<%BANNER%>

PCANAL



PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Panama American
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01254
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01254
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
f^^


M
+ BRANIFF
AN INDEPEND
W>/fHE\'DA
D>ILT NEWSPAPER
L PAZ
OHt WAY....$231.75
ROUND T.. 420.7
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country i$ gafe** Abraham Lincoln.
ScaavamsV.O.
CANADIAN WHISKY
TWKNTI-8IXTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY. OCTOBER 5, 1951
PITE CENTS

Battered Reds Give Up Korea Death Stand;
100,000 UN Troops Rip Open
' (NEA Telephoto)
. MCCARTHY TESTIFIESSen. Joseph R. McCarthy (seated,
leit) testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Subcom-
mittee on the nomination ol Philip C- Jessup to be a mem-
ber of the U. S. delegation to the UN. McCarthy charged
that Jessup adopted "100.per cent' Owen I^tUmoresiO-
/ \ point Far Eastern policy alfned at giving U- 8. resfgnltlon
V ) and aia to the Communist Chinese.
(NEA Telephoto)
LIES, SAY8 JESSUPAmbassador-at-large Jessup. testifying
before the subcommittee, brands McCarthy's charges against
him as "bare-faced falsehoods,' distortions and misrepresen-
tations." At right is Jessup's legal adviser. Robert Low.
Kersh Still Missing;
Search, Plane Crashes
The search for missing Amerl-
fean flyer Dwight M. Kersh and
[his two passengers was nullified
[this morning by rain and fog at
[the headwaters of the Bayano
I River.
Air Force and private planes
I were not able to cover the area.
1 Yesterday a searching Ercoupe,
(owned and flown by Commander
IF. L. Dubois of 15th Naval Dis-
I trict headquarters, crashed into
the sea after engine failure,
Dubois and his passenger, radio
| commentator Vicente Alba
reached shore safely.
Dubois and Kersh are flying
friends.
The search for Kersh's party
was concentrated in the Bayano
River area after United States
Air Force search planes, shortly
before dusk last night, reported
seeing red and green flares fired
from the jungle in that area.
Aviacin General Inc. (AOSA),
the Panama domestic airline
which owns the Piper Clipper
:ersh was flying, reports that
be Clipper carried no flares.
But Dubois fired red flares at
C-82 from the beach near the
Tocumen River mouth.
A bam radio operator reported
picking up signals from a trans-
mitter believed to be in the Ba-
yano area that the three missing
men were safe.
This report Is being treated
with reserve pending confirma-
tion.
Kersh has been missing since
he left La Palma, Darien, for
Paltllla at 12:05 p.m. Monday.
His passengers were wealthy
Darien merchant Adan Diaz
and Enrique Alves, also of Da-
rien. \
They carried no jungle equip-
ment, but in the Bayano area
at least there are many small
native villages where they could
find food and shelter.
While mist this morning foil-
ed Air Force attempts to follow
up last evening's flare sighting.
AGSA pilot Ruben Cantu in a
Piper Cub found a hole In the
mist over one village far up toe
Bayano.
Cantu carried as his observer
Rafael Font, nephew of the
missing Diaz.
As the Piper Cub circled, the
villages lit a smoke signal by
the river, but Cantu and Pong
(Continued on Page a. CoL t)
'Cristobal' Resumes Voyage
After Riding Out Hurricane
WASHINGTON, Oct. 5 (UP)
The Panam Line ship Cristobal.
Panama-bound, with 155 passen-
gers, resumed her voyage at mid-
night last night after being hove
to since Wednesday in a hurri-
cane 7 miles north of Cape Hat-
teras. '
She is now due to dock at Cris-
tobal 7a.m Tuesday. -
The hurricane was churning
northeastward along the Atlan-
tic coast today and was expected
to hit the Nantucket and Cape
Cod areas of Massachusetts with
0 m.pJi. winds this afternoon
and tonight.
A Weather Bureau advisory
this morning warned shipping:
"Exercise caution off the coast
from Cape Hatteras to Portland,
Maine.'.
"Storm warnings remain dis-
played over the area.
"Abnprmally high tides are
likely along the coast from the
Virginia Capes to Block Island."
The hurricane, slowly losing its
punch as It churned northward,
swerved out to sea last night af-
ter fllrtlru with the Virginia-
Carolina coast for 24 hours, and
menaced Atlantic shipping off
the eastern seaboard.
The big storm had Une mar*
than $t,MMN'w*th of dam-
age, claimed at least one Ufe
and battered a scare of eeaatal
hamlets along with Florida's
Gold Coast and truck crop re-
gion- .
Gales, tides and high winds
punished coastal-towns from Wil-
mington, N. C. to Norfolk, Va.,
Capt. 0. Vineyard,
Ex-Canal Pilot,
Dies In Florida
Captain Oakley Vineyard who
retired in 1944 as a Panam Ca-
nal pilot, died yesterday In St.
Petersburg.
Funeral services will be held
next Tuesday at the John Spicer
Funeral Homer In Wilmington,
Delaware.
Captain Vineyard was born in
Warwick, Maryland, and attend-
ed school In Ddessa, Delaware.
He was employed for about ten
years as a tugboat captain be-
fore coming to the Canal Zone,
the Canal organiz-
but little serious damage was re-
ported.
The Navy and Coast Guard
gave up their search today for
an vunlden tilled six-year-old boy
washed overboard from the mer-
chant ship Valento about 22 miles
east of Hatteras, off the wind-
swept North Carolina outer
banks.
An oyster boat, the 85-foot
Marvin K, was driven aground in
Chesapeake Bay ana an 8,558-
ton ore carrier, the Marore,
grounded briefly early yesterday
off Cape Henrv but got free be-
fore Coast Guard cutters reach-
ed it.
About 5O0 utility poles over a
five-mile stretch of ocean front
near Virginia beach were short-
circuited and flaming early today
before rains quenched the fires.
Small craft stayed in port
along the Virginia-Carolina coast
and military bases all buttoned
up as the hurricane passed off-
shore.
Carolina coastal residents, who
have escaped every major hur-
ricane in the last 10 years, were-
n't excited about the big storm.
Police In Wilmington and Eli-
zabeth City, N.C.. at the two ends
of the long outer banks, report-
ed "a little blow and a little ram
but nothing much."
Five-Year Suspended Sentence
Meted Out To Cuestick Killer
A- young Panamanian today
was free after facing a voluntary
manslaughter charge In the US.
District Court at Ancon.
- Albert De Costa Howard was
given a five-year suspended sen-
tence by Judge J. J. Hancoek
this morning
who Jammed
while spectators
the courtr o om
Last Tree Payday'
For (anal Employes
Will Be Monday
The era of so-called "free
paydays" will come to a close for
employes of the Canal organiza-
tion with the paychecks which
they will receive next Monday.
After the payday next week,
a deduction will be made on
every paycheck for rental, as a
result of the new weekly rent
schedule which will go into ef-
fect Nov. 1. The first payroll de-
ductions for rental under the
new system will be on the pay-
checks to be received Nov. 6.
Since electric bills, rentals and
other charges have been made
on a monthly basis and most
employes are paid bi-weekly,
there have been two "free pay-
days" a year on which no deduc-
t for
Jan-
He Joined
atlon In January 1914 and serv-
ed as mate In the Dredging and tion were necessary except
Marine Divisions until July 1916 retirement and, since last i
when he became a towboat mas-
He became a pilot in May 1017
and held that position through-
out the remainder of his Canal
service. .
Captain Vineyard is survived
by his wife.
SS Southern Isle'
Splits In Atlantic;
5 Drown, 7 Rescued
NORFOLK, Va., Oct. 5 (UP)
A 3,325-ton cargo ship, theSouth-
pm Isle, broke in half and sank
400 miles off the South Carolina
coast, killing at least five mem-
bers of the 24-man crew.
Seven others were rescued
from the seas by the freighter
Charlotte Lykes which raced to
the scene following a brief dis-
tress signal which the Southern
Isle was able to transmit over
the radio before her radio'room
was afloat.
The Coast Guard said that five
bodies had been sighted.
Dispatches left 12 crewmen
unaccounted for.
uary Income tax.
The last free payday was on
May 8.
The "free" features of next
week's payday will be marred
for teachers by the deduction of
fixed charges for the pay per-
iod ending Sept. 1, which were
not collected on the Sept. 11
payday; and for hospital em-
ployes, for whom subsistence
and quarters charges will be de-
ducted from this paycheck for
the service month of August.
These charges for hospital
employes formerly were deduct-
ed two months In arrears and
starting this pay period, are be-
ing placed on a basis of one
month In arrears.
Hey!
You Can
Move Now
Checkout charges for tenants
vacating Canal quarters have
been eliminated, it was announc-
ed today by Henry L. Donovan,
Community Bervices Director.
Charges will be made, how-
w
strained to hear every word.
Howard, who just turned 21
yesterday, pleaded guilty Oct. 2.
in free on 1600 ball.
ifgec? wlH'lsseng"V%-
sponUfttt for the death of a
young La Boca boy, Clarence
Brown, whom he struck over the
head with a cue stick following
an argument in the La Boca
Theater Aug. 22.
The victim died a few days la-
ter.
Today, defense Counsel Will-
iam J- Sheridan, Jr.. called on
George C. Wright, principal of
the La Boca School, who testified
as to Howard's good conduct and
character.
Also testifying in the defend-
ant's behalf this morning was
Ricardo Bunting, shop foreman
at the Dodge-De Soto Automobile
Co. of Panama where Howard
has been employed as a garage
helper. Bunting declared he
would, not hesitate to reemploy
Howard since he had never given
the company any trouble, and his
work was highly satisfactory.
Acting District Attorney Row-
land K. Hazard recommended
three years in the penitentiary,
and Sheridan asked for a sus-
pended sentence.
Judge Hancock said that the
court Is always Impressed with a
man's previous record. He added
that although the charge How-
ard faced was an extremely se-
rious one. he wanted to give the
man a "fair chance."
The suspended five year sen-
tence carried with It the provi-
sion that Howard maintain a
good conduct record in Panama
and the Canal Zone for the en-
tire period.
Red's A-Blasts
Can Pulverize
West-British
LONDON. Oct. 5 (UP)British
sources said today that Russia
probably has a stockpile of about
50 atomic bombsenough to ob-
literate all the capital cities of
western Europe.
Because of their current
"peace" offensive, however, the
Russians were expected either to
deny or to Ignore Wednesday's
Washington announcement that
they have exploded their second
atomic bomb, leaving it to alarm-
ists in the West to preach the
gospel of fear.
If Russia takes any notice at
all of the Washington announce-
ment, British sources'said, they
probably will pass it off with
vague claims tnat atomic energy
Is being used to bend nature to
Stalin's willas was the case af-
ter their first atomic explosion
was reported.
The Washington announce-
ment created Tittle excitement
here. A spokesman for Prime
Minister Clement R. Attlee said
Britain knew about the atom
blast before it was reported in
Washington.
In Washington, meanwhile,
the Congressional Atomic En-
ergy Committee heard a secret
briefing on Russia's new A-
homb test and promptly sched-
uled a vote 'Monday on a reso-
lution calling for "all-out" ea>
Sanslon of the U. S. Atomic ef-
ort.
President Harry 8. Truman si-
multaneously disclosed that this
country learned of the second
Soviet atomic bomb explosion
less than 10 days ago.
He also told his weekly news
conference that he hopes the
Russian atomic progress does not
make war more imminent. But he
added soberly that he cannot be
sure.
All atomic sources. Congres-
sional and administrative, put
substantially the same interpre-
tation on the new Russian blast:
It means the Russians have built
up their stockpile of "conven-
tional" clty-wrecklng A-bombs to
the point where they can now
use new production of atomic ex-
plosive for other types of wea-
pons, such as guided missiles.
Authorities with access to U.S.
Intelligence reports said Russia
now has enough A-bombs to
blast 20 or 30 American cities
simultaneously. Since several
bombs would be needed for a
thorough demolition job on
larger cities, such as New York,
their estimate of the Soviet
stockpile points to around 100
bombs.
The US. stockpile Is estimated
in the best-informed unofficial
circles as more than 1.000.
8TH ARMY HQ., Oct. 5 (UP) Bartered Commun-
ist armies suddenly gave up their death stand in Western
Korea today and fell back northwards under an attack by
100,000 United Nations troops.
British Brigadier George Taylor claimed that the five-
division United Nations offensive has broken the Commun-
ists winter line.
Taylor said: "The Chinese on the British Common-
wealth Division's front broke and ran this morning.
"We have taken over hills with bunkers as deep as
20 feet, which indicate the Chinese intended to stay there
all winter. They had new winter gear which they left be-
hind."
The Communists are believed to have taken up' posi-
tions farther north, guarding the lowlying plains below
the North Korean capital of Pyongyang.
On this third day of the flam-
ing fall offensive along a 40-mile
front the Reds abandoned forti-
fied hill positions which they had
fought bitterly to hold only a
few hours earlier. ,
The United States 3rd Division
seized without opposition one
height which had withstood
flamethrowers *nd tank and In-
fantry assaults for seven days.
In the past two days fighting
for this and two other heights
the 3rd Division is estimated to
have Inflicted the following cas-
ualties on the Reds: 500 dead, 682
wounded, 35 prisoners.
Though blasted continuously
by one of the heaviest United Na-
tions artillery barrages of the bres ahot down one of a flight of
Korean war, most of the deep- 9* Mies.
Communist mountain emplace. United States Thunder! et- pi -
ments were still intact.
One Red entrenchment, but-
tressed by dirt and logs, was large
Clothesline Pilferer
Nob 45-Day Term;
Teen Ager Gels 30
Lincho Hawkins, who la earn-
ing himself the reputation of
"clothesline thief" was setnenced
to 45 days In jail on two petit
larceny charges in this morning's
session of the Balboa Magis-
trate's Court.
Hawkins, a 36-year-old Pana-
manian, pleaded guilty to both
charges. In Ancon, he stole four
men's shirts, valued at $6, from
a line belonging to J. J. Wood.
He was also charged with taking
one basketball uniform belonging
to Jean Dorgan from another
clothesline in Ancon.
Hawkins faces, another petit
larceny charge (also involving a
clothesline theft) later in the
week.
Also handed down this morn-
ing was a 30-day sentence meted
out to Adolfo Bernal. 15, who
broke Into a car near Oorgas
Hospital and stole a leather bag
containing medical equipment
valued at $12. Bernal pleaded
guilty to petit larceny. The stol-
en goods belonged to Dr. Lewis
L. Parker. This was Bernal's sec-
ond offense.
enough to shelter 1,000 men.
The United Nations advance
cleared the last threat to the
Seoul-Chorwon railway, which
could be vital In supplying Unit-
ed Nations troops on the east
coast this winter.
Eleven Superforts thundered
out ahead of the United Na-
tions ground forces and dump-
ed 138 tona of bombs on a 1,200-
ft. steel railway bridge across
the Taedong River, where It
runs through the middle of Py-
ongyang.
The Superforts reported mea-
Sr anti-aircraft fire and no
jhter opposition. All the Su-
perforts returned safely to base.
A flight of 34 United States Sa-
lots reported that a flight of SO
Mlgs stood by without attacking
as United Nations propeller-driv-
en Mustang fighter bombers
dive-bombed rail lines north of
Pyongyang.
Finally eight of the Mlgs came
down from 30,000 feet to 10.000
feet where the Thunderjets were
covering the Mustangs.
The Thunderjets turned on
these eight Mlgs and damaged
one.
All United States Jets returned
safely to base. The Mustangs are
not mentioned.
The sudden Communist with-
drawal on the western front came
as a surprise. The Red resistance
melted shortly before dawn.
Stiffest fighting last night was
northwest of Yonchon, where a
(Continued on Page 6. Column f)
Ft Clayton PFC
Accidentlaly Shot
On Maneuvers
During night maneuvers
Wednesday PFC Eugene W.
Winget of the 45th Reconnais-
sance Battalion was accident-
ally shot in the-left shoulder
Kith a blank cartridge wad, by
a soldier of the same organisa-
tion.
Private Winget was admitted
to U. Army Hospital Fort
Clayton, where an examination
showed the wound was net se-
rious.
to
from San Juan. Puerto Rico,
Chester, Pennsylvania.
Not Quite
That Easy!
JACKSONVILLI, Pla.. Oct. 5
(UP)A Jacksonville finance
company that advertises how
easy It Is te borrow money
opened it safe today and
found $1.300 In cash missing.
"This isn't exactlr what we
had in mind," said Manager
H. H. BeU.
gross negiiger.ee or unauthorized
acts committed during a tenant's
occupancy of Quarters.
The new svtem went into ef-
fect Oct. 1.
Charges which have been e!lr
minated Include those for gar-
age floor cleaning, cleaning of
electric ranges, drayage on fur-
niture returned to the Housing
Divisin, removal of minor Ins-
tallations such as shelves, re-
moval of decals, use of non-
standard paint In basement
rooms and other similar minor
items.
SAFE AT HOME in a cloud of dust is Monte Irvin (20),
New York Giants' leftfielder, who streaked across the
plate in a daring steal in first inning of Thursday's
World Series game against the Yankees in New York.
Yank catcher Yogi Berra mokes the tag too late while
Bobby Thomson, who was gt bat, falls away from the
action. It was the first steal of home in World Series
competition in 30 years.


i
>\OE TWO
tnr. MNAMA AMERICAN AN WDEPENTJFNT DAILY NEWSPAPER
targo and Freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping &
Ah Line News
Fertile Afent Returns
From Buenos Aires
Nigel Simons and his wife have
Just returned from a two-month
vacation which they spent In
Buenos Aires. Argentina. Simons
Is local agent for Femle and
Company. They boarded the Vll-
ma Dan in Chile for the return
trip.
KLM To Transport
Flying Fish in Plastic Bags
In the near future KLM. will
transport Uve fish In special
plastic bags which are about 3
feet long and which are hung up
in the aircraft.
The idea is to increase the oxy-
gen content of the air above the
water surface, so that the fish
can be transported under favora-
bl? rendition*.
The necessary information Is
bsin- compiled partly on a scien-
tific basis and partly by experi-
ment.
The bov messengers at the K.
L.M. Head Office in The Hague.
for example, now spend their
spare time catching sticklebacks
with a landing net.
The first of the jam pots filled
with these tiny fish have just
been delivered to the Freight Di-
vision by enthusiastic messen-
gers, and so it is now possible to
begin experiments to find out the
Ideal way of transporting flying
fish.
TERRY AND THE PIRATES
FRECI
rfturwn*
Wise Guys, Huh?
**u*r soy.'...i kmsm thm* rumos*
AOUT YOU MIN0 A pon WU PHOWy
AMD A SOON A* I IMPORT SACK
TO OL JO ANO OC MAO, YOU WON'T
HAV>ATHIN6 TO WORRyAfOUT.
panagra OFFICIALS who'visited Panama held a meeting In the Pan-American room of
Hotel El Fanama at which the entire local personnel of Panagra attended, in addition to
the traffic representatives of Panama Agencies Co., A. G. Diesz. general manager of Pana-
ma Agencies, and E. Orozco and A. Erb, managers of the Panama and Balboa offices.
Each of the Panagra officials addressed the group on the close harmony between the
various component operations of Panagra, enabling the line to give maximum service to the
passengers.
The Panagra officials, now In Call, are J. W. Walker. Jr., regional manager; G. K. McCoun,
assistant sales manager; J. K. Butler, superintendent of stations; and Capt. F. Hummel, de-
puty chief pilot.
PAA Plans Tourist Service
Across Atlantic Next Year
Pan American World Airways
plans to Inaugurate tourist-type
Clipper service between New York
and London next year at a fare
level of $250 or less.
The decision to seek govern-
ment approval for its long-
standing proposal to offer bar-
gain fares on the North Atlantic
route was made after other North
Atlantic carriers, repudiating a
previous agreement for introduc-
tion of such a service, had turn-
ed down the proposal at a London
meeting of the .International Air
Transpor. Association (IATA.i
Recalling that the other air-
lines at an IATA traffic meeting
in Bermuda last May had made
a "firm committment" to set up
the tourist service, PAA an-
nounced its intention of proceed-
ing"either within the frame-
work of IATA. or outside that
framework if necessary"with
plans for a trans-Atlantic serv-
ice "at a fare level that will ap-
peal to the general public."
PAA Introduced scheduled tour-
lei-type air service for the first
time anywhere In the world be-
tween New York and San Juan.
Puerto Rico, in 1948. Regular
service was maintained parallel
to the low-fare service. .
It was Pan American's expe-
rience after a year of operating
tourist-type service taht the vol-
ume of air traffic between the
two points was three times great-
er than it had been in the pre-
vious year. It also was proved
ihat traffic on the regular serv-
ice, rather than decreasing, ac-
tually showed a "marked gain.
In 1949 PAA Introduced tour-
ist service from New York to
Buenos Aires and around South
America. This service has proved
so popular with the traveling
public that It is now considered
Now Many Wear
FALSE TEETH
With Little Worry
Ett. talk, laugh or *n*C7r without fear
of Insecure fls* tegth dropping;. *liprjinj[
or wobbling, r AS TEETH holds platos
firmer and more comfortably This pleas-
ant powder has no gummy, gooey, pasty
taste or fooling. Doesn't cause nausea.
It's alkaline (non-acid) Checks "plate
meet" (denture breath). Get PASTTETH
t any drug atore.
Florida Gets Big Lift
With Service Contracts
TALLAHASSEE. Fla., Oct. 5
i UP iMilitary contracts poured
-total of $49.357,000 into Florida
rom July, 1950 through May,
1951, the State Improvement
Commission reported today.
The awards Included $30.973-
030 for the Army, $14.562,000 for
the Navy, $1,471.000 for the Air
Force and $2,351,000 for the Arm-
ed Services Peti oleum Purchasing
Agency.
The Improvement Commission
also announced the following in-
dustrial expansions in Florida
during the last month:
Miami International Petrol-
eum Co., a Canadian corporation,
has almost completed the mov-
ing of its executive offices with
55 employes from Toronto to Co-
ral Gables m a $200.000 remodel-
ed building.
MiamiNational Cylinder Gas
Co. opened Its new plant In Miami
to produce $5,000.000 cubic feet
of oxygen per month.
JacksonvilleTennessee prod-
ucts and Chemical Corp. has ac-
quired a plant site In Jackson-
ville to manufacture a light-
weight aggregate from perllte.
Initial plans call for construc-
tion of two buildings and em-
ployment of 12 workers.
CocoaNorthrop Aircraft Inc.,
announced plans this month for
establishment of a new guided
missile testing facility near Pat-
to be a major reason why 77 per
cent of the total traffic between
South America and the United
States goes by air.
Pan American's position, as
frequently expressed by its pres-
ident. Juan T. Trippe, is that the
principal barriers to Internation-
al travel have been the barriers
of time and money. Trippe be-
lieves international air transport
has the choice of "becoming a
luxury service to carry the well-
to-do at high prices or to carry
the average man at what he can
afford to pay."
A one-way tourist service fare
between New York and .London
in the range of $225 to $250 would
make It possible to sell a 17-day
European vacation by air for
$700, a price within the pocket-
book range of hundreds of thou-
sands of vacationists. PAA offi-
cials point out.
RHEUMATIC
PAINS
Here is real relief .
For real rebel from rheumatic paina it is
essential to correct their canse When
they are doe to the accumulation of bodily
mpuriuei. it means that your kidneys
which boald help to Alter away these
impur.deare sluggish and
seed a medicine to tone them up.
Do Witt's Pills are specially
prepared for this very purpose.
They have a cleansing *nd
antiseptic action on the kidneys,
soothing and toning them up so
eSecti*] that these vital organs swiftly
retara to their normal function of clearing
the system of impurities
Oe Witt's Pills have Dees widely used
ail over the world with great success.
This is amply confirmed by many thankt ul
letters sent to as by people who longed for
relief from rheumatic pams and found it
after trying Oe Win's Pills Why not
try them for yoor trouble t Go to voar
chemist and obtain a supple right away
A
(
De Witt's PilL
n asese .mull, >
BACKACHE
LUMBAGO
SCIATICA
lOINT PAINS
RHEUMATIC
PAINS
OUR CUARANTfl
Oe Witt's Pius art
made anda strictly
hygienic conditions
and the ingrediente
all conform to rigid
standards of punty i
rick Air Force Base to employ
about 300 workers.
Fort PierceWaco Fertilizer
Co. has almost completed a $250,-
000 plant expansion.
TampaChem-Ice Corp began
operation this month at a new
$250,003 dry ice factory at Hook-
ers Point.
AnbnrndaleDefense Co. of
America announced plans for
opening a branch plant at Au-
burndale to design and manu-
facture colonial picket fence,
split rail, border and driveway
fence, arbor and rail fences.
OrlandoBecopa Glove Mills.
Inc., of Yonkers wih establish a
branch factory in Orlando to
manufacture knit gloves with
between 30 and 50 employes.
Pert OrangeMacMelth Co. of
Newark announced plans for
moving to Port Orange to manu-
facture ticket punches and hold-
ers.
Communion Sunday
To Be Observed By
Episcopal Churches
Under the theme: "The peace
which the world cannot take a-
way," world-wide Communion
Sunday, will be observed this
week by many different races,
languages and religious commu-
nions in a continuous fellowship
around the world.
The Episcopal Church of Our
Saviour of New Cristobal will
take part In this continuous fel-
lowship with a celebration of
Holy Communion at 7:30 a.m.
and at 11 a.m. at St. Margaret's
Chapel, Margarita. It will be at
8:30 a.m.
Loveday's choral setting of
the Holy Communion will be
sung at the 11 a.m. celebration
by the senior choir under the di-
rection of Mrs. George N. En-
gelke and Mrs. R. de Boyrle, or-
ganist. The offertory anthem:
"Like as the Heart deslreth the
water-brooks" based on Psalm
46 will be sung. The sermon
hymn will be "In Christ there is
no East or West."
The Rev. Milton A. Cookson
will preach on the subject: "The
Great Fellowship of Belle-ers."
This sense of World Fr'J wshlp
with other Christians ' ihe ob-
servance of World-wide Com-
munion which began 12 years a-
go will brmg Inspiration and
strength for better Christian liv-
ing In this critical time among
the nations.
No Penny Slots In
New Toy Banks
HACKENSACK, N. J. (UJ.)
Sign of changing values pen-
ny slots will be eliminated on the
new toy banks produced by a loc-
al company.
Mrs. Ann Payson. president of
the Durable Toy and Novelty
Corp.. announced that from now
on the firm's banks will have
three coin slotsfor- nickels,
dimes and quarters. Pennies
won't register in the bank, mod-
eled after a cash register.
"The government's recent re-
quest for families to turn in ex-
tra pennies to alleviate the cop-
per shortage is one reason for the
change," Mrs. Payson said. "But
I've also observed that pennies
mean very little to children to-
day. They show little apprecia-
tion for anything less than a
dime."
WHAT HfH
HEELS vou
.VE.6RA.ND
MERRILL RLOSfUnt
MARK.
Around
N
CIRCLES.
/
AMD
THAT
V*JNT
Be m
ANYTHIM&-
NEWr
N"H

ALLEY OOP
There's Old Xvill
Y Y. T. HAMT.ru
rrraetfBrs^l/^-^I^NCrrfSiWIMGD! ;*"*-sfA FAIR BET YOU
\tHGBBAT y AW. V^I HEARD HE / VB<.-IT*\aAY IT BE.THEN
JSm. WHX/THAt'8 ALL^rtOULONT PLAY/A FAIR BET \LET*S mXKE
FIGHT / WRONG! HE \ BALL WITH /THEYLLFIND )ONE,..YOU
TODAY.' DISAPPEARED GENERAL I HB BODY IN AN MEf
LAST NIGHTf/eAN60CU6.1TH' TIBER.'
MIAMI

EZ
.^
BOOTS AND HER R HO DIES
Yes Indeed
BY EDGAR MARTT*
i o*.\6Y onset ww ?
-v* imKv. n
wet twN* i WN-wy'.
Imported
Conned Hams
PER
DREWS
KRAKVS*
ATALANTA BRAND
are offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Coln
HOME DELIVERY
HOW... THRIFTY
TOURIST SERVICE
IVERY DAY
These PAA "El Turista"
flights to Miami offer you
conteniente as well as econo-
my now you may leave and
return any day of the week.
Remember, toe, the very
moderate fares:
CAPTAIN EA8Y
V
The Boy Has Talent
Y LESLIE TURNES
%iftt! vou Ywed wane weait' of
MEAN VOO WONT ( TaiBIT TO 0A WIM. MACiW
wCLL TMOr|AjresV ME BOV. SUTER. FriwSTMKE..
UNlSw* THt*e_TWEe>.-----------
CHMr.ACTERS.MlE OWEN / V
SOFT JOS**) '
THE PLANT*
VOU WON'T S'UBVE 015. BUT I USTA
t-HMc HE WA* A IGNORAMOS, WID NO
SJTI69T M NUTTaVTl I TRIED TO LEARN
Ml WOT I KNOWCPi BUT DA MORE X ,
^BSBsa"
WtM HE CAN HT ON frA BEACH AN'
STARE AT -EM ALL DAV1 YESTt. DAT
BOy' GOT A MOOON FULLA IDEAtf
ON NEW MODEL* TO BEING OUT'.
OH.MT
VIC FLINT
On the Job
MY MICHAEL O'MALLAI
$83 M
One Way
$150*2
Round Tria
Stt yomr Trtarf Agut or
WOMB'S
PaivAMmcAN
PasMawt L Stwst No. 9,
. Tat t-OeTO
CeWSals Has., Tal. 109,
MUM
Kidney Trouble Causes
Backache, Getting Up Nights
&2XJBSCLX3S&. *2J* !^W .* C?s>Aaftaa.?allfrala.
Kirh's. or aurrtr from Backaeha, stroni
DE WITT SPILLS
for Kidney and Bladder Troubles
Wwa'your Ubi, kldn.r muela aaay
s taa eausa. ^^
Wseaa- ioed and rlaks. worry. eoMa
* VOS** e*3e a *tn traa on
yl'i',.*,i*!,^." ,hM T lunetlon
poorly ano ofta may need hale to
ESf "* F?ttT rour * 1 maintain
aealrh aftd anarcy.
... """e" VaajrKtsWrs
A fat aetins Internal snedleiaa
yetea, derail ky tke Km Ceatre
le now _
SlHs?
thousands to revitalise
tfeeae t aasttrre ways:
and Mrtr>\k,K-S,,| *c2SSi
senses la the urinary system. 1/setae
and eaJma Irritated tluuee.
Cyetex le sow Impastad ay
drasalata, ae> there le ao asad ef any
eete auSartas; from aWkaake, Oattraf
U Nishte sad the ether eymatetas
mentioned agr withal the kanaflu
ef this treat aadlelna.
Set Cyetex trans your drufaiet tedsr

i


npvivimNnMPPT*
11 "*
-- """-


y o
i

>
o
FU I DAT, OCTOBER 5, 1M1
l~-
PAGE THrW
GOP Chief Denies Impropriety
In His Firm 9s RFC Borrowing

WASHINGTON, Oct. 5. (UP) Repubican
National Chairman Guy George Gabrielson said yes-
terday he tried to line up the $100,000-a-year presi-
dency of the New York Stock Exchange for an RFC
director who handled Government loans to Gabriel-
son's gas company.
The GOP leader told the Senate Permanent
Investigating Committee that he sought the job un-
successfully in the fall of 1950 for Harvey J. Gunder-
son, a Republican member of the RFC board whose
term expired last Oct. 12.
Gabrielson said the Carthage Hydrocol Co., of
which he is president and counsel, had no business
pending with the RFC at that time. He grew visibly
irritated with committee members for questioning
him about the affair, and insisted it was "of no im-
portance at all."

Sen. Richard M. Nixon. R.. Cal.,
replied that Oabrlelson:J forts
to line up a high-salaried Jo? lor
Ounderson would have been "an
act of Impropriety" If Ounderson
then was In a position to make
decisions afiecting Carthage Hy-
drocol.
But Nixon said RFC records
confirm that no RFC action af-
fecting the firm was taken be-
tween May 24, 1950 and Sept. 24,
1851.
The firm received $18,500,000 in
RFC loans before Gabrielson be-
came GOP chairman In August,
1849.
Gabrielson acknowledged that
he has approached RFC officials,
Including Ounderson, several
times since he became Republlc-
an chairman to seek adjustments
In the loan teims.
Bat he aid all of these deal-
ings were conducted "on a
straight, out-and-out business
basis, without the slightest
tinge of influence-peddling,
bribes or any other unethical,
illegal or immoral overtones."
Ounderson, who sat In the aud-
ience during the hearings, told
reporters the stock exchange ne-
gotiations were "all after I left
the RFC" last vear and 'I see no
reason for their bringing It up.
Gabrielson testified at his own
request after his dealings with
the RFC became a stormy side-
issue of the committee's hearings
on the relations between Demo-
cratie National Chairman Wil-
liam M. Bqyle, Jr., and the Amer-
ican Llthofold Corp., of St. Louis,
another RFC borrower.
Gabrielson noted recent de-
mands from several Republican
congressmen that he resign as
party chairman to spare the GOP
"embarrassment."
He-said he has spurned such
demands because such a resig-
nation "would have been con-
strued as an admission of im-
proper conduct."
He preferred, he said, to "re-
fute slander with facts," because
he is confident that any fair In-
quiry will show that he "neither
asked nor received favors" from
the RFC.
The national GOP executive
committee already has given him
a clean bill.
Gabrielson noted that the RFC
only last month turned down his
request for a postponement of
repayment installments on the
loan, and asked:
"Would any member of this
committee like to try to persuade
my puzzled stockholders that I
have any Influence with this
agency?"
Gabrielson charged that De-
mocratic "partisans" raised a
furore over the Carthage Hy-
drocol loan in an effort to
Sooner Child Gets Fluorides
Better Are Results for Teeth
(Nation wide interest has
been aroused in the program
of fluoridating public water
supplies as a means of helping
reduce tooth deeay among
children. To bring its reader*
the latest information about
this process, the Panama Ame-
rican, through the cooperation
of the Canal Zone Dental So-
ciety, is presenting a series of
articles on fluoridation. Today,
the effectiveness of fluorids-
tlon.)
H
mix
L_JACOBY ON BRIDGE
BY OSWALD JACOBT
Written for NEA Service
"hide or minimise a scandal in
their own party."
After reading a 5,000-word pre-
pared statement, Gabrielson told
the committee he knew Commit-
tee Counsel Francis D. Flanagan
was planning to ask him about
his Job-hunting for Ounderson.
He said he had a talk with
Oundersonhe could not re-
member the datewhen the RFC
director learned that he would
not be appointed to his Gov-
ernment post.
Gabrielson said he told Oun-
derson he was "admirably fitted"
to be president of the New York
Stock Exchange, a position then
vacant.
"I told him I would be glad to
be of any help I could." he added.
The OOP chairman said his ef-
forts on Ounderson's behalf were
"feeble" because he has no busi-
ness ties with stock exchange
members..
Capl. H. E. Robins
Is Medical Officer
For Naval District
Captain Harvey E. Robins,
'MO USN, 'ims relieved Captain
A. C. Smith as Medical Offlcier
uf the Fifteenth Naval District,
the Navy announced today.
Captain Snih, who has com-
pleted two tours of duty in the
15th Naval District, accompanied
by his wife will proceed to San
Diego. Calif., for duty there.
Captain Robins attended the
University of Pennsylvania pre-
.nedlcal school and took time out
for service during World War I.
After his discharge from the' ser-
vice he returned to bis medical
studies and whs graduated from
the University of ClncinatU.
In 1924, alter completing his
internship he entered the Navy
and was assigned to duty at the
Naval Hospital at League Island.
Captain Robin's Naval career has
given him an opportunity to
spend time In many parts of the
world.
He has served in Shanghai,
Ouam the Admiralty Islands and
also In manv Navy installations
throughout the United States.
His most recent duty was that of
Medical Officer at the U.S. Naval
Station, Port Ilueneme, Calif.
Captain an.i Mrs. Robins are
temporarily occupying quarters
five on the Headquarters reser-
vation. Their .on, Harvey, Jr. is
attending thj University of Cali-
fornia.
Children literally can drink
their way to better dental health
If the water In their homes con-
tains the proper amount of fluo-
rides.
Research has produced much
evidence showing conclusively
that children born and reared in
communities whose public water
supplies contain one part per 1,-
000,000 or more of fluorine have
only one-third as much dental
decay as children who drink wa-
ter which does not contain the
chemical.
Children need not be bom in
an area which has a sufficient
supply of fhiorlde In Its water to
receive the benefits of fewer cav-
ities1.
But the earlier and longer
they drink water containing
fluoride while their teeth are
developing, the greater protec-
tion against tooth decay they
will have. This applies to both
first and permanent teeth.
One of the most convincing ex-
amples of the value of fluorida-
tion is provided in a six-year stu-
dy made at Newburgh, NY., and
the nearby city of Kingston.
Newburgh began fluoridating Its
water supply In 1945 and Is con-
tinuing to do so. Kingston has
never fluoridated its water.
Dr. David B. Ast. New York
state dental director, who con-
ducted the study, has reported
that among 5 to 6 year old chil-
dren in Newburgh there has
been a 115 per cent Increase In
the number of children with all
of their first teeth free of decay,
compared with children in King-
ston.
During a four-year period of
fluoridation, there was a reduc-
tion of 32.5 per cent in the num-
ber of decayed, missing or filled
teeth artpnerNewtonrgh childiaja
from 6 to 12. Complete health ex-
aminations showed no harmful
effects that could be attributed
to fluoridation.
Lewlston. Idaho, reported a 58.
per cent reduction In dental de-
cay among 7-year-olds in three
years after fluoridation was
started, and drops of 35 and 25
per cent, respectively, among 8
and 9 year od groups.
When fluoridation was begun
In Marshall, Tex., in 1948, a
neighboring city, Jacksonville,
which has fluoride-free water,
was selected as a control point.
Examinations were made of na-
tive born, children in both towns,
and the decay rate at both plac-
es was between 7 and 8 decayed
teeth per child.
After 29 months, Marshall
children showed a 23 per eent
reduction in the deeay rate,
while at Jacksonville the rate
was unchanged.
Six-year-old Marshall children
who had been drinking fluorida-
ted water almost half their lives
showed a 47 per cent reduction in
decay.
At Brantford, Ontario, Cana-
da, the decay rate among 6-year-
olds dropped 56 per cent after 54
months of fluoridation, with re-
ductions of 43,22 and 20 per cent
for children 8, 12 and 14. respec-
tively.
In a five-year test period of
fluoridation at Grand Rapids,
Mich., the decay rate was reduc-
ed 51 per cent for 6-year-olds. 36
per cent for 9-year-olds and 16
per cent for 13 year olds.
Sheboygan, Wls.', reported a 39
per cent deeay rate cut among
kindergarten pupils In a 44-
month period of fluoridation,
with- drops of 2 per cent for
fourth graders, and 18 per cent
fo rseventh to hinth graders.
It is apparent from these re-
ports that the earlier a child
starts to drink fluoridated water
the more protection he has from
decay.
(Tomorrow: Cost o fluorida-
tion.)
NORTH 4
K86
VK0S2
? A 10
?
wist KA**
A9S4S \QH>'a
VJ 1094
? Q7J ? * .
.J6S2 *AK7
SOOT*
t
VAQ87S
? K942
? Q104
North-South vuL
lost torn* West North
Psis IV Pass *
Psss 4V Pass Pass
Pass
Opening isad
Says Being 100
Isn't So Strange
WORCESTER. Mass. (UP.)
How does it feel to be a centen-
arian?
"It's a great curiosity to be
100," says Mrs. Martha A. Bren-
nan. "Why It's so funny I don't
know. My paternal grandmother
lived to be 92 and I never
thought I'd be that old. I don't
remember ever seeing anybody
who was 100 only myself.
And I don't feel any different."
ii\
1
Passing The Hal
Out Under Florida's
New Election laws
TALLAHASSEE, Fla.. Oct. 3
(UP) Attorney General
Richard Ervln said today that
Florida's new election laws
prohibit a political candidate
from "passing the hat" for un-
identified campaign contribu-
tions.
In a ruling for George Nicho-
las of Miami, candidate for
Dade County attorney, Ervin
said candidates will be required
to list the name of each cam-
paign contributor and the a-
mount given.
The new law restricts contri-
butions to a maximum of $1,000
, from any one person and pro-
hibits donations from officials
of race tracks, utility firms or
liquor Interests.
Truman Praises
Hull, Now 80,
As Peacemaker
WASHINGTON. Oct. 5 (USIS)
Felicitating former U.S. Secre-
tary of State Cordell Hull on his
80th birthday, President Truman
praised the "single-minded pur-,
pose for world peace" which
marks Hull's long career of pub-
lic service.
Hull held the post of Secreta-
ry of State forl2 yearslonger
than any man in VS. political
history in the wartime and ear-
lier administrations of the late
President Roosevelt.
Today's hand was passed out at
many tables of a recent tourna-
ment. When South felt ambitious
enough to open the bidding, how-
ever, he was pretty sure to get
to game. As might be expected,
the game contract was far from
solid, but there was a reasonable
play for it.
At one table the South player
made his game with an overtrick
by a combination of deceptive
plays and shrew reasoning. At
this table, West led the deuce of
clubs, and East took the top
clubs and returned a third club.
South won the third club with
the queen, discarding a small
diamond from dummy. He then
immediately led the Jack of
spades from his hand. West
quickly played a low spade, think-
ing that South was going to let
the Jack ride as a finesse.
As it happened this was far-
thest from Souths rnlnd. He
knew that West had the ace of
spades, so he put up dumy's king
without a moment's hesitation.
This play eliminated the spade
loser.
How did South know that West
had the ace of spades? He didn't
have to peek. East had passed
originally and had already
shown up with the ace and king
of clubs. If East also held the
ace of spades he would have bid
Instead of passing.
South ruffed a low spade in his
hand, much to West annoyance,
drew three rounds of trumps,
ending in dummy, and then ruf-
fed another spade. By this, time
South knew the spade situation
iest would not have ducked, the
s first apde if he had held the
queen as well as the ace.
South therefore knew that
East's original hand included
four clubs, four spades, and
three trumps. East therefore held
only two diamonds. The odds
were 3 to 2 that West held the
queen of diamonds. South there-
fore took the finesse through
West and easily made the rest of
the tricks.
FRESH CRISP
LETTUCE
from
CERRO PUNTA
By Refrigerated
Truck
PAUL'S
MARKET
HEN SHUNNED HEAT
CORDOVA. Tenn. (U.P.)
Record breaking temperatures
drove Rebecca Morton's hen to
lay an egg In the- water trough.
'.
If lolklnq like it on tk
y
roa
MERCURY with MERC-O-MATIC Drive
The BEST in every way! New BEAUTY, new COMFORT, new SAFETY
... all this and a NEW DRIVE, too! Thia new automatic transmission
doea all the work while you ait back and relax . it velvet-smooth
power responde automatically to your every wish!
MERC-O-MATIC DRIVE is SUPERIOR
to other types of AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS!
Simpler Design
Quiet Operation
Instant Response
Easier Servicing
Smoother Driving
Gas Economy

WE CAN OFFER A LIMITED NUMBER of 4-Door Sedans and Coupes for
CANAL ZONE DIRECT SHIPMENT and US. DELIVERY during OCTOBER.
COLPAN MOTORS, INC.
Your FORD MERCURY LINCOLN Dealer
On Automobile Row Panam Phones: 2.1033 2-1036

SECOND FLOOR
WOW*
WE ARE UNPACKING
Metal Kitchen Ladder Stool with
Back Rest ....................13.50
Special Stools for Ironing Ma-
chines .......................11.50
Children Wading Tools..........10.50
Plastic Travel-a-Bag for Suits 4.95
Fortable Insulated Buckets......C.95
Two-tone Door Chimes......from I, >
riasttc Bread Boxes............. 5.95
Plastic Bathroom Paper Baskets 2.50
Toilet Mats it Lid Sets.......... 5.95
Plastic Toilet Sea\s in Colors.. 8J


Plastic Kitchen Towel Rods......1.10
Metal Adjustable Closet Rods... 2.50
Metal Traverse Rods........from 3.95
Metal Ironing Boards............11.95
Plastic Clothes Hangers, aet of 4 1.50
Aluminum Broilerette........... 2.95
Self Wringing Sponge Mops..... 5.95
Stainless Steel Cooking Spoons-
set ef 2....................... 195
Pyrex Rasters................... 5
Bu\ NOW
Second Floor 5a Avenida
/
//*?/.. //(>w.. 11
e w
* SANDALS by Marie Antoinette
* LADIES' BAGS
Leather and Plastic assorted colors. -*
* GIRL'S BAGS
Straw and Plastic.
SKIRTS
. Silk Linen Gabardine
CHILDREN'S CLOTHES
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS
Beautiful SWISS HANKIES
La Moda Americana
102 Central Avenue Panam

cJUirecl *j7-rom illli
tStautifM Shipment
ami
SoriKi
w&i
Here's the newest in men's and women's
smart leisure fashions!
MOTTA'S
PANAMA COLON
n
.
'-I
M
o.
-*
-3
"1
t
iC
Mi
Ml'
t-r-
(I

i
Tt
fit
..-

'!
I
1
i.:

i
frVfli

FAMOUS NAME
WATCH 0L
\Uff \
PTOf
<:'.:: \
:t\
HfifJ
TAHITI
THE JEWELRY STORE
157


f
P AfiE FOCT
THT PANAMA AMEKICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPEB
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1951
__ ., i.
.
IN HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKWE JOHNSON
NEA Staff Carrwaondent
'. HOLLYWOOD (NBA I Hol-
lywood predicted a pyrotech-
nic display Isi the same league
With an H-bomb when Humphrey
Bogart and Katharine Hepburn
were stnt to Africa to co-star in
John Huston's "African Queen."
But the fission lizz'.ed and it's
Bogart shouting Katie's praises.
On his first day back in Holly-
wood alter the long overseas lo-
cation Junked, Bogart said:
**I're more admiration for
Katharine Hepburn than any -
ther woman I've met in my life.
Her type has always irritated me
but when I got to know her, I
found out she's one hof a dame.
"You don't pull up a chair for
Katie. You sav. 'Pull up a chair
for mc. babv. and go get one for
yourself.' It's a Hepburn you've
never seen in this film.
"After She found out we knew
our business. John Huston and I
relaxed her. She winds up in the
final scenes the messiest looking
dame you ever saw. Me? I wind
up as a pleasant little fellow."
About the picture, in which he
plays a drunken bum opposite
Katie's missionary role, Bogart
slipped me the word:
"It's Huston's bet movie. I'll
personally shoot the first critic
wo doesn't like it."'
The story is making the rounds
that Errol Flynn picked up a
newspaper headlining the Tom
N.eal-Frachot Tone brawl over
Barbara Payton and quipped:
"This proves there can be a
Bollywood love fight without
rte" _______
' Wedding bells will ring for
Gloria de Haven and Manhattan
manufacturer David Haft before
the year's end. They were a ship-
bbard blaze during Gloria's re-
cent trip to England.
open again In the Carrol tradi-
tion with "Holiday for Love," a
musical extravaganza.
It wasn't planned, but Woody
Woodpecker's "Slingshot 6 7/8"
is on the same bill with Greg
Peck's bid to sling-shot fame in
David and Bathsheba."
Panama Bomberos Do Phenomenal
m
anama
Rosalind Russell, without a
movie for two years, turned down
the role of Piper Laurie's mother
In UI's "Oh. Money, Money." It's
about No. 20 In the list of vetoes
by Roz, who's angling for a plum
role.
Sonny Tufts and blonde chirp
Qelia Llpton are a news Item in
London... It's Gene Tierney back
afc Tvrone Power's leading lady
In "Diplomatic Courier."... Earl
Carroll's big theater restaurant is
Mae West playing a mother!
"I'm trying to break her down
and get her to do a mother role,"
Director Arthur Lubln whispered.
"We have telephone conversa-
tions once a week about it. I keep
telling her that Claudette Col-
bert, Barbara Stanwyck and Irene
Dunne have all played mother
parts, but Mae isn't sold yet."
Wanna by an actor? dept:
NBC is trying to sell Red Skel-
ton's radio show to a different
sponsor each week. Ads in the
trade papers read: "How would
vou like to buy a piece of Skel-
ton?"
Ads for Columbia's "Saturday's
Hero" show John Derek stripped
to the waist with the line: "This
Body For Sale."
Inside on the dropping of a
highly touted new face by a maj-
or lot is that the doll fell for
the studio's big dancing star. He
happens to be married.
Dolores del Rio's Income tax
problems with the Mexican gov-
ernment are responsible for her
?"n-down of Hollywood movie
offers. She nixed the co-starring
role with Gary Cooper in "High
Noon."
Bob Hope about Jane Russell-
"hat Jane. She's great on a set.
She just busts out laughing at
everything."
Gloria Swanson's return to
Broadway In "Nina" wil have her
playing a 40-year-old woman
whose sole preoccupation Is am-
our. .. Doctors are telling Milton
Berle to take It easy... Virginia
Fields and Willard Parker will tie
the wedding knot Oct. 12... The
Robert Prestons, who called It a
day several months ago, are call-
ing it marriage again.
Broadway's revival of "Of Thee
I Sing" may have Van Johnson
in the BUIy Gaxton role. Van's
trying to talk MGM into the Idea.
ACID INDIGESTION?
Here are the facts on
' Eno relief for acid indigestion
Acid Inatieastien of a temporary |
nature frequently occurs when the ;
acid-alkaline content in your gas- |
trie tract (chemically known as
your normal pH) is out of balance.
Each teaspoonful of Eno con-
tains approximately four grains of
free Sodium Bicarbonate, and fur-
nishes, in solution, approximately
lifty grains of complex SodiumTar-
tratas. These two very important
elements tend to restore your nor-
mal gastric pH. In addition, Eno
acts as a mild laxative. Thus Eno
fights acid indigestion in two ways:
it helps neutralise excess stomach
acids, and furnishes mild taxation.
Don't wait until acid indigestion
hits. Get a bottle of Eno today for
quick ttlitt. Used by millions. Ask
for it at all druggists.
Take Good-Tasting ENO
Job of Saving
(EDITORS ". -)TE: The following article concerning the
Fire Depanim..... system in the Republic of Panama was pre-
pared in connection with a series of stories about Republic,
Canal Zone and U.i>. Armed Forces firefighting systems. All
of these agencies are engaged in an Intensive program of
activity in connection with Fire Prevention Week).
In a' country' where the fighting of fire has become an art.
as well as a serious, workaday profession, members of the
Republic of Panama's Cuerpo de Bomberos are deeply concerned
v.itn the prevention of fire and highly qualified to prescribe
method thereof.
In a thriving, humanity-packed city such as Panama, there
are ever present and numerous fire hazards which call for the
utmost vigilance on the part of fire and safety departments
In the prevention field and for the continuance of Its magni-
ficently trained and well equipped corps of professional and
volunteer firemen.
Best qualified Individual in the Republic of Panama to out-
line the dual problems of flreflghtlng and fire prevention Is
Commandante Ral Arango, of the Cuerpo de Bomberos and
Inspector General of Fire Departments of Panama. He also
heads the Oficina de Seguridad (Department of Safety and
Inspection.)' _
"Some cynical people," says Commandante Arango,
"can't believe that men who seem to relish their work as do
the professional and volunteer firemen of Panama are really
interested in preventing fires. But, they are quite wrong.
"In the first place, an efficient fire department must be
made up of real men men who will risk life or injury at
any time. It must be made up of men who are ready at any
time of night or day. Such an organization must of necessary
have a constant esprit d'eorps a love for their work.
But there Is not one of our men who Is not conscious or
the terrible danger that Impends whenever the alarm siren
sounds and he leaps to put on his flreflghtlng clothes..
"Every bombero either remembers from personal experience
or has often heard the storv of the El Polvorn explosion when
five members of this department lost their Uve and 20 were In-
jured. That explosion was the result of a fire caused by some-
one's carelessness a thoughtless tossed cigar or cigarette.
On the 5th of Mav of May every year Panamanians know
that the Cuerpo de Bomberos march in reverence to the monu-
ment at Plaza 5th of May to pay homage to those heroes of the
El Polvorn disaster. So, In the minds of bomberos and in the
minds of their families Is always the thought of fire preven-
Improper use of cooking facilities and careless disposal
of lighted cigarettes are two of the greatest caused of fires,
says Comandante Arango, Other major canses are spontane-
ous combustion and faulty electric wiring installations.
As a working fireman, who must brave the perils of fire-
fighting Comandante Arango receives no pay. As head of the
Department of Safety (Oficina de Seguridad), he is a paid em-
ploye of the Republic. In the latter function is involved day-to-
day contact with many important phases of fire prevention.
Members of the Oficina de Seguridad and of the Cuerpo
de Bomberos make constant Inspections of places of business,
theaters, hotels dwellings and industrial establishments.
There is also much volunteer work along these lines.
The citizenry, Itself, aware especially of the not too distant
Colon fire of 1941. the earlier El Polvorn disaster and the Cho-
rrillo fire of 1950. are cooperative. Gradually, the fire risks
natural in a city where wood has been for hundreds of years
a chief component in construction and where economic and so-
cial progress has not yet been overhauled by'adequate housing
facilities are being cut down. v
As noted before, the City of Panama has a magnificent
and well equipped fire department as Ms the City of Colon
an the other side of the Isthmus.
Centering around the Cuartel Central at Avenue A and West
16 Streets, the Capital City's fire department has three other
stations. Calldonia, Mercado and Jose Gabriel Duque, all strate-
8lCaThe equipment of the Capital city department includes 10
hose carts, seven pumpers and two hook and ladder outfits as
actual flreflghtlng units. In addition, there are a score or so
of other and business vehicles. ,.
The heart of the personnel of the Cuerpo de Bomberos are
56 full time firemen. But, 500 volunteer members all highly
trained bring the manpower level up to or better than that
of the fire departments in United States cities.
Membership in the volunteer branch of the corps Is
much coveted among young Panamanians and, in the rate
instances where a bombero must resign or in the events
of old age or death, there is always an eager and already
partlv trained man ready to step Into Jireflgbter boots.
Comandante Arango, It might be said, was "born into the
Cuerpo de Bomberos. His grandfather, Ricardo Arango. organiz-
ed the service in 1887 and was its first chief. Comandante Aran-
go's father. Ricardo Arango. Jr., was a member of the corps for
i SO years and was captain of the corps of Bomberos.
The present Comandante has been with the department a
1 Years although his youthful appearance belies this long service
He became Comandante In April 1950 after having served in all
positions of the ranks.
The huge volunteer corps Is made up of men from all wanes
of life in Panama workmen, doctors, bank clerks, dentists.
Froperty
(U.8. Army Photo)
HIT THAT POLE!!!The old reliable method of getting
downstairs, used for many years by firemen the world over,
is very efliclently utilized by Panama's Cuerpo de Bombe-
ros. Firemen at the Cuartel Central in Panama City are
shown on the way to a fire, a few seconds after being
awakened by the fire gong.
technicians, etc. Every man has two uniforms furnished by the
Rovernment.
One is for actual flreflghtlng and the other is for dress
occasions. The uniforms are similar glistening white hel-
mets, bright scarlet shirts, white breeches, and, for dress,
shining black boots.
Adequate personnel responds to every alarm. A modern elec-
tric alarm system covers the Capital City, alarm stations being
located strategically at hundreds of points. When the fire siren
sounds, a system of signals Informs volunteer personnel as to
the location of the blaze. If It is withrn the particular district
of the Individual volunteer he is into his "running gear" in a
flash and on his way either to the fire, to a point where he
can be picked up by responding apparatus, or to a station
where he will act as a reserve.
The most recent demonstration of the department's ef-
ficiency when faced with a major conflagration was the Cho-
rrillo fire In February 19S0. This disaster occurred late at night.
but within a matter of minutes all of the apparatus of the
Panama department was either on the scene, on its way, or
being redeployed against other possible emergencies.
The Chorrillo fire was in a densely populated area, with
nearly all of the closely aligned buildings of wood construction.
Smoke and Jire killed 5 persons and many were Injured.
Yet, fire fighting experts, including Cant. Arthur J.
Troup, of the Canal Zone Fire Division, marveled at the ex-
pertises* with which the Panama smokeeaters got the fire
under control within an hour-and-a-half.
Without Its smooth and courageous action, the experts be-
lieve many more would have been killed or Injured and many
more thousands of dollars of fire loss would have been sustained.
The most common cause of fire here and in other countries
an explosion in.an improperly operated oil stove caused
the Chorrillo fire. The wives and children of firemen know only
too well the sounds of the fire sldens and the roar of the
pumper engine and they know that often It Is the trivial,
careless acts of otherwise thoughtful people that send gallant
firemen too frequently Into the jaws of peril.
| RALLY! RALLY! SUNDAY SCHOOL CHURCH
<
a.
^
RALLY! RALLY! RALLY! RALLY! SUNDAY SCHOOL CHURCH RALLY! RALLY! |
_i
8
X
>
<
Q
EVERYONE IS INVITED OCTOBER 7 th. 1951
3 STAR PROGRAMS *
* 9:30 a. m. SUNDAY SCHOOL FEATURE
All Departments Participating

-

* 10:45 a. m. SPECIAL MORNING SERVICE

Two Choirs Chile, ii'i Messafe
"The Create*! Church Rally in the Bible'
1


* 7:30 p. m. EVANGELISTIC SERVICE


Trumpeteerg Gospelaires "Hake Believe Christian"
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Balboa Heights, C. Z.
PASTOR BEEBY Speaking HOXO 760 kcs. Radio Outlet

PANAMA AMERICAN
TUF LUG
For trucking opera-
tion, on and oR-the-
road in logging and
excavation work-
Maximum traction on
,oft or sandy terrain-
greater mileage.
F1SK
Agencloi
Panamericanas S. A. |
V Call* l.fudl.nt. Ha.
me, 1.4 P.
D/ffr.'hwisfar I.ll.liv
* RALLY1 RALLY1 SUNDAY SCHOOL CHURCH RALLY! RALLY! RALLYl RALLY! SUNDAY SCHOOL CHURCH RALLY! RAL
Cana/ (clubhouses
Showing Tonight
BAL SO A
Alr-Condltlonrd
4:M :15 S:H
Gordon MacRAE Julie LONDON
"Return of The Frontiersman"
Saturday "STaiCTLV DISHONORABLE"
DIABLO HTS.
. S:1S S:M
M.ckry ROONEY Terry MOORE
"HE'S A COCKEYED WONDER"
Sal. "TAKE CARE OP MY LITTLE GIRL"
cocol;
S:U :*
Lurry PARKS Barbara HALE
"Jolson Sings Again" (repeat)
Saturday "CAUSF TOR ALARM"
PEDRO MIGUEL
15 I IS
Kathryn GRAYSON Ava GARDNER
"SHOW BOAT"
Saturday "PRENCHIE"
GAMBOA
S:1S
(Saturday
'HE'S A COCKEYED WONDER'
1.
G A 1 U N Gregory PECK Virginia MAYO
imru. "Captain Horatio Hornblower'
e Sat. "THE GOLDEN SALAMANDER"
MARGARITA
.IS *:
Rod CAMERON Cathy DOWNS
"SHOK! GRASS"
Saturday KIM"
CRISTOBAL
alr-CeadlUoned
i.:i."> a:S
TARZAN'S PFR1T." Plui:
. TURPIN vs. ROBINSON
Saturday "A MILLIONAIRE FOR CHRISTY"
BALBOA
STARTS TOMORROW?
Show Times: 2:30-4:25 6:20 8:15

-
1 I
This
delicious
dish from
Dixie gives I
the former
ith
; ajuifie"
star gay
answer .
and it'1 strictly I
fun and love
soags from
there on in!.
m-g-MV
htlaritut amedywitk *{>. ..ttmrrtmt
EZIO PINZA JANET LEIGH
Ith
MILLARD MIJCHEU-GALEOBBINS
AN M-G-M PICTURf
..... IMPORTANT NOTICE! M
I REGULAR RELEASE PICTURE 'KIND LADY"
WILL ftOT BE SHOWN AS SCHEDULED!
s
CENTRAL
Shows:
1:11 2:43 4: S:* S:M
Randolph SCOTT Adele JERGENS
In
"SUGAR FOOT"
IN TECHNICOLOR I
LUX THEATRE
1:11 1:SS T.-tS :M pa.
stewart anger. is
terrkic iv a big new
l-bV M-S-Mht.!
BFLLA VISTA
2M. 3;. S-2S. 1:1*. : P
HIGH-DRAMATIC MYSTERY
STORYI...
CIMKTTE ANN I
CflLBERT-BlYTH;
'Thunder On The Hill'
- CECILIA THEATRE
The Champion that made a Joke
' out of basketball I
"The Harlem Globetrotters
Also: _
Edmond OBrle. ^ *""
"BETWEEN MIDNIGHT
AMD DAWN"
TRO+ICAL-
PAT O'BRIEN -- ROBERT RYAN, la
"MARINE RAIDERS"
Atao- World's Championship Official Fisht Films
SANDY SADDLER vs. WILL.I __PEP_
ENCANTO THEATRE
_______a*_CaadlttM______
At 8:30 p.m.
PEPE DUARTE
Comic Presentation
. Also: .
A Biq Stage Show!
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
Louis Jourdan Debra
Paget, In
"BIRD OF PARADISE"
. Plus: -
Susan Hayward, In
"I CAN GET IT FOR'IOU
WHOI~
TIVOLI THEATRE VICTORIA THEATM
BANK! 100 BANKl
At 5 and fl p.m. AIs/j:
-THE AVENGERS" Abo:
Crmtinflas, In
El, PORTERO"
and
MARIA ELENA"
9


THURSDAY. OCTOBER 4. 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT IMIT.Y NEW8PAPEB
PAGE FIVE


O
19
Northern Animal
HORIZONTAL
1,7 Depicted
animal, the
caribou
13 Brinf into
tyntony
14 Latest
15 Observe
IS Siberian
I Mongoloid
18 Silkworm
It Chief priest
of a shrine
10 Scoffer
22 Opera (ab.)
23 Symbol for
erbium
24 Electrical unit
28 Hindu weight
28 Frosted
31 First man
32 Diminutive
Of Eleanors
33 Cosmic order
34 One-eighth of
an ounce
35 The dill
36 Lampreys
37 Oriental
measure
3t Diminutive
Edward
3 Arctic gulf
41 Jabber
47 Pronoun
4 Winglike part
51 Change
52 Block
53 Abatement
5 Jeers
57 Cubic meters
58 Rounded and
cylindrical
VERTICAL
1 Foundation
2 Solar disk
3-Route (b.)
4 Symbol for
ruthenium
5 Grafted (her.)
Approach
7 Pleated
> Uncommon
8 On time (ab.)
10 Shoshonean
Indian
11 Roman
' emperor .
12 Fall in drops
17 Palm lily
20 Vivid
21 It is a small
Greenland
23 Click beetle
25sCrooved
28wicient Irish
capital
Anawtr to Pr.viout Puzil.
iyilL-(L3ad"l2JIIMl JLdH
l"IIIU HWWOM* i VJki
MBS (-31 IHMlsML! I K'
>-:\irj,:>mmmmim '< < <-
mi i I:'AaII*1 i;iu
I'll '|WlJ :lt I
,-ii bMbMAbbI ,v,i
nun auuwii- >j:'h
1U
Norse god
Pertaining to
an age
River barriers
Rowing
implements
Internal fruit
decay
Detest
Malt drinks
Size of shot
43 Trial
48 Sea eagle
4tStag
48 Gaelic
50 Lincoln's
nickname
52 Honey-maker
54 Measure of
area
58 Comparative
suffix
of
F
L
O
R
E
C
I
T
A
Available at your favorite store!
Made in New Zealand
Distributed by the Swift, Co.,
Panam.
B
U
T
T
E
R
ut ******** ^"^sgLu
St**- N*.
'fie
9k
*a*
in 20 minutes-
an RuvniHG!
Gum,.ntd-th. brighttst, longt
wearing waz-finiah your car aver had*,
with revolutionary CAR-PLATE.
Even a 12-yaar-old can do an apart
job, in 20 minuui! Johnson' CAR-
PLATX protacta colors and urfaca
from waathar. Clean car fint with
Johnson's CARNU. Than tpreed on
CAR-PLATE, the free-Sowing liquid
wa..WjpJ.ltl,tly-and you're
through! Gat CAR-PLATE!
Johnsons CAR-PLATE
Johnson's CARNU
Distributors: I
i'iWu.
TROPIDURA 'if?
Co\o
Giv. your skin a soft, velvety,
sweef-tinted finish waft Pond's
heovoniy face powder. Because
fit's afseor-gouge," Pond's Dream-
flows* Powder drifts on lightly,
smoothly ... and dinas for hours!
Choose your Pond's Powder today.
Choose from eight enchanting
Dreomftewer shades)
VISCOUNTIM IIIOeoiT, SHICMSSS
OFMOHlt rtn-i-, fee** m.^,
ays, I'm aMmW wMb NmTi mw saws
Bwisssss iir * fc-sawa. *!..
Racket Battling
Attorney General
Up For Reelection
TALLAHA8SEE, Fla., Oct. 5
(UP)Florida's racket-battling
Attorney General Richard W.
frvln announced officially today
that he will be a candidate for
re-election as the State's chief
legal officer next year.
The 46-year-old attorney la the
first cabinet member to an-
nounce his candidacy for re-elec-
tion. Becretary of State R. A.
Gray has said informally he will
run again.
Ervin notified Gray that his
brother, Robert M. Ervln, Talla-
hassee attorney, will serve as his
campaign treasurer. And he de-
signated the Capital City Nation-
al Bank of Tallahassee as his
campaign depository to become
the first candidate for statewide
office to fulfill the requirements
of the new election law.
The attorney general's an-
nouncement confirmed a state-
ment he made to United Press
two weeks ago and stilled rumors
that he might run for Governor
or seek the State Supreme Court
post to be vacated by Justice Alto
Adams.
Ervin said he would formulate
his platform later. But he Is cer-
tain to run partially on his anti-
gambling record.
Army's New. Weekly,
'The Buccaneer/
Makes Bow Today
First edition of USARCARB's
new weekly newspaper .The
Buccaneer will be published to-
day.
The new paper will be tabloid
size, with interesting and time-
ly features to appeal to all
members of the Army. A full
page will be printed In Spanish,
aid articles* will be prepared
especially for the callsted per-
snnnnel.
The Buccaneer Is the succes-
sor to the old "Caribbean Army
News," which during its publica-
tion was often lauded by the
Armed Forces Press Service as
the best Armed Forces newspa-
per printed outside the con-
tinental United States.
Olsrer Takes Few
Days Off For Fair
BRAZIL. Ind. (UP.) Sev-
enty nine year old William
Brown of Harmony, reported
mlsaing for five days, reassured
relatives he was Just visiting the
Indiana State Fair in Indiana-
polls.
Brown called Indianapolis po-
lice headquarters when he heard
relatives were worried about his
disappearance, and told thejjfi
fleers he was all right.
"Just came lo the city to see
the fair." police quoted him.
So happy because
. I found this
HIGHER TYPE
Intimate Feminine
Hygiene
uper

ervice
Presents
STARTLING VALUES IN
Automotive Maintenance
GET RID OF DRIVING
2L
A0!*?**'
Enjoy the ".itfro" advan-
tage of this Greaseless Sup-
positoryIt Gives Hours
of Continuout Medication
Now tb argent need oi act-
ing women far an easier, dain-
tier and more conven ieat way
te intimate feminine cleanli-
ness Is tatiified thanks 'to
ZoMTOas. And here's why
Zoniiori ara one of the mo!
important discoveries arar
made for this parpse:
1. Zonitors are new-white,
greaieleae, tlalnleu vaginal
suppositorieseasily in-
otrttd and so convenient.
' 2. Powerfully eermicidal and
deodorant yet to tale to ed-
tate titsues. Positively non-
irritating, non poisonoui.
non-mtrting.
i. When inserted Zoniiori
rVkiy begin to relate
ir powerful fcrmicidal
and deodorant qualities.
And hecaase they melt grad-
ually, Zonitors give you
Houas or Continuous
Munition yet leave no
sticky residue.
4. Zoniiori intently kill every
. germ en contact. They pre-
vent germs from asulli.lv-
iag.
Enjoy the priceless advantage
'of this new higher type Ulti-
mata feminine hygiene get
Zonitors today! Any drag
counter.
Don't risk the driving hasard of a car that might slip out of coarrol
in traffic or at high spstak Careful, accurate wheel balancing can assure
you safe, drpendoblt steering PLUS smoother, easier car riding on every
mile you drive.
Our aaaasiag new Stewart-
Warner Electronic Wheel Bal-
ancer does just that and all
in a manar of minutes. Your
wheels are balanced quickly,
accurately... in true running
position . e mil speeds .. .
right on your own car. The re-
sult: a perfectly balanced wheel.
Remember: Balanced Wheels
Meen Safer, Smoother, Easier
Drivingand Save Tires, Too.
Come in and have your car's
wheels balanced the Stewart-
Warner Blttmic Way now
today!
WHEEL BALANCING
We will cross-switch all lour tires and ^T f\f\
balance all .out wheels. (Weight extra). / **
SPECIALS OCT. 6th to OCT. 12th
OIL CHANGE & LUBRICATION
with 5 QTS. of 40t OIL O gg
ALL FOR ONLY -fc'^T
PROTECT THAT NEW... or OLD... FINISH
with POWER GLAZE IAqQ
Guaranteed 4 Months **
AUTHORIZED
STEWART WARNER
Speedometer and Instrument Service
Your ALE MITE AGENT
Super Auto Service
15th & Belisaro Porras Golf Club Road
Phone 3-0035
Wise Shoppers Have Learned its
TO SHOP AT
SrtdAlS SUNDAY MONDAY
K%y)OG_Foop .17
;
^^ubeS[eak__
Swift Oriole Barony ib_____
Hejnz_Peanu[ BuHeu3 9
V^ Heinz Soups Ass't .10
v.
f .
'f>
-
_
ClappV Baby^ Food ,
-
Royal Gelatin & Jello.
"Jn\
J/jwift's Arrow Soap Chips
W5jye^Urd.Zo
V* Swift's Floracita Butter .65
Grocery Savings
Swift's Pard DOG FOOD .24
HEINZ ANCH0VIE SPREAD .10
AV0SET Whipping .49
AV0SET Table .39
BIRDSEYE A O
STRAWBERRIES .47
'Jjaheru \ nltu
ues
FINGERS doi. .24
PINEAPPLE LOAF m. .59
SPICED MUFFINS doz. .48
BLUEBERRY CUPS -. .05
EGG LOAF
TWIST
.10
Enjoy Top Quality MEATS
Porterhouse Boneless .59
FRANKFURTERS .45
SIRLOIN STEAK i .49
LUNCHEON MEAT .65
BRISKETS Swifts Empire .51
[Bodega [Bargains
Imported Italian CHIANTI 1.25
JOHN HAIG SCOTCH 3.95
CHILEAN WINE .95
AGEWOOD 2.80
UNDURAGA
WINE
1.15
i
FREE HOME DELIVERY Coll 3-0034
PANAMA'S ONE STOP SHOPPING CENTER
Under New Management V
OPEN DAILY7 a.m. to t p.m. SUNDAYS: S s.m. ( 1 p.m.
ISlb Via Beliiario Porras ton Francisco Golf tlab Road
PLENTsY OF PARKING SPACE
>.
,---------------------------------.


p,or el
1
mi PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PRIDAT, OCTOBER 5. 161
^
if
S?B
l
You Sell em... Wiicn You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
He. 4 TItoH Ae.
fhanc t-l
KIOSKO DE LESSEES
Paran e> Laai.es
P.n.mi.
MORRISON'S
Ne. 4 rwlt ef Mr Ave.
PIMM S-tttl.
BOTICA CARL-TON
lt.tW M.lin*.. An.
Phase 255-Col*
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
tie. H Wwi lith Street.
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
n: it h" wmi tmmt
S: 12,171 Cotral A r C.l.a.
50'
Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additional
word.
s
FOR SALE
Household
II
FOR SALE:One Westinghouse 7
1-2 cu. ft. De Luxe refngerotor.
Ii!;e new. Curundu 2179-A, 8th
St. Eost. Tel. 4242.___________
FOR SALE:9 ft. oil porcelain re-
frigfrator. new General Electric
motcr. S7C.00. Gos woter heat-
er ond tank. 30 gollons. $100.00.
Almost new. Contact Lola Cheese-
man 3-1660 Beouty Shop.
FOR SALEOne dmmg set 2 tablet,
ene buffet, one dresser, one kitch-
en table, one library toble. all
are steel ond in good condition.
6 c.'< dining choirs. 4 small
table1.. Baby bath tub and mis-
cellaneous articles. Call (Thurs-
day' Friday and Saturday 1559-
B Calabosh St. Bolbco. Phone 2-
- 3436.
"TOR SALE: Refrigerator, Rodio &
record player Household furni-
ture & miscellaneous articles on
display oil day Saturday. Building
Apt. 6, De Lesseps. Cristobal 3-
1233.
FOR SALE: Universal stove, used.
Good condition. Telephone 2-
3137 Panama. 8 to 12 o.m.2
to 5 p-m.
FOR SALE:9 cu. ft. Westinghouse
refrigerator needs repairs 35.00.
Balboa 2-3324.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
u
C

cc
9,
u
c
s
I
896 more 896 more 896 more
:c
figures
that speak
for themselves
Last month THE PANAMA
AMERICAN carried 3 247
classified ads as compared
to 2351 in all other daily
papers in Panam com-
bined !
RESORTS
1
FOR SALEor LEASE: Property in
the city of Ponama consisting of
2,700 square meters land and j
concrete office and warehouse '
building Principols only. Aparta-
do 1293. Panama.
896 more
FOR SALE
Automobile
896 more
896 more
9
1
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
IUICK
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Paredes
Panam 2-0600
LOVELY HOME .furnished, lorge
livingrocm. good housekeeping
kitchen, two bedrooms, three dry
c>sets. toilet, shower, lorge gor-
o&e. own water system, fluores-
cent lights. 2400 meters land,
ocean bathing. Gorgcna Beach.
Tel. Bolboo 2-2130 I Foster I, $5.
! 000. 2646
VOUR DREAM:To enioy mildest
climote. privacy, superb mountoin
view, oi range appointment to vi-
sit amp'e. smooth slope, end of
1 hill ot LAS CUMtRES. Yet your
; dreams for o bucolic, heolthy life
can be moteriolized right here in
J the rridst of a hilly, olluring Na-
ture REAL ISTATE CENTER. Via
.' Esparto No. 31. Tel. 3-4512
; 3-2969. Eng. Demstenes Verga-
r.
FOR SALE:1949 Codillac convert-
ible, excellent condition. Extras
Call Coco Solo 380 or write Box
382, Coco ,Solo.
Whatever used ear you wont to
buy or sell consult first with
Agencia Cotmot S. A. Automo-
bile Row No. 29. Tel. 2-4721.
Eesy terms. Opened all day Sot-
urdoys.
FOR SALE: 1938 green, 2 Door
Buick Special. Very good trans-
portation. Priced at $225.00.
Phone Kobbe 6276.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
IUICK
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Paredes
Panam 2-0600
OR SALE:Santo Clora. 5 room
' cement cottage fully furnished, on
2 lots 130 Ft. by 250 Ft. with
small building in back of proper-
ty suitable for Maid or Handy
man, several young fruit trees.
beautifully landscaped and fenced.
e.ectricity ond water. Tef. 2-2612
or Box 934. Ancon.
FOR SALE:Super Buick four-dcor
sedon. 1947. duty poid, perfect
condition. Call during office hours
telephone 2-2644, Panama.
Repairs on Front- suspension on all
makes of cor using the famous
BEAR aligning equipment. Mini-
mum fee for checking. Tropical
Motors.
MISCELLANEOUS
0* y.y heve eMsftbts e.eel.i.?
Writ. Al.efcoMt. Aw.,...
> 2011 Ante*. C. Z.
Civil Office: All matters concerning
this office will attended by Bu-
reau de Servicio Internacional. S.
A., next door to the Civil Office,
32nd Street. Tel. 3-4835 Box
2061, Panama.
Are you glass, brakes, alignment
ond lights ready for early inspec-
tion this yeir? .Get ahead of the
rush by visiting
TROPICAL MOTORS
We offer you any kind and size of
lumber, imported or native, nails
and screws of ony description.
Lowest prices. ALMACENES MAR-
TINI. $. A. North Ave. Tel. 2-
0610 Martin Sos Street Tel. 3-
1424.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Sere
$250.00
Leice lotatee with 1.5 lent
(neteee $475.0* I)
$244.50
Inrcrnerienel Jewelry
I adj. Int. Hotel)
~.r
BEACH Front property. Furnished
house, running woter, electricity
cottage in rear, Gofgona. Coll
Balboa 3164. House 1479-8 Hol-
dsn St.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:Rebuit Diesel engines,
Graymorlne, fG. M.I Buda Cater-
pillar. Diesel light plants. Morcot
Villcreol. H Street No. 34. Phone
2-1746
FOR SALE: Steel unsinkable 22
foot Cabin Cruiser "Sea More."
rand new Universal Marine Mo-
tor ond oil equipment and geor.
Owner leaving. Will sacrifice for
half cost. Call 2-3446 for ap-
pointment.
SALE: Heavily built motor
sailer '-Crusoe"; 32' x 8' W x
*Vi', fir, pine, mohogony; four
Sunks, large cockpit, emergency
filter. new sails, refrigeration;
equipped for outriggers and fish-
ing chair; licensed for ten. Stain-
less steel water and gos tanks. Six
.cylinder gray marine, 75 HP.
\ Fresh woter cooled. Leaving-soeri-
fice, $25.00. New 2,\\P. John-
in outboard With spare parts,
r$l 39.00. J. V. McGimtey Pono-
lina Canal Yacht Club, Cristobal
1983.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
BUICK
NEW YORK OP DETROIT
Smooth Paredet
Panama 2-0600
FOR SALE: Buick Special 4 Dooi
Sedan. Purchased in February
1948. Original owner selling.
Scat covers. Excellent mechanical
condition. Fine tires. Phone Bal-
boa 2439.
FOR SALE
Motorevele"
FOR SALE: "M5" Hortey Motor-
evele. recent complete overhaul.
Coll Albrook 3189 during duty
hours.
CASINO SANTA CLARA:Cobins,
food, swimming. No reservations
necessary.
Gramlich's Santa Clara beach-
cottages. Electric ice boxes, gas
stoves, moderate rotes. Phone 6-
441 or 4-567.
Phillips. Oceanside cottages, Santo
Clara. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Ponomo 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673
FOSTER: Cottages for rent by
day, week or month between Santa
Clara ond Rio Hato. Tel. 2-3142
or tee care taker.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modem furnished-unfurnished apart
ment. Contact office No. 8061. 10th
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386, Co-
lon.
FOR SALE: Plymouth 1950 Cou-
pe, new tires leather upholstery
ond radio $1.275.00. One Pac-
kard 1949 Sedan of four doors.
Duty pcid, new tires leather up-
holstery and rodio, $1.300.CO
Balboa 3489.
FOR SALE: 1948 FORD CLUB
COUPE. Can be seen daily. Con-
tact R. G. ADAMS Esto Standard
Oil, Q Street Panama.
DODGE 1937 Four-door sedan;
good tires, recent overhaul, new
battery. Hertig, Panama 3-3134.
Position Offered
WANTED:Clerk knowledge Span-
thjEnglish shorthond. Columbia
Pictures, 7 and 8 Justo Aroseme-
ne .Avenue No. 7092, Colon.
<
FOR
FIDELITY
I0NDS
SEE
BUSINESS MAM'S
LUNCH J5
Beef Jc Barley Soup or Fruit (up
BEEF A LA MODE
Mashed Potatoes Vegetables
Salad e Bet Balls Detects
Coffee Tee
OR SALE:Leaving soon, 47 Htr-
ley Davidson A4 model. Insurance
to July 52. $375.00 cash. 5464,
apartment J. Tel. 2-1889. Diablo.
FOR SALE: Motor Scooter (Cush-
manl excellent condition, cheap.
House 117-B. Phone 4-318.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED: Wood working ma-
chines: one band sow, minimum
12 inches. One circular sow, mini-
num 10 inches. Tilting arbor. One
spindle thaper, minimum 5-8 inch
spindle. Call Curundu 83-6294
from 4 to 6 p. m.
WANTED TO RENT: Beginning
December unfurnithed three bed-
room house with garden In Bella
Vista or vicinity. Phone Panama
3-3976.
FOR RENT
Misce) I a n eon
MARTINIS MANHATTANS
i'Aiqcmig
from 4
to C p.m.
ON IKE HOUSE...
APPETIZERS a la Radolphe
25
FOR RENT:Finco in Chilibre with
furnished home. Water well, trees,
etc. chicken-wire fence. Cantina
Chico Modelo, cross from Corre-
giduria Chilibre.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT:itlle Visto, fully fur-
rushed house: three bedrooms,
maid's quarters, garage, large en-
closed yard. Attroctive, newly
painted. Coll. 43 No. 54. Tele-
Phone: 3-3176 or 2-0980.
FOR RENT: Available December
Itt. Beautiful, spacious 4-bedroom
residence in Lo Cresto. excellent
view. Will show by oppolntment.
Phone Pannma 3-3564 or write
ox 165, Balboa Ctghts, Canol
Zcrte,
FOR RENT: One-bedroom apart-
ment, furnished with all modern
convenience Well located. Avail-
able immediately. Call 3-4651 ot
7 p. m.
FOR RENT: Modem unfurnished
apartments in new building.
$45.00. $65.00, $75.00. Comer
11 th Street, Parque Lefevre. In-
formation 181 Central Ave.
FOR RENT: If looking for refined
surroundings to live, come to
house 82 Avenida Porras. Lovely
apartment completely furnished.
Beautiful view, large grounds.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom apart-
ment on Justo Arosemena Avenue
#73-A living-dining room, two
dry closet in each bedroom, moid*
room with both room, garage. Te-
lephone 2-2341 3-0294. After
7.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT:Furnished room, Amer-
ican home, near Ancon, bus stop,
to American woman only. Refer-
ences required. Telephone Pon o mi
2-3067.
READY FOR OCCUPANCY Light
cool airy rooms to rent for ba-
chelors only. Moderate rentals.
Rooms ready for inspection. In-
quire American Club, facing De-
Lesseps Park.
Help Wanted
/
WANTED:Maid must know to
cook, clean. Sleep in. Good salary
Apply #18 52nd Street Apt. 1.
Bella Visto.
WANTED maid oble to cook refe-
rences required. House 0419-A
Venado Street Ancon,
WANTED:Moid for
work. References.
Cruces. Balboa.
General House
1412-B Los
LOST & FOUND
LOST:Female Dobermon Pincnner
thoroughbred. Nome "Lady",
walks with slight limp front right
leg. Phone Panama 3-1565, 6 to
10:30 p.m.
REWARD for the return of wallet
ccntoining licenses and other iden-
tification papers to HARMODIO
ARIAS JR. Panama American of-
fice. Tel. 2-0740.
Wanted Position
AMERICAN, college graduate, fluent
Spanish, excellent references, ad-
ministrative, soles, transportation
general business experience Latin
America, desires position. Write
J. D. Box 134. Pneme, R. P.
We Are
Headquarters for
Sherwin-Williams
Paints
Ws invite you to visit
our Stores to inspect
our hugs assortment of
colors. We hove a paint
for every purpose.
BEST QUALITY
LOWEST PRICES
83 North Ave. Tel. t-Mle
Msrtfa Sees Street
TeL 1-1424
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
DON'T STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL.
VERTAGREEN
3-Way Plant Food.
is cheaper than water
foi H
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
27 Central Are. .Tel. 3-0140
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
TeL S-171S
-22 E 28th St
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hei.l r I Panam
Has far Bale the f.Doxtn Blacks:
ABATTOIR NAL.. 8. A.
NATIONAL BBEWEBY
FLEXZA V LIZ (rracerre*)
HOTELES INTVXAMBBICANOS
rOMMOtCIAI. CKRDIT CORP.
CLUB AETNA DC COLON, B. A.
If Utereatee fat aaaldatf any ale er
Prchate, pitis call ta at raaaaaA
3-n er 1-iast
Cane te Taatpa, Plerlia tar vaea-
)! er tar fee*. I eaa ketp you la
he/ er raat h teen, arapait/, rate
eraras, eMekta tanas, betels, tic,
at all ericas tai tenar. If Intcreat-
es write te rlrraua Kleenex, c/a
Otarei w. Bsaset, Baal stale Beak-
en, at Framklia Street. Tubs* Z,
rlerkta.
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM -BUILT
Slipcover Reupholstery
visn- oub show-room:
AJetrts Beret
J. r. > la Oaae 77 (AettttltBe Bow)
ree Bstsaetat Meta DeUrery
TeL S-eOS l:M 3 te 7:M em.
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
TrWELXRYItt
IS Tvoli Ave. Pan. 2-20M
Sanalac
IN8TANT
Fat-Free Powdered Milk
(fortified with Vitamin D)
for
DRINKING
e for
COOKING
for
WHIFFING
Farm Fresh
Flavor-
On Sate in
F.C. Co. Commissaries.
LEGAL NOTICE
UNITED STATES Of AMERICA
CANAL ZONE
Unite*" State. Dietrkt Ceeit Per The
Battrtst Of The Cewel Zeee
DMeiee ef Beftee
Geor.. O. GOaa*.
r*.
Vlalatiff.
Mar/ W. eOaae.
eafeaeaat.
SUMMONS
Cate Me. 140
Civil Docket II
ACTION FOB DIVOBCB
To the abero-aaBM* oaf.ad.Bt:
Toa ara hanky roeelre* to awear
at aaawer the asawiaiat flla* la the
abo.a-oatiU.a oclioa wliala ala.tr car
attar th. tint publitatloa.
la aaao of roar fattan te to' as
roar an* aaaw.r. l fataat yea hr ojofaajt for the re-
lict *ataaooa la th. complaint.
WITNESS tko Heeorekle JCM>R J.
HANCOCK, Je*ae. UaKoe State. Dtltrlet
Cart far the Dlatrkt ef the Car*]
Zoae, tkU IZtk ear f Seat. Itt!.
C T. MlC.iearth, Jr.
Clerk
(SKAL)
Br Lai. C. Harrkaa _
Daautr Clerk
To M.ry W. Gil...
The forocoint auauaoa. (. ..rr.e
upon roe hf aoollcatloti aaraaaat te
tko erect of the Honorable JOSEPH !
HANCOCK. Jadee, Ualtad State. Bit'
trial Ooort far the Diatriat .f the
Caaal Zone, dated Sett 11. Itt I and
catered aad ftted la thi. aatlaa la the
office af the Clark of ..Id Ualtad SUtet
Dl.trlat Court for th. DlrUloa ,t Bal-
boa ea Sept. 11. i*n.
C T. hWC-lcW, Jr.
Br Lai. E. Harriaaa
Dcp.tr Clark
Pension Authorities
Seek information On
Mrs. E. R. Sleadman
I n f o r matlon concerning Mr.
and Mrs. Edward R. Steadman,
who lived In the Canal Zone from
about 1908 to 1911, is needed in
connection with a pension for
Mrs. Steadman under the "old
timers" pension plan.
Anyone who could personally
verify the facts concerning this
couple'i residence here is asked
to communicate with the Retire-
ment Clerk, Room 102, Adminis-
tration Building, Balboa Heights,
telephone 2-2661.
Mr. Steadman came from Alex-
andria, Virginia, and was em-
ployed In April 1908 in the Oor-
gona Shops of the Mechanical
Boy Scouts Receive 8-Foof
Replica of Liberty Statue
An 8 V foot replica of the (thick is used both in the original
Statue of Liberty has been do- [ and in the svatue to be erected
nated by Morris H. Hoffman of here. The g.-cenlsh color of the
Kansls City, Missouri, to the Ca-
nal Zone Council, Boy Scouts of
America, Council President Will
R. Price announced recently.
The Status has arrived on the
Canal Zone and is to be uncral-
ed In the next few days, Price
stated. It will then be viewed by
the Building Sites Committee of
The Panam Canal before as-.
Ignment of a site for It's erec-
tion is made.
Members of the American
Legion and Uie Veterans of For-
*
Division. Mrs. Steadman came to construction of the base for the
original Statue of Liberty is
caused by the atmosphere. After
four to five years of exposure to
the weather, the replica wlU
have approximately the sam
appearance.
Price said that the Boy Scouts
and the other sponsors of the
statue see It aa a symbol of
the important e to our everyday
lives of the great heritage of
America.
"The statue," he said, "will
serve to recall to everyone the
elgn War of the United States | great ideals cf freedom and de-
have volunteered to assist in the
the Isthmus about 1909.
Mr. Steadman was transferred
to the Atlantic Division In 1910
and served as locomotive engi-
neer, until June 1911, when he
resifned. Their future address
given at thai time was Jackson-
ville, Florida.
Men Who Registered
In US May Request
Files Sent To CZ
Canal Zone men who are re-
gistered with local boards in the
States may now have their files
transferred to the Canal Zone,
according to lnrstuctlons recent-
ly released by National Selec-
tive Service Headquarters. -
State Director A. C. Medinger
estimated that there are more
than 100 young men in the Ca-
nal Zone who will be eligible to
have their registrations trans-
ferred to local boards In the
Canal Zone.
Transfer of registration will
be optional with the registrant.
However, such transfer cannot
be effected in any case where
there has been mailed to the
Statue. In announcing the ar-
rival of the Statue/Price, said,
that It was loped to hold the
dedication ceremony on Armis-
tice Day, November 11.
It Is planned to dedicate the
Statue as the Canal Zone
World War 11 Memmorial, Price
added.
The famous statue of Bedloe's
Island In New York Harbor, rises
300 feet above the water. It was
given to the people of the Unit-
ed States by the people ofFrance
In 1876 in commemoration of
the hundredth anniversary of
the signing cf the Declaration
of Independence.
It was officially dedicated ten
years later on the foundations of
Fort Wood, a bastion construct-
ed in the form of an eleven
pointed star, which accounts for
the shape of the base.
8heet copper, 3/32 of an inch
Juror Said Biased
In Bid For Retrial
01 Florida Killer
BARTOW. Fla.. Oct, 5 (UP)
A serie sof defense witnesses tes-
tlfled today that a juror was pre-
reglstrant an Order to R-Porl. judiced against undertaker A. El-
wood North before the trial that
resulted in his conviction on a
first degree murder charge.
The testimony came'in a hear-
ing on North's appeal for a new
trial. His conviction last month
for the slaying of prosperous Mrs.
Betty Albritton carries a possible
death sentence since the Jury did
not recommend mercy.
North's attorneys' listed S3
Sounds in the appeal for a new
ial. Judge Don Register started
off with the defense's contention
that Juror Thomas P. Blood-
worth, a Lake Wales barber, was
prejudiced. Four witnesses testi-
fied they heard Bloodworth say
before the trial that North should
be convicted for killing Mrs. Al-
britton.
The State called 19 dltnesses,
including the 12 Jurors, and the
defense 17 witnesses for the ap-
peal hearing.
for Induction which is still cur-
rent and in effect.
To accomplish transfer, a re-
gistrant will have to submit a
written request therefor to the
Canal Zone local board having
jurisdiction over the area. In
which he resides.
The request must state that
the registrant was at the time
of registration, and thereafter
has continued to be, a resident
of the Canal Zone.
Information Is also required
to be submitted as to his address
and the number and address of
his present local board of juris-
diction.
Molino Criticized
By Deputies For
Signing Jap Treaty
Panama's Foreign Minister,
Ignacio Molino, was harshly cri-
ticized yesterday by two Deputies
of the National Assembly for
signing the Japanese Peace Trea-
ty in San Francisco last month.
Deputy Juan B. Arias, who
took leave from the Assembly for
ten days yesterday, spearheaded
the attack on Molino stating that
Molino's action in signing the
treaty was unconstitutional.
Deputy, Aquilino Boyd alleged
that the Minister signed the do-
cument ending the state of war
with Japan although Dr. Ricardo
J. Alfaro. legal adviser to the
President, had said that it would
be illegal.
This morning, a delegation of
the 25-man parliamentary bloc
visited President Alciblades Aro-
semena reportedly to advise that
the bloc had decided not to give
their approval to the appoint-
ments of the managers of the
Social Security Board, the Farm-
Livestock Bank and the National
Lottery Office.
Trie visit preceded the regular
Cabinet council meet 1 n g, at
which Arosemena is expected to
inform his ministers of the bloc's
decision.
Members of the powerful As-
sembly bloc are believed to have
decided on (his morning's an-
nouncement to the President at
a conference yesterday with, Po-
lice Chief Jos A. Remn, who
has the backing of the group as
a Presidential candidate In next
year's elections.
BATTERED REDS
GIVE UP KOREA
(ContiBued from Paga 1)
battalion strength Communist
attack was repulsed by elements
of the United States 1st Cavalry
Division.
This morning there was lit-
tle or no contact with the Com-
munists.
Patrols of the new British Com-
monwealth Division ranged up to
2.000 yards ahead of the divi-
sion's new-won objective!, and
met Only light fire.
The western front offensive
was on a line from Korangpo, a-
bove Seoul, to the approaches of
Pyongyang, apex of the old Iron
Triangle.
The five divisions Involved in-
cluded troops from the United
States, Britain. Canada. Austra-
lia, New Zealand, Oreece. Turkey
and South Korea.
Reports from the eastern front
also told of diminishing Red re-
sistance.
Communist guas on and be-
hind Heartbreak Ridge, above
Yanggu, were strangely silent-
'Fire Prevention'
Cachet Now In Use
In CZ, RP Moils
A special fire prevention week
cachet for United States Mall
moving in the Canal Zone and
from the Canal Zone to the Re-
public of Panama was authoriz-
ed for fire prevention week Oc-
tober 7-13.
James Marshall, Director of
Posts for the Canal Zone, au-
thorized use of the cachet as
fart of the concerted campaign
his year of U. 8. and Republic
of Panama governmental agen-
cies to render fire prevention
week more effective.
For stamp collectors informa-
tion, the cachet will be used on-
ly during through October 13
and will be used on ordinary
mail moving In the Canal Zone
and to the Republic of Panama.
The cachet has been furnished
to all Canal Zone postmasters
with instructions to use it with
red ink.
mocracy thac this country ot
ours has stood for since-the sign,
lng of the Declaration of Inde-
pendence. We are bringing to
the Canal Zone a vitally Import-
ant chapter n! American history,
one. which affects each one of
us every day. It is our hope that
this statue will remind every
citizen of th- Canal Zone that
freedom is everybody's business,
every day of the year."
KERSH STILL
MISSING;
(Continued from Page I)
were unable to identify any of
the people.
Cantu flew about the area for
*n 1Lou,r and a hB,i *n indifferent
conditions, but saw nothing of
tnernksing men or their plane.
Other AQSA planes will keep
up the Bayano search this af-
ternoon. The weather shows
signs of clearing sufficiently
for the Air Force helicopter
SB-17 team to Join in again as
wen.
Cantu himself plans to follow
up a hunch that Kersh may have-
come down south of La Palma,
after turning back from the
storms which blocked the coast
between La Palma and PaltiUa
Monday.
Yesterday Cantu landed on
beaches in thst area to question
fishermen and villagers.
At Patina and Taimanti he
was told the plane had been
sighted heading down the coast
south of La Palma about 1 p.m.
This afternoon Cantu will
scour the hills behind Taimanti.'
Dubols and Kersh owned the
only two Ercoupes on the Isth-
mus. ..,
Dubols took off at 3 p.m. yes-
terday and flew over the water to
a point east of San Miguel Bay,
returning via the Perlas Islands.
When about four miles off Che-
plllo Island at 5:40 p.m. his en-
gine failed.
He ditched the Brcoupe about
one mile offshore.
Dubols and Alba, who were
wearing life Jackets, broke out
their rubber boat, pumped it up.
and paddled to the beach, whero
they landed three miles east of
the mouth of the Tocumen River
at 8:25 p.m.
In the twilight they could dim-
ly see their plane still afloat, but
low down in the water.
They started walking towards
Panam.
As they walked along the beach
they saw an Air Force C-82
search plane looking for Krsh.
Dubols fired two red flares,
then blinked an S.OS. The plan*
circled four times.
In the darkness Dubols and Al-
ba encountered quick sand, and
with great difficulty arrived at
the Tocumen River.
Being bogged down in the quick
sand, according to Dubols, was
the most difficult part of the)
whole trip.
A fisherman named Garcia
picked them up and In bis cayu-
ca paddled them a mile up river
where he had a camp site.
Dubols and Alba decided to get
to the Tocumen Highway, and
Garcas small boy guided them
from the fisherman's camp over
the difficult two-hour journey to
the highway.
Upon reaching the highway,
they were, picked up by Alfred
Paget, of Panagra Airways, and
driven to the Tocumen Airport.
y&*m/uv%4*& %
onion's
StomcbJSttp'iuifHZ *
O


/RIDAY. OCTOBER S. 1951

T PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWIPAPfl
_______
--. -_ >..
rAOE SEVEN
O

THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNir AND ukUHM TMt A.' '"A AMERICAN PRISA INC.
ratiNncn at nm.ro* (-.' NSevtLl im iAt
HARMODIO AMIAS, miro
? H STXttT R O SO< >34 RAKAMA R Of R
TlLlPHONl 'A.1M. NO : 0740 IB LlNfH
CARL! AODHIAS. RANAMBRICAN. RANAMA ''
COLO* OMICEl IS 17* CINTRAI AVINUf RCTWItN <*TM ANB HTM Iwllll
ROAtlAN R,(RAC(fNTATIVIA> JOSHUA Rr.WTR*. INC
SAW MAOIRON VI NIW VOAK. I<7> N. V
ll Mu
MONTH. IN AOVANCt ., I 70 .SO
O l MONTH. IH *"""" t BO 13 OO
ON TAR. IN ABVAN6I_____________________< SO t4 OO

Walter Winchell
In New York
Labor Mew
Ad
(Comment
By Victor Riesel
CHICAGO. Some dramatic
aignal this month may unleash
a military revolution against
Generalissimo Franco.
If the Spanish generals pull
their putsch to drive the worried
Falangist ruler from Madrid, the
Army will be supported not only
by the Monarchists, but also by
the Socialist and Anarchist la-
bor unions run by exiles to Pa-
ris and Southern French towns.
There Is no doubt that .the
Socialist UGT and the Anarch-
ist CNT can paralyze Spain
MAN ABOUT TOWN '
Lady Iris Mountbatten's new big romance is The Duke of
Kellle. He phrantically phones from Mexico every night. Bat one
of her local musician-beaux, she tells chums, clipped her for SI.too
...Pearl Bailey, the Blues star, has finally filed for divorce...
Songhlt-writer Bob Merrill's Truly, Truly Fair is Susan Sulaberger
of the N. Y. Times tribe.. Edna Ferguson, who doubles as Nancv while the military move.
Randolph on the society pages, will center-aisle it with writer Neil
Wilkerson. Alger Hiss is ailing- in the prison hosp ..Dr. Gaye-
lord Ha user returned a matron s slave bracelet (worth II Gs) by
Western Union boy... Edith Kermit Roosevelt's new bay bee-
bay bee is coast reporter.. .Baseball star Mel Ott's dghtr Lynn
will he a Christmas bride.. .Lew Ayres and Coleen Gray are Fish-
ing ic Tushing.. .The lovely widow of Eddy Duchln has a proposal
rom a Park Ave. medic...The Wm. Sarovans, who divorced and
re-manied, are atomic in- again!
"Co 'Way, Boys-Y'Bother Me"
The International Stage: Deanna Durbin and her new hus-
band. Chas. David, are taping their toes, which is a heluva way
to run a railroad... Befty Dodero, whose merger to actor Alan
Curtis oops'd. is dating Count Linaskt on the Riviera.. .Prince
Feisel of Arabia is coming to N.Y. because o! model Jill FeUer...
Mmt. Pandit got a Miguel Finnola in Mexico City...They say
Denise Lawson Johnston and Marquis Niceolo Theodoll Are Fit
To Be Tied...The reconciliation between I'mberto of Italia and
wife Maria Jose of Belgium appears to be almost legal.. Countess
de Cordoba and Aral Yavcnsonne, the talent agent, arc niakinr
with the preacher talk...Jack Topping will hunt hi Greenland
by private plane. If you po'n his lorgnette.. .A Yurropean mil-
lionaire speculator of Park Ave. face deportation via a morals rap.
Quick Action D.ept: The other colyum we noted that Rea Polk,
the widow of the CBS correspondent murdered in Greece, was an
intelligent girl of 24prettyand a linguist.. .That she was job-
hunting and how about it?...If Mrs. Polk still needs a job-
there's one for her at Look Mag.. Girl Friday has the letter.
Those aren't reconciliation dates Fatsv Lydon is having with
Johnny (I'll Take the Check) Meyer. She's discussing details of
the abrogation Lou el la Parsons' niece LoueHa blends with Jerry
Rehfield Oct. 8th... The image may have arrived by now over at
the Richard Baeharti (Valentina Cortesa). The Del Casinos of
Chateau-Madrid art adding to the Mom-and-Population. She
was Jey Cherry, cover gel.. .Socialite Wm. Black and thrush Jean
Martin are honeymooning... Franess X. Bushman's little girl is
now Mrs. Richard Quine...D, Garroway hasn't anv to program.
hut he has Peggy Lee.. .Patricia PhlUIpp deserted the Copa choir
to become Mrs. Dennis McCarthy... One of the Blue Ribbon
jurors (according to one of the cops on trial recently) was a man
he once collared on a swish charge.
Since the IS accused cops (In the graft-bookie case) were
freedbooks are operating wide open all over town. Four big ones
in the garment center can cover $1,000,000 In wagers with ease...
They keep saying the payoff to Bookie Gross (not lo testify
against, anybody) was S75.0OObut Insiders suspect it wa* half-a-
mill...Gross Is suffering from hypertension and Indigestion. Ubso
a dozen yrs In the clink...The big Abe Stark dinner at the Wal-
dorf last year 'attended by Police COmm. O'Brien and top brass
August Flath) will be news shortly. Because Gross bought mos
of the tickets at S100 each.. The reason the Abe Reles "murder"
Will wind up with no indictment: There were only two civilian
witnesses who put one pf O'Dwyefs chiefs at the scene. One is
verv dead and the other witness (the hotel's night; cTrk) refuses
to testify.
This was proven in a dry run
last April, which had the secret
support of the Army, the police,
the Monarchists and the indus-
trialists unhappy over Spain's
poverty.
Now word has come that the
Army is ready to move and
show its strength on the mili-
tary front just at the under-
groun dunions did six months
ago.
At the sign of the putsch,
the tough Anarchist forces
will pull their unions out of
all shops and plants in Ca-
talonia, where they're a
force. The Basque workers
are expected to move down
from the mountains. The
Andalusian miners and
dynamiters will cut loose
in that province. And the
Socialist unions wiil at-
tempt to paralyze the other
industrial provinces.
In other words, the master
plan, as relayed here from Eu-
ropean labor circles to the AFL
foreign experts now rushing
back to. New York and Fran-e.
calls for an anti-Franco united
front of all-forces.-from Anar-
chists to Monarchistsbut not
the Communists.
They are pledged to a resto-
ration of the crown under Don
Juan, who seeks the throne.
These reports, according to
the AFL's international agents,
have caused Gen. Eisenhower
to slow hlj moves towards
merging Spain into the Euro-
pean defense force.
There can be n doubt as to
the authenticity of these mes-
sages to the AFL people.
The word comes from their
own liaison operatives, who con-
tacted not only the Socialist
and Anarchist unions and the
Spanish "government" in exile,
which the AFL has been sup-
porting financially, but military
and Monarchist circles as well.
^why WASHINGTON
MERRY- GO- ROUND
/HEW MARION
Matter Of Fact
By JOSEPH ALSOP


14 GROUP AIR FORCE

It's About Time Item!: The Bureau of Narcotics, long under-
staffed, is getting a new bunch of special agents. This is Bad News
for tt'>se on the other side of the needle... Ex-Copa girl Javce
nolders. .The Toots Shoracles are saying Larry Doby won't bean
InriVv! next season. Some of them crystal-balled that Cleveland
would rin the fine, too... Milady's hosiery prices are due for a
sharp dive. Mfrs and retailers plenty frightened.. .Things To
Worrv About: Mortimer Hall is miffed over his wife's shawt hair-
doodle. Mrs. Hall is meanly movie star Ruthie Roman. Sooo. mit
a face and figger like hers, Mort has time to look on her hair!
'I give vou pomengrants and everything, Ruthie. (mona mv
house???)
Joy Hodres, the recent Mrs. Paul Dudley, and Jeff Jones are
decorating the La Rue ringside.. .The Bramwell Fletcher splitua-
tlon Is over a femme ad copy writer's provocative lines...The
Bigot Set (Pelley, Wlnrod. O. L. K. Smith, et an will hate Colum-
bia's "The Magic Face." It's about how Their Boy A(dolf) van-
ished. .Life staffer Shana Agar married Stephen Alexander Fri-
day. .We announced that New York's famed 52nd Division would
soon be called to the colors and the phone hasn't quit ringing for
rf*""s. which we no got. But it's soon.. .Roberta Quinlan files
to St. Louis (Oct. 7th i, which His Honor the Mavor nroclalmed
1 Ttd Day. A St. Loo gal who clicked in The Big Citv...
Tl" *....."to in H'wood just sent in S20.000 from Its Josephine
w- thanks...Total donation to Runyon Fund to date:
$5,383,745.04.
WASHINGTON. Before very long, the final
.-ttlement of the embittered controversy about
uie size of the Air Force ought to be publicly
announced.
After the most prolonged and laborious discus-
sion, which at one point kept the Joint Chiefs
of Staff in almost continuous session for ten
days on end, the heads of the services have
reached agreement among themselves. The agreed
plan only awaits the approval of President Tru-
man to become official. -
If the President approves, which seems almost
certain, the plan will provide for expansion of
the Air Force from 95 to about 140 groups
the exact figure is still secret, but this Is the
general scale.
There is dpubt, however, over The Increase in over-all alrpower will allow a
the time table much larger investment in tactical air power,
thus remedying our gravest weakness In the

The Washington Bus: No Blalr House secret that Pros. Tru-
man is rooting far Attlee over Churchill. All 5 of the SEC com-
missioners apneared quietly before Cong. Heller's committee. A
long and troubled session. They appear again this week for an-
other Going-Over...FDR's law partner (Harrv Hooker) Is on the
mend at Harkness Pavilion. Pneumonia.. The Communist rag in
San Francisco is losing clrc fast Blames it all on those nasty FBI
ratcatchers. .The unsung heroes of the sealing of the tJ. S. Con-
stitution and Declaration of Independence (as photo'd in Life's
current) were scientists from the Llbbey-Owens-Ford glass firm.
They worked 11 years on the problemand weren't even men-
tioned.
------------ .
Fibber McGee Molly's dghtr (Kay Jordan) was married
otto voce to a coast physician last week. Her second sealing.
Cameron ShiDp Is toiling over a book on Eddie Cantor which
Doubleday will undrape ln-the Winter.. The Liberty on 42nd gives
Barbara Payton top filling over the star James Cagnev. Mrs
Tone has a minor rpbiijn ftx Wealthy gem dealer Carl Dietrich
hasM)osomy Joyce Qinlan warbling: "Diamonds Are a Girl's,
etc".. Cafe Madison's romantic duo are M. Jelke and model Poo
Brown. (Poo is krect. Mr. Editor. Prob'ly short for Poo-Pop.)...
Roney-Plasa chief D. Schlne is Olnnv 81mms' favorite dream-man
...Joe Louis has that Because of You look because of Natalie
Harper, a Boston model...We understand there's quite a heated
argument between "Borscht Cattades" and "Bagels and Yox" as
to which how Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip should see
first.. Russia better not start anything with us in the mood
Brooklyn is in!
Thee tense Spanish crisis is
analogous to the moment just
before "Munich" in 1938, Irving
Brown, the AFL's chief Euro-
pean representative, pointed
out.
At thai time the widely res-
pected German General Von
Beck had organized an airtight
plot to kill off a man by the
name of Adolph Hitler. Der
Fuehrer's prestige and power
had sagged.
Then came Munich,, when the
West capitulated and a weary
old man called Chamberlain,
depressed by the haunting
knowledge that he had but two
anti-aircraft guns In. London
and 500 eld line planes sur-
rounding the city, returned to
Croydon airport announcing
peace in our time.
After Munich, Herr Hitler's
prestige zoomed. Beck's plot
was doomed. So was the gene-
ral. He and his co-conspirators
were executed.
Here then is the analogy in
the Spanish situation.
Qen. Franco is much bol-
stered by American bid and
the visits of our military.
Naval and dplciiatic per-
sonnel, says the AFL ex-
pert. The Generalissimo
has furiously been wooing
all sides in unpublicized
conversations. Not only has
he sought out Don Juan,
- but he has been seeking NEW YORK. It Is known that Harry Tru-
Spanish and American man is a stubborn man. and it is known that at
labor support. times he has shown himself something less than
For more than a year now,' brilliant, and It is known that he dislikes critic-
Franco has had A standing
air.
On the basis of current scheduling, this great
increment of American strength will be com-
pleted by 1964.
In money terms, the agreement reached by
the Joint Chiefs will mean that about $3,750.-
000.000 of the $5,000.000,000 supplemental de-
fense appropriation recently voted by Congress,
will be allocated to Air Force expansion, while
much of the rest will go to added Naval air
strength. This will get the program started.
In the two following fiscal years, -the huge
capital outlays involved in the expansion of the
Air Force will add about SIO.000,000,000 annually
to the defense budget.
And when the period of capital spending is at
an end, the Air Force expansion will result In
a regular annual bill for maintaining the ar-
med forces of a little under $40,000,000.000. in-
stead of about $35,000,000,000 as previously pro-
jected.
It has long been very obvious that Air Force
expansion would eventually be approved, in one
form or another.
The reason Is that the Air Force has not one.
but two main jobs its own specialized job of
building strategic air power, and its cooperative
job of providing tactical air support to the
ground forces.
In the past, because of budgetary! and other
pressures, the problem of tactical air has been
neglected. I
When the present struggle started, the air
staff prepared a plan for a 183 group Air Force,
which was Sponsored by Secretary of Air
Thomas K. Flnletter and Oen. Hoyt 8. Vanden-
berg.
This first Air Force plan, involved in Increase
in strategic air power even greater than the
projected incerase for tactical air power.
It is understood that most of the sating in
the less ambitious agreed plan of the Joint
Chiefs has been achieved by holding down the
strategic air increases.
On the whole, the most striking aspect of
this: crucial decision that the Joint Chiefs have
taken is the manner of taking it.
What has. happened represents a long step
forward on the hard road toward gepuine uni-
fication of the services;
The Joint Chiefs of Staff themselves plunged
into the debate with far less venom and obstin-
acy than In the past: and the mere fact that
they have been able to agree upon such a furi-
ously controversial subject as Air Force expan-
sion is proof of enormous progress.
Now for the first time, the rule Is recognized
that (he American people are only to pav for
the armed forces they really need for their se-
curity.
This is a great change from the old rule of
the Joint Chiefs, that Increases in appropria-
tions for any single service automatically led to
Increases in the appropriations of the compet-
ing services, whether these were needed or not.
In the main, however, the agreement that
has now been reached signifies a triumph for
the civilian element of the defense establish-
ment, and especially for Secretary of Defense
Robert A. Lovett.
The new climate in which agreement of the
Joint Chiefs became possible was largely created
by the hard work of Lovett. and by the constant
efforts of the two coordinating committees com-
posed respectively of the service secretaries and
under secretaries.
Moreover, the outlook for compromise was
very far from hopeful even at the end of the
oerlod. some weeks ago. when the Joint Chiefs
hardly left their conference table for ten days
on end.
At that time, their prospective disagreement
was reported to Secretary Lovett.
\
Deathly Hush
By BOB RUARK
Try the small but mighty want
ad
's the wander selling aid
'eta results to fast, to cheaply
Yhsfl you want to tall Or trade!
You'll agree P.A. Classifieds are
UPER. too. for buying, seffln.
rftw'. tTavM-" hiring or what
er your need Is!
I
offer made through some U. 8.
government officials, to play
host to a delegation of AFL
and CIO leaders so they can
ee for themselves how bis Fa-
langist unions operate. These
Invitations have been ignored.
To effect a reconciliation
with the underground unions
inside Spain. Franco has sent
fcarord down that he would soon
"remove Minister of Labor Giral,
a hard man the Spanish work-
ers particularly hate.
At the same time, Gen.' Fran-
co has sought to appease dis-
gruntled business men by
changing the Minister of In-
dustry. ,
But the friends he may
have won in these approa-
ches could never match in
strength the rehabilitated
prestige which he will draw
from the American Com-
. mission now in Spain, sur-
veying his needs. Soon it
trill be turning over to him
K2,SOO,000 unconditionally.
Much can be done to reha-
, bilitate that unhappy land
with these stacks of Amer-
ican dollars.
When that rehabilitation
ss is over, Franco will be
nger.
(CopwioM Ml Post-Hall
Syndicate, Inc.)
Ism. especially when it is administered by the
press.
But he is not entirely a fool, and I hope he
shows a minor flash of intelligence by rescinding
bis latest bluff. '
That would be the executive order allowing
the right of censorship to the head of each gov-
ernmental department.
It sounds more innocuous than it Is. If just
says that each department head will have the
right to "classify" all pertinent information, un-
der the guise of security.
That means burying facts, hiding stenches
refusing information that might be of public
Importance.
It is the most powerful weapon I know, this
censorship, and In the hands of petty men,
working for a big boss, It wrecks a country
quicker than any other totalitarian device.
In final boll-down, the President has just or-
dered. In effect, that one manhimselfmay be
declared Judge of what the country needs to
know.
I don't think the boy's that good at his busi-
ness, for a start, and even If he were a parlay
between Einstein and the Angel Gabriel I
wouldn't want an arbitrary limitation on what
you can and can't write.
The next step is the jailhouse for people who
disagree with policy, in print.
With the President's order in effect, the cur-
rent lovely Stench that floats from Washington
concerning his pal Boyle and the Llthofold
Corp. and the RFC would certainly Be 'class-
ified'' information, on the grounds that it is
much too rich for the voter's blood:
I expect Gen Vaughan and the food freezers
would be regarded as rather too secret for pub-
lic dissemination.
1 know that the 8tate Department would be
inclined to discourage any pertinent informa-
tion on whv Bill O'Dwver. that broth of a bye.
was whisked out of New York and into an am-
bassadorship when the corruption heat started.
The ehief reason I hate any censorship, im-
plied or otherwise, is that I was a censor at
one time, when war censorship was partially
necessary, but not to the degree to which it
was applied.
You give a small man a blue pencil and a safe
to hide things In and you have bought your-
self a junior-grade dictator.
During the war I saw censorship practiced to
ratify personal spites. I saw news withheld for
no reason save guile and/or stupidity.
I saw it violated callously and the violators
went free If their connections were right.
Security Is a word that dan be mishandled
about as fully as any known noun. If It reflects
discredit on the subject, all of a sudden it is
security. If it falls to praise, and tends to em-
barrass-bingo! Security.
In the last war we had enough regulations in
the card file to cripple any zealous reporter Into
Incoherence and to run him out of the
theater If he made a snide. If honest, remark
about any of the higher brass.
I think we called It. roughly, anything that
tended to cast a shade on the morale of our
troops or jeopardized our relstions with our
gallant allies.
It was a bjank check, blanket Indictment, ever
ready for use.
Lord knows it is hard enough to keep a gov-
ernment honest as the Truman regime has
amply shown even when your press is free
and they can't slap an Irreverent in the clink
for kicking and snorting occasionally.
But give the same government the weapon of
over-all censorship and the .concentration camp
is just around the corner.
You find a stranger playing your linotypes, as
in the case of La Prensa in Argentina, and a
polite sentrv informs you that the government
has "expropriated" your paper because you didn't
say pice lies about said government. Expropriat-
ed means hijacked.
Haul in your horns on this one. Harry. You
made no friends among the press, and, remem-
ber, election time is just over the hila
Drew Pearson says: Ottawa conference ducks European
defense problem; Europe wants to spend more money
for civilian uses; Three states capture major defensa
contracts.
l*JE52T0,1*' f~. D'P100- returned from the Ottawa con-
ff, a, th.T^P,rivatelyJ that il vuaX nywhere near as success-
" the headlines and the official press communiques Indicated.
,",' It ducked the most important problem for which it
S21a'. the .ue8"n of deciding how much money U to be
spent on European rearmament and how much'for civilian uses.
-.,, J?ermoe' l5* O11** diplomats did not even botheT to
read Oeneral Eisenhower's report on Europe's military defense
nrf V, DrePa_red'a port on the present strength of Europe,
and on how much more armament would be necessary But hu
analysis was not even read. "
will nnAdh.ti7M.ufrred the next "ting "i Rome, which
government November after Great firltaln gets a new.
knowl^tote^bhc* P,Mi ** *"* e"lon* d " "
Keynote of the general attitude at the Ottawa conference waa
a speech given by Bjarni Benedlktsson, Foreign Minister Of Is*.
."V'.h- ands?me yiklBB-type gentleman with long, drooping .
mustaches very much like a walrus.
.. "j"1*"^" aw Foreign Minister Benedlktsson at the first'
closed session, -has already done her share. We can do no more. -
-i. J.! SfSL ^"^"V,11'00'* on our oU- A"1 w h* new
air base at Reykjavik which is keeping all the people awake "
__. ONE-SIDED GAME
Other Foreign Ministers took u similar position. They weren't
Suite so blunt, but their general feeling was that further efforts "
aould come from the United States.
As one delegate put it afterward: "It was !lke a tennis gamr
played against a wall, with the United States the lone tennis""
player and Europe the wall." I
Secretary of State Acheson led off the first closed-door ses-"*
Iv. w ? nP=e to lnsP'rlnK speech, whereas he was very much ,-
on the ball at San Francisco. Dean seemed tired at Ottawa.
He addressed the foreign and finance ministers on the obvi- '
ous fact that Russian foreign policy has not changed in several
hundred years, that it continues one of aggression, and that Rus-
sia under the Kremlin, as under the Csar, is still struggling for>
warm-water ports. s '
Acheson also dwelt on the equally obvious fact that trouble
hi the Near and Middle East as Iran could vitally affect '*
Europe.
Another delegate read lugubrious quotations from Lenin show- "
Ing Russia's passion for conquest quotations which were well <-
known and presumably of no great Import to a group of world
leaders gathered because they were already aware of threatened *
Soviet aggression. .-
The Portuguese delegate also complained: "The one country -
which has stanchly and consistently fought Communism Is not4
here. It should be seated beside us. carrying on this battle should-
er to shoulder. I refer of course to Spain."
SEVAN'S GHOST
Though he wasn't present, the chief shadow which hung over
the conference was that of Aneurin Bevan, resigned British Min-
ister of Health, who left the Labor government because he claim-
ed it was Spending too much on armament and not enough on- -
health benefits.
The standard of living of the British people, he argued, must
not come down.
Unquestionably a majority of the foreign ministers at Ottawa
agreed privately with ex-minister Bevan.
They didn't put it in exactly the sam words, but they knew '
that their governments would fall If workers' wages were further
reduced by Inflation and inflation is Increasing because of re-
armament.
They also knew that Communism inside their countries would"
Increase II they .spent too much money on armies to resist Com- -
munism from the outside.
This was the real problem at Ottawa and it was ducked.
It was ducked by appointing a committee of twelve "the
twelve wise men" they were called to study the matter and re-
port later. '
Meanwhile, most of Europe also ducks the problem of heavier
taxation in the upper brackets and revamping of Its system of'
putting the chief tax burden on the masses.
This remains one of the greatest breeders of Communism
inside Europe, but it Was not discussed, even informally, at Ottawa.
WASHINGTON PIPELINE
The Army has lost all control over its chief lobbyist on Capitol
Hill, Brig. Gen. Robert Moore. He has so many friends in Congress
that he Ignores his bosses in the Pentagon and does as he pleases.
When the Army passed over his promotion. Moore's Congres-.
sional friends made him a general anyhow by writing it into the
appropriations bill. '
A bay window can be a political liability. So two Senators
have gone on strict diets to get rid of them Johnson of Texas
and Ives of New York. Each has lost 25 pounds
Defense Moblllzer Charles Wilson and other Government big-
wigs will act as faculty members for an institute on defense ad-
ministration, beginning next wee* at America University.
Senator Welke of Idaho caused ex-FBI man Downey Rice to
turn down the Job of chief investigator for tne Senate Commit-
tee to Investigate Crime in the nation's Capitol. Welker put Rice
through a humiliating cross-examination and made it plain that
he Intended to bulldoze the committee. Bo Rice bowed out.
DEFENSE CONTRACTS
A secret analysis just completed by the Pentagon reveals that
41 per cent of all the major defense contracts awarded up to
Auk. IS have gone to only three states.
The contracts total more than $22.000,000.000.
Of this amount, California received $2,700,000.000, $2.260.000,-
000: but New York state topped the list with more than $4,000,-
000,000 in prime defense contracts.
Compared with these whopping figures, Nevada and North
Dakota were listed as having less than $500,000 of defense con-
tracts each.
In many cases the figures reflect the state where the pro-
ducts will be assembled, with many parts farmed out to smaller
pifen ts In other states.
Here Is a breakdown of the figures by states:
New York, $4,074.513.558: California. $2.743.791,047: Michigan,
$55,874,362; Ohio, $1.082,105,800; Indiana. $1.5(14.634,858. Connec-
ticut, S1.463.817.4M; New Jersey, $1,153,885,670; Illinois, $1,028.848,-
829; Pennsylvania, $948,698,276.
Washington, $553,080,750; Massachuseta, $649,141491; Wiscon- .
sin. $534. 134.147; Maryland. $486,705,788; Texas, $413.531,480: Mis-
souri. $399.572.624; District of Columbia, $249.298,834; Georgia,
$159.750,139; Iowa, $155.497.025; Rhode Island. $151.824,393: Kansas, > -
$151.266,455: Minnesota, $127.849.392; Tennessee. $121.735.281; North
Carolina, $111,553,149; Louisiana, $104,285.905; Virginia. $100,711,- .
751. _i
Alabama, $99,608,271; Maine. $79.367.840: South Carolina. $79.y--
260.517; Oklahoma, $67,289,377; Nebraska. $41,156.902; New Hamp-
shire, $40.346.183; Oregon. $$4,7M,726; Arlona, $34,304,947; Ver-
mont, $30,001,008; Florida. $28,006.556; Colorado, $25.866,664; Ken-
tucky, $23.859.336; Mississippi, S20,l4,8ll: West Virginia, $12,766,- '
037: New Mexico. $12.279,456; Utah. $9,623452: Wyoming, $8.739.-
009 Montana, $7,398,500; Arkansas. $9.749.700; Idaho. $2.450.937;'
Delaware. $1,892,090; South Dakota, $1,441.000; Nevada and North
Dakota, less than $500.000 each.
Orders placed outside the continental United States totaled -
$111.568,872.
'Mr. P.A. Want Ad' attracts
a following
Of prospects mighty fine!
What's more ... he signs
them quickly
On the dotted line!
Your classified ad will at-
tract a parade of good pros-
pects because everyone in
Panaos aad the Casal
Zoae reads P.A. Want Ads
regularly. Try thea bow
... MM resalta wil surprise:
yoat



(-=*. sat
M
f r.r rrri
'roic PAXAMX AivfUMAfc Ak
f
f^acific J^ocie
I.
9
ffrs. Carrol . JCtcktr
Bo, 17, Am 3L &Am 352/
AJOR AND MRS DIVNEY HONORED
N WEDDING ANNIVERSARY
Major and Mrs. Raymond Divney were honored, with
s.rprlse cocktail party. Wednesday. !>,!* ^sisals
t.wrntv second weddln* anniversary, by Lieutenant Colonel
VS2R-* -Sat the Melntyre, h. I.
Fort Kobbe.
Those attending were Lieuten-
ant Colonel and Mrs. George Ma-
b.y, Lt. Colonel and Mrs. Regin-
t1 i Weber. Lt. Colonel and Mrs.
J03l Hollls. Major and Mrs. Rich-
ard Rawlinas and Miss Ann Div-
ney.
Wlggin Mrs. Florence Yard and
Mrs. Eiizabeth Zlrlunan.
The one new member added to
the rolls is Mrs. Nina Picket.
The visitors attending were
Mrs Blanche Bishop. Mrs. Alice
Burkle. Mrs. Gladys Wofford,
Mrs. Clara Walker and Mrs. J.
D. Fendell.
At straight bingo an electric
radio-starting clock was award-
ed Mrs. Fisher, a Waring-blen-
der to Mrs. L. G. Wilson, twen-
ty eight dollars in cash to Ser-
geant G. R. Fastnacht, twenty
five dollars in cash to Mrs. W.
S. Johnson and golf clubs (in-
cluding a set of irons and a set
of woods" and balls were won by
Staff 8ergeant T. S. Walker.
Next Wednesday a cash prize
o" two hundred and twenty five
dollars will be given for blocking
out 49 numbers.
Miss Mary Lou Divney. daugh-
ter nf Maior aid Mr.= Ravmo.id
Divn Tailed last Tuesday, a- Members of Catho <: Ladies
board the Transpon -Henry Sodality Hold Meeting
gibbons." for the States to re-
side with her grandmother in
Ohio.
Maior and Mrs Divney have
a son. Donald, stationed at Al-
brook Air Force Base, as well as
two younger children Pat and
John.
"Hridge and Canasta Party
at Albrook Club
The Albrook Women's
The members of the Albrook
Catholic Ladies Sodality met
Wednesdav at 7:00 p.m. at the
base chapter where a movie on
the Holv Year was shown by Cap-
tain Baniak. Chaplain. Refresh-
ments were served after the mo-
; vie.
Those present included Mrs.
'Florence Mayforth. Mrs. Toodie
Icummings. Mrs. Eleanor Stew-
Club! art. Mrs. Doris Clark, Mrs Marte
held a bridge and canasta party Leper. Mrs. Braun and Mrs.
Wednesday evening In the wom-
en's lounge at the Olficers club.
Those winning bridge prizes
were: 1st. Mrs. Rosalyn Kmcald,
'2nd, Mrs. Mary Dawn Jones. 3rd.
Mrs. Evelyn Thurston. The win-
ner at canasta was Mrs. Bascomb.
35th Anniversary of All Star
Circle Celebrated
The All Star Circle Club cele-
brated Us 35th anniversary on
Wednesday, at the Scottish Rite
.. Temple in Balboa, with a lunch-
eon and a birthday cake. A busi-
- ness meeting followed the Iun-
K cheon after which cards and bln-
go were played.
- The members attending were
" Mrs. Marguerite Bouche. Mrs.
I Eorothv Allen. Mrs. Grace Brun-
dage. Mrs. Maude Clinchard,
" Mrs. Rose Cunningham. Mrs.
'. Ethel Clarke, Mrs. Annie Calvlt.
Mrs. Laura Davis, Mrs. Edith
; Eppley, Mrs. Melba Harris, Mrs.
Rena Harvey. Mrs. Irene Hase-
mann. Mrs. Edith Henshaw, Mrs.
; Harriet Koehler. Mrs. Effie- Mc-
Glade. Mrs. Harriet Powell. Mrs.
-Stella Price. Mrs. Marlon Schaap,
Airs. Mary Snow. Mrs. Katherlne
Sellens. Mrs. Blanche Wright,
Mrs. Edith Voss, Mrs. Minnie
Daughter of Ambassador
Returns from Peru
The daughter of the Ambassa-
dor of Peru to Panama and Mrs.
Emilio Ortiz de Zevallos returned
Wednesday morning by plane
from a vacation of several weeks
spent in Lima. Peru.
Beautv Queen in Panama
Miss Volsenet. the beauty queen
of Chile, is a guest at Hotel El
Panama.
2),
&
Marjorie Goddard.
Mrs. Chase of Balboa
Returns from States
Mrs. H. J. Chase of the Doro-
thy Chase Studio in Balboa, re-
turned Tuesday by plane from a
brief vacation spent in New Jer-
sey visiting her mother, Mrs. C.
Hallberg.
Fridav from 6:45 to 11:45 will
be family night at the N.C.O.
club. A special dinner will be
served at reduced prices for
whole families. Coral Greaves
and his Trio will provide the mu-
sic for the occasion.
An informal dance will be held
Saturday from 8:30 p.m. to 12:45
a.m. at the new N.C.O. club with
Danny Bishop's orchestra fur-
nishing the music.
Cooking Class Luncheon Held
Wednesdav at Austin Home
Mrs. Betty Lou Austin of Fort
Kobbe was "hostess for a lunch-
eon given Wednesday at her
home for the members of the In-
ter-American Women's Club.
Mrs. Ruth Doan was co-hostess
for the occasion.
Attending the luncheon were
Mrs. Alice Lombard, Mrs. Dora
A. de Arias. Mrs. Luz G. de Mn-
dez, Mrs. Ruzena de Goldstein,
Mrs. Katherlne Kerr, Mrs. Angle
M. Smith. Mrs. Rosa de Hernan-
dez. Mrs. Diana Bright. Mrs.
Urania Arnuz. Mrs. Esperanza de
Perez, Mrs. Ursula de Ventura,
Mrs. Rita de Duran. Mrs. Irene
Parmley. Mrs. Louise Eaton, Mrs.
Natalia L. de Rivera. Mrs. He-
le-i Adler. Mrs. Mabel Comley.
Mrs. Marguerite Brown, Mrs.
Martha Anderson, Mrs. Ruth
Townsend and Mrs. Jeanette Mc-
K'bbon.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5. flit

Mr. H. J. Chase sailed today
aboard the 8&. Panama on a
semi-business trip to New York
and New Jersey. While In New
Jersey he will visit his mother-
in-law. Mrs. C. Hallberg.
Minister of Franco and Wife
Entertain with Dinner
The Minister of France to Pan-
ama and Mrs. Guy Menant en-
tertained a group of friends at a
dinner given Wednesday evening
at the Legation.
>ar
Compleu mint of
DOG SUPPLIES
at
Of
IS Tivoli Ave. Tel. 2-310?
Mrs. Medinger of Balboa
Heights to Return Monday
Mrs. A. C Medlnger will re-
turn by plane Monday from a va-
cation spent in Florida. She at-
tended the wedding of her son.
Mr Robert Medlnger to Miss
Edith Skidmore. in Tampa, on
the 13th of September.
New N.C.O. Club Scene
of Large Bingo Party
The first bingo party to be
held in the new N.CO. Club at Al-
brook Air Force Base was given
Wednesdav at 7:00 p.m. with ap-
oroxlmatelv 500 players present.
Bineo will be played every week
on Wednesday at the club, it was
announced.
Prizes awarded to winners at
bingo were a Sunbeam toastmas-
ter to Agnes Thompson, twenty
five dollars in cash to Ann Rob-
inson, twentv five dollars in cash
to William Price, an Admiral ra-
dio to James Qulnlan and fifty
dollars in cash toTheda Page. A
deeo freeze will be awarded next
week for six numbers straight
bingo.
Army-Navy Club to Hold
Informal Dance Saturday
The Armv-Navy Club at Fort
Amador will hold an informal
dance for members and their
euests on Saturday at 8:00 p.m.
Dancing will be on the esplan-
ade, weather permitting.
Highlighting the evening's en-
tertainment the horses will run
between dances on the Amador
Downs, the first race starting at
9:00 p.m.
Girls Athletie Association
Sponsors Inaugural Ball
An inaugural Ball will be held
Saturday by the Girls Athletic
Association in the ballroom of
the Hotel Tivoli at 7 p. m. The oc-
casion is to Introduce and Inau-
gurate the new class officers.
The teacher-sponsors, who will
U. S. Mutual Defense Pacts Ring Communist World -
US MUTUAL DEFENSEThe Newsman above shows how defense pacta with otMtr free a-
tions extend U. 8. frontiers to the fringes of the Iron Curtain. A critical area perhaps soon
to be bolstered by a mutual defense alliance is the Middle East. In addition to pacts listed
here, the U. S. Is aligned with 20 Latin-American nations In a mutual-defense arrange-
ment signed In Rio de Janeiro in 1947._____________________________________________________
Australia May Gel
Big Oil Refinery
LONDON. Oct. 5 (LPS> A big
new oil refinery capable of hand-
lig about three million gallons
of crude oil each day may be
built in Australia.
British experts are now In
Melbourne to discuss the project.
The Commonwealth Oil Refin-
eries representative have been
conferring on this subject with
Harold Foxon. senior executive
of the Anglo-Iranian Oil Compa-
The new refinery would be the
largest of Its kind in Australia
end would produce high quality
products. ______^^
also be Introduced at this time.
are Mr. Allan Ward, sponsor for
the Senior Class; Mr. Walter
Fischer, sponsor for the Junior
Class; Mr. James Elliot, sponsor
for the Sophomore Class and Mr.
Wesley Seaqulst. the sponsor for
the Freshman Class.
Sponsors Rewind Models
of Fashion Show Rehearsal
All models for the Olrl of the
Year Fashion show are requested
by the sponsors to be present for
final rehearsals at 9 a.m. Satur-
day morning in the Washington
Salon of Hotel El Panama.
Ciris! Women? Who Suffer Distress Of
~ TMAl WIAKNBS

with Its nervous
cranky feelings...
So female functional monthlv dis-
turbances make you feel nervous.
fidgety, cranky, so tired and
vacgedout'at such tunes? Then
J try Lydia K. Pink ham's Vege-
I
cz.(&HU**a
table Compound to relieve such
symptoms. It's famous tor helping
girls and women in this way!
Taken regulsrly Pinkhamt
Compound helps build up resist-
ance against such distress. Just
see if you. too. dent remarkably
benefit. Also a great ttotnaesvie
tonic. Worth trying!
FIRST CLASS RUGS
oil Wool and Cotton.
Will exhibit the first Creations of the Season,
in the Fashion Show, Sunday, October 7th,.at
the Saln Bella Vista El Panam Hotel.
Make your reservations now!
RUTH MILLETT Says
Men claim they like women to
be straightforward with them
but...
If a woman points out what are
to her obvious flaws in a wom-
an a man is praising he Is sure to
mark lt up to jealousy.
If a woman keeps reminding
her husband of a job he has pro-
mised to do, without clothing her
reminder In flattery, hecalls lt
nagging.
If a woman Insists on airing a
grievance that she hopes can be
straightened out by honest dis-
cussion she la accused of trying
to start an argument.
If a woman tells a man she
thinks he Is In the wron when
be gets Into difficulty instead of
championing him even though
she Is sure he Is at fault, he tells
her he didn't expect her to un-
derstand.
If a woman comes right out
and says she doesn't believe
something a man lias told her.
she is credited with being a sus-
picious person.
If a woman doesn't pretend to
respond to a man's mood, she is
"cold."
If a woman takes a straight-
forward way of getting what she
wants, men call her bossy.
If a woman says what she hon-
estly thinks about another worn'
an. she Is being "catty."
If a wife speaks her mind free-
!' and forcefully, her husband U
oltled as being henpecked.
And yet men claimand pro-
bably even believethat they
like women to be straightfor-
ward and honest.
Pharmacy Calls
All Winkelmans
ST. LOUIS (U.P.l The rolls
of the St. Louis College of
Pharmacy show a total of nine
Wlnkelmanns.
Ernst A. Kinkelmann and five
of bis sons are graduates of
the college. His brother, Ernst
A. Kinkelmann. and his broth-
er's daughter and son also are
graduates of the pharmaceutical
school.
A grandson. Ernst J. Winkle-
mann. Is enrolled there now.
To grow and stay healthy
children need minerals and vitamins in their
diet. That's why millions of mothers keep on
serving Cream of Wheat, delicious and nutri-
tious, and so digestible that it is very generally
used as baby's first solid food.
The "5 Minute" Cream of Wheat has been
enriched with extra food iron and calcium.
FURN
ENTRAL AVE.at 21S1E.ST.
PHONES: 2-133C
* 5-1833
Cream of Wheat
i DELICIOUS.
* ..NUTRITIOUS
First Aid Instructors
Course at Ft. Gulick
Begins On Monday
FORT GULICK, Oct. 4 Col.
Henry F. Taylor commanding
officer, Atlantic Sector and Di-
rector, Disaster Control Sub-Cen-
ter. Atlantic Side announced
today that In connection with the
Joint Army-Navy-Air Force Dis-
aster Control Program, classes in
a 16-hour First Aid Instructors
Course will begin at the Fort Ou-
lick Education Center on Mon-
day.
Classes will be held from S a.m.
to 11 a.m. on October 8, 10, 12,
16. 18. 22. 24 and 20.
Pre-requlslte for the course
which will be open to residents
of all Armed Forces installations
on the Atlantic Side will be
the Standard American Red
Cross First Aid Conrae.
Instructor for the course will
beLt. William O. Dolan. Station
Commander. Margarita Fire Sta-
tion. He recently completed a
series of instructors courses giv-
en at Fort Clayton and corozal.
I PANAMAS NEWESTaHdFMJT frmiwA
tH.CUrUftiaUl Clllb
SORRY!!
WE COULDNT KEEP THEM ANY LONGER
SUNDAY IS THEIR FAREWELL NIGHT
CHARLIE BOURNE
THE MASTER OF THE KEYBOARD
and
DON AND LOYAL RAYMOND
WHO SANO THEIR WAY INTO YOUR HEARTS
1
TWO REQUESTS SHOWS
NIGHTLY 10:30 and 12:30 NIGHTLY
Have CHARLIE Play Your
Favorite Numbers In The
Popular
ZEBRA LOUNGE
DANCING
IN THE
BAMBOO ROOM
mm DOWNimanage
BULLS!
New Macarena Ring
IN SAN FRANCISCO
TREAT BABY
GENTLY I
Far baby's skin, nothing soothe
and protects like Johnson's Baby
Powder. Us* it after
baths, at disper changes.
sfsrrossAsr...
nsr rot
doAMOH 4efcM*OM
SsssassMsasttftVk tnsstM
SL.I.1A
U. S. ROYAL
Takes the bounce out of the bumps
cushions snd protects you and your
car. la tact, the U. S. Royal Air Rids
takes the bounce out of the
bumps like no other tirs!
PANAMA AUTO S. A.
Aporrado 1913, Panama
mmsmm***^mmmSS.S-BSS-
A
SATURDAY, OCT. 6 and SUNDAY, OCT. 7
AT 3:30 P. M.
FOUR FIERCE BULLS WILL BE FOUGHT
AND KILLED EVERY AFTERNOON
"Y THE PROFESSIONAL BULLFIGHTERS
ARMILUTA DE ESPAtiA
MANOTO ORTEGA* j.
WITH THEIR CUADRILLAS.
Tickets for Sale at Iberia Caf, and San Francisco Gardes.
LARGE SELECTION OF
^Trench L^njital
16 Tivoli Ave.

tw/ooiy fead flassifgdV


i
PIDA Y. OCTOBFR 5. 1951
'.......'. . \
Tm PANAMA AMERICAN AN 1N15PNDENT OAItt NEWSPAPER
^Mtlantic S^ociet
bjim
'i
&x 195, QmUu Zkfmfm* CJtlun 378
MRS. LANK COMPLIMENTED BY GATUN AUXILIARY
The members of the Gatun Union Church Auxiliary,
entertained with covered dish luncheon In the dining:-
room of the .Church, Thursday, in honor of Mrs. Arthur
Lane. Mrs. Lane has been an active member of the Auxiliary
for over twenty years, and sailed today to make her home
in Orlando, Florida, after a visit with relatives in New
Jersey.
Mrs. Leon Egolf presented the
honree with r. ilgurine as a
token of remembrance from the
group.
The group was seated at a
large U-shaped table centered
with sprays of greenery and in-
dividual orciiid corsages for th?
members and guests.
Mrs. William Badders. the pre-
sident, welcome two visitors. Mrs.
Claytor and Miss Noralie Roche,
to the luncheon and the meet-
ing which followed. Mrs. R. R.
Gregory gave the blessing at
lunch and Mrs. Leslie Croft the
devotionals at the meeting.
Mrs. Ralph Graham and Mrs.
Dlxon Daniels were hostesses for
the luncheon. They were assisted
by Mrs. 8am M&uldln.
Marie Meyers and Richard Butler
Meyers, Jr.
Mrs. Murwin and Mrs. Meyers
of Jacksonville, Florida, are vis-
iting Mr. and Mrs. Sulie M. Ben-
nett of Balboa.
The other ladles present were:
Mrs. Fred Newhard, Mrs. Ray-
mond Ralph, Mrs. Joseph Irving,
Mrs. George Poole, Sr.. Mrs. B.
R Brundage, Mrs. Richard Pen -
nlngton. Mrs. B. B. Gray. Mrs.
S. F. Allen. Mrs. E: E. Stern,
Mrs. Emerson Cottrell. Mrs.
Fred Willoughby.Mrs. Arthur Al-
bright, Mrs. John Greening and
Mrs. Lee Nash.
.
Mr. Madison Feted on
Eighty-Fifth Birthday
Mr. and Mrs. DaveJ. Madison
of Margarita, had a family reun-
ion at (heir home In honor of
Mr. Maflisphs'father, Mr. Tho-
mas C. Madison, on his 85th
birthday anniversary.
The honoree retired twenty
years ago from employment with
the Panama Railroad, and re-
mained on the Isthmus, residing
with his sons.
The members o the family
present were his three children,
Dave J. Madison, J. Allen Madi-
son and'Mrs. William H. Mur-
win; his grandchildren, Mrs.
Eulie M. Bennett, Mrs.'Richard
B. Meyers and Misses Jane and
Ellen Madison; his great-gr;nd
children* Leon anarpensteen.
Carrie Mlay Sharpensteen. Anna
Cristobal Woman's Club
Holds First FaU Meeting
"Knew Your Club" was the
theme of the first meeting of the
Cristobal Woman's Club for the
1951-'52 club year. Mrs. R. W.
Rubelll extended a welcome to
the new members and guests.
She presented the officers, who
wore corsages of yellow carna-
tions, the club colors.
The new memebrs were Intro-
duced by Mrs. Roy Fort and Mrs.
Raoul Theriault and they were
also presented corsages. Mrs.
Hunter Dare gave a report on the
Philanthropy Work of the organ-
ization .'
Mrs. Claude Strobridge. the de-
legate t othe National Conven-
tion, held In Houston, Texas,
gave a report on the Convention.
Mrs. E. F. McClelland read
the collect at the opening of the
meeting and Mrs. John Brown
outlined the work of the newly
organized committee, pertaining
to "Government Activities."
An original musical program
was preesnted by Mrs. William
Clute an dMrs. McClelland. The
club officers were caricatured in
clever musical parodies which
were sung to them as they were
presented.. .
Mrs. J. W. H. Hall was chair-
man of the elaborate tea which
followed the meetnlg. The long
table was centered with an Illu-
minated sea-shell centerpiece en-
circled with pink coral vine. Mrs.
John Brawn and Mrs. John Blen-
nefhassetf presided fc the tea
and coffee services.
The centerpiece was the work
of Mrs. Marcelle Gringoire, who
presented It to the club.
Hotel Washington Wednesday
evening, honoring Mr. and Mrs,
Arthur Lane.
Mr. and Mrs. George Roth
were also present.
Informal Dinner Party
Mr. and Mrs. William Nessler
entertained with a dinner at the
A MASS
I'of tt^sttf^
MARIA VDA. DE CONSTANTINO
October* 7th at 10 a.m7 at ths
Orthodox Church, Coln.
NCO Wives Club Meeting
The Fort Gullck N.C.O. Wives
Club held their regular monthly
meeting Tuesday at the N.C.O
Club. Donations of money and
food were brought by "the mem-
bers for the St. Vincent De Paul
Orphanage. During the business
meeting plans were made for a
covered dish supper to be given
for the families of the members.
Several new members were
presented. They were: Mrs. Mike
Kinnick, Mrs. Austin Tulip Mrs
Joe Shirley, Mrs. Elva Mauder
and Mrs. Virginia Potter.
At the close o the meeting
late refrshments were served
The -other members present
were: Mrs. Mildred A. Harte, Mrs.
J. C. Bremer, Mrs. Joseph Flo-
res, Mrs. Owen Tolbert, Mrs. Al-
fred Pacheco. Mrs. C. S. Harvey,
Mrs. Lowell Parker, Mrs. Vilma
Sweeney. Mm. Margaret Dell,
Mrs. Ralph Johnson, Mrs. Helen
Smolka. Mrs. Russel Mann, Mrs
William Ellingsworth, Mrs. John
Cousins, Mrs, E. O. Hutchms
Mrs. Jerry Whyte, Mrs. Mary
Mundkowsky, Mrs. Jesse Friese,
Mrs. Arthur Kerr. Mrs. Harry V
Colbert, Mrs. J. A. Faatlnger,
Mrs. Isabel Agulrre. Mrs. Vlrgii
Lucky, Mrs. Ruth Mossman, Mrs
W. A. Hawkins, Mrs. w. D. God-
win. Mrs. Ernest Beck, and Mrs.
Miriam Tawne.
Emblem Club Meeting
Cristobal Emblem Club No. 52
held its regular monthly meeting
at the Elks Home Tuesday even-
ing, with Mrs. Mae Waldron and
Mrs. Madeline Tuttle as hostess-
es.
A novel white elephant prlsee
was donated by Mrs. Vera Fager-
berg and won by Mrs. Eva Dock-
ery.
Mrs. Jeannette Cain, the presi-
dent, officiated at the meeting.
The other members present were:
Mrs. Mildred Recela, Mrs. Char-
lotte Tully. Mrs. Muriel Arnold.
Mrs. Helen Morrison, Mrs. Ruth
Huldquist. Mrs. Margaret Ash-
ton, Mrs. Margaret Larrison,
Mrs. Lillian OUayer, Mrs. Edith
Henning, Mrs. Geraldine Celuc-
cl, Mrs. Dora Bell, Mrs. Hlldreth
Turner. Mrs. Thelma Walnio,
Mrs. Alice Smith. Mrs. Kathleen
Huffman, Mrs. Jean Sanders,
Mrs. Gladys Smith and Mrs
Fanny Kaplan.
irams
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Where 100.000 feee!. Meet
New Books
Presents
Today, Friday, Oct. S
P.M.
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without words
4;15David Rose Show
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Lean Back and Listen
6:15Evening Salon (request)
7:00Mayor of Casterbrldge
(BBCi
7:30BLUE RIBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00NEWS and Commentary
Raymond Swing. (VOA>
8:15Radio In Review (VOA)
8:45Facts on Parade (VOA)
9:00The Jazz Club (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures o P.C. 49
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
On Display
Thursday afternoon thru Sunday
The Dodge Coronet Sierra
All Steel Station Wagon .
at Colon Motors, Inc.
Tivoli Crossing Panam
Card Party Tonight in Gatun
The roundup card party will be
held this evening hi Gatun. It is
being given by the members of
the Woman's Auxiliary of the
Gatun Union Church. Dessert
will be served at the church at
6:45 p.m.. after which cards will
be played at the homes of the
members."
Anyone interested in playing
should Join the group at the
church. Price of admission is 75
cents which includes refresh-
ments and table prizes.
Elks Anniversary Dance
Tomorrow
The first Anniversary Dance to
commemorate the opening of the
Elks Home will be held tomorrow
night at the club. Dancing starts
at 8:30 p.m. and ends at 12:30
a.m. A buffet supper will be serv-
ed at 9:30 p.m.
All members are reminded that
they must make reservations for
Saturday, Oct. I
AM.
6:00Sign On
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Jazz Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30 As I Knew Him
8:45The Duke Steps Out
9:00NEWS
9:15Women's World (VOA)
9:30As I See It .
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00NEWS
P.M.
12:05NEW TUNE TIMEPAN-
AMUSICA
12:30The Football Prophet
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Tour de France (RDF)
2:00Latin American Serenade
2:15Date For Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
?.: 45Battle o the Bands
3:00American Band Concert
3:15The Little Show
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude
4: opMusic for Saturday
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Guest Star
6:15Masterworks from Farnce
(RDF)
6:45American Folk Songs
7:00Gay Paris Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00^-Ne\vsreelU.S A. (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Battle Report (VOA)
9:00Radio University (VOA)
9:15Stamp Club (VOA)
9:30Radio Amateur Program
(VOA)
9:45Sports and Tune of Day
(VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
"The Sea Around Us," by Ra-
chel C8rso:i. is one of the new
books placed in circulation dur-
ing the past week by the Pan-
ama Canal Library.
Beginning with a description
of how the earth acquired its
oceans, the book covers such top-
ics as how :ife began in the pri-
meval sea; the hidden lands; the
life recently discovered in the
abyss by highly delicate sound-
ing apparatus; curretns and
tides; mineral resouices.
The complete list yf new books
at the Library : ollows:
Engineering MetalsThe Be-
havior of Engineering Metals,
Gillett.
Fine Arts: Hlstorv of Modern
Pa lilting, Gloeckner; Shantymen
and Shanty boys: Songs of the
Sailor and Lumberman, Doer-
Ilinger.
English Drama: Bouyant Bil-
lions. Shaw.
Biography, History: Career
Ambassador, Bcaulac; Invitation
to Moscow, Stypulkowski; The
Magnificent Century, Costaln.
Fiction: Too Many Bottles, Hol-
ding; A Mouse Is Born. Loos; Al-
thea, McDonned; The Holy Sin-
ner, Mann; Eight at the Vulcan,
Marsh.
Gift Replacements: Hymn
Lore. Laufer; The Tree of Life,
Smith; Aircraft Welding, Elzea;
Handicraft. Simplified Procedure
and Projects. Griswold; Architec-
tural Drafting, Svensen; Oil
Painting. Foster; Hymns of
Praise for the Church and Sun-
day School. Kingsbury; An An-
thology of Llgr-t Verse, Kronen-
bergcr; Aristotle's Politics, Aris-
totle; Asia'; Lands raid Peopjes,
Cressey; Voiceless India. Sen; A
History of England, Marcham.
Added to the Reference Collec-
tion: Publishers' Trade List An-
nual, 1951.
11:00The Owl's Nest
l:00a.m.-^Sign Off
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp.
RDFRadlodlffuslon Francaise
ACOBYon
CANASTA 1%
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
The average Canasta player
gives away a tremendous amount
of Information about his hand.
He doesn't mean to do it. and he
doesn't realize what he is giving
away. Fortunately for him, in the
average game his opponents are
not alert enough to gather in the
information that is being handed
out.
Let me illustrate this with an
example from actual play. Both
sides had made unimportant
melds, and the pack then became
frozen. A long struggle for the
frozen pack developed.
At length one player moaned
and groaned and tremulously
discarded a queen. This was the
first queen that had appeared as
a discard or as a meld.
This discard got by safely en-
ough, and each of the other play-
ers made a safe discard. The tre-
mulous player drew from the
stock and got another queen
which he promptly discarded
without even putting it Into his
hand.
Now. you card detectives, here's
a problem for you. If you had to
make a discard to that tremulo-
us player, would it be safe or un-
safe to throw a queen?
The answer is not even close.
The chances are overwhelming
that the tremulous player didn't
throw a singleton queen Into a
big frozen pack. It's dollars to
doughnuts that he broke up at
least three of a kind. Certainly
he didn't like to discard the first
queen of the hand, but certainly
he was making a play that had
some element of safety. He had
more queens in his hand.
There was no way for him to
avoid giving that information
away. If a man picks his discards
at random, he is a sure loser, but
the opponents won't be able to
work out the meaning of his dls-i
cards. If a man picks his discards
for a logical reason, he'll have
a better chance to win. but the
opponents may be able to work
out the logic o those discards
and thus learn something about
the players hand.
The big mistake came at the
tremulous player's next turn. He
drew a queen and discarded it
without putting it into his hand.
In other words, he made it clear
that his hand sad not changed. If
he held them after the play.
It would be suicidal to discard
a queen to our tremulous hero.
Just discard something else and
thank him mentally for tipping
you off by failing to put the card
into his hand.
See how different the situation
would be if he had put the queen
into his hand and had then dis-
carded |t (or one of the other
queens). It would then seem that
he has discarded a second queen
and that his hand has changed.
In these circumstances, it Is a
fair chance that he has broken
up his queens and no longer has
a pair. You might well discard a
queen to him on that assumption.
Enjoy the
full flavour
of meat dishes
with ...
-V
.^rybodyRssa^aassi/feig
NOW VIA MIAMI
or Houston
For your convenience, Braniff now offers
two routes to the United States. Via Mi-
ami, only one-stop to New York (non-stop
Panama to Miami). Your choice of quick
connections to any city in the eastern half
of the U. S. or Canada. Via Houston, you
fly direct to the heart of North America
with the best connections to California and
the West Coast,'
themselves and guests.
Informal Bridge Group
Mrs P. L. Balay was hostess
Wednesday for her weekly bridge
group. The other ladies playing
were: Mr. L. L. Koepke, Mrs.
Charles C. Yanquell and Mrs.
John Schwartz.
.. Thanks to delicious Clapp's Applesauce
Take years
off your
figure with
You'll took younger, fed younger,
in (he fashion-wise, long-wearing Fiexees PROFILE Girdle
... and in the unique Fiexees PROriLE Bra that shapes
your bosom so alluringly, so comfortably.
Now you too can give your figure that .youthful .and
fashionable look . with a Fiexees PROFILE Girdle
and Bra.
41 mmmllmU, in Ik. mm, 4m fW Ortmn ml m .lightly kighmr mrtee.
It's Time To Send
Your Christmas Gifts
To The Folks Back Home!
One of our new
400-DAY
(ANNIVERSARY) CLOCKS
Will remind them of your
"
love for many years to come!
Choose from eight beautiful models, at
reasonable prices!
-
We pack them so you can mail
.'
them with confidence!
Clapp's Foods are so tempting
Sabias enjoy eating them ... to
uiritious, they grow up (trong
ad healthy.
Yes, Clapp's makes only baby
sods. That's why Clapp's know
what babies likeand what's
good for them, too! Mothers de-
pend on Clapp's, and doctora
verywhere recommend it. Re-
mtember, your doctor is the final
mmUhonty in feeding your baby.
Clapp's Applesauce is only
stte of the 19 delicious varieties of
shopped and strained fruits and
vegetables prepared by Clapp's
sr your baby. All eo tasty, nu-,
tfitSKS, and economical.
ftarrfaa fa "Twe Flo. Wait",
a 20Hi Century Fx PraalvcNeii
'
.l *>AUJ0. S. A
CIUZ MAKGOT
IA VILLA DC PAB1S
wt taw ai.
Interior: Or ELI A Ok NAVAKMO (DavUO
HUIMELINDA CALVO < A.aake>
caatea. IRVING XAtr CO., S. A. TtL 2-tSSS PaaaaWL
I
The French Bazaar
"The Most Talked'About Gift Store____
On The hthnu" ____
JUAN PALOMERAS
COLON COLON
V8 Has lively Ravor as
"Wholesome Goodness
no *sin <<<<<
In V-8 there are 8 delicious juices
of garden-fresh vegetable-not just
one. Thafs why V-8 has Ihnly flavor
.and wholesome goodness no singlo
juice can match. Each juice adds its
own tempting flavor plus vitamins
A, B, Ccalcium and iron. Your
' family will love V-8. Serve it often.
vary ai... .1 V-S h illj.w UmJ af.
mala*. Celery Seer. Carral. Parsley
larreas Weiarcr... taraaa
AUea by *m malar, af Compb.ll'. Seuaa. V-l I. .
For information and reservations. .
call your travel agent or Braniff
office.
City Ticket Office a
Tivoli A vs., 18Tal. 2-37*
El Panam Hotel
Via Espaa 111
Tai, 3-4726 or 3-1160,
extension 130
Tocumsn Airport
Coln Ticket Office:
Calls 10 No. 10,113
Tal. Coln 779
*
a
s


TAGE TEN
THE PANAMA AMFRICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAItT NEWBPAPKs?

FRIDAY, O
B lMf

.
Larry Jansen Faces Ed Lopat In 2nd Series Gamt*
Giants Upset Yankees 5-1
Behind Koslo's 8-Hitter
By United Press
1951 WORLD SERIES STANDINGS
Teams Won Lost Pet.
New York Giants 1 0 1.000
New York Yankees 0 1 .000
NEW YORK, Ocj;. 5.It was one down and
three to go for the Giants. Three more victories over
the Yankees will climax baseball's storybook finish
for the Giants and give them the World Series
Championship along with their hard won National
League title.
(US Army Photo
USARCARIB ALL-EVENTS BOWLING CHAMP-Sergeant Henry J. Madeline. 746' Army Unit
iSiKnal' Fort Clayton, exhibits the form which won for him the United States Army Ca-
ribbean'Bowling Championship All-Events Trophy j-ecently. In addition the sergeant took
runner-up place In the singles, and with Lieutenant Colonel Herbert W. Cooley, tied for
runners-up place in the doubles. With a total of 1584 pins, he took the trophy from Capt.
John Hipson United States Army Caribbean School who placed second with a pin fail of
1582 Other winners were: Sergeant First Class Joseph Bovkin. United States Army Caribbean
School Singles Champion; Sergeant Tony Miske and Corporal Gerald Gavillon. 4oth Recon-
naissance Battalion, who tied with Colonel Cooley and Sergeant Madeline for runners-up in
the Doubles, and Captain Louis Nelp III, and Sergeant Severo Saylon, Signal Doubles
Champs. The trophies, contributed bv the United States Army Caribbean Special Services
Section, will be presented to the winners by their unit commanders In the near future.
Sunday's Program
1st Race "B" Native? 7 Fgs.
Purse: $325.00Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1BljaguaL V. Castillo 112
2Manolete R. Vsquez 114
3Annie N. J. Contreras 112
4Mr. Espinosa C. Ycaza 120
5J. Huincho G. Snchez. 109
6Raymond E. Silvera 108
3Cipayo
4Hechizo
5Lituana
6Picn
7Delhi
8Caonazo
9Porter's Star
10Rinty
R. Vsquez 120
V. Ortega 114
J. Phillips 115
K. Flores 114
J. Cadogen 110
A. ngulo 117x
F. Avila 112
A. Mena 115
3Wild Wire J. Rodriguez 120
4Mosquetn R. Vsquez 120
5Piragua G.Cruz 107
6Prestigio V. Castillo 116
2nd Race "A" N
Purse: $375.00 -
Second Race
1White Fleet
2Don Pitin
3Hortensia
4Golden Tip
5Blk. Sambo
atives 4' i Tf*.
- Pool Closes Iil5
of the Doubles
C. Chong 103x
H. Reves 105x
A. Mena 122
A. Enrique 103x
J. Contreras 110
5th Race "B" Natives 61 Fgs.
Purse: S350.06 Pool Closes 2:55
3rd Race "G" Natives 4> Fgs.
Purse: $250.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1La Negra P. Avila 116
2Capitana II J. Cadogen 108
3Mona Lisa K. Flores 108
4Monteverdc E. Ortega 103x
5Barn C. Chong 103x
4th Race "H" Imported4'j Fgs.
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1Sans Souci J. Contreras 118
2Miss Fairfax B. Aguirre 117
1Eloina
2Lolito
3Helen B.
4Amazona
5Batn
6 Don Tem
A. Mena 110
G. Snchez 113
B. Aguirre 115
K. Flores 120
V. Ortega 116
G. Cruz 110
6th Race "1-2" Imported1 Mile
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1rabe J. Chuna 107x
2Nantago J. Jimnez. Jr. 107x
- 3Interlude V. Ortega 115
4Sandarin R. Vsquez 110
5Charles S. J. Phillips 110
6Athos J. Baeza, Jr. 108x
7Nav. Trail D. D'Andrea 110
8th Race "1-1" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1Breeze Bound J. Phillips 110
2Jepperin J. Rodriguez 112
3Silver Fox A. Mena 116
4Bendigo V. Castillo 113
5Bien Hecho A. Vsquez 112x
6Betn G. Prescott 120
7Doa Eleida F. Avila 114
8Beach Sun Jos Rodgx. 115
9th Race "1-2" Imported1 Mile
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
l^Klldare
2Hanna
3Armeno
4Black Bull
5Blumaha
6Zevelania
7Gay Ariel
T. Avila 110
G. Cruz 112
K. Flores 114
B. Aguirre 118
E. Silvera 110
E. Dario 116
A. Mena 110
7th Race "F" Imported 1 Mile, 10th Race T-2' Natires$V< Fgs.
Purse: $500 00 Pool Closes 4:05
Second Race of the Doubles
1Beduino E. Silvera 108
2Asombro A Mena 112
Meet
Scotland's
Favourite Son
ion* moinn coinc srONG
JOHNNIE
WALKER
SCOTCH WHISKY
The fashionable drink everywhere
|ohn VaUci & Soni Ltd., Scotch Whuky Distiller*, Kilmarnock
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1W. Money E. Campbell 112
2Caaveral G. Snchez 120
3Aqui Estoy E. Ortega 112x
4Hercules G. Ramos 113x
5Fonseca R. Vsquez 116
6 Buenas Tardes F. Avila 120
11th Race 'F-2' Natives6' Fgs.
Purse: $275.00
1Diez de Mayo G. Grael 115
2Cosa Linda A, Mena 120
3Danubio Jos Rodrguez 112
4Lonely Moiiy L. Pea 109x
5D. Catano A. Vsquez 112x
For the first time in this dizzy
baseball season the bettors and
the experts were beginning to
concede Manager Leo Durocner's
fantastic team might do it.
Durocher, proud and confi-
dent, nominated 23-game win-
ner Larry Jansen to make it
two in a row today while Casey
Stengela bit shocked but still
confident named 21-game win-
ner Eddie Lopat to pitch for
the Yankees.
The Giants won the first big
one at the Yankee Stadium yes-
terday when Durocher gambled
with one of his second line pitch-
ers, lefty Dave Koslo, and won 5-1
over Allle Reynolds, who pitched
two no-hlt no-run games during
the American League season to
set a record.
Now Durocher's pitching rota-
tion was finally establishedaf-
ter a great first game gamble. It
would be Jansen. Jim Hearn and
Sal Mage in that order for the
next three carnes.
The weather may even give the
Durocher-men a helping hand.
There's a chance that bad wea-
ther may intenere with the sec-
ond game today. The Weather
Bureau forecast for today was
"Cloudy with strong winds and
occasional rain."
The game is scheduled to start
at 1 p.m., EST.
Yesterday the Giants scored
the first run in the first inning
when Henry Thompson walked
with two out and sped to third
on Monte Irvin's single, then tal-
lied on Whltey Lockman's ground
rule double to left field.
Then came the great crowning
play. Monte Irvin stole home
with Bobby Thomson at the plate.
Here was a master stroke by a
great managersending *u"
runner in from third to steal
home with Thomson, the Luu.. I
run hero of the National League
pennant race, at bat. I
The Yankees and the fans rea-
soned the sameThomson had
to hit. But Durocher seized just
that "complacent feeling" to
spring Irvin home. After that, it
was up to the Yankees to catch
up.
Hank Bauer almost tied the
score in the first inning with a
towering drive to left field, but
back went Irvin who spun his
twisting body at the last moment
to make a one-handed catch of
the long drive that was headed
into the left fiejd seats.
The Yankees scored their only
run In the second when Gil Mac-
Dougald doubled and came home
when Thompson fumbled Jerry
Coleman's single to right field.
With two out and two on in
the sixth, Alvin Dark exploded a
three-run homer into the left
field stands to give the Giants a
5-1 lead which held up to the last
inning.
Along The Fairways
George Riley, Summit's Tour-
nament Chairman, announces
that Summit Hills Golf Club will
be the scene of much fun and
frolic this week end.
Tournaments are scheduled for
both days, a flag tournament and
a blind bogie. It is possible to play
either or both of these tourna-
ments for a 50-cent entry fee in
each tournament.
To save strain and pain, Riley
announces that both tourna-
ments may be played simultane-
ously for a flat buck. You may
play either on Saturday or Sun-
day.
Tee-off time Is 8:00 anh. each
day. (Special announcement for
Engel and Anderson: tee-off time
6:45 a.m.:
These tournaments are open to
both sexes, and all members of
the club are urged to come out
and participate...'
CLOUT CALISTHENICSTh World Series postponed their 10-round match two weeks, moved it
from the Polo Grounds to Madison Square Garden, Oct. 26, but Joe Louis, left, and Rocky Marciano
bear down in training just the same. Louis is doinf his sitting up exercises at Pompton Lake. N.J..
Marciano toughens his stomach muscles at Greenwood Lake, N.Y. The old champion, 37, is potting
the knnrkerout of Brockton. Mass.. 10 years. (NIA)
Brewster, Thompson Wind up
Training In Excellent Shape
H'ilfredo Brewster and Louis | This also will be his first crack
Juan Franco Tips
By CLOCKER
1Annie N. Juan Huincho
2Black Sambo Hortensia
3Mona Lisa La Negra
4Cipayo Picon
5Don Temi Amazona
fiAthos Interlude
7Prestigio Asombro
8Jepperin Breeze Bound
9Armeno Black Bull
10Fonseca Caaveral
11Don Catalino Cosa Linda
ONE BESTDon Temi.
Thompson today wound their
heavy training schedule for Sun-
day night's 15-round lightweight
championship bout at the Pana-
ma National Gym.
The handlers of both boys claim
that the fighters are in excellent
condition. After today the boxers
will do only light calisthenics to-
morrow, then calmly await the
big moment.
The improved Brewster has
been getting a lot of late support
including several experts (but,
remember, tbey are usu ally
wrong.) The odds at the time this
article went to the press were
about eren.
The hard-hitting Thompson
has never gone over ten rounds.
In fact, he has gone ten rounds
only twice. However, he easily
took both decisions after drop-
ping his opponents several times
and seemed strong at the finish.
Brewster. on the other hand,
has gone 12 rounds sereral times.
at the 15-round championship
route. He is a speedy lad with lots
of stamina if nothing else. But
he has much more than stami-
na. He knows his way around In
the roped square and Is a mas-
ter boxer.
The Victor Ardines Vicente
Worrell six round semifinal
shapes up as a real "knock-'em-
down-drag-'em-out" affair. Both
of these lads relish toe-to-toe
millingand during one of these
exchanges it is almost certain
that one of the two will hit deck.
Ardines was an impressire win-
ner orer Fidel Morris and Lupe
Pancho his last two times out
while Worrell has been on the
losing end of two straight disput-
ed decisions. These lads are 126-
pounders.
Two four rounders complete
the four-bout program. Melanio
Pacheco meets Melvin Bourne at
an 118-pound limit while in the
other preliminary AI Hostin tac-
kles Daniel Martinet at 115.
Junior College, Balboa High
In CZ Football Opener Tonight
It's football tonight at Balboa
Stadium when the Canal Zone
Junior College Green Wave and
the Balboa High School Bulldogs
open the Interscholastlc League
competition foi 1951, Game time
is 7 p.m., with the Bulldogs play-
ing host to the Green Wave ag-
gregation.
Local football fans are urged
to arrive early to avoid congrega-
tion on parking and securing of
good seals. There are no reserved
seats, and everything is on a first
come first served basis. Price of
tickets is 75 cents with element-
ary school children 25 cents.
Balboa's starting lineup will
find lettermen at both tackles
and both guards, the quarterback
post, fullback, and one halfback.
This will give the Bulldogs seven
monogram winners in the start-
ing 11. J. C. on the other hand,
will be forced to start almost en-
tirely new boys In the,lineup.
Five of the 11 stastess for J.C.
claim previous experience, but
none with the Green Wave. Both
guards, quarterback, left half,
and center have all played ball
before enrolling at J. C.
Probable starting; lineups:
Benefit Softball
Game At Ml. Hope
Stadium Tomorrow
COLON, Oct. 5 The Arsl-
Cola softball team will journey
to Colon tomorrow to meet the
Atlantic Stars in Mt. Hope Sta-
dium In a benefit game in aid
of Amador Guerrero Hospital
children's ward. The game will
start at 4 30 p.m.
Gwendolyn Layne ace pitch-
er of-the Atlantic, will oppose
Mary Y area" Roberts of the
Arsi-Cola aggregation. This Is
the game that the public was
waiting for.
A fee.of 15 cents and 10 cents
will.be charged. Bring your
Silver Collection for the cause.
BOUNTIFUL, Utah (UP.)
Dr. D. Keith Barnes, county
health commissioner, believes
Davis County leads any section
of the country in the vital index
in the radio of births over deaths.
During 1950, there, were 970
births and 120 deaths, a ratio of
eight to one or about four times
that of the national average of
220 to 100.
BULLDOGS
Bob Dolan........ ,. LE
Bill Riley.......... LT
Irwln Frank........ LG
Fred Cotton........ C
Dick Dlllman........ pa
Clalr Godby........ RT
Francis Boyd........ RE
Ray Nlckisher...... QB
Jim May.........'. LH
DickOstrea....... .. RH
Sam Maphls........ FB
GREEN WAVE
Manuel Roy....., ,. LE
Chick Kruze........ LT
Bob Seivers...... ,. LG
Ralph Huls.....'. .. C
Jaik Al exalt is. ,, ,. ;, RG
Ellas Entebl........ KT
Alex MrKeown...... RE"
Bill Stevenson...... QB
Bill Maloney........ LH
George Mc Arthur .... RH
Henry Phillips ...., FB
OUR FURNITURE IS THE BEST.
If you need easy payments and if you belong
t the Armed Forces or have a steady job ..
you may choose your own terms!
-
We alto offer you
EASY WASHERS SIMMONS SPRINGS
ZENITH RADIOS AND MATRESSES
and
A WONDERFUL CLUB SYSTEM
The Store Where You will Find the Largest
Assortment of Class and Linoleum.
86 Central Avenue
Telephone 2-2465
RACES SATURDAY
DOUBLES
1st, 2nd-6th, 7th RACES
ONE-TWO
3rd and 9th RACES
COLON:
For the convenience of
our patrons we are now
opera ting both at the
"COPACABANA" and
"SAVOY."
SATURDAYS STELLAR RACE
7th RACE "F" IMPORTEDS 1 MILE
PURSE: $500.00 POOL CLOSES: 4:05
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
1 BEDUINO............... E. Silvera 108
2 ASOMBRO...............A. Mena 112
I WILD WIRE..........J. Rodrigue* 120
4 MOSQUETON.......... R. Vsquez 120
PIRAGUA................G. Crux 107
6 PRESTIGIO............ V. Castillo 116
SUNDAY
QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES
CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
AT THE RACE TRACK
SUNDAY'S FEATURE RACES
5th RACE "C" IMPORTEDS 6V2 Fgs.
PURSE: $650.00 POOL CLOSES: 2:55
1 (PARAGON.......... .. V. Castillo 117
2 (FAIR CHANCE..........E. Gugnot 114
3 LACEY................ A. Phillips 112
4 MICROBIO............. A. Mena 109
5 AVENUE ROAD........./. Phillips 108
6 RIDING EAST ...*......K. Flores 112
7 TOMEBAMBA......... J. Contreras t 115
1
2
3
4
5
7th RACE "E" IMPORTEDS 7 Fgs.
PURSE: $550.00 POOL CLOSES: 4:05
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
MR. FOOT .............V. Castillo 1
CURACA...............* Fi* l
CORAGGIO....... J- Contreras 1
MIMO .................A- Mena 2
RO ADM ASTER.........'.'<& Vsquez h


FSIDAT, OCTOBER 5. 1S51
r~-
THB PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE ELEVEN
ichigan State Now Competes For Talent On Equal Footing With Michigan
luge Athletic
'rogram Must
'ay Own Way
EDITOR'S NOTE: Here's tin
[10th of a series that takes yon on
i eampus-bjr-csmpus tour for the
side story of pressure football
md how It f ets that way.
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
EAST LANSING. Mich. (NJEA)
-Michigan State College built
fenison Gymnasium and Field-
louse before World War II at a
bo:t of $1,100,000.
Th? capacity of Macklln Field
StPdium was Increased to 50,089
for the Notre Dame series at a
tt of $1,500,000.
The old fieldhouse was trans-
formed into an Ice Arena at a
co-.t of $750,000.
In frcnt of each of these
ptmtures. signs assure the pub-
ic that they were constructed
without expense to them. "Fin-
anced on borrowed funds to be
epp'd In earnings from the
glwTltV they read.
rcicMgan State, the long-time
a?' college, has added 17 major
jui'dinss to the campus in an ex-
te-v've post-war building pro-
p--!. Athletics are Integrated
vi"v other Institutional activi-
ties.
you see, the teams, espe-
FclalW the football varsity, just
[have to be good. They have to get
[th- more Important money. ,
Ch-rley Bachman went along
cor.inlacently at East Lansing for
13 years. As one athletic depart -
[ me!ft bfficlal puts it. Coach
Bachman probably recruited six
or seven good boys, a nucleus, and
did the best he could. But that
Isn't enoueh today, when hlgh-
Sessure football demands pla-
ins-and a depth of at least
three teams.
ffi Clrenee L. Munn. Minneso-
ta All-America of 1930-31. was
bro.i'jht on from Syracuse to do a
bii league lob. Biggie Munn as-
sisted Bernle-Blerman at Minne-
sota, was Michigan's line coach
for eight campaigns. He knew the
Big 10, where to look for pros-
pects and.how best to sell the
beautiful campus divided by
Red Cedar River.
Alumni, dormant for 40 years,
commenced to meet.
Munn has built so well that Mi-
chigan State, which in the past
war fortunate to land one Wl-'
standing Michigan high school
boy out of four, now competes
for them on an equal footing with
the mighty Wolverines.
FOR STRENGTH AND VIGOR
The Western Conf e r e n c e
frowned on Michigan State's Jen-
lson Scholarships as unethical
ELECTRIC SHAVER
REPAIR SERVICE
Authorized Remington
Rand Dealers
V
0Y0 BROTHERS. INC
Ave. TvoU No. 16
Tel. 2-2010
VEN STEVENCoach Bigg Munn built so well at Maeklin Field SUdium Uut Middgaa State
WfcW 81 tj^^eav^ for (ootball stars osu^qul footing with mighty Michigan. (NEA) .
*i
subsidization, but Michigan had
the Elmer Gedeon Scholarships
and other free rides based on
marks. Michigan State had to do
something about that in order to
remain in business, so the How-
ard C. Rather Scholarships were
established. They are awarded
from a fund of $15,000 a year al-
located from athletic receipts.
"A student receiving a Howard
C. Rather Scholarship shall pos-
sess unusual qualities of leader-
ship, demonstrated mental abili-
ty and physical strength and vig-
or," reads the conditions. "Men-
tal ability shall be deemed to
have been demonstrated by an
entering freshman only if he
shall have graduated in the top
quarter of his high school or pre-
paratory school class,- and by an
entering transfer student If his
Drevious college record shall have
been substantially as high as a
B average."
Mlchiean State men attribute
Ihelr athletic rise to two men
orogressive President John A.
Hannah and Athletic Director
Ralph H. Young.
But those closest to the situa-
tion give even more credit to an
alert scouting staff, the key op-
Satlvea of which are Line
each Hugh D. (Duffy) Daugh-
erty and End Coach Earle L. Ed-
wards, a pair who know their
way around the Pennsylvania
coal regions and other fields fer-
JMeirith sizable ana-swift kids
who can block, pas*, carry and
catch a football. Eleven varsity
men and five freshmen register-
ed from the Keystone State, a
half dozen of the former from
New Kensington.
Michigan has a remarkable
six-foot two-Inch. 238 pound
freshman center. Glenn Bowers,
from the neighboring state of
Arizona, but Michigan State also
matches the vaunted Wolverines
in bringing them m from around
the country. Nine states are re-
presented on both the Spartan
varsity and frosh.
SHARE FLINT STARS
Michigan corralled Duncan Mc-
Donald, the extraordinary asser
of Flint Northern's chamlonshlp
side of last Autumn, and three of
his teammatesJohn Veselenak,
a six-foot-two, 190-pound end.
Tackle Joe Shomsky and Guard
Jim Wagner. Michigan State did
not give up without a struggle
however, and from the same out-
fit grabbed two of the finest
halfbacks in the state, the Negro
lads. Ellis Duckett and LeRoy
Bolden. *
Michigan State made every ef-
fort to snare McDonald and Ves-
elenak. McDonald visited East
Lansing, and the story there is
that he might have matriculated
had not the revelation of his be-
ing rushed by the VS. Military
Academy created such a furore
when the West Point cribbing
scandal broke. Michigan an-
nounced that McDonald would
enroll at Ann Arbor, and the boy
didn't want any more publicity
in connection with his being pro-
selyted .
Duckett and Bolden were as
adept at catching McDonald's
passes as Veselenak as all-con-
quering Flint Northern ran a
victory streak to 15 games.
Michigan State bagged 29 of
the superior Michigan boys this-
Fall, Michigan 24. which gives
you a good Idea of how fierce is
the bidding.
Michigan State, situated be-
tween two other foremost foot-
ball foundries, Michigan and No-
tre Dame, has a tremendous po-
tential patronage. There are 13,-
400 students. The college serves
more than 200,000 Michigan resi-
dents each year through Its Agri-
cultural Experiment Station and
Cooperative Extension and Con-
tinuing Education Services. -JThe
school Is brought to the people,
and fans come from Detroit,
Flint, Jackson, Battle Creek.
Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo and
Saglnaw.
Michigan State crashes the Big
10 In football In 1953, when Mi-
chigan has given the Spartans
the eighth spot on its schedule,
just ahead of Ohio State.
Michigan State played to 413,-
043 persons In six home and three
road games last season. 97,239 at
Michigan, 57,886 at Notre Dame,
47,461 in bad weather against
Minnesota and 45,237 against
Indiana at East Lansing. The
price Is $3.60, so you have a total
gate crowding $1,500,000.
In order to pay off the build-
ing debt, receipts have to be ro-
bust and continuous. The team
must have a continual influx of
players capable .of winning.
Scholarships are one way, soft
Jobs on the campus another.
College football is thus on a
business basis, and the athletic
department thinks in terms of
millions.
Education seems to be a secon-
dary consideration.
TOMORROW:
state.
Texas is a big
Playground Sports
RED TANK AND PARASO
The Paraso Basketball League
was won by Vlctor-5 which de-
feated Cyclonla by the score of:
59 to 28. The Champions took on j
an All-Star team on Monday, al- i
so defeating this aggregation 59
to 49. *
For the All-Star it was R. Good- I
en. high scorer, of the game with
26 pts., F. Alder, c. Grant, A.
Wilson, D. Lyder and S. Cadet.
For Victor: T. Scott with 10
field goals and 4 foul shots for a
total of 24 pts., D. Weeks, E.
Seales, T. Lowe and N. Perez.
Victor got off to a fast start as
they perforated the All Star's de-
fense time and again to go ahead
in the first quarter 15 to 11. The
All Star retaliated in the second
quarter to surge ahead 25 to 22.
With both teams scoring the
same amount of points In the
third quarter. 8 points apiece, the
All-Star was still ahead by 3
points. However In the final quar-
ter Victor's center T. Scott found
the range of the basket to lead
his team to victory scoring 16 of
their last 29 points.
Score of the game:
Victor-5 Fg Ft Tp
T. Scott ............ 10 4 24
D. Weeks ........... 6 0 12
E. Seales............ 3 15
T. Lowe ............ 6 Q 12
N. Perez ............ 3 6
Totals ............ 27 5 59
Ail-Star Fg
F. Alder ............. 3
C. Grant............. 5
A. Wilson............ 0
D. Lyder .......v.... 0
R. Gooden.......... 12
8. Cader............. 3
Ft TP
1 7
0 10
0 0
0 0
3. 26
0 6
Totals ............ 33 S 49
DETROIT (F.) Tolvo
Hulkkonen told the police officer
who arrested him for drunken
driving that he had Just finished
off 15 bottles of beer. In court
the defendant changed his story,
admitlng to only five beers. The
Judge compromised at 10 beers
and gave Hulkkonen 10 days In
Jail to match the figure.
Petitbon Goes Off Tackle For
Irish After Barretts Feint
First of a series by famous
coaches, diagramed and writ-
ten for NEA Service.
By FRANK LEAHY
Notre Dame's Coach
SOUTH BEND, Ind., Oct. 4.
(NEA) This is one of Notre
Dame's, best plays.
It is our 27F.
The ball goes to Quarterback
John Mazur, N? 1 in the diagram,
who fakes to;
Fullback Nell
Warden, No.. 3,1
going over our
t left guard.
Mazur con-
tinues his spin,
feeding the ball
to Left Half-
back John Peti-
tbon, No. 2. who
runs off our
right tackle.
The success
of the play de-
pends on the
deceptlv e n e s s
of Right Halfback Billy Barrett,
No. 4, who fakes an outside block
on the defensive left end, thus
setting him up for our left guard.
I hope and believe Notre
Dame will be Improved this fall.
General squad Inexperience Is
our biggest handicap. Sixty per
cent of the squad Is made up of
sophomores and freshmen. For
the most part, it can be said that
Notre Dame football prospects
are still suffering from the mass
Frank Leahy
OFF TACKLENotre Dtme'i
27F sends Halfback Jolut retlt-
bon through.
OFF TACKLE Notre Darnel
27F sends Halfback John Pet-
itbon through.
exodus that took place ajter the
great 1949 season.
Capt. Jim Mutscheller is an ex-
perienced performer, both offen-
sively and defenlsvely, at end.
NEXT: Michigan State's Biggie
Munn.
They said they would rest dur-
ing OctoberMrs. A damson in
Paris and Remy in Algiersand
leave for Brazil by air at the end
of the month.
Canadian Club
Tournament Set
For Tomorrow
The very active Tournament
Committee of the Brazos Brook
Golf Club have scheduled the
Canadian Club Tournament,
sponsored by the Henriquez Com-
pany of Colon, to get under way
this Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 9
and 7.
Eighteen holes will be played
as a qualifying round during the
week end and full handicap will
be allowed with the low net score
receiving several bottles of Hi-
ram Walker's famous Canadian
Club whisky.
Pairings will be made Sunday
night for the match play stage*
which will commence Monday,
Oct. 8 and the first round match-
es must be completed by Sunday
evening, Oct. 14.
Three-quarters of the differ-
ence in the competitors handi-
caps will be allowed in these)
matches and the eventual winner
will receive a Handsome cocktail
shake whilst there will be many
bottles of whisky for distribu-
tion amongst the defeated semi-
finalists and the losing player la
the final.
Football
B.H.J. vs College
Admission . 75< '
FRIDAY NIGHT
Kickoff: 7:00 p.m.
.
THERE is No Substitute
for P-slity
GENERAL PAINTS
Listen to...
THE FOOTBALL
PROPHET
*
Every Saturday at 12:30 p.m.
on
HOG 840 on your Dial
The Football Prophet
Picks the winners of Saturday and Sunday' bis;
football games. . And he's seldom wrong.
The PROPHETS winning average last year 773,
Don't make any beta until you listen
to
The Football Prophet
over HOG 840 kcs.




------
CORE BY INNINGS:
(WANTS
YANK5ES
00 0 106 10 0-15 t$.
18 1 091 0 1x-3 S ij
Fr-complete details on to-
ay's first game of the World
?rles between the New York
Wants and the New York Yan-
? *, listen to HOG's sports re-
1 'cv at 7:30 p.m.
'.TORTS PAGES: 10 & 11)
Rent Hike
Notices Now
Being Mailed
Announcements of increased
rental for approximately 900 non
employe occupants of Panam
Canal'Company quarters are now
being sent out.
The increases, which range
from 100 to 150 per cent; are ef-
fective Nov 1.
Announcements of the increas-
es are accompanying bills which
are being sent to the non-em-
ployes covering charges for the
month.
The increases affect all those
non-employes who do not have
contractual agieements with the
company or those who are ex-
empt because of legislation.
The increase which was au-
thorized at the Sept. 17 meeting
of the Panam Canal Company's
Board of Directors, is to cover
depreciation, a proportional
share of the oost o! the Canal
Zone Government in lieu of tax-
es, and maintenance costs which
had not previously been fully re-
ceived.
Affected ny the 100 per cent in-
crease are members and civilian
employes of the armed services,
retired Canal-Railroad employes,
clergymen, employes of other
government agencies, beauty
shop operators, barbers and oth-
ers In a similar category.
The group to which the 150 per
cent increase will be effective
are: employes of shipping con-
cerns, banking houses, oil com-
panies, etc., who now pay a sur-
charge of 50 to 100 per cent of the
regular rental rates.
The plan Is identical with that
announced last January to go In-
to effect on July 1.
In May the increase was post-
poned pending further study by
the Board of Directors.
Peron Daily
Says Pearson
Cast Insult
' ENOS AlhES, Oct. 5 (UP)
The official government eve-
ning paper "Critica,'' yesterday
reproduced a facsimile of Drew
Pearson's syndicated column
whifch appeared in the Havana
newspaper "El Mundo" on Sept.
17 entitled "Argentina arming
gainst her neighbors."
Crtica headlined the repro-
duction "Yankee Capital Attri-
butes Its alms of domination to
usPearson Insults our country."
The reproduction-was followed
by a lengthy comment refuting
Pearson's article which was based
on an alleged report by the Bra-
zilian General Pedro Goes Mon-
teiro in Washington.
The Argentine newspaper hint-
ed that It was an attempt to cre-
ate tension between Brazil and
Argentina.
(The Pearson article, enti-
tled "Blueprint for Conquest,"
was earried in The Panam
American on Sept. 17.)
AN INDEPEND
D^ILY NEWSPAFE*
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln. %
PANAMA, R. P.. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1951
FIVE CENTS
Mario Moretti
CUFFSIDE PARK, N.J., Oct. 5 tyP) Gangland
guns yesterday silenced Willie Moretti, gabby gambler
whose wagging tongue made him a star underworld wit-
ness in the Kefauver committee's investigation of organ-
ized crime.
Moretti went down, as other hoodlums have before
him, under fire from the guns of four "pals" who were
drinking coffee with him in a restaurant.
The 57-year-old sidekick of such underworld bosses
as Joe Adonis, Frank Costello, Charles (Lucky) Luciano
and the late Al Capone, died in a typical gangster-style
ambush.
Hence Gabby
In N. J. Bistro
He drove up in a yellow 1951
Packard convertible to a road-
house known as Joe's Elbow
Room early yesterday morning.
There he Joined four men he ap-
parently knew, and started talk-
ing with them.
Waitress Dorothy Not a'c k
said she went to the kitchen,
and a few minutes later Mo-
retti's unknown assai 1 a n t s
started shooting.
An autopsy showed one bullet
had entered the top of Moretti's
head and the other hit him be-
hind an ear. Pour slugs were
found in the restaurant.
The waitress said she thought
she could identify the four men
with Moretti from, their pictures,
but she refused to say whether
she knew any of them by name.
Aaked whether Costello would
be questioned In connection with
the shooting. Assistant Deputy
General Harry L. Towe aid:
"We are going to Question all
persons who might have any
gambling or any other connec-
tion with Moretti."
Police Chief Frank Burrell said
local police were told about the
slaying by an anonymous tele-
phone caller, who apparently was
"a hysterical woman."
Authorities found the swarthy,
pudgy Moretti lying about 10 feet
inside the restaurant doorway.
His left hand rested over his
heart, his right hand stretched
out as if pointing to the door-
way.
His natty clothes brown
trousers, Jacket and suede shoes
were stained with blood.
Outside on the seat of his con-
vertible was a scratch sheet for
the day's races at New York's
Belmont Park. Moretti, who
boasted before the Senate Crime
Committee that in the last 10
years he averaged between $20,-
000 and $30,000 playing the hors-
es, had circled his selections of
winners on the scratch sheet. But
the underworld provided the fin-
al "pay-off."
Officials said two men walked
into the restaurant and sat at a
counter and ordered coffee. They
were the only customers In the
place. Shortly afterwards, two
more entered and the four went
over to a table and talked In Ital-
ian. One rose, walked outside
where he met Moretti. and theni
walked back with him to the ta-
ble.
The waitress said Moretti and
the four men had dined there
several times before and appar-
ently were "good friends."
Moretti, a former altar boy,
was the father of three children
and grandfather of six.
He was the most talkative un-
derworld witness before the Sen-
ate Crime Committee whose in-
vestigators charged that his lo-
quacity once prompted Frank
Costello to order him to Califor-
nia for "a rest."
Moretti sold his $100,000 man-
sion in Hasbrouck Heights, N.J..
less than two weeks ago without
explanation and was reported
planning to move before he was
shot down.
Moretti proved somewhat,of a
Joker before the Crime Commit-
tee, providing amusing testimo-
ny on his underworld associa-
tions.
He testified freely, admitting
most of his Income came from
gambling and that he won $25,-
000 on President Truman's elec-
tion in 1948. He said he won $10,-
000 of it from the late Lou Clay-
ton, vaudeville partner of come-
dian Jimmy Durante.
"I'm a longshot player," he
told the committee.
He said his income from gam-
bling was reported in his income
tax returns.
State Deputy Attorney General
Nelson F. Stamler took charge of
the investigation of Moretti's
slaying and started questioning
all persons in the restaurant or
in the vicinity.
Catholics In Paris
Of US No Longer
Eat Meal Fridays
SANTA FE. New Mexico, Oct. 5
(UP) The Catholics of New
Mexico and parts of Texas and
Arizona, Joined others of their
faith today in eating meals with-
out meat on Fridays.
An order by Archbishop Edwin
V. Byrne, revoking a special dis-
pensation which extended from
the days of the crusaders in 1089,
became effective today.
The Santa Fe Register, official
newspaper of the Archdiocese
said the action was taken be-
cause of the "serious condition of
world affairs/'
The paper raid "our Holy Fa-
ther, realizing the serious con-
dition of world affairs has urged
all Catholics to unite on this day
of the week ir memory of, and
out of love and gratitude for our
Blessed Savior's passion and
death."
Catholic officials said special
permission to eat meat on Fri-
days was first granted to the
Crusaders by Pope Urban II In
1089. It extended to all subjects
of the Spanish crown In the late
1400's and was carried to the
Southwestern part of the Unit-
ed States by Spanish explorers.
3 Destroyers
Dock at Rodman
With 1000 Men
(NBA Telephoto)
BIG MOMENT A hysterical swarm of his teammates, fan and Polo Grounds ushers mob
Bobby Thomson and carry him from the field after his dramatic home run that won the
game and the play-off for the New York Giants. Thomson's nlnth-lnnlng homer, with two
Giants on, gave the Giants a 5-4 win over the Dodgers and the National League pennant.
Baby Sitting Is
No Slouch Job -
Scouts Plan Class
All Girl Scouts in Senior and
Junior High School are Invited
to attend a Baby Sitters Course
I beginning Moi day, at 6:30 p.m.
in the Balboa Scout House off
! Morgan Avenue.
This course wilt be given by
Mrs. Jqhn Mial, R. N. and girls
wl{l have the opportunity to
practice on real babies.
Girls completing the six week
course will Se given a Baby Sit-
ters certificate.
It is planned to have a Baby
Sitters Club of certified Baby
Sitters to serve the community
with a central call phone.
The project is being Initiated
by Mrs. W. N. Pence.
London Police Will
Advise Venezuelans
LONDON. Oct. 5 (UP) The
British Foreign Office said today
that three London police inspec-
tors will leave shortly for Vene-
zuela where they will advise the
Venezuelan government on po-
lice organization and training.



Now! Stop unpleasant
mouth odor 2 ways as you
brighten your teeth!
A dean breath one day, a tainted breath the
next day-it can happen to anybody. So guard
against this hard-to-forgive fault by brushing
your teeth with Ipana after every meal.
.Yes, Ipana meant a sweeter, cleaner breath
because it stops unpleasant mouth odor two
way, right while it* cleansing your teeth!
1. tnana's deaaeina feem helas remove fer-
menting load particles and sticky coating
which cauie bad breath.
2. laana's keen, clean flavor actually over-
comas "stala month," sweetens breath In-
stantly. .
At the same time, Ipana gen teeth sparkling
clean and bright. So fix a sweeter breath, a
brighter smile-get a tube of Ipana.
TO EDUCE T00TN DECAY EFFECTIVELY-
No other tooth paite, ammoniated
or regular, has been proved better
than pana.'
IPANA
a a^raafsaav A)/ aW^^""''f^B^WW
TOOTH PASTE
Run-in With Flat
Car Proves Fatal
For RP Youth, 17
A Panamanian youth whose
light leg WH3 caught under the
wheel of a flat car in the Dock
9 yard in Coln yesterday, died
at 4:40 this morning at the Co-
lon Hospital.
The 17-year-old boy, Victor
Manuel Vargas, had been tres-
passing la the area known as
the "mole track" yesterday af-
ternoon when he sat down under
a parked flat car. The train sud-
denly moved and tore the flesh
off his calf.
A coroner's Jury is being im-
Sanelled for an Inquest. The
ody w?,s transferred to the la-
bor^ t^"" for -n autopsy.
A Naval Task Unit composed
of three United States destroyers
the Miller, the Rooks and the
Hie koxarrived In Balboa at 9
a.m. today and berthed at Pier 2,
Naval Station, Rodman,
Almost 1,000 men are aboard
the ships and will be given shore
leave during the vessels' three-
day stop.
(These vessels are an entire-
ly different Naval unit from
the three ships of the Amphi-
bious Force of the Atlantic
Fleet which are bringing an-
other 1,000 men to the Isthmus
next week. As reported yester-
day, the Amphibious unit will
berth in Cristobal.)
The three destroyers which ar-
rived this morning are en route
from San Diego to Newport,
Rhode Island, and will remain In
the port of Balboa until the
morning of Oct. 8.
These combat ships are under
the tactical command of Com-
mander Cruiser Destroyer Force,
Saclf ic Fleet, and upon arrival in
ie Canal Zont reported to Com-
mander In Chief, Atlantic Fleet,
for duty and to Commander De-
stroyer Force, Atlantic, for oper-
ational control.
The complement of each of
these war snips is about 20 offi-
cers and 309 enlisted men, total-
ling about 1,000 officers and men.
Captain W. H. Benson, USN, In
the Flagship USS Miller Is the
Task Unit Commander. The Com-
manding Officers of the destroy-
,ers are: USS Miller (DD-535),
CDR A. T. Jones, USN; USS Hlek-
ox (DD-673), CDR V. V. Trice,
USN; and USS Rooks (DD-804),
CDR L. E. Strlckler, USN.
Rev. Montgomery's
Body Due Tomorrow
On Cape Cumberland
The body of the Venerable Gld-
eon Clark Montgomery, who died
Sept. 26 in Santa Marta. Colom-
bia, Is due in Cristobal tomor-
row morning aboard the SS Cape
Cumberland.
Rev. Mpntgomery was priest In
charge of St. Andrew's Episco-
pal Church in Cocoll.
His remains are being accom-
panied by the Right Rev. Regin-
ald Heber Gooden, Bishop of the
Missionary District of the Pana-
ma Canal Zone, who flew to Co-
lombia the day after word of
Rev. Montgomery's death was
received here.
Funeral services for Rev.
Montgomery have been tenta-
tively set for 9 a.m. Monday at
St. Luke's Cathedral in Ancon.
Rev. Montgomery was visiting
Episcopal missions In northern
Colombia at the time of his sud-
->n death at the guest house of
' United Fruit Company In
\ Marta.
' (NEA Telephoto)
THEY MADE IT'It's a happy moment In the Giant dressing room, as the team celebrat-
ed In a three-way hug are (left to right) President Horace Stoneham, hero Thomson, and
manager Leo Durocher. _______________ "' .'
George VI Cancels
Australia Trip;
Princess Will Go
CANBERRA, Oct. 6 (UP)
King George VI today decided
to abandon his scheduled tour
to Australia next year following
an operation for the removal of
all or part of one lung, author-
itative sources said.
Princess Elizabeth and the
Duke of Edinburgh will make
the tour Instead of the King,
the Queen and Princess Mar-
garet.
Sources said that Princess
Elizabeth and her husband are
scheduled to sail January.
2 British Jets
HitCliffside;
3rd Clears Top
FLAMBOROUGH, Eng Oct. 5
(UP) Two Royal Air Force Jet
meteor fighters flying in from
sea in a dense fog at a terrific
speed, crashed head on into a
300-foot cliff near this town to-
day.
A third plane of the formation
Just managed to clear the cliff-
top. The planes were believed to
be frying at more than 500 m ph.
Both pilots are believed to have
been mied.
Panamanian Woman
Dies On Land Lease
Cristobalina Martines, a 38-
year-old Panamanian woman
died in her home on land least
Manteca Trail in the Canal Zona
early this morning from appar-
ently natural causes.
For the past two weeks. Canal
Zone police learned, she had
complalnecLtff pains in her right
.side acconffjanied by chills and
fever.
She was taken to Gorgas Hos-
oital and pronounced dead. The
body will be transferred to the
Morgue for an autopsy.
A-Flane Poses Constructors Tough Problems
By DOIT ~ TAR8EN
CINCINNATI, Oct.. 4 (NEA).Tlie basic research on an atomic
engine for an airplane has been completed, proving its feasibility
and determining its general design. But there are still some vital,
complex problems which have to be worked out before such an
engine can be made that will actually put a plane Into the air.
Solving these problems, and
then manufacturing the first nu-
clear aircraft engine, is the big
Job which General Electric Co.
has now begun to tackle at Its
huge Locklnd Jet engine plant
in Cincinnati.
An unusual statement of what
these immediate problems are,
plus a new summary of what has
been accomplished on the nu-
clear engine, has Just been clear-
ed for public release by the Ato-
mic Energy Commission and the
Air Force. The information has
been compiled and presented by
Dr. Miles C. Leverett. a top ato-
mic scientist who has been work-
ing on the project from the start
The reactor Itself, as Dr. Lever-
ett describes it, will be cylindri-
cal. Throughout It Is distributed
the actual fuel, uranlum-235 or
plutonlum-239. The reactor also
contains tubes or pipes for the
flow of the coolant which cap-
tures the reactor's heat,'Its usa-
ble form of energy.
Extremely exact control of the
reactor action is vital, first be-
cause there is a remote possibili-
ty of it becoming a low-grade
atomic bomb, but more Impor-
tant because it could heat up and
just melt or disintegrate.
The reactor is controlled by
absorbing rods. He explains:
"The absorbing rods can be in-
serted into the reactor or with-
drawn from it. If, in their orig-
inal position, the rods were ab-
sorbing that number of neutrons
which made the reactor most cri-
tical (that is, neither rising nor
falling in power) then withdraw-
al of the rods will create a slight
excess of neutrons in the reactor
and the power will begin to in-
crease.
"If it is desired to decrease the
povvsr of the reactor, inserting
the rods more deeply than the
original position will enable them
to absorb more neutrons than
before and the chain reaction
will graduailjr die/' _-
How to use the reactor heat to
fly the plane Is another Item to
be solved by the GE engineers.
One method being considered is
to have propellers driven by tur-
bines, run by expanding through
them vapor such as steam, gen-
erated in the reactor.
Another consideration is that
the reactor should directly take
the place of the combustion
I chamber of a conventional turbo-
jet engine.
Variations of one of these two
basic Ideas for using the reactor
heat will probably be used in the
final nuclear engine.
In addition to giving off heat,
the reactor also produces fatal
gamma and beta rays. Shielding
the crews from these rays is one
of the big problems to be worked
out, Dr. Leverett explains;
si, l are dictated by the two ba-
sic radiations which it is desired
to stop. The neutrons are (lowed
down most effectively by Hght a-
toms. For this reason an effective
shield will contain light atoms
such as hydrogen.
"Gamma rays, on the other
hand, are degraded in energy and
stopped best by heavy elements
sudh as lead. It is clear that a
mixture of light and heavy ele-
ments arranged in the most stra-
tegic fashion will be desfred. So-
lution of the ptoWero U very
complicated." ..
, Radiation damage other man
to the human anatomy Is an-
other major headache of the pro-
Some substances which might
be used as- a coolant lose their
ability to conduct heat under
constant exposure to radiation,
and some just decompose. Even
outside the area of the most in-
tense radiation, ordinary oil or
grease becomes like tar or solidi-
fies. Electrical Insulation also
breaks down and disintegrates
on long exposure to radiation.
*-----"The^asle require* oftbs >!** to tot -
moupt of fissionable fuel used in
the reactor to a minimum for
various obvious reasons. Includ-
ing the fact that the amount of
uranium investment is not sim-
ply the amount of uranium car-
ried aboard the aircraft, but also
that which is on the ground In
various stages of preparation for
use.
Dr, Leverett explains the limi-
tation on this:
"The chain reaction will go da
In the reactor only so long aj
there Is- present a certain mini-
mum quantity of fissionable ma-
terial called the critical mass. A*
soon as the reaction has consum-
ed so much fissionable material
that the mass drops very slightly
bleow the critical mass, the chain
reaction dies and cannot be start-
ed again without adding more
fissionable material. This makes
It necessary to remove the re-
mtame fuel from the reactor,
purify it and prepare it for re-
use."
Despite all the problems In con-
nection with the nuclear aircraft
engine. Dr. Leverett Is convince*
thart the project is possible and
will be a success.