1 oo
MOO
fhi i rom QKUM rM hamu own column
THE MAIL BOX
i

Labor New* Wi" He Havc To Co Throu9h Thls Everv Four Years?
*.ir--r -
PAGE SEVEN
And
(iOmment
By Victor Riestl
Tfc MsH > n s sass fsrusi sossi st rt.. ssorm Arhmksi
.*... IS rSc.iv.S rStSTsH. .AS ... k.RSM. i. bslly is..!.!
' H,* csitfiftsts o Mttst sri k. imsttwm M
; s.y. L.i.,. ms mAIsjIma) im ttw srsst rsssH-sS.
Isst try f. ktss Mm Istfsn ImrWss is
OSSM? tSfMJOl *
MJRft"
Isr|r> .1 lefts. Writsn m hsM is sVtkrstr c* "sVncs
THE U. 8. EMBASSY COOPERATES....
"n-JS! .NatVnal ,?niIerltJr o Panama on its steady progress
'^."IZ^N ts ^."^ed Prestige has started a new fool:
.t hlh001 ofPPum!Llc and Conaular Service. This school has
IKS* ~n wede.by .the new ieneratlons of this small but be-
'2?22&b Si*MS /rth.ls ".001 te to DreDare vounmen
ana women In the field of International Service to enable them
0. i'?rel?enL. country at the International conferences and
oe able to obtain for her all the benefits possible based on mutual
.respect and Justice.
.' .t,The 8ihool ha 'ready obtained the cooperation of the United
ions which must have seen the need of this school for Panama
am to our geographical position and our role In the defense of
!m P*1aina. CanaJ- We "hall rve in the near future publlca-
l!" and .b001" ifom this organization to be used during the
.course of our studies.
:f-nJ?uti..why. tai* aboul tne cooperation that we have received
hi %2f *wh,ei? rtght htn m pan">a various institutions
nave offered to help.
'JPi"!?? ^ cooperation that high government officials have
? "r"1 ** glvc we can *tao men"on the United States Embassy
Ana to prove this, the honorable Ambassador Mr. J. c. Wiley wlli
oner a reception at his private residence located at La Cresta
'S MLzhe "tudents of the Diplomatic School. (Editor's Note:
Tne Embassy will announce the date in the near future.)
ki.ni Vud*nt"' we can't but appreciate this noble gesture of
Ur. diplomat towards the betterment of the school and I say
towards the betterment, because this reception Is coming from
*.^n^dPlomati ot m.ore than 30 vear8 oi foreign service and
representative of one of the greatest nations of the world
.. i. ? wnen an Ambassador takes time off from his multiple
d~r?vto..atend .R ^""P University students he is not only
contributing to better the relations of our two countries but ac-
tually giving a helping hand to our university in particular'and
sur country in general in the educational field.
hIfk'tmif ke'tnla opportunity to erase from the minds of those
who think that we. the students, profess Ideologies contrary to
the democratic way of Ufe. this being totally false and this In-
vitation from the U.-8. Ambassador helps to prove that.
*v ,,ey,.has gPno on record of being one of the few If not
the only u. S. Ambassador to establish real friendship with
Panamanian, students.
In conclusion, I want to express, in the name of my class, our
sincere gratitude and respect to this promoter of the "Good
Neighbor Policy," created by that Great American, man of mem.
Franklin D. Roosevelt. ,
Seor Embajador, SalutN
_ RoUndo A. CastMo.
Student of the Diplomatic School
rr. WHO STAYS?.... WHO GOES
Please tell me how I as a retired employe have less right to
occupy the Quarters in Margarita than a foreign 8S agent of a
line In the isthmus.
.r. lZ&2*uma thu man and hls wlfe
are allowWwremam In Margarita and the Zone.
But I am told they need quarters for employes and bachelors?
The Community-Services Director and the Housing Chief
I gnow are both fair minded and do they realize our plight. oUr
cases and all that is In this way.
Evicts*
NEW YORk.Harry Bridges,
one of the most powerful lead-
ers of Moscow s global labor net-
work, has been ordered to fly In-
to New York City on a mission so
secret that only a handful of
his closest lieutenants know his
plans.
They are under his strict or-
ders to keep his trip under cover.
If this story doesn't frighten
off the fiery West Coast pro-
Soviet activist and waterlront
leader, his mission will eventual-
ly create considerable turbulence
throughout America's defense
industries.
Bridges' strategy was te rush
ts New York this week and ge
inte hiding Immediately. Then,
be will attempt to slip quietly
Into a carefully guarded con-
ference la the Hotel New York-
er. So secret is this pro-Com-
munist parley that all arran-
gements have been made in
the name of Bridges' people.
Including a William Glazier of
Washington ans Joseph Selly,
the man thd left wingers years
ago assigned te Infiltrate onr
communications industry.
It Is considered significant
that these men have called this
confab In the city in which the
eight Communist fugitives from
a Federal pen'tentlary have been
hiding ana having a soft time of
It while their comrades are be-
ing whlplashed Into furious acti-
vity, across the nation.
UNTIL HE WENT TO MEXICO
There is no doubt that until
he went to Mexico, the dyna-
mite expert, Qua Hall, Party
boss, and his seven aides, who
Jumped bail Instead of going to
Jail, had been in New York al-
most steadily since they went
underground.
One of the exceptions was
Fred Fine, Communist Party sec-
ond string labor commissar who
ran the Chicago "People's Peace
Congress" hurt summer.
It is assumed that that Com-
munist Party Trade Union com-
missar is back In New York City.
Summoned to meet with
Bridges are 15 to 36 of the most
trusted leaders of the pro-Com-
munist unions kicked out o the
CIO last year.
For weeks now, they have been
alerted for the organization of
the Communist labor federation
which they hope will rival CIO
In America's defense industries.
Then, if strength develops, the
Commuhlst organizers will in-
vade AFL territory.
It is at this sessisn. one ean
^why WSHINGTOH
MERRY-60-ROUND
BIIW PIARSON
Drfw Pearson say:,Chiang's aide keeps son out of U S.
HrVn s??lS, Embo$,y P$t t0 circumvent
draft, Chief Justice Vinson stays down-to-earth.
now
his
ifl
Germicida! Homicide
By BOB RUARK
OW PAST POR A GS RATING?
Mail Box Editor Balboa" C *
Panama American
Republic of Panama
Civilian Personnel at Albrok, AFB., should keep themselves
posted with latest examinations. As they are riot entirely gov-
erned by Civil Service Regulations, except when the occasion
suits them. In cases of reduction of force, to suit their own pur-
poses, a person will be told they are abiding by the rules of Civil
Service Commission. Civil Service Examinations for Clerk-Typist
at the present time calls for 40 words per minute, from plain
t*>py, with nine errors.
In the United States all federal government organizations
ar giving on the spot testa, 40 words per minute for clerk-
typists.
To be offering a derk-ateno a OS-2 at this time Is ridiculous.
Its nd wonder Albrook has lost no many of their employes, and
transferred to Army.
Common sense tells one that any kind of stenographer types (ported Immediately that'"he* Is
more then 45 words per minute. Why not have a class of instruc- not aware of these secret dls-
Dn with the latest dope for the personnel of this above organ-
Itlon. offer a decent rating to the employes then they would
Bt require the constant turnover.
Here's for Efficiency
ZONIAN SEEING RED
Of course I am only a "Non-Canal-Employe" but I would luce
know by what right, God given or otherwise, the P.R.R. and
Pan Canal Co., directors can double my rent and state In the
?.C. Review that it's to make up for not paying taxes.
I always thought that Congress decided who paid taxes, di-
ctiy or Indirectly.
I pay them in the U.S. and my Congressman will be glad to
w that certain non-elected non-representatives of the people
usurping his elected powers. .
For me this high handedness has, gone far enough and that
ludes the present profiteering, personnel Increasing actions of
Commy and Quartermaster and Clubhouses and Finance Bu-
ad lnfinltum.
(A U. S. Citizen (Non-Beaurocratic)
presume, that the Communist
leaders, who still have enor-
mous power in the fields of
atomic energy, copper and
metal smelting and fabricat-
ing, meat packing, electronics
and aircraft as well st auto-
mobile manufacturerand a
combined treasury of some
58,ott,m_ will be briefed sa
the newest international Com-
munist line. This anoald bs
watched carefally, fsr it will
reveal the most recent trend
In world-wide Soviet policy.
The Parley is scheduled to run
for two daya. tn the New York-
er's Parlor C and then Parlor B,
running hito evening sessions.
It can also be revealed that
every move being taken Is
screened by the inner directors
of this operation to make cer-
tain that it would meet with the
approval of Jcbn L. Lewis.
In all fairness to the Mine
Workers' chief, it should be re-
NEW YORK.It Is possibl? to find a curious
public-health aspect in the recent murder of
Willie Morettl Dy his criminal colleagues, and
in the general air of distrust of one hoodlum for
the other.
The murders of Bugsy Siege!, the Binagglo boys,
and sundry other minor chieftains would Indi-
cate that the house that Frankle built is in need
of drastic repair.
That is good for the nation as a whole. If only
because it Indicates that the recent crackdowns
Harry Gross to forget to remember.
The untouchable Frank firickaori drew a bit
in the cooler, as did the dapper Joey Adonis.
n the whole, it would seem the good folk are
finding precious little right with wrong, and
are discovering that they can do something about
It.
This appears to make the polished hoodlums
who have achieved seml-reepectablllty and an
air of good citizenship nervoua.
?X"j"""*** tnat tne recent crackdowns Their legitimate Industries were runnlna walL
&nS ^t^VV^JtL^^i "i"^ was reduced to .TA^M
Diablo Heights
Need Office Equipment?
Get It With a Want Ad
n't asMstsf whs battels* y*u ssa
sick whs rwiMi Urris Wan
Ad is tas r-sasms AsssHess. Tr ft
Tort ffSt fStsftt,
cussions amona the country's
highest pro Communist labor
leaders.
However, unless this story
tops them, they will offer the
presidency of the new federation
to him.
Therefore, their inner sanc-
tum dlscusslonr"have for weeks
been studded with phrases such
as "Do you think John Lewis
will approve this?..." or... "Will
Lewis go for that?..." and___
"la that inconsistent with his
views?"
At the same time, no report
can be complete without dis-
closure that John Lewis' man
In the field are still contact-
ing left wingers and hinting
that Mr. Lewis has net entire-
ly closed the door to his lead-
ership of inch a left wing coa-
lition of unions such as Bridges'
boys are working on right now
in this city.
the hoodlums. They had been semi-respectable
much too long.
..Hack in the dear, departed Prohibition days,
the gangsters used to shoot each other up with
peat eagerness, before Frank Costello finally put
together a truce, and the tacit agreement to
cooperate.
The occasional upstart whj did dissent was
quietly ice-picked by a member of Murder, Inc.,
an enforcing outfit with stock fees for guns to
hire, it was very neat.
The neatness seems to be disappearing.
.v t hazard on the slaying of Morettl was
that his associates were afraid he would sing
loud and clear in upcomim; investigations of
graft and general corruption.
It was hinted that poor, departed Will had
once acquired a case of what the boys call Big
Casino, which ended in the same paresis that
finished Al Capone.
Paresis has a tendency to unhinge both ton-
gue and mind, which Was amply illustrated last
year when Willie popped his yap before the Ke-
fauver committee.
Rather than risk another session of Willie's
garrnlousness, they sent four hard guy with
iats to forever quell his loquaciousness.
There were the rifle execution of Bugsy and
the repeated attempts on tne life of Mickey
Cohen, the big kill In KC, adaed to the Jail sen-
tences, revelations and assorted confessions, plus
the Intimidation that suddenly caused gambler
/i.,!*w.iand.>BoU,tlcs had bwn a anointed with
olive" oil. and palm grease, the Illegitimate dodges
almost, seemed legal.
Now they say they fear a wholesale series of
HSMS ta""9lrten **"*and J n-
m^E *dlfkrnS. wltnJn tne rank4 monts so
high that the boys are gunning each other, the
resultant confusion is apt to breed some start-
ling revelations as to Just who was mired up
with whom, and for how much.
iJH^iJtJZP^f 1 lt^ni "nportance deve-
lops, at least the breakup of a well-founded
smoothly operational organization of crime will
have been temporarily disrupted.
C-4i fl? the old rats, grown fat and suave
and sleek, will suddenly assume their old posi-
tion in the public eyes as what they are Just
rats that got their hotels ano racing franchises
and hauling contracts and beer factories and
bottling works and whiskey monopolies and pol-
itical protection with a gun and brass knuckles
and lit cigars to burn the feet of former friends.
I say that fear" of a general gang war is the
wrong word.
I think a gang war would be Just dandy, and
hwS.reWh? geUt,,!*h,na' ear the merrier
Weep not for Willie nor for any who collect
i1l?!-J?52" had c9ming. all of them,
ever since they broke into big business with the
butt of a gun.
Nowhere to GOP
By Peter Edson
PANAMA
AMERICAN
Only a few weeks ago. while In
San Francisco, we learned that
Bridges, through mutual left
wing contacts In Detroit, had In.
vlted Lewis ro address a Los An-
Kles mass meeting. John L., sl-
ough he turned It down, re-
ceived the bid with obvious
friendship.
It Is known that Bridges' and
Lewis' views coincide on at least
one project the number one
goal of the Commies today In-
side labor.
WASHINGTON (NEA) The Washington
meeting of Republican leaders from Jl eastern
states was most revealing, though not for the
usual reasons.
. w revealing for what R did not develop,
rather than for what It did.
No new platform was unveiied. No new party
line was put forward which would guarantee the
Grand Old Party a victory in 1952.
Neither was any oi
plugged as "the man
can forces to the White Hou*e.
On only one subject did the Republican spokes-
men seem agreed.
This was that the Truman administration was
terrible and should be thrown out of office. But
this Idea Is no longer news, coming from this
particular source.
Otherwise, speakers at the public sessions of
the meeting skirted all around the principal Is-
sues without ever coming to giips with them.
New York's Congresswoman Katherlne 8t
George put her finger on this point In her lun-
cheon talk to the 300 national committeemen
and other party leaders in Washington:
"Of course it is very pleasant to meet old
friends, to Indulge la plenty of back-slapping
and to tsU each other that all is right with the
blue-stocking district in the east, it was a shock-
-Jf.ti%M*Bm had any effect on her listen-
ers in the closed meetings of the Washington
SrSn6,'." WMn't rel"ted m the "ir Sb-
tn.tiihe,*dinn*r meeting, Senator Leverett Sal-
oT^drin popular S^SSS ~
- lead Repu, ^aSSJXpT^&1S!'SSi
tha?somettSSSltbatf **& attitudes
*i Evi ?2.mai keJllu m the earller dav-
h.i. tSwJ'H m ttM Republican Party we
f?hTdK?2.,l!S2I. """vos and not enough
of those hard workers who ring doorbells set
d on._thelf hoes, make fr"nds Vna win the
S%?$%?Z$r SSS Chow ate0 P^edUe's^keeS
a. &2r sayas uw" *i ^ >
the d7a0ftniiwb.^tfhte.I"shlh ta "tudying to USA. and subject to
"Loo Yta" ?Ihthr,.ii0.?ratm5nt *"'" wrote chow. J
^eS..>S^
oi- n CHINESE AMBASSADOR BOWS
M^.l e ^neral Chow is i second In power t Chiana Kai-shfit
^m^lf^0nscl,entl0U8..ChlnMe Ambassador Wclltnpton Koo re,uc
no^Vtehn.t0?grth.thls trlckery ad ftSwWtod *official
note to the Stste Department on April 17 reouesttaa a "chan?s
in the residence status of Mr. I. Shi Chow rcqueBlmg a chance
Mn ,"Mri(Show waa Unltted at Honolulu, Teultory of Hawaii' on
Son a.Tt^slteSJSrS ?! theuchi.na National AvlaUon Corara-
change of status from section 3 (2) to that under section am stf
speculate on the commodity market, tax free'. used it to
.'K^menT116 "* ^^ PUr* **Sr&&V
^-ThJi hlfh-powered, highly paid China Lobby has tried to ron-
Chnes. AS^SS^ffi^^St^ *'
havlnr no connection with the Nationalists mna'
H,Pt J??en!e_,DePar?m*.nJ ta hi touch w:th these guerrilla
of Chiang* te arang mnd *ldmg ,hem ~ C0"P'tel> independent
VINSON'S YELLOW SHOES
itni.'2ff?-U.n,diwn"0."ea.rtJ1 Fred V'nson, Chief Justice of th
u^it**?*,k' glS ?Ut to d"ner occasionally, but hostesses some!
times tear their hair over his clothes
nsr g^^Mt"^ UP at the home of Mrs. Arthur Oard-
rified shoes- Sonic guests were hor-
Mrs. Gardner comes from Detroit.
It sfeL hjcorporated the original Ford Company when
iy,Sr- iirstw.began making automobiles, end got paid off S
stock. It made him a millionaire.
nn^OWo^W^fnlngtonlan/ 8usle Garner gives gay. select dinner
End oSn^gSelg" ^ "^ US AmbsS5tdw
* k?04ig.ns?mof,the amar^y'clad ""ts turned up their noses
at the Chief JuaUce's yellow shoes, he didn't pay any attention
When you re boss of the Supreme Court, you can afford not to.
On another occasion the Chief Justice was seated unobtru-
52S at 1 dlnne.r f?ven J1 glamorous Owen Cafritz when she
called on Greek Ambassador Polltls to speak
- 'ykcount7.'." he aid, "is known for two things its poverty
and its key position between the Communist world and the West."
CHIEF JUSTICE ARGUES
Next Madame Cafritz asked the Chief Justice to speak
u ". Hft. myeelf taking vigorous exception to the Greek Am-
with him. He's Just all wrong."
.. J* aSHS1!!! Rationed to Washington likes to be reprimanded
|y the Chief Justice. Guests looked apprehensively at Ambassador
"The Ambassador described Greece as a poor country," con-
tinued Vinson.
"But what country is poor that gave us Democracy? What
country is poor that gave us the Acropolis, Grecian art, Grecian
architecture, and its great philosophers?"
The Chief Justice continued to recount the glories Greece
had given the world, then concluded:
"No, what little we Americans have flven Greece today in
food, money and military support will never equal what Greece.
through the centuries, has given us."
The Ambassador beamed. The nervous guests relaxed.
.9|
0
. world .and the P*rtv and that we are on the road
That s the destruction of Wal- to victory.
ter Reuther's Influence.
The Commies seek to break
him because he's one of the
greatest stabi'islng forces In our
basic defense industries.
Lewis loathes him because
Reuther Is the one labor leader
who has out-glamorized him, not
only In the U.S., but across the
world.
But whatever brings the lefties
and Lewis together, after a re-
cent rift, would create a labor
coalition as powerful as any In
the country for among them
'hey would control almost every
'-net of war production, except
steel Industry.
(Copyright 1M1, Post-Hall
Syndicate, Inc.)
Well," she continued, "this audience Is adult
an.di_tne,fai.t* *" thta we have lost five conse-
cutive elections. We had better pause and re-
flect on why and how this nappened.
"Our party to divided, it is split in two Just as
much as the Democratic Party is split In two and
no amount of cheering to going to change this
Republican Party we
d not enough
doorbells, get
___ o. ...
confidence of
at i? th.r ?\cojivl?ci!*>* TOt* that the
oop o the IMO's to dead and burled deeo that
Problen^ ^PubUcaW under^d^theu-
Senator Dlrksen almost completely disregard-
ea a/SgS %t hta t^end^em
16 Ba,ve,ne Democrats the dickens *>r even'Sn
artho,,2n<0iJdW5',and ,he 'J-Siaied crowds
a'nK'^pKe" "d *"** u> ** l0ud
As for a constructive platform howevsr tha
hate %?J5X2,*A *- *S5yW8
ff-SS; fn.atui: Dfk-. declared, "I want
PARIS BAZAAR
Emilio Palomeras
COLON

.
"In my humble option. the Republican Party no platform uia1^ hasIhTn-,SSf/"1' "X wWant
has lost the last three elections because It has o ?8e-Cto; And thm~ ?* ,wSatae*s
*s?^^j?^K2-"***% thevrin^h. t&t^,zr$ais&
face them, on account of cleavage In our own
ranks.
The Republican Party will never win an elec-
tion and may become nothing more than a use-
ess appendix to the body politic if it does not
take a strong stand on the important issues far-
ing this nation and the worlds ^^
Something like this might be expected from
mentioned. ^ WWch **"" 8t' 3-
a^"^u^^a^ISan


i
^sttfiSa 7S5W
ormally.
=3 oisr,ssa;'.?BSSs, sj?js. ;?-ir *^sa-mmt
From England ..
We have just unpacked
lovely designs in
LACE TABU CLOTHS

Size 72 x 90
.-.
Uso
*
a/




rAGE EIGHT
rnr. PANAMA AMERICAN AN fNDETENDENT OAUT NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1151
I <
!

I
J-^acific ^Jc
ocie>
V
ffln. Curro" -Xochi*
go, 17, EJloa D.L BatLa 3521
COCKTAIL PARTY HONORS NEW FRENCH ENVOY
The newly appointed Minister of Panam to France and
' Mrs. Alberto Mndez. Pereira. who are leavin* soon foiPans,
r were the ruests of honor at a cocktail party Wednesday,
J evinin. Riven bv the Minister of France to Panama and
Mrs. Guy Menant.
The cocktail party was held at the Lefation.
Doctors Wires Club
Met Wednesday
ham, retired residents of Gam-
boa, left Saturday by plane for
for a vacation of two months in
the United States.
They plan to visit their son
and his family In San Francisco,
California and will also visit sev-
eral former Canal employes In
and around New York, Washing-
Ion and Los Angeles.
I The monthly luncheon meeting Houma. Louisiana, where they
will make their home.
The -Grahams are the parents
of Mr. Perc Graham of Diablo
who Is a lieutenant at the Bal-
boa Fire Station.
Mrs. Morris Returned Yesterday
Mrs. Robert Kean Morris, of
Bella Vista, returned yesterday
by plane from Miami, after a va-
cation of several weeks spent in
Chicago and New York.
Former Comptroller is
Guest at Hotel El Panama
The former Comptroller for
U.S. Caribbean at Fort Amador.
Colonel R.E.M. Deslslets arriv-
ed here yesterday from Washing-
ton. DC. During his brief stay
here he will be a guests at Hotel
El Panama. Colonel Deslslets Is
now the Comptroller for the De-
partment of Army Engineers In
Washington.
Costa Rican Ambassador
and Wife Hold At Home
The Ambassador of Costa Rica
to Panama and Mrs. Alfonso
Guzman Leon held At Home
Wednesday evening at the Em-
bassy for the members of the
Costa Rican colony.
of the Doctors Wives Luncheon
Club was held Wednesday at the
Fort Kobbe Officers Club. The
Hostesses were Mrs. Joseph Lion-
Mrs. John Lloyd. Mrs. Charles
esley. Mrs Stanley Blber and
Mrs. Eugene Erman.
The members who ailended
were Mrs. Francis Reginer, Mrs.
Wommer. Mrs. Osterberg. Mrs.
William Ossenfort. Mrs. Fon-
taine Mrs. Deering.Mrs. William
Brown. Mrs. C. A. Zarzekl. Mrs.
F D Summerlin. Mrs G. M.
Stevenson. Mrs. M. J. Smith.
Mrs. F. Smith. Mrs. H. W.
Shreck. Mrs. F J. Sebron. Mrs.
L. L. Parker. Mrs. J. R. Mit-
chell. Mrs A V. Mastellarl.
Mrs J. E. Marshall, Mrs. Geo.
E Heater, Mrs. D A Jutzy,
Mrs. M. C Davenport. Mrs T.
G Bouland. Mrs. R. H. Boon.
Mrs R W. Bonifaci. Mrs. Clif-
ford G. Blitch. Mrs. S. J- Beau-
drv. Mrs W T. Bailey. Mrs
Richard Postlewaite. Mrs. Jack
Schroll. Mrs. Robert Rennick.
Mrs. William Wegner. Mrs. Da-
vid Stroup Mrs. Andrew Sipos,
Mrs. Roland Sigafoos. Mrs. Ger-
ard Shannon. Mrs James McGe-
heen Mrs. Irving Lvman, Mrs.
Joseph Kopp. Mrs Georee John-
ston. Mrs. Forrest Jacobs, Mrs.
Edward Day. Mrs Michael Da-
vis. Mrs. John Christianson and
Mrs. Joseph Caspar.
The new members of the club
Who attended were Mrs. Dean
Klevan. Mrs Harvey Robbins
and Mrs. Walter Correll
' The guests were Mrs Howard
Ross and Miss Peggy Smith.
Tower Club to Hold Meeting
' The meeting of the Tower Club
Of the Cathedral of St. Luke of
Ancon will be held in Bishop
Morris Hall on Monday 1 October
15. Dinner will be served at 6:30
p.m.
The speaker of the evening
Will be the Very Rev. Raymond T.
Ferris who will discuss "The New
International Set."
New Arrival
at Cargas Hospital
Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Law-
yer of Balboa announce the birth
Of a baby daughter. Michelle Al-
leen on Tuesday. October 9 at
Gorias Hospital. Mr. Lawyer's
mother. Mrs. Frances Lawyer,
resides with her son and his wife.
The maternal grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Utegg of
White Mills, Pennsylvania.
Grahams of Gamboa Moores Sail Today for U.S.
to Make Home in Louisiana Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Moore sail -
: Mr. and Mrs. William H. Gra- ed today on the S.S. Cristobal
Daughters of American
Revolution to Meet Tomorrow
The Panama Canal chapter of
the Daughters of the American
Revolution will meet tomorrow
at 2:30 p.m. at the home of Mrs.
Worden H. Cowen of house 891
on Morgan Avenue.
The board members will serve
as the hostesses.
Mr. Edwin F Rlgby will give
an informal talk on his vacation
In Tahiti.
Reception Honors Faculty
of University of Panama
A reception was held at five
o'clock last evening by the Dean
of the University of Panama and
Mrs. Octavio Mndez Pereira at
their residence In Bella Vista In
honor of the faculty of the Uni-
versity.
Fern Leaf Chapter Meeting
There will be a stated meeting
of Fern Leaf Chapter No. 4. O.E.
S.. at the Lodge Hall in Pedro
Ml 7:30.
All Eastern Stars are cordially
invited to attend.
[
THIS IS YOUR INVITATION TO
THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Balboa Heights, C. Z.
SUNDAY October 14, 1951
10:45Morning Worship
"RADIANT LIVING"
Choir Under direction of Mr. Jones.
7:30Evangelistic 8ervice
"THE PASSING HARVEST"
Girls Trio Youth Choir Gospelaires.
EVERYONE WELCOME
Pastor W. H. BeebySpeaking Radio Servlce-HOXO-760 kc.
Columbus Day Ball To Be Held
Tonight at Hotel El Panama
The Panama-Balboa Council
1371, Knights of Columbus, has
completed arrangements for the
ball to be given this evening In
the Balboa Room of Hotel El Pa-
nama.
Dance music will be furnished
by Al Martin and his orchestra.
The Rainbow Ramblers, who are
well known local radio perform-
ers, will sing hillbilly songs. Wes
Townsend will call the square
dances in which the guests at-
tending the ball will participate.
Joaqun Cruz will sing some of
the compositions of the Ruman-
ian composer. Salo Eldelman.
McAllister Buried
With Full Military
Honors Al Coroial
A military funeral with full
honors was hold yesterday at 10
a.m. at the Cornil Cemetery for
Dalmar H. McAllister, 46, who
died recently at Gorgas Hospital
after a long illness.
The services was conducted by
Chaplain W. \V Winter, USN, of
the Fifteenth Naval District
Headquarters Fort Amador.
Mr. McAllt>t?r, a native of San
Diego, California, was a former
Machinist Mate first class In the
Navy during World War II. Since
discharge from the Navy he has
lived in Puntarenas, Costa Rica.
He was an engineer on a tuna
boat out of Puntarenas when he
was taken ill with glioblastonla
multiforme. He died at Gorgas
Hospital of a brain tumor after
a 10 month Illness.
The funeral included a detach-
ment from tha local Veterans of
Foreign Wars volunteer pall
bearers and firing squad from
the Naval Station, Rodman and
PFC C. H. S^hecker, USA, who
acted as bugler, from the 71st
Army Band.
Lieutenant J. E. Praytor, USN,
was in general charge of the fun-
eral detall while J. F. McGee,
GMC. USN, was In charge of the
firing squad.
McAllister is survived by his
wife Francisca McAllister of
Puntarenas, Costa Rica, who at-
! tended the funeral, and a sister,
CaDtaln Lucille H. Wlmberly
iWAC). USA. who Is stationed at
the Valley Forge Army Hospital,
Phoenexvllle, Pa.
Junta Femenina Plans
Fund-Raising; Function
The Junta Femenina de Bene-
ficencia will sponsor a night of
entertainment on Saturday, Oc-
tober 20 to raise funds for the
poor at Xmas.
The function will be held at
the residence of the Ben Davises
at 9th St. No. 2616 (formerly 5th
St.) Rio Abajo.
Dancing, games and surprises
will be among the many features
of the evening. '
Members and friends are ask-
ed to support this venture.
:hools Washout
alh Time To Save
Valer In Carolina
COLUMBIA, S. C, Oct. 12.
(UPiA serious water shortage
in the Carolinas has forced at
least four industries to curtail
operations or shut down and in
Raleigh. N. C. schools cut out
gymnasium periods today to
save shower bath water.
Three firms have been affect-
ed by the low waters in the
Santee-Cooper authority reser-
voirs in South Carolina.
State Sen. R. M. Jeffries,
head of the state-operated util-
ity, said the firm sliced indus-
trial commitments because
drought conditions drastically
reduced Its power output.
The Pittsburgh Metallurgical
Co. plant at Charleston an-
nounced that it would .close for
an Indefinite period this week-
end.
The Virginia-Carolina Chem-
ical Co. at Charleston reduced
Its production load.
Hardest hit bv the shortage of
water and power was the city
of Raleigh. N. C.
The Carolina Power and Light
Co. there reduced the power
suoply to customers and the
Pilot textile mill cut its work
week to three days.
Raleigh high schools cut out
gym periods, and the county
jail limited prisoners to running
water for only four 30 minute
periods dally.
One Inch of rain fell In the
Raleigh area in the previous 24
hours, but citv officials said the
situation still was critical.
Cristobal Plons
San Lorenzo Trips
For Visiting Gobs
One of the program features
of the Cristobal Armed Services
YMCA that receives the most
enthusiastic approval from
naval authories Is the sightsee-
ing tour of Fort San Lorenzo
and the Canal loocks at Gatun.
These tours are an integral part
of the 15th Naval District plan
to provide experiences of an
educational nature to visiting
sailors.
The trip this morning lor
naval personnel on the U.8.S.
Thuban and U.S.S. Lloyd and
Sunday for the U.SB. Monrovia
is made possible by the Army
Atlantic 8ector who have pro-
vided troop carrying trucks ac-
commodating 80 passengers on
each trip.
A booklet by Harry H. Douglas
entitled "Sentinel of The Cha-
Ses" is provided for each of
e tour partv members.
Because of the Cristobal "Y" 's
strategic location and special-
ized functions, It serves as hosts
for visiting servicemen In the
Cristobal area. Your contribu-
tions to the Canal Zone Com-
munity Chest makes it possible
for the YMCA to represent you
as hosts to members of the U.
S. Armed Forces.
BIG DIVIDEND
COLUMBIAVILLE, Mich. (UP.)
Elmer Herkel of Flint, Mich.,
caught an eight-pound bass the
easv way. Two smaller fish he
had caught were dangling on a
line outside his boat. When the
bass mistook them for bait. Her-
kel Just netted him into the boat.
LARGE SELECTION OF
irrencn Crytaf
nnr
SAINT LOUIS
THI MNIIT CIVITAl MADI
@f%?.
* All Patterns In Open Stock
* Easy Terms Available
16 Tivoli Ave.
- FURNITURE -
made of
FINEST GRADE MAHOGANY
Panama's richest native woods!
BUY NOW
and
SAVE!
9 Furniture made
to order. .
Down Payment
JACOBY ON BRIDGE
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written (or NEA Service
NOETH 11
AQ852
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? QJ 109
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WEST EAR
A J 10 9 8 A 7 4
J653 Q74
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SOUTH (D)
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Both fides vul.
South Wftt North East
2N.-T. Pas 8 N.-T. Past
Pas Past
Opening lead4> J
Scouts Spot Taft Top Choice
Of GOPartyliners Next Year
When does the average man
work hardest? When he can hear
the wolf scratching away at the
door. It may sound silly, but
that's true of the squeeze play
also. It works best when the wolf
Is at the door.
Let's take today's hand as an
example. South has 11 tricks In
top cards. If he takes them all
right off the bat, the squeeze
doesn't work. The wolf isn't close
enough. West can save a spade
and a heart as his last two cards,
while East saves two clubs or
perhaps a club and a heart.
There's a different story to tell
if South gives away one trick
during the early part of the play.
Then he's really up against It,
for he needs the rest of the
tricks. And then the squeeze play
works.
' >
Let's see how It goes. South
wins the first trick with the ace
of spades and finesses dummy's
nine of clubs. He expects to lose
this trick, so he Isn't disappoint-
ed when East wins with the ten
of clubs.
East can't do anything specta-
cular, so let's suppose he returns
a spade. Dummy wins the queen
of spades and cashes the kfcnp of
clubs. Declarer then runs the
four diamonds, discarding the
deuce of hearts from his own
hand. Then he gets to his hand
with the king of spades to cash
the ace of hearts and the ace of
clubs.
When South leads the ace of
clubs everybody has to come
down to two cards. West and
dummy have saved a spade and
two hearts. East has saved two
clubs and a heart. East has had
to give up his heart-stopper In
order to prevent South from win-
ning a trick with the seven of
clubs.
What does West discard on the
ace of clubs? If he discards a
spade, dummy's six of spades will
win a trick. If he discards a
heart, dummy gets rid of the six
of spades and now dummy wins
the last two tricks with the king
and ten of hearts.
The moral Is quite clear: Ev-
ery wolf must have his day.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 12 (UP)
8en. Robert A. Taft, R., O.. was
told by two of his aides today
that he is the "overwhelming
and obvious" presidential choice
of Republican voters and proba-
bly could win the GOP nomina-
tion "on the first ballot."
The report from David Ingalls
and Ben Tate, who surveyed GOP
sentiments for Taft on a 55,000-
mlle trip through 38 states, was
expected to clinch his determin-
ation to seek the Republican
Presidential nomination next
year.
Taft merely said, however,
that he had "every faith In their
political Judgment and the sin-
cerity of their report."
He added that he probably will
announce next week whether he
will run.
Tate and Ingalls released a
statement urging Taft to run and
describing himon the basis of
his Ohio senatorial triumph last
vearas the "best vote-getter
the Republicans have."
It predicted he would draw a
far bigger vote frOm rank-and-
fUe Republicans than the GOP
candidates of the past few Pres-
idential campaigns .
While It named no names, the
report was sprinkled with veiled
criticisms of the campaigns of
Gov. Thomas E. Dewey and the
late Wendell L. Willkle.
It said a "great majority" of
Republican leaders believe Taft
would have more appeal for reg-
ular GOP voters.
"They feel that In past elec-
tions, many of these regular Re-
publicans have been lukewarm
and indifferent because they did
not feel that the candidate sup-
ported forcibly the principles of
Republicanism," the statement
said.
"They feel confident that all
Fire Prevention
Roundlable Parley
Over HOG Tonight
How the public may play its
part In reducing the number of
needless fires that annually
take an enormous toll of life and
property will/be topic of a rqund
table discussion to be held 'Fri-
day evening (October, 12),J)
Station HOG, Panam. ft.
as a Fire Prevention Week
ture.
3
Those who will participate
include Captain Luis H. Tapia,
Captain-Engineer of the Pana-
ma Bomberos and secretary of
the Security Office: Joshua B.
Webster, Fire Prevention En-
gineer. U. 8. Army Caribbean:
John M. Whalen, fire chief at
Albrook Air Force Base; L. D.
Corlett, Fire Prevention En-
gineer, 15th Naval District; Lt.
P. F. Graham, of Balboa sta-
tion. Panama Canal Zone Fire
Division, and Len Worcester,
HOG station Manager, who will
be discussion leader.
Republicans would flock to the
polls for a candidate who did not
condqne the principles of the
New Deal."
Taft's only serious rival for the
OOP nomination at present Is
Gen. Dwight D. Elsenhower
1| the general decides to run.
But there are several "dark-
horse candidates" such as Gov.
Earl Warren of California and
Harold E. Stassen. Dewey is in
Elsenhower's corner.
Warren was Dewey's running-
mate m 1948 and there were ma-
ny then who felt he should have
headed the ticket.
Taft thanked Tate and Ingalls
for their work In his behalf and
said they gave him a "lot of da-
ta" on various states which he Is
eager to study.
"Therefore," he said, "I will
not be able to make any final
decision this week, but hope to
give an answer both to them and
to the Wisconsin leaders and the
Ohio leaders within a reasonable
time."
Republican leaders in both
states have urged Taft to seek the
nomination.
Tate and Ingalls said they talk-
ed to GOP Congressmen. Repub-
lican Party leaders and business,
farm and labor groups. .
They expressed the belle/ that
Taft would be "by far the strong-
est Republican candidate among
the labor element."
White Helmets To Be
Identifying Mark
Of Disaster Wardens
,.,Wi,helm*ta wlth ^e word
WARDEN painted across them in
black will distinguish sone war-
dens from other members of dis-
aster teams, it was announced
today.
A Joint Army-Navy-Air Forca
Disaster Control Center spokes-
man stated that helmets have
been allotted to the 11 disaster
zone training officers for distri-
bution.
Similar to the soldier's helmet
.lner, the new warden helmets
were painted by the United
States Army Caribbean Head-
quarters Commandant 6ectU>n
personnel.
Storing hi ""litHaa" SMw Mali"|
PaaaI Ncfcjra
V-8 Has Lively Bavor as
Wholesome Goodness
no *sn 4iv V-8, there are 8 delicious juices
of garden-fresh vegetablesnot just
one. That*s why V-8 has lively "flavor
and wholesome goodness no mngl
juice can match. Each juice adds its
own tempting flavor plus vitamins
A, B, C calcium and iron. Your
family will love V-8. Serve it often.
tv.ry gis el V4 ii rf.tiel.yi blaaa) all
1 C.I. ry laati Carral. Paraiay
lattuca Watanraaa Spinach
Maab by Ifca makara al Campb.ll'% laua*. VI I.
Trademark awrtia* by Compb.ll Soup Company.
GORHAM
TOWLE
Heirloom
Stieff
Norwegian
Sterling
at CcCoua 1{.S. jbiiccJ
(RSflFRSTLKH
PANAMA
(0L0N JEWELRY (0.
i \ If opic R*s *ai I
COI ON
FOR BABY'S
TENDER SKIN!
.ENTRALA.VE.a-21 TE.ST. PHONES' 2-1830
* 2-1833
U* Johnson'* Baby Powder after
baths, at diaper change, and in be-
tween times, too. It
sooth**protect I
atsT'ewsvur...
im rot rou ^r^\
(|oA>nCmal((c*&ttt0K ^SSafaT*
fl.!.. > Pajaliaiialat.at.au-
At hath lian, wash baby with aenda,
fragrant Johiuoo'i Baby Soap. Ask
K >t toda;!
FISK
TRANSPORTATION
runs
LONGER
because it runs
COOLER
Add to this the many re-cap. *"* ^^n
rayon body, and you' know why we true
prefer Fisk Transportation!
FIS Transportation
AGENCIAS 'AH^JMWCANJ $*
Calle Estudian* Ho. 90
Panama t. de
Distribuidor f xclush/a



mmm^mi
FRIDAT. OCTOBER 12. 1S51
THI PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAttf NEW8PAPEB
PAC NJNB
^ftuintic C^ot
ocie
t
V
nu niton a, ru
Bo, 195, *tm* DiLplum COLONEL AND MRS. ALEXANDER INTRODUCED
T D'NNER PARTI
*
Colonel Robert P. Alexander, the new Commanding Of -
licer of the 370th Engineers at Fort Sherman, and Mrs.
Alexander, were Introduced to a ironp Atlantic Side of-
ficers and their ladles at a dinner given by Colonel James
W. Pumpelly. Commandant of the USAR Cartb School, and
Mr. Pumpelly. at their Fort Gnllck residence Wednesday
Invited to meet the honorees were: Colonel and Mrs. 8.
Taylor, Captain and Mrs. L. L. Keepke, Commander and Mrs.
W. W. Bemis. Lieutenant Colonel and Mrs. Myron Smith,
Lieutenant Colonel and Mrs. William J. Bennett, Major and
Mrs. H. W. Hankie, Major and Mrs. Byron Kin, Major and
Mrs.' J. H. WIm*. Captain and Mrs. Raymond Patricio,
Captain and Mrs. John Hipson. and Mrs. William Coleman.
k Colonel Alexander and Colonel
luir nelly had a tour of duty to-
ther In Hawaii In the 8th Ar-
Kii.nda Share Honors
t Dinner Party
Mrs. Robert Peterson arranged
m elaborate dinner party at her
Iw Cristobal home Wednesday
ening to honor her husband
Kd Mrs. F. E. Riefkohlon their
Bthday anniversaries.
_JThe buffet table was covered
th a yellow cloth and centered
fth painted daisies flanked by
plow tapers In silver holders.
io birthday cakes were cut by
guests of honor.
le relatives and friends who
ebrated with the honorees
re: Colonel and Mrs. L. V.
Innicutt, Mr. and Mrs. W. R.
lnicutt, Mr. and Mrs. L. B.
inicutt, Mr. and Mrs. Wlll-
Ooebertus. Dr. and Mrs. T.
iDowell. Mr. and Mrs. W. C.
I, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Har-
1 Miss Margaret Willis of Fort
kyton, Mr. and Mrs. R. K.
Imna. Mr. and Mrs. H. K. Pe-
rson, Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Pe-
terson, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. 8tone,
trs. W. B. Zimmerman. Messrs
lOeorge V. Dignam. F. F. Long,
I. W. K. Billings, Jr.. of Boston
and W. O. Petersdn.
Mr. and Mrs. Bremer
Celebrate Wedding Anniversary
Mr .and Mrs. Joreph Bremer
celebrated their Sth wedding an-
niversary Wednesday evening
with a dinner party at their Ft.
Gulickhome.
A white decorated cake topped
with a wedding bell was used as
the centerpiece of the dinner ta-
ble with red carnations and
white tapers In triple-branched
silver candlesticks.
Celebrating with the host and
hostess were: Mr. and Mrs. Ne-
ville Hart, Major and Mrs. Hollto
Prelss. Lt. and Mrs. Joseph Ca-
tania, Mr. and Mrs. Douglas
Smith and Mr. and Mr. Tho-
mas Drohan.
Episcopal Auxiliary
Elects Officers
At the regular meeting of the
Woman's Auxiliary of the Ameri-
can Episcopal Church of Our Sa-
viour the officers for the new
Church year were elected.
Mrs. C.^J. O'Sullivan, vice-
president, presided at the meet-
ing and was elected to serve as
president for the new term. The
other officers elected were: vice-
president, Mrs. Harold White;
Secretary, Mrs. Russell Weade;
Treasurer, Mrs. Herbert Engelke.
Following the business meeting
refreshments were served by Mrs.
Zror ail if pea of lUlixed aUrinlt, uA*....
- WHITE ROCK Products
- 7 UP
S" HOME DELIVERY Call Panam 3-0996
DlERS & ULLRICH, S. A.
.'*'
PANAMA "*: COLON
Edith Engelke and Mrs. Mary
Engelke.
Mr. and Mrs. Lee
Retara from Hong Koag
Mr. aid Mrs. Eustace Lee re-
turned recently from a two-
month vacation which they spent
In Hong Kong and 8an Francisco.
Mr. Lee Is the Consul General of
China In Colon.
In San Francisco the travelers
visited Mr. and Mrs. Dash wood
Darling and Captain and Mrs.
Robert Bertschey and Mr. and
Mrs. Guthrle, the former British
Consul in Colon.
US Communist Leader Believed
Jailed In Texas; FBI Keeps Mum
American Federation of
Teachers Honors New Teacher
The American Federation of
Teachers. Local 338, gave a din-
ner In the cafeteria of the Cris-
tobal High School Tuesday even-
ing to welcome the new teachers
to the junior and Senior High
School.
An interesting talk on Panama
was given by Miss Sue Core, of
Ancon and Mr. Richard L. Sul-
livan, General Manager for the
Commissary Division, also ad-
dressed the group.
The new members who were
welcomed at this time were: Miss
Lorraine Foxhall of New York
State Miss Veva Sasso of Ne-
braska, Miss Rebecca Schweitzer
of California. Mr. Ray Crlmmell
of Nebraska, Mr. Bruce Davey of
Wisconsin, Mr. Benjamin, Good-
head of Idaho, Mr. Clyde Serger
of Colorado, Mr. Reynold Vann
of Illinois and Mr. Bernard Frost
of Ohio.
Mr. and Mrs. Cardse
Return frdm Honeymoon
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Car-
doze returned Tuesday by plane
Irom Miami, Florida, and Jamai-
ca. Mrs. Cardse is the former
Miss Anne Leigh of Colon, her
wedding took place September 23
in the Coco Solo Naval Chapel.
They are residing in the Franco-
nla Apartments In Bella VUta.
Mr. and Mrs. Moita
Return to Isthmus
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Motta. of
Colon, arrived Tuesday from Mi-
ami where they spent the past
two weeks.
Rehearsal Supper Party
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Perret
entertained Vlth a buffet supper
at their residence. Villa Omega,
In Colon, Thursday to honor their
daughter. Miss Dora Mavis and
her fiance Mr. James FtTnandes,
following the rehearsal for their
wedding, which takes place this
evening at the Coco Solo Naval
Chapel.
Their guests were: Mr. and
Mrs. Anthony Fernandez, Mr.
and Mrs. William Car doze, Mr.
and Mrs. Paul F. Karst. Jr., Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas c. Barnes, Mr.
and Mrs. George Splotta, Mr.
(DP) Gus Hall, Communist
leader whose three months of
freedom as a fugitive ended
in Mexico City, apparently was
lodged in the Federal Correc-
tional Institution here today.
But the FBI refused to give
any information on Hall's de-
tention. G-Men grimly turn-
ed to hunt for persons who
helped him in his international
flight.
Hall's movements were secret
from the moment at 4:07 am.
Tuesday when he walked into
the Immigration office under
custody at Laredo, Tex.
Just 40 minutes later, it was
learned, a chartered plane left
Laredo for Texarkana. A char-
tered plane landed here about
7 a.m. Seven men, Including
one who was handcuffed, left
the plane. FBI agents and local
motorcycle pojjce met the
group. The men drove away to
three waiting automobiles, with
police escort. The plane de-
parted for San Antonio.
Warden Albert McDonald and
FBI agents here refused to ans-
wer questions about any in-
mates or 'new arrivals at the
walled federal Institution five
miles southwest of Texarkana.
In Washington the Justice
Department said that Hall
would begin serving Immediate-
ly in "federal correctional
and Mrs. Charles Perret, Jr.. Miss
Hercllla Herrera. Miss Margaret
Dagnal. Miss Lilla Leignadler.
Miss Grace Williams and Lt.
Commander E. F. Praino, Chap-
lain. U.8.N.
As a surprise to her daughter,
Mrs. Perret made her a present
of the diamond earrings, neck-
lace and ring, which was her
wedding gift from Mr. Perret.
' I' *
D.A.R. Meeting Announced
The Panama Canal Chapter of
the Daughters of the American
Revolution will hold their Octo-
ber meeting on the 13th at the
home of Mrs. Worden H. Cowen,
Morgan St., Balboa, at 2:30 p.m.
Ail ladies eligible to Join the
organization as well as the mem-
bers, are cordially invited to at-
tend. .
Two Five-Year-Olds Celebrate
Thomas Cousin and Michael
Tulip celebrated their fifth birth-
day anniversary with a party at
the Fort Guilek home of Mr. and
Mrs. John Cousin.
Games were played with prizes
being won by Philip Marsh, Isa-
belle Towne, Angel Reyes and
Magall Alvarez.
The residence was decorated
with pink and blue crepe paper
and multi-colored balloons.
The young guests included:
Nancy Jean Mann. Philip and Di-
ana Godwin. Patsy and Jeff
Oormley, Junior Alvarez, Joe
Flores, Jr., Linda Lou Tolbert,
Dennis Dickinson, Roland Burk-
head, Billy Back, Bobby Crandall.
Susan Copare. Larry and Freddie
Crumley, Janice Mar tlndale,
Peggy Ann EllIngsworth and
Jeanne and Jimmie Smith.
The adulta who attended were:
Sergeant and Mrs. Austin Tulip,
Sergeant and Mrs. Fred Crum-
ley. S.F.C. and Mrs. Harry Co-
pare, SFC and Mrs. Russel Mann.
Mrs. William Elllngsworth, Mrs.
Joseph Oormley, Mrs. Maurice
Towne, Mrs. Fontauzzi and Miss
Leah Palm.
HOME GROUNDS TEAM
JACKSON. Mich. (UP.) One
team in the Southern 'Michigan
Football League has no transpor-
tation problem for the 1951-sea-
son. League officials said that
the Southern Michigan Prison
team will play all of its games
at homo.
institution" his five-year sen-
tence for conspiracy to teach
and advocate overthrow of the
government by force.
Hall with three other top
Communist leaders jumped a
total of $80,000 bond. Seven
other Communist leaders sur-
rendered and now are serving
their sentences.
Because he is a convicted
and sentenced felon who ex-
hausted his final appeal to the
U. S. Supreme Court, he can
be taken to federal prison with-
out a court appearance.
His commitment papers still
were In the hands of the fede-
ACOB
CANASTA
BY OSWALD JACOB*
Written for NEA Service
"I play with two different
groups of Canasta players,"
writes a reader. "One group fol-
lows the official rules. The other
group follows the local rule that
a discard that matches a closed
canasta may not be picked up
except by a natural pair in the
hand.
"I find that I have to vary my
playing style when I go from one
game to the other. What varia-
tions would you suggest?"
In general, you should tend to
play for a fast out more often
under the local rule than under
the official rule. If you happen
to get a good offense started, the
opponents get more and more
safe discards as you make each
canasta.
By the time you have three
canastas, the opponents should
ussually have enough safe dis-
cards to stay out of trouble. If
you get fewer than three can-
astas, of course, you haven't
much of an offensive.
In the official rules, of course,
the opponents do not get safe
discards in this way. Suppose
ou close a canasta of kings and
hat the player at your right dis-
cards a king. Under the official
rules you can pick up that king
(together with the rest of the
discard pile, as always).
As a result, you can often get
a good offensive started and can
continue it for a long time.
Sometimes you can make six or
seven canastas, thus scoring a
real bonanza. That sort of huge
score Is very rare when the local
rule is played.
In short, playing for a big
score under the local rules is like
fishing tor whales in a village
pond. The odds are against your
catching any. The wiser course is
to go for small fishor, in Ca-
nasta, to try for a fast meldout.
One other variation is worth
while. Under the local rule don't
completa your canastas unless
you ara in position to go out
promptly. If you have a large
assortment of cards (which may
happen even if you don't actual-
ly plall-o fight for the pUe) leave
the melds open Instead of clos-
ing them as canastas. This keeps
the pressure on the enemy
whereas closing the canasta
would make cheap discards a-
vallable to them.
Even In the official game it
Isn't always wise to make a can-
asta at the earliest possible mo-
ment. This is particularly true
when it takes a wild card to make
the canasta. That wild card may
be more useful in another meld
If you have the patience to wait
until you get a natural card for
your canasta.

-nfwINDELIBLECREME"..
SEARS' NEW
CHRISTMAS BOOK
ie 1951 Christmas Book has
arrived on the Isthmus.
Get Your copy at your
postoffice.
i
NEW OFFICE HOURS
At both of our offices on the
Isthmus the new shopping hours
will give more opportunity to
shop from the new Christmas
Catalog.
MONDAY, THROUGH FRIDAY,
8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
A^ENCHA SEARS
REPRESENTATIVE* FOR
'EARS, ROEBUCK AND <0#
_.f"^ frf" Aneon Peat Office
PANAMA Cm No. It Tlvell A venus
Tenth and Melenas
COLON

the wiriclfl lipstick!
fabulous WEAR
fabulous LUSTER
fabulous DREAMINESS
Here' he fifW and only truly creomy
Indelfcle HpsHckl Now-drying because if
mad* with lip-*oftening lonolitel And the
color! Not the thin, flat shades you find in
ordinary IndoMblo npstkks-btit a full
range of fotnlon-qenkis color only Rcvlon
could create! Discover Tndofible-Crem*''
nowl '
Ttiiy...try RffWs1s*1iM*CreM"
tkt vtrtft cfMntat IptUcki
ral marshal In New York to-
day.
Hall was arrested In Mexico
City Monday night. He had
been staying at a suburban
hotel. He was ordered deported
by the Mexican government
because his papers were not in
order.
Four plalnclothes agents of
the United States and Mexi-
can governments drove Hall to
Laredo, where FBI agents took
custody of him. He was taken
to the immigration office for
about IS minutes of question-
ing.
Newsmen were not allowed to
talk to him. They could see
him through a window a* he
talked with FBI agents.
Two men and two women
who were with Hall at Mexico
City were not arrested and were
not Identified.
Sino-Reds To Try
Catholic Priests
As Revolutionists
HONO KONG, Oct. 13 (UP)
A Shanghai newspaper said to-
day that three Catholic priests
will be tried soon as "counter
revolutionaries" and also said
that two other priests have been
arrested by the Communist pol-
ice.
The three who will be tried
are Canadian Monslgnor Qustav
Prevost, Irish father Aiden Mc-
Qrath, and Belgian father
Frances Elgrande.
All are members of the Catho-
lic "Legion of Mary."
YOU ARE C0RD.ALLY INVITED TO ATTEND
Week-End Set vines at
Cocoli Baptist Church
i
Phone 4-S1J
Box 2B< 111 Bruja Road
COCOLI, Canal Zone
W. T. Pond, Jr., Preacher Lt. Bryan Zlaglev. Mask Director
Friday Night 7:3 Sunday Morning 11:45
Saturday Night 7:30 Sanday Night 7:8*
Testimonies Singspiration Gospel Preaching
.Christ Is The Answer!
Sboa Bar
Complete Assortment of
DOG SUPPLIES
- *
18 Tivoli Ave. Tel. 2-38*7
KIDNEYS
f ACIDS
Tour body cluu out new Add;
and polaonoua wulu In your blood
inru million tiny dallcata Xldaty tubai
or Altara. Poltona la tba Kidnaya or
Bladder nay maka you autrarfro
tron, cloudy rlBa. Gat tina up NaMa.
N.rrouanaaa, Los Palna, Ctrcte* tfiuln
Byaa. Baekacha, Achina Joints. Aoldlty
r burnlnf paaaaajw. Cyatax, now Im-
portad from than. S. A., atarta workliiS
promptly, balpa mak* yon aal rounsar,
atrona-ar, botur la I waya: 1. Halo
your kIdnaya elaan out potaonoua acida.
L Combata tonos la tba urinary ayataav
a. Soothaa Bad alma rtttatad daauaa,
Aak your aruagtet far Cyatax today.
8m bow oulekTrl -a bala va
PARIS BAZAAR
Emilio Palomeras
COLON
We have just received
from England
high quality
ANGORA SWEATERS
wide variety of color*
1395
LAST DAY MONDAY, OCT. 15th
PRE XMAS
CAMERA SALE
REDUCED PRICES ON
LEICA U F2 LENS
iih CASE ......____302.58

LEICA Ml f F1.5 LENS
with CASE____...... 224.60
.
GET YOUR XMAS PRESENT NOW
AND SAVE $50 -
PORRAS
PLAZA 5. DE MAYO
PANAMA .
jam firt1 & (tyt- ^
Mr: v^
WITH TH SPARKLIN6 JEWELRY FROM

TAHITI
THE JEWELRY STORE
7 e.. 7
ay year ticket for the monumental raffle of the Uoau Cine at Propaganda, S.A.
No. 8 Bast 18th Street, or from any member of the lions Crab.


i
E
i

...
i
r
i,
*r\GK TEH
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEE
FEIDAT, OCTOBER It, 1M1
Bulldogs, Tigers To Clash At Mount Hope Tonight
~ Dixie Revolt Against Bigtime Football Spreads
Contest May Decide Season
(ihanipionship;TeamsEven
jX The game every football fan has been wailing for this year,
ill he played at the Mount Hope Stadium, 7:00 p.m. tonight,
between the mighty Balboa High School, and the spirited Cris-
tobal High School.
This will be the second game of the Canal Zone Inter-
scholastic Football Schedule. Balboa opened the scheduled sea-
son last Friday night, with an easy 28 to 0 score over Junior
College. This was one of the
Saturday's
Program
, 1st Race "D" Natives 6!i Fgs.
highest scoring games in several rursc: $300.00-- Pool Closes 12:45
years, so the Cristobal Tigers will have a busy night trying to
stop the Bulldogs scoring power. The Bulldogs have a letterman
starting eleven, in such stars as, Maphis, hard charging full-
bark: May. a hard-running right halfback; and Nickesher and
Oslrea, two dependable backs. Their line which will outweigh
Cristobal's, will be headed bv Oodby. Mill man. Franks, and Fox,
.'!! who have one or two years of varsity experience. Also, to
)e watched are Morris and Maphis on defense.
.. The Cristobal Tigers, will be out to protect their undefeated
Brco.d, ami with the choice, being a tossup between the two
teams, it looks to b<> tops for the season. The Tigers backfield
will he composed of Manning, Grace. Sailer, and Bailey, who
hare provrn to be tough when the going gets hard. Outstanding
pits! perlnrmancse bv lineman Whitlock and Bryant, should
asain he the deriding factor in this encounter.
A larse crowd is expected to be on hand for this game, so
he there earlv and get a good seat. The gates will open around
6:00 p.m., and tickets will be sold at the entrance.
Probable starting line-ups:
CRISTOBAL
LE. Robrrson or Anderson; LT. Wong; LG. Katalinas. Joe;
C Bryant: <<(,, U'hitlock: RT. Blaklev; RE, Hughes; Q, Man-
ning: RH. Grace; l.ll. Sailer: FB. Bailer.
BALBOA
LE, Dolan; II, Godby: LG. Dillman; C. Cotton; RG. Frank:
RT. Meissner; RE, Bovd; Q. Niskesher; RH, Ostrea; LH, Mary;
B. Maphis.
Giants, Nashville In Working Agreement
Great Hornsby Back In Big Time
No Longer Crazy About Horse
First Race of the Doubles
1Filigrana B. Aguirre 120,
2Mr. Espinosa C. Ycaza 114
3Juan Huincho B. Pulido 113
4Arquimpdes A. Vsquez 109x
5Bljagual V. Castillo 114
6Manolete O. Qrael 110
2nd Race "G" Natives 2 Fgs.
Purse: $250.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1La Negra F. Avila 118
2Componedor L Pea 103x
3Piropo E. Campbell 104x
4Almirante R. Gomez 108
5Con Valor II J. Cadogen 108
6Barn C. Chong 107x
7La Mucura H. Reyes 103x
NASHVILLE. Tcnn.. Oct. 12
' i UP'-The New York Giants of
the National League and the
Nashville Volunteers of the Sou-
thern Association have signed a
working agreement. Vol General
Manager and Vice President Lar-
ry Gilbert announced yesterday.
Gilbert said the Nashville club
will work with the Giants
through their Minneapolis farm
In the Class AAA American As-
; sociation. Nashville had an
i agreement with the National
League team before, in 1934 and
; 1935.
The contract will send Nash-
ville to train at Melbourne, Fla.,
7ith her Giant farm clubs next
?ring.
kT Gilbert
also announced that
"eight or 10" men have applied
for the team managership vac-
ated by th release of Don Os-
born. These Include, he said.
Frank Scalzi. Fred Walters, Bert
Niehoff and Nick Cullop.
3rd Race "E" Natives 4V4 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1Mueco A. Vasquez 106x
2Raymond R. Reliman 120
3Dmino E. Sllvera 110
4Pregonero Q.Grael 112
5Romntico C. Chavez 107x
6Volador J. Contreras 116
7Politico H. Reyes 106x
8 Villanval J. Cadogen 108
9Rina Roi V. Castillo 110
HIGH PERCENTAGE
Tuscaleoia, Ala. Alabama, In defeating Mississip-
pi Delta State, 89-0. scored on
every fourth play from scrim-
mage.
4th Race "F-2" Natives--I' Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes t:U
Quiniela
1Welsh Mon'y R. Vsquez 119
2Tap Dancer A Mena 110
3Dandy L. Pea I07x
4Avivato E. Sllvera \110
5Cafetal H. Reyes 107x
Campesino A. Vsquez 118x
7Peggy F. Avila 117
8Tuira D. D'Andrea 116
9Recodo J. Phillips 110
10Opex G. Grael 120
SLOW STARTER
Annapolis, Md. (NEA) Navy
failed to score in the first quar-
ter of any football game last
year.
i

.i
For the confidence
thai QUALITY insures-
c
Enjoy the peace of mind that
comes from knowing your car
is equipped with a superior
quality, reliable battery. Insist
on a Prest-O-Lite Battery that
gives your car greater starting
power more dependable
service and reduced oper-
ating costs. For high quality
and maximum performance in
your car buy a Prest-O-Litc
Battery.
PRIST-O-LBTE
BATTERIES
5th Race "D" Imported6'. Fgs
Purse: 5600.00 Pool Closes 2:55
lGalante ID V. Castillo 112
2Lujoso i A. Phillips 115
3Montlelito B. Agulrre 120
4CoragRlo J. Contreras 112
5Microbio A. Mena 120
6The Douber B. Pulido 110
6th Race T Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $500.0* Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1Mr. Foot B. Pulido 120
2Marlscalito O. Cruz 120
3Nijlnsky D. D'Andrea 120
4Rondlnella J. Contreras 112
5Mosquetn F Avila 120
6Prestigio V. Castillo 114
7Wild Wire J. Baeia, Jr. 117x
-------
7th Race "B" Imported 7 Fgs.
Parse: $750.00 Pool Closes 4:05
second Race of the Doubles
"Federico Plummer Handicap"
1Carmela II E. Darlo 108
2Chacabuco V. Castillo 112
3Gorsewcodi B. Pulido 120
4 Main Road) K. Flores .120
5Lacey A. Phillips 112
8Ph. Aoollo R. Kellman 115
7Tomeb'ba J. Contreras 112
WHOLESALE TIRE & SUPPLY CO., Lid.
No. 71 West 17th Street Tels. 2-1726. 2-1728
8th Race "1-1" Imported1 Mile.
Purse: 8375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1Delhi o Cruz 120
2Bendigo E. Gugnot 113
3D.D.T. C. Chavez 106x
4Armeno K. Flores 115
5Betn B. Pulido 114
8Vermont V. Castillo 115
7Dona Cielda C. Ruiz 116
8Jepper'n J. Baeza, Jr. 105x
9In Time R. Kellman 112
10Charlemont J. Phillips 115
9th Race "I-1" Imported1 Mile.
Purse: 8375.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Goylto) H. Reyes 106x
2Hob Nob) C. Rnlz 120
3Sandann R. Vsquez 115
4La Chata B. Pulido 116
5glen Hecho A. Enrique 106x
6Batt. Cloud B. Aguirre 118
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK, Oct. 12 (NEA)
Rogers Hornsby was in town for
the World Series, and somebody
asked him if he still played the
horses.
"No," replied the new manager
of the Browns. "Not ior two
years.''
"Why?"
"My handicapper died two
years ago."
You will re-
call that as a
major league
manager, trou-
ble trailed
Hornsby like a
faithful hound.
The Rajah was
as brilliant as a
strategist as he
was as a second
baseman and
the greatest of
_ all natural right
I Rogers Horaakj hand hitters yet
In the old days
he couldn't hold a Joo.
You heard "horses" whenever
he was let go.
It will be good news to Little
Brownie fans, if ?ny, to hear that
the seven-time National League
batting champion no longer tel-
ephones a poolroom.
The question about horse-play-
ing, innocent when asked of most
men, is almost the key to Horns-
by's life.
"Did you ever lose a lot on
horses?" he was asked.
"Never," ne said. "I made mon-
ey. I did okay on the horses be-
cause of this handicapper. He
figured the races and I bet them.
People said I lost money on the
horses. That isn't true. What
money I lost was in another form
of gamblingthe stock market.
I don't play that any more, elth-
NBODY EVER SAID HE
MANAGED BADLY
It was whispered that Com-
missioner Kenesaw Mountain
Landls banished Hornsby. He
was asked about that and his big
league Jobs.
"Every time I was fired, they
whined and moaned around
about the horses," he said. "No-
body ever said I did a bad job
managing. Thev tried to prove I
associated with gamblers and
7B. Bound
8Flamenco
3. Philiips 110
A Mena 109
9th Race "1-2" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Poo! Closes 5:40
1Hanna
2Terry J.
3Alabarda
4Nantago
5I.im Lass
Arabe
F. Avila 112
3. Avila 120
3. Cadogen 113
A Mena 110
J. Baeza, Jr. 107x
E. Sllveaa 110
Fgs.
11th Race "C" Natives 7
Parse: J35 00
1Dallda P. B. Agulrre 110
2Casablanca A. Enrique 108x
3Annie N J. Contreras 112
4Sixaola R. Gmez 107
Juan Franco Tips
Bv CLOCKER
1Juan Huincho
2La Negra
3Domino
4Opex
5The Dauber
6 Rondlnella
7Goraewood (e)
8 Betun
9La Chata
10Hanna
11Dalila P.
ONE BESTDalila P.
Filigrana
Almirante
Volador
Tuira
Galante II
Mosquetn
Tomebamba
In Time
Battlint Cloud
Nantago
Annie N.
bookmakers, but I never did. The
closest I ever same to a bookmak-
er was calling up to place a bet
"The first blOw-off about the
horses came shortly before the
Cubs let me out early in August
1932, when 1 had them headed
for. a pennant. Judge Landis call-
ed me In, and started asking
questions, based on Information
he had from detectives.
" 'Judge,' I said, 'when I came
in here I said I'd answer any
questions you wanted to ask. But
I'm not going to sit here and an-
swer questions put by a lot of
stool pigeons'H
While managing the St. Louis
Americans, Hornsby. says he
bought some stock in another
business owned by Donald L.
Barnes, when proprietor of the
Browns. He explains that he paid
$6000 down and owed $4000.
TALK WAS HE GAVE
TIPS ON HORSES
A telegrs-n arrived at the club-
house one Mfterrioon.
"It had the names of three
horses," says Hornsby. "I went
across the runway to a telephone
booth, called a bookmaker in St
Louis and another in Chicago
and got down my bets.
"We were playing the Red Sox,
and as I came out of the booth,
two of them came Into the park.
One was Buck Newsom. He
snatched the telegram out of my
hand and saw the names of the
horses. The three Red 8ox went
across the street to a bookie Joint
and bet on them.
"Nothing would have come of
it. except tnat the horses won
and paid a hatful.
"Talk got around that I had
given out tips on horses.
"I took my winnings In the
form of a 'ashler's check, and
went In to pay Barnes what I
owed on the stock. Barnes said
the money was no good because
I had won it on the horses.
"I blew upand so did my
Job."
HORNSBY HEARD HE
WAS BARKED
Hornsby heard he was barred
because he bet on horses, but
couldn't prove it. A few months
after his unofficial exile, he had
a phone call from Landls.
"You stUl gambling on the
horses?" the Judge asked.
"Yes, Hornsby replied. "And
that's my personal business and
nobody else's.
"Judge, if every man tried to
stay as clean in baseball as I do,
you'd have no worries."
"He was an awful stubborn
man, Judge Landls," said Rogers
Hornsby, concluding with a high-
ranking under-statement.
Along The Fairways
Johnny MacMurray, who de-
lights in setting course records,
has done it ag.iln.
Johnnys latest conquest oc-
curred last Sunday when he rip-
ped Summit's soggy course apart
with a beautifully executed 66.
This lowered by one stroke the
former record held by Matt
Shannon.
Johnny, playing with three of
Summit's better golfers, missed
par only on the tricky par-three
fourth hole, but picked up bar-
die on holes 5 and 7 on the out-
nine to finish one under at the
turn. On the in-nlne Johnny
murdered par on the 2nd, 4th,
and 5th holes to make it 34-32
66.
Par 45435344 335
McMurray 45444334 5U
44424344 3fc
Playing lr the same foursome
was George Rlley who only last
week had scored the second hole-
ln-one In Summit's history. Play-
ing with Howard Toland, the Pe-
dro Miguel policeman, George
knocked his tee shot on the 165-
vard sixth hole in with a 6-iron
that lit,on the front half of the'
green, took one bounce and roll-
ed gently but convincingly Into
the cup.
Paul Moran Is the only other
olfer to score an ace at Summit,
ast year he knocked a four-
wood shot Into the cup on the
same sixth hole.
Results of the Flag and Blind
Bogey tournament held over the
week end show the following
winners:
Flag Tournament
1George Rlley, 12 Dunlops.
2Howard Tettenburn, 3 Dun-
lops.
Blind Bogey
1Vern Anderson, Golf Um-
brella.
2Earl Engel 6 Penfold Balls.
3J. G. Epperson. 6 Penfold
Balls.
All prizes may be picked up
from the burtender at the club.
GUN CLUB
NOTES

Another feature that has been
added to t.-.e skeet shoot at the
Gamboa Gun Club Sunday, 9:30
a.m., Oct. 14, is a fiah frv spon-
sored by Mary and "Charlie"
Disharoon.
Virginia U. Special Faculty
Urges School To Take Lead
, ------ 0------ -
By United Pre
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va., Oct. 12.-The Dixie
revolt against big-time collegiate football spread to
the historic University of Virginia yesterday and a
special faculty committee urged that the 132-year-
old school take the lead' in restoring athletics to a
pure amateur basis.
The program remains the same
as previously announced100-
blrd skeet team shoot with an
entry fee of 83.00, one dollar of
which will go to the winning
team. We are looking forward to
seeing the Army, Air Force, Bal-
boa, and Cristobal Gun Clubs
represented by their teams. Rel-
atives of the shooters will be cor-
dially welcomed.
The committee, appointed last
March to study faculty say-so In
athletics, turned a 43-page report
over to Dean Ivey Lewis. Its core
was a series of recommendations
"a re-assertlon of the traditional
primary position of the general
faculty as euaranteeing the In-
tegrity of collegiate athletics."
Speciflcaily, the report recom-
mended a br for athletes, plus regular Inquir-
ies into the records of any ath-
letes parti-ipatlng in intercolle-
giate contests. The athlete him-
self would have to apply in writ-
ing to the committee on athlet-
ics for their approval.
Lewis scheduled a special fac-:
ulty meeting Wednesday to con-
sider the report, which clearly
urged de-emphasis of Virginia
athletics. No special reference
branded football alone. Robert
W. Gooch, a political science pro-
fessor who headed the special
committee, himself is a former
Virginia football star.
The report cited recent scan-
dals at West Point, Bradley Uni-
versity and William and Mary as
examples underlining the need
for general curbing of profession-
al aspects of collegiate sports.
Among othi recommendations,
it urged a ban on alumni-prov-
ided scholarships and aids for!
athletes.
Virginia, which la not a mem-
ber of any conference, was the
fourth southern school to act in-
dependently this fall on the ath-
WASHINGTONChairman A-
dolph Sabath says that gangs
operating In horse racing have
led the House Rules Committee to
Investigate horse owners. The
committee is considering a res-
olution to create a seven-man
committee to investigate possible
corruption in all sports.
u..ta,f.e- ie*rbr1.wU"*n nd
Maryj faculty earlier Issued its
now-famous "manifesto," decrv-
.'rfn ver-eD?Ph"" of athletlis
82? fe^Cfflr ro,e decld-
Sort* lT* toPrtn<: Tr^e manlfeto came after Dr.
hn E- .Pomfret, college presl-
rhiHM,,ed ln the w'ke of in
f Jl"t.monLh the Southern Con.
vSSEf' ]wlng 17 colleges in
X* J *nd the Chinas, voted
mUaiI ^-eason' bowl
games and recommended stiffer
regulations for athletes inemd-
mfnti""?!1 entran requlre-
WMhi'n.S^m802> Marylnd and
Washington and Lee were the
n*yES* u the Conference
not voting for the proposal.
in the Southeastern Confer-
ence, Vanderbllt issued ngort
to alumni outlining a di-entteSa-
sis program which cut out aprtnV
footbair training, elimtoteTthS
two-platoon system and cut down
on granU-ln-ald scholarship for
athletes. Chancellor Harvie
Branscomb also urged a eurb on
post-season bowl games.
.
A drive to de-emphaslze foot-
ball at Georgia and Georgia Tech
was stalled temporarily last week.
Roy Harris, member of the Geor-
gia Consolidated University Sys-
tem Board of Regents and a pow-
erful state politician, led the
fight to keep football big at the
two schools.
The reg n voted instead to
appoint a committee to decido
whether they could consider foot-
ball programs, and to confer with
presidents and coaches at both
schools to !earn their stand on
de-emphasU.
Meet Scotland's
Favourite Son
JOHNNIE
WALKER
SCOTCH WHISKY
SOftN II2B-.5 nil CO/NC STH0N6
The fashionable drink everywhere
John Wilk a Sana Ltf., Scotch Whltky Dmitm, Kllifr*

I
Little Leaguers Wanted For '52
This year was the first time Little League baseball was
played on the Canal Zone. Nearly everybody knows how pop.
ular it became in the two months of active play.
In order for the Leayne officials to formante plane for
next year and to afford every eligible boy an opportunity
to play Little Leabne ball, It is requested that each boy
Interested fill ont and mail the Little League Application
Form shown on this page to Mr. J. 8. Watson, Player-Agent,
Box 618, Balboa, C. ., no later than October 15, 1851. Any
boy who will attain his Sth but not his ISth birthday before
August 1, 1958. and who is enrolled in any V. S. Rat* school
from Gamboa South is eligible to apply.
NAME
ADDRESS
DATE OF BIRTH
SCHOOL
PARENTS' NAME
Please print or type
H

RACESS ATURDAY and SUNDAY
DOUBLES
1st, 2nd-6th, 7th RACES
ONE-TWO
3rd and 9th RACES
COLQN:
For the convenience o
our patrons we are now
operating both at the
"COPACABANA" and
"SAVOY."
SATURDAYS STELLAR RACE
7th RACE "B" IMPORTEDS 7 Fgs.
PURSE: 750.00 POOL CLOSES: 4:05
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
"FEDERICO PLUMMER HANDICAP"
1 CARMELA II.............Et Dario 108
2 CHACABUCO ........... V. Carillo 112
3 (CORSEWOOD...........B. Pulido 120
4 (MAIN ROAD............ K, Flore, 120
5 LACEY................Am PhiUipt U2
6 PHOEBUS APOLLO.....R. Kellman 115
7 TOMEBAMBA ......... j. Contreras 112
QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES
CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
AT THE RACE TRACK

SUNDAYS FEATURE RACES
5th RACE -1 5/16 MILE*
Purse: $2,000.00 Pool Closes; 2:55
"CLASSIC FOR IMPORTED 3-YEAR-OLDS"
1 SILVER DOMINO J. Contretes 120
2 WELSHFOX........B. Aguirre 120
3 HIGHMOVST........K.Flores 115
4 ..................R.Gome* 115
10th RACE "E" IMPORTEDS -1 MILE
PURSE i $550.00 POOL CLOSES i 5i40
1 CHERIBERIBIN........J. Contrertu 120
2 (ASOMBRO..............B. Pulido 112
S (ROADMASTER ........... A. Mena 115
4 CURACA...............A. Enrique 113x
MIMO ,,.,,,,......mmi ** Flow
116
Ik


un
t
it
FSIDAT. OCTOBER It, 1951
rut PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDE. *DENT DAR NEWSPAPER
PAGE IXEVEN
Tech Proves Simon-Pure Football Can Be Fun And Pay Its Way
Skibos Show
How to get Out
Of Rat Race
uttO'E NOT: Ktri'i the
last of,i ttt\i that taken
tou Oft a camput-by-campu*
tur for tht innde itary of pre-
un football ani how it ten
hat titan.
By HARRY QRAYBON
NE/ Sports Suitor
prner uon, p. Oct.
IT7A1 C rneglr Institute
ixhriolosy muy have a solution
vei--emphasis of football
:tt to appllosble to other be-
e-.lea collves.
/ nvWiy, It works here.
[T-'.nt the system was Inaug-
--ri, Carnele Te:h a llS
r-1 *hsin Its tall In I vl-
eircV
'4 Athletic Department had
ire up a $i60,oon dficit de-
!' recruiting on a grandiose
M- and eapselty crowds wlier-
- the BktDos played.
th* tram his Men hand-
a-k to the students, ath-
-n '-(tiair oorste on a
r -'t budget, the school Is out
the t rac nd every-
i heppy
Brooks Wait Till Next Yean
Yanks Ash 'What About It*
PASSING THOUGHTMichigan Butt's Tom Yewclc, left, passed for the touchdown that shaeeo
QhloTsisTe. Princeton's Dick Kiimaier, inset, pitched to all three touchdowns that edged Navy. Oar
Kerkorisn completed 13 of JO. kicked Meld goal to live Stanford its first vletory over Michigan. (NEA)
lea
Dr. EUia Bakes
TM ftethod, launched In
1937, Is the essence of simplici-
ty.
Flayers can receive tuition
help only through The Walter
gtffen Memorial Athletic
rlarahlp Fund, Inc., formed
bv lufllnl interested In perpe-
tuating the name of Carnegie
Tech's great late coach, who
irilltd the Tartans from 1814
rough 'S?.
lere's the main gimmick. Al-
ugh the grant Is purely ath-
1?. no academic concessions
e made... player's high school
rades must he as high aa those
of non-athletl? entrants. A de-
serving preparatory athlete may
be enrolled in the customary
manner, his expense defrayed
bv the ateffen Fund.
ONE FREE MEAL A DAY
Athletic awards, are separate
from other scholastic gifts be-
caus regular scholastic scho-
larships are given to about
one of 10 and the monev in
the ateffen Fund Is placed
there bv outside benefactor*
' specifically for athletes.
The on.* soecla treatment
accorded Carnegie Tech play-
ers Is one free training-table
meal a day during the season.
i Incidentally, it was because
of this scholarship program
^that Carnegie Tech was drop-
ped from the National Colle-
giate Athletic Association.
For a while, the Carnegie
method, conceived and put into
execution by the late president,
lobert E. Doherty, had tough
Jfeddlng.
Now Tech has built up strong
rivalries with schools in its own
football class, and games Are
Just as exciting for the players,
students and Old Blues as were
the high preaure, big-time con-
tet of yore. Campus spirit Is way
up. Undergraduates and old
frads are prouder of their team
han they Wife when it was
humbling mighty Notre Dame,
and, after lean years, attend-
ance figures are on the climb
EVEN COACHES ARE PtlTf
Who plays? Bon fide stud-
ents whose academic grades are
higher than the all-schqol av-
erage. Embryonic engineers, ar-
chitects, artista, actors, music-
ians and other students with a
rigorous program of studies.
That the game h/s been given
back tq the students Is eviden-
ced by tfce lineup. Nick fllmclc
captain and tar left halfback
of last rail, and Frits Wilson
startlne end. were electrical en-
gineering honor students. Slm-
. clc never played before coming
i to Tech. Irving Shechter. 148-
! pound halfbi-k. w>s an art stu-
dent. Raymond Snermeyer, 14*
pound starting guard, waa a pu-
pil in Tech's highly-regarded
drama department. And so it
goes.
Even the coaching staff Is
semi professional. Dr. Eddie
Baker, head coach, is a dentist
Of the assistant coaches. Ed-
die Hirshberg owns a radio sta-
tion, constril tlon company and
a photographic studio; Al Irwln
Is a lumber salesman, Walter
Burns president.of a wholesale
urocery.
HANGED IN EFFIOY
With the resumption of foot-
ball in 1M6 after World War II,
all indications were that the
noble experiment was doomed.
Even against small-school com-
petition, the Scots were unable
to Win. The campus hadn't wav-
ed the victory flag since 1941
In '46. the Skibos didn't score
a point. A 24-gam< lov'nar streak
extending six vears, finally end-
ed with the final game of '48.
During the doldrums, Dr. Do-
herty was hanged in effigy on
the campus, Students staged al-
most anarchistic meetings, even
Invaded the president's office
'Terhaps you came to the
wrone school." he tcfld them.
BLUEPRINT FOR AILMENT
Dr. Eddie Baker took time
out from his dental practice
to coach in 1949, racking up a
four-three-one season. Last Au-
tumn. Tech Won leven, lost
oniv to powerful Lehlgh.
When he assumed the pre-
sidency, Dr. John C. Warner
heartily endorsed the policy ef-
fected by Dr. Doherty.
Eighteen players are being
helped this scb/wi year at a
cost to the fuiM of $10,900.
Carnegie Tech athletics now
pay their own way, things are
completely under control and
everybody's happy.
As Dr. Robert E. Doherty
pointed out, the Carnegie Tech
plan could well be the blue-
print for correcting the demo-
ralising concept that has be-
come pervasive on too many
campuses.
No 'Pigskin'
ATLANTA, Oct. 1$ (UP)
Pans at the Georgia Teeh-
Lonialana State football game
In Atlanta tomorrow won't be
able to see the traditional "old
pigskin."
They won't be able to blame
It en deceptive plays this time
...there won't be any pigskin
on the field. For the first time
in A ma|r college football
game, the ball used will be
made of rubber.
Some coaches believe robber
balls are more durable than
the traditional leather balls,
and easier to handle in wet
weather.
Havana Police
Arrest Miftoso
On 'Suspicion1
HAVANA, Oct It (UP)Ores-
tes Mioso, Chicago White Sox
baseball star, yesterday was ar-
rested in his hometown when he
was found carrying a "suspicious
looking" suitcase, according to
the afternoon newspaper "Prensa
Libre."
Under a banner headline "OR-
ESTES MINOSO ARRESTED ON
SUSPICION*" the Prensa Libre
said the policeman who picked up
the local hero did not know him.
The paper said the suitcase
contained Mioso's trophies he
was taking to a studio to have
photographed.
V
Listen to...
DIMiggio, Rizzulo
To Be Called As
'House' Witnesses
WASHINGTON, Oct.
11. (UP) Joe DiMag-
gio and Phil Rizzuto of
the world champions, the
New York Yankees, prob-
ably will be called as
witnesses in the second
round, beginning Mon-
day, of the House Mono-
poly Sub-Committee in-
vestigation as to whether
baseball should be
exempted from anti-trust
laws.
The inquiry was expect-
ed to go deeply into the
reserve clause, the sub-
ject of much testimony
during, the two weeks of
hearings last summer,
and Into the Pacific Coast
League's fight for major
league status.
Other baseball figures
and spot writers are ex-
pected to testify.
Delegate Sets New
World Sprint Mark
NEW YORK, Oct. 12 (UP)
The Woolfonl Farm seven year
'Delegate" shattered the world
mark for fivc-and-one-half fur-
iongs In winning the fifth race
at Belmont Wednesday.
"Delegate"ridden by Hedley
Woodhousewon the $4,500 add-
ed handicap m one minute, one
and three-ltha seconds. The
old world's record was set by-the
two-year old "Platter" at Morris
Park. New York, In October. 1902.
"Plater's time was one minute,
By HARRY GRAXSON
NEA Spette filter
NEW YORK, Oct. 12 (NBA)
While the gloomy Dodjeri cry,
"Walt till next year,'' tni Yank-
ees are asking themselves, "What
about next year?"
Three r r he New York Amer-
teme are ready
tor c-ld-age pen-
slon Mise,
Hopp and Di-
Magglo.
Tt. e Johnnys
Mise and Hopp
are said to he
in line fdf man-
agerial posts In
the Chain.
Jue DlMaggio
has .not made up
his mind, but
those closest to
the Clipper say
Casey SUngel this Is hi* last
Where in the past it hi* been
been his knee, heeLi and what-
not, fierce competition now hurt*
DiMagglo around the shoulders
One report haJ DiMag filling
the television announcing spot
left vacant by Dl*zy Dean. He is
experienced In front of a micro-
phone, and his vdlce registers
very well.
Yet others believe he will re-
turn to the rank for limited
service. He has said that he does-
n't care to manage.
"DiMagglo quitting would be a
big blow to baseball," saya Gen-
eral Manager Prank Lane of the
White Sox. "He's still one of the
top drawing cards. I'd say he
brings in an adoitlonal 6000 fans
every time he plays. He makes
money for all of us."
MANTLE TAKES OVER IN
CKNTKRF1ELD
Regardless of DlMag's plans.
Casey Stengel intends to play
this season's find, .19-year-old
Mickey Mantle, in center field in
1962. It will seem strange to see
anyone but DiMag out there in
Yankee livery, but the Yankee
hierarchy still contends The Mick
I* the brightest prospect it has
ever seen. ,
Speaking of Stengel's plans.
'Touch Football' To Be
Revived In CZ At Kobbe
there Is no assurance that the
funniest man in baseball will be
back next trip. 01' Case Is 0, a
millionaire, and hit health IS
none too good. Neither is that of
Mrs. Stengel.
Stengel can stay as long as he
pleases, but what better time to
step down than after winning
three straight?
At the season's start, Dr. Bob-
by Brown said this would have
to be his last year as a cure-all
man at third base. He's due for a
hitch in the Army, which gave
him his schooling.
Tom Morgan, the 21-year-old
right-hander, is another Yankee
who expects to don khaki.
FIRST BASE REMAINS
TO BE SOLVEb
The intangible factor in the
1952 situation Is the baseball
trade. .
The erstwhile Bombers may be
able to solve the first base ques-
tion that way It hain't been
worked out satisfactorily since
poor Lou Oihrij had to quit. Ed-
die Robinson of the White Sox
and Ferris Fain of the Athletics
are almost certain to be on the
market. Robinson always Is, and
you often r.onder why.
There'll be much talk of the
Yankees obtaining Ned Carver
from the Browns, but they are
more likely to wind up with Bob-
by Shantz. They beat Oarvr,
you see, and the little southpaw
of the Athletics beat them. They
usually go after the pitcher riv-
ing them headaches Stubby
Overmlre, for example. Spec
Shea, Joe Ostrowskl and Over-
mlre are not likely to be In the
Bronx next spring, by the way.
There'll be some changes made.
'Little League'
Volunteers Needed
For Work Tomorrow
All Pacific Little League bsll
players and their fathers as well
as all other bovs and fathers In-
terested in Little League base-
ball are requested to come to the
cite for the Little League Field
next Saturday, October IS, at9:M
s.m., equipped with ahovels,
rakes, hoes, etc. to assist in grad-
ing the diamond and setting the.
fence posts.
The field Is on Gaillard High-
way across the road from the
south end of Albrook Field.
A considerable amount of fill
dirt and too soli has been dump-
ed on the field and needs leveling
and grading. It Is also expected
that posts will be set for the con-
struction of a "home ran" fence
ISO feet from home plate. Your
voluntary Kelp In this project
will be appreciated by the boys
and the Managing Personnel.
two and two-fifths seconds.
Guillotine" ran second behind
Delegate" and Tearriaker"
third. "Delegate" paid $12.90...
rive 20... and three 40.
THE FOOTBALL
PROPHET

'
Every Saturday at 12:30 p.m.

on
HOG 840 on your Dial
The Football Prophet
Pick the winners of Saturday and Sunday's big
football games. And h'i seldom wrong.
The PROPHET'S winning average last year 773.
Don't make any bets until you Listen
to
The Football Prophet
over HOG -840 kcs.

CONRAD SARGEANT
Sports Editor
FORT KOBBE, C.Z. Touch
football in the Canal Zone will
be revived on October lith. with
the openln? game of the Bam-
boo League' at Fort KObbe.
Football enthusiasts Will be
able to watch their favorite sport
In the cool of the evening. All
ames, with the exception of the
urkey Dav Game, will be played
ftt 1900R under the lights at
Quinn Field. Quinn Field IS lo-
cated beside Hangar No. 1 and
has been the site of all night
athletic activity here at Kobbe.
.4ktfSftf3SI
The league was organised In
the First Battalion, 33rd Infan-
try, by Lieutenant Andrew W.
Baird and sergeant First Class
Joseph M. Hardy, WAAsR Officer
ahd NCO.
The schedule will run from Oc-
tober IS to December 8, with a
total of 20 games being played.
Five teams will compete, each
playing the other four teams two
times. The team with the best
won-lost percentage will receive
the handsome "Bamboo League"
trophy.
Each of the five companies of
the first battalion will be per-
mitted to enter one 15-man team.
Games will be played under the
American Football Rules for six-
man football. Slight changes as
to length of the fielr have been
made to fit Quinn Field.
Volunteer officials will attend
a school before the season opens
to acquaint them with their du-
Odds-Makers Tout
Noire Dame As Sure
Thing; Califs Also
NEW YORK, Oct. It (UP)
Coach Frank Leahy of Notre
Dame may not appreciate It but
the odds-makers keeo touting his
Fighting Irish as sure things.
A national price-making serv
ice says Notre Dame is a 14-polnt
favorite over Southern Methodist
this week end.
Texas, shooting for Its fourth
stralf ht win, is a six-point choice
over Oklahoma In other ames,
Alabama is IS over Vlllanova, Mi-
ami of Florida is six over Pur-
due, Fordham Is six over Boston
College, Tulane is seven over Holy
Cross, Illinois Is IS over Syracuse,
and Iowa seven over Pitt.
In the Mid-West, It's Colorado
19 over Missouri, Michigan six
over Indiana, Michigan State 27
over Marquette and Northwest-
ern seven over 'Minnesota.
In the South, It's Florida 14
Kilnts over Auburn, Duke IS over
orth Carolina State, Georgia
Tech IS over Louisiana State,
Kentucky seven over Mississippi
State, Mississippi seven over Van-
derblit and North Carolina 10
over South Carolina. The Mary-
land Georgia game Is rated a
toss-up.
In the Far West, California is
20 oyer Washington State, South-
ern California six over Oregon
State, Washington l'J over Ore
gon and the r.C.L.A. Stanford
game Is rated even.
In the East, it's Army seven
over Dartmouth. Columbia seven
orer Tale, Cornell 35 over Har-
vard and Penn six over Prince-
ton.
ties as either referee, umpire, or
linesman.
The first game of the season
will bring tof ether Company "C"
and Company "D."
Charles Explains
Missing Punches
In Layne Fight
PITTSBURGH, Oct II (UP) !-
Former Heavyweight Champion
Ezzard Chprles has an explana*
tlon for missing so many punch-
es wednesdsy night before kayo-
ing Rex Layne at Pittsburgh.
"I have a new 'power swing,'"
says Charles. "I've Sot the *o#-
er, but I still havent the accur-
acy. That's why I missed a lot df
punches."
Charles says he Is willing t
meet any heavyweight contender
while waiting lor a return bout
with Waictt next summer. Wi-
cott won the title from Charlee
in July.
A small crowd of 6,000 showed
up for the outdoor bout in Forbes
Field. An estimated 40,000,000
saw it on television, the first time
a fight ever was televised MM
to coast.
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if'1
Don't Forget The Golf Club Party
__________.________________________________________________________________________.____________________________________________,__________________________.________._______,_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ .'..-.
AN INDEPENI)ET^fJE\DAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
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FBI Arrests 120
From US Netting
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PANAMA, R. P.. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1951
FIVE CENTS
For Thefts
$ 1 Mi Hi on
WASHINGTON. Oct. 12 'UP' -
FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover an-
nounced tiday that more than
120 persons have been arrested
In the last two months in con-
nection with the theft of gov-
ernment, property valued in ex-
cess of $1.000.000.
He made his announcement as
30 of the persons involved were
arrested in the las- 24 hours in
New Jersey. California. Ohio.
Massachusetts. New York and
Washingtor DC. FBI agents are
investigating 1.025 additional
cases in all parts of the nation,
he added.
The latest 30 to be .-.nested are
being arraigned before U.S. Com-
missioners In New York. Newark.
N.J., San francisco. Cincinnati.
O.. LoulsvJJic. Ky Atinnta. Bos-
ton and San Diego. Cal.
Hoover said the Inefts range; a week ago.
eluding civ'lian and military per-
sonnel who allegedly received or
assisted in the .sale of stolen bed-
sheets valued at more than
$40.000.
Hoover said truck loads of the
sheets were removed from camp
warehouses, driven through gates
with the assistance of military
police, transferred to civilian ve-
hicles and delivered to buyers in
several New Jersey cities.
Nine persons seized on the
West Coast today brought to 22
the number arrested for thefts
of lumber, tools, sinks, bathroom
fixtures, pa:nt. plate glass, food,
guns and deep freeze units from
the Made island Naval Shipyard
at Vallejo. Cal.
Thirteen civilians, most of
them supervisory employes, were
arrested at the same shipyard
t
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a
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I
i
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t
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i
from raw .rude rubber to pure
silver. Among other items, they
include critical aircraft radio
equipment, nylon, combat boots
and blankets hospital supplies,
guns, tools, bed linen binoculars,
critical meials. building materi-
als, naint. platinum and gold foil.
Among those arrested so far,
he said, are long-time govern-
ment civil service supervisory
employes, military personnel,
civilian ana military police and
private citizens.
Sixteen persons were arrested
today at C-.mp Kilner, N.J., in-
Hoover said those seized to-
day included the chief, assist-
ant chief and an inspector of
the civilian police department
at Mare Island. An estimated
si.nun in government property
already has been recovered
there.
Three persons, Hoover said,
were arrested late Wednesday in
Da> ton. O on charges of theft of
Air Force property from the
Wright-Paiterson Air Force Base.
In New York, one man was ar-
rested on charges of stealing
$10,000 worth of raw rubber from
an emergency government stock-
pile. The rubber was recovered at
a Brooklyn garage.
The largest thefe so far, Hoov-
er said, resulted in arrest of 14
persons two months ago. They
alledgedly had taken an estimat-
ed $500.000 worth of electronic
and radio aircraft equipment,
nylon, pure silver and cadmium
from the Warner Robins Air
Force Base at Macon. Ga.
Eleven Killed. 13
Injured In Bogota's
Columbus Day Fete
BOGOTA, Oct. 12 (UP)
Eleven peasants died and 13
were injured today when high
tension wires collapsed and fell
on a crowd celebrating Colum-
bus Day festivities.
At part of the celebrations at
Copacabana, a little town near
Medellin; police fired into the
air.
Their bullets cut the high
tension cable.
i
F
Large Crowd Gathers
For Fire-Fighting
Display At Clayton
Crowds vcre beginning to Ba-
ther at Fort Clayton early this
afternoon to attend the annual
Armed Forces Interservice Fire-
fighting Competition and dem-
onstrations by Republic of Pan-
am, Canal Zone and Armed Ser-
vices smoke-eaters, climaxing
Fire Prevention Week on the
Isthmus.
The grand parade opening the
affair was to begin at 1:30 p.m.,
moving from Armed Forces Ra-
dio Station in Fort Clayton to
the Artillera Quadrangle where
the competition and demonstra-
tions will tase place.
Entrance was being made
through Gate No. 2 and the num-
ber of early arrivals Indicated a
large throng would witness the
afternoon's activities.
The concluding event of the
day will be a gigantic water cur-
tain to be created by the Joint
hose power of Army Navy and
Air Force fire engines. Winners
of the competitive events were to
be presented their prizes by
Brigadier General Francis A.
March, Chief of Staff, United
States Army. Caribbean.
Unmatched Progress
In Rocket Artillery
Claimed By Russia
MOSCOW, Oct. 12 (UP) The
n e w s p a per Red Fleet, In an
article today on progress in
rocket artillery said Russia has
jet planes and motors unmatch-
ed anywhere.
Dr. Bablants. a rocket special-
ist, wrote that the Katiusha mor-
tar which the Red Army used in
World War IT, and various rock-
et shells and landmines fired
from Red Air Force planes had
accomplished their purpose bet-
ter than did the German V-2.
Babiants also reported that
Russia has made considerable
progress with projected rockets
fpr inter-planetary flight.
He said one such rocket. In-
tended for a illght to the moon.
Included 20 motors with a total
capacity of over 300,000,000
horsepower.
This missile, he said, is 900
feet long, 50 feet In diameter,
and weighs 1.C00 tons.
A week ago scientist Mikhail
Tiksonravov told Pravda that
Russia's rocket-ship engineers
considered th* pioneer non-stop
flight to the moon probably
within the next 10 or 15 years.
THE BLOW THAT WON THE SERIES-Hank Bauer of the Yan ks Jaces a two-out. S-and-2 pitch by Dave KE^tTdNo'lett
field with the bases loaded In the sixth inning. Bauer's drive (dotted line) bounced off the left field wall for a triple to
break a 1-1 tie and send the Yanks out front. 4-1. They staved off a ninth inning Giant rally to win the game, 4-3 and
the series, 4-2. Yogi Berra is on third, Joe DiMaggio on second and Johnny Mize on first as Bauer connects.
Large Number of New
Members Received
By Local 595, NFFE
Twenty-four new members
for Local 595. National Federa-
tion of Federal Employes, the
largest group ever accepted at
one time, were obligated yes-
terday at the regular meeting
In the Chiva Chiva clubhouse.
Before a large group of mem-
bers and friends. John E. Gib-
son, charter member and past
president of the local was pre-
sented bv a gold pin bv John
M. Kennedy, president of NFFE.
Gibson, who has been a mem-
ber in the organization for 25
years, gave a short talk.
L. O. Ottinger. president of United States Plywood Corpora-
tion, was greeted at the Presidencia yesterday bv President
Alcibiades Arosemena. The U.S. firm has just taken over
management of the Panam plywood company.

US Corporation Takes Over
Reins Of RP Plywood Firm
Legion Invites
One, All To Club
On Canal Bank
"Come one. Come All!" is the
American Legion's open-handed
invitation for its weekly cock-
tail party tonight at the new
American Legion Club on the
Canal Bank.
Cocktails will be "on the club"
from 8 until 9 p. m.. with Legion-
naires, the Auxiliary their fami-
lies and friends on hand to
welcome all visitors who drop
In.
The United States Plywood
Corporation has cpmpleted ar-
rangements with Panama Forest
Products Co., Inc., to furnish
management and distribution
facilities for the local plywood
mill, and will be granted a long
term option to purchase one
half Interest in Panama Forest
Products Co.. Inc.
This announcement was made
yesterday by L. O. Ottinger,
president of United States Ply-
wood Corporation.
The United States Plywood
Corporation Is the largest manu-
facturer and distributor of ply-
wood in the world. For the year
ending April 30. 1951 their Bal-
ance Statement indicated total
sales of $108.451.000. with a net
profit after taxes of $8,951,000.
Their payroll for the same per-
iod totalled $17575,000.
They have 33 wholly owned
distributing units and 13 other
distributing units in which they
in which they have a 50% own-
ership. In' addition, they are the
owners of 26 manufacturing
plants, one of which U located
in the Belgian Congo.
Their sales figures of $108,-
000,000 do not Include the sales
of approximately $21,000,000
United States-Mengel Plywood
and Siuslaw Forest Products,
each of which are 50% owned
by the United States Plywood
Corporation.
With their entry Into the Pa-
nama operation, the United
States .Plywood Corporation is
installing Willis Parnell as gen-
eral manager of Panama Forest
Products Co., Inc. factory. Par-
nell has had extensive previous
experience in the manufacturing
of plywood and veneer products
for the Company's Wisconsin
operations. In addition to the
services of Parnell, the local
operation will be temporarily
assisted by the technical advice
of Carl Wheeler, who is as-
sistant to the vice-president of
United States Plywood Corpora-
tion. Bruce Lamb, a forester,
will be in charge of log procure-
ment and supplies. William Ef-
feney, who built the Belgian
Congo Plant, will manage the
veneer operations.
The new Board of Directors
of Panama Forest Products Co
Inc. will be composed of the fol-
lowing: Carl Wheeler. Willis
Parnell, Eugene C. McGrath,
Ricardo Marciaq, Carl Jansen.
The new officials, in issuing
a Joint statement with Ottinger
expressed great optimism in the
future of Panama Forest Pro-
ducts Co., Inc. and indicated
that they expect to increase pro-
duction and exports.
Ottinger is of the opinion that
the basic opportunity in the
Ipnber, plywood and veneer
fields is such that an enterprise
of several millions of dollars Is
extremely probable.
One of the saddest news sto-
ries of 1931 can be reported to-
day.. .According to the past
records many local people will
lose their fives by fire this year
...Ninety per cent of all fires
can be avoided, savs your fire
department, by CONSTANT
VIGILANCE against fire...
Costa Mean Flag
Vessel Sinks
in Bailie Collision
STOCKOLM, Oct. 12. (UP).
Seven sailors were missing in
a ship collision of the Swedish
west coast early today.
The 5253-ton Greek freighter,
Tharros collided with a 399-ton
coastal steamer Ranna, flying
the Costa Rlcan flag.
The Ranna sank immediately.
Only two members of her crew
were on deck at the time of the
collision they were picked up
by the Tharros.
A search for seven other
members of the crew was made
by life boats from the Tharros.
Fishing boats were alerted
by the coastal radio station.
The collison took place in a
heavy fog.
The Raima's crew list as of
July included six Estonians and
three Germans.
Catholic's Radio
Station HOLY
Goes On Air Soon
Plaruj are soon to be made for
inauguration of a new radio
station in Panama, according to
His Excellency, Mon s 1 g n o r
Francis Beckman, Archbtsop of
Panama.
Station HOLY has been broad-
casting and testing during the
last few weeks on a frequency
of 670 kilocycles by special per-
mission of the Ministry of Gov-
ernment and Justice.
The new station hopes to be
on the air before the end of
October, to serve the people of
the Canal Zone and Panama,
a spokesman for Monslgnor
Beckman announced.
Coifing Winners
To Receive Prizes
Tomorrow Night
Tomorrow is the night for
the second function at the
Panam Golf Club designed to
raise funds for 1932's $5,000
Open golf tournament which
will put Panam on the golf in*
map. .
At the dancing party, which
will include, among other
things, games of skill and
chance and a little gambling
on the side, prices will be pre-
sented to winners of recent
tournaments.
The winning shooters in the
Esso, Carta Vieja, and Women's
Championship all will receive
their spoils tomorrow along
with the plaudits of the crowd.
See you there!
Funeral Services
For Preston Cooper
Today al Coco Solo
Funeral services for Preston
Littleberry Cooper, an American
Navy employe who died suddenly
Monday, will be held today at
3 p. m. at the Naval Station
Chapel, Coco Solo. Interment
will be at the Mount Hope
Cemetery.
Mr. Cooper, who was born In
Birmingham, Alabama, served
in the Army from 1937 to 1940.
Upon his discharge he was em-
ployed in the Canal Zone, and
recently worked at the U. 8.
Naval Station at Coco Sola. He
Was 44 years" old.
Mr. Cooper is survived b? his
wife, Mrs. Emolyn Cooper, two
daughters, Philippe and Irene,
and a brother, J. Fentmore
Cooper of Orlando Florida;
---------------------. ii
Light Army Planes
Test Coif Courses
For Emergency Use
The order came from the Chief
of Staff by way of G-3 that caus-
ed golfers to scurry for cover re-
cently at Fort Amador Golf
Course.
The Army Aviation Sections at
Fort Kobbe were given the task
of making a survey of the Canal
Zone to determine the possible
emergency landing strips which
Army type aircraft could land
and take off from. The activity
on the golf course was part of
that mission.
Alter making a ground recon-
naissance, eight possible strips
were selected. Later these were
further reduced to five. The five
areas to be tested are Amador,
Fort Clayton, Empire Range, Ga-
tun and Fort Davis.
The Amador test is completed
and has determined that L-5 Air-
craft can land on and take off
from the eighth and eighteenth
fairways and that from the
eighth passengers can be taken.
SAVES THE DAYBauer makes a game-ending grab of Sal Yvars' Mne drive for the last out,
to give' the Yanks the game and the series. Yvars, a pinch hitter, slashed the first pitch to
right field with the tying run racing around to the plate. But Bauer grabbed the sinking
liner, fell down and came up with the catch.'
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