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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01247
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01247
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
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Panama American
"Lei fhe people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
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TWENTY-SIXTH TEAR
PANAMA. R. P., SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1951
FITO CENTS
Argentine Revolt Leader
DOWN THE HILL The body of a UN soldier found dead In the bills of the bloody Eastern
Korean front Is carried out by a South Korean soldier (right) and a South Korean laborer
Casualties' In the mountainous area have been heavy on both sides. (Photo by NEA-Acme tail
photographer Jim Healy.)
SHOWER FOR GI'S ON THE MOVEflow opaietlna in Korea is the mobile shower trailer unit,
above, towed by a Jeep, and able to deliver warm water from any stream or pond. Destined by
the Army Quartermaster Corps, the unit consists of stainless steel boiler, fuel pump, forced draft
blower and water pump, all driven by a.gasoline engine. Warm waterAnt heated scalding hot
and then mixed with coldis delivered from 24 jets within 20 minutes after the rig is halted.
---*'' '.'[n------------3--------......^'-----------
Reds' Sharp Assaults Persist;
Ridgway Confers With Bradley
8TH ARMY HQ, Korea, Sept.
29 (UP) Communist troops to-
day battered at the United Na-
tions line across Korea for the
third straight day In a largely
futile effort to win baclc terrain
lost to the 8th Army's "Opera-
tion Killer."
se*
In Tokyo, meanwhile, Gen.
Bradley and Gen. Rldgway be-
gan a series of urgent confer-
ences which may lead to a
United Nations ultimatum to
the Communists.
Speculation was rife that the
Chairman of the u. S. Joint
Chiefs of Staff brought the Su-
preme UN. Commander permis-
sion to fix a dedline for the Reds
to quit stalling and resume the
suspended armistice talks.
Rldgway Is understood to have
asked for such permission dur-
ing a prevlovs breakdown In the
ceasefire conference.
If the Reds should refuse to
comply with the proposed Allied
demand, the UN command pre-
sumably would begin all-out war
against them
This, morning, the Reds struck
in key sectors along a 60-ralle
front from north of Seoul In the
west to the mountains In the
King Gains Daily
As Princess Plans
US-Canada Tour
LONDON, Sept. 29 (UP)
His doctors said today that
King George VI is gaining
strength daily and that his
condition still remains frae of
complications.
Medical news of the King-s
fight for recovery from his se-
rios lung operation remained
good news.
It is understood that Princess
Elisabeth has aew completed
arrangements for bar Canadian
tour, including a twe-day visit
to Washington at the and of
October.
east in strength from 4fl t*'2,500
men, but they were cut dawn
unmercifully .by UN artillery and
planea/ .
Communist attacks drove alli-
ed forces from two hills'south-
east of the big central front, bas-
tion o Kumsong Friday, but UN
troops routed a Red regiment
and recaptured on of the hills
an hour.later In a blistering:
counterattack.
Plfth Air Korea flfhter boroh-
ers supported the counterattack
with-tSelr "heaviest air blowof
the w*r against a single objac-
tiva. i
Mustangs and Marina Corsairs
blasted burned, and atrafed the-
Conference To Up
Rice Production
Staris Here Today
A conference aimed at increas-
ing the production of ricea sta-
ple Panamanian foodgot under
way this morning under the aus-
Elces of the Ministry of Agrlcul-
ure, Commerce and Industry In
the local Chamber of Commerce
building.
Delegates from all over the Re-
public are attending the confer-
ence which will examine both the
technical and economic aspects
of rice production in Panama.
This morning's preliminary
session was presided over' by Dr.
Harmodio Arias, Jr., one of Pan-
ama's larg; rice growers. During
this session David Samudlo. Min-
ister of Agriculture, waa elected
chairman.
The confer v. will start this af-
ternoon to dlbcusa the type of
seeds that should; be imported,
regulation of planting dates, type
of fertfiteers that may be usad
and the most effective manner
of combatting plagues that often
ravish rice crops
A recommendation that the
government grant scholarships
for the study of grata eonaerva-
tlon, Is alto expected to be ap-
proved at -the conference.
Reds with 122 napalm and ma-
chlneaun strjaes. ',
. Eighth Army officers .said they
did not consider the Red three-
day drive" a counter-offensive.
One officer said, "therCom-
munist? are Just beoomlng ob-
noxious, that's all."
UN Bank May Grant
Loans to Panamanian
Firms, Government
The possibility that the gov-
ernment of Panama and private
Panamanian firms will be able
to get financial aid from the
U. N. Reconstruction and .Re-
habilitation Ban* was advanced
today by Simon Aldereweld.
chief of an economic mission
sent to Panama by tM brgan-
izallon.
Mr. Aldereweld told the Pa-
nama American today that eco-
nomic and technical aid bv the
RRB to Latin America also can
be made to private enterprises
which have the backing of the
government.
In most cases only technical
aid is given to private com-
panies, but financial aid Is also
possible, Aldereweld explained.
The mission headed by Al-
dereweld Is in Panama along
with a mission from the Inter-
national Monetary Fund, to
study Panama's shaky economic
situation ana make recom-
mendations.
The RRB official explained
that all a private concern need-
ed In order to obtain financial
aid from .the Bank waa te have
a nlan that was entirely prac-
tical, aimed at btnefitting the
economic development of the
country In which It Is estab-
lished and that the plan be of
primary Importance to the na-
tion's econonu - .
Seized;
ellion Fails
HugeOilPlantWillGo
SkyHighlfBritishLand
TEHERAN, Sept. 29 (UP) An authoritative Iranian
source said today that any attempt by Britain to land
troops at Abadan would result in the huge oil refinery
there being blown up.
The highly placed source said: "With the first Brit-
ish soldier to set foot on Iranian soil the Abadan refinery
will go sky high."
The Anglo-Iranian' Oil Com-'
pany's refinery at Abadan was
surrounded by Iranian troops
two days ago. and the 358 re-
maining British experts were
denied access to the refinery.
This seizure followed months
of crisis over Iran's national-
isation of the British-owned oil
concessions.
Britain's announcement that
it intended referring the dis-
pute to the Uhlted Nations
Security Council came as a sur-
prise to the Iranian Govern-
ment.
"Have thev really decided to
take such a serious step?" asked
Vice Premier Hosein Fateml
when notified of Britain's de-
cision.
II is understood the Iranian
Cabinet will be called for a spe-
cial eating to discuta the Brit-
, clrclea said" Tran
cable the current presi-
dent of the United Nations Gen-
eral Assembly. Nasrollah Ente-
san, to prepare Iran's defense
In the Security Council.
Entezem is also chief of the
Iranian delegation to the Unit-
ed Nations.
Fateml later said Iranian Pre-
mier Mohamed Messadegh him-
self would lead the Iranian de-
legation to the Security Coun-
cil if the Council took up the
oil dispute.
Fateml said he did not feel
it was a matter for the Security
Council, as It was an Internal
affair of a aoverelgn state. -
Anaemic Evita Sobs
Gratitude On Radio
To Loyal Populace
BUBNOS AIRES. Sept. 29
(UP) J!va Peron Is "rather
seriously 111 with anaemia of
medium Intensity" It was offi-
cially announced here today.
Rumors of her Illness have
been current for some time.
The official confirmation
came after she had spoken In
a sobbing voice last night over
the radio from her hospital
bed.
"I dont want this memor-
able day to finish without ex-
tending t the Argentine peo-
ple my gratitude and homage,"
she said.
"The population has proved
once again the greatness of its
soul and the heroism of Its
heart in remaining loyal to
Peron."
She broke down several times
during her .brief broadcast.
Officials said she had been
undergoing Mood transfusions
for some time.
Nearlv Half Navy's
Midsliroinen Ar .
Former Enlisted Men
Nearhr one-half of the 800
midshipmen In this vear's en-
tering class at U. 8. Naval
Academy are former enlisted
men of the Naw and Marine
Corps and their Reserve com-
ponents.
The full streneth of the new
class of "Dlebes" Is 1.100.
Aoclleatlons for enrollment
In the next elass of midship-
men (class of 1958 entering
USNA in July 19J) are being
accepted from euallfled enlisted
oeraonnel On active duty, No
deadline date as yet has been
established for anp'teaM'ms
from enlisted men of the Navy
and Marine Corps and their
Reserves for next year's class.
He added that the situation
had altered since Britain com-
plained to the International
Court at The Hague, because
Britain has now officially re-
cognized the nationalization
measure.
Iran is in an acute state of
tension over the mounting oil
crisis.
Iranian troops en 24-hour
duty pace nervously back and
for ih at their guard posts
round Abadan.
Tanks and armored cars pat-
rol the streets In "alert man-
euver."
British warships are anchored
just offshore.
The British government has
appealed to the remaining Brit-
ish oil technicians in Abadan to
hang on. and to be prepared to
Stab any attempt by Iran to
JM~p|>lafl&ilteF> Company.
The British Government's
pledge to preVent by all prac-
ticable steps the salles of oil
to any third parties suggests
the possibility of economic
sanctions, legal action, and even
naval blockade.
At the same time the Daily
Mirror, a London newspaper
known to have very close con-
nections with British Foreign
Minister Herbert Morrison,
started that: "Britain is diving
up Abadan rather than risk a
world war by using force to stay
there."
JORDAN'S RULER Newly
installed as king of .Jordan is
former Crown Prince Emir Talal,
above. Eldest son of King Ab-
dullah, who vas assassinated last
July, Talal recently returned to
Amman from Switzerland, where
he underwent treatment for a
nervous disorder.
Ike Tells Frenchman
'Knowing Gun Range
May ten Your Life'
WIESBADEN. Germany, Sep-
tember 29 (UP)Gen. Dwirht
Eisenhower, winding up his in-
spection tour of the gigantic
maneuvers of the Atlantic
Treaty armed forces, stopped
today to question some French
traags,
Ike asked an enlisted man
the range of the .50 caliber gun
on the soldier's armored anti-
aircraft vehicle.
The young soldier did not
knew.
"You'd better find eat, son.
Tour life may depend en it
some day," Ike said.
Aa Ike walked away from the
ywaag seldier a French general
was heard to order: "Give that
man eight days' detention."
Iranian Princess
InPanamaWon't
Talk Of Abadan
Princess Lelll Farman Farma-
lan of Iran had "no comment"
to make today on the current
Britain-Iran oil dispute when
questioned by The Panama Ame-
rican. She Is spending the day
In Panama before leaving for
Mexico City tomorrow.
The Princess was accompanied
here yesterday from Caracas by
her brother. Prince Nanucher
Farman Farmalan, who Is the
petroleum adviser of the Iranian
government.
He attended the Venezuelan
National Petroleum Convention
this week as an "observer."
The Prince left yesterday for
Mexico.
According to the current Issue
of "Time" magazine, the confer-
ence, which was held in Caracas
was attended by some 200 ob-
servers from 20 countries.
"The visitors heard how the
government got'fSeo million last
year (60"6 of the total revenue)
in taxes and royalties not just
a 50-50 split with the companies,
but a 52-48 division of profits In
the government's favor," report-
ed Time.
"They noted the 1,500 miles of
highway, the 30 schools, the 60-
odd hospitals built and main-
tained by the big foreign com-
panies that have developed Ven-
ezuelan oil.
"They also noted the high pro-
portion of Venezuelans In good
Jobs lh those companies.
"If only Anglo-Iranian had be-
haved aa well even a year ago,'
sighed Irao'a Prince Nanucher
Farman Farmalan.
. 'Ah,' said an English repre-
sentative, 'if only the Iranians
would behave like the Venezue-
lans.' "
BUENOS AIRES, Sept. 29 (UP) Argentina awoke
quietly today following yesterday's virtually bloodless re-
volution by a small group from the Army and Air Fores
who planned to assassinate President Peron, his wife Eva,
and other high officials.
Casualties so far reported are one dead and four
wounded.
The alleged leader of tne revolt, General Benjamin
Menendez, 60, a reputed Notionalist, has been arrested
and faces the death penalty.
British Post Office
Experts Investigate
Underwater Circuits
LQNDON, Sept. 29 (LPS> |
Several' new development in ;
underwater telecommunications j
are being Investigated by the I
British Post Office research ex- I
perts. Demonstrations were
given recently to show some-
thing of the most recent pro-
gress.
Outstanding amone the new
projects nearlng completion Is
an electronic device for am-
plifying telephone and tele-
graph signals. This device can
be used ui very deep water and
Is likely to be incorporated Into
a new submarine cable system
to be laid between Newfound-
land and Nova Scotia next year
which will cover a distance of
700 miles under water.
The first of these amplifying
devices was introduced /bv the
British,Post Office eight, years
ago and has been used on Its
telephone and telegraph circuits
between Britain and Europe
On the circuit between New-
foundland and Nova Scotia the
circuits will be submerged at
depths of one and a half miles
Special containers, resistant
to rust are being made to house
all electrical equipment needed
for amplifying signals Several
teleprinter services are likely
to be served by this new circuit
in addition to telephone and
telegraph network.
RP Politicians
Active; Assembly
Meets Monday
Political parties in Panama
were Jockeying for positions to-
day as the time drew near for
the last session or the National
Assembly elected In 1948.
The Assembly Is scheduled
to meet Monday for the Inau-
gural sitting of the 1951-52 ses-
sion.
A majority group of Assem-
blymen visited President Alcl-
blades Arosemena Thursday to
offer their support to his ad-
ministration and to the can-
didacy of Col. Jose A. Remon,
Panama Police Chief, whose
name has been mentioned as
a presidential candidate in the
elections, scheduled fcr next
June.
Col. Remon himself has not
publicly admitted that he will
run for President, but it is ru-
mored that at leaat four of the
Chief on their ticket.
The National Liberal Party,
meanwhile, remains firm In Its
decision to nominate Roberto
F. Chiari as Its presidential
candidate. This faction of *he
divided liberals is headed by
David Samudlo, Minister of
Agriculture In the Arosemena
administration.
The Deputies who comprise
the Assembly bloc which has
pledged its support to the Pre-
sident and Remon are mem-
bers of the National Revolu-
tionary Party (PNR), the Re-
form Party (Renovador), the
Authentic Revolutionary Party
(PRA) and the other faction
of the" Liberal party.
Observers were speculating to-
day on the number and the
nature of changes that may
take place in government or-
ganizations as a result of the
formation of the new parlia-
mentary bloc.
It was rumored that some
of the managers of autonom-
ous government Institutions
may be replaced with others
on the Insistence of the group
of Deputies.
Some observers believe the
Assembly will not ratify the
recent appointments to politi-
cal positions made by Presi-
dent Arosemena.
The political' situation may
take on added color tomorrow
after Denuty Jorge Illueca, Pa-
triotic Front Party policy-ma-
ker airs his views on the cur-
rent situation tonight at a
mass meeting.
Illueca, Is scheduled to return
today from Paris where he at-
tended the general assembly of
the ECOSOC as a delegate for
Panama. He will deliver an ad-
dress at 6:30 this evening over
a local radio station.
HST Releases More
Conner From United
Stales Stockpiles
WASHINGTON. Sept. 29 (UP>
President Truman todav au-
thorized the withdrawal of an-
other 30.000 tons of copocr from
the national stockpile to make
up for production losses In the
recent strike of copper miners.
Defense Mobllizer Charles E
Wilson saM It was "with great
reluctance" that he had asked
the President for this second
withdrawal from the stockoile
The release of uo to 25000
tons was announced Aur 17
Wilson said the oresent with-
drawal was necessarv to keep
defense Droductlon rolling.
He quoted a longshoremen's
strike. In Chile as an additional
factor In slovine copper nro-
ductlon, by slowing ore ship-
ment*.
Air Force Brigadiers Samuel
Guaycoechea and Guillermo Zln-
ny have fled to Uruguay with
some 70 other officers to eight
planes.
General Arturo Rawson, re-
Erted yesterday to be a co-plot-
with Menndez, reportedly
wrote the Ministry of the Army
last night disclaiming any con-
nection with the uprising, and
saying he could be reached at
his home.
The Uruguayan foreign minis-
try has announced that In ac-
cordance with the practices of
International Law the fleeing
rebels will be disarmed and In-
terned.
Argentina will be offered the
captured planes and arms back.
The lights of Colonia airport
in Montevideo were left on all
last night on the chance that
more rebels would fly across the
River Plate from Argentina.
The casualties as so far known
are:
Rebels: One officer of the C-3
Tank Regiment burned when hi
tank was set on fire; two officers
wounded, including a son of Gen-
eral Menndez.
loyalists: Lt. Col. Julio Carea-
res, second in command of the
c-a Tank-Beainernt. wounded;
on n.c.o. killed.
\ hi, ha already been m-
ti Juced into the Chamber of
Deputies to deprive them of j
their citizenship, as "cowards :
and traitors to the people," all I
the rebels who flew to Uruguay.
All their possessions will also)
be confiscated, if the bill is pass-
ed.
Official reports of the revolt
describe It In general terms.
Apparently the movement waa
partially and briefly successful
at only three basesthe Array
establishment at Campo de Mayo
and the Air Force base at El Pa-
lomar (both near Buenos Aires)!
and the Naval air base at PjjjaM
Indio, some 90 miles south of the
capital. .
President Pern's declaration ,
of a "state of Internal 'War" j
does not affect the country* !
normal civilian activities, but
only military affairs. It is net
known how long the declara-
tion will remain in force.
As yet nothing definite is
known about the numbers of re-
bels held as prisoners.
The Army Ministry announced,
most of those concerned had been
arrested, and proceedings had
been 'started for their trial under
the Military Justice Code.
It Is Impossible to ascertain the
number of troops involved,
though official reports empha-
size that comparatively few forcea
were involved.
Both the Campo de Mayo and
(Continued on Page 6. CoL S>
New Radio DF Gear
Ready For Yachts,
Cruisers, Fishermen
LONDON. Sept. 29 (CODIn
collaboration with Consolidated
Fisheries. Ltd., The Marconi In-
ternational Marine Communica-
tion Company, Ltd., of Chelms-
ford England, has been exhibit-
ing radio aids to navigation and
communication equipment In
the Fishing Industry Section ofi
the Festival of Britain Shipping
Exhibition at Swansea. Wales.
Attracting much attention
was the "Seapllot" an In-
strument of particular Interest
to fishermen and owners of
small craft.
"Seapllot" is a generic nam
covering several versions of di-
rection indicating equipment
based on existing Macronl Mar-
ine receivers, such aa the "Val-
iant." which forms the receiver
section of the "Seagull" radlo-
teleohone Installation.
The addition of a small aerial
coupling unit and rotating lopp
aerial converts the receiver into
a compact D. F. Installation
without In anv way affecting its
efficiency as a receiver.
The elimination of a separata
direction-finder means a ocn-
slderabie. saving in space and
cost to the small-craft ownax



r%GE TWO
TBB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAItT NEWSPAPER
V
Cargo and Fre|ghtShips and PlanesArrivals and Departures
SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 29, 195X
Insect
HORIZONTAL
1 1,1 Depicted
iflMCt
10 Shaded walk
11 Com tell it ion
13 Ifnited
14 Bound
18 Carets
17 Hypothetical
force
U Twitted cord
20 PrMidinr
elder (ab.)
21 Title
23 Bewildered
23 Paradise
28 Staffer
27 Finish
28 Army offlcer
(ab.)
29 Down
30 Belongs to it
32 Roman road
34 Dash
38 Was borne
37 Withered
38 Mystic
ejaculation
29 Wettest
45 District
attorney (ab.)
48 Pile
48 Extend
49 Courtesy title
50 Gaze fixedly
32 Burinf tools
54 Poem
35 Confused
crowd
VERTICAL
I Sum eying
instrument
2 Small ruf
3 Part of "be"
4 Nothing
Scent v. -
6 Short sleeps'-'
7 Measure Of
area *
8 Bite \A
9 Wigwam
10 Solitary
11 Augment
12 It will ------
young of
other species
15 Babylonian
deity
18 Offered
19 Soonest
22 Repaired
1______.
y Arfawer to Previous Puzifa
Eli*JL 'laba a**.*** i_: ^ ^ _. .-
'.'li.'kHtlll^.M! 5aJ.B|t-1
Wi 1.-4UHI tlRr-viuej
*JU|* 'upan 'it
l-'J'l Jl 3
VU\ -i i
& ."-' m -ii. :
24 Arrange
31 Pilchard
32 Presses
33 Fruit
35 Approaches
10 Exist
41 Pronoun
42 Narrow way
43 Unbleached
44 Drop off
47 Stuff
49 Salt
31 Concerning
83 Paid (ab.)
ARMY
All DRINKS
will be
sold at
i\.-.
VY
a vil
Vi
PRICE
Sundays CT1 ZJhuridc
from 8 a.m. lo 12 p.m.
t*
WE SERVE THE FINEST LIQUORS.
GIVE THE BEST SERVICE
I
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED Bl ROYAL CHARTER 1840
Royal Mails Lines Ltd.
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COASTS
<* OF NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA
'TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR. PERU ANO CHILE
M.V. "SANTANDER" ........................ Sent 30th
M.V. "SARMIENTO"................. ......, //. qPc, j^
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA,
HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. CORUA.
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
M.V "REINA DEL PACIFICO-...................Nov. 17th
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
8S FLAMENCO"" ......................... Mid Oct
M.V SALAVERRY- ................. ......Oct 15th
g. -SAUNAS-".......::.::::::::::::::::::::;& SS.
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTO. HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
6S "DALERDYK" ...............................Oct. 12th
TO UK/CONTINENT
S. "DRINA".............................. Oct 1st
M.V. "LOCH GARTH"..........................'.'. .Oct 29th
Accepting passengers In First. Cabin and Third Class
Superior accommodation available for passengers
All sailings subject to change without notice.
ninCrnar!TJ|A.M NV C0 Cristbal. Tel 1654 1655
FORD COMPANY Inc.. Panama Tel. 3-1257/1258: Balboa 1958
i
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Shipping &
Ah Line News
Panamanian Awarded Grant
In CAAV Foreign Nationals
Training Prog ram
A Oroup-C Training Grant has
been awarded Dante A. Fiorl of
Panama City who left this morn-
ing for Miami, en route to Wash-
ington. He will be given Instruc-
tion and training with the U.8
Civil Aeronautic Administra-
tion.
He will undergo a period of ap-
proximately eight months' stu-
dy, obcervatlon and practical
training related to the mainten-
ance of aeronautical communica-
tions equipment and systems in
various specla lired avi a 11 o n
training localities In the United
States.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Where 100.000 Pm,!, Mm
Presents -
Today. Saturday, Sept. 29
Newsman Brands Boyle's Story
False; Lithofold Probe Flares
ememfce, THE BOSTON BAR
New Books
"The Maestro; the life of Ar-
turo Toscanlnl," by H. H. Taub-
man. music editor of the New
York Times. Is one of the new
books placed In circulation dur-
ing the past week by the Pana-
ma Canal Library.
This book Is baaed on at-
tendance at hundreds of con-
certs and rehearsals; reading of
everything written about the
maestro; examination of his
scores; Interviews of many peo-
ple who worked with Toscanlnl
in the United states and Italy
and the close friendship and
eoopsratlve of several members
of his Immediate family.
The complete list of new
books at the Library follows:
Social Sciences Roads to
agreement; successful methods
in the science of human rela-
tions. Chase; Education psy-
chology. Peterson.
English language No Idle
words and Having the last word,
Brown.
Essays on science The Im-
pact of science on society, Rus-
sell.
Useful Arts Aircraft year
book. 1950; These well-adjusted
children, Langdon; Making
useful things of wood, Gott-
shall.
Orchestra The Victor book
of overtures, tone poems, and
other orchestral music, O'Con-
nell.
Travel. Biography The
Maestro; the life of Arturo
Toscacini, Taubman; Fabled
shore. Macaulay.
Fiction: The Beautiful Strang-
er, Carey; The Sleeping Witness.
Heberden; The Innocent Eve. Na-
than; Farewell to Otterley Pak-
ington; The Caravan Passes, Ta-
bori.
Gift Replacements: The Hurri-
canes Children. Carmer; Eggs,
Beans and Crumpets, Wode-
house; Men of Science In Ameri-
ca. Jaffe; coasts, Waves and
Weather. 8tewart; The Wire-
Haired Foxterrier. Ackerman:
Making Watercolor Behave. O-
Hara; Music Through the Ages.
Bauer; Those Were the Days. He-
witt: Amazon Throne. Harding;
Saints and Strangers, Wlllison.
3:oo-American Band Concert
3:15The Little Show
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude
4:00Let's Dance _
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Guest Star
6:15Masterworks from France
(RDF)
6:45American Folk Songs
7:00 Gay Paris Musi Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00News reel UJS.A. (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Battle Report
9:00Radio University (VOA)
9:15Stamp Club (VOA)
9:30Radio Amateur Program
(VOA)
9:45Sports and Tunt of Day
(VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
11:00The Owl's Neat
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
WASHINGTON, Sept 29.-(UP)-Senate in- AliWUr Infam-Aar
vestigators moved yesterday to subpena the accounts of Democratic National Chairman William
M. Boyle, Jr., after a St. Louis, Mo., Post-Dispatch
reporter predicted they will showssecret payments
from the American Lithofold Corp.
Theodore C. Link, veteran crime reporter for
the Post Dispatch, told the Senate's Permanent In-
vestigating Committee that a ''very reliable source"
supplied the newspaper's published charge that
Boyle received $8,000 from Lithofold after it got an
RFC Loan.
Chosen For Award
As Airman of Month
ROOSTERS ENDS ALL
SALEM, Ore. (UP.) Mem-
bers of a construction crew here
say they saw a rooster commit
suicide. Tracey Cox, superinten-
dent of a crew on the North Sal-
em- drainage system, said his
crewmen saw the rooster wander
to the edge of a spillway, gaze
with apparent moodiness at the
water for a moment, and then
leap In. Crew members fished out
the rooster's body.
Tomorrow, Sunday, Sept. 39
A.M.
8:00Sign On Musical Inter-
lude
8:15Newsreel U.S.A. (VOA)
8:30Hymns of All Churches
9:00BIBLE AUDITORIUM OF
THE AIR
9:15Good Neighbors
9:30London Studio Concerta
(BBC)
10:00In the tempo of Jazz
10:30Your American Music "i
11:00National Lottery (Smoot
. and Paredes)
11:15The Sacred Heart Pro-
gram
11:30Meet the Band
12:00Invitation to Learning
(VOA)
PJW.
12:30 Salt Lake Tablernacle
, Choir
1:00The Jo Stafford Show
1:15American Chorales
1:30Rev. Albert Steer
2:00Opera and Symphony
Hour
4:30What's Your Favorito
7:00Opera Concert
7:00American Round table
7:30Story of the Christian
Church
7:45Radio Varieties UB.A.
8:00Sports Roundup and News
(VOA)
8:15Report from Cong reas
(VOA)
8:30Almanac from America
(VOA)
9:00United Nations Review
(VOA)
9:80The Bing Crosby Show
(VOA)
10:00American Symphony
ll:00-Slgn Off
Explanation of Symbol
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish B r o a die a s 11 ng
Corp.
RDFRadiodifusin Francalse
Boyle denied the charge under
oath Thursday, and Intimated he
may sue the newspaper for libel.
" nk. In effect, dared Boyle to
sue.
A libel suit would open this
thing so wide. I doubt he'd ever
file one." Link said.
The reporter, who flew here
from St. Louis to testlfv at a dr?-
matic public hearing refused to
Identify his source "at this
time."
He said he Is bound by a pledge
of confidence, and that disclos-
ure of the Information now also
would be "fatal" to the newspa-
per's "continuing Investigation"
of the case.
Link said the Informant, in
whom his newspaper has great
confidence, told him Boyle has
been secretly receiving half of
the $500 monthly retainer
which Lithofold pays to Wash-
ington attorney Max Siskind,
Boyle's former raw partner,
and that "it will show up in
Boyle's bank account."
When Link commented that his
newspaper doesn't "have access"
to Boyle's bank accounts, Repub-
lican Senators demanded that
they be subpoenaed.
Committee counsel Francis
Flanagan said:
"We're going to do that."
Sen. John L. McClellan. D.,
Ark., indicated he may demand
that Boyle be "recalled" for fur-
ther questioning. McClellan told
Boyle Thursday that he had eith-
er perjured himself, or had been
libeled by the Post-Dispatch.
The committee had planned to
wind up its hearings yesterday,
but Link's testimony blew the
whole Investigation wide open
again.
Chairman Clyde R. Hoey, D.,
N.C., said further hearings will
oe held.
Flanagan said "every effort'
was the only member of the com-
mittee who displayed a sympa-
thetic attitude at this point. He
protested that Link war being
unfairly "maligned."
The climate in the committee
room underwent a >. s u d d e n
change when Link quietly-an-
nounced that he could furnish
"dates and places" where Boyle
met with R. J. Blauner, presi-
dent of Lithofold, and James P.
Flnnegan, former St. Louis tax
collector, now under Investiga-
tion by a Federal Grand Jury on
charges of accepting large sums
from Lithofold and* other firms.
Report Reds Make
Synthetic Rubber
Skin Sores
Don't let ltehlnf Ecaema. Plmpl*.
Rliuprorm. Blackheeae. Acne. Feoria-
"" EH! 'fh- Athlata-s foot (Ailpunta)
or other blemlehee dlanrure rovr sUn
and mbaraae rot anothar dar without
trj-lns Nitcederm. Thia sraat m.dl-lne
combata the ferma and paraaltea whiea
S2*? .""?' Tnl us of akin trouble*.
That la why Nlaeaerm ao quickly makia
your akin eort dear, amooth and a.
traetlT. Gat Nixaderm from yoar drua-
Imported
Canned Hams
PER
DREWS
IRAKI'S &
ATI'A UNTA BRAND
are offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Coln
HOME DELIVERY
Old-Fashioned Cents
Bring Premia mPrice
COLUMBIA CITY, Ind.. Sept.
29 (UPt"Indian head" pennies
re legally worth two cents each
here.
Circuit Judge Lowell L. Pefley
decided that 39 "Indian head"
rents In a collection belonging to
the Joseph P. Haney estate
should be sold for $1 Ig in order
to settle the estate.
will be made to "get to the bot-
tom" of the conflicting testimo-
ny.
He also revealed that Boyle
had refused to allow commit-
tee staff investigators to in-
spect his full income tax re-
turns, despite his statement
Thursday that Be was "per-
fectly willing" to produce them.
Flanagan said the staff was
given "only a portion" of tax re-
turns, and that he will demand
Boyle produce the rest at once.
For the first hour of the hear-
ing, Democratic members of the
committee badgered Link for his
refusal to identify his source.
But the 45-year-old reporter,
who once went to Jail to protect
a confidence, remained adamant.
McClellan denounced his tes-
timony as "hearsay and rumor"
and Hoey said It was "utterly In-
competent" without the names of
the newspaper's Informants.
Sen. Richard M. Nixon, R., Cal.,
HONG KONG. Sept. 29 (UP)
A Shanghai report received here
suggested that synthetic rubber
is now being made In either Rus-
sia or Communist China.
The Shanghai News said that
Chinese cotton mills have found
synthetic rubber rollers to be bet-
ter than leather-top rollers, and
will replace their leather rollers
with the synthetic product.
"The synthetic rubber roller Is
easier to manufacture than the
leather-top roller, and Is thrice
as durable," the newspaper said,
adding that the experiments
were carried out "to overcome the
difficulty In supplies."
"Leather-top rollers are made
of flannel and leather, for the
supply of which we depended on
foreign countries In the past.
Since the blockade, China has
had to rely on her own resources.
However, the supply of leather
was further curtailed as a result
of the government order forbid-
ding the slaughter of calves In
order to preserve draft cattle for
use of the peasants."
Airmen of the Month honors
at Albrook Air- Force Base went
recently to Sergeant Ronald L.
Valladares, interpreter-transla-
tor assigned to the United States
Air Force School for Latin Amer-
ica.
Sergeant Valladares was chos-
en for the honor by Albrook's
Character Guidance Council for
his outstanding display of Initia-
tive, efficiency, neatness, milita-
ry bearing, character, leadership
and participation In squadron
and base activities.
The nomination submitted to
the Council praised Valladares'
performance not only as Spanish
Interpreter-translator but also
for the work he did In establish-
ing a Spanish translation library
at the School for Latin America.
In addition. Valladares has
proven to be valuable asset to the
school In supervising the bar-
racks life of the Latin Americar
student body and acting at
friend and counsellor to the stu-
dents.
Valladares completed his high
school education In 1947 at Gua-
temala City, Guatemala. He also
4 Greenville Women
'Jumped" by Negroes
GREENVILLE. S. C. Sept. 29
Pour white persons, one
of them a woman, told sheriffs
deputies here today that two or
three Negro men "Jumped" them
early this morning when their
car stalled on a country road
The four told officers that the
Negroes jumped from bushes, one
grabbed the woman by the wrist
and another advanced on one of
the men with a pipe.
The men said they frightened
the Negroes away and were able
to get the license number of the
car they were driving.
attended the Facultad Ingenie-
ra there, specializing in engin-
eering courses. He enlisted in
the Air Force In 1948 at Albrook
Air Force Base. After completing
basic training at Lackland Air
Force Base, Texas, he returned to
Albrook for assignment at the
USAF School for Latin America
where he has served for 28
months.
Valladares will be aVarded a
trip to one of the South Ameri-
can countries plus a one hundred
dollar expense account. The Ser-
geant has chosen Guatemala Ci-
ty for his holiday.
f/y io COSTA RICA
TACA
3-ROUND TRIPS WEEKiy 3
A^w Deluxe DC-3'S Mairtact b
C C.A. Licensed Mechanics.
FIRST CLASS SERVICE TOURIST RATES.
!*30i>
utS2tLu/IrJ*.v.fl AieH* or TACA for details.
Monday Meeting Listed
For PM Civil Council
The Pedro Miguel Civic Coun-
cil will hold its regular, monthly
meeting Monday evening at 7:30
in the new Pedro Miguel Movie
hall.
All residents of the town, old
and new, are urged to attend the
meeting.
Iff Wide-Awake
with
WESTCLOX
QUALITY
MUAMUTY
i ** *m to woke ,* fa aaalauaai, ft* WaekUa Mf
m s*m i. nfcatli **. k|len|tii won't M yew **!. Wits***
fv prefei Ara, lewd oiona or faxes* cMnest, Here Hf lem far you.
Daaano'obie, bandeo-e fca ttr coa** wHb eleva plab. or kiminom dial
or eoiy raodino In dOytfJal *r doviaaaaa. So* tif on diaploy wl*
Sear ajooltty Woaedo ndala 4 yew nMaVi odoyj
WESJCL0X

KepTSMataittTe: VNlYttML EXFOBT COBP.
No. 3004 lth Street and Balboa Coon. R. P.
CNTVEKflAL EXPOCT COBP.
Jose Francisco de la Osa A v. "Q" ft. No. S3
Panam City. R. P.
Strong, Healthy and Happy
So** be waa pot a LACTOCEN. thera'a a* holdi. Usa. LACTOGEN, ia.
Wing him avert aera a/ Bemriahaaeni he needa, la a way* he cao ao easily
diaaau >ee hita bonadleaa ritality. babbling health. LACTOCEN is cow'a
aailkpactare freeh, rich and pare.
UCTOCEN provioes. la S for Baby eao aaaih- otaoat asat aaeimiUu, the
saod alaniaiata aereaea 17 I* satisfy the aaad* af his faet growing train* and
body: food to oaaka saod dense bone: eouod teeth) fina, lithe maecle; qaia
Mr***! a happy diepoottiea and a at ron vigorona eonatitation.
LACTOCW I. par*, freeh, faltereaan milk awdiftod especially for tmfaat

A NBTli MOOUCr MIPAM& aWaCUlLY SOR NftANT HH>*a>


*
''" -*'
SATTJBDAT 8EPTKMBER M. lSl
^Mtlanlic ^ociett
......- -j^j'
m PANAMA AHEIICAK -AN IKDIPKNDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

PAGE
&>, 195, (jatu* D.l.pLn. (f./un 378
MIM BURGESS WBD8 ARTHUR WHI8NANT
In a private ceremony at the Fort Gulick Chapel, Miss
Gay lamine Bwna, daughter of Mr. and Mr. Freemani L.
Bare cm. of New Cristobal, became the brie of Pfc. Arthur
K, Whiaaant of Fort Gulick, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ar
Whlsnant of Morgantoa, North Carolina,
'The ceremony took place at
half-past four o'clock. Friday.
Sept. 28, with Chaplain J. B.
Hemann, Captain U.S.A., per-
forming the double ring ceremo-
ny.
The young bride was escorted
and given In marriage by her fa-
ther. She was lovely In an after-
noon dress of orchid embroidered
organdy, The sleeveless, fitted
bodies was finished with a small
standing mandarin collar, and
the full gathered skirt was balle-
rina length. She carried a show-
er bouquet of white roses.
Misa Mary B. Sherry was the
maid of honor and the only at-
tendant. She wore an aqua after-
noon drassj, trimmed with white
eyelet embroidery. White buttons
closed the bodice on the side. She
wore a corsage of yellow carna-
tions.
Corporal Orady D. Walker, of
Fort Gulick. was best man for
the groom.,
An informal reception for the
members of the wedding party
and a few close friends was held
at the home of the bride follow-
ing the ceremony.
Mrs. Burgess received with the
wedding party. She chose for the
occasion a blue crepe afternoon
dress, with which she used white
accessories. Her flowers were a
corsage of pink carnations.
The bride and groom cut the
four-tiered wedding cake which
was beautifully decorated. The
bride's table was covered* with a
white embroidered cloth and
pink carnations encircled the
cake, which was flanked by pinto
tapers in crystal holders.
Mrs. Whlsnant Is a student at
the Cristobal High School.. Mr.
Whlsnant has been in the United
states Army for four years, and
has oeen stationed on the Isth-
mus for all of this time. He will
be sent to the United States ear-
ly in'October for reassignment.
The bride and groom will spend
a short honeymoon at Santa Cla-
ra, after which they will reside
with the bride's parents.
Hth Anniversary of Founding
of M.P. Corp. Celebrated
The 20th MF. Company of Ft.
Gulick. celebrated the 10th An-
niversary o the founding of the
Corps with a luncheon and after-"
noon of games at the Cristobal
Police Range Wednesday.
Csfptator Denver Heath.- com-
manding officer of the company,
was host for the occasion. Im-
promptu speeches were made by
the visiting officers and Lt. Col.
Fred, Stelner read a letter from
the Provost Marshal, Major-Gen-
eral R. F. Parker, of Camp Gor-
don, Georgia. Re commended the
M.P.'s on the past year'sachieve-
ments nd-tbe fine work they are
doing. .
Hail-and-Farewell Dinner
The members of the Gatun Un-
ion Church gave a covered dish
supper Thursday evening at the
Church to honor Mr. and Mrs.
Arthur Lane, who have been as-
sociated with the church for over
twenty years and have worked
with all of the organizations
within the church body. Farewell
was also said to Mr. and Mrs.
Dixon Daniel who are leaving the
Isthmus next month. The occa-
sion also was arranged to wel-
come the teachers and newcom-
ers to the town.
Seated at the guest of honor's
table were: Mr. and Mrs. Lane,
Mr. and Mrs. Daniels, Rev. and
Mrs. Mainert Peterson. Dr. and
Mrs. R. R. Gregory, Mrs. Ves-
tal Morris, Mr. and Mrs. Wal-
lace Rushing. Miss Mildred Houy,
Miss Stella Gallo, Mrs. Lucia
Gallo.
Mrs. Floyd McDermitt was
chairman of the dinner commit-
tee and was assisted by Mrs.
Leon Bgolf, Mrs. Emerson Cot-
trell, Mrs. George Poole, Sr., Mrs.
Joseph Irving, Mrs. Fred New-
hard Mrs. Walter Zimmerman
and Mrs. W. C. Smith.
Ferns were used with red ejeo-
rla to decorate the long tables
and vines and ferns were used in
the general decorations. A large
bouquet of hydrangeas centered
the buffet table.
A program was arranged In the
main auditorium of the church
following the dinner. Mrs. B. B.
Gray, Mrs. Spencer Smith of Pe-
dro Miguel and Mr. Arthur Al-
bright gave a musical program.
Mr. Emerson Cottrell. acting
president of the church council,
presided and presented Mr. Lane
a gift from the members of the
Council, in appreciation of his
work with this organisation.
Elbert S. Wald Auxiliary Meeting
The American Legion Auxiliary
Elbert S. Wait Unit 2. met Wed-
nesday evening at the Legion Hall
In Old Cristobal. Mrs. Louise
Griffon, president, presided and
Mrs. Mary Engelke, honorary
chaplain of the department of-
ficiated.
Mrs. Clara Nelson reported the
fine results of the Jamaica Re-
lief Drive by the Auxiliary. Mrs.
Celia Bush gave a talk on Cen-
tral and South American coun-
tries, and Mrs. Lucy Dewey, De-
partment Pan American Chair-
man, gave a talk on Uruguay.
Plans were made for a rummage
sale to be held Saturday, Novem-
ber 24 In Colon.
A person was selected as the
Person-of-the-month for out-
standing service In the commun-
ity. A radio program will be pre-
sented concerning community
service and if the person elected
accepts the. honor, he will be pre-
sented to the public.
Refreshments were served by
Mrs. Elolse Murray. Mrs. Onris
and Mrs. Fisher.
Memorial Service
at Church of Our Saviour
A memorial service and holy
communion will -be held at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow at the American
Episcopal Church of Our Saviour
In memory of Venerable G. Clark
Montgomery Arch deacon of
Southern Colombia, who died
suddenly In Santa Marta, Colom-
bia.
Rev. Montgomery had served
in Gatun at St. George's Church
and at St. Mary's in Silver City.
He had at numerous times filled
the pulpit at the Church of Our
Saviour.
Informal Morning Coffeo
Mrs. John Hlpson entertalneej
with an informal morning coffee
at her Fort Gulick home Thurs-
day. Her guests were the mem-
bers of the Fund Raising Com-
mittee of the Fort Gulick Ladies
Club, Of which she has served as
chairman.
The guests were: Mrs. Richard
Carle, Mrs. John McCarthy, Mrs.
Carl Cooper, Mrs. Ramon Vale,
Mrs. Raymond Patricio and Mrs.
Harry Gardner.
Birthday Party at
Gulick Officers Club
Terry Thompson, son of Capt.
and Mrs. C. B. Thompson of Ft.
Gulick, celebrated his fifth birth-
day anniversary with a party at
the Fort Gulick Officers Club
Wednesday.
Fancy "Happy Birthday" cov-
ers were used on the refreshment
table, which held a decorated
cake as the centerpiece.
The children present were:
Butch Wllkerson, John Hayden,
BUI Hankie. JJeJffrey Hlpson,
Paulette Forrest, Janice Lalche,
Robert Moore, Anna Claire
Oberg, Jackie Demlco, Tina Pum-
KUy, Stevle Zilkle, Bobby Meeks,
maid Dewey, Donna Hemann,
Raymond and Allen Patricio,
The
JUVENIA WATCH AGENCY
510 Fifth Avenue
New York 19, N.Y.
will honor the guarantee
which we give with every
JUVENIA WATCH
Accuracy and Elegance
since 1860
.
MERCURIO, S. A
Ml Central Avenue
i n
Rosemary Montgomery and Ron-
nie Heath.
The adults who attended were:
Mrs. A. A. Zilkle, Jr., Mrs. Ray-
mond Patricio, Mrs. Clayton
Moore who assisted the hostess
and Mrs. Roy Wllkerson, Mrs.
Roy Hayden, Mrs. J. E. Hemann,
Mrs. H. W. Hankie and Mrs.
John Hlpson.
NCO Wives Club Meeting
The monthly morning coffee of
the NCO Wives dob was held
Wednesday at the home of the
president. Mrs. Pauline Marsh,
with Mrs. William Ellingsworth,
Mrs. Ernest Beck and Mrs. Harry
Copare as co-hostesses.
Pink and red roses formed a
colorful centerpiece for the cof-
fee table.
The guests who called dufHng
the morning were: Mrs. William
Qulnn, Mrs. Shirley Crumley,
Mrs. Mary Cotes..Mrs. Virginia
Potter and Mrs. Jlmmie Tulip.
The members who attended
were: Mrs. Margaret Bell, Mrs.
Gladys Smith, Mrs. Mary Mund-
kowski, Mrs. Edna Shirley. Mrs.
William Godwin. Mrs. William
Hawkins, Mrs. Russell Mann,
Mrs. John Cousins, Mrs. David
Harshaw. Mrs. Arthur Crandall,
Mr/. Ralph Johnson, Mrs. Paul
Volght, Mrs. Neville Harte, Mrs.
Harry Colbert. Mrs. C. 8. Har-
vey. Mrs. Joseph Flores, Mrs. Al-
fred Pacheco, Mrs. Marvin Lucky,
Mrs. Harriet Johnson. Mrs. Ella
Kinnlck, Mrs. Helen Menard,
Mrs. Ina Gormley. Mrs. Rosalie
Wasuleskl. and Mrs. Edward
Dickerson.
Birthday Dance
Captain and Mrs. C. B.
Thompson enteralned with a
dance at the Fort Gulick Offi-
cers Club Wednesday evening to
honor their daughter. Harriet
Burke, on the occasion other six-
teenth birthday anniversary.
Novelty dances were enjoyed
with prises for the winners. Buf-
fet refreshments were served
during the evening.
The guests included: Misses
Helen Hayden, Janet King, Rita
and Jean Xatallnas. Dora Welch,
Mildred Marquard. Ann Thomas,
Helene de Boyrie. Barbara Egolf,
Maybelle Gardner, Arllne Lim.
and Messrs: James Pumpelly,
Joe and Jack Katallnas. Topper
Dldler, Herbert Lewis. Dick Reed.
Carl Pinto, Tommy Jordan and
Gary Cooper, Robert Orvis. Ver-
non Bryant, Jenny Dave.
Mrs. Roy Wllkerson, Mrs. A.
A. Zilkle and Mrs. Carl Cooper
assisted the hostess.
JACOBY ON BRIDGE
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NBA Service
NOtTH (D) 4
MOB
741
? KQ 108 42
? KB .
WEST EAST
87412 *J5
VJfl WQ1092
? ? AI3
? 97543 AQJ2
SOUTH
? AKQ6
\ VAK88
? J78
? 108
E-W vt'l.
NorU. East Sooth West
> Pan 8 N. T. Pass
Pass Double Pass Pass
Redout.*. Pats Pass Pass
' Opening lead* 4
One hand that sticks in my
mind, was dealt in the 1945 na-
tional championships. Sam Fry,
Jr., held the West cards and had
to find an opening lead.
A diamond was out of the ques-
tion, of course, but each of the
other three suits presented a pos-
sibility. Since his own hand was
worthless lt was vital to lead the
suit that would be best-for his
partner's hand.
Fry knew that his partner had
a good hand, otherwise he could
not have doubled three no-trump.
With a good hand and strong
holdings In the majors.. East
would have taken direct action
over the opening bid of three dia-
monds. Hence, Fry reasoned, East
must have a good hand with the
strength concentrated in the mi-
nor suits.
On this reasoning Fry opened
the four of clubs. This was the
killing lead. The defense speedily
! rattled off five club tricks and
eventually got the ace of dia-
monds too, setting the contract
two tricks.
If Fry had opened a spade or a
heart South would have made
three no-trump. For example.
South wins the opening heart
lead and leads diamonds until
East takes the ace on the third
round. East leads another heart,
and South wins and cashes his
top spades. He then leads a
heart to East, who must event-
ually return a club, allowing
dummy to make the king of clubs
and enough diamonds for the
contract.
CANASTA

VILANOVA
GREAT SALE
STARTS OCTOBER 1st
m
MASS OF THANKSGIVING
will be said in honor of
OUR LADY OF THE MIRACULOUS MEDAL
ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH (Coln)
On Sunday, September 38, at 8:48 a.m.
Graces received during accident suffered. The presence,
of all Devotees, Friendi and well-wishers, will be
appreciated.
\
HELENA LAWTON.
DUNLOP
fORT
CAR TYRES
DISTRIBUTORS:
.M.
AGENCIAS W. H. DOEL, S
Ne. 14 Central Ave. Tel. 2-7M
Atoo available at:
HEURTEMATTE & ARIAS, S. A.
PANAMA
C O. MASON, S. A. Colon
ARISTIDES ABADA & CIA. LTDA. David
IMPORTACIONES REVILLA N David
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
In recent articles we have been
discussing the choice of your first
discard. There are times when
yon should discard from strength I
(three or more of a kind) and
times when you should discard
from weakness (no more cards to
match the discard). Your choice
should defend mostly on the na-
ture of your hand.
Sometimes you are dealt a clear
cut offensive hand; sometimes a ,
clear cut defensive hand. Most'
of the time you are dealt a hand
that isn't mucli of anything, and ,
you must wait for the hand to
take on a real character during
the early part of the play.
An obvious offensive hand Is
one that gives you an excellent
chance to win the discard pile
very quickly. Naturally you must
have the count. Equally natural-
ly, you must have several differ-
ent pairs.
When the count is only 50'
points, the ideal hand is five,
pairs and a joker. Low pairs are
better than high pairs because
low cards arc usually discarded
more freely than hlph cards.
You will seldom get the perfect
hand, but you don't have to wait
for perfection. Four pairs plus
the count Is a very fine hand, and
even three pairs plus the count is
a good defensive combination.
With any such hand you should
begin a campaign to win the dis-
card pile. Keep your pairs and
try to accumulate new pairs. It
may be necessary to discard from
three of a kind when you have
such a hand (provided that this
discard does not give up the
count).
Such a discard from strength
serves three purposes. It may In-
duce the player at your right to
match the discardin which
case you will take the pack at (
once. It makes room in your hand
for new pairs. Finally, It Is prob-
ably the safest discard you can
make. The next player Is less
liktly to have a matching pair
when you discard from three of
a kind than when you discard a
singleton.
A defensive hand is one that
offers a good play for a fast out
and very little play for winning
the discard pile. For example, you
might hold four cards of one
kind, three cards of another
kind, and one or two wild cards.
Such a hand will produce a
canasta very quickly if your part-
ner can add to either meld. It Is
not much good for winning the
pack since you have only two
pairs. The enemy Is unlikely to
throw a card that you can pick
up.
With such a hand, you discard
odd cards and keep building up
your hand. When 'possible you
will make the initial meld, espe-
cially if you can do so without
having to use your wild cards.
RUTH MILLET! Says...
Don't be annoyed when your
wife does any of these things.
They're Just typical of a woman.
When she doesn't notice that
you got a haircut before coming
home, but Is put out with you be-
cause you didn't notice that she
is trying out a new hair style.
When you tell a bit of news to a
social gathering which you have
not first told her privately. Then
she gives you an accusing look
and pouts: "Why you never told
ME that."
When she explains why she
bought something she didn't
need by saying earnestly: "It was
such a bargain I just couldn't
pass it up." Or, "I got it for half-
price."
When he gets annoyed with
you for criticizing her best
friend, even though she often cri-
ticizes her.
When she goes to town for a
day's, shopping and remembers
everythingexcept the one thing
you asked her to do for you.
When she asks you how you
like a new hat or dress and gets
huffy If you find any fault with
it.
When she tells you she just
hasnt had time to mend your
socks or sew the button on a shirt
and in the next breath tells you
she has Just been made chairman
of another committee.
When she asks you what you
had for lunch and Rives you an
accusing look If It happens to be
the same thing she is serving you
for dinner.
When she. waits until you are
folng through the front door to
nform you that she needs some
money.
When she tries to shame you
Into' doing more around the house
by telling you how much some
other husband does.
When she can whip up a deli-
cious family meal with little ef-
fort, but always seems to wear
herself out getting a meal for In-
vited guests.
When she looks Into a well-fill-
ed closet and decides she hain't a
thing to wear to Saturday night's
party.
ANYTHING
FOR A PARTY
Lewis Service
4 Tivoli Avenue
Opposite Ancon P.O.
**&#**> EL RANCHO
EVERY SUNDAY afternoon from 12 to 3
FUN HERE IS A REGULAR HABIT! Here's our re-
cipe for a delightful Sunday afternoon meet your
friends for a leisurely cocktail. . magically created
by our head barman enjoy a delicious luncheon
listen. . or dance. . to the music of LOS RAN-
CHEROS!
oL anche
uncneon
Tomato Juice Cocktail
or
Pat of Shrimps in Aspic
Minestrone or Consomm Double
Spaghetti Caruso en
Casserole ..............1.00
Roast Loin of Pork
Cuban Style.............1.50
Broccoli
Chartreuse Potatoes
Salad
Banana Pie
Coffee Tea
Beer
COCKTAILS
2*
Manhattan
Martini
Old Fashion
Frozen Daiquiri
LOS RANCHEROS
LUIS AZCARRAGA at the organ
Every MONDAY Night
LUIS AZCARRAGA and his
Troubadors
Sapphire birthstono ring
for "her" In lovely 10K
gold sotting. gold mounting.
$36.- $19.50
PAY AS LITTLE AS $5.00 A MONTH

TAHITI
THE JEWEIRV STORE
157 THE FIRST SHIPMENT OF
Snow Crop Frozen Foods

HAS NOW ARRIVED
ON SALE AT THE FOLLOWING STORES:
COMISARIATO "SAS"
COMISARIATO BELLA VISTA
EL BATURRO
COMISARIATO "LA NIA"
MERCADO MODELO
CASA MIKE
MERCADO LOLITA
MERCADO BIZKAYNA*
COMISARIATO DON BOSCO
PAUL'S MARKET

ABARROTERIA LA CORTESA
Agent t
DONALD W. DICKERSON
TeL 3-1144
- Distributor:
FABRICA NACIONAL DE SALCHICHAS
Tels. 2-1821 Je 2-2M7

SS**"
W/&


PAGE FOU
-
THE PANAMA AMERICAN Aff TNPEPENDENT DAILY WEWSPAPCT
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER SB, 1MJ,
I
ISTHMIAN CHURCH NOTICES
Jewish
Jewish Welfare Soaro. biu i*2-X, La
, Boca Roaa. Balboa. CZ RaDDi Nalhar
.Witkm director.
Service* on Friday. i:30 p.mi
. (See also luting of Jew:sn senvue-
under Posts. Base* and Sta-jon
Coogregauoo Kol Sheanto uraei. Ave
oda Cuba and 38th Street. H*'1 v'?u
Panama City. RaObl Harry A Merteld
Service nr Fridav Son
Lutheran

'Mltt-MMI LUTHERAN IHttJtsi
-The l bun h *i Ike LuiBeran Hem'
il. T. Bernthal, Pastoi
830 B-iboa Ruad. Balboa.
Sunday School and Bible Class tare
'Worship service 10:15 a.m., -Come Thou
' Wuh Us and We Will Do Thee Good. A
friendlv welcome avail* all visitor Pol
luck supper ecnntaKundav each mom
"'ISO pm.. fame nifht. fourth Sunday
.17-30 pm The Service Center, open Wed
, nesda through Sunday, extends a coi
, dii welcome ill milltarv nernnnel
Churchai r the many reitht in the Canal Zone, end IK.
terminal crtiei or Panama and Calan, Republic at Panama, e
tend a welcome at all timei to man and women el the armad
ervice!, and ta civilian neighbor, Iriandt and strangtn
Ai a public lervice. Mea Panama Amaricen lata bata, by
denominations, notices el hoars of worship aad other raffaktr c-
tivities.
Listings o larfei' deneminattOM ara in alphabetical rdai.
hich 01 reteted (ran tima to tima. Denominations having only
ena ar two cengregotiens ere listed undei 'Othei Churches And
Services." A specie! listing is included far services at Army easts.
Air Farce basal and Naval stations.
Minuten, church secretaries and chaplains ara abad ta in-
form tha news dash by Wadnasday neon at tba
changes far tha coming Saturday's church page.
latest ef aay
Methodist
rut. METHODIST CHURCH
I British Conference!
Minister Kev. I. Herbert Moon
y.00 a.m. Morn ins Prayer end Sermon
, 1:00 pm. Sunday School
4:00 Men's Meeting.
7:15 u hi Evening Prayer and Sermon
IKIKiri METHODIST CHURCH
7tb Street and Melendei Avenue.
Coln. RJ.
Rev. Norman Pratt, Minister
Sunday Service at 9:30 a.m. and 7:16
,?.m.: Sunday School for all afea at 3
Monday 7 JO am. Weekly Prayer
Meeting,
CBCNEZER METHODIS1 LHT'KCH
Siver City. CZ.
Rev. Norman Pratt. Minuter
Sunday Services S a.m. and 5:ij p.m
Sunday School for all ages at 1:30 pm
Tuesday 7:30 pm.. Prayer Meeting
Salvation Army
Panama City. Calle is de teureto
Service at 11 em. and 7 JO p.m. (Mat-
er Wilson), Sunday School at 3 pm.
La Boca: Services at 11 am and 730
p.m. Sunday School at 3:30 p.m.
Red Tank: Service at 700 o-m Sunday
school at 3:00 n m
Colon. Uth 8treat
Services at........11 a.m. 7:30 p.m.
Sunday School at........... 3:00 o
Colon. 3rd Street
Services at ...... 11 a.m. 1 JO am
Silver City
Service at ................. 'Jo Ato.
Sunday School at ...........3:30 p.m.
Seventh Oay
Adventist
1 J. A.
Pacific Side
Cabo Verde. Panama City. No
hUynard; Panama City ro 2 Jamaica
Society Hall 18a booth Services onlyi:
Adoiphus Lawes. Chorrillo, P. A. Henry:
Rio Abajo, C. D. Abrahams: Gamboa. A.
A. Brlzrle. and Snanlsh City Church, t-
duardo Auilobe
Atlantic Side
, Colon Xhird Slraat. Joseph Bryan Crle-
lobal English New Church. E- A. Cruefc-
. shank; Cristobal Spaniah Church. B. 1.
Maxon. (Ho
or sent. I
Sunday night service at
Sabbath school each church Saturday
0:30 a.m. Divine worship 11 a.m. Sunday
night service at all churches exeeot
'otherwise Indicated.
Union Churches
Where all Prelastaata coop
lestaats operan
amity In easeailala. liberty us
le wit
| aaacsiiials aad charity in all
TUB ATLANTIC SIDE
"Crsrtaaal
i The Rev. Phillip Havener. Pastot
1 Phone 3-14*3.
l:S Worship service and Church-lime
smrsery
* *:to Young People's Meeting
" The Rev. J. William L. Graham. Pastor.
' Phone 5-45.
tto 3J0 Broadcast on HOK; HF5K
Sad HON.
!' 8:45 Sunday School
11:00 Worship Service.
i 5:00 Christian Endeavor
Mar gar i la
The Rev. Henry Bell. Pastor
" Phone 3-14At.
* :30 Bible School.
* 10:45 Worship service and Church-ume
.nursery.
. JO Youth fellowship.
! THE PACIFIC SIDI
Balboa
_ Balboa Road at San Pablo Street
. Rev. Alexander Shaw. Pastor
Phone 2-143. Olo. Phone 2-323
. AJO Church School, free bus service.
10:30 Worship service and Church-time
(0:30 'Y/outh Congregation
8:00 Chi Rno Senior HI Fellowship
00 Post HI Fellowship
7:30 Service Centered On Song"'
Gamboa
All service In Gamboa Civic Canter.
Tha Rev. Raymond A. Gray. Minister
Phone -130.
t:00 Sunday School.
7:30 Worship ervice.
reare Migael
:30 Church School.
10:43 Divine Worship.
7:30 Evening Vespers
MRS'I BAPTIST CMUJtCB
Balboa Heignts, C.Z
627 Ancon Boulevard
Drawer "B~ Balboa Height
Phone Balboa 1727
your Church away tram heme
with e welcome lust as friendly"
William H tteehy
Sunday School............
Morning Worship ....*.....
Baptist Training Union ....
Evangelistic Service........
Prayer Meeting Wednesdaya
W.MS Bible Study
rhursdays ...................
Mena Brotherhood
(Last Monday to month) ..
s .311 am
10:45 am
30 pm
7 30 o m
7JO pm
... t am
J JO pm
ATLANTIC BAPTIST CHURCH
Bolivar.Avenue at 12th Street
Cristobal. C.Z
Rev. Fred U Jones, Pastor
"year Invitation Ta Worship"
Bible School ............... 046 am
Worship .......a,.......... 11:00 am
Training Union ............ JO p.m.
Worship ..................7:30 pm.
Prayer Meeung iThurs.) ... 7J0 pm.
ST. JOSEPH 9 cnuRcn
Colon, leth. A Broadway
Pastor. Rev. J. Raymond Maohxte. C M
Assistant. Rev. Robert Vignola. C M
Sunday Masses. 3:45 A 0:00 a-m
Weekday Mass. 5:45 am.
Holy Day Mamie. 5:45 A 0 am
1st. Fri Masses. 5:45 A O am
Communion. t:0C am.
Baptisms Sun.. 4 00 pm.
Miraculous Medal Novena services .
Wed. at :li A 7.00 pm.
Novena of the Sacred Heart. Prl 1:15
om.
Confessions Sat. 4.00. SAO cm A
;. o io s oo pm.
Sunday School. 3 to p m.
Discussion Club. Young men of Pariah
Sun. 3:00 pm
Instructions for adulta seeking know-
ledge of the Catholic Church. Mon A
Tburs. at 7.15 t> m
1st. Sat. Devotion, every 1st Sat after
Catholic
>
Unitarian
THE
UNITARIAN
SOCIETY
10.30 a.m.
JWB Armed
Forces Service
Center Library
Balboa. C.Z.
Your invitation
to liberal
religion.
Baptist
NATIONAL BAPTIST CHLKCHka
Panama Baptist. Prayer Meeting Sill
am. Divine Service, 0:30 am. Divina Ser-
vice 7:13 p.m. and Serving of The Lord's
Supper at Both Service Sunday School
SaAB to.
Hoya Baptist. La Boca. C . Divine
Services 11:00 a.m. and 7 JO pm. Serving
the Lard's Supper at both Service Sun-
day School at 1:00 Djn.
Naw Hope. Chiva-Chiva, C.Z.. Divine
Service- Il 00 sm Sunday School a<
1*0 pm
av. B. N. Brown, tftalstcr
GaroDua. L.Z.. Divine Service at 11:00
am. and 7-JO om with Sundsv School
at :0f> om
ay. A. W. Croak. Mtalster
Rio Abalo R.P Sundav School at
*By nm
COCOL1 APTUT CMUBCM,
Building 311 Bruja Road
W. T Pond Jr Factor.
Sunday School .
Preaching Sat i Us
eterna
. hfng Union .
Pleaching Service
BVotberhood 7:00 su
Prayer MeeUng 7*> Weclneaday.
M am
l*M am
3:00 pm
:AA pm.
1M urn.
m. Mondays.
(Listed beiuw arc the Cathout Chuxche
m the Canal Zone and those in the tei -
coinai cities of Panama and Colon whuae
consregaUons are primarily English-
speaking Besides these, the Cathedral In
Panama City, me Cathedral of the 1m-
maculate Conception in Colon, and bum.
erous parish churches in Both cities, wel-
come English speaking visitors. Hv^'gh
their congregauoris are orunaiily Span-
uh-speakuig.1
ST. MARY'S
Balboa
Sunday Masses: :io. A:M. 10:00. 11:00,
12:00 am.
BenedlcUon: 5:00 p.m.
Holy Day Hisses: iM, 1:00. 11 at, 11:51
am
Conlessions: Saturday3:30, :00 pm.
7:00. 1:01 p.m. Thursdays for First
Friday7:00. t:00 p.m.
Miraculous Medal NovenaMonday at
7 00 p.m.
Rosary every evening at 7:00.
SACBED HEART
Ancon
Sunday Masses: :S3. 7:30. t JO a.m.
Holy Days: 5:53. 7:30 am.
Confessions: Saturday3:30. 5:00 p.m
7:00. t:00 p.m. Thursday for First
Friday7:00. I Oo pm.
Sacred Heart DevotionsFriday at 7:00
p.m.
ST. JalAA t
Coeali
Sundav Mass: 3:30 a.m.
Holy Days: 00 am.
CUBUNDU CHAPEL
Curundu
Sunday Mass: 3JO a.m.
Holy Days: 3:45 am.
Confessions: 3:30, 3:00 p.m. Saturdays.
ASSUMPTION
Pedro Miguel
Sunday Mass: 8.30 am.
Holy Days: 30 am.
Confessions: Saturday7:1S, 7:43 p.m.
Rosary: Monday, Wednesday and Satur-
day at 7:00 pm.
Catechism Classes: Sunday-10 30. 11:30
a.m.
ST. JOSEPH'S
Paraso
Sunday Mass: 7:00 a-m.
Holy Days: 3:43 a.re.
Confessions: Saturday3 JO. 4:00 p.m.
Rosary: Tuesday7:00 p m.
Catechism Classes: Sunday10 JO. 11 JO
am.
. VINCENTS
Panama
Sunday Masses: 6:00. 3:30 am.
Holy Days: 6 00, 3:30 a.m.
Confessions: Saturday3:00, 3:00. 7:00.
8.00 p.m.
Before Holy Days: 7:00, 00.
Rosary every evening: 7:00 pm.
ST JOHN BAPTIST DE LA SALLE
Rio Abajo
Sunday Masses: t JO. 8:30 am.
Benediction: 4:00 p.m.
Holy Day Masses: 8:43 a.m.
Confessions: Saturday3 30. 4:30 p.m.
Friday after Miraculous Medal No-
vena.
Miraculous Medal NovenaFriday 7*0
p.m.
Rosar;.: Monday and Wednesday7:00
pm
ST. THERESK'S
Sunday Mass: 7:00 am. Holy Day Mam:
t:4S am. .
Sacred Heart Devotions: Friday -7.00
pm.
Confessions: Saturday3JO. 3:0*. 1:00.
8:00 p.m.
Rosary every evening except Tuesday at
7:00 n m.
COCO SOUTO PLAY SHED
Pastor. Rev Wm. J. Finn. CM
Sunday Mass............... f:43am
Holy Day Mass............. t:00 am.
Sunday School ............. S:45 a.m
Services Thursday nights ... 7:45 am
Cenfasninm Before afaap
CHURCH OP TUB HOLi FAMILY
Marga r i ta, C.Z.
lev. William J. Finn. CM
.......................... t:lf
MIRU 1'I.OtS MEDAL CHUBCB
Naw Cristobal. 4th. A G St
Psstor. Bev. Vincent Ryan. CM
Sundsy Masses. 7. 8 A 10:30 a m
Weekday Mass. f JO em.
Sat.. 3:t0 a.m.
Holy Day Masses. 6:00 A 0:00 a.m.
Confessions. Rosary, nightly 7:00 p.m
Sunday School after the I am. Mus.
Miraculous Medal Novena services -
Mon. 5:00 A 7:00 pm.
1st- Sat Devotion, every 1st. Sat after
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH
Bolivar Highway, Gatun. C.Z.
Pastor, Rev. Francis Lynch. C.M.
Sunday Mass. 8*0 am.
Weekday Masse, Thura. 30 am
Sat. 7:00 a.m.
Holy Day Mass. 7*0 a.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena service -
Mon. 7:15 p m.
1st. Friday. Confession. Communion
7:13 p m
Confessions Sit- tJO A 7:00 pm.
ST THOMAS' CHURCH
Gatun. Near Locks
Pastor, Rev. Francis Lynch, CM.
Sunday Mam, 43 a an.
Weekday Masses. Tuee. A Prl. f 00 am.
Holy Day Mass. :00 a.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena service -
ST VINCENTS CHURCH
Silver City. C.Z.
Pastor. Rev. Raymond Lewis. CM
Sunday Masses. 3:43 A S.At am.
Weekday Mass. * asa.
Holy TJSry Masses. 5:3t A 30 a n>
Sunday School. 11** am.
Miraculous Medal N
Tues., 7.*0 pm.
Baptisms Sun 4*
Confeasions Sat 3 3*. 3** p.m A it
to 8 00 pm.
Instructions tor adults. Tuca. A Frf.
7 JO pm.
1st Sat. Devotion, every 1st Sat after
Mass.
OUR I.ADV OF (.000 COUNSEL
Gamboa. C.Z
Pastor. Rev. Charles Jacobs. CM.
Sunday Masses, 7:00 A 8 JO am.
Weekday Masses, JO am
Holy Day Masse SA A I JO am
Miraculous Medal Novena service
Tues 7:00 p.m.
Sacred Heart Novena service. Prl. i .to
BB1,
Conlesalon Sal. 7.00 pm.
1st. Sat. Devotion, every 1st. Sat. after
Mass.
Christian Scientist
CHRISTIAN MII..MI. till KCHKh
r'irsi Church ol Christ. Scientist Ancm
560 Ancon Boulevard
Sunday 11*0: Wednesday S*t> om
Sundav School t JO a.m
list enarca i Christ, Mcsealssl, cvisional
13th Street A Bolivat Highway
Sunday 11:00 a.m. Wednesday 7:30 pm
Sunday School tJO a.m
Christian Bcleare Society, liambes
Civic Center Building
Sunday II JO a.m. First A Third Wed
-.eaday 7:30 p m.
Sundav School 10:15
10:30 a in Chui^chSor^"^^"
7 JO o m. Solemn Evensong Sermon
WEDNESDAYS:
6 in Holy Communion.
1:30 p m. Evensong and Sermon.
8 30 pre Adult Confirmation Claa.
rHURSDAYS:
8 Dm. Prayei Guild.
FRIDAYS:
g p.m Children's Eucharist
7:30 o m. Choir Practice
SATURDAYS:
10 am Children s Confirmation Class
7 JO D.m Compline angVMedttation
OATUN
91. George's Church
Getun. C.Z.
Rev Solomon N Jacobs
45 a.m. Church School.
A .45 a.m. Morning Prayer.
10:00 am Holy Eucharist and Sermon
Tuesdays:
7*0 am Holy Communion (Also Holy
Oji- and Saints Days.)
Wednesdays:
,' imi p.m Evening Prayer,
8:0fl o m St Vincent' Guild
l :3tl om Choir Rehearsal
rhursdays:
Church ef St Mary The Virgin
Archdeacon Waldock. Priest in Charge
Morning Prayer ........... 8:43 e.m.
Holy Eucharist snd Sermon 7:00 em.
Church School ............. 3:00 pm.
Solemn Evensong ......... 6:00 p m.
Woman's Auxiliary, 2nd Mondays.
Order of St. Vincent Acolite Guild.
Tuesdays.
Vestry Meeting 2nd Thursdays.
Holy Communion. 7 am. Thursday.
Evensong 7:30 p.m.
Homing Prayer. 8 am. Friday, Choir
Rehearsals 8 pm.
BIO ABAJO
St Chrtstepher's Church,
10 St. Paraue Lefevre
Rev. Anteado Ornea S.
ffaea Pean Migad 4-338
Holy Communion......... 7:30 a.m
Sunday School ............ 10:30
Baptisms. 5 to 6 pm. 2nd A 4th Sun-
Evening PrayerBible Study t
1st and 3rd Sundays.
Woman s Auxiliary 2nd A 4th Sundays
7:00 pm
Holy Communion. Wednesdays, 7 a.m.
Episcopal
PH. 7:13 pm.
Mass Sat, 7:15 A 8*0 an
1st Sat Devotion, every 1st Set after
Confe
ROLA FAMILY CHURCH
Margarita. CZ.
Pastor. Rev. William . Finn, CJI.
Sunday Masses. 7J A AJA am.
Holy Oay Mass. to am.
Miraculous Medal Novena service -
Moa 7:00 pm.
tostructions for adults Fri. 7:00 pm
^Confesarse SaL 4 to. to A 7 to u
AM THE CATHEDRAL Oe si LUKE
The At. Rev. R. Heoer Gooden, Bishop
The Very Rev. Raymond T. Ferris. Dear
7:30 a-m. Holy Communion.
30 a.m. Cathedral School.
lt:S Morning Prayer end Sermon.
I First Sundsy of the month Holy Com
reunion and Sermon.)
7*0 p.m.Evening Prayer and Sermon
CRISTOBAL, K.P.
CHURCH OF OUR SAVIOUR
Ad St. near G. Navy
Rev. Milton A. Cookson. Pastoi
Holy Communion 7:30 am
Church School AJO a.re
Morning Prayer-Sermon li.uu am
tH.C. first Sunday In the month I
ounp People's Veapei -Service 4JO
O.m.
Wednesday, Holy Communion 8 JO o m
Chpr Rehearsal 7:30 am.
A Heuse Of Prayer for all people
COCOLI
Church ef 81. Andre
The Rev. Gideon C. Montgomery.
Rev. M. A. Cookson. Chap. USNR
Holy Communion 7 JO a.m
Sunday School t:30 a.m.
Public Worship 10:45 a in
VfLC. first Sunday in ihe month.)
oung Peoples Fellowship 4*0 pm
Choir rehearsal Wednesday evening
at 6:30 p.m
Women's Auxiliary 2nd and 4th rhurs-
days at 7:30 p.m.
House of Prayei and Fellowship ta all
aHaBAA,
^
COROZAL
r.ead Shepherd
The Ven. A. F. Nightengale
7JO am. Every Friday. Morning Pray-
"(H.C 1st Friday, i
GAMBOA
SI. Shawn's Church
Bev. Antonio Oches S.
Pedro Miguel 4-338
Holy Communion .......... 10:30 sm
Sunday School ............. 3.00 p m.
Youth Organixations 3:00 A :00 p m.
Evening Prayer A Bibble
2nd A 4th Sunday ........... 7 JO p.m.
Women's Auxiliary ........ ijg pm.
2nd and 4th Thursday
LA BOCA
St. Peter's Church
Rev. Lemuel B Shirley. Priest
t a.m.Holy Communion.
7 a.m.Choral Eucharist ana Sermon
10 a.m. Morning Prayei end Church
School.
pm-Holy Baptism.
7:30 pm.vespers and Sermon
Communion Tuesdays and Thursdays,
7 sm.. Wednesdays and Fridays A a.m.,
Girls Friendly A and 7 p.m. Monday, t
pm. Tuesday; Vespers nightly at 7, ex-
cept Saturday Compline 7J0 p.m.
MARtiARITA
St. Margaret's Chapel.
Margarita Hospital
The Rev. M A. Cookson
Sunday School t am Evening Prayer
/to p m.
PALO BBCO
Church ef The Holy Comfertet
The Ven. A. F. Nightengale.
Every Mondap 8J0 a.m. Holy Coca
m union.
PARASO
Rev. D. A. Osborne
1.00 a-m. Holy Communion 2nd Sunday
8:30 a.m. Sunday School.
5:30 p.m Evening Prayer: 2nd and ttt)
Sundays.
Monday: 7:00 pre. Youth Meeting
*dnday t JO om. Girls' Friendly
RED TANK
Rev. D.A. Osborne A Rev. C A Crsgwell
11:00 a-m. Holy Communion and See
inon 1st and 3rl Sundaya.
11:1* a-m. Menina Prayei an* add-
raca: And. and 4th. Sundaya.
3*0 p.m Sunday School and Ba
7 JO p.m. Evening Prayer and
2nd. and 4th. Sundaya.
PANAMA Cm
AT. PAsJsVS CHUBCB
A. F. Nightengale. BD MBB
aad The Rev. RiU ResOnald Atwell
VaoanUe Aretideacon
tto am. Holy Caanrnsjiilau 8*0 am
7 to ore >enaarui and Shim
C~"^CoK^i'p*-**
SUNDAYS: "* ""
A am Hoty rtaaaAiBihWi,-
A am. Choral Eucharist and I
Posts, Bases
Arid Stations
PACIFIC SID
Croles taut
FORT AMADOR
Sunday School.................
Morning Worship .............
FORT CLAYTON
Sunday School, Bldg 134 ....,
Morning Worship ..............
FORT KOBBE
Sunday School.................
Morning Worship ..............
12th Station Hospital .........,
ALBROOK A1H FORCE BASE
Bible School ................... A-45
Morning Worship............... 10:45
Youth Group ................... 4:00
Servicemen's Hour.............. 7*0
0.8. NAVAL STATION, RODMAN
Morning Worship ............... iO:5
HQTRS. 15th NAVAL DISTRICT
Morning Worship ............... *:15
Coroza 1 Chapel ........'.........
Catholic
FORT CLAYTON
Daily Mass................ ..
Sunday Masses ......8:00, 8:00 A
I2TH STATION HOSPITAL
Sunday Mass ..................
COROZAL CHAPEL
Daily Mass ..................... 7:30
Sunday Masses ..........3*0 A 8:00
15TH NAVAL DISTRICT
Sunday lust ................... 7:48
U.S. NAVAL STATION. RODMAN
Sunday Man................... AJO
ALBROOK AD FORCE BASE
Dally Mas .................... f JO
Sunday Matate ..........7:45 A 8:45
ALBROOK
Saturday
FORT CLAYTON
Saturday......,
FORT KOBBE
Thursday ___
JWB, Balboa. C.Z.
rriday..........
Jewish
ADS FORCE BASE
ATLANTIC SIDE
Freteetaat
FORT DAVIS
Protestant Warship Service ...... 3:00
FORT GULICK
Sunday School ................
Morning Worship............
COCO SOLO NAVAL STATION
Sundav School ...
Protestant Worship Service ...
Catholic
FORT DAVIS
Sunday Masa.................,
FORT GULICK
Sunday Mas................... 0:00
COCO SOLO
Sunday Masa.................... 8:00
FOR1 GULICK
Tuesday
Jewish
Othei Churches
And Services
BAHA'I CENTER
Apartment 1 Lux Building. 34th Streel
Panama Monday: Lecturer and Dhv
cussidn 8*0 om.
Church ol Jesus Christ ol Laiiei Oa>
. Satuala (Mermen) Balboa CZ
Sunday School 30 am.
Service 10:30 a.m
At JWB Armed Force Services Center
op L Bncp Rned
Evening Service at S p.m. at a place
)f meeting announced at morning ser-
vice.
CHURCH OF CHKIS1
0831 BalOoa Road. Balboa
W Harland Dllbeck. Evangelist
Telephone 2-3802
SUNDAY SERVICES
Bible Clases tot all asas ___ 10*0 am
Preaching and Communion .. 10:45 a m
Preaching and Communion .. 7*0 o to
MIDWEEK SERVICES
Bible Study ...... Wedneeday 1*0 pm
Ladies' Bible Class Thursda 1:43 o.dt
CHURCH OA CHKIST-Olo Crtsteeai
SUNDAYS.
We meet in the American Legion Hal
m from of the Clubhouse
Morning Worship 10:43 em
Visitors welcome
Ladle* Bible Study at Gatun
Phone Gatun It or Ft Gullck to*
CURUNDU PROTESTAS-I
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Chaplain William H Blab
Sunday School ................
Morning Worship...............
Young People's Service ........
Evening Worship ..............
Prayer Meeting Thursday......
Choir Practice. Wednesday et
7:00 ore and Saturday 3:30 a
OLD LArilOI.lt CHURCH
St Eaehsel The Archangel
13th St West No 1
Holy. Eucharist: Sunday at ijo am
Tuesday. Wednesdays end rhursdav
AJO am
Sacrament ol Unction (HeaUng Ser-
vice) First Sunday of each month ai
7:30 o.m
hteual Hsllhetk Christian Chare*
Panama. R.P
HI Bev T Jamen. D O unshoe
offlctentlng
Morning Worship et...... 8*0 ato
Holy Communion at .,...... 3*0 aa
Fellowship Worse* to...... 11*0 a as
We Beading to .......... 3 to om
Divine Service at ....v.... 7*0 a as
to?^atoRW.>":::::: .SSi
Nea-De
Veapaa Service at 8:15 am Sundaya
UBO Out
lama
t


SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER **. 1M1
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAP1


PAGE mm
pacific -Docietu
ff/rs. Carrol . -Kochtr
&, 17, BaLa VA Ba&oa 3521
come. The donation Is $1.00 per
person.
Consul and Sister
Visit m Panama
The Consul of Panama In
Curacao, D. W .1-, Mr. Alvin
Delvalle and his sister, Miss
Vera Delvalle are visiting in
Panama for one week. During
their stay they will be guests
at El Panama Hotel.
League of Lutheran Women
To Hold Meeting Monday
The regular meeting of the
League of Lutheran Women
will be'held Monday at 7:30
p.m. at the Service Center in
Balboa.
All Star Circle Club
To Meet Wednesday
The All Star Circle Club will
meet at the Scottish Rite Tem-
ple in Balboa on Wednesday.
Lunch will be served at 1:00
p.m. and will be followed by
a business meeting. A social
hour will follow.
' '
MISS PATRICIA ELLEN KENEALV
oOo
KENEALY-STELLINGWERP. *
ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
Mr. and Mrs. James N. Nenealy of Los Angeles, Califor-
nia, announce the engagement of their daughter Patrie
Ellen to Sergeant Nicholas C. Stellingworf, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Taeke Stellingworf of Maurice, Iowa.
Misa Kenealy is a graduate
of Balboa Hlgn School and ot
the Canal Zone Junior College.
She also attended Regis Col-
lege in Weston, Massacnuseits.
She is now employed at the
Panama Line Steamship Ticket
Oflice, Sergeant Steilingweri
attenoed Iowa State University
and Is now with the 506th AAA
Operations Detachment at Fort
Clayton. He Is leaving shortly
for Helicopter Pilot School at
Fort Sill. Oklahoma.
The wedding will take place
in Loa Angeles, California fol-
lowing Sergeant Stelllngwerf's
graduation. , ^, J, ^
Colonel and Mrs. Wells
Ta Entertain Tonight.
Colonel and Mrs. Jesse B.
Wells, of Fort Clayton, are en-
trtaixBaU with a small -buffet-
supper this, evening *t 8:30 at
their quarters.
New Teachers Honored
With Buffet-Supper
The American Federation of
Teachers entertained Friday
evening in the Balboa dining
room of Hotel El Panama with
a Duffet^upper In honor of the
new teachers on the Isthmus.
The guests Included the Lieu-
tenant Governor of the Pana-
fra Cana, Calonel- and Mrs.
Herbert D, .Vogel. superinten-
dent jot Schools, Dr. and Mrs.
Lawrence Johnson, Mr. and
Mrs. Forest ,'G. Dunsmoor and
Director of Civil Affairs, Colo-
nel R. Salee, U.S.A. (Ret;
Mrs. Ebey Honored
With Luncheon
Mix Robert Nason enter-
tained with a luncheon at 12:30
today, in the main dining room
of the Hotel Tivoli, honoring
Mrs. Harold Ebey who is leav-
ing in the near future to make
her home in Llca, Peru. Six-
teen guests attended the lun-
cheon.
sister, Miss Carmellna Jime-
nez.
Dean Ferris and Family
Ta Return Monday
The Very Reverend Raymond
T. Ferris, Dean of the Cathe-
dral of St. Luke In Ancon, with
Mrs. Ferris and their daughter,
Margaret, will return Monday
on the S.S. Panama from a
vacatjpn of three months spent
in the United States.
Wife of Ambassador
Vacationing in Costa Rica
Mrs. Alfonso Guzman Leon,
the wife of the Ambassador of
Costa Rica to Panama, left re-
cently for a vacation to be
spent in San Jose, Costa Rica.
Author Is Guest
At El Panama Hotel
Mrs. James Stewart Martin,
of Washington, D.C., the author
of "All Honest Men," arrived
Thursday by plana and will be
a guest at El Panama Hotel for
a week. Mr. Martin Is the for-
mer Chief of Decartellzatlon in
Germany, and his book tells of
his experiences as a "trust-
buster" there. He is in Pan-
ama to gather material for a
new book.
Rrs. Romero To Return
inday from Cuba
Mrs. Arlstldes Romero, who
I has been visiting her parents,
. Mr. and Mrs. .Armando Len-
dian, In Cuba, will return to
Panama by plane tomorrow.
Ambassador and Wife Guests
Of Honor at Luncheon
The newly appointed Ambas-
j sador of Panama to Peru and
Mrs. Anibal Rios, who will soon
[leave for Lima, were enter-
jtalned with a luncheon Thurs-
(day at the Panama Golf Club
(by Mr. Raul Jimenez and his
Secretary of Embassy and
Family Leave for New Post
The Secretary of the Mexican
Embassy in Panama and Mrs.
Armando Gonzales M., left re-
cently for their new post in
La Paz, Bolivia, accompanied
by their children.
Officers Elected at Meeting
Of Army Daughters
Twenty four members at-;
tended the meeting of the So-,
clety of Daughters of the Unit-
ed States Army, Panama Canal:
Chapter, last Tuesday In the,
Driftwood Lounge of the Al-
brook Officers Club.
Each' new member was pre-
sented with an orchid corsage.
An election of officers was
held and Mrs. R. C. Williams
Is the new president, Mrs. Vir-
gil Shaw Is the vice-president,
Miss Barbara Shaw is Junior
president, Mrs. Logan Shutz is
secretary and Mrs. Merrick
Truly Is the new treasurer. Af-
ter the election plans were dis-
cussed for the coming year.
Card Social to be Held
Wednesday Night
Parishioners of the 8acred
Heart. Chapel in Ancon will
hold a Card Social Wednesday
at 7:30 p.m. Refreshments will
be served and prizes awarded
to winners. Everyone Is wel-
Anna Galloway
Chosen Editor
For 'Parrakeet'
The Balboa High School news-
paper, the 'Tarrakeet," has an-
nounced the results of its re-
cent elections for this year's
editorial staff.
Editor-in-Chief Anna Gallo-
way and Associate Editor Kay-
leen Vinton will head the "Par-
rakeet," which Is under the
sponsorship of Miss Mary S.
Brigham.
Others on the staff are:
Make-up Editor. Joan Baron;
Literary Editor, Heliana Filos;
Picture Editor. Leo Romero;
Girls' Sports Editor. Virginia
Sel by; Boys' Sports Editor, Dick
Dillman: Exchange Editor, Bob
Hentchel; and Art Editor, Julene
Page.
The columnists are: Rose-
mary Hollander. Sharon Gar-
rison. Lambert Baxter, Ray
Davldsory.and.Bruce Qulnn.
[oe JLoveliei
than
Sver (Before! II
It's easy! Let us analyze
your hair and your make.
up to see that you'ra doing
complete justice to vour
looks!
SEE OUR EXPERTS
Balboa 3677
Armed Services
YMCA Beauty Salon
(YIWCA Bldg.) Balboa
THIS 18 YOUR INVITATION TO
THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Balboa Heights, C. Z.
Sunday Sept. 30, 151
10:46Morning Worship '
"No Tune to Serve The Lord"
7:10 fvangellst'e Service
"The Man Who Knew How Long He Would Live-
YOUTH CHOIR G08PBLAntK8 TRUMPETEERS
Great Singing by Congregation.
EVERYONE WELCOME
Pastor Beehy-Speaklng HOXO760Radio Outlet
slop worrying...
start tinting!
Don't worry about that
first gray strand! Let it be a
"blessing in disguise" a
signal to you to take action
and do something about ob-
taining lovelier, natural-
looking new haircolor! So
relax and let Roux take
over! For Roux Oil Sham-
poo Tint treatments conceal
every visible strand of dull
or gray hair, give sparkling
highlights and lustre, adds
subtle, natural-looking color
that changes your worry to
delight!
ROUX OIL
SHAMPOO TINT
COLORS CONDITIONS
CLEANSES
Caution: use only as directed
on label.
Ohlrlbulor in ihr KcaaMtc at
US lb* Canal Com
JULIO VOS
No. S "A' Street
Telephone t-t*71 Panam
THREls
JLAIWAVS
ROOM
KRONE
MORE
Air Force Reshuffles
Priority Target List
Schorr's En Route
To New Post
Colonel and Mrs. David P.
Schorr and their daughter Su-
san sailed yesterday for New
York en route to Col. Schorr's
new post at Fort Bragg, North
Carolina. The Schorr's have
been residents of the Isthrr.us
for the past two years.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 29 (UP)
Enemy heavy bomber bases
have been earmarked as top pri-
ority targets in the United States
Air Force's plans for revolution-
ary all-out atomic war.
Second priority targets Include
ammunition and military supply
dumps, railway marshal ling
yards, key bridges, cantonment
areas, troop concentrations In
rear areas and the like.
The destruction of sueh targets
is covered in the military term
"retardation" the slowing of
the movement of enemy troops to
the battle lines.
.A high officer said here to-
day that under the Air Force's
new plans, enemy industrial
cities were dropped to priority
three for atomic bombing.
Top Air Force officers consid-
er the new plan to be revolution-
ary not only owing to the wide
use of atomic weapons, but also
because the first tactical blows
would be struck at enemy troops
far behind the ground battle-
lines.
The Air Force's new plans are
founded on two basic assump-
tions:
1) The United States will
sharply step up the production of
various types of atomic weapons;
2) Russia will not attack the
United States or any of the Al-
lies till the Soviet has accumu-
lated at least 200 or 300 atomic
bombs of Its own. Informed cir-
cles place this time as at least
two or three years from now.
The United States Air Force
will couple Its atomic attacks on
the enemy's heavy bomber bases
with the tightest possible defense
of the United States.
Russia is known to have the
TU-4 bombera version of the
B-2Swhich could reach practi-
cally all parts of the United
States on one-way suicidal mis-
sions.
Because the best possible de-
fense of the United States, com-
prising a radar warning network
working with fast interceptor
fighters, could be expected to
stop only about one-third of an
attacking bomber force, the Air
Force puts top priority on knock-
ing out the enemy's bombers on
the ground at their bases.
This job would fall to the Stra-
teeic Air Command.
From bases in the United
States it could use B-38s and in
time the new B-52 long range jet
bomber.
From bases In Europe and
North Africa, it could use B-29,
B-58 and the new six-jet B-47
medium bombers." ,
The Air Force is also count-
ing on the B-47 to carry a hea-
vy load in the retardation
bombing work. uartieeUrly tUl
there is quantity production If
atom bombs small enough tobe
carried by fighter bombers.
In addition to the job of
knocking out enemy bomber bas-
es, strategic Air Command would
also have the task of hitting in-
dustrial cities.
Air Forces officers are confi-
dent that in time guided missiles
with atomic warheads can be
added to the arsenals of both
Tactical and Strategic Air Com-
mands.
Although the three major mis-
sions have been assigned first,
second and third priorities, the
Air Force would like to have
enough planes, missiles and ato-
mic bombs to carry out all three
tasks simultaneously Imme-
diately after an enemy strikes a-
galast the United States or any
of its Allies.
An officer said today that at
least the first and second attack
missions would be executed sim-
ultaneously so far as numbers of
weapons and planes would per-
mit.
As for the third mission
bombing of industrial Cities
considerable opinion has lately
risen in high quarters that ene-
my industrial cities should be
bombed only us a last resort.
. This opinion is based on two
factors:
1) A moral revolution against
the Inevitable mass slaughter of
civilians;
2) The stupendous and costly
job of post-war rehabilitation;
But the Air Force's strategic
planners still believe the atomic
bombing of enemy industrial
centers Is essential to victory in
an all-out war.
is excellent for
KLIM
era sere
MILK
nrav m rrattranca mrsn over
0|>;. IMItHaC liutnul 1 Or. R.MM.rl
ATTENTION PLEASE!
Save your money for a great occasion:
HAWAII, your reliable Jewelry Store, is going
to have its
9th ANIVERSARY SALE
October 1st with lowest prices ever seen.
IMPORTANT: We are practically giving away
our lamps and Italian crockery due to ths
complete liquidation of that department.
Remember this important date: OCTOBER 1st
SUPER SALE
RLURII
56 CFNTRA.L AVF.
AT
THE
RELIQBl E
JELUELRV
OPEN UNTIL S FJM.
ADJOINING BAZAR ESPAOL
PANAMA'S NEWSTarFMSTlENP[mj\
QttUteaii Ctub
ANNOUNCES a Special Week-End Request
Program by the musical comedy stars that
have taken Panama by storm.
CHARLIE BOURNE
The Master of the Keyboard
and
DON and LOYAL RAYMOND
Who Sang Their Way Into Tour Hearts
TWO COMPLETE SHOWS NIGHTLY
at 10:00 and 1:00 a.m.
Visit Panama's Smart Spot
THE
ZEBRA LOUNGE
CHARLIE at the piano
to play your favorite
request numbers.
"S
D.'NGNG
m THE
BAMBOO ROOM
HECTOfi D0WNE
manag
"^cnEWINC CENTERS
DURING ...a-i-i/
INTERNATIONAL SEWING WEEK
OCTOBER 1 to 6
': ...
M
. A
T
T
R
E
S
S
; E
S

"Charm" "Deepsleep" "Beautyrest"
Different Sizes and Prices.
Easy Payments on All Our Merchandise Home Delivery Service
7th St. Bolvar Ave. No. 6075 Tel. 334 Coln
.

BIRDS EYE QUALITY FOOD FROZEN

. ,
At New Low Prices
Strawberries
-
12 OZ....................
:



Sliced Peachesi6oz .37
Baby Lima Beansi2oz .42
Mixed Vegetables.....................35
Brocalli Cutsiooz....... .38
Brocalli Spearsiooz .43
Rhubarb i6oz......................34
Orange Juice v .34
Cut Corn iooz-...................................30
Succotash uoz .37
Caulifloweriooz .40
Brussel Sproutsiooz .47
Cut Green Beans .......................35
Fordhook Lima Beans .44
Chopped Spinach "z .34
Asparagus Spears i2z .61
Peas and Carrots i2oz .32
Green Peas i2z .35
FROZEN FOOD HEADQUARTERS
PANAMA'S ONE STOP

t

v#*.^SJ

,-. a
m
ya
- -
i .


- M
'
-
Shopping Center
For Home Delivery Call 3-0034
15th and Via Belisario Porras Qolf Club Road
P. A. CLASSIFIEDS
KtAtk


PAGf SIX
THE PANAMA AMKK1CAN AN INDEi >'l)r NT DAILY NEWSPAPER
ll.J41.li-_--
You Sell em... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Leave your Ad with one of our Agents or our Office
KWIS SERVICE
NO. 4 Tlvo" *\.
h.-t :-::u
.lOSK'" DF. LESSEES
rtro.ll *' I.HH
T r.n.m.
MORRISON'S
No. 4 PeurtH of Jul) Av.
Phone 2-9441.
BOTICA t'ARI.TON
I .IS* M!nlei Avt.
fhtnt J.;-Colon
SAI.ON DE BELTEZA AMERICANO
No. v-, nest 13th Strerl
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
No. 47 "H" MM-Panam
No. 12,175 Central Ave.Colon.
SOP
Minimum for
12 words
3c. each additional
word.

MISCELLANEOUS
0 *fM etlahiat re>onsr
Writ Akohtlitt Aaeeyraeat
2031 *" C. t.
FOR SALE
VlllOMlol>il( -
Whotever you desire to sell Or buy
includ.nfl your automobile, con-
tuit first with:
A6INCIAS COSMOS S. A.
Automobile Row No. 29
Telephone 2-4721
Open II doy on Saturdays.
Margarita Nursery School. Informa-
.... "lion cill Cristobel 3-1701. 3-
1403.
TROPICAL MOTORS with the
desire to serve their many friends
r.d customers with best available
workmanship; announces that we
have just contracted the services
of MR. LEOPOLDO DE LEON,
oo.) expert, who was formerly
the Shop-Foreman of Henry J
Vcung's Garage.
FOR SAL!:. .1949 Chevrolet Coupe
color block, only $400.00 down
one1 drive way. Your Ford deal
r. Coloen Meten Inc. On Auto-
mobile row. Tel. 2-1013 2-
1036.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
U I C K
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Paredes
Ponom 2-0600
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE9 cu. Ft.
trigorotcr, latest n
Trap St.. Curundu-
Kerosene re-
lOdel. 701-C.
C. Z
FOR SALE 1950 Cadillac "62" 4
Door. Perfect condition, low mi-
leage. Call Albrook Exchange,
Ext. 3203.
FOR SALE:Bargain 1950 Buick
Super. Perfect shape, new looking.
Best offer. 2104-B. 5th St. Cu-
rundu.
FOP. SALE: States bedroom set.
wicker choirs and desk, steel bea
with mottress. electrical applian-
ce:. Morris chair, miscellaneous
household effects. House 205. Bol-
boo Heights. Phone 2-1662.
FOR SALE:Washing machine 25;
Cycles. $120.00. new, has been!
used five times, reason for selling
moving. Coll Ft. Kobbe 6272.1
Houe 605-B.
FCR SALEMahogany bedroom sef
8 pieces. Phone Panama 3-0745.
Saturday after 7 p, m. or Sun-
day, between II o. m. 12.
FOR SALE:New 3 sectional sofa,
modern grey finish mohogony,
turquoise green, inner spring, loose
cushions. Sold secticnolly, S145-
C0 Quarters 131-8. Albrook
FOR SALE:1949 Buick Super 4
door teden. Dark blue, radia,
faad tire, now teat covert. Thii
car ii a tteal. Only $500.00
dawn. Your Ford dealer. Colpen
Matan, Inc. On outomobile raw.
Tal. 2-1033 2-1036.
FOR SALE:1948 Pontiac Convert-
ible Hydramatic, Radio. Duty paid
Coll Bolboo 2-6319.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Sara
$250.00
Laica camera with 1.5 lent
(atead $475.1/ lirti
$244.50
Internotionol Jewelry
(adj. Int. Hotel 1
RESORTS
FOSTER: Cottages for rant by
day. week or month between Santo
Claro ond Rio Hoto. Tal. 2-3142
or tee care taker. ,
Miguel Hive.
CASINO SANTA CLARA:Cobins,
' food, swimming. No reservations
necessary.
office
Com-
C. Z.
Williams Sonto Cloro Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms. Fngidaires, Rock-
gas ranges. Bolbou 2-3050.
Bids will be received in the
of the General Manager,
missary Division- Mt. Hope,
until 3:00 p. m., Wednesdoy, Oe-;'" r
tober 17. 1951. when they will *?* Oeewislde
be opened in public, for furnish-
ing 465,000 pounds, or alterna-
tively 232.500 pounds of Fina (romiicrVt
Granulated Sugar.* Forms of pro-
posol. with full particulars, moy
be otbained in the office of tha
Supply Or Service Director, Balboa
Heights, or of the General Man-
ager. Commissary Division, Mt.
Hope, C. Z.
cottages, Sonto
Claro Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Ponomo 3-1877, Crijtobol 3-1673
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
FOR SALE:1949 Mercury Convert-
ible Coupe, celer yellow- black
tap. White tidewall tires, plastic
eat cavers. Only $550.00 down.
This is a clean car. Yaur Ford
dealer. Colpon Motors Inc. an Au-
tomobile raw. Tal. 2-1033 2-
1036.
FCR SALE:White electric consola
sawing machine. 100 dollars, with
' buttonhole attachment. Large
Schwinn cVke Iboy's' $10. Detec-
" to babv scales. $4.00. Livingroom
9 x 12 rug ond 4 scatter rugs to
*ratch 5IO.CO. One floor lamp, 3
' dollars. Tel. Navy 2242.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
BUICK
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Paredes
Panama 2-0600
BUY OF THE WEEK. 1949 Nash
Ambassador, rodio, 4 new tires.
Perfect condition. Priced to sell
fast. Leaving on October 5th.
House 5433-C. Endicot Street,
Diablo. After 6 p. m.
WANTED USED CARS
10 need used cart wanted at trade
int an Naw Romblen thii month.
NASH AGENCY
One black from Tivoli creating
FOR SALE:1940 2 Door Plymouth
Sedan. $275.00. Apply Box 3090,
Ancon'.
fCR SALE:Double -.et Guotemalon
li\:ngrccm $17500. Combination
* vowing and writing desk $35.QO,
'""Sunbeam mixn-aster $20.00. May- '
taa De Luxe washing mcchine. CO
eyeie. $14000. 86-5216.
FOR SALE:Buick Super, 3,000
miles. 2 door Sedonette, duty
paid. Owner leaving. Inquire Ho-
tel Tivoli, ask for Mrs. Morvin.
FOR SALE :_Over tuffed Sofa. anc1
' choir with 2 sets of slip cover';
occosinnol chair, end tcble. Al
brook 5221. .......
Res.
..FOR SALE:General Electric wah-
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
BUICK
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Paredes
--rcrr ' ftfOO
FCR
SALE. 1949-50-51 Chev-
nt-. .: Or. Fleetline Dr.
i-6-c- d> newl Tight side. misc.
par'- inrh moior--ootpr wheel
FOR SALE-Aquorium, 20 gol. ca-
pacity. Stainless steel frame, 1 -4"
piole glass sides. Positively leok-
proof. Swordtoils, platys, scavang-
er fish, with weed balanced green-
ery and snails. Complete $35.00.
Coll 6-149 or see 124-A, 6am-
bco
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS STRUCTURES FOR SALE
For sale to the highest bidder,
Buildings Nos. 315, 322, Ancon;
184 Pedro Miguel; 1053. 1055.
1064 Cocoli; 4001, 4016. 4018,
4020, 4022. 4024. 4026. 4028.
3343. 4027. Camp Bierd; and 862
Balboa. Sealed bids will be received
in the office of the Superintendent
of Storehouses at Balboa until 10:
30 A. M.. October 15. 1951, when
they will be opened in public. Forms
of proposal with full particulars may
be secured in the offices of the Su-
perintended of Storehouses, Bolboo.
end the Housing Managers ot Bal-
boa. Pedro Miguel. Cocoli, and
Cristobol.
Sonta Cloro beoch-
cotroges. Electric ice boxes, got
stoves, moderate rates. Phono 6-
541 or 4-567
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT: Modern, wall venti-
loted cholet, two bedrooms, mold's
room, garage, etc. Vio Espaa.
No. 2024 above Juan Franco,
$130.00. Miguel Hive, phone 3-
4844.
FOR RENT: Completely furnished
one bedroom concreta cholet, all
modern improvements, on Pon
American highway, 8 1 -2 miles
to ferry, sign at driveway. John-
son.
FOR RENT:Recently furnished re-
sidence: livingroom,' diningroom,
office- pantry, kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, maid's room, yard, ga*bge
Rent $275. Tel. 3-3143.
DON'T STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL.
VERTAGREEN
3-Way Plant Food
it cheaper than water
fei it
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC
279 Central Ave. .Tel. 3-0140
Should you decide to buy or toll
any of vour Holding
Piense contact
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hoi-i El Panam
Phones: .1-471 3-144(1
Today we have orders to buy
Breweri. Clay Product! and
Panam Cerne!.
Come lo Tampa, Florida for vaca-
tion or for good. I can help yon to
buy or rent houiei, properly, orante
(revet, chicken firnu, hotels, etc..
at all prices and terms. If Interest-
ed write to Herman Kleefkeni, c/0
Geerae W. Blades, Baal Batata Brok-
en, 444 Franklin Street, Tantea X,
Florida.
MEMBERS OF THE ALBROOK AFB WOMEN'S CLUB covered a week's travel In on dav nn
Wednesday when they flew to the San Bias via COPA plane In an excursionconducted by W
S. K. Trapnell of Panama Tours. They visited four Islands In the archipelago The irouo In-
cluded the Mesdames Bess Kiel. Dorothy Faulds, Jane Popkin, Ethel DeUInter JuUe iBallwtt
Jane Plnder. Kitty Thompson. Joan Mayforth, Jane Bush. Tuddie Cummlnts Marlorte Strvkei'
Charlotte Booth, Helen Sensing, Nadene Legg, Leda Clemence, Lee PoweU Bea Derek Evei
Dick, Shlrlev Butler. Idolene Clarke and Betty Jones. "' Bea Drc"' Evelyn
1 - 11 1 , FOR RENT
Apartment
Baby orchid corsoges. bouquets air
mailed onywhere USA. Also local
oelivery. Potted palms, .plants
sold cheop. Moudry's Orchid Gor-
aen. Telephone Cristobol 1033,
Panama 3-0771.
?
FOR SALE:Furniture misc. house-
hold. Ford Coupe 1939 (6. c.)
House 655-B. Curundu Hgts. 83-
4222.
ing mac.nine.
.' been used 5 times. Reoson for
-"telling leov.no. Telephone Ft
* "Kebb* 6272 House 605-B.....
-FOR SALE:Mohogony living, dining
ond bedroom set, One gos' stove.'
Phone 836254, Curundu. House
No. 2042-A.
5 cycle, ne,v,..HqsComple^w"h.,.ire- 86-.526
FOR SALE: 1948 Buick Sedan
b!-:'' with whit sidewoll tires.
. .ri_,>. ..-,----------- Perfect con-
dition. Coll 2-3446 for porticu'ars
FOP SALE: Porceloin 9 cu. ft.
Westmghouse ice box case'. $35.-
00. Phone Gatun 378.
FOit SALE:-Diningroom set'$25.-
-, 00. 7.4 cu. ft. Frigidoire $100.00.
Stools 0.50 each. Kitchen uten-
. ils. 1951 Mircury 6 Pas. Coupe.
2,000.00. Plants. Bedroom set.
. -House 170. 5th St. New Cristobol.
'for
Nc. 3.
^c to 1939. B.250 00
0 Baterios Purru. 21 Street
FOR SAL:1950 Mercury 6 pas-
senger coupe, light-green, radio.
overdrive, leatcaveri. goad tire!
only $625.00 down. Mutt be teen
to appreciate. Yaur Mercury deal-
er Celpon Maters Inc. an Auto-
mobile Row. Tel. 2-1033 2-
1036.
SALE: Universal tw!n or
bunk beds, with spring and mot-
tresses. dresser with stool, deck
with choir. $100.00. Curundu.
2150-C.
Help Wonted
OrVANTED:Cosk and housekeeper.
Must sleep residence. Apply from
3:00 to 4:00 p. m. 46 East
-' Street. Edificio Riviere Apart-
ment A.
i WANTED:Shop foreman for mo-
dem garage. Must be capable me-
chanic with sound background ond
good references willing to work
uto new busineis. Write Box 879.
Ponamo.
FCR SALE:Bu.ck 41. new tires,
duty paid in excellent condition,
$1,000. Tel. 3-2737.
Wanted Position
POSITION WANTED:Architectural
droftman. field supervisor, fomilior
with accounting and office pro-
cedures, oble to manage construc-
tion materiel, warehouse. Write G
Bex 759. Colon.
WANTED
MiftcellaneoiiB
Stomps wanted, clean accumulations
V collections. Write description
tc. Corlbbeon Stomp Club. Sox
465. Aneen.
WANTED:Smoll unfurnished room
With privte entronco Ond both-
roevn odfoinirp. Residential see-
flon. Te!. 3-1276.
JOB TO MATCH
SPOKANE, Wash. (UP 1 Henrv
J. Kaiser took a Job as a drafts-
man at the Henry J. Kaiser plant
here. Draftsman Kaiser, no rela-
tion to the Industrialist, said It
was "just a coincidence"that
he came here for a change In
climate.
The) need of a
got you
;W# pay cash to the best price for
iurrant account c.--.-i.:t of tha F -
'-tioj Bonk. Tebj(.:i;ne 3-0171
* ' Pueble. Mr. Lcmbcrc.-
Owt gentle
relief in 2
hours with
sparkling,
dint
SAL HEPTICA
Sealed bids, in triplicate, will be re-
ceived in the office of the En-
gineering & Construction Direct-
or, Panoma Canal Company, Bol-
boa Heights, until 10:00 a. r
November 27, 1951. ond then
' opened in public, for preparation
of site ond construction of pave-
ments, utilities, and buildings for
townsite extension at Silver City
South. Canal Zone. Bid sche-
dules, forms of proposals, sped-
ficotiins. ond full particulars may
be obtained from the Office of
the Contract ond Inspection Di-
vision. Room 336- Bolboo Heights,
("Telephone 2-3739). Specifica-
tions ond drawings will be is-
sued on a deposit of $40.00 per
set. Deposit will be forfeit If
specifications and drawings are
not returned within 30 days after
opening of bids.
FOR SALE:Ga~s~ Move. $8000.
Other furniture. Cor, S500. 13th
ond Melendez. "Santo Isabel"
Building, Apt. 24. Colon.
ALHAMBRA APARTMINTS
Modem furnished-unfurnished eport
ment. Contact office No. 8061, 10th
St. Naw Cristobol. Phone 1386. Co-
lon.
FOR RENT:For $80.00 two room
aportmant, living ond diningroom,
ate. Apply Via Espaa No. 106,
across El Panamo Hotel.
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM -BUILT
SUpcoTpr Reupholstery
VISIT OUR SHOW-BOOM!
Alberto Heret
J. P. de la Oeta 77 (Automobile Bow)
Free Batlatatet Pickup A Delivery
Tel. 3-4428 t:M a.m. to 7:H p.m.
FOR RENT: Two-bedroom opart-
ment in Bella Vista. Call Pon-
omo 2-2064, 9 to 12 i. ei.
FOR SALE:Home bar ond four
stools ond cooler, porch swing,
chair, steel cocktail table. 1515-
A. Akee St. Balboa. C. Z. Phone
Balboa 2-2316. All day Sunday
and Monday.
FOR SALE: S X 71 Hallicroftor,
rece/er $100.00, floor model,
electric ironer, needs point. $25.
00. Coll 86-6232.
FOR RENT:Aportment one large,
one moll bedroom, litting-din-
ingrocm, kitchen, both, at No. 9,
44th Street Eosf Bello Vitto, sea
De Castro. B Avenue No. 24.
phone 2-1616, Ponomo.
FOR RENT:Aportmant I bedroom,
sitting-diningroom, kitchan, both.
at No. 20. Vio Espaa. Castro. B Avenue No. 24, phone
2-1616.
FOR RENT:Nice furnished opart-
ment. Military Inspected. Infor-
mation Vio Porras 97.
FOR RENT:Z bedroom apartment.
Recently built maid's room, gar-
age. "D" street El Cangrejo, near
Hotel El Panama. Tel. 2-0313
3-0460.
FOR RENT
Room*
FOR RENT:Cool and clean fur-
nished room with meals if desired.
No. 34, 45th Street. Telephone
313921.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:Babbsey Twins and
other young people's books at 20
cents; odults $3 ond $4 books of
50 cents. Scooter for $3. Pho-
nograph records cheap. Skinner.
613-A Ancon Boulevard near gas
stotion.
FOR SALE: Metol desk, dining-
room lamps, reproducer ond .tone
orm. Phono motors, Obsolete ra-
dios, ice box cop. 300 Lbs. Elec.
repoirs. 164 Calidonia.
FOR SALE:Beautiful length, dork
brown, fur coot, used only twice.
$95.00. 1409-D. Carr St. Bol-
boa, Mrs. Brown.
FOR RENT:2 bedroom apartment,
livingroom, diningroom, porch,
garoge. Hispano Building, No. 3,
Colombia Street.
POR SALE:$22500. tmall piano.
Excellent condition. 3rd. of Nov-
ember Sf. No. 5. downttoir.
tip -
MY r."-csiis ot
Uft' '3. Tt I, Vet I
>. .cirb- ..j V-io.
s
efw/vetMnf.
Likens Fish Pond
To Pasture Land
SHERMAN. Tex., Sept. 29 (UP)
A farm pond resembles a pas-
ture In many ways, according to
Bob GlllesDie, a conservationist.
Fish in a properly stocked
pond, like cattle In a pasture that
U not over crazed, will be fat and
healthy, Glllesple said. Both cat-
tle and fish will lose weight and
ue we?.!: If there's Isn't enough'
ood to go around.

FOR SALE: Heavily built motor
toiler "Crusoe" 32' x 8 1-2' x
3 1-2', fit, pine, mahogany; four
bunks, large cockpit, emergency
tiller, naw sails, refrigeration;
equipped for outriggers and fish-
ing choir; licensed for tan. Six
cylinder gray marine, 73 H.P.,
fresh water cooled. Leaving, sacri-
fice. $2,650.00. J. V. McGimsay,
Panama Canal Yacht Club. Phone
3-1983 (Cristobal!.
New Auto Painters
Union Sets $5 Limit
On Repair Estimate
A group of some 60 Panama
City auto bodywork men and
painters met last Tuesday night
at the Balboa Garden and
formed the Auto Painters
Union, aimed at getting more
uniform prices from local In-
surance companies and overall
better working conditions.
Walter F. Drakes, local body-
work man who issued Invita-
tions for the meeting, was
elected provisional president of
the group.
During the course of the
meeting, which preceded a buf-
fet, the men agreed that a $5
fee would be charged for mak-
ing estimates on repair Jobs.
This Is aimed particularly at
eliminating alleged badgering
by local Insurance companies.
A committee of three was
appointed by the new union
to draft a constitution and by-
laws. The committee is com-
prised of B. Grant, G. Warren
and R.. Morrell.
FOR SALE: 22 foot unsinkable
stee Cabin Cruiser, with brand naw
Universal Marina Motor and all
equipment. Call 2-3446 for par-
ticulars.
FOR SALE:25 foot Cris Craft. New
V8 engine. Fully converted. See
the "Amber" 530 Cristobol Yacht
Club. Call Benson at Curundu
7194 or 446 Colon.
FOR SALE:19 foot launch in good
condition. Ford V8 motor in per-
fect condition, $500.00 Coll
Amador 3139 or Kobbe 4282.
THERE is No Substitute
for Ouality
GENERAL PAINTS
Dixie Division
Off On War Games
FT. JACKSON. 8. C, Sept. 20
(UP)The 31st (Dixie) Division
was off to North Carolina war
games today.
The first echelon of the divi-
sion got underway here early
this morning for Camp Mackall,
N. C, and October maneuvers.
By next Thursday, all but 439
of the Division's men will have
left. The remaining 425 will
stay here as a rear guard ele-
ment for the Division.
All maneuvrelng elements of
the division will start first field
exercises at Camp Mackall
Oct. 8.
C.ommunists Claim
NeW Cork Supply
HONG KONO. Sept. 29 (UP)
Communist China is now pro-
ducing Its own cork, the Shan-
ghai News claimed.
The paper said that China for-
merly had to Import cork from
Spain, Portugal, Italy and France
at a cost of $200,000 annually In
foreign exchange. Last year, how-
ever, corkwood trees were dis-
covered growing in Shensi and
Kansu provinces a swell as hr
Shantung and Klangsl which
proved to be "of high quality."
The report said the cork Is be-
ing manufactured Into sound-
Sroof boards, cold storage lnsu-
itlon and Hie preservers.
Mrs. Frances Jones
To Be Buried
Sunday Afternoon
Mrs. Frances Jones, 79-year-
old native of Jamaica, died
Thursday at 11:30 a. m. follow-
ing a lingering illness.
Funeral services have been
set for Sunday afternoon at
3:30 p. m. at the Seventh Day
Adventist Church of Cabo Ver-
de. From there the cortege will
continue to the Pueblo Nuevo
Cemetery where the burial will
take place.
Mrs. Jones Is an Isthmian old-
timer, having migrated to this
country 40 years ago Decem-
ber 31, 1811. She Is survived by
two daughters. Mabel Jones and
Mrs. Olive Jones Cumberbatch,
plus eleven grandchildren and
two great grandchildren.
1st Dinosaur Bones
Found In Texas Fit
TEXARKANA, Tex., Sept. 2
(UP>Anthropologists are exult-
ing over the first positive proof
that the mighty dinosaur once
inhabited the Red River area
along the Arkansas-Texas bor-
der.
The first dinosaur bones ever
to be taken from the area have.
| been found north of New Bos-
ton, Tex., in a gravel pit exposed
by low water in the Red River.
The fossils, apparently those of
some grass-eating species, have
been taken over by the Strecker
Museum of Baylor University,
Waco, Tex.
Prof. Bryce C. Brown, assistant
curator, said the river probably
washed the bones onto the grav-
el bed after sweeping over what-
ever unknown deposit holds the
prehistoric reptile's full skeleton.
The man who made the actual
discovery of the important fossils
is Harget Ellis, who said he had
been collecting such bones "for
years.'' He happened to show
some of them to a Texarkana at-
torney and the attorney contact-
ed Baylor scientists.
Ku KIux Klan Challenges
Jaycee To Public Debate
LEESVILLE, S. O. Sept. 29
(UP)Two Ku Klux Klan bosses
said today the challenge to the
president of the North Carolina
Junior Chamber of Commerce
to debate with Klan leaders still,
holds.
South Carolina Klan head
Thomas L. Hamilton of LeesvUle
and Bill Hendrlx, top man of
the Florida Klan, said a speak-
ing will be held as scheduled
tonight at Whiteville, N. C. and
they said President Harry
Stewart of the North Carolina
Jaycees Is expected to appear
and answer the challenge.
The North Carolina Jaycees
branded the Klan as "Un-
American" several weeks ago.
Hamilton threatened to brin
suit if the Jaycees statement
were not retracted.
The Jaycees have not re-
tracted, and Stewart has not
said he would accept Hendrlxs
challenge to debate at the
Whiteville meeting.
Hamilton today also branded
as untrue a report that he lam-
basted a press photographer at
a recent Klan rally at Marion.
The Carolina Klan boss said
the only, photographers at the
last two Klan meetings were
State Constabulary men.
"Press photographers a r
welcome at all Klan rallies In
this state," Hamilton said.
POPULAR GOLF COURSE
MIDDLEBORO. Mass. (UF.)
For four weeks m a row, local
golfers shot holes In one at the
municipal golf course here. Three
of them came on the 177-yard
17th hole.
Newcomer Will Again Head
March Of Dimes Campaign
With Zonians
In the Service
(Isthmians with family
members or friends In the
U. 8. Armed Forces are urged
to contribute to this depart-
ment by mailing data to the
Zone Serviceman's Editor,
The Panama-Amerlean. Box
134. Panama. R. P. Informa-
tion as to servieemen'a
whereabouts, their promo-
tions and excerpts from their
letters are of particular in-
terest.)
at r
NEW YORK. N.Y., 8ept. 29
Hon. F. K. Newcomer, Governor
of the Canal Zone, for the fourth
consecutive year will head the
March of Dimes In his area This
was disclosed today by Basil O'-
Connor, president of the Nation-
al Foundation for Infantile Par-
alysis.
As 1953 March of Dimes chair-
man, Governor jewcomer will
coordinate the fund-raising acti-
vities of city campaign directors
In the Zone.
In announcing Governor New-
comer's appointment, O'Connor
said the Zone Chairman was as-
suming his post at one of the
most critical moments In the Na-
tional Foundation's history.
"The March of Dimes," O''
Connor declared, "has not kept
pace with the march of polio.
"During the last three years
that polio has been on the up-
surge," he added, "the National
Foundation has ended each year
in debt. That is why we must
launch the 1962 March of Dimes
on January 2 Instead of January
19, doubling the usual two-week
period of the campaign.
"We must have unprecedented
help In this next appeal of ours
and we hope, therefore, that ev-
eryone in the Canal Zone who
can contribute his time and ef-
fort will contact his local March
of Dimes office to volunteer for
the coming drive. I know Gover-
nor Newcomer will provide the
kind of leadership so desperate-
ly needed at this time."
time later, was promoted to Brl-I
gadier General. Army of the Uni-
ted States.
He became Governor of the Ca-
nal Zone in 194.
In

M "
-au*
MAYS
ROOM
poftone
MORE
ZA
A veteran of World Wars I
and II, Governor Newcomer
was awarded the Distinguished
Service Cross. He served as As-
sociate Professor of Mathema-
tics at the United state* Mili-
tary Academy from 1919 to
1924.
Subsequently, he was District
Engineer, in Charleston, South
Carolina and District and Corps
Area Engineer In Boston.
In 1928 he was Assistant Chief
Engineer, Federal power Com-
mission, and three years later
was made Battalion Command-
er, 3d Engineers, Scofield Bar-
racks. Hawaii. In 1933 he was
transferred to Fort Leavenworth
and was attached to the Office of
the Chief Engineers In 1935-'39
during which time he was promo-
ted to the rank of Lieutenant-
Colonel.
J. A student in the Army War
College, Class of 1940. Governor
Newcomer served as Assistant to
the President, Mississippi River
Commission and while on duty
two years later as Engineer, Third
Army. San Antonio, he was pro-
moted to Colonel. He was Chief
Engi n e e r. China-Burma-India
Theater. January 1943 to April
1944. The next month he was
made Engineer of Maintenance.
The Panama Canal, and a short
MIDSHIPMAN, NROTC, EV-
ERETT G. S. DILLMAN. son of
Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Dlllman of
818-X Crotn Street. Balboa,
Canal Zone, stands a look-out
watch as part of his training
aboard the destroyer USS H. J.
Ellison In the Atlantic.
(US. Navy Photo)
COSTS MORE TO DIE
PAYSON. Utah (U.P.) Pay-
son residents, along with the rest
of the nation, have watched with
dismay the rise in the coat Of
living. Now they have the bad
news that the cost of dying Is on
the Increase too. Charges for pre-
paring graves In the city cemet-
ery were boosted from $14 to $30.
ARGENTINE
REVOLT LEADER
(Coatlnued from Page 1)
El Palomar fell Into the hands of
Government troops after brief
skirmishessome artillery fire
was used against the rebels St
El Palomar.
But Punta Indio resisted long-
er and the government had to
send forces from the Rio Santia-
go naval base, near La Plata, to
take it.
An Air Ministry communique
said that as soon as the revolt
became known steps were taken:
"1) To eliminate totally from
the skies the few rebel planes
which flew over Buenos Aires;
"2 To eliminate on the ground
the rebel planes which had flown
to the naval air base at Punt*
Indio."
The Air Ministry aid these eli-
minations were carried out bv
Gloster Meteor jet fighters and
Avro Lincoln heavy bombers,
both Brltlsh-bullt types.
There had been rumblings o
military disaffection for Pern
for several months.
Col. Jos Francisco Surez and
MaJ. Juan Aquilea Deteo, both re-
tired, were reported arrested
June 30, with 11 civilians, on
charges of plotting to overthrow
the Government, i
On Aug. 14. all private civilian
planes were barred from flights
over greater Buenos Aires and
from approaching the coast
without previous permission, un-
der penalty of being shot down.
At the same time, the Interior
Ministry said steps had been tak-
en to suppress possible opposition
terrorism In connection with the
Presidential campaign.
The Presidential elections, or-
iginally scheduled for Feb. 24,
1952, were advanced to Nov. 11,
1951.
Since early this year there
have been reports of arrests of
opposition leaders, closings of
opposition newspapers and of-
ficial claims of an "Interna-
tional conspiracy" against the
Government.
larly In August Pern Invoked
wartime emergency powers to
place the entire railway network
under military rule following a
series of bombings of railway in-
stallations and the second at-
tempt within a year to stage gen-
eral railway strikes.
Sources outside Argentina be-
lieved yestefday's uprising stem-
med from the Army's opposition
to Pern's wife, Evita.
(Madame Peron was asked re-
cently by the labor organization
to run for Vice President on the
ticket of her husband In Novem-
ber's national flections.
(After considering the labor
organisation's request for some
time. Madame Pern announced
with tearsthat she would not
be a candidate.
(It was generally believed she
withdrew because of the strong
opposition of elements In the Ar-
gentine Army to having a woman
in public officeparticularly in
a position where she might one
day become the Army's com-
mander in chieij
rj"


SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER W, 1*.
OK PANAMA AAOCR1CAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEfRN
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNIO >ND PubtilKlD av TM1 PANAMA AMSMlCAN MU*. INC.
POUN0I0 V NILMh POllNBtVILL IN Kit
HARMODIO AMIAS. COITOP
17 h Strict P O Bo '34. Panama P. o P
TciiPMONt Panaka No J-074O B tlN|t>
CAIll AOOPtaa PANAMKBICAN. PANAMA
Colon omic>: <2 i7B Ccntpai avenui pitwiin POPIISN HtPPIAlNTAT.lVia- JOSHUA PCrVERS. ,INC.
14S MADISON AVI NIO YORK. I 17 N V
i.OCAl IV MA'l.
PIP MONTH. IN """ "*0 t 3.80
POP IK MONTH*. IN a""""- B BO 13.O0
POP on va im ""* IB SO 24 00
Walter Winchell
In New York
MAN ABOUT TOWN
I
The tragedy overlooked by tbc papis in the walkout of book!*
iirry Gross, which freed 18 of the accused cops: Detective Fana-
reila, who committed suicide (rather than stand trial), would
. e been frfea- too. .Balletmaster Balanchlne't marriage to
ballerina Tanaqull LeClerq will be his 5th to a ballerina. The ex's
re Tmara Geva, Alexandra Danilova, Vera Zorina and Tallchief
...Lana Turner and Cy Howard are Movietown's hideaway rom-
ance of the week...Joan MeCracken, the dancing dervish, told
nubcrt Alley pals her merger plans have oops'd.. .Scott Brady
and Dorothy Malone of the Mockmbo-Clro's set will announce
their betrothal in a fortnight.. Franchot's Intimates report that
f."lr! f,ce WM P"hed In and "there was no nose at all!". .
Neva Patterson, leading lady of "Lac* on Her petticoat," and
producer M. Ellis are far past the hand-holding stage. ..Aren't
Marie (My Friend Irma) Wilson and actor Bob Falln secretly
sealed?.. Elisabeth Taylor made a present of Stanley Donen to
starlet Marlon Marshall. Jane Wyraan and Jndd Downing, tht
barrister, are a new Dally Double.. Gilbert Roland proposed to
Dons Duke via a signed document pledging no part of her mint.
New York cabbies meet at the Hotel Diplomat on Oct. S to
unionize via United Auto Workers Union. This Is the first that
big fleet owners know of it...The N. Y. Times Is expected to
endorse Rudy Halley...Roy Howards ax Is about to fall (as ln-
o lea ted here last Spring) on 3 top salaried news men... Ex- Am-
bassador Gerard's will Is expected to be about 60 mlllllon...
Riker's Island (where gambler Frank MUllonerlckson is Jailed)
hused an attempted prison break.. .Barbara Hutton. who gave
up her U. 8. citizenship to wed a title, applied for re-instatement
last May. Did she ever get it back?.. .Confirming the colyum's
reconciliation Item of last Spring, the Vladimir Horowitzes (of
the concert field> sailed together. ..What's all the to-doodle about
Harlem's Billy Rowe being named 7th Deputy Police Comm. "be-
cause he isn't qualified"? Mayor O'Dwyer created the post for
his chauffeur!
Labor INews
And
Comment
In Our Time?
By Victor Kiesel
Washington social circles buss that Martha Rountree, th
prop, of Meet the Press" and "Leave It to the Gels," will marry
titled rich furriner. Mebbe this Winter.. .Joe Louis has $80,000
troxen in London banks. Marlene Dietrich has I400.0W. The*
ran take It out via British goods. "What'll I do with all that
stuff?" groans Joe.. .Carole Sawyer, who thrushes in "Two on the
Aisle," married Arthur Dupler, a student.. .Mrs. Peter Shaw (An-
il ela Lansbury) expects her final citizenship papers and her first
image around Yuletude...Summer Welles, the diplomat, requests
denials every time they print It, but the Mayfair crowd sav he
will merge with Harriet Post when her decree Is final from Em-
merich von Jesecsky. ..Paris gossip insists that N Y. Post prop.
Dorothy Schiff will marry oilman Rudulph Sonnerbora.
"The Story of the N. Y. Times" by M. Berger looks like the-'top
newspaper book In publishing history. The tribute to that paper
on page 565 was composed by a Tribune man...George L. Hart-
ford carries on as sole trustee of AA:P. which grassed over 3 Billion
last year. Sharing in dividends are the heirs of another brother
And two sisters.... When we Itemed (months ago*.that a certain
utility stock (selling under II) Was a big tip In Wall Street, two
papers and a newsmg. hmi'd at 11. Nat'l Power & Light went up
to 2 and one-eighth Friday. That's better thAn doubling vour
money... Flo Chadwlck'S next swimathon will be from the Calif,
coast to Catalina Island...No community property ettlement In
the Bob Topplng-Laua Turner matter. He owns none there.
The Vanderbllt clan Is pressuring heir Peter Howard net to
raah into a marriage with Egyptian actress. Aya 'Samal.. Fanny
Ward's grandson Lord Plunkett is wooing Verm Sailing-, dghtr
or p Yankee military chief.. .Italian actress Lia dl Leo (who got
her :id In the papers with Robert Taylor) has settled for Or-
ion Welles.. Leonore Rosensteii, unwinding in Rene from Seen-
ley's top man, will become Mrs. Walter Annenberg (he's the prop,
of The Phila. Inquirer) this week?...An important witness In
the purrent RFC probe attempted suicide Thurs. a. m. by slashing
his throat and wrists. Now at GJUenger hosp under an assumed
tag.. J. Foster Dulles told White Honscrs he doesn't want to be
Ambass. to Japan... Capt. P. Terranova of Police Comm. Monag-
ban's vice squad and Jeanne Toomey of the Bklyn Eagle blend
on the Uth.
"Woodv" Morgan, the new canary at the Raleigh Room In the
Warwick Hotel, is Woodruff Sims Morgan of the banking tribe...
The quick rise in Paramount movie stock last week, they say, was
over the "word" that Lord Beaverbrook bought In.. Marlon Mur-
ray says her love still Is Danny Arnsteln"just waiting for his
rtlvorce".. .The Sherry-Frontenac paid $4 million for the Casa-
blanca Hotel In Miami Beach.. .From the June 7th colyum: "Gto
Marshall was set to quit June 20th. Ass't Sec'y of Defense Lovett
may Inherit the top post". Also for the Cocka-Doodle-Doo Dep't:
From here of Nov. 13, 1960: "Gamblers offer even money Ezzarrt
Charles won't be champ a year hence".. The choice of Ford Prick
as baseball commlsh Is the most popular decision In years...
Robert Cointreau of the famed French liqueur family and Princess
Yourevitch are a grande passion.. But so are Betty Furness and
teew ftctor John Newland.. .Jackie Ellnson says there's no truth
tp the talk that when Mil on Berle opens his new restaurant
he will burgle all his food from Llndy's.
SAN FRANCISCO This is
John Lewis' political obituary.
He overplayed his hand again.
And this time he's being dealt
out of, the game by men who
no longer tremble when he
roars, but snicker instead.
This last game he played
cost him about $250,000 in the
past few months and almost
$750,000 in the past few years.
Time for writing Lewis' po-
litical obituary came at 11 a.
m. on the last day of the AFL's
annual convention here. Power-
ful federation leaders revealed
that within a few weeks they
would quietly contact the CIO
and ask It to merge with the
AFL despite previous bitterness
and name calling. It had been
expected that John Lewis' mine
workers would be asked to Join
at the same time. But Brother
Lewis was one man who got
under the skins of the AFL
chiefs.
Just as they mere writ'
ing their invitation to him
to come in the other day,
they received reports here
that he, wan negotiating
secretly j or a bid from the
CIO; was encourageing
through free spending
agents the Communist's use
of his name as a national
bogeyman, and was still
hating his people keep in
direct telephonic touch
with convention policy
makers here.
Typical of his operation was
the action of a small band of
met who slipped into the con-
vention hall early ope morning
and left on all tables a costly,
16 page booklet featuring the
Great Mane on the front page
as "Mr. Organized Labor."
It was then '.earned that
John L. had financed this three-
faced operation with a special
war-of-nerves fuh'd totalling
$250.000.
This was being spent by an
undercover staff' of at least 80
men stretching front washing-
ton to Detroit to this bay area.
This should be added to tht
annual $250,600 publicity cam-
paign he's been runnng for sot*
eral years.
Furthermore, the AFL leaders
are disturbed by the cynical
manner In which John Lewis'
men are repeating their old
Gin And Bitter Truth
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK.This ricketv old frame is racked
with laughter over the story of the expulsion of
a testified in the RFC fraud-possibility hear-
ings.
The Senate Investigating committee, at the
suggestion of Sen. Joe McCarthy, gave the boot
to Cecil Green, Lithofold Corp.'s Washington
man, because "he had a Martini for lunch and
was in no condition to testify."
I don't know whether the man was loaded,
but I sure would have hated to take a breath
check on the peers who were present at his dis-
missal.
That Washington town, It anything, Is a more
tacitce of earfy CIO days the fanatic devotee of the three-hour martooni
use ot pro-Commies to needle' luncheon than New York, which fights the mld-
There's an epidemic of purse-snatching from pews at 5th
Avenue churches. Holy men patrol the aisles telling worshippers,
"Watch your Bags*'.. Sugar Ray owns the films on the Turpin
Itght, packing theaters everywhere... Paul Heller, a Lindy's waiter,
resigned to open his $125,0*0 eatery at 86th and Lex...That
thunder yon may have heard was the sound of rolling heads of tv
staffers at Music Corp. of America. Onlv 2 tv programs were sold
all Summer... The M. Masseys of Tune Pan Alley have reconciled.
Ho published "My Heart Cries for You". Sonja Henle's lee Show
premier* at The Cow Palace (Nov. 16th) In San Francisco goes to
the Rnnyon Fund. They've never seen her skate there.. .Big gab
around town: About the husband who came homo unexpectedly
and gave a famed harmonica player "until morning to leave!"
CHI$ IS rOUk OaUM THI MAPIM-OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
th Man tat a#aa tarva to. tea Bar oi fh *mM Awerlsaa
Lot Kit ft rocalvd raft IK ax. ara kopaMa. ip a ban* .eartsWia'
MMI
It ran eaa.rtB.ta lattai m fea ipipatiaal M ..ain't aoposi iM
* Say. Lai tan ora ptrbliakas in ika o< <,.
BBM try ta .a Hw latter limita, lo pofi lapath
Issntrtv St lata wrtfeN hala h rfnetatt taattssaca
Thai oewiaaaai tunan Ba tSO*aaaIUt> ret IsaBwaar ai boIbUbs
MBiMiaa la MtBft tram reader.
the respectable labor leaders.
In the words of one of the
Federation's top strategists:
"John Lewis is a 'has been.'
He has Influence only in- the
coal fields. Even there he's got
his own troubles. Nobody needs
him any longer. If he wants to
waste the coal diggers' money
plavlng puerile politics, that's
their business. We Wouldn't
waste our members' money just
to satisfy our egos."
Reference to trouble in
the coal fields followed re-
ports here that "Old John"
has been frightened by the
terrific tonnage coming out
of non-union mines af
least 25,000,000 tons from
Pennsylvania alone. Lewis
is so pressed for manpower
in his drive to beat back
this competition that he
has ordered the retired
tioo-a month miners to
picket if they want their
pensions assured.
So the AFL policy makers,
having little time for Shake-
spearean research and being
too devout to desecrate their
Bible by pulling David phrases
to hurl at the old Philistine,
simply Ignored him. Their bid
to CIO was frlendlyi
"Fully mindful of our special
responsibility as the parent and
the predominant organization
day booze pretty Rood.
If you Will but drop Into the Occidental of
Harvey's or O'Donnell's or a dozen other of the
more popular chow halls on any given nav save
Sunday. It is amazing Just how many of the na-
tion's bulwarks can be seen pearl-diving after
the onion In that Gibson, the very dry one with
the dividend in the little jug.
I expect a great deal of heavy legislation has
been born .over the oysters and roast beef, and
considerable statesmanship has emerged from
the office bottle the boys work on when there
ain't time to go downtown for lunch.
I do not fancy the Martini luncheon myself,
being a person of considerable purity, but It
has come to be as much a part of the Ameri-
can big-wheel scene as the expense account and
the softoning-up celebrity party.
The flossier traps around the nation's major
cities are lammed, at lunch, with people who
are all trying to sell each other something, and
are using juniper juice as a lever to the deal.
This results in a national drowsiness In the
afternoon, but is widely practiced, natheless.
From close observation of the effect of the
pre-food Martini on the personality, I would
strongly recommend that any testlfler before
snv committee, when the subject Is skulldug-
gery, be force-fed At least four of the delicate
marriages between gin and vermouth. That way
we mlgnt more easily arrive at truth.
A Martini opens the pores of the spirit, more
or less extravagantly, and causes the tongue to
wag violently.
The fourth Martini strikes off the shackles of
Inhibition, and encourages forgetfulness of plan-
ned caution.
It Induces a man to regard hlmeslf as a giant
whose word Is law, and whose every deed is a
monument to his ego. It breeds momentary in-
vincibility and involuntary honesty.
This, it seems to me, could come in handy at
some of these hearings when you just know that
the subjects have made up a pretty scenario
and are perjuring themselves.pink.
Martinis foster a recklessness that at times
might lead to fact Instead ot mantrtactured
fancy.
A successful hostess I know has always prac-
ticed but one rule of thumb on entertainment.
She pours a wicked belt, and she serves her food
late, because what she spends on the booze she
gets back on the groceries.
"Oet 'em stiff enough." she says, with alarm-
ing candor, "and they won't give a damn what
you throw at 'em in the way of food."
This Is frlghtenlngly cynical, but might very
well work as an adjunct to cross-examination.
Get the witness loaded and he throws away
his script, and often may be forced to fall back
on the ingrained truth, which pops to the sur-
face like the toothpick In the olive.
I would not recommend a small ration of
marijuana to the witness, fr this might lead
him Into too lofty flights of .total recall, but
somewhere between the gin bottle and the truth
serum is a happy compromise.
Don't send 'em away from the witness stand
when the air is tinctured with the aroma of
grog, boys.
Keep 'em pinned down, just like a wife does,
and extract the full measure of truth when
their defenses have been weakened by the
wassail.
^.dahy VC4SHIH0T0N
MERRY- 60- ROUND
ly DIIW PIAKSON
|BBBaBUSSaaBBUBXaBnjfBBBBBwBBB]
Matter Of Fact
By JOSEPH ALS0P
ABOUT STAR CHAMBERS
WHAT PRICE LIBRARY MOYE?
Balboa Heights. C Z.
September 8, 1951
Mall Box.
c/o Panama American,
Panama City, R.P.
We have learned, through the;
grapevine, that the "Brass" went
built; partitions taken out. win-
dows filled in money would be
no object, In fact.
But as this would be a wonder-
ful thing for all the little people,
no effort will be made nor a dol-
lar spent, to make it possible.
With $11 million dollars to be
will welcome the CIO to unite
Organically with the AFL.
"In this sense, we propose to
tlve council to Implement this
may soon be
realized as an achievement of
and for our labor movement,
our nation, and the nation, and
the entire international free
trade union movement," the
convention said. ^
However, there seems to be
little hope for agreement on
anything more than the isola-
tion of old triple threat John.
There Is an authoritative
source for all this, an intimate
and trusted friend of the CIO
WASHINGTON. In a courageous letter to
President Truman. Henry A. Wallace has now'
provided the strongest documentary support lor
of American labor, especially In : certain yery grave charges previously made in
this hour of crisis, the AFL lhls pace.
This letter and Its enclosures contain every
essential fact needed to prove that Sen. Pat
McCarran's subcommittee on Internal security
has been taking demonstrably false testimony
the incoming 'execu-ionjC^1nlni Wallaces trip to China In the spring
tha ind Pnder le*dln questioning by the McCarran
that organic< mlfteatVnn nf subcommlttee counsel, the semi-professional ex-
Amiri-an i.w . ion v Communist. Louis Budenz, testified that during
soon be tnl8 trlp Wallace was 'guided" along the Com-
munist party line by the State Department of-
ficial, John Carter Vincent. He further testifi-
ed that Vincent was a "member of the Commu-
nist party" at that time.
On the on* hand. Wallace's letter and enclos-
ures now show that in 1944 Wallace conspicu-
ously failed to recommend either of the great
Communist party line projects oL-that period In
China.
He did not advocate American military aid
for the Chinese Communists.
He did not urge the President to force the
Chinese. Nationalists into a political coalition
with the Chinese Communists.
On the other hand, these Wallace documents
down and looked over the Balboa' spent on "projects" during the
DUpensary, and decidedJust
llek that!that It would be com-
Setely Impossible to use It for
ite of a Public Library. It
seems there are "too many doors
and windows" and the one-story
back portion is wood and ter-
mite-eaten.
So what? If it was something
one of them wanted, ways and
means would be found paily
enough to overcome the difficul-
ties The old wooden part would
be torn down, and a new wing
fiscal year, It seems a crying
shame; diverting the money to
be spent for a one-family cottage,
to a .simple library building,
wouM benefit literally hundreds.
But the best and most central-
ized spot on the Isthmus will be
given over, no doubt, to the dear1
old commissary, for a warehouse
wi h rats and cockroaches
spreading out to all the nearby
quarters. So be It now and ever
more.
The Bitter Ones
of 'beinghcalSdntheh?abcr SZ 10 show th,lt Wallace's main recommendations
2. E., JLCJSS? St!. -~ prleSt to President Roosevelt were a series of positive
measures to strengthen the then-weakened gor-
ernment of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek.
of Pittsburgh's skid row.
He- is Father Charles Rice,
who wrote tp *>*, *--
"The CIO is now an Ame
rican instila Jon i t. ,t
not Murray's Intention that
it should fade away. Or-
ganic unity with the AFL
is hardly possible because
the CIO has so many subs-
tantial interests of tts own.
There is a large staff; there
I the network of state and
municipal councils; there
is a hefty bank balance and
an effective Washington of-
fice, among other things,
and nearly 1,000 000 mem-
bers" -v
So there'll be several Itmses
of labor, and John L. Lew) will
find their back door locked.'Kuomlntang.
And they show further that John Carter Vin-
cent, the man accused of being a "party mem-
ber" and Wallace's Communist "guide," actually
joined in the most drastic and Important of
these recommendations.
This was the recommendation for the Imme-
diate replacement of Gen. Joseph W. stllwell by
Oen. Albert C. Wedemeyer in command in Chi-
na.
In order to see how damning these documents
are to the testimony taken by the McCarran
subcommittee, it is only necessary to consider a
few facts about Gen. Stllwell and Gen. Wede-
meyer,
On the political side. Oen. Stllwell's Interven-
tions in the Internal politics of the Chungking
government' had led. in. ways too complex to
explain In detail, to fhe total triumph of the
most inefficient and reactionary faction of the
And this had served the Communists by pro-
ducing unspeakable demoralization and decay
among the Nationalists.
Equally, on the military side. Oen. Stllwell's
whole aim was to fight the Japanese in Burma,
and to draw Into Burma all American and Chi-
nese military resources.
And this had served the Communists even
more Importantly, by leaving the armies of the
Generalissimo In China, which were never given
a pound of American military supplies, exposed
to a series of crushing defeats by the Japanese.
In addition. Oen. 8tlllwell was possessed it
IS the onlv word by a venomous personal
hatred of Chiang Kai-shek.
He warmly admired the Chinese Communists,
and wished to give them American military aid,
while continuing to hold down aid to Chiang.
And he was already working to gain these
ends when Wallace cabled Roosevelt about him.
The great weakness of the Generalissimo's
government, resulting from Its military defeats
in East China, was to be exploited In order to
extort vast new powers for Stllwell.
Among these powers was to be absolute au-
thority to distribute American military equip-
ment within China, which in turn was to per-
mit Stllwell to give our arms to the Commu-
nists.
As a result of Gen. Stllwell's singularly dis-
torted reports to Washington. Maj. Gen. Patrick
Hurley was actually sent to Chungking, a couple
of months after the Wallace visit, to persuade
Chiang Kai-shek to grant to Stllwell these de-
sired new powers.
Stllwell's mood and purposes are clearly re-
vealed by one of his contemporary diary note
about Hurley's negotiations, as follows.
"September 16: The g-mo (generalissimo) In-
sists on control (of distribution of military sup-
plies i. Our stuff that we are giving him! T.V.
(Soong) says we must remember the dignity'
of a great nation...Pat (Hurley) told him
horsefeathers'...If the g-mo controls distribu-
tion, I am sunk. The Reds will get nothing.
Only the g-mo's henchmen will be supplied."
Hurley's efforts to gain these powers for Stll-
well failed In the end, for reasons which are
another story, and on Chiang Kai-sheks re-
quest. President Roosevelt then followed Wal-
lace's advice to replace Stllwell with Wede-
meyer.
(Copyright, 1951. New York Herald Tribus* lac.)
D,w Pearson says: U. S. experts anticipate no WorM Wfr
III this year; Friendship Balloons harass Kremlin; Sen.
McKellar blasts Tennessae colleague.
h.r WA8H,INOIN ~ Tne month of September and early Octp-
SLJZ ^ 5?5S? u ln ' tne llm* wnn the chanceries and
general staffs of Europe watch closest for signs of war
im. E",0P cn $et by this period of dry. wild weather before
n nt 88.down ,n "king army, they figure there will be
no danger of war at least until June. ,
f *Ti'P .' of/lclBl*. likewise, have made all-imnortant surveys
2'hl tW*r P0"101 "y- *nd it la possible for this column to report
what their general conclusions are: .-
p.i' Ru*sl* wlS not launch World War HI this year. However,
>'" ^PNted to continue pressing war by satellite*-.
it . ,1 not Russia, has been more eager for a truce. The
croivi'i ISSSL lnolcat" tht Russia came out with the truce
fim^i .iy ior PrP*8nda purposes; perhaps to stall for
tune in order to get new arms to Korea
Thaii.'r.H*^ f^L!" Communist aggression is ;kely to be Burma,
hn ir th ^nndOCU2. " ta ^-Important to the Krem-
linif the millions of China are to have rice. Moscow would pro-
bably gamble on starting World War III ln these countries, though
she doesn't actually want It.
am n!nSSL?*& ern province of Azerbaijan and take it by force if the British
go into southern Iran to protect their oil refiner*. Here again the
Russians are willing to gamble that the West will not go to war
over Iran.
i 5'( . rmny, the U.S. analysis does not anticipate a Rus-
sian military move, but does foresee a continual army build-up
Moscow s biggest drive will be pressure through local govern-
ments to stop the building of TJS. air bases In Europe and North
BEHIND THR IRON CURTAIN
increasing evidence is com! tag back from Inside the Iron
curtain to show that the Freedom-Friendship oalloons and other
activities of the Crusade for Freedom have really got under the
nremim s skin.
In East Bohemia, for instance, fields where the balloon mes-
sages fell were declared "off-llmlU" to farm workers by security
sections of the National Communist Committee.
In another section of Bohemia, Communist officials offered
rewards to the teams of youth brigades who collected the largest
number of Friendship leaflets.
Near the Czech-Austrian border, a patrol of border police re-
ported voluminous flying objects" which might be enemy para-
troopers. When Prague got the report, It dispatched tank unit
amid great excitement.
The flying objects, however, turned out to be pillow balloons
with the word "Svoboda" "Freedom" written on them in
large letters.
MTwfy,.were.bouncmi,*lon* tbt round ln the early morning
twilight like miniature flying saucers. Inside o? them of course
were friendship messages from the American people to' the peoplo
of Czechoslovakia. ^^
This i an illustration of how the American people, usually
ahead of their Government, have begun to penetrate the Iron
Curtain on their own, at the-same time aged Senators have dras-
Ucally and dangerously curtailed the State Department budget
for winning friends and influencing people.
NOTE: The Crusade for Freedom Is headed by Oen. Luclua
Clay and supported by Americans of all walks of life from Gen-
era; Elsenhower to Dan Tobln, head of the Teamsters Union. Bill
Green, head of the A. F. of L., and James Carey, secretary of
the CIO.
TENNES8ER FEUD
It was meant for the eyes of a few, select Senators only, bug
crotchety Kenneth McKellar. grandpa of the Senate, has written
an angry letter about his Tennessee colleague, crimebuster Este
Keauver.
The letter was mailed to all members of thi> Senate Judiciary
Committee ln order to undermine Kefauver's plan for appoint-
ing a roving judge for Tennessee.
"As a member of the policy committee of the 8enate, I se-
cured for Mr. Kefauver a place on the Senate Judiciary Commit-
tee I apologize tor that." sourly wrote McKei.ar
This is the latest eruption in a bitter feud between the two
Tenneessee Senators.
It started when Kefauver refused to let McKellar handpick
all Federal Jobs ln Tennessee. McKellar became so enraged that
he lorbade his staff to mention Kefauver's name In his presence.
Ever since, the vengeful McKellar ha sniped at everything
Kefauver has tried to do in the Senate.
Now McKellar is urging a new judge foi- middle Tennessee,
but Kefauver Is seeking a roving judge who wOi.ld divide his time
between the mid-state where a Judge Is 111 and western Tennes-
see which is rapidly growing.
Local sentiment supports Kefauver ln this.
"For some unaccountable reason, unless It be politics, Mr.
Kefauver turned up not long ago wanting to make that judge a
roving judge..." McKellar complained bitterly in his private let-
ter to the Judiciary Committee members.
"He lnssits on having the neW Judge made a roving judge for
both middle and west Tennessee, and in some manner unknown
to me, he claims to have secured a majority of the committee, in
lavor of his amendment."
Then McKellar, who wields great power as boas of the Ap-
propriations Committee, appealed: "I am asking you as a Sen-
ator to vote for my amendment to strike out Mr. Kefauver'
amendment.
"I would be greatly obliged for your vote and support In keep-
ing politics out of our judicial affairs." concluded McKellar after
himself pulling heavily on the political wires.
WEEDING OUT BUREAUCRATS
It hasn't received any publicity, but President Truman has
ordered a drastic housecleaning to sweep the drones from Fe-
deral Government.
An ultimatum has already gone out to all agencies to clean
house or face budgetary and personnel cuts.
"The present emergency has caused great demands on the
manpower resources of our country with shortages of manpower
ln cetraln special areas already being felt... the Federal Govern-
ment, as the largest single employer ln the country, should act
the example.
"Therefore, I expect the head of each executive department
and agency to bring about maximum effectiveness and economy
ln the utilization of personnel." the President wrote in lndenrical
letters to Civil Service Chairman Robert Ramspeck and Budget
Director Frederick Lawton.
Truman ordered them to "resquet reports from all depart-
ments and agencies and conduct regular inspections and survey
so that reports can be made to me on progress in conserving man-
power.
"This manpower conservation program snould be given top
priority throughout the executive branch," the President added.
As a result, Ramspeck and Lawton sent a joint ultimtum
to all agencies to "take steps to assure the most effective and
economical use" of manpower.
This will be followed up by on-the-spot Inspections to mako
sure the drones exit.
NOTHING IS HARD TO GET
. . if you use a
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Every month . every week . every sy --
THE PANAMA AMERICAN carnet MORE CLASSIFIED
ADS than all other daily aaper* in Panama combined!


I m.

PAGE FIGHT
THB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
IATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 151
Giants, Dodgers Tied; Yankees Clinch A.L. Flag
Pressure Football... No. 4
.

Grid-Happy Tennessee Clearing House For Players
University Has Football Recruiting System Like Big League Baseball Club
Faces In
The Majors
'. By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
KNOXVILLE. Tenn., Sept. 29
(NEAiA four-foot wire fence
surrounds the gridiron of Shields
Watklns Field, the home battle-
pit of the University of Tennessee.
"That's to keep these lootball-
happy people down here off the
field." explains Gus Manning.
Byoung tub-thumper.
"The top strand is barbed.
"That's to keep them from
climbing over it." says Manning.
"Without it, they'd be on the
field to carry the ballplayers off
before he completed his run.
We'd have more 12th-man inci-
dents than freshman players."
There are 60 lreshmen this fall,
the bulk of them hand-picked,
.of course. Brlg.-Gen. Robert
Reese Neyland. the coach, an-
nually has one open practice on
Labor Day. While only light work
and a little blocking was sched-
u'ed, more than "5000 spectators
attended.
It was with this tremendous
enthusiasm that Neyland, In his
26th year here, built the greatest
of all college football empires.
It is said that Nevland spends
more on scouting and recruiting
than many schools do for their
entire football program. He
frankly tells you that Tennessee
football costs $250,000 a year, and
it is run with military precision.
Neyland goes strictly first class.
He has seven assistants and a
trainer.
When Tennessee has good re-
ports on a boy and wants him. he
gets a round trip air ticket. One
hundred brignt prospects visit
the campus each spring.
The Tennessee Volunteers are
to college* football what the
Yankees and Dodgers are to ma-
jor league baseball. Tennessee is
more than a football factory. It
is a football clearinc house. No
PRESSURE FOOTBALL: 4
What's the score on college
football in the aftermath of the
West Point scandal? For the
answer, NEA's sports editor
takes you on a campus-by-
campus tour of the colleges
where football (and players)
are big business. Here's the
fourth of his series of on-the-
spot reports that Rive you the
real inside story on pressure
footballand how it gets that
way.
big league baseball club has a su-
perior scouting and recruiting
system.

No fewer than 73 disciples of
Neyland are coaching colleges,
teachers colleges, high and pre-
paratory schools and profession-
als in 16 states, as far west as
Wyoming and California. All, plus
alumni and friends, feed him
with prospects.
TENNESSEE'S STADIL'M: A wire fence keeps out the fans.
JOE WILLIAMS
.'u^h^LJknown- w" ked hotel man, Bob ChrUtenberry, is the
'! .,".?.?/ 1r 5ox,nf cn"n*i>n, succeeding Eddie Eagan
:!? .h?ermi"ed * bow out gracefully by Got. Tom Dewev fol-
swing charges of unsatisfactory supervision of the ring sport.
'iart.vi- ,.?h/J|sV:nberry faces a stern challenge. He steps into the
Srfnr^n,^ ". ^ UndW "" a"d '" U1 faVOr- S an
SS3S amount of work to be done if the sport is to regain public
Z Cn?SSe; * 8reatvdeal w" depend on the gentleman's awareness
Si ~t Iff w,iorm,s.' nls ^PacKy for cooperation and hew earnestly
.he applies himself. *
Mm *fr,hrlstenberry was a surprise selection. I had never heard of
.him before in connection with the sportnot even as an arrtPnt
J&.2S V?at IhU need be a "o handicap Althe job calls for w
S? eM and C0'nm0n Sense' a'ong with on-the-to^s vgl-
iauho^dinates n2iLe.dcbfCnaUfe he,,tean too heavily on incompetent
;!2^^t? d.was. "" t0 dlsPosed to cooperative effort This
ffififK th- ,iyJ?ie0.ta lnf 'VAtanc.e of the Medical Advisory Board
SSfJfi.^ the Legisteture in '48 to function in conjunction with the
'STf??,5fi-n- "If3" Eaf?a.n the ooard was Permitted to disintegra e
.Rf findings and suggestions largely ignored !!",
:.kirmfn ?Em?,a new deal, for boxlnK witn Mr- ChrUtenberry as
SlabFandrl^Jfli SK1dly stressed the ""PorUnce of the
!'-/i,. re?u?s5.d ,that ll be constituted. This snould be the
:S&wh ^tahnnHttailaiSfep- Morever- ^e M.A.B. should be e^uip!
!" w ,, DR- NARDIELLO CAN HELP
Hmmiinn~ "?* ** di!I^ult for Mr- Christenberry and his fellow
ltir/f il lo assemble a competent and sympathetic medical
;toff to operate the state outfitted clinic which is available to all
.boxers. But this would be only the beginning. There are other prob-
lems more complex and equally important
' 'disclosed in th rBr.Bn^H^ee i0,r Rreater caution and alertness was
estoblisVn*Tu wenttrvTh".?.tY ,cha";man have no trouble in
V. ih.2ii Identitycertainly not as much as I did in tryinu to
get the gentleman s name from the poorly run commission office
sardio hWitV^ that.Mr' Chrlstenberrv make Dr. Vhicent
Mrdiel o hi sr ght hand man In all matters pertaining to the snort
tan DrtaNSL?hthe m^-B- Ylth no srespect to thenew cS
SE? ? k W0UJ<> have been mv immediate choice as Eagan's
.ucccssor. for he would have qualified on all counts, save rabana
at he does not vote the Republican ticket pernaps
', JS25 in hls yonunth'..Dr- Nardiello has been associated with
.the commission since 932. He was the only one in boxing who lifted
'deff?hengthVi0rHesf1?h'nSp.theHm5tch whcllsent *ounS " to hto
death, the third such we've had around here in 19 months Lone
before the creation of the medical panel, which was to be scuttled bv
neglect and conflict. Dr. Nardiello had proposed such a set up *
a v. WEED OUT THE INCOMPETENTS
mwmmmm
alP-.^Ah^M.A-B. been empowered tei issu a diiecUve U
impelled to obey and the
invited the aross neglect whlehtauTdSiSe nch &to toS?
and aroused so much public indignation.
A Southern Conference
school is entitled to 140 athletic
scholarships, partitive and full,
and you know that not many of
them at Tennessee go in for, say,
tennis. When Neyland called his
company to attention this fall,
there were 72 varsity men and
the 60 frosh. He expected the
squad to be reduced to 100 with
the opening of classes. A football
scholarship represents $1000 a
year.
Business men of Knoxville con-
tribute generously. Big time
football is the only major sports
attraction In this industrial and
agricultural center of east Ten-
nessee. There are Vols and
Touchdown Clubs-In the state's
larger cities, with members pay-
ing $10 a year each.
The Tennessee Atnletic Asso-
ciation does well with programs
and concessions; the Vol Network
broadcasts games into western
North Carolina, southeastern
Kentucky, northern Georgia and
western Arkansas as well as
Tennessee, and occasionally far-
ther north and to New Orleans
and Miami.
In eight games at home last
autumn, Tennessee played to
199,243 .paid admissions, in four
road games, including the victory
over Texas in the Dallas Cotton
Bowl, the Vols played to 137,654,
for a total of 336,897. That, at an
average of $4 apiece, spells $1,-
347,586, fine business In any
league.
"We were below normal at
home," says Mrs. Edna Callaway,
the.only woman business manag-
er of a big-time football school
In the nation. 'Washington and
Lee doesn't draw here. We would
have done 43,816 Instead of the
13,816 had we had Georgia Tech."
Tennessee's check for the Cot-
ton Bowl game was $125,000. The
net was $42,000 after all expens-
es, Including the band's.
those schools are coached
Tennessee men, of course.
by
COACH NEYLAND: "If the end
justifies the means, fine."
send stickouts in his direction,
Neyland returns the favors.
"When I see a boy can't quite
make it here, and wants to. play
badly. I recommend other
schools," he saya. "I sent seven
who played excellent ball to
Wofford College, three to Bowden
Wyatt at Wyoming, others to
Memphis State, and so on." All
When Neyland finds that he
can't land an outstanding pros-
pect, he'll do his best to see that
he goes to a school not on Ten-
nessee's schedule. A Southern
Conference coach tells me that
Steve Meilinger, who has unlim-
ited potentialities at end, could
have made a much better deal
with him, through Tennessee.
had he not been tied up by Ken-
tucky.
Neyland says they'll never le-
gislate scouting and recruiting
out of major football. Any at-
tempt to do that would mean un-
der-the-table transactions, he
believes.
"And what's wrong with It?"
he asks. "If the end justifies the
means, I say fine, and it most
certainly does."
Neyland reels off a long list of
coaches, a number of them fa-
mous, and successful men whom
he coached at Tennessee. Foot-
ball gave the majority of them
a chance to attend college.
"I take the utmost pride in
having, with the aid of football,
helped turn many fuzzy-faced
kids into men of stature," he
smiles.
He is an excellent spokesman
for the high-pressure college
football of the era.
Phillies Upset Brooklyn;
Reynolds Hurls No-Hitter
By UNITED PRESS
NEW YORK, Sept. 29.The Yankees pocketed
the American League pennant for the third succes-
sive season yesterday, but it looks as though the
Giants' and Dodgers' fans hiay be kept guessing un-
til next Wednesday about the outcome of the breath-
taking National League race.
M-.,
Preacher Roe
GusZernlal
On The Alleys...
Tomorrow: Bluegrass football.
USARCARIB Championship
Pistol And Rifle Matches
Scheduled For Oct. 24, 30
Tlie United States Army Car-
ibbean Panam Area) Cham-
pionship Pistol and Rifle match-
es will be held on October 24 and
October 30, respectively, it was
announced by USARCARIB
Headquarters today.
Beginning at 8:00 a.m., the Ri-
fle Matches will be held at Em-
pire Range and the Pistol Match-
es at Farfan Beach, and will be
conducted by the Commanding
Officer, Pacific Sector.
Teams will consist of five men
representing the Atlantic Sector,
Post of Corozal. 33rd Infantry,
370th Engineers. 65th AAA Group,
45th, Cavalry Reconnaissance
Battalion, 504th Field Artillery
Battalion. 7461st AU Signal, 7470
AU-USARCARIB School. Special
Troops and the UJS. Army Hospi-
tal at Fort Clayton. Each of these
units will enter one rifle team
an done pistol team.
National Match Rules will ap-
The Clinchei
Pesky, 2b
Maxwell, rf .
Vollmer, If .
Goodman, lb
Hatfleld, 3b
Moss, c .
aRichter .
Wight, p .
Masterson
Stobbs, p .
Nixon, p .
bWrlght .
There arc fantastic stories
about how remarkable runners
and blockers get to Tennessee.
There Is the one about Jimmy
Wade, a freshman tailback of
Lynchburg, Va. North Carolina
put the celebrated Choo-Choo
Justice on him, but it was re- >,
ported that young Wade would Satfie" Sh
get $8000 cash and an automo-
bile to enroll at newly-football-
happy University of Richmond.
Yet here he is at Tennessee. You
figure it out.
Tennessee's foragers get
around. A total of 21 states are
represented on the varsity squad.
Only IB membefs are home-
grown.
"A man of whom 1 had never
heard wrote and said he had
some good boys who wanted to
come to Tennessee.' says Ney-
land. without batting an eye. "I
told him I would be happy to look
at them, and I must say they are
a splendid bunch. I'd be a sucker
for not taking them."
One close to the set-up here
says Herman Hlckman. an All-
America guard' at Tennessee,
steered five of them this way.
Hickman was stymied, it seems,
In getting them into Yale. As his
former players now coaching!
SECOND GAME
Boston AB R H PO
O. OiMaggio, cf 4
P
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
ply to both the rifle and pistol
teams. The U.S. Caliber .30 Ml
rifle will be used to fire eight
rounds In sitting, kneeling and
standing positions, at a slow
pistol pace, and nine rounds for
50 seconds of sustained firing in
prone and sitting positions over
a 200-yard course.
The U.8. Caliber .46 pistol will
be used at the Farfan Matches
and. teams will be required to fire
10 rounds, slow fire over a 50-yard
course, 5 rounds In 5 minutes; 10
rounds, timed fire, 25 yards, five
rounds In 20 seconds, and 10
rounds, rapid fire, 25 yards, five
rounds in 10 seconds.
The USARCARIB (Panam
Area i Rifle and Pistol Trophies
will be presented to trie units
with winning teams. Individual
trophies ill be awarded also to
members of the winning teams,
runner-up teams and to the three
individuals making the three
highest individual scores in each
weapon.
In both matches, the five-man
0 team with the highest aggregate
0 score will be named the winner
0 of the match and champions of
0 the U8ARCARIB (Panam Area).
! The individual making the hlgh-
! eat aggregate score wlfl be named
0 the USARCARIB (Panam Area)
0 rifle or pistol champion.
0
0
0
0
0
The Curundj Men's Bowling
League swung into the third
week of the season at the Cu-
rundu Restaurant Alleys on Wed-
nesday night. V.F.W. Post 3822
made a valiant effort to climb
out of the cellar and at the same
time dislodge the Angelinl men
from the top slot, however, an
even division of the spoils en-
abled the leaders to hang on to
the first place and with the Can-
ada Dry team sharing 2-2 with
Hector's Boys from the American
Club the Vets still remain to the
bottom place.
Budwelser beat Carta Vieia 2-1
and picked up the extra point by
the slim margin of 15 pins, a han-
dicap of 18 points made all the
difference. Balboa Beer Jumped
from sixth to fourth place by vir-
tue of a clean sweep over Acme
Paints.
McCarragher (Carta Vieja) was
high score with 204 whilst Cof-
fey (American Club) with 184,
180, 200 (564) was the winner of
the case of beer donated by Gen-
eral Christie of the Balboa Brew-
ery for the highest aggregate.
The reconditioned alleys were a
source of great satisfaction to all
concerned and the obvious im-
provement to the pin action in-
dicates that high scoring will be
the rule rather than the excep-
tion in the future.
Here are the standings and
team scores:
TEAMS No. W. L. P. T.P.
Angelinl. . S 39 7516
Budwelser ... 5 638 7593
American Club 2 6 3 8 7443
Balboa Beer ..7547 7318
Carta Vieja ..4455 7569
ACME Paints .3455 7296
Canada Dry ..6273 7394
VFW.Post 3822. 1 3 6 3 7199
Hovan .
Steuwe .
Bryan. .
Stah 1. .
Walker .
Handicap
BUDWEISER
. 183 142 15
145
148
151
116
112
124
141
192
131
112
479
166 435
133 422
198 541
141 388
112 336
That s when,,the World Series
is supposed to start But there
could be a slight delay. The Gi-
ants and Dodgers were tightly
deadlocked for first place and It
was an even money bet they
would wind up that way when
the schedule has run Its course
late Sunday afternoon.
Brooklyn, once considered in-
vincible with a 13 and one-half
game first place lead on Aug. 11,
now was in full panic after a sec-
ond straight late Inning loss, 4-3,
to the Phillies in a Philadelphia
night battle
Leading. 3-1, In the eighth In-
ning against last year's National
League Champion Phillies, Andy
Semlnick tied the score against
the Dodgers, 3-3, with a two-run
homer.
Carl Ersklne, who had pitched
creditably until that time, then
dug his own grave in the ninth
when- Richie Ashburn blooped a
single to left and Dick Slsler sac-
rificed.
It was an ail-star cast of
pitchers for today's climactic
games. Don Newcombe, who
pitched the Dodgers to triumph
in Boston Wednesday for his
19th win, will go tonight
against Robin Robertsa 21-
game winner for the Phillies.
When the Giants take on the
Braves this afternoon, it will be
Sal Mage, a 22-6 winner, against
Warren Spahn, a 22-13 winner.
Meanwhile, the Yankees, who
clinched the pennant with a no-
hit no-run performance by Allie
Reynolds, will resume
course todaystrictly for batting
and fielding practiceIn a dou-
bleheader against the Red Sox.
Reynolds' no-hltter gave the
Yankees an 8-0 victory in the
opening game of the ooublehead-
er against the Red Sox at Yankee
Stadium. The Yankees then
clinched matters in the nightcap
by coming from behind with a
13-hit attack to win 11-3.
Reynolds became the first
nurler in American League his-
tory to "double blank" two teams
in a single season.
Vic Raschi wound it up In the
second game clincher as the
won thelr 18th ,ta*sico
In other games the White Sox
topped the Browns 6-2 and 4-3 at
St. Louis in the American League
while the Reds clinched sixth
place by def eating the Pirates 4-3
In a Pittsburgh National League
night contest.
The Athletics-Senators game'
was postponed due to football
weather and no other games
were scheduled.
SISTERS MATCH
CORINTH. Miss. (U.P.) ' Mrs.
B. B. Voyles and Mrs. Leroy
South, each the mother of four
children, were operated on for
the same ailment on the same
day by the same doctor and oc-
cupied the same hospital room,
their Incidentally, they're sisters.
American League
Totals.
855". 842 9042601
CARTA VIEJA
Mynarclk. 147
Norris. ... 115
Rose (Blind) 124
Kelsey. ... 160
McCarragher 184
Handicap. 106
170
129
124
189
164
106
139 456
133 377
124 372
162 511
204 552
106 318
Totals
836- 882 8682586
TEAMS Won Lost Pet. G.B.
New York. 95 56 .629 mm
Cleveland. 92 69 .605 3H
Boston ... 87 64 .584 8
Chicago. 89 Detroit ... 72 72 .526 1414
89 .474 23 W
Philadelphia 68 83 .450 27
Washington 61 99 .404 34
St Louis . 51 191 .336 444
National League
Today's Games
Boston at New York (2).
Chicago at St. Louis.
Detroit at Cleveland.
Phil'delphia at Washingt'n (N).
Only Games Scheduled.
Totals.....33 3 6 24 6 2
New York AB R HPO A E
Rizzuto, u. . 5 13 1 3 0
Coleman. 2b. 1 3 1 1 2 0
Bauer, rf. 5 2 3 3 0 0
J. DiMagglo, cf 5 1 1 3 0 0
McDougald, 3b 5 0 1 2 0 0
Berra, c ..412500
Woodllng, If 4 10 6 0 0
Collins, lb ... 4 1 2 6 0 0
Raschi. p .... 3 1 0 0 0 0
Totals.....36 11 13 27 5 0
Score by Innings
Boston 210 000 000 3
New York 070 003 Olx11
a Fouled out for Moss In 9th;
bFlied out for Nixon in 9th. Runs
Batted InBoudreau. Hatfleld,
(D. DiMagglo scored on Raschl's
wild pitch in 2nd), eolitos, Riz-
zuto 2, Bauer 2, McDougald 2, J.
DiMagglo 4. Two Base HitsBau-
er, Coleman. Three Base Hit
McDougald. Home RunJ. Di-
Magglo. Stolen BaseD. DiMag-
glo. SacrificeColeman. Double-
playsBoudreau, Pesky, Good-
man (2). Left on BasesBoston
5, New York 6. Bases on Balls off
Raschi 3, Wight 3. Stobbs 1.
Struck Out byRaschi 5 Stobbs
2, Nbron 4. Hits and Runs off-
Wight 4 and 6 in 11-3 Innings;
Masterson 2 and 1 in 1-3; Stobbs
5 and 3 in 41-3: Nixon 2 and 1 in
2. Wild PitchesRaschi 2, Nixon.
Passed BallMoss. Winning
Pltcher-T-Raschi (21-10). Losing
PitcherWight (7-7).
VFW POST 3822
Mashburn 122 137 125 384
Hannberg 89 138
Billings. . 106 118
Wltzig. ... 122 134
Moss.....114 151
Handicap. 194 194
121 348
117 341
160 406
108 373
194 582
Totals.
747 862 8252434
ANGEUNI
McConnell 163 136
Studebaker.
Woner
Balutls .
Colston. .
Handicap.
Totals. .
166
142
129
122
123
157
130
113
190
123
139 438
132 455
157 429
143 385
136 438
123 369
845 849 8202514
Yesterday's Results
FIRST GAME
Boston 000 000 OC-D0 0 3
New York 202 102 Olx8 10 1
Parnell (18-11), Scarbotough,
Taylor and Robinson; Reynolds
(17-8) and Berra.
SECOND GAME
Boston 210 000 000 3 6 2
New York 070 003 Olx11 13 0
Wight (7-7). Masterson, Stobbs,
Nixon and Moss; Raschi (21-10)
and Berra.
_____ '
FIRST GAME (Twilight)
Chicago 040 011 0006 12 0
St. Louis 100 000 1002 7 0
Holcombe (11-12> and Sheely;
Mahoney (2-5), Sucheckl (2),
Medllnger (8) andBatts.
TEAMS
Brooklyn .
New Yerk.
St. Louis .
Boston .
Philadelphia 13
Cincinnati 67
Pittsburgh 63
Chicago. . 61
Won Lest Pet.
94 58 .618
58
72
76
79
85
89
90
94
79
76
.US
.523
.599
.489
.441
.414
.494
G.B.
15
18
21
27
31
32ii
Today's Games
Brooklyn at Philadelphia (N).
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh.
St. Louis at Chicago.
New York at Beaten.,
Yesterday's Results
NIGHT GAME
Brooklyn 110 010 0003 8 ,9
Phil'delphia 000 001 0214 10' 0
Ersklne (16-12) and Campanel-
la; Drews. Hansen (3-1) and Se-
mlnick.
SECOND GAME (Night)
Chicago......'...... 4
St. Louis............ 3
BALBOA BEER
Stanley. . 154 127 158 439
Cain.....154 162
Schock ... 119 119
Smith. ... 103 128
Carpenter 161 132,
Handicap. 167 167
NIGHT GAME
Cincinnati 040 000 0004 8 1
Pittsburgh 100 020 0003 8 0
Wehmeler (7-10) and Howell;
Yochim (1-1). Werle <2), Wilks
(9) and McCullough.
Only Games Scheduled.
158 474
106 344
121 353
160 453
167 501
DOCTORS ON HOLIDAY .
CROWN POINT. Ind. (U.P.)
Lake county residents did their
best to stay well last Aug. 15.
That was the day members of the
Lake county medical society 1
their annual stag picnic.
Totals.
858 830 8702564
of the City of New York
.hould, the commission would av7een"coTnpTued to ooey andlhe
hance. are Flores would be alive today. This lack of authorUy
nr t;iEt?,berry 8hou'd turn to practical, knowing ring men
J3T. Nardiello is only one. There should be a rescreenin of all
licensed trainers and managers. As matters stand now fm shoe
maker can train or manage fighters around here OuTnewVhah-
ttan should call in a man like Mannie Seamon. who grew ur with
^HK?ESrd.t,?S m **' ye?rS nas handled Joe Louis P th
L ,m Vere ls.th.e ProDlem oi referees and Judges, many of whom
*T> political appointees without ahiiitv ir. 1., t .,.._? ri w;
liuli
appointees without ability. Let'sTgVt1 rea line o "hem
bd who better to handle this task than Ruby Goldstein the^T-
*'s No. 1 referee? What Mr. Christenberry needs a"team It 1
-uate for him and the sport that he has men like Dr NartUeUo
wSWS Sito coldT GOldSteUl ,0 tUm " * Jobflft
The Chase National Bank
Total resources over $5^227,000,000.00
PANAMA BRANCH
COLON BRANCH

General Banking
DAVID BRANCH
CRI8TOBAL BRANCH
BALBOA BRANCH
Wt Specialize in Financing Imports and Export
Casten
Corn . .
Yarbro. .
Lavalle .
Harvey .
Handicap.
ACME FAINTS
116
99
128
129
116
160
137
121'
131
149
116
160
148 401
116 336
123 382
158 431
146 378
160 480
Totals.
748 814 8462408
Vale
Hellwlg. ,
Prltchard.
Coffey .
Reichert .
Handicap.
Totals. .
AMERICAN CLUB
. 99 104 132
127
138
184
162
144
115
124
180
145
144
335
129 371
106 368
200 564
127 434
432
854 812 8382504
Hicks.
Murdock .
Henry. .
Lane . .
Allen . .
Handicap.
Totals. .
CANADA DRY
113
125
163
159
134
153
15?
123
142
156
169
153
108 373
140 388
129 434
137 452
169 472
153 459
847 895 8362578

Help Your Piles
Don't niftar from ptinful. Itching
Pll another hour without trying
Chlftirol*. Upon aspUoatlon Chlnaroi*
tarta curbln PU* mlMiio* S waya: 1.
- Baaaa pain and lichln. 1. H.Ip. ahrlnk
ora. awollaa tlaauaa. I. Balpa natura
h.al trrltatad manbraaaa and aliar Pila
Narrouinaaa. Aik year l>ru*lat BM
CMaaraM toiaf. _
Distributor.: CIA. CYRNOS, S. A.
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i

SATURDAY. 8EPTFMBBF , 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAD. NEW8PAPI
PAGE NINE
Southern Conference 'Outlaws' Bowl Games
Representatives Recommend
Curb On 'Spring Practice'
By Uni'iz Press
CHAPEL HILL, N. C, Sept. 29.Representa-
tives of the 17 Southern Conference schools passed
a motion yesterday, by a 13 to one vote, outlawing
paricipation in post season games by Conference
teams. The representatives also recommended a curb
on spring practice.
Delegates to the 17-member
conference met here on .the call
of Gordon Uray, president of the
University of North Caro.'lna. All
participating schools were repre-
sented but only one, Clemson,
vo^ed against anti-Bowl ruling.
A spokesman for the confer-
ence officials said the ruling
would become effective this year.
Delegates made sure their deci-
sion would stick by agreeing to
bind their representatives at the
next conference meeting in De-
cember to follow the earlier deci-
sion.
lie anti-Bowl decision came
almost five hours after the
meeting began. The additional
action binding delegates at the
nest meeting was taken after
conference Commissioner Wal-
lace Wade commended the del-
egates on "a fine action," but
asked. "But do you mean busi-
ness?"
The grouo also passed a motion
unanimously asking fcr "definite
restrictions" on elimination of
spring practice and other off-
season training in football and
other sports.
Wade, who recommended the
motion, said It was one of a group
proposed by conference commis-
sioners at a national meeting
earlier this year.
The group also voted to ban
athletes from participating in
varsity sports when they have
transferred from another school.
An earlier conlerence ruling held
they could participate alter a
year of residence.
Traditionally, the huge con-
ference has contributed heavily
to Bowl games. Last year Wash-
ington and Lee mythical "Cham-
pion" of the conference, met Wy-
oming in the 'Gator Bowl at
Jacksonville, Fla., and Clemson
played Miami of Florida In the
Orange Bowl.
Duke and North Carolina,
both voted in favor of trie ban.
North Carolina State, Wash-
ington and Lee and Maryland
abstained from the vote. The
final count was 13 for, one
aea'nst.
Wade presented 11 recommen-
dations in all to the conference
Along The Fairways
The "Crazy Tournament" and
luncheon at Amador Thursday
had a record attendance of wom-
en golfers, and was voted a big
success.
Frizes were won bv Mrs. Irene
Eason, Mrs Birdie Hewitt. Mrs.
Reb Peachoi, Mrs. Kay Withers,
Mrs. Marian Mallory, Mrs. Olena
Harrington, Mrs'. Mary Agnes 81-
gafoos, Mrs. Pat Williams, Mrs.
Clara Walters, Mrs Connie
Thompson, Mrs. Wauntta Wol-
ters. Mrs. Helen Howell, Mrs. Al-
lda Lehman.
We hope the turnout will ap-
proach this for the Match Play
vs. Far Tourney next Thursday,
Octi 4.
~lease don't forget the Scotch
Fovrsome Sunday, Oct. 14. Wom-
en Dlayers contact Mrs. Brown,
82-5118^Mrs. Hamilton. 84-5115;
Mrs. Donley, 86-3101. Men regis-
ter with Mr. Hammond.
delegates, most of them concern-
ing minor action. He pointed out
that the group could only recom-
mend now, and final binding ac-
tion would have to come at the
December meeting.
This was the second confer-
ence meeting of the year, called
to take up administrative re-
sponsibilities "in an attempt to
develop' further an atmosphere
of complete mutual confidence
and trust," Gray said.
Last March, the conference ap-
proved NCAA recruiting provi-
sions and asked for machinery
to effect compliance with them.
Other conference members are
the Citadel, Davidson, Furman,
George Washington, Richmond',
South Carolina. Virginia Military
Institute, Virginia Polytechnic
Institute, Wake Forest, West Vir-
ginia and William and Mary.
Dr. Irvln Stewart, president of
West Virginia, Insisted on the
rollcall vote on the Bowl mo-
tion.
The recommendation to ban
spring practice was softened by
clause making It effective "so
far as practicable." A confer-
ence spokesman explained lat-
er he expected it would amount
merely to a limitation of the
time of spring practice, prob- ,
ably to about three weeks.
Other recommendations passed
Included:
An amendment to the confer-
ence constitution allowing each
member one vote, to be cast by
the school's president or another
administrative officer or faculty
member whose primary duty is
not In athletics.
A proposal to establish uni-
form entrance requirements for
athletes, working from standards
suggested by southern colleges
and secondary schools.
A proposal to bar coaches from
handling all-star teams, or from
interviewing high school athletes
participating in all-star games at
the games or en route to and
from them.
Fourteen of the 17 college pres-
Interest In Adult
Recreation Increasing
At'Di?bIo Gymnasium
Activities for adults at the Dia-
blo Gym are being attended by a
larger number each week. Acti-
vities at present are in the em-
bryo stage for ping pong, shuffle-
board, badminton, volleyball and
handball.
A sma'l orchestra is beginning
to practice weekly. Some of you
might be Interested In a singing
grourj or helping out with the
children's program or special
day? such as Hallowe'en, etc.
Due to a number of people tak-
ing night courses at the Junior
College it has been necessary to
change the general adult evening
from Thursday to Tuesday.
Starting on Oct. 1, the adults
will meet every Tuesday evening
and the children will meet on
Thursday evenings from 7 to 9S0.
Please remember that If you
have an Interest In any recrea-
tion activity or hobby and would
like to have a group organized,
drop In or eall Mr. Mower or Mrs.
Morris at the irvm and, If at all
possible, they will be glad to help
you.
Ex-Michigan Grid
Star Says Victories
Rate Over Fair Play
BOSTON, Sept. 29 (UP) A
former football star at Michigan
charges that the university rated
football victories over fair play,
sportsmanship or book learning
during his three years on the
team. /
The man who made this state-
ment In a magazine articleIn
the October Issue of Atlantic
MonthlyIs Allen Jackson. Jack-
son was a letterman three years
at Michigan and played In the
Rose Bowl game.
"The supposed benefits of big-
time football are either grossly
exaggerated or completely imag-
inary," Jackson say3 in the arti-
cle. "And It seems to me that most
of the enormous amount of time
I spent on the gridiron was wast-
ed."
Jackson says that big-time
football has no respect for the
Individual's word-or body. "At
Michigan," adds Jackson, "to win
Is of utmost Importance. Fair
play and sportsmanship arc fine
but to win Is of utmost Impor-
tance." ,
Dismissed West Pointers May
Get Another Chance To Return

SJu'** Briefs
By UNITED PRES8
One of the 90 cadets expelled
from West Point for cheating
claims Army football actually
overshadowed military studies In
come/tastances.
He is William Shine, a former
varsity boxer from South Boston.
"One day In mathematics
class," charges Shine, "the pro-
fessor told us to write down
what we thought the football
score would be. The one who
came closest to the score," adds
Shine, ".would have the choice
of not having his papers graded
on Saturday or the next Mon-
day."
Shine also says an Informer
told Array authorities last Jan-
uary that cribbing was going on,
but nothing was done until Au-
gust.
Ohio State has gained a back-
field map and Harvard may lose
one. Ohio State officials have
lifted the suspension of fullback
Johnny Hlay. He had been sus-
pended for being convicted in a
barroom brawl on Sept. 15. Hlay
la eligible ^effective Oct. 8 which
means he will miss the gamej
against Southern Methodist' aha
Michigan State.
Harvard's captain and ace
passerCarroll Lowenstelnmay
go Into the Army after Satur-
day's game with Holy Cross. Lo-
wensteln has been ordered to re-
port for induction next week in
Maiden, Massachusetts. The Har-
vard captain says he is 1-A but
may be rejected because of a
broken ankle suffered during
spring practice.
JAMBOREE TROPHY Cristobal's Captain Paul Whitlock
and Queen Karen Stroop pose with the beautiful traveling
trophy, donated bv Smoot and Hunnlcutt of 'Colon, to be
presented to the winning school at the Tri-School Jamboree.
THE SAVINGS BANK
Institution Guaranteed by the State
Pays 2% Interest Annually on Savings Accounts
INITIAL DEPOSIT $5.00
We make loan with guarantees on firat mortage
or other securities.
CHRISTMAS SAVINGS
~5c. SCc. $1.00 and $5.00
deposits are accepted thru a period
of 48 weeks.
Individual safety deposit boxes, for 'jewelry and
documents, in 4 different sizes.
OFFICE IN PANAMA:
10 Central Are. at
eorner of "I" Street.
. R. Ik ROUX
Manager
COLON BRANCH:
Front 8t. at eorner
of 7th St
CARLOS JViOUYNES V.
Sub-Manager.
HOURS:
Iron. 8:00 a.m to 12:30 p.m
SATURDAYS: from 8:00 a m to 12:0 p.m
X
Pinch Hitter
Came Through
HATTIESBUKG. Miss., Sept. 29
(UP i J. L. "Bo" Pierce was rest-
ing; at home when an emergency
call came from his old team-
mates on the Purvis. Miss., town
baseball team.
The team was losing In a cham-
pionship game. "Bo" climbed into
his baseball uniform, drove the
12 miles to Purvis, and arrived to
find Purvis trailing 2-5.
- Put in as a pinch hitter. Pierce
banged out a home run with the
bases loaded, circled the bases
and drove back to Hattlesburg.
He was back home 40 minutes
and four runs after the telephone
call from Purvis.
WITH AN
BATTERY
YOU GET
HIGH POWER RUGGEDNESS
FOR FARM MACHINERY
THE STOHY OF THE JET FLYERS
Stephen McNally Gail
Russell, in
"AIR CADET"
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air Conditioned
* THIPri ATTRACTION I
TURPIN vs.*ROBINSON
Return Match I
CUuJette Colbert, In
'RIDE FOR SALE"
John Wayne, In
"BACK TO BATAAN"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
A Great Double Program I
TIVOLI THEATRE
Glenn Ford Rhonda
.Fleming. In
"THE COWBOY AND THE
REDHEAD"
Bob Hope. In
"THE I.EMON DROP KID"
Gary Cooper Jane Greer.
- In -
"YOU'RE IN THE
NAVY NOW
Danny Kaye Gene Tiemey
- In -
"ON THE RIVIERA"
VICTORIA THEATRE
"THE BLACK SPIDER" "
Chapters 10 and 11
- Also: -
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DEPENDABLE BATTERIES
FOR 61 YEARS!
Distributors:
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CANADIAN WHISK!
^%t<&et
NEW YORK, Sept. 29 (UP)
Some of the 90 cadets dismissed
from West Foint for cheating
during examinations may get
another chance to return to the
academy.
Army Secretary Frank Pace,
Jr., says the 90 cadets are eligi-
ble to re-enter West Point pro-
vided they can get another ap-
pointment. The final decision on
whether any re-appointed cadets
should be re-admitted would be
up to the Military Academy's Ac-
ademic Board. The board is made
up of the academy superintend-
ent, the commandant of cadets
and 13 other officers on the West
Point staff. The cadet, to be re-
nominated by a congressman al-
so would have to be within the
age limits of 17 through 22 years.
"Conceivably, a congressman
may re-nominate one of those
men," says an Army spokesman.
"If they are within the age lim-
its. Their reappolntment, how-
ever, rests with the Academic
Board at the academy."
Pace also says any of the 90
cadets may enlist In the reserves
of the regular Army, attend of-
ficer candidate school and enroll
in College Reserve Officers
Training Corps.
Robert Daru, general counsel
fOr the New York Criminal and
Civil Cpurts Bar Association, re-
ceived word of Pace's ruling while
In York, Maine. Daru Is In New
England in connection with the
association's investigation of the
West Point scandal. He went to
Maine after taking depositions
from some of the ousted cadets
at public hearings in Boston.
Daru says he will proceed with
plans to hold additional hearings
at South Bend. Indiana, Chicago
and on the West Coast.
Daru says the hearings are in-
tended to show that the rights of
the expelled cadets were tram-
pied upon" and their punishment
was a "grave injustice."
Isthmian Sports
Cage players In the Pacific
Boys' Club Basketball League are
ready again this year for the an-
nual battle for supremacy. The
kids of the Junior circuit, like
their older brothers, have been
busy getting their regular lim-
bering up, with the view of being
in tip top form for the forthcom-
ing season.
With the exception of Depor-
tlvo Brewster, all the teams that
participated In last year's loop
will be on the floor again. The
list includes Lavandera Tropical,
two time's winners of the circuit,
BURUB
:niz ClAIR
mi
AtlNC
AROUND UK
' WOMB t
AN MTERNATIONAl
STRIP TEASE BATTLE
mmnc wet
ADULTS ONLY!
(NEA Telephoto)
DODGERS GET MAD The Brooklyn Dodgers execute
snappy double-play in Boston, but It was all to no avail as
the Braves won out 4-3 to slash the Bums' lead In the Na-
tional League. Here Jackie Robinson steps on second base
to force Earl Torgeson, then fires to first to double up Sid
Gordon.i Pee Wee Reese watches in the background.
S
Treos, Halcones, and Mueblera and serve to offer keener rlvalrj
Rojas. to fans.
The league's initial meeting
was held last week, with repre-
sentatives of most of the teams
attending. The next meeting is
scheduled for Monday night, Oct.
1, at the Pacific Clubhouse com-
mencing at 7 o'clock.
A point of much interest Is the
exerted efforts of most of the
outfits in scouting additional
power for their lineups. The
teams are endeavoring to match
stride with the strong Lavande-
ra quintet, which stands predo-
minant in the loop, having won
the two previous years. The bol-
stering of the squads will no
doubt add interest to the league,
T
Buy MORE LOTTERY
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Because you have an otra
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Tune in Sunday 11 ugtuB
HJ.M.21 1060 K.C. Radio
Newspaper of George Williams.
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Courtesy of PAULS MARKET.
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Sun. "Cspt Horaria
Cristobal 6:15 8:15
CUften WEBB
"MR. BELVEDERE
RINGS THE BELL"
A]*o Showlns Sunday)


^p
RED HOT N.L. BATTLE CONTINUES
Deadlocked Bums,
NY To Go Ail-Out
So. Conference
Quits Bowl Tilts
AN INDEPENDE^

fie Your Own Traffic Policeman
daily newspaper
The League's Best
(Includes Last Night's
Games)
National League
Stan Miisial. Cardinals.....357
Richie Ashburn, Phillies.....339
Jackie Robinson. DoJcers .. .333
d Campanilla. Dodgers .. .32
Montr Irvin. Giants ....
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1951
FIVE CENTS
.316
American League
Ferris Fain. Athletics......347
Orestes Mioso, White Sox .326
Georce Kell. Tigers.......318
Ted Williams, Red Sox.....318
Nelson Fox. White Sox.....317
(SPORTS PAGES: 8 & 9)
Florida's Gov. Fuller Warren
Sues Colliers for $1 Million
By Barbara Frye
The suit was the second filed
by a Florida Governor against
TALLAHASSEE. Fla., Sept. 29 Collier's Magazine. Hillard
(UP) Gov. Fuller Warren Caldwell asked Collier's for
asked Colliers Magazine today $500,000 in connection with an
for $1.000,000 In damages he, article on Caldwell's ideas on
claims he suffered as a result j the (Negro question,
of the article, "Secret Mr. Big i
of Florida." After winning two verdicts
Attorney Weldon G. Starry for $237.542 and then $100,000,
filed the suit for the Gover- and losing two appeals In hlgh-
I nor In Federal District Court er courts. Caldwell'aettled with
No Increased Rales
For Southern Bell
Telephone Company
TALLAHASSEE. Fla.. Sept. 29
'UPiSouthern Bell Telephone
Co.. which serves 80 per cent of
Florida, today lost its fight for I Johnston, owner of race tracks
an immediate temporary in- in Florida and Chicago.
here against the Crowell-Col-
lier Publishing Co.
The article was authored by
Lester Velle After U. S. Sen-
ate Crime Committee hearings
in Miami. The article identi-
fied "Mr. Big" as William H.
crease of 25 per cent in rates.
The State Railroad and Pub-
lic Utilities Commission denied
Southern Bell's petition to in-
stall the rate hike while hear-
ings are still being held on the
company's appeal for a per-
manent hike of 25 per cent.
Today's decision does not af-
fect the company's petition for
the permanent increase for
extra funds to assure Southern
Bell of an 8.25 per cent return
on investment.
The Utilities Commission said
the company has failed to
make a satisfactory showing
that its losses, if any. are con-
flscatory under current charges.
The agency said It did not feel
justified in disturbing present
rates since it would be ruling
shortly on the application for a
permanent increase in lntra-
(tate rales.
A final hearing on the per-
manent increase proposal is set
for Miami Oct. 29.
An increase granted Southern
Ball would affect 400.000 sub-
scribers in 140 Florida com-
munities.
The crime committee hear-
ings brought out that Johns-
ton and two other Florida mil-
lionaires, citrus grower C. V.
the magazine out of court for
$50.000. Warren referred to this
suit in his action, contending
that the Court convicted Col-
lier's of "lying about Cald-
well..."
Warren's suit charged that
publication of the article was
"maliciously and wickedly done
with the Intent of casting ri-
dicule and contempt upon"
Warren by portraying him as
a Governor "who had entered
Into an unlawful conspiracy
with certain named .individuals,
the purpose of which was to
so manipulate the placing of
State business as unlawfully
Pepper Not Sure Hell Join Senate
Race, But Still "Toying With Idea"
TALLAHASSE, Fla., Sept. 29 elusion; that at the proper time
Griffin and industrallst Louis (UP Claude Pepper denied a 1 would make an announcement
E. Wolfson, contributed some I newspaper report today that he
$400.000 to help Warren get! has definitely tossed his hat
4 Donaldson Airmen
Lose Their Way Home
GREENVILLE. S. C. Sept. 29
UPI Four airmen from Don-
aldson Air Force Base still had
red laces today following an
"extended'' trip from Atlanta.
The four went to Atlanta last
elected.
The magazine story said
Johnston. Griffin and Wolfson
met with Warren to "divide"
up the state's business.
This statement, the Gov-
ernor said in his suit, is
"false, damaging and libel-
ous.''
"The. article with its false
statement, inferences and in-
nuendos. has served to defame
and impair the plaintiff (War-
ren) as a law abiding citizen
and as a constitutional officer
(Governor of a sovereign state,
and to leave the Impression...
that (Warren) had violated his
oath of office and been guilty
of criminal conduct," the suit
said.
Democracy-A Word
Of Many Meanings
COLUMBIA. 8. C.j Sept. 29.
(An authority on Scandinavia
told the University of South
Carolina student body today
that democracy Is a word of
many meanings.
Dr. Henry Goddard Leach,
speaking at the first fall as-
sembly in the University field
weekned to see the Georgia house, said "democracy through-
Tech-Southern Methodist Uni-
versity football game.
Returning through heavy fog.
they took a wrong turn at the
intersection of two highways.
The mistake was not discover-
ed1" until the Airmen passed a
sign which read "Ashevllle,
North CarolinaCity Limits."
out the world is a most popular
word and even the Communists
like to call their government
a people's democracy'."
Leach said Icelanders are the
most democratic and individual-
istic Scandanavians.
"A study of them reveals what
it Is to be "American." he said.
into the ring for Florida's Sen-
ate election next year, but said
he is still toying with the idea.
The former Senator said the
Defunlak Springs Weekly He-
rald "inadvertantly misquoted"
him when it published that
Pepper announced his decision
to run against Sen. Spessard
Holland in 1952.
The newspaper article, claim-
ing to be an exclusive telephone
interview, quoted Pepper as
saying "I am preparing to make
the Senate race at the request
of my '/lends, and most prob-
ably will be in the race. My
present intentions are to run.1"
Pepper admitted that he Is
"giving consideration" to mak-
ing an attempt to regain the
seat in the Senate where he
served 14 years until his de-
feat in 1950. But he said he
has made "no decisin about
the matter.."
"I am shocked that I was
misquoted by Mr. Storrs (Ho-
ward Storrs, Editor of the De-
funlak Herald." Pepper said in
a statement released through
E. A. Falrcloth. the ex-Senat-
or's law partne.- here.
"Some friends called me from
his (Storrs) office and discus-
sed with me the matter of my
being a candidate for the Sen-
ate. I told them Just what I've
been saying publicly for some
time that I've had numer-
ous requests and urging from
friends over the state that I
should maki the race; that I
was giving consideration to It
but had not come to any con-
on the subject."
In Defuniak Springs, Storrs
stuck to his guns.
"He told me he was planning
to run," protested the Editor.
"That he'd be letting his friends
down if he didn't. He said ex-
actly what I quoted him as
saying and I told him I was
going to publish it In the pa*
Per."
"You can't call a Senator a
liar." Storrs complained, 'But
that's what he said."
and unjustly to enrich such
.individuals at the expense of
trie state..."
The Governor also said he
was "maliciously and wicked-
ly" portrayed aa permitting
the power of his office for
the "purpose of affording
protection to the operation
of certain illegal gambling
enterprises for the benefit of
the alleged conspirators."
"As a contributing result of
said article," Warren said
"there were introduced in the
House of Representatives ar-
ticles... designed and having
for their purpose the impeach-
ment (of the Governor.)"
The Governor, taking up sev-
eral statements in 'the maga-
zine article and branding them
false, said no meeting was ever
held by him and three men to
divide up the State's business.
The Governor said' the dam-
age done by the article would
continue against him
Mrs. Rita Siegel's
Funeral Services
Will Be Tuesday
- R1rrfl?L.swhic^.HifoH.. sj-
ss* remainder of his fife ^ ft^ 'ftX *
be conducted Tuesday morn-
The lives of school children depend on your skill and Judgment as a driver. Heed this ahrn
wherever you see It; obey the speed limit set for school zones, and drive with extra ca.ftlon
through them. The life you save may be your own child's. vSSSSmSn^^SSn
SrTXSti^l^'Siff' nC*ly enr0Ued 1D "-". dramatizeos6/ $
and throughout, his personal
and professional affairs."
PC
To
Ice
One of the large building pro-
jects of the Panama Canal Com-
pany in the 1952 fiscal year will
be the construction of a $500.000
lee cream and milk bottling plant
for the Commissary Division at
Mount Hope, It has been an-
nounced by L. B. Moore. Supply
and Service Director.
The project will be advertised
for bids starting November 18
and the bids will be opened Jan-
uary 18. It Is expected that con-
struction will start about the
first of March.
The construction to be done
this year Is part of a three-year.
jr.500.000 project to expand and
modernize the storage, receiving
and distribution units of the
Commissary Division at Mount
Hope.
Preliminary work done during
the past year included the relo-
cation of Whitlock Street, work
on sewer and electrical lines and
the demolition of a storage shed
back of the wholesale grocery
warehouse where the new ice
cream and milk bottling plant
will be located.
The three-year modernization
program will include the building
of the Ice cream and milk bot-
tling plant; construction of a new
cold storage plant; the conver-
sion of most of the present cold
storage into drv storage and the
remodeling of the present indus-
trial laboratory.
The program Is scheduled for
eorr-letlon in the 1954 fiscal
year.
The new ice cream and milk
bet'Ung plant will be located
Berth of the oreaeat bakery
and storage building. It will be '
{ene-ttory building with a
arement, with the center see- \
Men of the structure higher
than the rest of the building, j
Ask Bids on $500,000
Cream, Bottling Works
It will be a steel frame struc-
ture with walls of concrete and
hallow tilt and glass black pan-
els.
The Interior walls will be of
glazed structural tile. The floors
of all manufacturing and pro-
cessing rooms will have special
industrial brick "slip proof"
floors.
Other special features will be
the elimination of all overhead
piping and the use of flush type
lights with no projecting parts
which can catch dust.
The milk line in the new build-
ing will be much more direct
than in the present plant, elim-
inating many present operations
In the receiving, bottling and de-
livery of milk.
The new plant will not be air
conditioned-but will have forced
ventilation. Ammonia will be pip-
ed from the present cold storage
plant for refrigerated areas.
The temperature In the hard-
ening and packing rooms for ice
cream will be 20 below aero.
The building will also have a
small office and laboratory for
the daily checks of the milk.
There will be a large bottle stor-
age area and room for storage of
paper packaging for ice cream
and other dairy products.
There will be railroad trackage
on the west side of the building
to receive shipments. The north
end of the plant will have a cov-
ered loading platform for trucks.
Equipment In the new plant
will be the most modern avall-
le. About 15S.0O0 worth of
new equipment will be purchas-
ed and the remainder will be
taken from the present plant.
J. A. MeKlnley, refrigeration
engineer from Washington, D.C.,
has served as consultant on the
construction. He has been on the
Isthmus about 16 months work-
ing on the ice cream and milk
bottling plant and will also be
here to assist In the design and
construction of other parts of
the Commissary Division moder-
nization program at Mount Hope.
Preliminary plans for the Mt.
Hope building program have
been under consideration for a-
bout three yean by Canal offi-
cials and the plans were also
studied by a firm of consultants
on refrigerations and cold stor-
age plants.
The need for increasing and
modernizing the storage and
handling facilities at Mounl
Hope have long been apparent,
acordlng to Commissary Division
officials.
The cold storage warehouse,
for instance, was completed in
1919 when ten retail stores were
doing a total business of about
$12.000,000 annually, as compared
to the present 19 stores with a
business volume of $25,000,000
yearly.
Changes in merchandising, in-
cluding the general use of frost-
ed foods, have contributed to the
need for additional space and
facilities at Mount Hope.
Certain parts of the buildings
are unsatisfactory, preventing
the use of modern methods of
handling food products. The pre-
sent cold storage plant, for in-
stance, has deteriorated to the
point that considerable expense
is involved in maintenance on the
insulation to maintain the re-
quired temperature.
Studies made in 1947 indicated
that complete rehabilitation of
the present plant would not be
economically feasible.
The over-all modernization
program was originally planned
as a $4.000.000 project but chang-
es were made in the original
plans la the Interest of economy.
Cry of 'Burglar*
Brings Riot Squad
To Nurses' Quarters
There were more than enfragh
police available to answer an
emergency call from- a nurses
quarters In Ancon early yes-
terday.
The call was received as the
7 a. m. shift was preparing to
leave the Ancon station. A
maid reported that she had
seen a burglar in the build-
ing.
The Ancon policemen quickly
rushed to the building No. 288-
A and surrounded it. In a
short time, a man was spotted
attempting to hide behind a
car.
Police Identified him as Luis
A. Mosquera, 23, Panamanian.
Mosquera was booked for bur-
glary. He win. appear Monday
morning in Balboa Magistrate's
Court for preliminary hearing.
He is being held in default of
$500 bail.
Panama Auto Club
Executive Board
To Meet Tuesday
Leopoldo Arosemena. presi-
dent of the Panama Automobile
Club announced today that there
will be an Executive Board
meeting at 4:30 p. m. on Tues-
day in the board room of the
Administration Building in Bal-
boa.
Bishop Gooden Off
To Bring Back Body
Of Rev. Montgomery
The Rt. Rev. Reginald Heber
Gooden left yesterday bv plane
for Santa Marta. Colombia,
where he will make arrange-
ments for the shipment of the
body of the Ven. Archdeacon
Gideon Clark Montgomery, who
died Wednesday night in Co-
lombia.
The Rev. Montgomery was in
charge of the Episcopal Church
of St. Andrew in Cocoli. and
was also Archdeacon of north-
ern Colombia where he was
making several visits to the
missions at the time of his
death.
He is survived by Mrs. Mont-
gomery who is at present stay-
ing with Bishop Gooden's wife
until arrangements for funeral
services here are made.
OPS Special Agents
Uncover Violations
By Packing Houses
COLUMBIA. 8. C, Sept. 29
(UP)Enforcement Director J.
Edwin Belser of the Office of
Price Stabilization said today
meat slaughter violations in
South Carolina uncovered by
OP8 special agents have soared
to 39.
Belser said of a total of 23
plants inspected today under
the nation-wide enforcement
program, 11 were found to be in
violation of OPS regulations.
The larger plants throughout
the State for the most part are
complying with regulations,
Belser said. But he said there Is
widespread violation among
the smaller packers and slaugh-
terers.
ing at 9 a.m. at St. Mary's
Church in Balboa. The services
will be followed by burial at
Corozal.
Mrs. Siegel, who was 42, had
been confined In the hospital
since July 28. A resident of
Balboa, she had been on the
Isthmus since 1917, and was
born In Mobile, Alabama.
The deceased was employed
as clerk with the Credit Union
before her illness.
She is survived by her hus-
band. Edward Siegel, a postal
clerk at Balboa, two children,
Mary Agnes, 14 and Larry, 12,
her mother Mrs. Catherine Stel-
ner of Mobile, Alabama, and
two brothers, Jerome Stelner
who is with the Paymaster's
Office of the Panama Canal,
and Charles stelner who re-
sides In Mobile, Alabama.
The body will be at the Chapel
of the Gorgas Hospital Morgue
from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday. Rosary
service will be held at 8 p.m.
Monday.
THE VOLUNTEER Bruce Graeber. 2ft, of Belleville, 111., is
in critical condition from epilepsy and complications at an
East St. Louis, 111., hospital. Hi parents. Mr. and Mrs. Ar-
thur Graeber, have offered their son for medical research. In
the hopes that a treatment may be discovered. Bruce's
doctors say a brain operation may save his life.
Tone Weds Barbara Payton
In I last y Hometown Ceremony
By Cart H. Adam
CLOQUET. Minn., Sept. 29 (UP) house on Chestnut Street, where
Actor Franchot Tone and sha lived as a child. Her two
blonde Actress Barbara Payton. spinster aunts. Muriel and Faye
were married last night In ahur- Redfttld, live there still,
ry-up private ceremony at her
family home here. Tone tried to disguise himself
The two screen stars made as "Sam Pascal" while flying
their plans known shortly after half way across the continent to
Misi Paxton, bare-legged but Join Miss Payton for the surprise
wearing a mink coat, rushed to wedding, but airline press agents
greet Tone with a hug as his disclosed his Identity. '
plane landed at Duluth. When his plane landed at Du-
Tone. still showing the effects luth municipal airport, Miss
of a beating administered by ac- Payton dashed from the waiting
tor Tom Neal in a Hollywood room to meet him, her blonde
brawl for Miss Payton* affec- locks flying,
tions. left Los Angeles by plane Dahllng." she shrieked,
late yesterday. TOne, who had paused to let
He and his fiancee motored news photogeapher "Get all set."
here from Duluth and then drove bounded down the ramp and into
to the county seat at carl ton to a clinch.
get a waiver of the five-day wait- After repeating the embrace
ing period required for Mlnneso- for photographers several tunes,
t*-mar^UIe,, Ton notkadafls* Payton's four-
The couple picked up a mar- year-old son, John Lee, bouncing
riage license at the county clerks up ad down at his mother's side,
office and were granted the dressed in i cowboy rait,
waiver by Judge Edward John- Too* and Ml** Payton. who
son after explaining that Miss claimed tbwy were "mistreated"
Payton must leave on a publieBy by Hollywood newsmen, smiled
tour shortly. affably a* they posed for photo-
The ceremony wu bold in the graph*.
"Yes, I always order White Horse
For every man whose palate it responsive to fine flavour,
here is the whisky of his choice. White Horse I Smooth
to the taste; mellow because it has been so long maturing
made among those Scottish hills where. Scotsmen and
their fathers and foretathers before them have perfected
the art of distilling beyond all comparison. How can you
be sure of always enjoying such truly fine whisky? By
always asking for White Horse by name.
WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky
A pUasurt to rsmsmbsra joy to t again
Sth DimOmmu COMPAUA CYJtNOS SU. COLON & PANAMA

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