<%BANNER%>

PCANAL



PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Panama American
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01246
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01246
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text

^3>

,
**BRANIFF
AN INDEPENDENT

J^ILY NW8PAPB
GUAYAQUIL
ONI WAY------$ M.PO
ROUND TTUP.. 167.40
'
"Let the people know the truth and the country i$ $afe" Abraham Lincoln.

TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR
PANAMA. R. P., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 151
FIVE CENTS

REVOLT

ARGENTINA
-"


They're In The Army Now

LOOKS^KINDA BIG... Herbert T. Leggett, Jr. holds up a
pair of Army Bvd's to see if they're his size, while Law-
rence T. Fortner stands by.
THIS IS NO BAG OTRICKS. Ex-Magician Fortner (left)
stus his duffle bag full as John G. Johnson follows
his exrmple.
HOW'S YOUR -heartbeat. Mister? Captain Gerald P. Wants (left) listens to Carlos A.
Young's ticker while Sgt. Doyce Pope takes Johnson's bloodpressure.
__ o -----.
-HOLD UP- YOUR WGHT BAND! Warrant Offlctr D. E. Carter (extreme right) smears
in the six Canal Zone youths who were the first to be drafted in the new selective service
letup here. Shown, left to right, are Johnson. Young, Fortner. John 3. Pashnles, Reed R. Mc-
vDvaJne, and Leggett. *
A seventh, Leo L. Preeho, originally In the aroup. failed a, pa*, the med'cal examination.
Now Truman
Will Pay
Taxes, Tool
1 '9SHrOTOW,,iJt'.^'i
The Senate voted overwhe
ingly yesterday to make the Pre-
sident, Vice president and mem-
bers of Congress pay Income
taxes on their now tax-free ex-
pense allowances, but not until
a new Congress convenes Jan. 3,
1953.
In other words, members of the
present Congress afe not affect-
ed.
By a 77 to ll vote, the Senate
approved an amendment to the
$5.500,000,000 tax increase bill
which in effort would Impose a
wage cut on the officials if It is
approved by the House and sign-
ed by the President.
Under present law. President
Truman gets a $100,000-a-year
salary and a $50,000-a-year tax-
free expense allowance. Vice Pre-
sident Alben W. Barkley and
House Speaker Sam Rayburn
each get a $30,000 salary and a
$10,000-a-year tax-exempt al-
lowance.
Senators and- Representatives
get a $12,500 salary and a $2,500
tax-free expense account.
The amendment, sponsored by
Sen. John J. Williams, R., Del.,
would make no changes in the
amount of money received by the
President.and members of Con-
stress, but all of it would be sub-
ject to regular income taxes.
Hope Increases For
King's Recovery;
Princess Plans Trip
LCWDON. Sept. 28 (UP)
Hope rose in millions of British
subjects of King George today
as he reached the first stages
of recovery from a serious
operation on his Jung.
"The King has had another
comfortable night and Is mak-
ing steady progress," Royal
doctors announced In, a bulletin
this morning.
The events of, the last 48
hours Indicate that the King
is progressing better than had
been hoped for. His chances
now seem better than ever.
Princess Elizabeth and the
Duke of Edinburgh planned to
start their Canadian tour Oct.
9 from Quebec, and would also
Include a visit to Washington
if Truman can fit their revised
schedule into his.
The period of anxiety over
the King's health will not end
however, until the end of next
week. But that will be before
the departure of Elizabeth and
her husband.
Meanwhile, a Council of State
composed of five members of
the Royal family took over the
King's duties, and started
clearing away an accumula-
tion of paper work that was
backlegged since his operation.
Queen Elizabeth, princess Eli-
zabeth. Princess Margaret, who
Is councillor for the first time,
the Duke of Gloucester and the
Princess Royal form the Coun-
cil.
Army Declares Uprising
Against Peron's Regime
Bradleyln
Tokyo For
War Talk
TOKYO, Sept. 28 (UP)Gen-
eral of the Amy Omar Bradley
and State Department Expert on
Russia Charles E. Bohlen arrived
in Tokyo from the United States
by air today.
They will discuss with United
Nations Supreme Commander
General Matthew Ridgway, prob-
lems of the Korean ceasefire sit-
uation and the possibility that
full scale war may erupt against
the Communists.
Officially they are here for "a
routine survey of the entire Ko-
rean situation."
Shortly before Bradley'arrived
here Pelping Radio announced
Ridgway s new proposals to shift
scene of the ceasefire, talks
ght miles
BUENOS AIRES, Sept. 28 (UP). Revolution broke out
here today against the Peron Government.
President Juan D. Peron declared a nationwide state of'
internal war.
The Government Radio said the rebellion was started by
the Army. Generals Arturo Rawson and Benjamin Menendez
were named as leaders.
_ gwayls
eanylng out orders from Wash-
ington to use the change of site
question to block the resumption
of the ceasefire conference.
Red Chinese
By Thousands
Hit UN Lines
8TH ARMY HQ.. Sept. 28 (UP)
Thousands of Com m u n i s t
troops hit the United Nations
line along a 60-mile front across
Korea today in the biggest series
of Red ground attacks in recent
Chinese and North Koreans
struck in company to battalion
strength all the way from the
fireviously quiet west central
ront above Seoul to the Punch-
bowl Valley, north of Inje In the
eastern moun^ins.
All the initial Red thrusts were
repulsed, but fighting still raged
in some sectors.
The Reds appeared to have
been goadd into counter-action
by the relentless "killer attacks"
of the 8th Army
In the air United Nations
planes in the past 24 hours des-
troyed or damaged a record
breaking 1,121 Communist trucks
lerrying supplies and reinforce-
ments to the front.
Eight Supcrforts aiming by ra-
dar bombed a railroad bridge
across the Tacdong River In the
center of Kaesong. Other Super-
forts hit supuly areas near the,
oorts of Kyor.ilpo and Chlnnam-
po.
United Nations jets patrolled:
Mig Alley but no Red fighters
rose to challenge them.
HukTeadeTKied
By Philippine
Government Force
MANILA, Sept. 28 (UP) The
Philippines Defense Department
said today that Guillermo Capa-
docla. 45, one of the top leader
of Hukbalahaps vas killed by
Rovernment forces In the Panay
Island In the Southern Philip-
pines.
Capadocla was the leader of
the dissidents on Vlsayan Is-
land's Mindanao.
Iranians Grab
Abadan In Fast
Dawn Operation
TEHERAN, Iran, Sept. 28
(UP) Iranian soldiers took
over the giant Abadan refinery
of the naltonalized Anglo-Ame-
rican Oil Company yesterday
refinery gates.
Iranian troops from an sur-
rounding provinces were re-
portedly racing towards Aba-
dan today to back up the seiz-
ure of the port.
Iranian troops already In oc-
cupation were fingering their
rifles nervously within sight of
the 8,000 ton British cruiser
Mauritius, sent to the oil cen-
ter to protect British lives and
property.
Neither the British nor Unit-
ed States governments have yet
made any official comment on
the surprise Iranian move.
'The Iranians effected the
seizure in a bloodless operation
at dawn.
British technicians going to
work in the Abadan plan later
in the morning were met at
every entrance by the fixed
bayonets of the stony-faced
guards.
It is believed that before
the Iranian move Britain had
decided to refer the Abadan
case to the United Nations se-
curity council.

Military planes flew low over Buenos Aires dropping
pamphlets announcing that the Army had,left its bar-
racks to restore order in the country.
The pamphlet said the army was supported by the
Navy and Air Force, and had the support of all political
parties.
The State Radio promptly announced that "every
military man who has rebelled will be shot."
Montevideo reports say the Army gave Peron till
3:30 p.m. today to resign or face full civil war.
FLASH*
.BUENOS AIRES. Sept.
fOP)The Government Ra-
dio announced this afternoon
th*t the military, rising a-
fainst the Peron regime had
been put down, and that the
ringleaders. Generals Rawson
and Menendez, had fled.
The radio said the rebels
initially took over the military*
base at Campo de Mayo and
the Palomar air force base,
but loyal forces regained con-
trol in both places.
Churchill To Bock*
Excess Profit Tox
If Tories Win
LCCTDON, Sept. 38 (UP)
Winston Churchill pledged him-
self to Impose a form of ex-
cess profits tax on British In-
dustry during the rearmament
period, If his conservative party
is returned to office in the Oct.
25 general election.
The profits tax proposal was
the surprise of an election
manifesto written by Churchill
and Issued today by conserva-
tive headquarters.
Jos Espelo, secretary of the
General Federation of Workers,
which strongly supports the Pe-
ron regime, announced:
na sufficient sa-
r but now the Ural-
eught their own pun-
ishment
"From this moment every
worker Is converted into a sol-
dir of the Peronlst cause.
"The traitors will pass over
bodies before they can fulfil
their sinister designs."
Espejo called a nationwide
general strike which would af-
fect everything but public ser-
vices and hospitals.
All plane flights in and out of
Argentina wt-re halted.
Peron was in the Presiden-
tial Palace. The guard was
strengthened as a crowd of
about 3 0 fa 0 gathered and
jammed the streets.
Almost all stores, except gro-
cery establishments, closed.
Espejo had apparently assum-
ed the leadership of the pro-Pe-
ron faction. He broadcast.
"All workers, with all urgency
and without exception, should
concentrate in the Plaza de Ma-
yo as exponents of the unanim-
ous opinion of the Argentine
people who feel the flame of pa-
triotism burning in their breasts.
"We cannot permit our con-
quest to be swept away because
the traitors have for their ob-
jection their own ambition and
the betrayal of our sovereignty
and our country.
"The moment for decision has
arrived. We workers must show
that nothing avails against our
unbreakable will, snd the will of
the people who will defend their
conquests and their freedom with
their lives.
"Peron's rule gave them liberty
and dignity.
"Forces against our country
JUAN PERON, today facing; re-
volt in the Army that first
brought him to power.
would like to return us to slavery
and scorn.
"We say with all the force of
our spirit th.it they shall na
pass."
Labiosa Found Gui Ity Of Rape
On C.Z.; Faces Gamboa Tern
"teat-Up Pontiac Goes
On Auction Oct. 4
A public auction will be held
Oct. 4 at 10 a.m. In the Balboa
Police Station The item for sale
is a 1941 Pontiac sedan which
has been in tne custody of the
police for mr: e than 60 days.
The car was badlv damaged In
en accident, ar.d belonged to Sgt.
' eon E. Roadmaeer of Fort Clay-
too,
It took the Canal Zone jury
one hour and 23 minutes to
find Ezequlel Labiosa, 49-year-
old Puerto Rlcan, guilty of rape
yesterday In the U. S. District
Court at Ancon. The Jury re-
commended that he be sent to
the penitentiary.
Tuesday the convicted man
will be sentenced by Judge Jo-
seph J. Hancock. According to
Canal Zone law, rape is pun-
ishable by not more than 50
years in the penitentiary or not
less than one year in jail.
Labiosa was found guilty of
raping a 13-year-old Panaman-
ian girl after a three-day trial
during which the jury heard
ten government and six de-
fense witness. He posted an
additional $300 to the original
$1.000 ball yesterday, and re-
mains free until Tuesdry.
The Jnrv iced juries Han-
cock, before turning ui a vet-
diet, whether the defendant, if
found guilty would lose his
Navy retirement pension. (La-
biosa was retired last year af-
ter 38 years service as Navy
Chief.) They were told by the
court that this was out of their
Jurisdiction.
Labiosa who was an employe
of the Army Transportation
Corps as a guard In Balboa, is
married and has four children.
At yesterday afternoon's ses-
sion, during the summing up.
his wife sat and wept in the
spectator's section
She had been called to the
witness stand briefly yesterday
morning by Defense Counsel
William J. Sheridan. Jr.
The defendant had insistent-
ly denied raping the 13-year-
old girl on the morning of Julv
4th In the riavy 300 area be-
tween Diablo RoM and Qall-
i*"* Highway. The girl, who ap-
peared once in court. Identified
Labiosa as the man who. she
said, had forced himself upon
her. She had been found wan-
dering, and In a disheveled
state around noon on July 4th
by a Canal Zone policeman,
and had then showed him the
spot where the offense took
place. Army Intelligence aided
Canal Zone police in locating
Labiosa, whose car fitted the
description given by witnesses.
Acting District Attorney Row-
land K Hazard conducted the
prosecution.
The Jury, consisting of eleven
men and one young girl, re-
tired at 4:38 p.m. yesterday
to deliberate. The judge charg-
ed them with reeommendlng
whether the defendant should
be sentenced to a jail or a
penitentiary verm, if found
guilty
4
^.u. ...y


Ths PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
"Taroo and FreightShips and PlanesArrivals and Departure*
TEKRY AND THE PIRATES
HOT SPOT
1 - ^PTEMBER t, 195l|
I
K .

r
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
Arrives
New Orleans Service____________ Cristbal
S.8. Chlriqul ...................................Sept. 36
S.S. Piador Knot................................Oet. II
S.S. Chlriqni ....................................Oet. 14
(Handllni Refrlserates Chiller! aad r.uttal Caifo)
New York Freight Service
Cristobal to New Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
Arrives
Cristobal
S.S. Chlriqni .....'...............................Oct. t
S.S. Chiriaui ....................................Oct. IS
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL IU1 PANAMA 1-2804 COLON M
___JAS* ntEIGBTFJC SRRVICr BETWEEN
uaorr ad north ano south pacific coast*
A Limned Number of Pamenset Berths'
| TO KIR Or F :
Pon En B
October T
TO COLOMBIA. ECUADOR, mi C HII t
" Vlon. ....................................... October 4
TO CENTRAL AMERICA WEST COAST USA.
MS. Winnipeg .............................
. October 17
FROM NEW YORK TO PLTMOUTH 4k LE HAVRE
3*. Gemma-.......................................... October 13
Otanm........................................ October 16
rauenser Sfnici fro CARTAGENA U EUROPE Via Caribbean mrta-
'Co">"""" ....................................... October T
riMlMI. IMMII UNL r.O rto Ml lei 4-47* MM
Fenama LINDO V MADURO S A He, It
Tel Panam 1-ICU I.|M|
100K YOUR BEST
Your hair will be
handsomer by far
when you treat it to
Vaseline' Hair Tonic.
Just use a few drops
day...then see
the difference!
Buy a bottle today i
Va*l
TRAD MARK
SHE t* gill ii _
lOHNSONl
GLOCOAT
i o4sii";,,M,HC
- WAX
fir ioo
<4fif *f? //tWi" itf//7
with the wonder
polish that's now
wotor-ronleati
Yoar tile, wood or Boolean. Boor getabeautJ.
ful, protective chine in minutes, with self.
Vri*B* OoCoat. And now you can wipe
wary water or spilled tiwp. yet your floor
A*ep their throe! Johnson t CHo-Coat is now
positively wntw^epellemf Save time and
effort. Make your houatwuik easier. Get Glo-
Coat. Save money, too-boy larger wet
JOHNSON'S CLO-COAT
ACOBYTon
CANASTA
Arrives
Cristob.il
S.S. Cape A vinof ...............................Sept. t9
S.S. Sixaola ....................................Sept. 29
S.S. Morazan ...................................Oct. 6
S.S. Cape Cnmberland...........................Oct. 7
Weak!; Sslllnaj lo New York, Los Anieles, San rranrtico. Seattle
Occasional Sailing? lo New Orleans and Mobile
(Thr Sleanen In Ihts service are limited to twelve paw-enters)
frequent rrclsal Sslltnf tren Cristobal to West Coast Central America
tie ma ybe. If you meld cards
from your hand, such partners
fight on gallantly (but foolishly)
even though It may be obvious
,.!;you are trym" * meld >t.
with such a partner you can-
not try for a fast out. You must
do what you can to help him
fight for the pack. Hence you
tend to discard from strength a
trifle more often than your cards
would really warrant.
There Is another kind of part-
nerthe man who always plays
for a fast out no matter what hts
hand looks like. He always puts a
meld down on the table at the
iirtm.... j j? "i "='" meouuin caras. Me Knew he
RPafftaaV" "-Z^S ES ^ il- -Ml hand but hoped
for the pack, he gets" himself
down to two or three cards and
promptly gives the pack away to
the enemy.
With soch a partner you can-
not hope t owln the pack. You
must play for a fast out whether
you like It or not. Hence you tend
to discard from weakness at
your first turn, saving your
melds and your pairs.
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written lor NBA Service
We recently had a question a-
bout the first discard that a
P ayer should make. Should you
discard from strength (three or
four of a kind or from weakness
(no more cards to match the dls-
We have already seen that It la
very poor policy to stick unfail-
ingly io one practice. You have
to have a change of pace to keep
the enemy guessing. However
you may have a leaning toward
one method or toward the other
even though you are careful to
mix a slow ball with your fast
ball every once in a while.
Which tendency should you a-
dopt? The answer should depend
on your hand, if all players in the
game are equally good. However
the answer may depend more on
your partner than on the hand
you happen to hold.
alwavsVh! S?0-f55*3S
SSSfftffjS^A\STS tournammt * have
tie ma %tV^g?Z^JSt 5?1"" *SP. **1* * When
you get the right sort of hand
you must try to push the oppon-
ents around a bit. If they fall
down, you get a fine score/ If
they step aside, you probably find
yourself on the floor with no
points at all.
I*. last year's tournament there
was a great deal of Jockeying for
unusual results. Just as there Is
in the tournament now being
held in Washington. One of the
best bits of homswoggllng occur-
red in the hand shown today.
Dave Warner, of Philadelphia,
held the South cards. He knew he
QIn a two-handed Canasta
game I have In my mind numer-
ous cards that I could meld My
wife has four cards in her hand,
and it is her play. She draws the
last card of the stock pile, melds
three cards and discards a black
three. She still has one carrl In
her hand. Ara I then allowed to
lay down my melds before count-
ing the score?
ANo. When your opponent
discards the black three the hand
ends immediately. You are stuck
with all the cards that are still In
your hand. This Is one of the
risks you take when you keep
melda-ne cards In your hand In-
stead of putting them down on
the table.
many
Summer Excursions
toIOSANGOB
to get a good result by plavlng
at some low dlamcnd contract.
For that purpose he made a psy-
chic bid and then got on his bi-
cycle.
South's spade overean was
promptly doubled, exactly as he
had expected. If he had then
Immediately bid the diamonds, i
the opponents might have seen
the trap and avoided it. Hence he
first went to one-no-trump.
West promptly doubled one no- !
trump alsoand who can blame
him? Now the time was ripe for
Warner to mention the dia-
monds.
West quite properly passed. He
had already shown a good hand j
and good spades. He didn't have
god dJamonds.jso he cbul* afford i
to pass and hear what hi part-
ner had to say.
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
Awful Thought
BY EDGAR MARTI?*
OW-VUA'.tO TYWK "WrS OM. VCVvVfc
PU6 \S URTOKa. 031X16% I
COV\JtGt!"W SMAt c*>i.
MMK \ PUR SO MWN V\r\9V>y
v%w?>ao wea. w*. Tun
"W&4MT <&VfCfW. vw.
East bit and never felt the
hook. He should have known that
Bis partner was short in dia-
monds since he had failed to dou-
ble. He himself had onlv three
diamonds, so it was fairly clear
that South was m a fairly good
trump suit. What's more. South I
must have known in advance
I that he had this soot to run to
; and if South liked the contract it
i was prettv sure to be useless for
his opponents.
However, East doubled, and all
parsed. West opened the king of
diamonds, and dummy won with
j the ace. Now all Warner could
j lose was two trumps, two clubs
i and a heart. Two diamonds dou-
bled and made was a very fine
score considering the fact that
East and West were spread for
game in no-trump.
V% UUStttlO Ott T?
9tV5. A V* rVo e \ -\Y\\m
VC'S H%^ VM*. V
%V\%'6 ^MeWAtt'- e*V
WrWri'T. VTOSKt '%w.
\6VTC xe. ^i6
X06
CAPTAIN EASY
Off Too Soon
LESLIE TURNER
IT* A GOOD IDV,
COMJN' DOWW TO
LOOK OVER OUR.
FACTRV.ORVIU.El
A FELLER CAN?
TRUST UPDER5 TO
RDM'IS
UO 1M0EEDV1 AW I WAWTA BE
HAMDV WHEM OEM DIVIDENDS
START ROLL)'I! BESIDES, ME
spi wOsAAM MEED A RE&T.
. ONLY SIS7
SPECIAL ROUND-TRIP
EXCURSION FARES
Only Ptn American can
offer you this vacation oppor.
tunity to visit Los Angele for
this very low combined excur-
sion fare, in effect until Sep-
tember 30th. with a 30-osy
limit on the Mexico City
Lo Angeles portion of the trip
but with 60 day. to complete
your entire round trip.
Fastest Flrtht Offered
rTyinf PA A you reach Los
Angeles ths very ttm ^f
you leave here, enjoying luxu-
rious, non-stop DC-6 servacs
frsm Mexico Cay.
8m ywur Tmd A #, .
IC FLINT
Onto the City
HY MICHAEL O'MALLEI
I
I FlftURB LBNS
WILL DRIVE- MRS.
DUNJDER HOWE,
DONT VOU, ROWL?
HOW ABOUT VwwtC'
INS WER HOUSE?
WE'LL COVER TW
DUNJDER MOUSE,
INSPECTOR. BUT
BETTER MANDLB HON-
ORS*. WITH KID SLOVES-
AHE'S 60T LOT* OP
MONEV AND LOTS OP
i.UK BOAKU1N HOUSE .
wttb
. NA>OK H*HN*L 11 HI OtTE VVAf
By J R WILLIAM!)
PANAttatCAN
PMM*, L fatal N. f,
T- tA70
C4^ lm-aM,,Iw 10T7 .
HkfwrW
AIR-FLIGHT
DE LUXE
This up-to-date pa
enatr car tira with
its wide, flat tread
assures extra mile-
age- Its tough carcass
Is a protection
gainst blow-outs.
Allxperieatddriv.
rs choose Air-Plight
Da Luxe.
I i. A,
c*s i,,,,,-,. . ,,
' . 4, t.
WHswMsrl>atorvo
ESAD, 5AK6/ YOU'CE ONLY
TKy|r46 TO EXCITE MV * .
,CRlOSITy WHEM YOU HINT
WooNe got a million!- *
DOLLAR IMNIEKTIOM/-M-THE
LA4T IDEA "OO HAD WA^,
TO RUM AWAY FROM
HOME TDE5CAPe
the arduous .
lCHORBS'
' LI6TeN,6TUPe/eVEM YOO
HEERD about the atom
f BOMB.' -~ \AlELL, IT '
^WOULOA TOOK MILLIOM5
OF LIFES TILL OL*
JAlE HOOPLE COME
ALONG WITH THE
SCIEKiTtFlC DIS-
COvJERY THAT'LL MAIE
THE 8\G t?LAST AS
^HARMLESS AS A
JALOPY
.BACKFIRE.'
bl
>*&,
THEY NE>R (SOT
ME THAR.' SEE
My HAT FLY OFF ?
THEM THAR WITH
A FOOT UP ARE
DONE FER/
X
F5AU
.
r
BOY, A LONE SHERIFP ^
TACKLIN' THAT "TOUOH
RUSTLERS'NEST/ IM
GLAD YOU GOT SO MUCH
COURAGE, SHERIFF,
CUZVCXJGOTTDGO
I TDTH'DENTrSTS
MOW/
T**
u* .I
*<
V/ii. i "/,,*,
,i;iivf,,fT". .r
^IwV/...'
,\vV*r>iV*>.'
vj* I
>K%
m$*
,."*.
TMal WORRY WART *-_..
m


TRIDAY.' SEPTEMBER 21, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAOR TRi||
Britons Predict Their Jet Airliners
*
Will Treble Air Travel In 5 Years
LONDON, Sept. 28.(LPS)The man who in-
travel possible, forescast here yesterday that jet air-
travel possible, forecast here yesterday that set air-
liners will treble the number of air travellers in the
next* five years ii\sme areas.
Sir Frank Whittle, speaking to a conference of
aviation experts from all parts of the British Com-
monwealth, said: ,'
"Air traffic will probably be doubled during the
next five years throughout the world and in some
areas will be trebled."
Indications are that main traffic will be over
stages of under 1,000 miles in length.
^There must not only be high
speed but frequent services," he
said. "This will ease the traffic
problem.
"Advantage/must also be taken
of the abilit/ of Jet aircraft to
get off the ground quickly. A
check prior to taking off can be
completed within three minutes
and it should not be delayed bp
the longer preliminaries heeded
for piston enghned planes.
"The main defect in'the pre-
parations for Jet airliner services
at the moment is the lack of wea-
ther Information on high alti-
tude conditions. There are rare-
ly route forecasts for airflights
above 20.000 feet.
"The need for a world wide
meteorological organ 1 z a 11 o n
which will provide standardized
Information in all areas."
It is on British Commonwealth
air routes that Jet airliners will
be f!rst used.
Permanent Secretary of the
Br i- listry of Civu Aviation,
Sir Arnold Ovrton, said in ln-
au. Mng tne conference:
on Commonwealth
routes that turbo Jet aircraft
\. nist used *nd this ex-
perience will be l>f Immense
value in preparation forrthe use
of jet transport on other trunk
routes throughout the world.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
.HOG-840
Warren And Dewey Will Take
Governors' Meeting Spotlight
Wlwr. 100.000 People Me.l
Presents
Today, Friday, Sept. 2$
.....
P.M.
3:30 Muaic for Friday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose Show
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Lean Back and Listen
6:15Evening Salon (request)
7:00 Mayor of Casterbridge
(BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00NEWS and Commentary
' Raymond Swing (VOAj
8:15Musical Notebook
8:45Facts on Parade (VOA)
9:00The Jazz Club (VOA),
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures of P.C. 49
(BBCj
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.^-Sign Off
"Such British aircraft as the
Comet and Viscount have been
flying experimentally for many
months and remarkably few
snags have* been disclosed in
their development.
"Within the next few months
the Comet will begin flying re-
gular schedule services on some
British Overseas Airways Cor-
poration routes.
"Before then prop-jet Vis-
counts will be operating on Brit-
ish European Airways routes.
"The 60 to 100 per cent Increase
in speed offered by the. Comet
will make long Journeys less fa-
tiguing to passengers.
"This together with the re-
duction of noise and vibration
in the cabin will add greatly to
the attractiveness of air travel.
"To consolidate such a big ad-
vance It is essential that accur-
ate decisions be made properly
both on the ground and In the air.
"This implies provisions of
quicker and more accurate infor-
mation to all concerned, relia-
bility of meteorological and traf-
fic control aids also good adio
communications will become even
more important than at present,"
said Overton.
The Comet, which is the world's
first jet propelled airjiner, leavei
London tomorrow for another tri-
al flight.
This will be the eleventh of a
series of Journeys designed to
provide a complete test of this
machine under normal flying
conditions on usual air routes.
Tomorrow's flight is from Lon-
don to Bombay by way of Cairo,
Basra and Karachi.
Previous Journeys have been
made to South and East Africa
and to theOiUMUffiasi.
Costs Of Haircuts
Leads to Trouble
SAN DIEGO, (UP) A teen-
age youth found the $1.25 cost of
'Oircuts above his means so
traded two guns to the barber for
three months' worth of hairputs.
When it was found that the
guns had been stolen from a
iowntown sporting goods store,
the well-groomed youth was
placed In juvenile detention and
'-" barber was jailed for receiv-
ing stolen property.
OATLINBURG. Term., Sept. 28
(UP) The governors of two of
the nation's largest states will be
the political centers of attraction
when the 1951 national Govern-
ors' conference opens here Sun-
day.
Gov. Earl Warren of California
and Gov. Tom Dewey of New
York, the combination which the
Republican Party sent against
President Harry Truman and
Vice-Presldent Alben Barkley in
1948, are expected to draw the
most comment in this last meet-
ing of the governors before the
1952 national party conventions.
Dewey, however, has virtually
declared himself out of the run-
ning after twice getting defeated
as the GOP candidate.
Warren is presumably availa-
ble for the Republican ticket next
year and the California governor
is certain to be a popular figure
at this gathering, which will find
the political line split down the
middle.
Half, of the governors are Re-
publican and the other half De-
mocrats.
OUT OF SEASON
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. (UP.)
Judge John L. Niblack ruled that
a local landlord may not build a
fire In a tenant's furnace. His
ruling came after the tenant,
Mrs. Adele Abraham, complained
that the mercury reading was 90
when the landlord built the
blaze.
Some of the state executive
have already declared themselves
for one of the three most-men-
tioned candidates President
Truman, Sen. Robert A, Taft or
General Dwight D. Elsenhower.
Both Warren and Dewey are
classed in the liberal wing of the
GOP. but the California governor
has been comparatively free- of
the criticism directed at Dewey
by the more Conservative mem-
bers of the Republican Party.
Warren blames his party's
ranking as the minority for the
last 19 years on failure to live up
to campaign promises.
He says Taft has failed to live
up to the GOP platform laid
down in the 1948 presidential
race.
The California governor, who
will preside next Wednesday at
a round table discussion of law
enforcement, is also known as an
authority on criminal law.
Engineering
Supplies
Lewis Service
4 Tivoli Avenue
Opposite Ancon P.O.
VI.LANO\/A
GREAT SALE
STARTS OCTOBER 1st
Available at your favorite store!
'**^ti>*r '

'Made in New Zealand
Distributed by the Swift Co., Panama
A
6:
6:
7:
8:
8:
8:
it:
9:
9:
10:
10:
11:
11:
11:
17:
r
12:
12
1
1
1
2
2
2

3
3
3
3
4
4
6
0
6
7
7
7
8
8
8
9
9
9
10
10
11
1
I
Saturday, Sept. 29
,M.
00Sign On
00 Alar clock Club
30Jazz Salon /*
15NEWS (VOA)
30Let's Join In
45The Duke Steps Out
UUNEWS
15Women's World (VOA)
30As I See It ,
00NEWS
05Off the Record
00News
05Off the Record (Contd.)
30Meet the Band
<"NEWS
.M.
Ub-NEW TUNE TIME-PAN-
AMUSICA
: 30Popular Music
00NEWS
15Personality Parade
45Tour de France (RDF)
60Latin American Serenade
15Date For Dancing
:30Afternoon Melodies
45Battle of the Bands
00American Band Concert
.15The LittlevShow
:30McLean's Program
:45Musical Interlude
:00Music for Saturday
: 30What's Your Favorite
:00Guest Star
: 15Masterworks from Farnce
(RDF)
:45American Folk Songs
: 00 Gay Paris Music Hall
(RDF)
:30Sports Review
:46Jam Session
:00Newsreel USA. (VOA)
: 15Opera Concert (VOA)
:46Battle Report (VOA)
:00Radio University (VOA)
: 15Stamp Club (VOA)
:30Radio Amateur Program
(VOA)
: 45Sports and Tune of Day
(VOA)
: 00HOTEL EL PANAMA
:30-The HOG Hit Parade
:00The Owl's Nest
:00 a.m.Sign Off
Antonios Innovacin

84 Cen'r.-.I Avenue
PANAMA'S LARGEST DEPARTMENT STORE
IS NOW OFFERING

THE BEST PRICES AND ASSORTMENTS
First Floor
Complete Girl's and,Boy's Departments
Bedding Department,'
Stationery and Office Supplies
Sport Goods for Boys



steams
7
-.
SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY
CAMEL
CIGARETTES
carton J.59
a se/eefio of ft sty
Explanation of Svmbels
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp.
RDFRadiodifusin Francaise
Second Floor
Ladies' Dresses Blouses Skirts
Complete Ladies Lingerie Department
Ladles Hosiery
Millinery
Pocket-Book largest Assortment In town
Gift Items
Basement
Household Goods '
> Complete assortment of baking molde
Glassware
I Complete assortment of ALUMINUM KITCHEN WARE
Men's Department
For Each 1.00 Purchase
you will receive a numbered ticket. If your numbere coincide with
the last two numbers of the first prize of the National Lottery
Drawing, Sept. 30, YOU WILL WIN $5.00 IN CASH!! '
Cc^^ZZr7? from Panama's
Most Modern Bakery
EGG LOAF Delicious COFFEE
10 ESKLM w .35
CHOCOLATE RAISIN
cake .59 8 p cake .49
SWIFTS PSS
|N Premium Beacon____y2 lb. .41
r# 5i/ picnic hams ........ ib. ,65
Swift's PREMIUM..... Ib. .59
Swift's New Zealand Butter..............Ib. .67
Swift's American Cheee.............5 lbs. 2.99
SWIFT'S ,%f_ SWIFT'S
PARD - fW IMPERIAL
DG rt&T COOKING
FOOD TCl 0 I L
.24 & 1 gal. 2.99
Our Juicy, Tender Cuts of MEAT
Will Make Your Meal!
May we suggest...
Veal Stew......................'........lb. .25
Beef Liver.............................lb. .54
Halved Spring Chicken..................lb. .89
Prime Rib Roast Ib. J9
Veal Loin Chops Ib. .79
ypP Fresh Tripe ..... Ib. .19
- --__________________
Fresh Irom our Ovens
KITCHEN FRESH PR0DUC1
MEAT LOAF (available at 2 p.m...........Ib. .49
Saturdays)
STUFFED SPRING CHICKENS............Ib. |.I5
BAKED VIRGINIA HAMS
BARBECUED BEEF & PORK
flrW*r
Dtibonett Wines ........;................. 1.95
Unduraga Wine........;................. 2.1S
Gordon's Dry Gin......................... 3.45
Bosco Imp. Chianti..............;......... | .25
Kentucky Cream................4......... | .95
Regency Club Gin........................ | .95
LIBBY'S QUALITY PRODUCTS

Nectar Ass't, 5i/2 oz...................... .fJ8(
Nectar Ass't, 12 oz. .____.................. JjJ
Golden Wax Beans No. 2................... .31
Whole Kernel Corn 12 oz................... .22

Diced Beets 12 oz......................... .13}
Mixed Vegetables ........................ .23
..:.....:................ J
{
f CLAPP'S
BABY 4(\
FOOD -IV
Post Su:.: Crisp........'......... *........29
JELLO Ass't ............................ .11
Sliced Perches
\

Quaker Oats............................. .7
Aunt Jemima Pancake Flour................ .29
Lr* r-'^in Syrup..........................41
SALAD BOWL
SUGGESTIONS
Crisp VOLCAN
CABBAGE
Luscious red-ripe
TOMATOES
(from Costa Rica)
A dash of onion alt
topped with KRAFTS
miracle Whip
Kraft Miracle Whip 8 oz.................... .|
Kraft Mayonnaise 16 oz.....................9
Kraft Cheese-Swiss 8 oz................... ,4|
Kraft Cheese-American 8 oz................ .41
Kraft Cheese-Pimento 8 oz.................. .41.
Kraft Spread-Ass't.........................35
Kraft Dinner..............................21
BODEGA BARGAINS

CALL 3-0034 FOR HOME P-FL'VERY
Chilean Wines ........................... .95
Nolly Pratt Vermouth...................... 1.96
John Haig Scotch......................... 3.95
Agewood, Ltrs............................ 2.M
Castle Club Gin ..'........................ 1.75

- CALL 3-0034 FOR HOME DELIVERY
OPEN DAILY 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. SUNDAYS 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
(UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT)
PANAMAS ONE SWP^m
15th & Via Belisario Porras San Francisco Golf Club Road


-^|^^M^^
-
a^


litMpi'^

P4t ro r
f*
irXC
St 9 fc
2:s
Sheriff Who Closed Gambling
/*ew Orleans Comeback
Zone, Panam (ops
Join MP Company
Al Police Fele
tUt PANAMA AMSKICAN an INDEPENDENT DAILY NKWSPArt
------ o -
,(! '; ',' " ->!1 1VP'- '" |UL"' vears He said his system
ili Fiv.:ik iluiv:. Clancy, was to et all the facts at the
Vila was s oved down ihc saw- Fair Grounds track from jork-
<*um trail by Hie Senate Crime eys and stab.'cbovs and then play
Jhttsti Committee, under- o.ilv the last two races
tome to make his new life ouicinl. Clancy's testimony nearly gave
lasrnisht by running for reelec- Sen. Charles Tobey, R., H, a
tio as an anti-gambling "reform stroke.
'"" I "I simply cannot, sit and listen
Tne Rev Duna -Dawson of to this tvpe of what I call a poli-
Munholland Methodist Memorial tical vermin, who comes up here
.1 in tlie fashionable sub- before us and shoots off and de-
UMhoi Metalne, uno loid the fies the law." Tobey said. "If you
cpSnittee about Clancy's conni- had a Governor down there who
vfce with Ramblers. Rave Clan- had any nuts, he would kick you
cyWcandidacy -100 per cent en- out. would he not?"
dpSfinent." -f guess he would." Clancv said.
rBte lias made good ion his "Therefore he hasn't got the
p-rwu* > reform) the Rev. guts." Tobcv said.
m said.
"lhave found him tobe a man
of hi.; v il lie i. also a very in-
telligenl man. Unlike many men
of hi- age 'oili lie can change
with the times."
Among other things, tlie Rev.
DBwson told the committee that
hud sent some of his men
Clancy promised that if the
senators would spare him con-
tempt proceedings, he would go
back home and shut up all the
gambling Joints in Jefferson Pa-
rish.
This he did. but he predicted
- today that Phil Kastel, manager
around to offer him a new. 0f the Beverly Country Club, and
h and -Sunday school if he other Costello elements in Jef-
wi lid "lay (>n the gamblers. ferson Parish would fight him.
Chine refused to testify be-| "But," Clancy said, "I think I
Ore the Crime Investigating, Wj]i have most of the preachers
Committee in New Orleans last and other good government peo-
Januarv lor fear of mcriminat-! nje with me"
irjg himself. i_________[________________
iBut when Chairman Estes Ke- Tit A VAS I PflVP
fanvcr. D. Tenn.. threatened to ",crci l-COYe
send him to prison for contempt Hnlf A RiL-o
of Conaress Clancv .hrivnrl him- i1 'Ull r* UIIVC
of Congress, Clancy
self.
He hurried to Washington in
February and bel'oie a special
s<.-. ion ol the committee confess-
ed he had llocted the laws he
wa sworn to protect.
He admitted that gambling
joints, like Frank Costello's rich
GREENVILLE, S. C. (UP.) _
Although Greenville police are
accustomed to the operations of
bicycle thieves, they're afraid
one is at work now with a new
technique.
The front wheel of a bike be-
Beverly Country Club, ran wide longing to a small bov was taken
open m Jefferson Parish. ] while the lad was in the movies.
Clancy also admitted that he The rest of the vehicle was left
.iad won $78,000 on horse races unharmed.
DESIGNcD FOR
LONG WEAR
The fiat.non-skid treaddeeper
than on ordinary highway tires
effectively resists abusive wear,
makes the U.S. Royal Fleet Delivery
a real money saver!
FORT GULICK. Sept 28
The 20th Military Police Com-
pany of Fort Gullck celebrated
the 10th anniversary of the Mi-
litary Police Corps of the Unit-
ed States Army yesterday.
The celebration took the form
!of a picnic at Ran:ho Ramos
at the Cristobal police range.
A buffet lunch and refreaments
were served; various games
were played; and -music waa
furnished by the orchestral unit
of the 60th Army Band.
Members of the Cristobal and
Colon police forces, as well as
other dignatarles. and repre-
sentatives of other Army units
were at the party.
Among those attending were
Major Pastor Ramos and Cap-
tain Celestino Camarena, Chief
and Assistant Chief, respect-
ively, of the Colon Police; Cap-
tain John M. Fahnestock and
Lieutenant Gaddis Wall, Dis-
trict Commander and Aast. Dis-
trict Commander of the Cris-
tobal Police; Sherman C.
C. Brooks, Clerk of Court, Cris-
tobal Magistrate's Court; E. D.
White. Deputy Clerk of the Dis-
trict Court; Colonel Robert I.
Alexander, Commanding Offi-
cer, 370th Engineer Amphibious
Support Regiment; Lt. tiolonel
L. A. Arnold. U. S. Army Carib-
bean Provost Marshal; Lt. Col.
William J. Bennett and Major
John H. Wiggs, Commanding
Officer and Executive Officer,
respectively, 74th AAA Gun
Battalion.
Key personnel of the 20th
Military Police Company are
Captain Denver Y. Heath, Com-
manding Officer; Captain Jack
B. Oakley, Executive Officer;
1st Lt. Walter G. McBride. Mo-
tor Officer; WOJG Gordon C.
Knight, Mess Officer: and 1st
Sergeant G. W. Wyatt.
Lt. Colonel Fred O. stelner
Is the Atlantic Sector Provost
Marshal.
If! HOLLYWOOD
EBSKINE JOHNSON
NBA Staff Correspondent
o
i.H^YW009r(NKA)-A mo" tor- Marc Daniel. U from the New
vie queen emoting an a studio York vstage and TV. Cameraman
sound stage with a built-in audl- Karl Freund Is a movie veteran
ence is the latest "Well, I'll be
darned" eye-opener In today's
faat-changlng Hollywood scene
The movie queen is Lucille Ball
and workmen knocked a hole
through a thick studio wall I built
to keep people out so Lucllle's
audience could by-pass the stu-
dio gateman and get In.
There's no standing around on
the set with the usual head wob-
bling for Lucllle's audience.
No, sire*e.
After knocking that hole
through the *tudio wn, the
workmen built a aeries of raised
platforms and installed 3*0 plush
seats right on the sound stage
floor behind the camera.
Darned If they didn't build a
fancy theater-like lobby, too
complete with rest rooms, thick
red carpet and uniformed ush-
ers. No boxoffice, though, because
admission is free. No popcorn
machine, either.
The movie studio with the hole
in the wall so the eager public
can get In free to watch a star
emote is General Service, and the
big sound stage with the 300
plush new seats has a long and
glittering history of "No Admit-
tancePublic Keep Out" movie
making.

Blame or hall television for this
first mass studio gate crashing
stunt since the early days of Hol-
lywood when Carl Laernmle
erected bleachers on his outdoor
sets and charged the public 25
cents a head to watch the film-
ing of Universal's old silent dra-
mas.
Lucille's sound stage audience
will be* watching her make a
weekly half hour television mo-
vie. "I Love Lucy," a comedy se-
ries in which she co-stars wfth
husband Desi Arnaz, supported
by movie veteran William Fraw-
who lensed several of Lucille's
films at MOM.
If you want to be confused,
here's the way lt works:
The show is rehearsed like a
plav on a bare stage with chalk
marks on the floor indicating
walls and furniture. Then It's re-
hearsed on the set in front of
three movie cameras just like a
movie.
Then they let the audience in
and they shoot the scenes with
all three cameras and the sound
track picking up the audience
laughter.
Then the audience goes home
and Lucille and Desi and the cast
run through their lines again
while the cameras move in for
closeups which will be cut in with
the long and medium snots.
Lucille, Desi and Producer Jess
Oppenhelmer insisted on an aud-
ience for their movie making on
the theory that a movie for tele-
vision Is not like a regular movie.
Says Desi:
"PeoDle alona at heme libe te
feel that they are part af the
audience in the TV theater. They
want te hear an audience reac-
tion.''
*
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER te, ltm
BriHsh Minister
Promises Fulfilment
Of Arms Program
Britain s Chancellor of the Ex-
chequer Hugh Galtakell, made it
?i?r ? press conference here
today that Britain U determined
fSjf ^ *n nn* Proram m
glWWfl^eMtlank in effect,
htVh """' m Mme garters
h,.* of,.w.as *me hesitation
artoEMe.8"?"^ ^ntinumg to
shoulder its tremendous arms
Rr?tt1ii?ke11 made u c,ear tht
etaRUTS Program was ac-
tively under way.
aaiJ iwJ*.P,r ProTa"," he
!& but. \ W"* which U
great deal of the action takes SStfflS2t5 m, reaty. We
place inside the small cabin of I "rd.nip "Vff Ur iorIelto c"
the tarett family, and Para- K given? b undert*k
HOLLYWOOD. Sept. (U.P.)
One of the stars that will not
get any screen credit in the com-
ing motion picture, "Shane," la
a collection of antiques.
And the talent search that
brought the 10th-century kitchen
utensils to the screen was as hard
as any ever conducted fox an un-
known to star on the aereen.
The picture, produced and di-
rected by George Stevens, tells
the itory of a family of Wyoming
homesteaders in the 1880s A
Situation Termed
'Simply Shocking'
PALL RIVER, Mass. (UP) _
Some hasty withdrawals were
made from the Fall River Natlon-
L.E,'.?*' Pa'fona who leaned
against a metal post at the build-
inLcrner i0.und " ank had
S^ ?tw cha.rge otmtv com-
pany workmen found and fixed
n.eA lE* wlre U,at h"d eIectri-
fled the post.
Claims Producer Oppenhelmer:
"An audience dictates to an actor
what to do. He has to atop and
acknowledge the audience's re-
action. Hollywood takes care of
the problem with previews be-
fore a film is released.
"We don't have time to pre-
view our films. So instead of tak-
ing our pictures to an audience,
we've brought our audience to
the picture."
"Great idea, isnt lt?" aid Lu-
cille,
and her hair tucked under a ban-
mount set decorator mile Kuri
waa assigned the chore ef round-
ing up the kitchen tool*.
slur! had about given up hope
until he learned of a collection
ewned by T. O. Bond of Black-
foot, Ida, Bond, a lover af early
Western history, has made a hob-
by of collecting antiques.
"What do you know about this,
mother," Bond said to his wife
after Kuri explained his problem.
"The movies have heard about
me and they need help." .
Kuri promised to take personal
responsibility for every Hem he
could use. and Bond turned him
loose to pick out whatever he
needed.
The starett kitchen, therefore,
will boast a Mason jar dated
1858 as well as an 1M0 coffee
grinder that still works.
There also will be seen a hand-
made butter churn, a plate from
the period of the overland trail,
a hand-made double rolling pin,
a hand-made coffee pot with
undertakings
An at the aame me doing
everything possible to lncreaa!
their effectiveness and fighting
strength.
Oaltakell (ave a brief account
of the work ef the recent Ottawa
Conference. "
"At the conference." he said,
we were not presented with any
clear-cut plan for increasing our
scale of defense, but it was made
clear that such proposals ware
under consideration. ^^
"I am bound to say that I can-
not see how we in the United
Kingdom can do more than we've
promised and are carrving out__
the $13,000,000.000 program-uji-
less there were to be a radical
change in the economic policies
of all the members of the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization in-
volving something much ore
like a war economy both intern-
Iv in each case, and in their re-
is with each other."
lat
.-- -- -------- ..-. *,- n net nan iuucu iiurr a un-
iej and Broadway Import Vivian dana for an eight-hour session ef
eni iota, iin v lit said L.U- '* fr" "" ""'' w*"*
who was wearing slacks! copper bottom, and IM1 iron tea
r Vint liifiUarf .mJ. w.u < l/ef 1 la Ivfin *tM*lra twabair*
U.S. ROYAL FLEET DELIVERY
PANAMA AUTO S. A.
Apartado 1913, Panama
Asteria Club Holds
Coronation Tomorrow
The winner of the Club Aste-
ria's Queen Contest will be
crowned tomorrow nieht at the
Pacific Clubhouse. Edna Davev
of Panama City was the victor
and will reign over the festivities
to be sponsored by the Club As-
teria.
Miss Davey polled a total 7.615
votes to cop the queenly honors.
Her court will be formed bv the
other contestants who finished
in the following order:
Gwendolyn Oddman .... 5.105
Elosa Archlbold....... 4,115
Rosita Peters ...........2455
Alicia Downs ........... 2,205
Elena Comrle............1.345
The coronation will be a semi-
formal affair at which Queen
Elena I will be crowned by Ceci-
lia McLaine. 1948 Junta Femeni-
na de Beneficencia Carnival
Queen.
Also to be included in the
I night's activities will be a "hot
shdw" with Napoleon the "Sand-
man" In a feature role. Tomas
Rosado will be singer for the
dance numbers. Reggie and Mar-
va, popular dancers, will also per-
form.
Music will be provided by Ar-
mando Bosa and his "La Perfec-
ta" boys.
Vance.
The first film will be seen on
coast-to-coast CBS-TV Oct. 15
atthe* ar1 comp*ny paylat
Filming of "I Love Lucy" is as
precedent-shattering as the hole
in the studio wall.
As Desi, who put the idea to-
gether (Lucille claims she "didn't
have anything to do with lt. Desi
deserves the credit. I was home
having a baby") sees it:
"We're putting a stage shew en
film for televiiien."
All three techniques are rep-
resented in the setup. The direc-
rehearslng.
I confessed I was a little con-
fused.
'** won't be when yea see the
first picture," she assured me.
"We're jast putting a safe shew
on film for television."
But I'm still confused.
"I Love Lucy," too. but Is it a
play, a movie or a television
show?

Ten-year-old Gig! Perreeu will
get the biggest kid star buildup
since Shirley Temple at UI. She's
s big click in Reunion in Reno"
and^'Weekend With Father."
Panama Canaf Clubhouses
- Showing on.ght
WANT TO HAVE FUN... GO TO TItt MOVIES I
"TAIWAN'S PFRH." Pin.:
TURPIN vs. ROIINSON
Sl A| MILLIONAIRE fOJI CHISTV"
Rod CAMERON s Cthy DOWNS
"SHORT GRASS"
S*' CAfTAlN HORATIO HOKMBLOWEB
Ttvot HOWARD ANOL'K
"THE GOLDEN SALAMANDER"
H.li^rdjy "TARfaET UNKNOWN
Listen to...
THE FOOTBALL
PROPHET
Tomorrow and Every Saturday at 12:30 p.m.
BALBOA
Alr-CoMMMW
_ <:3 *M S:8t
DIABLO HTS.
S:IS I 5
COCO LI
cm sue
HDRO MIGUEL , lttme CRA
T:es p.m. Take Care of My Little Girl"
* '"fHV "rAY"K*ff W OEM*MP"
GAMBOA MsfcsedBW
'": "SHORT GRASS"
G A 1 UN
Tiee p m
MA*G AHITA
i net
CRISTOBAL
air-rwi|,M|i||
I:1S :M
Rd SKELTON Silly FORREST
"EXCUSE MY DUST"
Ann BLYTHE Mark STEVENS
"KATIE DID IT"
S.lurdy THE WEST POINT STOBV
Glee FORD Edmond O'BRIEN
"The Redhead And The Cowboy"
Sit MR BELVEDERE BINGS THE BF.1.1."
: --3I
.
BALBOA
OPENS TOMOR ROW !
on
Its the story of operation ermine
AND HOW TO GET ON*'
kettle, iron psneske makers.
muffin pans, and candle molds
that date back to 1100.
A folding earpet-rooker. knives
and forks, clock and oandle-stlek,
all from the covered-wagon era,
are other Items Kuri picked out.
"Usually It takes me months to
round up as valuable a collection
as this." Kuri said.
. Besides the antique collections,
the picture features Van Heflln
and Jean Arthur as the Starretta
and Alan Ladd as Shane, their
rescuer.
Gen. Francis March
To Speak on Radio
For Legion Group
Under direction of Department
Radio* Chairman, a radio pro*
gram concerning- Civil Defense
wDl be presented on a local ra-
dio station Saturday from 6:M to
0:30 p.m.
The special guest speaker will
be General Irtncls March. Com-
manding General, USARCARIB.
Lt. Douglas Graham will be
presented by Unit No. 1, Balboa.
Canal Zone u their selection for
the Person-of-the-Month for hi*
outstanding service in Ciyll De-
fense Instruction.
Major Leon J. Carrington. De-
Eartment Commander, American
egion. Mrs. Addle Colclasure,
Department Seeretaey, American
Legion Auxiliary and Mrs. Marie
Bennett, Unit President. Unit
No. l. Balboa, Canal Zone will
participate In a radio script enti-
tled "One Nation UnexpendaWe."
I concerning Civil Defense and its
Importance in the community.
Also present will be Pepartment
Badlo Chairman and Mrs. Patay
Ryan. Department President and
Mrs. Lydla Nadeau. Nati. Bxee.
SCHOOL UNPOPULAR
i
AST CHICAGO, Ind.
Vrtnouncement of the beginning
of fall classes brought a brief but
violent reaction in which 2S win-
dows were kieked in at the Har-
rison school here.
HOG 840 on your Dial
The Football Prophet
Picks the winner of today's and tomorrow' big
football games. . And he's seldom wrong.
The PROPHET
winning average last year 773.
Don't make any bets until you listen
to
The Football Prophet
over HOG-840 kcs.
THE FIRST SHIPMENT OF
Snow Crop Frozen Foods
HAS NOW ARRIVED
ON SALE AT THE FOLLOWING STORES:
COMISARIATO "SA9't
COMISARIATO BELLA VlSTA
EL BATURRO
COMISARIATO "LA NlfiA"
MERCADO MODELO
CASA MIKE
MERCADO LOLITA
MERCADO BIZKAYNA
COMISARIATO DON BOSCO
PAUL'S MARKET
ABARROTERIA LA CORTESA
' Agent;
DONALD W. DICKERSON
Tel. 1-11*4
Distributor:
FAgRICA NACIONAL DE SALCHICHAS



\
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1951
THE PANAMA AM KK It AN AN INDEPENDEN! DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE FIVE
'Americas Icebox Alaska
Set to Repel Air Attacks
By PETER J. HAYES
United Pre Staff Correspondent
ANCHORAGE. Alaska, Sept. 29
(UP)Uncle Sam Is spending
staggering sums of mone* to con-
vert "America's Ice-box" into a
Gibraltar of the airways.
Alaska, a territory nearly three
times the sise of. Texas, blocks
the Arctic short-cut that Siberia-
based bombers might fly to at-
tack the U. 8. In the event of to-
tal war with Russia, military
leaders believe Alaska's big air-
fields would be eyed greedily as
perfect springboards for round-,
trip bombing missions to Ameri-
ca's production centers.
"The advent of the air age has
placed us In the direct line of
possible attack." Lt. Gen William
E. Kepner. Commander-in-Chier,
Alaskan Command, said.
"Alaska is our Gibraltar of
the air age. We are living in a
bastion and we must be pre-
pared to defend it." _
TO do this, the United States
is pouring more dollars into Al-
aska defense construction. This
year it amounted to more than
$200,000,000. Next year money
spent on airfields and other in-
stallations la scheduled to top
$300.000.000.
A-l priority project Is the ra-
dar net. Begun last year, work is
being speeded to complete the
ring of radar stations by late
1952. It would be these listening
posts that would give Alaska's Jet
lighter .pilots the few precious
minutes needed to beat off an
enemy .air assault.
Most of the defense funds are
being spent at Elmendorf Air
Force Base and Fort Richardson
just outside Anchorage, and Ladd
and Elelson Air Force Bases near
Fairbanks.
These two strongpolnts are
many hundreds of miles Inland
from Alaska's Bering Sea coast,
which Is only 50 miles from Sibe-
ria. .
The decision to embark on
a nH-out program to strength-
en Anchorage and Fairbanks
installations, at the expense of
coas tal outposts close to Rus-
sia and the Aleutian chain was
made following World War II.
General Kepner said:
"We must concentrate in and
defend Alaska from the heart-
land of the Territory, where cli-
mate and terrain permit us to
maintain our .strongest concen-
trations of military power. For, 1
believe, these are the sections
probabl coveted by the enemy
u basis fot projected attacks
gainst the production centers of
thoj United States."
Beneral eprW tresaad .that
Alaska Is "a? stronghold for de-
fense. His command's alt arm de-
pends on the jpeedy Jet fighter
rather than bombers, although
Kelson Air Force Base Is capable
of lftndljng-t^eblgB-38 bomber
atfastaTifcajfJSeftown up from
the' States.
Alaska's ground defense team
la trained for tho primary job
of repelling an airborne attack
en these kep strips.
Military planners do not feel
that the Russians would be so
foolhardy aa to attempt an am-
phibious landing on the swampy
tundra or Ice-coated Arctic coast
and march over the roadless
wastes to the Interior.
Such an operation would in-
volve tremendous supply prob-
lems and leave the attacking
force open to punishing air blows.
The Fourth Infantry Regiment
and the recently-arrived 196th
Regimental Combat team are
charged with Alaska's ground de-
fenses. These two units are flex-
ible and especially trained for
difficult Arctic warfare.
If the bulldinr. of Alaska's.de-
fenses has appeared slow, lt can
be blamed on the weather.
Only from May to August can
the big construction companies
build the barracks, power
plants, warehouses and han-
gars necessary.
Even in the summer, in the
Fairbanks area, the builders must
contend with permafrost. This Is
the froren sub-surface earth
three to 80 feet deep that never
thaws and defies normal excava-
tion methods.
Contractors solve the perma-
frost problem oy jamming steam
pipes into the grourid and thaw-
ing the earth. Another method is
to discharge blasts of dynamite
underground to loosen lt.
Although the huge military
program in Alaska is far from
complete, the Territory would be
no pushover for enemy forces. "If
Joe Stalin sends some of his rep-
resentatives over here," Kepner
said, "they'll get a helluva Jolt.
We're here to nold Alaska. With
God's help, we will."
Wants Own Ammo
Sent to Korea
WORCESTER. Mass., Sept. 29
(UP)A woman phoned the
Chamber of Commerce to ask if
It was legal to ship ammunition
out of the country Said she
wanted to send some to Korea.
It developed that her officer-
husband had taken his own .38
caliber pistol to Korea for use In
target practice When he arrived
he round he couldn't obtain the
type of ammunition needed for
'the weapon.
World's In a Mess
Say Han and Wife
Seeking Solitude
SYDNEY, Sept. 28 (UP) An
American yachtsman and his
wife left Sydney in search of a
"Shangri-La" In the Pacific.
The couple, Byron Tanner and
his wife Dorothy, were en route
to Tahiti in their 36-foot ketch
"Bachelor's Wife."
"The world's in such a mess
that we want to get away from it
for a while," Tanner said as he
left.
The couple, formerly of Hono-
lulu, Intend staying in Tahiti for
several months before commenc-
ing a world cruise in the ketch
early next yea.
During the course -of their
cruise they hope to find their
Shangl-La on an Island some-
where in the Pacific
Tanner said the voyage to Ta-
hiti would probably take about
w./elve weeks.
"The trip will be lonely, but my
wife and I like solitude.," he said.
"At sea Dorothy does all the
cooking and occasionally steers
while I navigate We Intend look-
ing for a little Island on which
we can settle after we have fin-
ished traveling. Then we can Uve
In peace."
Tanner and bis wife left Hono-
lulu late last year foi Sydney to
take part in the premier event of
Australian sailing, the Sydney-
Hohart race.
Neither of the couple had any
previous sailing experience and
used the ketch's motor during
the trip. The Sydney Harbor pi-
lot ship Captain Cook, had to
tow them Into Sydney after the
engine of the Bachelor's Wife
broke down two miles from Syd-
ney Heads.
Since then, Mr. and Mrs. Tan-
ner had been "beachcombing"
around Sydne>, living on the
ketch In the Harbor.
The couple were given a revis-
ing farewell when they left Syd-
ney.
Polynesian oanclng girls, In
grass skirts, and Hawaiian guit-
arists from Sydney's Polynesian
community, played and sang the
"Maori's Farewell" as the ketch
left her moorings.
Friends showered the water
Band Leader Busse
Sounds Off On
Men With Horns
MEMPHIS, Tenn.. Sept. (U.P.)
The man who" once played in
Paul Whlteman's orchestra back
during the golden jazz era, said
the late Bix Belderbecke wasn't
- --eat figure he's cracked up
to be.
..d leader Henry Busse, here
for . dance and dinner engage-
ment, said It's not professional
Jealousy to debunk the Belder-
becke legend.
Bix was considered the original
"young man with a horn." Maga-
zine stories have been written
about his style and tone two dec-
ades after his death.
"If they want a legend, there's
Bunny Berlgan." Busse said. "He
had a phenomenal lip. wonder-
ful tone."
Busse described Bix as a super-
ior musician, but not the genius
time has made him.
"Why thev made him a legend
I can't understand," Busse said.
"He had no Up, his playing was
fuzzy, and he was often under
the influence of-liquor. You can't
play great that way."
Busse, however, said this of
Bix: i
"Whatever he thought out he
went Into with his heart. He did
have a sense of tone, and he
knew how to hit a note where
it stood out."
Busse, a popular trumpeter,
played slde-by-slde with Bix in
the old Whlteman orchestra. He
picked Charley Splvak as the best
living trumpet player.
Busse described Rafael Mndez
as "wonderful, out of this world."
, Asked to compare them, Busse
said "You can't. Joe Venuti's a
Dentist Displays
Work In Jars
HAGERSTOWN. Md. (UJ.)
Dr. H. R. Eavey, 81-year-old dean
of practicing dentists here, has
something to show for Ms six
dcades work.
Hs office is lined with 22 Jars
containing every tooth he ever
pulledthousands of them. Ea-
vey said he cleaned and bleached
them for display because the
sight of so many extracted teeth
encouraged nervous patients.
around the kttch with flower
petals and Hawaiian leis.
Hundreds of small craft sailed
around the ketch as she passed
through Sydnev Heads.
Pipes Forgotten
In Cabfest
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (U.P.) Or-
vllle Bond, at the City Audit-
orium on business, walked off
without his pipe. Later, he called
to ask If he had left his pipe
there, and was told that it was
waiting for him at the office.
Bond dropped by to pick up his
olpe, and started talking with a
friend.
At last report, Bond had two
oipes waiting for him at the Au-
ditorium office.
eood fiddle player, and so Is
Krelsler."
Busse was first noted for his
"Hot Lips," written and record-
ed in 1922. It sold more than a
million records. *
Four years later he had a tune
named "Madonna," changed to
"When Day Is Done." Busse
wrote "Wang Wang Blues" and
"Fiesta."
He was with Whlteman for 10
years. In the days when Blng
Crosby. Blx, the Teagardens. the
Dorseys. Frankle Trombauer.
Ferde Grofe and George Ger-
shwin were associated with the
band.
Busse came to this country In
1912 with his horn and $3. He
gets, as much pleasure with the
. horn today as he did back in the
days when he was Just another
trumpeter.
When Thirsty ,
Be Careful
GREENVILLE. S. C. (U.P.)
The police department may have
to devise some way to distinguish
Its fire alarm boxes from drink-
ing cup dispensers.
Twice in one week out-of-town
Visitors pulled the alarm boxes
and brought the fire engines run-
ning when all the uniformed
visitors wanted was a drink of
water.
Likes Parking Meters
But Not So Close
HUNTINGTON, Ind. (U.P.)
Mayor Roy Howell Is a staunch
advocate of parking meters, but
when he found one of the meters
Installed In front of his house
he blew his top .
Two culprits, who yanked the
meter from In front of a drug
store and dragged it to the may-
or's house were fined $21 each

f^v.
e&otu&J /tee?
In 19:6, Rolrx created the -orki'i fint I metallic surtacr upon another. Moreover,
ATTENTION PLEASE!
Ssjve your money for a great occasion:
HAWAII, your reliable Jewelry Store, is going
to have its
9th ANIVERSARY SALE
OctoU. 1st v/'.i'.i lowest prices ever seen.
IMPORTANT: We are practically giving away
our lampa and Italian crockery due 'to the
complete: iiquidatwrr of that department.
Remember this important c'a'o: OCTOBER 1st
SUPER SALE
RHIRII
AT
THE
RELIRBLE
-----------------CT-------------
ADJOINING BAZAR ESPAOL
JELUELRV
r
f
TS^INCER SEWINC-LfcNIERS
DURING ...--
INTERNATIONAL SEWINC WEEK
OCTOBER 1 to 6


>A
Sport Dressy
from 4.45 to 39.95
Fine HATS
latest styles'
ROBES
In. rayon, chenille and taffeta
Beiirtlful leather
BAS
Nylon BLOUSES
BLOUSES for Ladies
In crepe, rayon sizes 40 to 48
HANKIES
Swiss Linen
embroidered In beautiful colors
45*
'V
LA MODA AMERICANA
Avenida Central 1*2


MAKE-UP
v
U*UU'#*/
1/tt**tiA
Night Cream
0 Beauty Balm
Skin Cream
Eya Bath
Medicated Lotion
Sensitone Lotion
Plastic Cream
Powder and Rouge
Also:
* Rose Skin Cream
Tan-Proof Lotion
* Skin Freshner
Lipstick
Beautiful GERMAINE MONTEIL Compacts with Power, Rouge and
Lipstick Golden Make-Up Kits with Complete Set.
MOTTA'S
PANAMA COLON
SECOND FLOOR
WE ARE UNPACKING
Steel Traverse Rodsall
sixes .............from 3.05
Chrome Metal Shoe Racks 1.60
Baby Car Seats....'..... 4.5
Chrome Tie Racks...... 4.5
Wall Mirrorslarge siae 12.50
Metal Kitchen Stool with Ladder. .13.54
Metal Bathroom Stools............ .95
Plastic Wading Pools for Kids......1.50
Metal Bread Baskets............... t.l
Step-On Garbage Disposal Can.... 2.15
"PepperelT Sheets
in colors. ....... 4.95 ea.
"PepperelT Pillow-
cases in colors.. 1.15 ea.
Pepperell" White
Pillowcases ..... 0.75 ea.
"Martex" extra large
Bath Towels .... 4SS ea.
"Martex" Beach
Towels in colors 4.05 ea.
THERE is

GENERAL PAINTS
waterproof match, the urm|m-ly successful
Rolex Oyster. Today, twenty-two years
later, the Oyster's reputation remains
unrivalled. This is because the Outer
case is made permanent!/ waterproof bv ataje
the patented self-sealing action of one Uw
both men's and ladies' models are ex-
tremely handsome in appearance, and arc
available either in stainless steel or in
solid gold. No wonder they are treasured
by well over a million men and wornea
in every part of the globe.
ROLEX
OFFICIALLY CERTIFIED
WRIST-CHRONOMETERS
dutvNb'
FRBH JE
STOKE
a/afa/tlkh
THSfi
DUTY'
MSB JSWELRY HADOUARTEHS
STORE! PANAMA
Metal Ironing Boards ,11.0
Barn-Proof Ironing Board
Carers .................. 3.W
Cotton Cover ft Pad........ 2.1*
Plastic Mattress Covers---- 4.06
Moisture-Proof Salt A Pep-
per Seta................. 1-00
Buy NOW
Second Floor 5 Avenida
fflMppw Jbrihm fan Hurt
ALSO IN COLON- fBOUT STKiir IN .AHINA Of COLON BUILDING fU.H't





PAGE SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN a AN INDEa>DENT DAIXf NEWSPAPKK

You Sell em.... When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
Lovt your atJ with.one of our Agent! or our Officis
LEWIS SERVICE
veil A
-mu
Ne. 4 Tivell Av.
Phene :-?
L
KIOSK OE LBISEPS
r.r.ur de limn
r.niwi.
.MORRISON'S
Ne. 4 Fearth *f Jul- A>*.
Phene j.i
BOTICA ARI.TON
lite* Metender Av*.
Pheae SSCelen.
H&USWSP WCAMO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
No. IT "H" SBNI-rMIBi
Ne. 12.179 Central At*.Calta.
SOP
Minimum for
12 words
In. each additional
Wit
i sViii
MISCELLANEOUS
a yea have eVinhrnf peeal.m.
Writ* Ale.eBel.ee Aaaay-e
> 2011 Anm, C. Z
Whatever you desire to stll or buy
including your outomobile, eon
eulf tint with:
AOINCIAS COSMOS S. A.
Automobile Row No. 29
Telephone 2-4721
Open all day on Saturdays.
FOR SALE
Automobile-
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE:2 arm choirs, 3 strand
Rattan bamboo. First class con-
dition. S45.00 each. J. H. Hagan,
Cristobal 3-1CI.
0* SALI:_1Mt Ch..r.kt Cup.
eeler black. .M, $400.00 daw*
and any. .... Year F.r. deal
ar, C.la.n Maan lac. On Aute-
m.kile raw. Tal. 2 1033 2-
FOR SALE
MiscellaneoiiM
'V~"',
RESORTS
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
NEW YORK
CHIVROLIT
6 WEEKS DELIVERY
ST LOUIS
Smoot-Paredes
Panama 2-0600
0R SALE-Oriental rug 9 x 12,
$295.00 inspect at 85 Cuba
Avenue.
FOR SALE:Mahogany diningroom
sat by Cowes. mahogany bedroom
set. washing machine. Phone Pan-
amo 3-0745 between 7 ond 8 e
FOR SALE:1946 Duty Paid Chev-
rolet I '; ton stake truck $600.
00 cosh. The Texas Company
I Panama) Inc. Tel. Pan. 2-0620.
FOR
FOR SALE.Mahogony chest rock-
ers, eosy chair, Mixmoster, 2 small
rugs, glassware. 1546-B. Mango
St. Gaviln Area, Balboa. Phon
2-1827.
ER SALE.9 cu. Ft. Kerosene re-
-/rigeroter. latest model. 701-C,
-Trap St. Curundu> C. Z.
FOR SALE: States bedroom set.
wicker choirs ond desk, steel bed
with mattress, electrical opplian-
. pes, Merns chair, tiiscellaneous
household effects. House 205. Bel-
boo Heights. Phone 2-1662.
Help Wonted
WANTED:Cook and housekeeper.
, Must sletp residence. Apply from
3:00 to 4 00 p. m. 46 Eost
. Street. Edificio Riviera Aport-
merit A.
SALE:1)49 Illicit Sup.,. 4
?leer aadan. Dark bine, radia,
a... tirei. new teat cavan. Thi
ear a a it*.I. Only $500.00
dawn. Your Fard dealer. Calaan
Matan, lac. On eutomek.l. raw.
Tal. 2-1011 2-1 OK.
Save
$250.00
Laica cmara with 1.5 lana
i instead $475.Cf lirt
$244.50
Internatianal Jewelry
I adj. Int. Natal)'
FOR SALE:One metol desk, I cor-
ner mahogany speaker cabinet,
1951 metallic green, Tudor Ford.
White side waft, radio. Coll 83.-
6251 or may be seen at 2011-0.
Curundu after 4:00 p m
[ Genell Bliss Sonto Clara Houses over-
looking ocean, .privte steps to
beoch (2 min. walk;. .Got range
and refrigeration.. Piano, morim-
bo, borbecue, pin-pong, badmin-
ton, croquet, etc .Coll 4-557 doys.
4-230 evenings.
CASINO SANTA CLARA:Cabins,
food, swimming. No reservations
necessary.
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
FOR SALE:4 tires, 670 x 650 x
15" brand new Goodyear, $13,50
each. Adding machine calculator,
steel work tables, chainhoist lathe,
fcr metol, drill press, motors,
wrenchfB and tools. Pumps and
mony other items. Vary cheap.
II7-B, Pedro Miguel, Tel. 4318.
HOTIL PAN-AMERICANO in El
VaHe. Special room rates for Sep-
tember. $35 per month, $20 for
2 weeks. Meals a la carte.'Tale-
phone Panomo 2-1112 for re-
servotion.
Williams Sonto Cloro Beach Cottoges.
Two bedrooms, Frlgidoires, Rock-
gas ronges. Balboa 2-3050.
FOR SALE:4 door Plymouth 1948.
price $1.000.00. perfect condition.
Tel. 2-4624 from 9-12 to 2-5 i
p. m.
FOR SALE:1940 FORD Sedon.
2 new tires $200.00. 1489-
D, Dohrmon Street. Balboa, Satur-
day 4:00 to 6:00 p. m.
FOR SALE: One 36" 4 Harness
Loom, 2 reeds, one Mixmoster,
One cor baby. Battle Warmer, one
25 cycle phonograph motor, Bal-
boa 3179.
Phillies. Oceonside cottages, Santo
Clara. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Panama 3-1877. Cristobal 3-1673
FOR SALI:1949 Mercery Convert-
ihle Cup., celer yellew- bleak
tap. White aidewell tires, plastic
eat eeven, Only $550.00 dawn.
Thia hi a cleen cer. Y.ur Ford
d.aler. C.lp.n Meten Inc. en Au-
remefcile row. Tel. 2-103} 2-
I0M.
FOR SALE: One 12 volume, Cen-
tury Dictionary ond Encyclopedia,
$20.00, two cribs, both for $25.-
00. One hose 25 fet for $3.00.
House 205-B. Riu Grande Street,
Pedro Miguel, C. Z. Tel. 4-338.
Gromlieri Sonta Cloro beoch-
cottoges. Electric (cat boxes, go*
stoves, moderate rete. Phone 6-
. 541 or 4-567.
FOR RENT
Houses
DONT STARVE YOUR
LAWN AND EXPECT IT
TO BE BEAUTIFUL.
VERTAGREEN
3-VVay Plant Food
it cheaper than water
fot It
GEO. F. 1NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ave. .Tel. 3-0140
Americas Urged
To Order DDT
To Fight Fevers
WASHINGTON, Sept. 28 (USIS
The American Republics were
urged Tuesday to order the in-
secticides they need from the
United SUtes for their public
health programs before Decem-
Da.
The critical shortage of chlo-
rine-based Insecticides through-
out the world was cited in a res-
olution presented to the dlrect-
uig council of the Pan American
Sanitary Bureau which is now in
session here.
Dr. Fred L. Soper, director of
the Sanitary Bureau, pointed out
that the United States has given
other countries a high priority
In purchase of DDT Insecticide
for use in public nealth pro-
5 rams. He said the priority will
e given to domestic needs be-
ginning in January, 1952. The
Sanitary Bureau acts as pur-
FTflPAT, SBPTEMBBft *j ftil
1st Army's Crittenberger
Recalls 8 Navy Captains
Piped Him Off At Albrook
FOR SALE:Lorge metal sideboord,
$20.00, wood choirs, $1.00 eoch,
livingroom choir, upholstered, $7.-
50. Phone Balboa 2-3173.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
NEW YORK
CHIVItllT
6 WEEKS DELIVERY
ST. LOUIS
Smoot-Paredes
Ponoma 2-0600
WANTED:Shop foreman for mo-
,,dern garage. Must be copable me-
-ochonic with sound background and
x-flood references willing to work
.,-i*e new business. Writ Box 89.
Pname.
BUY OF THE WEEK. 1949 .Nash
Ambassador, rodlo, 4 new tires.
Perfect condition. Priced to sell
fast. Leaving on October 5fh.
House 5433-C, Endicot Street.
Diablo. After 6 p. m.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED:_Sub-let or rent: Small
furnished Apt. Call Mr. Thomas
. 2-0690.
Stamps wanted, clean accumulations
or collections. Write description
etc. Caribbeon Stomp Club, Box
465. Ancon.
WANT USID CARS
' teed eeed cera wealed es trede
ina en New Rambler thia month.
NASH AtalNCY
Oae alack fren* Tiv.li ereeeina
FOR SALE: Philco Deep Freeze
(Upright model), 8 tbic feet,
$275.00. Phone Albrook, 6242
or 7144.
Bids will be received in the office
of the General Manager, Com-
missory Division, Mt. Hope, C. Z.
until 3:00 p. m., Wednesday, Oc-
tober 17, 1951, when they will
be opened in public, for furnish-
ing 465.000 pounds, or alterna-
tively 232,500 pounds of Fine
Granuloted Sugar. Forms of pro-
posal, wittj full particulars, moy
be otbained in the office of the
Supply & Service Director, Balboa
Heights, or of the General Man-
ager. Commissary Division, Mt.
Hope. C. Z.
FOR" RENT:Three bedroom house,
with electricity ond running wo-
ter, tiled throughout. Good tecotion
in Los Cumbres. Rent $60.00. Cell
Singley. Curundu 3265^ or Clay-
ton. 4130.
FOR RENT: Modern, well venti-
lated chalet, two bedrooms, maid's
rcom. garage, etc. Via Esparto,
No. 2024 above Juon Franco,
$130.00. Miguel Hive, phone 3-
4844.
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. a-1713
-22 E. 29th St.
Should you decide to buy or aall
any n' vour Holdings
Please contact
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Hot.-I El Panam
Phones: 3-471 3-leM
Today we have arden te buy
rewer>, Clay Productj and
Panam Cement.
chasing agent for the American
Republics.
At the Council's session on
Monday, Dr. 8oper had reported
to the delegates from the 21 A-
merlcan Republics that yellow fe-
ver seems to be moving west and
north from Costa Rica, which re-
cently suffered an epidemic In Its
jungle areas.
Although the yellow fever virus
has been largely eliminated from
urban areas, Dr. Soper said, the
disease is still active In the jun-
fle sections of Mexico ana Cen-
ral America, where monkeys
transmit the virus to mosquitoes,
who in turn carry it to humans.
"We may anticipate a move-
ment to and possibly through
Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala
and Southern Mexico," Dr. Soper
said. The only probable excep-
tion, he added, la El Salvador,
where there are fewer monkeys.
The continuing seriousness of
the problem of yellow fever In
the .Hemisphere emphasizes the
need for the Sanitary Bureau, in
cooperation with public health
authorities, to wipe out disease-
carrying mosquitoes in cities and
to extend programs of vaccina-
tion In the Jungle areas, Dr. Sop-
er said.
.-1?.*,* Qi former Commander-
Ch.lei' crtbbean Command.
-Ja now tne t0P Aray mn
for New York, New Jersey and
New England, appeared in a re-
cent issue of "The New Yorker"
"Zetv. Va Publication's
*T u the Town" c0,um" M:
rritTlu?'nt 0en> Willis D.
it"^berger. commanding gen-
."" blue-eyed Individual who as
n..i*nklng local military man.
nf^T* up on tne d18 l mu-
?S!ffa banquets; recently, pro-
lSS5?hhr^Bhw ch*nn.l>. the
it? -em the ^nnel between
fh* B*"er? *no C+overnors U-
ff'Jfa ? occupied by Fort
Jay. the First Army's headquar-
ters, we gained access to him. He
toSJSF^SS* y!ars ,g0 ln An-
derson, indiana. "Mv people are
newspaper people," he said "Mv
brother publishes the Anderson
Bulletin, which we Inherited
from our father it used to be
called the Anderson Democrat
James Whitcomb Rlley's first
published couplet appeared in It
I worked for It a few months in
1907, after getting out of high
school, and one day John A. M.
Adalr, an old friend of my fami-
ly's who was congressman from
the Eighth Indiana District, said.
'Willis, how would you like to go
to West Point?' Very much Wil-
lis said. After graduating ln
1913, he Joined the 3rd Cavalry.
In Texas. He subsequently taught
at his alma mater and at the Ft.
Riley, Kansas, Cavalry School;
?l??n* k an *ry - ter, and has had an assignment
."M^rL Uf from battalion
to the Department of the Army.
His three sons went Into the Ar-
my; one was killed while crossine
the Rhine at the RemageH
Bridge. 'Our Army Is as true a
cross-section of cltlaens as any
army in the world.' he aid.
.'Tell the American soldier what
it s all about, and there's no bet-
ter soldier anywhere. There's
been some talk about the Army'
educational- program. Well, you
understand we don't get these
boys until they're eighteen or
nineteen. By that time, they
should have been educated by the
home, the school, and the church
We do the best we can In the
time we have.'
"Invited by the General to tour
Governors Island in his Bulck,
we Inspected South Battery, an
1812 structure that now houses an
officers' club; the Chapel of St.
Cornelius the Centurion, an out-
post of Trinity Parish; and Cas-
tle Williams, facing Manhattan,
which was completed ln 1811 as
an opposite number to the Bat-
tery s caatle Clinton and has
more recently served as a guard-
house. "Orover Cleveland Berg-
doll was confined in it after the
First World War." our guide said
That's a questionable claim to
fame from a military point of
view." We wound up our tour at
the Oenerai'a quarters,
SnS5*nSS a aIalry a-uaaron Colonial house, dating from 1840*
at Port Bliss, Texas; served as which faces Brooklyn across But-
chief of military intelligence ln termilk Channel. ItContatos ma-
PErfiL'SS in 19,34 *'a* a"ln- ny memento with military as-
ed to the 1st Cavalry (mechante- ociations, including a statue of
ed), at rort Knox, Kentucky, Saint Ambrosio given to the Oen-
aP& Ju*ly- 1?40' after a 8tlnt!eral bv tne cltlaens of Milan as
J^Ku?!S: ' SSSftL hei;the liberator of northwest Ita-
flrst chief of staff of the at Ar- ly," and a dress sword given to
FOR RENT: Completely furnished
one bedroom concrete cholet, oil
modern improvements, on Pan
American highway, 8 1 -2 miles
to ferry, sign ot driveway. John-
son,
FOR RENT
Apartments
Coma te Tampa, Florida far taca-
lion or lor .nod. I can help v.u to
buy or rent houses, preecrt), arante
troves, chicken farms, hotels, etc
at all price and terms. If Interest-
ed nrite to Herman Kleefkens, ce
Geerf. w. Blades, Real Estate Brok-
er., Ml rrankltn Street, Tampa I,
Florida.
FOR SALE:Super Buick Four-Door
Sedan, 1947. duty poid, perfect
condition. Coll during office hours-
telephone 2-2644, Ponoma.
FOR SALE:Hudson, 4-door, 1940.
$295.00. 2042-B-E. 3rd. Curundu.
Wanted Position
Buy of the week 1949 Nash
Ambassador, radio. 4 new tires,
perfect condition. Priced to sell
fast. Leaving country on Ott. 5.
5433-C, Endicott St., Diablo, af-
ter 6 p. m.
POSITION WANTED:Architectural I F0" UlitIffSJ Mercury 6 ees-
FOR SALE:Aquorium, 20 gol. ca-
pacity. Stainless steel frame, 1-4"
plate glass sides. Positively leak-
proof. Swordtalls, platys, scaveng-
er fish, with Weed balanced green-
ery and snoils. Complete $35.00.
Coll 6-149 or see 124-A, Gam-
boa.
draftman. field supervisor, fom I,or
with occeunting end office pro-
cedures, able to menage construc-
tion material, warehouse. Write G
Box 759. Colon.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
THOMAS REAL ESTATES AGENCIES
PANAMA'S LEADING REAL
ESTATE BROKERS
Central Ave. 259 Celidonia
Telephone 3-1069
Offers for sale several properties at
bargain prices. Seles of lots and
houses anywhere in the city. Please
call telephone 3-1069, Panomo. Now
H the time to buy. Consult THOMAS
REAL ESTATE AGENCES FIRST.
eeaoer ceuee, light-green. radie,
overdrive, seatcevers. geed riree
only $(25.00 dawn. Must be seen
re appreciate. Veer Mercery eeel-
er C.lp.n Matara lac. en Aute-
mebile Hew.
1036.
Tel. 2-1031 2-
Repoirs on Front suspension on oil
makes of car using the famous
BEAR oligning equipment. Mini-
mum fee for checking. Tropicol
Motors.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
NEW YORK
CH IVROLIT
6 WEEKS DELIVERY
ST. LOUIS
Smoot-Paredes
Panomi 2-0600
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OfFHS STRUCTUMS FOR SALE
For sole to the highest bidder.
Buildings Nos. 315. 322. Ancon;
184 Pedro Miguel; 1053. 1055.
1064 Cocoli; 4001, 4016, 4018*
4020. 4022. 4024. 4026. 4028.
3343, 4027. Camp Bierd; and 862
Balboa. Sealed bids will be received
in the office of the Superintendent
of Storehouses at Balboa until 10:
30 A. M.. October 15. 1951, when
they will be opened in public. Forms
of proposal with full particulars may
be secured in the offices of the Su-
perintendent of Storehouses, Ba'boo,
end the Housing Managers at Bol-
boo. Pedro Miguel, Cocoli, and
Cristobal.
ALMAMIRA APARTMINTS
Modem furnished-unfurnished epart
ment. Contact office No. 8061. 10th
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386. Co-
lon.
FOR RENT:For $80.00 two room
oportment, living and diningroom,
etc. Apply Via Espona No. 106,
across El Ponoma Hotel.
MODERN FURNITURE
CUSTOM BUILT
Slipcover Reupholstery
VIBIT OUR show-boom:
Alberta Herat .
fcr. d. I. om 37 (AaUmohlle Raw)
*&!SS".-JU!km' Delltery
Tel. S-4SM (:M >.m. la 7:M p.m.
FOR RENT: Two-bedroom apart-
ment in Bella Visto. Call Pon-
omo 2-2064, 9 to 12 a. m.
FOR RENT: Furnished one bed-
room oportment. For two months
$80.00 a month. Call Tel. 3-
0057. ^
FOR RENT:Aportment one lorge,
one small bedroom, itting-din-
ingroom, kitchen, both, at No 9
44th Street East Bella Visto, see
De Castro, B Avenue No. 24,
phone 2-1616, Panamo.
TRAVEL ANYWHERE
Without Worry Or Care
TrlRYCL
II TivoU Ave. Pan. 2-2006
US Marines To Tell
II To Royal Marine
NEW YORK, Sept. 38 (BIS)
Gen. Sir Leslie C. Hollis,
Cofnmandant General of Bri-
tain's Royal Marines arrived
here today, aboard the Cunard
liner Mouretania.
At the invitation of Gen. Clif-
ton Cates, Commandant of the
U. a Marine Corps., the 54-
year-o!d' General will make a
coast tour of U.S.M.C. installa-
tions.
In Korea. Britain's Royal Ma-
rines, a fighting force which
will be 287 years old next month
and the Xf. 8. Marines, 178
years old In November, have
been fighting together for the
first time since the Boxer Re-
bellion ln China ln 1900.
Gen. Hollis joined the Mar-
ines in April 1915, as a Second
Lieutenant.
FOR SALE:Furniture! misc. house-
hold. Ford Coupe 1939 (6. c.)
House 655-B, Curundu Hots. 83-
4222.
Morgorlto Nursery School. Informo-
tion call Cristobal 3-1701, 3-
1403.
FOR RENT:Apartment 1 bedroom,
sitting-dmingroom, kitchen, bath.
*f No. 20, Via Espoo, see De
Castro. B Avenue No. 24, phone
2-1616.
FOR RENT:Nice furnished opart-
ment. Military Inspected. Infor-
mation Via Porras 97,
LEGAL NOTICE
NITRB STATES OP AMERICA
* CANAL ZONE
Jnjt.d State. Dl.inct Curt P.r Tk.
Di.ir.ct O Tk. Canal z...
D.vi.i. ,f B.Ik..
K.rmit T.yi.r.
PUIntlff.
Mara.r.t T.ylor.
tomioKh *"ni"u
C... ti. S40<
Civil Docl.r is
ACTION FOR DrVORCB
To *fca akov.-nam.d defendant:
Ju ai. hanky required to appear
ris.iu.tr the eampl.lnt fi:.. in the
ak.ji-.ntlt>. action wltn.n nin.tr ...
ertr th. tint puolie.tion.
Jf <* af rear tallare to to sppear
an. in..-, ju.gan.n; wU, ^ ukfn
! v.u . 4feult 'or tke relief
knd.d ia the templa nt.
lS?* ,,fc* "' .10SEPH J
-tOCk. Jndee. Uaited State. i.
Court fer tk. Di.trict of the
tki. Uta day af Beat
C T. MeCarasick. Jr
fkEAI. C,r'
By Saea d. la P.a.
a. . ch'' Bep.ty Cl.rk
ra^aWa. aa:-. Taylor
be foreaoma .uaamons la aerv*.
raa h publlcaUos par.u.nt te
rear af th. Hanorakl. J.SEPH
JUNCOCIt. Jd... umud St."
WarWt Court far the Di.trlet of the
Caatjl Zone, dated Sept. 11. 1,51 ,c
lnd a. 't** a.' Ike Clerk ..id C ,
Ht.k*. PilSrl.-t CuH fo th. Olvl.l
f aTafkaa oa kept. II. Ilk!.
C. T. McCaraaick, J
Clark
By Bare at. I. P.aa>
Chief Deputy Cler.
t,
FOR SALE:1948 Pontioc Convert-
ible Hydramatic. Radio. Duty paid
Call Balboa 2-6319.
w. will h,v.
a" few
N1W PONTIACS
v.il.kl. et rite
OLD PRICIS
Better Btry New!
CIVA. S. A.
Yeair Pentiec Dealer
Pane me Celen
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT:N.ce large bedroom,
near bus stop, sharing kitchen,
diningroom., couple with small
child. Coll Mrs. Hagen 2-2957
Panomo, Nine Street No. 12, top
PANAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS FOB SALI NINE
VEHICLES
Sealed bids Will be received until FOR RENT:Furnished rooms with
October 16. 19^1 for or without board. Cool. Ideal, rea-
FOR SALE
Boats ft Motors
10:30 A. M.
7 Trucks, arvi 2 Trailers. Informa-
tion ond Bid Forms moy be ob-
tained from the Municipol Division.
the Bolboa ond Cristobal oHices ef
the Motor Transportation Division,
ond the office cf the Superintendent
of Storehouses, Balboa, 2-2777.
FOR SALE:All material for mak-
ing Polrero. House 205, Gorges
Rood. Phone 2-1662.
FOR SALE'37 Buick, two doer, 4
new fires and battery. $200.00.
Gos stove. B. 15.00, trumpet $40
00. Federico Boyd No. I. Phone
3-1516.
ssnoble. 48th Street No. 7, Belle
Vista.
FOR RENT:Cool and clean fur-
nished room with meols if desired
339Z]' 45'h Sfr**'" Telephone
FOR SALE: Heavily built motar
toiler "Crusoe" 32' x 8 1-2' x
3 1-2, fir, pine, mohegony; four
bunks, large cockpit, emergency
filler, new sails. refrigerate,
equipped for Outriggers and fish-
ing choir; licensed for ten. Si
cyl nder gray marine, 73 H P
free* wore;-cooled. Leaving, sacri-
fice. $2,650.00. J. V. MeGimsey
37oT? ** Yacht Clu0- **>"
3-1983 (CristobaU.
LESSONS
' Tr--AC_RS! Our
' dnzt C:d;s is s: II ope.
s'lscV ?,30 ,0 ";co Q- m
?' Thr-s menilri rcurse
Barbie YMCA, Ha.ntn & f^nn
Ec'
Stoled bids, in triplicate, will be re-
ceived in the office of the En-
gineering & Construction Direct-
or. Panama Canal Compony. Bal-
boa Heights, until 10:00 a. m.
Nevember 27. 1951, and then
opened in public, for preparation
of site ond construction of pove-
ments. utilities, and buildings for
townslte extension at Silver City
South, Conol Zone. Bid sche-
dules, forms of proposols. speci-
ficot.ins. ond full porticulars may
be obtained from the Office of
the Contract ond Inspection Di-
vision. Room 336. Bolboa Heights
Telephone 2-3739). Specifica-
tion end drawings will be Is-
sued er. a deposit of $40.00 per
set. Oeoo-f will be forfeit if
irji-.,Vat ons and drawing ore
net rtt- w.thln 30 days efler
Opening gf bid. "*
ALADDIN
KEROSENE Mantle Lamp
J^* *afJPCag| Modern White
Light. Bums SO Hour. On 1 ail. of
Kerosene. Uaea % AW Only '.
KUIOSiNE Abaoluttly Safa It
cannot Explode Require, no gener-
ator or pump No Smoke nr Odor.
So Simple a Child Can Operate It
S9.95 Lowest Price
ever Offered la Panam.
All Part Available.
Ob Bale In All HABDWABB and
FURNITURE atarea
Olatributora; -
WONd CHANG. S. A.
Colon fUi flt. A Balbea >
Tel MS
Panama ft) Central Ave.
Tel. una
After a distinguished military
career, den. Hollis was appoint-
ed in 1938 as Assistant Secre-
tary to the Committee o Im-
perial Defense.
During the greater part of
World War II he served as aide
to Mr. Churchill, and accom.
panled the wartime premier to
many historic conferences.
He was awarded the Legion of
Merit, Degree of Commander,
by the President of the V. 8.
In 1947, Gen. Hollis was ap-
pointed Chief Staff Officer to
the Ministry of Defense, and
Deputy Secretary (Military) to
the Cabinet.
He was appointed Command-
ant General. Royal Marines,
May 20, 1949.
mored Division. He was a lieuten-
ant colonel then, a brigadier gen-
eral a year later, and six months
after this, he was given a second
atar and became commanding;
general of the 2nd Armored Di-
vision, at Fort Bennlng, Georgia
Other posts followed, and in 1944
and 1945 he commanded the IV
Corps, which fought the Ger-
mans in Italy continuously for
four hundred and one days In
April. 1945, in Castigllone. in the
Po Valley, he accepted the un-
conditional surrender of the
German Ligurlan Army, which
marked the beginning of the Ger-
man collapse in Italy. "I received
General Pemsel in my van," he
said, "and handed him an un-
conditional surrender to sign. He
hesitated, and I told him I'd give
him fifteen minutes. I left the
van and, looking back, saw him
peering out-of it. I had with me
a platoon of tanks, which were
quite active in the square occu-
pied by the van. The air was also
rather busy with our planes. He
looked at the tanks, and he look-
ed at the air. and when I went
back, he signed. I later found out
that my people had spurred the
him when he became an honor-
ary general in the Brasilian Ar-
my. He explained that he com-
manded thirty thousand Bratl-
lans in Italy, then showed us a
photograph of himself being pip-
ed onto an Air Force plane by
eight Navy captains when he was
leaving his Caribbean Command
post in Panama.
"That's unification." he said."
Memorial Services
A memorial service service
will be held this Sunday at
7: SO p. m. at the Bible Truth
Church of God on 28th Street
No. 39 for the late Mrs. Dorothy
Otty de Jones.
Mrs. Jones was the wife of
Robert Jones, an outstanding
Chorrillo soloist.
Knights of Colombus
Ladies Plan Bake Sale
MARGARITA. C. Z., Sept. 88.
Ladles Auxiliary of the
Knights of Columbus are spon-
soring a bake sale tomorrow, at
the Knights of Columbus Club.
Margarita.
The proceeds from this sale
will go for local charity.
tanks on to unusual activity that
day."
"General C. who Is the senior
cavalryman on active duty In the
Army and since the war has
served as commander-in-chlef of
the Caribbean Command and as
chairman of the United States
Military Delegation to the Uni-
ted Nations, a post he still holds,
told us that the First Army, which
Is one of six, embraces New York,
New Jersey and New Eengland an
area with population qf 30 mil-
lion. The inspection of installa-
tionsFort Slocum, Fort Mon-
mouth, Fort Devens. Camp Ed-
wards, etc.takes up some of his
time, and he has been abroad on
five official missions In the past
two years. "My duties keep me
pretty much on the hump," he
said. "My service has been a nor-
mal oneI was a major
20 Infantrymen Attend
Army Armorer's School
Twenty men of the second and
third battalions. 33rd Infantry
Regiment are attending an Arm-
orer's School at Fort Kobbe.
Sergeant Robert Minor of the
408th Ordnance MM Company,
Corozal. Is conducting the course
with Sgt. William Vest and Sgt.
Raymond Mateon assisting as in-
structors.
The men will be taught assem-
bly, dls-aasembly. nomenclature,
repair and actual firing of the
weapons that a rifle company
uses. These me nwill-be the com-
pany armor experta when they
complete the course.
Men who succeasf uilv complete
the course will be presented with
certificates in graduation cere-
monies to be held October 5.
MVSTBKY BUNDLES
INDIANAPOLIS (UP.) Au-
thorities still are wondering a-
bout two bundles found in the
for men's wash-room at Union Sta-
eighteen years." The General has tlon. They were filled with wo-
commanded everything from a'men's clothing.
DRY CLEANING
DYING
General LAUNDRY
TROPICAL CLEANERS
Pheae S-SS71
Mala Plant Via BeaaSa
Branch teatral Av*. A 24th St.
a n a la c
INSTANT
Fat-Fre Powdered Milk
(fortified Ith Miami. D)
rara freak
riaver
Teaches ealy
taanleee Meet
la) ereeeeetas
e Okwelvetbtf
taatl te eelS
er le tratar.
Oa Bale at r.C. Ce. Caatatleaarlaa.
WRONG GAME
HADLETOWN. Ind. (UJ.)
Maurice Snell said he didn't have
much luck when he went squir-
rel hunting. He didn't see a Bn-
ele one. But Snell ran across two
leer which art protected under
Uto law.
LEGAL NOTICE
NITID ITATIS Of AMIMCA
CANAL ZONE
Uairee- St.,., Ohrrlet Court Per The
Dirtrict Of The Canal Zane
Di.is.en ef lelbea
Oaore. O. Gllaad,
eklatlff,
Mary W. Gila.il.
SUMMON.- *'"*"
Caae No. ;:i>i
Civil Docket II
action roa DIVORCE
Te the .bov.-aaai. eafendeat.
You ar. her.br required lu appear
yd anioer the complaint filed I* th.
kc.-entltl.d action within ain.ly day.
after the flr.t mikllaatlen.
Ia i... of year failure te aa an-
pear aad antw.r. judeai.nt III te take.
*'." y*u r default far tke rf
-.T'.T,N"' ' "onorahU j:ifH 1.
MAM.ni-K .!,,.. United tut.. Dlaariet
Co.rt far the Dlitrlet af the Canal
Sue., tki. ifih 'day af Beat. Itli.
C. T. MeCanatth. Jr
(SEAU CM
By Late I. HaraUea
I.M.r, W. Oum B*"W C'#rk
The f.r.eslBB aumm.aa I. aarvad
aaon you ky pualiaaaloa aaraaaat ta
iffw.r!.r,f lh' "enereble J0SBPM 1
MANCOCK. Jade., UaHel ti.U. Dl.
trl.t ( uurt for the Dlitrlcl f lb
Canal Zone, dated Sept. II, till and
eetere.1 ad fll.d la kkl. aation la tke
fcfflr. f th. Clerk <,f add United kl.t.e
Uillrlet cauri far th. Ul.l.l.a .f Bal.
baa an Sei. 11, nil.
C. T. MeCer-iah, jr.
Clark
By Lei. t. Harriera
Deputy Clark
f)rfW*&
ASK FOR
Haig
SCOTCH WHISKY +J
__________



F * 4 y SEPTEMBER SS. 1*Rl
""~ THE PANAMA IMBRICAN AN INDCPENDENT BART NEWSFAfF*
PAGE SEVn
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
SAHIB HO ukLisHID V TNI PANAMA AMIIIICAN ***. INC.
POUNHCD T NKLSON OUNNVILL IN lit
HAHMODIO ARIAS. IDITOR
f7 H Sln P.'O. OX 194. PANAMA, *. O P.
rill'HONl PANAMA No. 9-0740
CMLI coin. PANAMIPICANJ. PANAMA
COLON of He. 12 \yt CINTAAL AviNUr IfTVUIIN 1TH ANO ISTH HICI
POAIION MPRtMNTATIVIS. JOSHUA I. PCWgRS. INC.
34 MAOiaon Av.. Niw York. 117 > n. v.
LOCAL T MAIL
c month, in '" i i 'o a.ao
PSA ! MONTH*. IN " t O 13.OO
O- ON TfAR. IN ""*'" 18.SO 14.OO
Walter Winchell
In New York
PEDDLING HIS PAPEBS
Our anecdote last week boat Frank Costcllo's oilIni scores
Brought this ipaoe-flUer from a Scrtpps-Boward italfer who rob-
ably enjoya the anonymity of no by-line: "A eolumnlat continues
na role of apologist for Frank Costello, ven to the point of de-
iending his prowess aa a golfer."
Good-reporters, (it aaya hese) acquaint themselves with Names
That Make News in every field.. .Because any entertaining or In-
teresting; story about them is news...The adverts used by The
N. Y. Times to salute Meyer Brrger (Its reportorial aee) included
this: "Berger knows New York Intimately as few have ever known
t...He knows Its characterspriests and pugs, the law and the
lawlessas Damon Run.von knew them. Even Dutch Schulti
spoke softly and with respect when Mike Berger of the N. Y.
Times was around."
The N. Y. Times, incidentally, published an amusing anec-
dote about Gromyko that ssme day Does that (we get so clever
when we have a pushover) make the N. Y. Time* an apologist
for Russia? Jess call me Sugar Ray Winchell.
The beat of the week: From Our Sunday Nighter of Sept. 16:
"Insidera tell me that 80% of the cope will beat the rap. No
corroboratlon."
From the Sept. 19th headlines: "Eighteen cops freed. Star
witness won't talk."
We were on holiday when that Sioux Citv story broke about
the Indian soldier hero being refused burial there because his
skin was red. ..Spoiled our whole vacation beeanse we had no
handy soapbox.. At any rate. Sgt. John B. Rice was buried with
full military honors in our national cemetery at Arlington, thanks
to the President's thrilling punch-ln-the-nose for those Sioux
City foreigners. ..The Irony of it: Sgt. Bice, a Wlnnebago Indaln,
refused burial in a elty named after a great Indian tribe.
Labor Mews
And
Comment
By Victor Rietel
The Dep't of State refused to rule on whether It regards Tass
(the Russian news agency i primarily as a propaganda or news-
fatherlng group.. There Is more stupidity than diplomacy In
his decision...Obviously, every newspaperman representing a
dictatorship becomes a target for a firing squad.
J. s.: Tass men are registered as Foreign Propaganda Agents!
"The Rise and Fall of Hermann Goer inn" (published by
Hoaghton-Mlffl!n> offers this eyebrow-lifter: When Goering was
a youngster he and his parents were maintained in a luxurious
castleby rich Jewish friends But this news (about his ashes)
is something to enjoy: The cremation was carried out at Da-
chau concentration camp, where hundreds of thousands ef Jews
nd Anti-Nazis had been imprisoned and met their death. The
last remaining Incinerator of original Nasl design was used. At
the Tribunal's order, the ashes of Hermann Goering, originator
f concentration camps, were thrown onto the trash heap.
The. Big Illusion gripping and chocking many network and
advertising execs (that teevy has almost obliterated radio and
other' entertainment media was effectively shattered by John
Crosby, an authority on the subject...He quoted this from For-
tune: "The big story about tetrw today Is no longer one of irre-
sistible power. It lies rather in the unexpectedly strong bargain-
ing position of teevy's competitors, heretofore given up for lost,
arid in the equally unexpected weakness of the new medium."
Then there's Variety's report that the motion picture busi-
ness Is thriving, despite pessimistic assertations a year ago that
teevy was murdering it...Mr. Crosby (in the Herald Tribune)
added; ."These are lust a tew.pt the portent tadicatlng.tbat tv
has reached'*-tart* whereby ft may very well be losing ita au-
dience."
That, John, is hardly a skewp to our readers. We have re-
peatedly proved that radio's audience outnumbers teevy'sand
that radio's profits still provide teevy's major financial support
.. .Translated, this meant that radio is not only alivebut is rich
enough to pay teevy's funeral expenses.
The President has attacked Russia as a government of "fear
and tyranny." He declared any Kremlin agreement "is not worth
tbe paper it is written on".. .Back in IMS (at San Francisco) .this
reporter began alerting the people to the danger of war with
Russia...We frequently stressed that the nature of Communism
makes amicable relationships Impossible.. .We proved It with
Stalin's own quotes from speeches, articles and book Yet,
while we were warning the American people (and the President),
his administration pooh-pooh'd the perils and slashed funds for
defense.. .Even after the Korean War exploded Mr. Truman de-
clared It was passible to settle all problems with Russia peace-
fully
flow the President echoes what we've been saying since 1945.
The Nat'l Security Council suspended the Kenn Amendment
recently.. .That means Congress has failed to stop American
aid to foreign nations exporting military supplies to Russia...In
short. Business Aa Usual...For fear of offending our dear allies.
Amreican factories will continue to supply the Red war machine.
Scrap-iron to Japan was a bouquet of Forget-Me-Nots com-
pared to what our allies are selling to Russia.. .It Is a great mis-
take, however, to think that everything connected with inter-
national diplomacy is two-faced...There are whole wards, for
example, of soldiers who have no face left at ail.
The other day Congress truck America another Pearl Harbor
by slashing the Nat'l Science Board's budget by 91%.. Dr. Conant
warned the Congress that In slashing the budget It "has threat-
ened ear future national security and welfare".. .What Irony!
The same Congress which voted 20 billions for Europerefuses
American scientists 14 millions.. That's three per cent of what
we sent to Greece...It Is less than the price of one new des-
troyer... Bpt the discoveries these scientists make already saved
million of lives.
On the very day that congress voted down the scientists It
voted to continue it barbershop at the taxpayers' expense...
Proving the heaviest thing en a Congressman's mind la a free
haircut,
Capt. Anant Singh, a newspaper publisher from New Delhi.
India, went very big with a favorite dog story in Chandler's the
other night.. .You knowthe one about the man at the movie
who sat near a fellow and his dog...Thev obviously were en lov-
ing the flicker.. The dog applauded like mad and barked
Bravo!" several times...When the film ended, our Hero went
over and expressed his amazement at the hound's human be-
havior. 'Flabbergasting." he said Most astounding thing!"
TO which the dog-owner agreed that It astounded him, too,
Inasmuch as the dog "hated the book I"
Ruayon Fund won again at Aqueduct West. EMS.
Mr. P.A. Wswvt Ad' gttrgct
a following
Of prospects mighty fin*!
What's mor* . h* sign*
them quickly
On the dotted line!
Yotjr cltitiifw. ad will at*
tricl a parade of good pros-
pecta because everyone in
Panam id tbe Canal
Zone reads P.A. Want Ads
regularly. Try theat now
... the results will surprise
you!
SAN FRANCI8CO The labor
leaders, who hope someday to
deliver 9,000,000 votes to their
friends on the political Unes, just
as they deliver them on the pic-
ket line, today disclosed a purge
list of SO senators and M con-
gressmen whom they want to
drive from Washington In '62.
This is big league politics, not
Just the smoke-filled room stuff
of kifluenttlal labor chiefs at-
tempting to fill Idle hours In the
restaurant heaven of the nation.
There Isn't a house hold
which won't be affected If the
AFL's labor league succeeds
Jnd to succeed It needs to de-
eat only nine senators and 3(
representatives on ita purge
Hat to give the country a com-
pletely pro-labor congress.
What's more, the AFL doesn't
care whether its friends are Re-
publicans or Democratsso long
as they'll vote right.
And the 700. delegates to the
AFL's 70th annual convention,
each of whom is a powerful la-
bor chief In his own state, ar*
under orders to:
"Go back from here and see
that the local leaders of both
parties understand" that they
are ready to bargain over, candi-
dates right now.
What has been little understood
so far by the nation's politicians,
who so seldom bother going be-
hind the scenes of the big labor
conventions, Is that the AFL now
Is ready to back up its political
bargaining with the same kind of
power it throws behind Its Indus-
trial bargaining for wages and
hours.
It has quietly created a year-
'round political machine better
equipped and more reliably fin-
anced than the Republican and
Democratic National Committees
during the months between elec-
tions.
In many other states, this new
machine will be more powerful
than the Democratic and Repub-
lican organisations themselves.
This new strength comes from
a concept, which is truly revolu-
tionary. The old AFL leaden, the
men of Sam Gompers era and
tradition, would say their mem-
ories have been forgotten.
A long slow process was com-
Iileted at thta convention. The
eft of center bloc won after 5*
yean. For now the AFL has, in
reality, a political department.
Juat as It has a union label de-
partment, a maritime depart-
ment, a metal trades depart-
ment and a publicity depart-
ment.
This revolutionary concept la
contained in one sentence which
is burled deep In the report by
AFL national secretary George
Meany to the National Commit-
tee of labor's league.
That sentence, in effect, coun-<
try-wide makes the AFL a poli-
tical party without benefit of
name; this Is what it says.
"The funds needed to carry on
trie year-around political educa-
tion activities of the league will
henceforth be taken over-a a di-
rect expense of the AFL."
This means that the national
AFL office, between elections,
will hire organisers, researchers,
special campaign directors to
work anywhere in U.S. where the
AFL wants to build a machine to
defeat a political leader.
It waa done by increasing
the percapita tax on each of
the AFL's 9,N*,M* members by
$3 Mi". This will give the AFL
over a million dollars through-
out the year for national poli-
ties. Add to this the SlM.Stt
cost of the daily, nationally
hooked-up Frank Edwards ra-
dio broadcast and you have the
picture of the hard hitting po-
litical machine.
What's revolutionary in this
Never before did such conserv-
atives as Republican Big Bill
Hutcheson of the Carpenter's
Union or Dan Tobln of the
Teamster's Union dream that
they would be contributing hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars a
year to put the AFL into politics
on a regular basis just as the
English unions are part of the
British Labor party.
This they have alwaya fought
as "Socialistic."
Furthermore, it has an even
greater impact on them.
This U it: In the past there
has been a Chinese wall between
the national office and the AFL's
9,000.000. That wall waa thrown
up by local labor leaders playing
personal, instead of labor, poli-
tics, tying up wltn the city ma-
chines across the country.
It has not been unusual for re-
lonal AFL leaders to ignore na-
lonal policy.
Now with ita own national
funds, not dependent on the en-
thusiasm of local leaders for
some political project, but ra-
ther being checked off from their
treasuries, the national office
can go to the rank and file right
over the heads of the local lead-
ership through ita national or-
ganizers and radio program.
This smashes all traditions.

Party Lines
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK. There seems to be lot of
high moral indignation rife amongst the yeo-
manry concerning that big. expensive shindig
the Mexican fellow threw in.the paiazzo In
Venice.
Party cost $50,000 and was attended by most
of the titled, social and movie promtrotters who
infest Europe in the summer season.
The costume ball was paid for by Carlos de
Beistegui y Iturbi, a Mexican with nothing but
money that comes from his family's silver
mines.
He tossed his rout in an ancient palace, which
be had fixed up fancy at a cost of about $750,-
000. Everybody from the Aga Khan to Barbara
Hutton showed, to drink that old champagen
and kick up the heels.
I guess my moral sense Is somewhat stunted,
but I can't see anything wrong with pitching a
parto If it:* your dough,, no matter what It eosts.
Fifty thou is a pretty steep tab. but a man's
money is his own. and if he wishes to set fire
to it. it is his privilege if he has the price of
the match.
Concerning the wastage of dough, no money
that goes into party-throwing is ever wasted.
The poor and medium well-offs profit from
spendthriftlness, just about as much as if you'd
consigned the scratch to a program of good
works.
Behind the squandering of 50 grand for an
evening's revelry is the cold fact that the mo-
ney went to a great many people whd need mo-
ney to live.
Indirectly the wine charges were spread
among the grape growers, the grape pickers, the
grape stompers. the bottlers, the glass manu-
facturers who make the bottles, the wholesalers
and the retailers, all of whim employ people.
The money that went into food reached all
the way down to the farmers, and passed
through the hands of everyone who had to do
with processing and packaging of the food.
The fancy costumes put indirect money into
the hands of the little seamstresses who stitch
the hems and sew on the buttons.
The end product of a piece of cloth passes
through Innumerable Industrial stages, all em-
ploying people, before It finds its way to the
perfumed frame of a fancy lady with a mask
on.
Concerning the fabulous renovation of the
Palazzo Labia, Beistegui y Iturbi unleashed more
scratch among the Italiana than a boatload of
tourists.
If I know anything about decorators, knd I
bitterly add I do, moat of Venice had k piece
of the rich Mex's wad before they hung the last
picture and sent out for the rhododendron
leaves to stick in the vases. He created a year's
employment for half the town.
By the time the hotels put a severe crimp hi
the pockets books of the 1,500 guests, and the
yachts and aircraft and trains that fetched
them got their bites, another heavy chunk of
dough had been added to the local economy.
Of necessity the restaurants and bars did a
thriving business, and the butcher, baker'and
candlestick maker all carved off a- chunk of
change.
I do not see how even the Communists can
complain about the scattering of that much
spendable coin among the deserving poor and
the deserving tradespeople.
They might deplore the fact that a man ha*
so much that he can afford a big rumpus like-
that, but they must commend him for spread-
ing it round among the proletariat.
Actually, the fellow was a piker alongside
some of the lavish livings .of our own old ty-
coons, who really threw the -stuff up for grabs.
and not a deal worse than a combination of
some of the free loads that are thrown around
Washington for the purpose of dazzling the
right folks who might help you later with the
contract.
I find nothing to holler about concerning the
Mexican's big blowout. ave possibly pique at
the fact that I wasn't there to see it.
Matter Of Fact
By JOSEPH ALS0P
DO THEY HAVE ANY GUTS?
UP IN SMOKE
EVANSVILLE. Ind. (\P.)
Smoke commissioner Raymond
Wetzel said two men were pho-
nies who posed as smoke com-
trled to sell
WITH THE FRENCH ARMY IN GERMANY.
"The real question is." said the young American
supply officer, as he sipped hi beer, "have they
got any guts?"
This question about the French was perhaps a
natural one for an American, who remembered
without understanding the shameful French
collapse in 1940.
But to this reporter, who saw the France of
the wartime resistance, the question brought
back a flood of memories.
Indeed, it is a curious experience, full of the
sudden remembering of things forgotten, to see
and talk to and train with French fighting men
after so long a lapse of time.
For the French army of today has clearly In-
herited a good deal from those other days of
the defeat, the occupation, and the Maquis.
And here it must be said that not all of this
influence from the past is good.
Consldtr, for example, a spectacle which this
reporter witnessed recently.
A -French general shouts loudly and angrily
at a French captain. Without turning a hair,
the French captain thereupon shouts more loud-
ly and more angrily right back at the general.
This sort of thing was to be expected in the
informal days of the Maquis, but It is surely a
little disturbing in a regular army,
After all unfortunate though it may be, an
army must have its generals.
This Incident, moreover, whether typical or
not, accurately reflected a very real tension be-
tween the combat officers in the lower ranks
and the higher command.
This derives partly from the defeat In 1940.
for which generals as a class are, rightly
enough, held responsible
It derives partly from the fact that a good
many of the older officers did nothing during
the war. and then resumed their full rank once
the war waa ended.
And it derive* also from the high premium
placed on disrespect for authority in the re-
sistance era.
"After all." said one junior officer, "Is it not
true that LeClerc was a captain until he dis-
obeyed his commanders, and that he then be-
came a general?"
Another young officer (after, perhaps, one
Pernod too many < remarked: "In the next "war.
the tint thine well do i* to kick the old fogies
- to use a very mild translation "and
miasioners and
householders a device which they out
claimed would make th*ir chim- ukt command ourselve*
neys stop smoking. Resistance leaden wen deposed during the
war with the regularity of South American pre-
sidents; but a regular army whose leaders an
at the mercy of their inferior cease to be an
army.
Another incident which this reporter witness-
ed during maneaven In Germany also partook,
not very reassuringly, of the Informal atmos-
phere of the Maquis days.
An English guards officer, his moustache-
adorned face glowing with the intense serious-
ness with which the imaginative British take
maneuvers, arrived breathless at the command
post of a French unit.
With .great solemnity, he handed a typed
message to a French officer, one among several
who were gathered together to drink port and
complain picturesquely about, the horror of Brit-
ish rations.
The French officer thanked the Englishman
genially, dropped the message under the table,
and offered the visitor a glass of port.
"But surely.'f the Guards officer enquired, in
very English Fnnch. "there waa some method
of cataloguing auch an important message?"
This struck all present as a huge joke, and
there was a hearty laugh all around. Later,
when the unit commander arrived, the message
was Irretrievably lost.
This sort of thing could have its unamusing
side under, different circumstances.
But when all this is said, it must also be said
that thla distrust of higher authority, this ln-
dlffennce to all the tedious but necessary busi-
ness of military procedure. Is diminishing sharp-
ly as the memory of the recent past fades, and
as the French army begins to change from a
paper army to an army with the means to
And then la also much that 1* fine that has
survived from those other days.
There U an extraordinary sense of comrade-
ship, of having all been In hen together. In the
lower ranks. |
There is an energy and initiative lacking in
more formal armies notably the American
army, which sometime seems intent on stran-
gling Itself in It* own red tape.
There is an abiding willingness to play David
to any Goliath who may happen along.
And finally, there t* the answer to the ques-
tion posed by the American supply Officer.
(Copyright. 19*1, New York fleraid Tribune Ine.)
^wiy V^SWHQTOHI
MERRY-GO- ROUND
rwlIW FfAISON
q .
Drew Pearson says: D Gasper i influence mainstay of post-
war Italy; Long rule marked by sense of justice aril
religious convictions; Premiar proves real friend t*
U.S.A. in European defense plans.
WASHINGTON. Five years ago I was in the Luxembourg
Palace in Paris when a delegation representing defeated Italy eni
The entire peace conference sat stolid and chilly. Even the
American and Russian delegates, who disagreed on many things
agreed in their frostineas toward the nation which had'spawned
Mussolini and extended his Fascist brand of tyranny over We
Meclterranean.
Japan and Germany were not permitted to send delegates X*
tiie peace conference and doubtless would not have dared to do
so even had they been permitted.
In contrast, a thin-faced, frail Italian wearing spectacles walk-
ed timidly up to the rostrum and made a plea. *
"I raise my voice for a new republic which Is striving toward
the lasting and constructive peace which you also are seeking "
he said. "A nation of tollers la ready and determined to work with
you in the foundation of a more just and humane world "
There was no applause when the thin-faced Italian finished
no Indication that he had won support for the cooperation he
was seeking.
Nor was there any thought that this man could long remain
ut the helm of the turbulent, wavering coalition of parties which
then governed Italy.
Today, however, that man. Premier De Oasperl of Italy, still
frail, still thin-faced, still wearing hom-rimmed spectacles, is in
the United States, not as a suppliant representing a conquered na-
tion, but as a friend and partner in the defer.se cooperative for
Western Europe.
And having Just come from Ottawa and a ditcusslon of mutual
NATO defense. De Gasperi knows better than most how drastical-
ly the diplomats have reversed themselves sinre that frigid day
In the Palace of Luxembourg in 1948.
HOMESPUN PREMIER
It is quite possible that Italy would not he playing this role
of full partnership had it not been for De Gasperi.
He is not a prepossessing figure. In fact, vou can't Imagine
anyone more the opposite of Mussolini than A'.cide De Gasperi
drab, demure, modest, homespun.
But the exact opposite of Mussolini in more ways then on*
is what Italy has needed in these harassed nostwar years. And
De Gasperi's life has been the reverse of Mussolini's almost front
tile day It began. *
It began, incidentally, not in Italy but in Austria.
De Gasperi was born 70 years ago on the wrong side'of
the tracks. The son of a minor Austrian government official In
the Tyrolean Alps, where Austria and Italy mett and where slices
of territory have changed hands over the years.
De Oasperi studied at the University of Vienna, got into the
labor movement, was elected to the Austrian parliament as an
Italian Separatlonist, battled against both the Austrian aristo-
cracy and Italian Communists, and finally, after World War I had
sli'fted his part of the Alps from Austria over tc Italy, waa elect-
ed to the Italian parliament.
CHRISTIANITY AND POLITICS
It was in this period when the flnt seeda of Italian Fascism
were sprouting that De Gasperi helped found the Popular Party,
later the Christian Democratic Party, based on the principle ~of
applying Christianity to social and political welfare. *
The foundation of that party came too late. Also the train
on which De Gasperi first rode to Rome to take his seat in parlia-
ment arrived too late.
Ahead of him arrived Benito Mussolini and his Fascist black,
shirts. .
De Gasperi's train had been shunted aside to make way for
Mussolini's In the night.
It was inevitable that a man with De Gasperl's liberal lean-
ings be jailed by Mussolini. After a year and a half, however, he
was rescued by the Archbishop of Trento and later given a jota
aa librarian for the Vatican.
Incidentally, it was an Interview with King Victor Emmanuel
which led to De Gasperl's jail sentence. He and other Popular
Party deputies had called on the King to demand the ousting'ot
Mussolini a conversation which the King promptly relayed
back to II Duce.
There were those who claimed Victor Emmanuel had never
unproved of Mussolini and wanted to keep him after World War
II. But De Gasperi knew better.
And it was that conversation he had with the King 90 years
ago which contributed to the fact that Victor Emmanuel died in
exile and Italy Is a republic today.
De Gasperi emerged from the Vatican library after 14 years.
In exile to take part In guerrilla fighting against the German*
and to be elected Premier of Italy In 194S.
It is a tribute to his common-sense political sagacity and
some people say to his youthful training in balancing above Alpina
precipices that De Gasperi Is still In office today.
A dozen cabinets have come and gone in France. A new elec-
tion is about to be held in England. But De. Gr.sperl continues at
the helm in Italy.
The reasons include: First, his sense of fairness; Second, his
deep religious conviction that Christianity must be applied, to
politics.
The first was demonstrated after he won the national elec-
tions In April. 1848. The victory was considered a resounding de-
tent for the Communists, and many leaders in De Gasperl's party
demanded that the cabinet be filled entirely irom the ranks of
Christian Democrats. He refused.
It wouldn't be fair," he aald. This was a victory for demo-
cracy, not for any one political party."
And he proceeded to appoint to his cabinet some of the strong-
est men from the Republican, Liberal, and Socialist parties.
Such is the man who has pulled Italy thiough the rigorous
postwar period with a pro-American government, despite the fact
that the largest segment of the Communist Party outside Russia
is under his rule.
(Copyright, 1951. By The Bell Syndicate. Inc.)
Breed of Canine
HORIZONTAL
1 Depicted dog
6 This ------of
Eskimo dog is
not
standardized
11 Painter
13 Braying
implement
14 Beam
J 5 Artist' frame
IT Be indiiposed
18 Reguteied
nurse (ab.)
19 Antagonist
JO From
21 Lubricant
23 Wager
24 Chinese
trtefy port
26 Demolish
27 Witticism
28 Pieposmon
29 Symbol tor
tellurium
>0 Em met
32 Go by
34 Roman
emperor
36 Coniumed
37 Rodent
38 Son of Nut
39 Mountain
pools
144 Pronoun
45 Striped
camel's hair
cloth
47 Utopian
48 Follower
49 Mended
51 Dilettante
53 Man's name
54 Whei\es
VIRT1CAX.
I Cultivating
Implement
2 Radioactive
element
3 Pigpen
4 Kings (ab.)
5 River In
Belgium
S Device for
signaling
7 Rupees (ab.)
8 Japanese
outcast
S Ignores
Hi Remove
12 Oriental porgy
13 Vegetable
IS Under the
word (ab.)
22 Himalayan
peak
23 Dag
Answer to Previous Puzzle
CKX. JLMlu:U :sw .'
'-\JaslSMlJI1'_.,ijl _
.US'. I- c-oieruw^
VU (, )| )| ks ("-
IS
ia m < tatHaosaSH, 1..1 A
4sdr_- iniju>:ua. .ui:w
uti lat-jwiaai m.A
bdwrawuuiiw u
t
23 Shoshonean
Indians
28 Horse color
31 Betrayer
32 Pompous
show
33 Kettledrum
35 Musteline
mammal
3* Layer
40 Annex
41 French island'.
42 Short deep <
43 Blow with
open hand
46 Upper limb
48 Island (Pr.)
50 Compass point
32 Oriental
measure
,-
itij-ii'iiiiiir ir .



PAGE AGHT
- .......-------TWg PANAMA AMF.B4CAN m I HUM EN EN I DAI..T rtEWSFArnt
I
V
^ftlantic S^ociet
FUTftAT, .'Ml UMBER W, 1M1
'/
t
Wr>. Wilton J: flask
/-\i< 195, (faln Jtiplion Cjalu
378
IwSTH ANNIVERSARY OF RKBKKAH
DEGREE CELEBRATED
Cristobal Rebekah Lodge. No. 2, and Isthmian Lodge No.
%. celebrated the 100th Anniversary of the founding of the
Rebekah Degree of the I.O.O.F. with a dinner and special
rjrieeling at the Cristobal Masonic Temple Tuesday evening.
Dinner was served at 6:30 p.m. preceding a short busi-
ness meeting. .Mrs. Edith Kppiey had made three large cakes
for the occasion. One was a large three-tiered cake topped
with a dove with the emblems of the degrees fashioned in
colored frosting. Another cake was topped with the three
links, emblematic of the Odd Fellows, and the third was ap-
propriately enscribed.
Pink carnations and ferns, shipmate Shower
carried out the colors of the or- i Honors Mrs. Schmidt
gaaization. and were used on the The officers' v.ivea of Fasron,
banquet tables and to decorate | Squadron 105, arranged a show-
the Lodge Hall. i er lor their fellow -shipmate."
Mrs. Emhia'Estes, Noble Grand. Mrs. E. H. Schmidt The party
presided at the meeting, and wel-1 was given Wednesday at the Co-
comed the fifty members and > co Solo Officers Club.
guests who attended. The club was beautifully dec-
interesting talks were given by orated for the party. Pink h|bls-
Mr. Semon Therault, the District cus blostoms outlined the arched
Deputy Sovereign Grand Master entrance to the room and were
of the Canal Zone: Mrs. Edith used in the general decorations.
Eppley. P.N.G- who holds the Palms formed a background of w{ih"& bon~voYa.ee tea" Bi'ven'bv
oldest membership on the Isth- greenery and bamboo containers M"n RavmondTerrv at her hnmi
mus: Mrs. George Poole. Sr.. filled with trailing vines were J
P.N.G:, and Miss Grace Williams, used on the columns. A canopy
P.N.G., and Mrs. Estes. ; of pink, blue and white paper
A program of organ selections streamers, repeated the motif
was given by Mr. Arthur Albright. used on the bulfet tables. A huge
four-foot stork, holding two ba-
bies, in the traditional manner,
Dittman. Mrs. A. L. Janson, Mrs.
I. M. Rowell. Mrs. E. C. Atkinson,
and Mrs. J. F. Barlow.
Spivey-Means Wedding
Announcement
Mrs. Simon B. Jones, of Balboa,
announce the marriage of her
daughter, Mrs. Mildred J. Means
to Mr. John B. Splvey, of Gaiun.
i ne ceremony took place In An-
cn. Tuesday afternoon, Septem-
ber 25.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Willo at-
tended the bridal couple.
Following a short noneymoon
on the Isthmus, Mr. and Mrs. Spl- I
vey will reside in Gatun.
Mrs. Spivey was born and rear-
ed on the Isthmus. Mr. Splvey Is
employed by the Aids to Naviga-
tion Division and has resided on
the Canal Zone for the past sev-
en years.
Bon Voyage Tea
For 'Mrs. Clay
Mrs. C. c. Clay
was' honored
He.also accompanied Mrs. Max-
well Smith, who sang "Oh, Love-
ly Night." Group singing of old
familiar tunes concluded the
program.
Ouests from the Pacific side
were: Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell
Smith, Mrs. Maude Cllnchard,
towered over the refreshment ta- |
ble. Frilled parasols In the two
colors and ruffles of the crepe
paper completed the decorations.
Humorous directions cut out of
silver paper were suspended
Ui New Cristobal Wednesday af-
ternoon. Mrs. Roy Hearn assisted
the hostess.
The other guests were: Mrs. W.
L. Howard, Mrs. Reffie Pine, Mrs.
Earl Hoverter. Mrs. Noel Gibson
Mrs. William Grady. Ml". K<
o ones. Miss Ruth Crozier, Mrs.
Paul ri. uov-.cn, mrs. **.... .,
nan, Mrs. Robert Barnes ana ....
wauer riunrt.
Noble Grand of Lodge No. 1. Mrs. above the tables giving instruc-
Marie McNeff, Mrs. Mary How- j tions as to where tht gifts were
arq, Mrs. Nettie Bertrarid, Mrs. to be placed. A batrunet, set was
J. .Woodruff. Miss Vera Beck-' given the honoree from the
ham, Miss Luiille Morris. Miss squadron girls.
Mary Holmer, and Mr. William i Amusing games were played
Dobson. P.O. and the prizes were won by Mrs.
Mrs. William Wray, and her John Banow and Mrs M. L. Lea-
committee were in charge of the hy.
arrangements.
Stag Luncheon Honors
Mr. H. A. Bailey
Mr. Harold A. Bailey, Superin-
tendent of Operations for the
United Fruit Company was hon-
ored Wednesday at a birthday
luncheon given by Mr. Eugene J.
Dldier, Administrative Assistant
Xor the company in Cristobal.
Others fro mthe Fruit Compa-
ny staff who attended the lun-
cheon Included: Mr. William E.
Adams, General Agent; Mr. Sam-
uel D. Puller, Freight Agent; Mr.
Harold S. White, Chief of Pur-
Mrs. N. E. Thomlin served cof-
fee and Mrs. C. A. Lee presided
at the tea service, when the re-
ireshments were servd.
The hostesses for the afternoon
were; Mrs. W. D. King, Mrs. R. L.
Schaefer, Mrs. H. A Chandler,
Mrs. M. L. Leahy, Mrs. C. A. Lee,
Mrs. G. W. Kuhn, Mrs. R. S. "i uck-
er, Mrs. M. E. Thomlin, and Mrs.
C. G. Reld.
The other guests were: Mrs. L.
L. Koepke, Mrs. Davis Henderson,
Mrs. W. W. Bemis, Mrs. A. P. An-
derson. Mrs. V. A. Schweitzer,
Mrs. W. W. Stevens, Mrs. W. E.
Simpson, Mrs. J. D. Hives, Mrs. F.
Mr. Hay wood Address
Rotarians
The weekly luncheon meeting
chasing and Boarding; Mr. David L. Lilleboo. Mrs. F. H. 'Boekgmpi i 'he Cristobal-Colon Rotary
Mrs T. A finsari Mice 1. ClUb
C. Sasso, Soliciting Freight Agent,
and Mr. John C. Ketnick, Assist-
ant Superintendent of Pier Oper-
ations.
Teachers Welcomed at Tea
The Woman's Auxiliary of the
American Episcopal of Our Sev-
lour entertained with a beauti-
fully appointed tea Wednesday
afternoon to welcome the teach-
ers, and to introduce them to the
parishioners. The party was held
at the rectory, with Chaplain and
Mrs. M. A. Cookson and Mrs. C.
J. O Sullivan, president of the
Auxiliary, receiving the guests.
A hundred guests called dur-
ing the afternoon. They were
served by Mrs. Beverly Turner,
Mrs. M. J. Neely, and Mrs. Henry
Bigelow. who presided at the tea
table. Misses Joanne Parsons and
Joyce Cookson assisted.
Mrs. Russell Weade was gener-
al chairman from the Auxiliary
for the affair.
THE PATTER OF RAIN ON A PLASTIC ROOFA pneumatic rain hat that protects the
"wearer and at the sama time leaves the hands free for carrying packages is the ingenious inven-
tion of a California manufacturer. The hat, which is made of lightweight, flexible plastic,' is car-
ried in a small case that fits the purse. It is quickly and easily inflated, left, to the size of an
umbrella and ties on with attached ribbons, as seen at right The invention promises to eliminate
the "umbrella-rib-in-the-cye" hazard of crowded city streets during a rain.
Mrs. L. A. Snead, Miss Arva
Mead, Mrs. Roy Nielsen, Mrs. E.
M. Stein. Mrs. H. E. Walthers,
Mrs. W. D. Ronayne, Mrs. G. H.
MASS OF THANKSGIVING
will be said in honor of
OUR LADY OF THE MIRACULOUS MEDAL
at **** %
ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH (Coln)
, On Sunday, September 30, at 5:45 a.m.

Graces received during accident suffered. The presence
of all Devotees, Friends and well-wishers, will be
appreciated.
HELENA LAWTON.
was held yesterday at the
Strangers Club.
The chief talk was given by Mr.
Charles (Jack) Hay wood, who
spoke on "Automobile Insurance
and Accident Causes." He stress-
ed the three E's of safety: Engi-
neering, Education, and Enforce-
ment safeguards.
-.
Informal Dinner Party
Mrs. Reba Starke was hostess
for an informal dinner part; at
her apartment Wednesday eve-
ning. Her guest* were Mr. and
Mrs. Carl H. Starke and Mrs. An-
na Miller.
Mrs. Carl Starke and Mrs. Mil-
ler sailed today for vacations In
the States. Mrs. Starke will visit
In Greenfield, Mass., Remington.
Va.. and Cincinnati. Mrs. Miller
Is going to Sioux Falls, D. 8.
"Kttkya
Plastic Upholstered Living Room Sets
Different colon, styles and prices! .
Easy Payments an all our Merchandise
Home Delivery Service
,C0lDN.nMp
Mueblera
CLESA
7th St. & Bolivar Ave. 075 Tel. 334 Colon
m
me only makes you
appreciate them more...
YOUR
HOME
EASY
TERMS
Bingo at Margarita
Bingo will be played at the
Margarita Clubhouse Saturday
evening at 7:30.
PIANO
7A
/ LOME is a sanctuary where happy hours with loved
ones make the day's eiiort really worthwhile. The fine
tone oi the Wurlitzer Piano and its endless hours ol
. musical entertainment make the enjoyment ol family
gatherings live on in memories.
Mlt Bolivar Ave. COLON Tels. 40 4c 1364
'*NU> THAN THOSE OF AN' K* I H t r, A',
yttHWH ..what a treat! Always
delicious, and easy to makef
jutt odd mUk, cook 5 minuta*.
Recent Arrivals
Mrs. William Badders arrived
by plane Monday from a visit
with her son in Miami and with
relatives in Annapolis, Md.
Mrs .Benjamin Brundage and
young daughter returned the
early part of the week from a
short visit with Mrs. Brimdage's
grandparents in Connecticut^
Red Cross Parley
Seeks Preparedness
For Disasters
MEXICO CITY, Sept. 28 (USIS)
An Inter-American Red Cross
Seminar is under way here to en-
courage the development of pro-
grams of preparedness for floods,
earthquakes and other disasters.
The Red Cross societies of Pa-
nam, Bolivia. Colombia, Costa
Rica, Cuba. Chile, Ecuador, El
Salvador. Estados Unidos. Haiti.
Mexico, Nicaragua. Per. Rep-
blica Dominicana and Uruguay
were represented at the opening
session on Monday. The seminar
is sponsored by the League of
Red Cross Societies, which has
headquarters' in Geneva, Swit-
zerland.
The seminar alms at encourag-
ing agreements between the so-
ciety, in each country and the
government for preparedness a-
galnst disasters. A plan of the
Organization of American States
for participation in such pro-
grams Is also to be considered.
All problems of Red Cross so-
cieties in the Americas will be
considered at the Sixth Inter-
American Red Cross Conference
which opens here next Monday.'
Group Meetings
Members of the Junta Femeni-
na de Beneficencia are reminded
of the meeting to be held at the
Pacific Clubhouse. Tuesday Oc-
tober 2. beginning at 7:30 p'rn.
Among the items on the agen-
da to be discussed will be plans
for holding "A Night of Fun" on
Saturday, October 6th.
BATTED CAT
ATHOL. Mass. (UP.) Earl
Stoddard U no high-salaried
! baseball star. But one swing of
la baseball bat netted him $10
j With the bat he killed a 4 1/2-
pound wildcat which had lnvad-
I cd his chicken coop. He collected
the money as a bounty,
You will love this new way of keeping cool
Use Lotus Cologne on your skin and your hair,
in your bath and on your linen. Use it often,
and it will keep you fresh all day
and lurroiuid you with an aura of delicate fragrance.
YARDLE
Y joUi (oiotfne
Tktrt art alta othtr Tordlejr Cotagntt including am
wnkh tchaat tht famous 'Band Strut' pcrfwnu
TABDLBY OLD BONO STBEBT LOHOOK
rARE YOU DISCOURAGED^
fiCOMPLAINTS
I which makes yon NERVOUS,
NIGM-STRUfM oe Hch days?
IS*
^Lydie E. Pin khan,' VEGETABLE COMPOUND
RUTH MILLETT Says
la Your Marriage in Danger?"
asks a writer in a current issue of
a national magazine and then
points out: "Even the experts
\ agree that it Isif you suffer
from any of the following symp-
toms of matrimonial unrest."
t^&C ''symptoms" are listed.
What are the magazines try-
ing to do to Mrs. America any-
how? Make a complete neurotic
out o her? TheyVe got her look-
ing for symptoms of every kind
of physical disease. They've got
her wondering if she is "fit to be
a parent" with articles that tell
her "she Is not if..."
. They ask her In words of deep
foreboding if "working moms en-
danger the home"even though
the majority of "working moms"
are working from necessity and
not from choice.
And they constantly set her to
wondering if her niurriage isn't
headed for tht Wt,f,

After getting her to worry
about her health, her marriage
and her children, they then sic
some writer on.to telling her that
she is neurotic. ;
Why don't the magazines quit
trying to scare women to death?
Sure disease, divorce and juv-
enile delinquents seem to be here
to stay.
But why get Individual women
looking for symptoms of all three
every time they pick up a maga-
zine for a few minutes of relaxa-
tion?
That is not doing women any
service. It's Just keeping theri
eternally stirred up, worried and
uncertain.
If they are determined to set
Mama searching for symptoms
how about letting her took for
some symptoms that Indicate
that she is healthy, happy and
doing an admirable job?
onions
Stands SuptetKz
Streamlined beauty
for modern living
Here is the new Corsees girdle
by Flexees... strong, yet-light m"
weight, you wear it with the greatest
comfort and ease . keyed as it is
to the quickened tempo of modem
dving.
Corsees girdles or pantie-girdles,
with matching Pulchra bra, style
your figure correctly for newest
small-waisted fashions.
Airy poicar nal and luttrout rapo*
aolin. LaiUqma top. White, Fink,
S-M-L-XL. Matching Pulchra Bra.
A-B-C 33-40.
Vigour Restored,
Glands Hade Young
It la no longer mcimry to Buffer
from Iom of vigour and manhood,
weak memory and body, nervouinee.
Impura blood, alckly akin, depreaalon,
and poor alaep, becauaa aa America
Doctor hai diacovered a quick, aa/
way to end I hue trouble.
Thla dlacovery la in pleaaant, eaay-
lo-take tablet form, la absolute!
brralos, doea away with (land op-
eration and la bringing new youth
and vigour to thouaanda. It worka di-
rectly on the glande and nerve, and
pula new. rich Mood and energy In
your vein. Tou can ee and feel your-
aelf getting lounger. Tour ayea
parkb. yon feel alive and foil m
youthful vigour and power.
And thla amaslng, new gland and
vigour rcatorer, called Vl-Taba, haa
been proved by thouaanda and la now
aiitrlbuted by rhsmlata here. Vi-Taba
makea yon feel full of vigour and
MTfT nd year younger. A apodal
bottle of 41 Vi-fabe coata little.
IsTflhl from your
W *"* cbamlat today.
..rare. Maah.a. era. Vltalltt
FLIX B. MADURO. S. A.
',?,MARG01 HKKME1JNDA CALVO (AgWdaice)
lAX'tt* DK PARIS CATTAN. B. A. (WTauS)
MOTTA'S (Panama Caln) VARIEDADES (Coto.).
Agentes: IRVING ZAPP CO., S. A. Tel. 2-JSJ5 Panama.
Interior: OFELIA DI NAVARRO (David)
LTC "
FOR BABY'S
TENDER SKINI
J
wartat la "lafa Baa."
A faraaiMp.1 Ptcrere
Wholesome Goodness
no *$ing/'juice can match!
Uaa Mnmm's Baby Fowda, a/W
bsUm.Mdiapwcbane^ajrftobs-
lwa liases, too. It
ooUmsproucut
ewn0SAr.
Mr rat rev
fokn^oMnJfo^umt
at, HA
%&$""' ** *" ~
In V-8 there are 8 delicious juices
ot garden-Trash vegetables-not just
one. That's why V-8 has Uvoly flavor
nd wholesome goodness no tinglo
juice can match. Each juicudda its
own tempting flavor plus vitamina
*\ B, C-calcium and iron. Your
family will love V-8. Serve it often.
"tv Wee av V-i I. MUmw Umml'ati
lamia
Wafararasa
dear*.
"Iha
^___


m^ksWstWstWsttttW

<
MIDA?. SF.fTEMBER It. ISM
Til PANAMA AMERICAN
AN INDEPENDEN* DAILT NEWSPAPIB
PACW NINI*
l^arinc J^orietu
rf/ri. K^mrrol . -Kocht*
So, 17, Batloa I7, /mAm 352/
HINZ-LESTER JNGAQEMENT ANNOUNCED
Mr. and Mrs. Cbarls* F. Him have "rf"lced * W-
gagement of their daughter. Hilda Julia, to Charles tank-
lin Lester, ton tf Mr. and Mr. Charles Lester. Botfc families
reside a th* Pacific Side.
The wedding li t* take Mac* early in the Ian In New
HaTen, Conn.
Miu HUiniraduated {rom the! bassador of the United State to
Blbo.i High School nd from
Oberlin College In Qberlin. Ohio.
She has received scholarship-
for the past two years, and is talc-
ing post-graduate work In organ
at Vile She will receive her
Master's degree next year in Mu-
ie from Vale University.
M*. Lester ia attending Yale
Medical ojese and will grad-
uate next March.
Lester* to Attend
Sen's Wedding
Mr. and M. Charles Lester
sailed today for & short vlalt to
the Un'ted States where they
plan to attend the wedding of
their son, Charles Franklin Les-
ter. to Miss Hilda Julia Hlnz.
Dean of Diplomatic Corps and
Wife Entertain with Dinner
The Dean of the Diplomatic
Corpa and the Ambassador of Pe-
ru to Panama and Mrs. Emilio
Ortiz de zevallos entertained
with a dinner last evening at the
Embassy on La Croata.
The guests included the Am-
Panama and Mrs. John C- Wiley,
the Commandant'of the Flf-
taenth Naval District, Rear Ad-
miral Albert M. Bledsoe and Mrs.
Bledsor. the Executive Secretary
of the Panama Canal and Mrs.
Eugene C Lombard, the First
Secretary of the Argentine Em-
bassy and Mrs. Luis Olmedo Zu-
marran, Mr. and Mrs. 8amu Boyd, Mr. and Mrs. Miguel Mo-
reno. Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Fernan-
do Eleta, Mr. and Mrs. Javier
Ortiz de Zevallos, Mrs. Carmen
E. Arias, Mrs. Camilo Quelque-
ieu, Miss Cecilia Heurtematte,
Miss Olorlela Calvo, Miss Doris
Arias, Dr. Luis Carlos Alemn,
Mr. Robert M. Rummell, Mr.
Marcelo Borglanl, Mr. Qeorge T.
Qambll and Mr. Robert Rlee.
Associate Director of New York
Time and Wife Arrive op
Isthmus *.
-Mr- and Mrs. Julius Ochs Ad-
ler, Jr, arrived recently by plane
from Kingston. Jamaica. Mr.Ad-
ler Is the Associate Director of
The.New York Times." Mrs. Ad-
"
If
Grand Partial

SALE
ON ALL 5 FLOORS OF
PftST FLOOR
HaMo*'1 Hoetrti Teaitar 111!
Klaotrk Stava I Baratar ...........
Arril.crl Stova I aur.r
*J3#
MS A" MerliTe l*W .
it Auloaullc Iran
PHIttO" Ba*ia a
:i re Sai NtaUiwt rut!
rABMASTae- riacinc wt.i
Rlltord" SU *laa WIMIn Victrgla. .............,:.. 4I.S* JJ.S
litar*'- SS ovE Wlaeias Vlclrotai ................. MS lt.se
laraaa.l; MOW
1 ISH i in i
1 U
I.M TM 1
Til 5
. lt.M ais.
IM.M
T.SI 4.1*
. sees 41 M
SECOND FLOOR
Flaaua Chaaaaaaa (w CatlSr* .................
1 Burner Keratcna SMv (with lfa) ..........
t luiur KlHMM IUv (Milk ! ..........
-cmkr im aH i s Mr* ............
M.ial Klichaa CaMoet .........................
Mural. Kitchen llaoh ......................
>itai * La*e*n ...........................
Waaaan iNMfact Taalaa aa* 4 Chaira .........
Small \luatlauaa Kitchen Tahla .. ............
ir~ Tahiti BataM* In Whin ...................
Iran Whaatta* Tahtaa raala* la White .........
Cha*, Malai Chain........ ..................
WaoOa ral*ln Chair. iy|ib Cspva ...........
I am M*r.i Mahafaay War*rh far t hiUran
HbmII Moot Makauar Wr*rah tar Chitaran
In, Chain
Ipharila.a* *ftlaftal*in
ralShu Staahtoi Chala wHh Caavaa
rartablf Waadrn Tray
atMMois" Canlj-Oray WalaraW Mall..*.a.'.'.'
3rd. FLOOR
Mahaxanv Butfat .......................
Arm %a*hU Chato wMh Mn> inn ...
Arm achia Chair Wao*aa gaaU .....
Placo l'**J ntal"VB5aTaU ....
Bean* Cxi.n'lan MahaaaaTTahU lar I
M..ra Mahoiaaj auffct!. ..............
Mahatany Flfaa ........^..............
>"armrly
.tl
ISM
lit*
n<*
.. 4S.M
S.IS
. HI f.
SM
. ITS
.. II.**
|
.. S7.M
. I1J*
IS.*
::
ramarly
S3M
II.S*
.S*
1?"
I
4th. FLOOR
SMS
SS.M
Panaaaly
I Pc. Binlnir Raam Sal .Smnjhh laaijajanca Stria..
"Slaammu'' Cauch. Baa kta, ally waa* Bty It ......
Bimnatnc Single Be*. Panal UpkaWcrj i.'l|ht ain'c''..
Small Slmmaai Iran F.laMn, ka*a ................
Slmmini Kay Chair Cnhabtara* .................
lane* Mahasan.v Nlckt Tablea ................... ,.
* Pc. Carved Mahafany Diami Beam Seta I Chato
2M.M
I4S.M
SU
MOW
IS.N
I2.SS
3151
IS
11.5*
I.M
4.5*
i
T.M
a
lie
S.IS
MOW
s.s
II.M
U.M
itt.se
BH.M
MS*
I.M
St.**
xow
IM.N
HIS*
II.M
2S.M
Ilk Back* I'phelsferrd
B iii
5th. FLOOR
Gannlnr Wicker Ea Chain .........................
Mahei.axF.aiy Chain with Baal enchine ............
Plaatic Uneieltiere* Cany Chain ......................
Bamhee Chain lih C'uthlom ......................
namaak Lit ins Koam Sell ............................
Jfckefany S P. Parlar Sel. ..........................
I Pc. Strau^aat parlar lela ........................
Fermerly
.. IS.M
!:S
.. S.M
IM.M
HM
SM.N
MOW
IS
a
S*J*
lit sa
it* a
S7.M
STURE STORE
ITRALAVi.AT2iwE.ST. PHONES:
2-185C
2-1833
ler is the daughter of Dr. Doug-
las Southall Freeman, tho author
of "Lee's Lieutenants" and of a
Biography of Robert E. Lee.
Adlers Honor**] at Diaaers
Mr. and Mrs. Crede Calhoun,
with their family, entertained In
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Julius
Ochs Adler, Jr.. with a dinner
given last evening, at their home
In Bella Vista.
Truman Warns Democratic Party
Womenfolk Against Confusers
Mr. and Mrs. Jaime de la
OuardU, Jr..'are honoring Mr.
and Mrs. Adler with a dinner this
evening at 8:00 p.m. at their
home In Bella Vtata.
Cartottos te Vacation
in State*
Mr. and Mrs. Gregory O. Car-
totto and their daughter Chris-
tine, sailed todav on the SB. An-
cor) for a vacation of six weeks
to be spent visiting; their families
in New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
Prietos Honor Prionds
With Dinner
Mr. and Mrs. Jorge A. Prieto
entertained a small group of
their friends at dinner last even-
ing In their residence.
The guests included Mrs. Zen-
obia Fabrega, Dr. Miguel J. Ama-
do, Dr. and Mrs. Daniel chanis,
Dr. and Mrs. Rodrigo Nuez, Mr.
and Mrs. Victor F. Ooytia and
Dr. and Mrs. Ramon I. Mora.
Visitor from Guatemala
Due Here Tomorrow
Mrs. Alfonso Hernandez Po-
lamco. wife of the former Minis
ter of Guatemala to Panama, ac-
companied- by her grandson. Ro-
berto, la to arrive by plane to-
morrow from Gutemala.
She will visit her daughter and
son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Octa-
vio Mepdes.
WASHINGTON. Sept. 28
President Truman said yester-
day the Democratic Party stands
for peace and prosperity, and ac-
cused ''enemies of progress" of
trying to confuse the voters about
the issues of the 1052 campaign.
In an address prepared for de-
livery on a broadcast marking
the anniversary of Democratic
Women's Day, he declared that
peace' and human welfare are
"too precious to be made the
footballs of partisan politics,"
and "must not be Jeopardised by
men who are careless with the
truth-"
The President took much the
samo tack as In his press confer-
ence last week, when he accused
the Republicans of using smesr
and misrepresentation because
they lack real issues for a cam-
paign.
Asserting that truth U the De-
mocratic Party "best weapon,"
he said his Administration has
been working for world peace,
prosperity at home, lower prices,
better schools, greater security
for old people and better housing
and medical care for everybody.
'The Democratic Party. .has
jone a long way toward achiev-
ing these goals since 1932 and It
i still making; progress," he said.
"The enemies of progress try
to confuse the Issues but they
cannot obscure the plain Tacts."
He went on to say that his Ad-
ministration Is working for all
the people -"every man, woman
and child In the country"and
"with the support of the women
of America we will continue to
advance toward these goals."
"World peace and human wel-
fare are too precious to be made
the footballs of partisan politics,"
he said.
"They must not be jeopardised
by men who are careless with the
^S
(ommitte* to Meet
st Hturtematto Home
The Hospitality Committee
of th Inter-American Woman's
Club will meet Tuesday at 10 a.m.
at the home of Mrs. Elisa Hour-
tematta of 14 Bast 60th Bt. in Pa-
nama Qity.
I.uneheon Honor*
Envoy and Wife
The newly appointed Ambas-
sador of Panama to Peru and
Mrs. Anbal Ries, who ar* leav-
ing soon for Peru, were ghosts of
honor at a luncheon given re-
cently by Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Lananer.
Mr. De La Guardia
to Attend World Series
Mr. Bmesto (eco) de la Guar-
dia la leaving for New York soon
by plane to attend the world Be-1
res Baseball Games,
"Get Acsasintad" Coffo* To Be
Hold by Woman Club
At the Executive Board meet-
ing of the Balboa Woman's Club
plans wer* made for a "Get-Ac-
qualtned" coffee to be held in
honor of new members.
The coffee will be held at tho
Jewish Welfare Board Center in
Balboa on Wednesdsy, October
10, at 9:00 a.m.
All members are requested to
bring articles for the rummage
sale to be held in November.
Rev. Ronalda to
Visit His Family
The Rev. Daniel Renaldo, CM.
of Bt. Mary's Rectory in Balboa
sailed today for the United States
where he will visit his family In
Roseto. Pennsylvania during his
three months vacation.
Semi-Formal Dane* to a*
Hold by Am*dican Legion Club ,
The American Legion Club of
Fort Amador will hold a semi-
formal dance at :00 p.m. tomor-
row night at the American Le-
gion Club.
Annual To
and Installation Held
The annual tea and installation
of officers pf the Sisterhood KM
Jjhearith Israel was held yester-
day afternoon in the Communi-
ty Hall in Vista del Mar.
Hands to Visit
In States
Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Hand
and their son were among the
passengers sailing today for New
York. They will visit thoir daugh-
ter and son-in-law. Mr, and Mrs,
Reno Franks, former Isthmian
residents. In Washington, DC.
Mr. Hsnd's brother, Captain Ty-
ler Hand, will be their host In
Houston. Ttaa. The will also
spend some time In their homo In
Norfolk. Virginia before return-
ing here.
Star party To B
Held Monday Night
The American Legion Club of
Fort Amador will hold a Stag
Party Monday night at 7:00 at
the American Legion Club.
a a
Mac* and Carol Part* at
Tivoll Tomorrow Night
The Annual Dance and Card
Party to be held Saturday even-
ing at the Hotel Tivoli Is one of
the year's outstanding social
vents. Excellent music for danc-
ing In th* 6*i'room will be pro
vldod by the orchestra from tho
71st Army Band. Bridge, Canas-
Bhum and Pinochle will be
ayed in the card room, A few
ibiss for Bingo will bo provided
for those members and their
guests who use Braille cards.
Attractive Staffordshire Chi-
na and Boda Crystal will be a-
warded to the winners of card
game and door prizes.
Tickets ar* UN par aeraan
and may be secured from any
member of the organisation or
at the door on Saturday evening.
ANNIVERSARY SALE
ALL GOODS REDUCED
SK
awaS
No. 14 Tivoli Avenue
PANAMA
pahamasHimi^fimTkmumi\
(ImMeaa CM
ANNOUNCES a Special Week-End Request
Program by'the musical comedy stars that
have taken Panama by storm. .
CHARLIE BOURNE
The Master of tho Kay board
* and
DON and LOYAL RAYMOND
Who Bang Their Way Into Vor Hearts
TWO COMPLETE SHOWS NIGHTLY
a 10)00 and l:OOa.m.
s
Visit Panama's Smart Spot
THE
ZEBRA LOUNGE
( harlik at the alano
to play your fgverite
rcouast numbers.
'
DANCING
IN THB
BAMBOO ROOM
HECTOQ D0m mnager
LARGE SELECTION OF
*jrr*ncm C-ryial
SAIN I 10U3S
TNI riNISTCIVSTAl MABI
* All rartai-at In Open Stock
Easy Terms Available
16 Tivoli Ave
Pen Women Vie
For Prize Civen
By Ex-Ambassador
Artist members of the Canal
Zone Branch of th*- National
League of American Pen Women
are entering tbeir paintings dur-
ing the next few days m compe-
tition for the Pesrl Erhart Davis
Award, a 925 dollar prize left to
the group by the former Ameri-
can ambassador to Panama.
Monnett B. Davis, In honor of his
wife, an artist member.
Bach member may submit one
original oil painting, which must
be entered by Wednesdsy after-
noon Judges for the competition
will be Mr*. John Cooper Wiley,
wife of the new United State*
Ambassador to Panama; Juan
Cedeo, Direetor of the National
School of Painting In Panama:
and John C. Buechele. retired
Panama Canal architect and'ar-
tist.
The names of the winner and
of two honorable mention win-
ners will be announced at a for-
mal dinner for Pen Women and
their escort at the Hotel Tivoli
next Friday evening.
truth. When we face such sol-
emn decisions as those which
now confront our country, we
must act on the basis of facts,
not fables."
The President called on Amer-
ican women, whom he said know
what the Democratic Party has
"done for th* good of the coun-
try." to "*ee that your neighbors
know too."
"Make it your job to confront
the confusers with the fact*,"
he laid, adding:
"When the people know the'
truth and the facts, no one has
to tell them how to vote."
Mr. Truman noted that Demo-
cratic Women's Day commemor-
ates the date 32 years ago when
women were first admitted to the
Democratic Party's high councils.
"That was a great day for the
Democratic Partyand a great
day for the country." he said.
"Ever sinee then women have
helped the Democratic Party
work for the1 things the people of
this country want and need, and
are entitled to have."
CLEAN HAUL
' LOOAN8PORT, Ind.
The thief who made off with a
big truck here really cleaned up
on the haul. The. trailer was
loaded with soap.

FELIX
Special [Purchase
ff'i*' ~J**hion
On* look at this smart collection
f faehienable frocks will how
yeu why they are euch a won-
derful value at only
1850
- AT BOTH STOBBS
FELIX B. MADURO, S. A.
MAIN STORE
21 Central Avrnua
Tel. t-KB
BKANCB 8TOBB
( TivoH Avosme
Tol. I tit*

--'
Eat, drink too much?
Here are the facts on pleasant
Eno relief for overindulgence
Ovrina!ulg*aca uauallr cauta aacaaa
wit, aaat aaaaw nma, Uwal alu-
>a ft** a?.' Hala* ia.ur.lr
aal .mm aa aciaV
aalaar ia taw gastric mat AND aaaa
U a aailrl laiativt, gaudy wimulan tha
atiaainaiary procaaaia of tha inraatmt If
BSSlMai JB da iataaaiaa, tha la**BS aaaalia1
nil)
aa aafaa. I lohtica. da uah. -SUB,
aaaaer, BBfJ ** way aS*wa saaak, aaav
..... rfthaaowal.
Naartr tany, at BBSS oaaa ar a*B*BJ J
aaatasdiitga iraak m fcoal But ahaw'a -
aa imal t auOtr uaaaraaaanr)' ar "twaai ''"
out." Kaap Bao haaoV far alaaa.au, apaaaff '
raaaf. At aH 4ruMaa.
.31'
's"
TAKE GOOD-TASTING ENO
na
"Km-EWINC CENTtKi
DUMBO iis-ri/
|NTRNATIOHAL SEWING WEEK
OCTOBER 1 to 6


a

ATTHF *>4HT TlMB FOK. A ZEASONABLE AMOUNT* Al\
TAHITI
THE JEWflRY IT0RE
117 I
-V.






I
PAGE TEN
TBBS PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
'FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER M,^95I
.Second Annual Football Jamboree At Mount Hope Tomorrow
1 x
Pressure Football.....No. 3
Ohio State Gets Grid Stars. Code Or Not
by
JOE WILLIAMS
To the dated and battered taxpayer, conditioned to billion-
dollar tabs, the fact that certain Senators protest a trifling
$688,1100 item for Army and Air Force recruiting via radio as of
"doubtful value" can evoke only sardonic mirth.
Over here in sports what engages our fancy is that Bill Stern
Old Sterno as he la affectionately known around the Baron
Munehausen Clubis to handle pail of the program for 26 weeks
at S1000 per. a "very low fee" his manager apologizes, but, after
all, love o! country and flag must come first.
Army's decision to experiment with the tall tale, the out-
rageous distortion and the dramatic lie as a means of stirring
the military zeal of our youngsters will be followed up with In-
terest. With more sinister intent Hitler achieved considerable
results with a similar formula.
Mr. Stern is a phenomenon of the electronic age. A small-
town faiiure until he embraced the ancient fact that fiction,
the more lurid the better, is more saleable than truth, he has
gone on to conspicuous success, making scads of dough and an-
Duailv leading in various popularity polls.
>.o man since Barnum's time has found the sucker field
more profitable. I find that I view him with mixed feelings of
scorn and admiration. Mr. Stern has made it plain that he is
utterly without scruples, yet what is to be said of the unseen
millions who not only accept him but enthusiastically Indorse
him? Would he not be a chump if he didn't cater to their inno-
cent ignorance?

THE FELLOW'S NOT HARMLESS
Still, there are things about Mr. Stern's high position in ra-
dio that are baffling. His reputation as a notorious faker is well
known. Eut this does not restrain radio editors from acclaiming
him "the best sports announcer in America." They, too, seem to
be charmed with his bland Indifference to actualities, and see no
moral or professional wrong In his indecencies.
V/e have had sensationalists in journal'sm. fakers, too, but
there is something about the cold printed word that Is accusing
and withering and this type of editor or reporter does not last
lone. In radio it Is different, there seem to be no exacting stand-
ards and a man like Stern apparently can go on forever. He
wouldn't last 10 minutes on a newspaper with even average
regard for truth and reader Intelligence.
Mr. a em plays it rute. He cooks with the opium of the dead,
the long forgotten and the far-away subject who is in no posi-
tion to issue rebuttal and the likelihood of his ever hearing the
broadcast anyway. Is hopelessly remote. It is this approach that
marks him as a" sly. designing person and shatters the excuse,
often offered, that he is merely weaving fantastic fables to enter-
tain gullibles.
Mr. Stern is not as harmless as NBC, his sponsors and his
apologists would lead you to believe. There is irrefutable evidence
that he is a man of questionable principles, that he will seize
on the slightest pretext for a shocking broadcast, giving little
heed to its injurious effect on persons or institutions.
HIGH PRESSURE
FOOTBALL: S
Here's the third of a ser-
ies by NEA's sports editor
that takes you on a cam-
pus-by-campus tour of the
colleges where football (and
the players) are big busi-
ness the inside story on
pressure football and how
It kets that way.
VICTOR JANOWICZ: A job for
life and a station wagon.
Like in '44 when he elaborated on a gossip item in a slimy
Chicago tout sheet that the St. Louis Browns, on their way to
their first pennant in history, were going to throw he baseball
race. Reason? Their park was too small, there would be more
money for everybody, if the Yankees won. Only Old Sterno, it
should be noted, respected the shabby source. It was right down
his dark and curious alley.

ONE OF MR. STERN'S CLASSICS
For a time last summer it looked as if Mr. Stern might be
embarrar |:d, assuming It is possible to embarrass a man of such
monumental brass. There was talk that Baron Gottfried von
Cramm, German tennis star, would compete at Forest Hills. The
baron had been playing brilliantly on the continent.
Mr. Stern would have been hard pressed to explain to his
vast unseen audience not only the presence of the baron here
but how he was able to play tennis at all, for in one of his
super duper exclusives during the war he had told how the Nazis,
at the brutal Insistence of Max Schmeling, no less, had ampu-
tated the baron's legs above the ankles. And from his safe dist-
ance in the NBC studio Old Sterno belligerantly defied the Nazis
to deny his story. What a man.
In MS. Stern's eager pursuit of the dollar he has turned out
books, one of which is captioned "The Best of Bill Stern." You
won't find any of his Impossible fantasies between the covers.
He's too smart for that. The printed word can be a damning
thing. It is so much safer and simpler to twist, distort and invent
over the air where thumb prints, blood stains and the mangled
remains of truth vanish immediately.
But if Mr. Stern is what NBC. his sponsor and his audience
want there will be no dissent here. Nor am I competent to judge
whether the $688.000 item for recruiting is wise. But I do question
Army's sense of propriety In paying a man like Old Sterno $1000
a week to sell soldiering to our youngsters. How about Gen. Harry
Vaughan?
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
oOo
COLUMBUS, Sept. 28. (NEA)
What does a school playing
high-pressure football do when
the National Collegiate Athletic
code prohibits its coaching staff
from bringing in bright pros-
pects In carload lots and trying
them out on the premises?
In Ohio State's case, the state
was divided into sections, and
the Ohio State Front Liners were
organized to police it. There is no
rule against an alumnus or a vol-
unteer worker scouting .a vicio-
us ground-gainer or a big block-
er or tackier and paying his ex-
penses to the campus for the pur-
pose of selling the university to
him.
There are 70 alumni Front Lin-
ers, but adopted ones contribute
even more to the elaborate foot-
ball program.
In 1947. more than 50 colleges
sought Victor Janowlcz, a re-
markable 186-pound tailback for
Elyrla, O., High. The resourceful
Polish youngster, on everybody's
All-America last year, finally
leaned toward Notre Dame.
John W. Galbreath, multi-mil-
lionaire financier and realtor of
Columbus, Pittsburgh and Cleve-
land, man of many Interests, in-
cluding racing and baseball, set-
tled that one.
He gave Janowlcz a Job in his
Columbus offices, guaranteed
him employment for life, bought
him a station wagon, and oc-
casionally files the star and his
best gal to New York In his priv-
ate plane for a week-end.
The fact that Janowlcz is a
bright baseball catching prospect
easily could have something to
do with it. John W.. you see, owns
the Pittsburgh Pirates.
Galbreath and Leo Yassenoff.
a Front Liner alumnus who
played here years ago. take turns
entertajnlng the squad. Yassen-
off, who is in the construction
and motion picture businesses,
played Santa Claus to the Rose
Bowl squad in 1950.
oOo
J. Edward Weaver, then field
secretary of the Alumni Associa-
tion and now director of ticket
sales and assistant athletic di-
rector, conceived the Front Lin-
ers five years ago with the NCA-
A's adoption of the Dartmouth
amendment.
Other Front Liners all feel like
Galbreath. They are not doing
anything more than what 100,000
other people would like to do.
and promoting high-grade foot-
ball," says Athletic Director
Richard C. Larkins. "If we paid
anyone, or got out of bounds, the
organization would fold just like
that. They're that kind of peo-
ple."
Ohio State and Minnesota are
the poorest in the Western Con-
ference in scholarship allot-
ments. A dozen football players
have scholarships on the basis
of grades, ranging from $300 to
$900, depending on the donor.
oOo
There are no athletic scholar-
ships. Tuition and fees for a boy
come to $50 and the expense of
an average student from within
the state runs about $600 for the
three quarters. Football players,
of course, eat at a training table
and are housed In the stadium.
The maximum that a football
rlayer can be paid on a Job is
100 a month, which cornea to
$88 when the withholding tax
and whatnot are deducted.
Ohio State, with 21.000 stud-
ents, 14.000 of them boys, la for-
tunate to be situated in the-state
capital. Of 450 undergraduates
in state jobs, 80 are athletes.
State office jobs pay from $40 to
$60 a month.
Other kids work in town, with
veteran assistant line coach Er-
nie Godfrey in charge of the
employment agency. Gladiators
must work 15 hours aweek. They
may make up this time after the
season.
Saturday's
Program
1st Race "F-2* Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00Pool Closes 12:45
First Race uf the Doubles
1El Indio J. Cadogen 114
2Hercules E. Guerra 120
3Eclipse O. Chanis 114
4Caaveral B. Aguirre 120
5Fonseca R. Vasquez 114
6Opex F. Rose 114
7Campesino A. Vasquez lllx
8Tulra L. Pea lllx
9Cosa Linda A. Mena 116
"State jobs are regulated," ex-
plains Dick Larkins, "but the
toughest task is to educate the
merchant employer and see that
the player puts In his time. The
tendency of the average employ-
er is simply to take care of the
plaver, and there is no dignity in
that.
"Without being moralistic a-
bout it, we feel we can do better
than all right with the 20 best
Ohio schoolboys each year, and
I don't mind telling you that we
go after them fiercely.
"I'm not going to sit here and
tell you that I don't believe cer-
tain people do more for our foot-
ball players than the University
and the athletic department pre-
scribe, but we have no control
over that, and officialy we live
up to every Big Ten and NCAA
regulation.
The attendance and receipts
show you how important it Is for
Ohio State to land good material.
The Bucks played to 398,074 paid
admissions in five home games
last Fall at an average of $2.75,
or $1,093,703.50. They drew 202,-
234 In four contests on the road,
$556,143.50 more, for a total of
$1,649,847. A college athletic de-
partment doesn't get that with
tennis or squash.
OOOt
Football fever rages in Colum-
bus the year round, and because
the violent fans insist upon a
winner in a stadium seating 78,-
726. Ohio State Is a graveyard of
coaches.
A Quarterback Club which
meets on Wednesday nights
throughout the campaign has a
COACH WOODY HAYES: His
players will earn their keep.
coach Is asked why he did this or
that, and is second-guessed all
over the place. Meetings fre-
quently result in fisticuffs.
Wesley Fesler could stand it for
only four years, and then signed
with Minnesota, where the talent
is not nearly as good.
When last Autumn's varsity
tailed off. after playing phenom-
enally, and was shaded by Ill-
inois and Michigan, Fesler re-
ceived vile letters. Mrs. Fesler
and their youngsters came in for
a share of the abuse.
oOo
With Fesler out, the Colurihus
Citizen conducted a write-inpoll
to determine who would be most
popular as his successor. Paul
Brown, who went from here to
the Cleveland Browns, was the
choice at 10-to-l.
A student petition asked Di-
rector Larkins to resign if he
didn't invite Brown. When Brown
visited the campus in the Spring,
students hung Larkins in effigy.
More than 500 gathered in front
of the Faculty Club.
Wayne Woodrow Hayes, who
met with success at Denison and
Miami of Ohio, was singled out
and approved by the Board of
Trustees, one of whom is Sen.
John W. Bricker.
Woody Hayes, a roly-poly,
handsome, dark-complexioned
man of 38, is remindful of Fran-
cis Schmidt In drill sessions
Impetuous, loud, hard driving.
After scrimmaging the Bucks
long in the hot sun. Coach Hayes
made the entice squad run and
jog six 240-yard laps, or nearly a
mile.
In his first head coaching Job
at New Philadelphia, o., High,
Woody Hayes worked his young-
sters into all hours of the night.
Parents ran him out of town.
Ohio State football players will
continue to earn their keep.
2nd Race "C" Natives1'.. Fgs.
Purse: $325.00 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
1O. y Platal V. Castillo 120
2Mr. Espinosa) H. Reyes 105x
3Tin Tan B. Aguirre 120
4Don Temi O. Chanis 112
5Filigrana Jos Rodgz. 112
6Bagaleo E. Ortega 103x
7Casablanca J. Cadogen 108
NOTE: Don Temi race out of the
betting.
3rd Race "F-2" Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 1:45
One-Two
1Tapsy J. Baeza. Jr. lllx
2-Jullto F. Rose 110
3Don Joaquin G. Ramos 116x
4Cacique Jos Rodriguez 110
5Dream Aw'y J. Cadogen 110
6L. Molly J. Contreras 116
4th Race "F-2" Natives 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1Cafetal G qrael 114
2Bfalo J. Rodriguez 115
3Recodo B. Aguirre 120
4La Rosita O. Chanis 110
5Carbonero G. Ramos 107x
6Danubio Jos Rodriguez 110
7 -'Jota Jota C. Iglesias 110
8Baru E. Ortega 107x
5th Race "1-2" Imported7 Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 2:55
1Vermont V. Arauz 112
2Black Bull B. Aguirre 112
3Danescourt M. Hurley 118
4Zevelanla B. Dario 112
5Bartolo A. Phillips 120
6Glory's Ace G. Grael 120
6th Race 1-1* Imported6'i Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1Hit K. Flores 117
2Jepperin J. Rodriguez 112
3Fulanlto V. Castillo 120
4Porter's Star M. Hurley 120
5Bronx I. Contreras 110
6Cotillon G. Sanchez 109
7Costina G. Cruz 112
8 Novelera C. Iglesias 114
9Batt. Cloud- B. Aguirre 120
10Breeze Bound B. Moreno 115
7th Race "F" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $500.00 Fool Closes 4:05
Second Race of the Doubles
1Caonazo A. ngulo 112x
2Prestigio V. Castillo 114
3Beduino E. Silvera 108
4Piragua) A. Enrique 109x
5Paris) A. Phillips 115
8High Mount K. Flores 115
7Levadura G. Ramos 102x
8Roadmaster B. Pulido 117
Local Interscholastic Grid
Season Gets Off Officially
Isthmian Interscholastic football will get off to an official
start on Saturday, 29, at Mount Hope Stadium at 7 pjn. For
this is the night of the most look-forward-to event in Inter-
scholastic football competition, or in other words, the Second
Annual Football Jamboree.
* i
After many months of planning and working the Cristobal
High School Student's Association is again sponsoring a frolic
of football skill and speed. Cristobal's guests will be the Balboa
High School Bulldogs and also the defending champions, the
P Wave of th Canal Zone Junior College.
The event will begin by the Jamboree QQueen's drawing of
cards to see which two teams play the first quarter of a game.
Following this will be various individual competitions between
the three schools, such as place-kicking, passing for accuracy,
distance-kicking, and a football relay race.
The Balboa High School Bulldogs, whose Jamboree Queen is
the lovely Marie di Bella, will be seeking a championship with
a well balanced and reserve-laden team. They have such star
as Dick Dillman, Bob "Peaches" Peacher, Jim "Mississippi" May,
Sam Maphis, Clair Bodby. Irwin_ Frank, and many other less
known but well accounted for football stars.
The Junior College Green Wave, whose Jamboree Queen is
Anne Howze, will be defending the championship for which they
fought so hard last year and are so determined to keep this year
in spite of their handicap of an extremely small team. Sad to
say gone are such stars as the incomparable Wallie "Walter C."
Trout, and other boys such as Chuck Sassara, Larry Parks, Al
Neckar, and their sparking coach. Coach Fanuccl.
Cristobal High School, whose Jamboree Queen is petite and
cute Karen Stroop, will be looking for their first championship
in three years after being champions for almost five years with
out losing a game. Cristobal will give the Balboa boys a real
run for their money as long there is a single "Tiger" alive. They
might be able to beat the "Tigers" in a game but nobody can
beat the Cristobal "Tigers" in the spirit for which they have so
long been noted. When you see Grace, Manning, Salter, Wilson,
Robinson, Orvis, Blakely, Whitlock (the captain), Wong, Kuhrt,
Bailey, and all the rest you will be convinced that what is writ-
ten here is no lie.
So come one, come all, to the Second Annual Football Jam-
boree on Sept. 29, at Mt. Hope Stadium and see a great bit of
action, for only four bits.
Tomorrow: The high
that acts like a college.
school
Juan Franco Tips
By CLOCKER
1Eclipse Hercules
2Don Temi Grito y Plata (e)
3Don Joaquin Lonely Molly
4Recodo
5Danescourt
6Jepperin
7Roadmaster
8Rondinella
9Lacey
, 10VaUria
"They are Interested In noth- closed membership of 700, a wait- | llBlack Sambo
ing more than selling Ohio State I lng list of 200. The poor head ONE BESTValarla.
Cafetal
Bartolo
Hit
Piragua (e)
Hechizo
Coraggio
La Negra
Hortensia
8th Race "H" Imported'/, Fgs.
Purse: $409.10 Pool Closes4:40
Quiniela
1Belfarset A. Enrique 105x
2La Chata E. Ortega 103x
3Hob Nob M. Hurley 110 ]
4Lituana F. Rose 120
5Hechizo G. Sanchez 122( i
ftRlnty A. Mena 115 ,
7Rondinella J. Contreras 112
8Delhi A. Phillips 118
9Miss Fairfax B. Aguirre 113
9th Race "D" Imported1 Mile
Purse: $600.00 Pool Closes 6:15
One-Two
l_Gaywood E. Silvera 104
2The B. Road A. Mena 106
3Pamphlet J. Rodgz. 120
4The Dauber B. Moreno 110
5Lacey A. Phillips 116
ftCoraggio J. Contreras 110
10th Race "G" Natives 2 Fgs.
Purse: $250.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1Valaria B. Aguirre 110
HERE'S HOWBUI Carey, left, of Michigan State, watches twin
brother Bob pluck a pass out of the air in practice at East Lansing.
The Careys are first string offensive ends for the Spartans. Bob's
an All-America candidate. (NEA)
2Capitana
3La Negra
4Monteverde
5Mona Lisa
J. Cadogen 110
B. Moreno 114
E. Ortega 103x
C. Iglesias 108
11th Race "A" NativesWi Fgs.
Purse: $375 00
1Golden Tip E. Silvera 106
2Hortensia A. ngulo 119x
3B. Sambo J. Contreras 110
4White Fleet A. Enrique 103x
More Comfort Wearing
FALSE TEETH
Here If pleasant way to overcome
loose plate discomfort. FASTEKTH. an
Improved powder, sprinkled on upper
and lower plates holds them firmer so
that they feel more comfortable. No
mimmy. gooey, pasty taste or feeling. It's
alkaline (non-acid) Does not sour. Checks
"plate odor" (denture breath). Get FAS-
TEETH today at any drug tore.
RACES SATURDAY and SUNDAY
DOUBLES
1st, 2nd-6th, 7th RACES
ONE-TWO
3rd and 9th RACES
COLON:
For the convenience of
our patrons we are now
opera ting both at the
"(OPACABANA" and
"SAVOY."
*iftakgr,-'?.V( ai-:
QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES
L
SATURDAYS STELLAR RACE
9th Race "D" Importeds 1 Mile
Purse: $600.00 Pool Closes: 5:15 p.m.
O N E-T WO
1. GAYWOOD...............E. Silvera 104
2. THE BATH ROAD..........A. Mena 106
3. PAMPHLET............ /. Rodrigue 120
4. THE DAUBER............B.Moreno 110
5. LACEY..................a. Phillips 116
6. CORAGGIO.............J, Contreras 110
uaa fiance TRace 7*&c6
CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
' AT THE RACE TRACK
SUNDAYS FEATURE RACES
5th Race
Purse $750.00
"B" Importeds
7 Fgs.
Pool Closes: 2:55 p.m
I
J. FULL................... K. Floret 124
2. POLVORAZO...............F. Rose 117
3. SILVER DOMINO.........B. Aguirre 110
4. RATHL1N LIGHT____.......A. Mena 122
. ----------------,------------- (
7th Race "E" Importeds 6Y2 Fgs.
Purse: $550.00 Pool Closes: 4:05 p.m.
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
1. GALANTE U..............O. Chanis 112
2. NIJ1NSKY.................G. Crux 107
3. CURACA.................B. Pulido 120
4. MIMO...................K. Flores 114
5. WILD WIRE.......... . /. Baeza Jr. HOx
6. MR. FOOT..............B. Moreno 112
**J^.^

'


r y, SEPTEMBER 2S, 1951
IR PANAMA AMFR1CAN AN INDEPENDENT OAIL* NEWSPAPEB
PAGE ELEVEN
Umpire Clears Dodger Bench As Braves Triumph
Campanella Ejected From
Game In Crucial Moment;
By UNITED PRESS
NEW YORK, Sept. 28.The Dodgers, who were
12 x/i games ahead of the Giants as recently as Aug.
11, saw that fat margin reduced to a mere half-game
Thursday when the Braves edged them 4-3 at Bos-
ton in one of the season's most tempestous games.
The Giants can move into a tie for the lead if
the Dodgers lose to the Phillies at Philadelpia to-
night. Meantime, the Yankees, who were idle Thurs-
day, can clinch the American League title by sweep-
ing a doubleheader with the Red Sox at the Yankee
Str.dium tonight.
Manager Leo Durocher, now
thoroughly convinced his New
York Giants are going to win
their first flag since 1937, almost
exploded with excitement when
the Boston Braves won their bit-
terly fought victory from the
Brooklyn Dodgers.
The Dodgers were jangry and
downcast over losing, not only
because they thought plate um-
pire'Frank Dascoli made a bad
call when the Braves scored the
winning run in the eighth In-
ning but much more because he
cleared the- Dodger bench and
ejected their great catcher, Roy
Campanella, from the game in
the ensuing wrangle.
The row developed in the
eighth inning when Bob Addis
and Sam Jethroe tingled off
Elwin "Preacher" Roe to put
runners on first and third.
Earl Torgeson grounded to
Jackie Robinson who fired the
ball to catcher Campanella as
Addis slid into the plate. Das-
coli called him safe and Cam-
panella exploded.
That was what hurt the most
because Campanella, the team's
leading candidate for the most-
valuable-player award and their
best clutch hitter, would have
come to bat In the ninth with a
man on third.
Pcewee Reese led off that ln-
nin-r with a double bff Braves'
rookie Chet Nichols who turned
In a spectacular six-hitter. Reese
was sent to third as Robinson
grounded out.
Campanella would have been
next but he was tearing his
heart out in the clubhouse and
Wayne Terwilllger went in as a
pinch-hitter. He grounded out
and Andy Pafko struck out and
it was all over for the day.
It was a shaken Dodger crew
which boarded the midnight
train for Philadelphia where the
stiU troublesome 1950 champs are
lurking. The Dodgers must win
their three remaining games with
the Phillies today, tomorrow and
Sunday to clinch the pennant
even If Durocher's Giants beat
the Braves In their two remain-
ing games tomorrow and 8unday.
If the schedule ends in a tie,
the Giants and Dodgers must
hold a three-game playoffthe
first in Brooklyn Monday and
the next two In the Polo Grounds.
The playoff would- delay the
World Series opening to next
Thursday when it would start In
an American League park.
The New York Yankees can
make themselves American
League champs for the third
straight time and for the 18th
time since 1921 if they take
the donbleheader with the
Boston Red Sox today.
If they don't do It today then
they have another doubleheader
tomorrow and a single, game fin-
ale Sunday. They would have to
drop all five to lose the pennant
even If the Cleveland Indians
should win their remaining two
games with the Detroit Tigers
Saturday and Sunday.
Faces In
The Majors
Margarita Volleyball
League. IMerway .
The Margarita Volleyball Loop
got under way Wednesday night
with all six teams of the league
seeing action at the Margarita
Gymnasium.
In the opening game of the
evening, a fairly strong Margari-
ta team took three hotly con-
tested games from the Shore
Battalion of Fort Davis, 15-10,
15-8, 15-11. From all appearances,
the Engineers will be giving the
traditional power teams a run for
their money this season.
Cristobal, which has taken the
league championship three years
running, battered the Faculty
team three games straight In the
second match.
i
The final games of the eve-
ning were between two newcom-
ers to the league, the 764th AAA
and Coco Solo. The 764th which
has been cleaning up (he Atlan-
tic Sector Army League moved
roughshod over Cocq Solo who
were playing their first game as
a unit.
After watching the 764th In
their first appearance at the
Margarita Gym, it was generally
concluded that they had a num-
ber of the deadliest splkers In
the league as well as a well coor-
dinated team.
Next Week's Games
6:30Shore Battalion vs. Coco
Solo.
7:30Margarita vs. Faculty.
8:30Cristobal vs. 764th AAA.
On The Alleys...
Pep, Saddler Face Suspension
For Their Rough House Milling
Roy CampaneU Tommy Bmm
Dave Sands Looks A Fighter;
Reminds Old Timers Of Darcy
BY NED BROWN
NEA Special Correspondent
NEW YORK. Sept. 28 (NEA) the United Press, tossing for Ca-
Dave Sands, Australian middle-
weight who holds quite a flock of
British and European boxing ti-
| ties, is the latest foreign invader
I of our Cauliflower colony. Dave
is here to do battle with Bobo
Olsen In Chicago Oct. 3. And he's
under exclusive contract to the
International Boxing Club, just
in case he Uves up to previous
billing.
Sands looks more like a prize
fighter than any other Invader
since Max Schmellng, whom he
resembles In meln. He was born
In the bush country of New South
Wales, and Is part aborigine. He's
a timber-cutter by trade. He was
christened Percy Richie, bat bis
father, who also was a fighter,
thought that :nonicker not fit-
ting for a fighting man, so he re-
named the eldest of four sons
Dave Sands.
Dave is a husky-looking chap,
reminding one of another Aus-
tralian fighter, the ill-fated Les
Darcy, He is swarthy, like a Puer-
to Rican, with black eyes and
black curly haii. He admits to 25
years, Is married and the father
of two daughters and a son. Dave
Is about five feet 10& inches tall,
and fights at the middleweight
limit, 160 pounds. He's had some
90 fights, of which he lost five.
Sands knocked out Dick Tur-
pin. brother,of Randy, In one
round for the British middle-
weight crown, and also holds the
Australian heavy, light-heavy
and middleweight titles.
If he makes good here, he ex-
pects to be matched with Sugar
Ray Robinson. Dave Sands is.no
talker, being extremely taciturn.
They say he expresses himself
with his fists.
WON COIN TOSS, ANYWAY
If the American League race
were decided oy tossing a coin
instead of a bunt-ball, the Cleve-
land Indians might have been a
cinch to cop the bunting. While
they still had one of those Ein-
stein relativity chances of wind-
ing up even-steven with the
Yan :sthey were two and a
hail games behind with only two
to gothev came through with
flying colors In the flipping con-
test to decide the seouence of
playoffs in the event of a tie in
the league race. v
Baseball writers, who appear to
have their fingers pretty deep in
major league workings nowa-
days, natura'ly did the tossing
rid Cleveland's representative'
Pav Joyce, snowed the best
P-ching arm. Ed Salrubury of
sey Stengel's Yankees, failed to
put over a strike.
When this heartening news
was relayed to Manager Al Lpez
of the Indians, he managed a wan
smile and said: "Well, we won
the consolation prize. By the
way, who'd you say was the guy
who tossed for us? We'd better
get him Into a uniform."
BUNTED TO DEATH
Even while clinging to the" for-
lorn hope of a miraculous break
for his team, Lpez bitterly ob-
served that the Indians were lit-
erally "bunted to death." It was-
n't the heavy cannonading of ex-
tra base hits or home runs that
shattered the hopes of the Cleve-
landers, but the small caliber,
bean-shooter bunt that did the
trick.
"I've never seen anything like
It," moaned Lpez, "never ran
afoul of so manv squeeze plays
before in.my life as were worked
against us' in our last series with
the Athletics, Yankees and Tig-
ers."
The Tigers supplied the un-
kindest cut of all, for their three
devastating defeats, which
knocked the Indians out of the
lead, were revengeful payment
for five beatings by Cleveland In
the final six games of their series
last year, which knocked Detroit
out of contention.
"Well," said one Cleveland die-
hard, "this only goes to show
that pitching ain't everything In
baseballyou gotta have field-
ing, too!"
Max R. Stem pel Keglers Step Into
Lead in Major Bowling League
As Angelini Lose
The Max R. Stempel bowling
quintet stepped Into the lead in
the Major Bowling League Tues-
day evening at the Diablo
Heights Clubhouse alleys by de-
feating the strong 7461st AU Sig-
nal team by a 3-1 score while the
Angelini team, which led by one
point, dropped three points to the
H. I. Homa Co. team.
The Stempeleers won the first
game handily by a score of 860
to 803, but dropped the second by
the lopsided score of 949 to 802.
Strong resistance in the third
game was overcome by Marabella
and Colston which enabled the
Stempel team to regain the lost
pin fall and the game by a score
of 973 to 867. Stempel bowled a
total of 2635 against 2625 by the
7481st unit
For the Stempel five, Ted Wil-
ber and Dick Colston tied at 541,
followed by Bud Balcer with 535,
Coffey and Marabella, both of
whom tied at 509. For the 7461st,
Sam Madeline with 546 led Say-
lon who followed- with 544. Nelp
with 520, Hudak with 517 and
Cooley with 498.
The angelini five managed to
scrape but one point from the H.
I. Homa Co. team, throwing the
liquormen into second place be-
nlnd the Stempeleers For Homa,
Joe Filebark "came up with a
smart 585, followed by Earl Best
with 546, Payne with 510, and
Sartori with 502. Fronhelser had
a poor night with 443. For the
Angelini team, only Jenner with
521 and Bates with 519 were able
to hit over 510. The three-point
win pushed the Homa team Into
a three-way tie for fourth place.
The Gashousers from the Fuer-
za y Luz dropped three points to
the N.F.E. Local 595 keglers In
the third match of the evening,
winning only with first game by
three pins, 830 to 827. The Labor
gang took the next two games
and pintail for three points. This
loss by the Gashousers knocked
them from a tie for second place
into a three-way tie for. third
place, along with the Local 595
and 7461st AU team.
In the final match of the eve-
ning. Boyd Bros, came through
for its first good point scoring
with a three-point take over the
Almacenes Martlnz team, drop-
ping only the final game. Por the
Boyd team, Lulu Zebrock was
high with 585, Including a* 233
game, fallowed by Ted Melanson
with 564 and Jack Sciuieider with
539, while both Dailey and Cre-
celius failed to make 500.
For the Martlnz team, Leo
Presho was hign with a clever 598,
In which he scored a brilliant
250 last game, followed by Owes-
ne with 568, and Pepe Damin
with 27. Both Burrell and Pipe's ,
brother, failed to make 500.
The standings f the teams af-
ter the night's play was as listed:
TEAMS Won Lost
(in.', i ,
BOO Mi. PLIES
at
%
Gf%:
1 Tivoli Ave. Tel. 1-58*1
Max R. Stempel St Son 8 4
Angelirii.......... 7 S
7461st AU Signal .... 8 6
NFFE-Local 595...... 6 6
Fuerza y Luz........ 6 6
H. I. Homa Co......, S 7
Boyd Bros., Inc....... 6 7
Mar an/.......... 8 7
Despite Andrews' poor night of
407. Including a low second came
which caught him short with five
consecutive splits, he retained
second place In the list of the 10
top bowlers. Howard Engelke
with his low 507 dropped from
198 to 188, while Andrews drop-
ped from 199 to 187. Balcer drop-
ped from 192 to 187 and Best
from 188 to 186, but Presho came
, up from 177 to 185 to get back
j into the fold of top bowlers.
The list cf the 10 top bowlers
after Tuesday's play:
VMiK Finfall Average
Er. e!ke...... 1697 188-6
Anirews...... 1691 187-8
Ea!cer....... 1887 187-4
Ee;t......... 1676 186-2
-:resho........ 1865 185-0
Slylon ...... 1663 1C4-7
Melanson..... 1658 184-2
Wifcc-....... 1643 182-7
Damin, J..... 1643 182-5
Dille-:........ 1835 181-6

Paine Stricken
Brooklyn
Furlllo, rf . .
Reese, ss . .
Robinson, 2b .
Campanella, c.
Walker, c . .
: aTerwilliger .
i Pafko, If .
| Hodges, lb'. .
Snider, cf . .
Cox, 3b.....3
i Roe. p.....3
1 Totals .... .31 3 6 24 14 0
Boston
i Addis If. ... 4 1 1 3
Elliott, 3b ... 0 0 0 0
Jethroe, cf . 4 2 3 0
i Torgeson, lb 4 1 1 12
Gordon, 3b-lf .4010
Cooper, c. . 3
1 Marshall, rf . 4 0 0
Sistl, 2b. ... 3 0 2
Kerr, ss. 3
Nichols, p . 3
Totals.....32 4 10 27 14 2
Score By Innings
Brooklyn 100 101 0003
Boston 000 201 Olx4
aGrounded out for Walker in
9th. Runs Batted InRobinson,
Roe 2, Jethroe, Gordon, Cooper,
Torgeson. Two Base HitsFuril-
lo, Hodges, Slsti, Jethroe, Reese.
Home RunJethroe. Sacrifices
Reese, Snider. Roe. Doubleplays
Roe, Robinson, Hodges; Cox,
Hodges: Gordon, Kerr, Torgeson.
Left on BasesBrooklyn 11, Bos- l
ton 5. Base on Balls OKRoe 1,1
Nichols 6. Struck Out ByRoe 3,:
Nichols 5. Hit by Pitcherby Ni-
cbjfls. (Robinson). Wild Pitch
RM. Winning PitcherNichols
(1F-8'). Losing PitcherRoe
(22-3).
SPIDER Kentucky's Clyde
Carlig seems to have three legs
as he goes up for a pass in the
game with Texas at Austin. The
extra limb belongs to the Long-
horns' Don Cunningham, who
broke up the play. Texw upset
the high-powered Kentuckians,
7-6. (NEA)

Your
Social
Crate
i
m
m

NEWS ABOUT OUR BUFFET!
Don't worry about the weather for
the duration of the rainy season, the
popular SUNDAY NIGHT BUFFET will
be served In THE BEAUTIFUL BELLA
VISTA ROOM instead of In the Patio..
So, whether there's moonlight or rain
Chef Andre Douthe's delectable dishes
will await you at 7 p. m. in the lovely
atmosphere of the BELLA VISTA ROOM,
where you and your friends can all be
together to see, hear and enjoy the gala
iestivlties.
Music by
KEN DELANEY and his crchestra
AVELINO MUOZ at the Organ
Hnr (he "New Tune of the Week"
S
v.v.v
Born 1820-
still going strong
JOHNNIE WALKER
SCOTCH WHISKY
The fashionable drink everywhere
JOHN Al.ktK a SON- LTD.. Seat* /a toe, Uwulton. klUMHNuCK
Everybody Rsa $ Classified
NEW YORK. Sept. 28 (UP)
"Tew York Eoxing Commission
Chairman Robert Cnrstenberry
cays he will hoid an open hear-
ing oil Oct. 5 o decide who was
to blame for the rou^h tactics,
in the Saddler-Fen featherweieht
title fisrht .ast Wednesday night,
Chrlstrnberry and Commission
Executive Secretary Dan Dowd
! will study the reports and decide
who should be called on the car-
net. The Commission C3n revoke
the licenses of toth Saddler and
Pepit can suspend themor
lew a fine.
"I warned Pep's handlers I
would disqualify Pep if he kept
that stuff up," says Referee Mil-
ler. "Neither would listen to my
instructions about breaking, but
:'eo was the worse."
Each fighter blames the other
for starting the rough stuff.
"I wanted to fight clean." says
Saddler. "But he started it, so I
finished it. Pep butted me, he
heeled, he thumbed mewhy he
even stepped on mv toes."
Pep says"I couldn't beat the
other guy. the referee and City
Hall. Pd fight Saddier again if
he would fight clean, but he
won't. Saddler is just too dirty."
It was the fourth time the two
met in a title bout and the third
winall knockout or technical
knockoutfor .Saddler. Pep was
leading In the official scoring
when the end came. Miller fav-
ored Pep five rounds to four.
Judge Forbes had it scored five
rounds for Saddler and four for
Pep. The United Press scorecard
read Pep four rounds, Saddler
three and two even.
The International Boxlne Club
announced the gate at $75,311.
Another $110.000 will come from
r-otion picture and theater tele-
vision rights. Saddler, who re-
ported to his draft board yester-
day for pre-induction examina-
tions, received 37'/2 per cent of
the net proceeds. Pep's share was
22"2 per cent.
American League National League
TEAMS Won
New York. 93
Cleveland. 92
Boston ... 87
Chicago. . 78
Detroit ... 72
Philadelphia 68
Washington 61
St. Louis 51
Lost Pet. G.B.
56 .624
60 .605
62 .584
72 .580
80 .474
82 .450
90 .404
99 .340
6
1514
22V4
26
38
42 a
TEAMS Won Lost
Today's Games
Chicago at St. Louis.
Boston at New York (2).
Phil'delphia at Washingt'n (N).
Only Games Scheduled.
Yesterday's Results
Boston 2C0 002 2006 7 1
Washingt'n 202 202 OOx8 11 0
Stobbs (10-9), Taylor, Nixon
and White, Moss; Moreno, Sima
(3-7), Consuegra and Grasso.
Detroit
St. Louis
010 210 0004 8
012 001 21x7 13
Hutchinson 10-10) and Gins-
berg; Markell (1-11 and Batts.
Only Games Scheduled.
Brooklyn . 94
New York. 4
St. Louis . 79
Boston ... 76
Philadelphia 72
Cincinnati 66
Pittsburgh 63
Chicago. . 61
57
58
72
7G
7:
85
88
90
Pet. G.B,
.623
.618 V4
.523 14
.500 lX'i
.477 22
.437 28
.417 31
.404 33
Today's Games
Brooklyn at Philadelphia (N).
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh.
St. Louis at Chicago.
Only Game Scheduled.
Yesterday's Results
Brooklyn 100 101 0003 6 0
Boston 000 201 Olx4 10 3
Roe (22-3) and Campanella,
Walker; Nichols (11-8) and Coo-
per.
Only Game Scheduled.
JUDGE TAKES IT PERSONALLY
MT. CLEMENS, Mich. (UP.)
Municipal Judge Donald J. Par-
ent raised the fine for running a
stop sign from $3 to $5 after he
was injured at a "stop" Intersec-
tion.
Insist on

Pains in Back!
NERVOUS!
Rheumatic?
Wrong food and drinks, worry, over-
work, and frequent colds often put a
&S& on tno Kidneyi, and Kidney and
madder troubles may cause Efrcest
Acidity, Strong-, Cloudy Urine, Gattlnc
Dp Nights, Burning Passages, Le '
Pains, Nervousness, Dlzilncs, Swollei.
Ankles. Rheumatism, Pufiy Evellda and
reeling old before your lime. Help your I
kidneys purify your blood with Cystex, .
Cystex goes right to work helping your
kidneys J ways: 1. Cleans out poisonous
aelds. J. Combats germs In the urlnarv
system. I. Soothes an.t calms Irritated
tissues. And thus you quickly get on to !
road to enjoying life again. Gat Oyste*
root your druggist today.
The Battery That Needs Water
Only 3 Times A Year*
For the very highest quality
battery construction and per-
formance that modern science
can produce, buy the Preit-O-
Lite "Hi-Level" Battery. "Hi-
' Level" gives you extra liquid
reserve ... superior fibre-glass
insulation :.. extra long life.
Enjoy long lasting, efficient
battery operation in your car.
Get your Prcst-O-Luc "Hi-
Level Battery now.
PREST-O-LITE "HI-LEVEL*
' BATTERIES
normal cm use
WHOLESALE TIRE & SUPPLY CO., Ltd.
No. 71 West 17th Street Tele. 2-1726 2-1728
"You are Invited
to Drive the World's
Most Modern Car
Sb&MMftl
Drive the big roomy ear that goes more
than 25 mile* to toe gallon at average
highway tpecd. like the Ambassador
it offer* Hydra-Mafic Drive, Airliner
Reclining Seat, Twin Bed.
%(96l Q#kMdA>U
One of the world's greatest road per-
former. Recently a Nash Ambassa-
dor averaged 95.3 miles per hour for
712 miles in official competition.
Compare it. drive it. Here'* your
finest value in fine can.
Comb I" and drive the 1951 Naah
Airflyte. Discover how Airflyte
Construction brings von new safe-
ty, economy and performance, with
luxurious roominess. See why Nash
has a postwar sales gain S time* as
great as the average of the indus-
try. Be doubly happy with the
,next car you buy. Before you decide,
take an Airflyte ridein the world'$
most modern car.
1951
Hi.--.
THI AMiASSADUJt 1H1 MtTESmaN
TNI MMIU1

Msst AWsra. *'*' OMaaa. IsM "**.. U.S. A.
VUlFOM YOU DECIDE TAKE AN AIRFLYTE RID!-IN THI WORLD'S MOST MODERN CAR i
CIA. CYRNOS, S. A.
(NASH AGENCY)
One block from Tivoli Crossing
Phone 2-1790

asMtSK.


.


I
r

I
DODGERS-GIANTS PLAYOFF PROBABLE
Bums Finish Up
At Philadelphia
Pep And Saddler
Face Suspension
The Leagues Best
(Includes Last Night's
Games)
American League
Ferris Fain. Athletics .....347
Orestes Mirioso, White Sox.. .326
Ted Williams. Red Sox.....320
George Kell. Timers
AN INDEPEND
sxm^ i
D^ILT NEWSPAPER
i^anam American
"Lei the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
-------
Yellow jack Duties Finished,
C 82, 'Copter Leave For US
i"
TWENTY-SIXTH TEAR
PANAMA. R. P., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28. 1951
FIVE CENTS
Johnny Pesky. Red Sox
.314
Bv RICHARD AMPER
National League
Stan Musial. Cardinals .. ..
Richie Ashhurn. Phillies. ..
Jackie Robinson. Dodgers
Ray Campanella. Dodgers
Monte Irvin. Giants.......316 prison after the full sordid
Bookie Gross Gets 12 Years;
Was King of Criminal Empire
.357 |
.340, NEW YORK, Sept. 28 (UP>
.332 ; Bookie Harry Gross was sen-
.327 I tenced yesterday to 12 years In
Three Dodgers
Fined By Frick
NEW YORK. Sept. 28 (UP)
Jackie Robinson, Roy Campa-
nella and Preacher Roe of the
Dodgers were fined by Nation-
al League President Ford Frick
today for "scenes they put on
in the runway of Braves Field
at Boston after yesterday's
game."
Robinson and Campanella
were fined $100 each and Roe
850.
The Dodgers ended the game
in an angry uproar yesterday-
after losing to the Braves, 4-3,
on an eighth inning run they
questioned.
First Campanella was eject-
ed from the game by Umpire
Frank Dascoli and later the en-
tire Brooklyn bench was clear-
ed. Later, Robinson was accus-
ed of kicking in the umpires'"
room door at Braves' Field.
He denied it,saying: "I know
who did it and it wasn't me.
But I won't tell who did it."
McDonald had asked, the
court to impose the top pun-
ishment and that the sen-
tence on each count to which
Gross pleaded guilty run con-
secutively.
Although Gross clammed up
McDonald's Investigation of the
tie-up of gamblers and corrupt
police took 22 months, the court
pointed out. and had cost more
than $400.000.
Gross already is under a five-
story of how he ran a 820,000.- year prison sentence for con-
000-a-year "criminal empire"' tempt of court for. refusing to I at the police trial, McDonald
by bribing police was revealed answer questions at the police; today revealed the bookie's
in court for the first time. trial. I grand jury story of how he paid
The young gambler who plead- The maximum sentence pos- grafting cops almost $90,000 a
ed guilty to 66 charges of book- sible today was 68 years in jail month and paid the rent of 20
making and conspiracy drew a and $33,500 in fines. families Just to use their tele-
; blistering denunciation from
I the bench because he had re-
I fused to repeat "in count what
i he had told a grand jury. By
i his refusal the 35-year-old
| gambler wrecked the case
against 18 present and former
police accused of snaring 81,-
000,000-a-year in graft.
Special sessions Justice Wil-
liam Sr Northrop, who headed a
three-judge panel which im-
1 posed the sentence, told Gross
he has "insolently and con-
temptuously disrupted" the
I police craft trial.
"You did it as part of a cold
! and calculated scheme to
destroy the interests of the
people of New York," North-
rop said.
District Attorney Miles F.
Boyle Admits Lithofold Fees
After Taking Democratic Past
By WARREN DUFFEE
WASHINGTON, Sept. 28 (UP)
-William M. Boyle Jr., admit-
ted today that he collected le-
gal fees from the American
Lithofold Corp., and many other
clients for about 10 weeks after
he became acting head of the
Democratic National Committee,
but defended his actions as
"perfectly proper."
CZ Junior College
Extension Classes
Starling Monday
will meet for the first time on
Monday, October 1, Dean Roger
C. Hackett has announced.
(SPORTS PAGES: 10 & 11)
Tractor Strike Ends
But Walkouts Idle
Other Industries
NEW YORK. Sept. 28 UP>
The largest strike involving
22.000 CIO United Auto Work-
ers at the Peora, Illinois, Cat-
erpillar Tractor Company plant advanced shorthand,
ended, but walkouts Idled 50,-' Other courses which will be
000 workers across the United 8lven include elementary Span-
States and more strikes were ish, selection and construction
threatened. Iof clothing and engineering.
: machine, sheet metal and ar-
Fedecal mediators announc- chitectural drawing,
ed last night in Washington All courses will meet at either
that the two-month Caterpillar 5:30. 6:30. or 7:30 on Mondays
strike had been settled with and Thursdays, .except the
acceptance by the Union of drawing courses. They will meet
13 1-2 cent per hour wage in- from 8:00 to 12:00 on Saturday
crease. mornings.
AFL President William Green The only courses which will
In a dramatic personal ap-
pearance before the Senate's
permanent investigating com-
mittee, Boyle denied under oath
that he helped to arrange a
$645,000 RFC loan for Litho-
fold, and said he "never" has
used his political influence to
get "a favor from any govern-
The Canal Zone Junior Col- ment agency."
lege Extension Division classes
He testified as President Tru-
man asked Congress to enact
"reform" legislation which would
Courses which will be given require all high-salaried federal
this semester in the commercial i--------------------------------------------
field include office manage-
ment, elementary accounting,
elementary typewriting, and
elementary, intermediate, and
Raft Leaving
Memphis; But
Crew-Girl III
MEMPHIS. Tenn., Sept. 28
officials, and all top political
party officers, to issue annual
public reports on any money,
gifts or loans which they re-
ceive besides their regular sal-
ary.
Mr. Truman's move apparent-
ly was prompted by the Senate
committee's previous disclosures
that a large number of federal
employes, including several In-
ternal Revenue Bureau officials
received handsome gifts or cash
"sales commissions," from Litho-
fold, a St. Louis printing firm.
The committee's investigation
resulted from charges published
by the "St. Louis Post-Dispatch"
that Boyle received 88,000 from
Lithofold, which obtained the
RFC loan In 1949 after it had
been turned down twice before.
Boyle said the Post-Dispatch
charges were "unfounded, dis-
torted and false," prompting
Sen. John L. McClellan, D., Ark.,
to comment that either the
newspaper has slandered Boyle,
or Boyle had perjured himself.
Boyle replied that ha con-
sidered the Post-Dispatch ar-
ticles "slanderous'' and that
he has consulted an attorney
about "the possibility of legal
action."
In St. Louis, Managing Editor
Raymond Crowley said the Post-
Dispatch had "no comment."
Boyle testified that he sold
his private law practice to Max
Slsklnd. his former partner, for
$150,000 when he became sala-
ried Vice Cl/.rman qf the De-
. (UP) -"One ofThe SiT^aMvLSgf^ SSSR5 S CJr^
appealed to the strikers at two be given on the Atlantic Side members of the raft Lethargia I gJS,"l..iffl ft. follow""
atomic energy plants to end are elementary typing at Cris- was under a doctor's care todayJ fn?\*rmaMlUp the l0ll0W"
the walkouts and return to tobai High School and third but her rftft-mates hoped she nderWslionlrur bv Sen Rl
W ? .___. ^1seJnester conversational Span- would be able to accompany
.? JLhIc ,&*S**JP & ln, thSw G?tun Elem%entarv them when they shove off from
stop operations at -the $500.- School. The former w meet MemDhls tomorrow
000.000 atomic installation at at 7:30: the latter at 6:30. I Mempms wmorrow-
phones to become what McDon-
ald called "the monarch of a
large criminal empire."
"I paid 'em all," said the
wavy-haired gambler.
McDonald revealed the de-
tails of the gambling empire
which graft built had held back
the names of police Involved on
orders of Judge Samuel Lelbo-
wltz.
The judge decided "it would
be manifestly unfair and un-
American" to make public the
'name or names, or incidents,
or information, which would
make it possible to Identify any
person named by Gross when
he testified" before the grand
Jury.
McDonald read voluminous
excepts from grand jury testi-
mony ln which Gross said:
He had 35 horse and wire
rooms ln his syndicate and
paid 9200 a month protection
on each room to each of 27
police division squads.
He paid the same to the
borough squad, "the. super
squads," the chief inspector's
.squad, and the police commis-
sioner's squad.
He also paid $50 a month to
the "contract" lieutenants and
inspectors of each squad, and
$25 a month to the "Dickup
man" who actually collected
"Ice."
On occasion, he handed out
$100 to $150 a month additional
to individual police officials.
His bill for buying suits for
police as still further bribery
ran "between $5.000 and $6.000
a year, not to mention what he
spent for television sets for pol-
icemen.
"Every (police) captain gets
paid for every book room in his
precinct at $50 a location per
month," he said. "Some of them
take It and some of them don't."
Asked to estimate the total
protection he paid annually at
the height of his 10-years of
operation. Gross replied:
WAGING THE FIGHT AGAINST YELLOW FEVER in Costa Rica. Dr. Oscar Vargas Costa Rlcan
director of public health. Inoculates a group at Altamlra. the advance baw for yellow leve?
tSK- ?S^?nd f,rT^leftls- C,apUUn ,ohn R' P"60**. helicopter Pilot who flew medical
technicians to the isolated yellow fever areas. (Official iisaf Ph?
The Air Force Helicopter from
March Air Force Base and its
and the personnel of both air-
craft c-82 carrier left Albrook
AFB for home this morning, hav-
ing completed their yellow fever
mission in Costa Rica. The hell-
copter, which transported medi-
cal technicians to the critical and
inaccessible yellow fever regions,
had flown back to the Zone on
Wednesday.
Early this week two Air Force
officers and two airmen, Captain
Ben M. D. Newsom. Captain John
R. Peacock, S-Sgt. Charles A.
Marsh and Sergeant Richard F.
H. Clancey of the 4th Air Rescue
Squadron, March AFB, Califor-
nia, were presented with token
medallions and letters of appre-
ciation by the Costa Rlcan min-
istry of health in recognition of
the part they played ln combat-
ting the recent yellow fever epi-
demic.
The presentation was made In-
formally by Dr. Jose Cabezas,
Costa Rlcan minister of health,
at the office of the health minis-
try in San Jose. Captain Newsom
headed the Air Force group which
a1 w?ld .??.' betw"n WS?;- brought the helicopter to Al-
Geraldine Garcia was ordeerd
Paducah. Kentucky, and halt-1 Other courses which were of-
ed construction of the $50000.-, fered on the original registra- 'by dStor. to "tote Tt ew Md
000 atomic project at Dana, .lion schedule were cancelled ^ lourf wt" to rMove from
Indiana i because of insufficient enroll- *
Meanwhile, negotiations in-, menu. However, any of these
volving 70.000 General Electric. courses could still be started
workers broke down and the if enough students desired them
contract covering 65.000 AFL Registrations for the courses
Geraldine hasn't been feel-
ing too well since we first
longshoremen in New York was, on the schedule will still be started-" sald Skipper Mary El-
due to expire.
accepted this week.
len McCrady. "But we hope
she'll be able to accompany us
I on an escort boat tomorrow."
Miss McCrady and two young
> men who make up the unmar-
I ried crew of the raft voted to
| leave tomorrow despite the fact
that Miss Garcia night not be
able to accompany them.
They explained that they had
to reach New Orleans soon ln
chard M. Nixon, R., Chi.. Boyle
acknowledged that he was the
actual operating chief of the
Democratic Committee from
Feb. 8, 1949. wheh he became
vice chairman, although he did
not draw a salary for 10 weeks
thereafter.
Boyle said that during that
period he was doing the day-by-
day work of then Democratic,
Chairman J. Howard McGrath,
and was occupying the chair-
man's office at Democratic
headquarters.
But Boyle insisted that his
"volunteer status" during this
10-week period "didn't deprive
me of the right to make a liveli-
hood," and "there was nothing
Improper" about his adding
nine new private law clients,
Including Lithofold, between
order that Mltton Borden could I Feb/uary and April.
.. Thanks to delicious Clapp's Pears
Clapp's Foods are so templing
babies enjoy eating them ... so
nutritious, they grow up strong
and healthy.
Yes, Clapp's makes only baby
foods. That's why Clapp's knows
what babia likeand what's
good for them, too! Mothers de-
pend on Clapp's, and doctors
everywhere recommend it. Re-
member, your doctor it the fined
authority in feeding your baby.
Clapp's Fears are only one of
the 19 delicious varieties of
chopped and straued fruits and
vegetables prepared by Clapp's
for your baby. All are tasty, no
tritious, and economical.
go Into his Job wjth the Fores-
try Service and so that Don
Brown eould return to the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
"Geraldine wants to go with
us tomorrow, and we want her
to come," Brown said.
Brown doubted that Miss
Garcla's condition was such
that the doctors would not per-
mit her to accompany them, al-
though the doctors had not de-
finitely committed themselves.
"She's been on the go ever
since we started, and today It
Just sort of caught up with
her." Brown explained.
Doctors said Miss Garcia was
suffering from hypertension, a
I condition similar to a nervous
| break-down. They put her to
bed and gave her sleeping pills.
If Oeraldine is' unable to
leave tomorrow, the other crew
He said he accepted $1,250 ln
retainer fees from Lithofold to
"be at their command" for gen-
eral legal counsel, but never
did any actual work for the
firm.
Allied Air Armada
Sweeps Europe's Sky
To Test Defenses
FONTAINBLEU, France. Sept.
28 (UP)About 1.200 Allied Air
Armada planes including 700 Jet
fighters swept into the skies of
Europe from tne North Sea to
the Alps to test a new concept of
air defense.
On the ground, ln separate but
simultaneous maneuvers were
more than 150.000 United States.
British and French troops, and
30,000 tanks, armored cars and
000 and a million a yearpretty
close to it."
Naw Reserve tarns
Set For Dec. 8,
Men 17-21 Elidible
Nation-wide Competitive ex-
aminations for the Naval Re-
serve Officers Training Corps
will be'held on December 9,
1951. Headquarters^ Fifteenth
Naval District announced todav.
Young men. who are U. S.
citizens, between the ages of
seventeen arid twenty-one. ohy-
flB"Y 2S2S* ^i?hX disease. During the 11 days ato-
brook AFB in a C-82 on Septem-
ber 9. Captain Peacock, formerly
of Flight B, 1st Rescue Squadron
at Albrook who received notice
of his promotion to captain while
on the yellow fever mission, was
helicopter pilot. Sergeants Marsh
and Clancey are helicopter me-
chanics. '
Flying from an advance base at
Altamlra, .Costa Rica, the heli-
copter made 42 landings in 11
days, covering an area of 6000
square miles and facilitating the
inoculation of 978 people. Twenty
three of the missions were de-
voted to alerting villages so that
farmers could assemble for Ino-
culations.
These missions also served to
investigate the progress of the
AFTER RECEIVING TOKEN MEDALLIONS of appreciation
from the ministry of public health, of Costa Rica, Air Force
personnel who participated ln the fight against yellow fever
In that country, are shown with officials. Left to right,
S/Sgt. Charles A. Marsh, Sergeant Richard T. H. Clancey,
Philip P. Williams, charge d'affaires American Embassy Se-
or Mario Echandl, Costa Rlcan foreign minister, and Dr.
Jose Cabezas, minister of health for Costa Rica and Captain
John R. Peacock, Air Force helicopter pilot.
(Official USAF Photo)
members said she catch up with other vehicles that moved in a
them In a few days by bus or masslve counter-offensive in the
train. French Zone of Germany against
an Imaginary enemy who crossed
The rew made preparations thuRh,lnev ....
today to resume the trip, stock- tJ*? ^ Allied maneuvers are
ing up on groceries andP chee-! &*,?k,ta"nSE*1 f^Ee
lnr over th nii-rimm r.f nowtr took command of toe
TheThoS ' fig SV \ g tb. North Atlantic Pact
an? t^etwfd km0ir BU^howM will fly*Oermany
U Clirksdale, Miss. -----------pound maneuvers.
school seniors or Graduates are
elegible to' take the examina-
tions.
. Applications for the four-year
Navy spnosored college course
for the school year 1952-53 must
reach the Naval Examining
Board. Princeton, New Jersey,
prior to November 17, 1951. Ap-
plication forms are available at
all high schools, colleges and at
the Naval Reserve Section. Ad-
ministration Building. Fifteenth
Naval District Headauarters.
Room 14. Full Information re-
garding this program mav be
obtained by calling 25-2263.
This program trains young
men to become reserve officers
in the Naw and Marine Coros.
Upon completion of the pro-
gram, men are commissioned ln
one of these services to serve
the maximum of three years
during which time thev mav
request retention ln the regular
service.
NROT Cunits are located at
52 U. S. colleges and universi-
ties. Successful applicants must
be accepted as students bv one
of these schools before beins
arjpointed a midshipman In the
U. 8. Naval Reserve. Tuition
books, normal fees and oay of
$50 per month are furnished bv
the Naw to those appointed.
The NROTC course covers the
normal four year college period
and Include* courses ln naval
science ln the regular curri-
culum. ,.
Candidates who successful'^
pass the aptitude test on De-
cember 8th. and who are found
to be qusllfled In all Other res-
pects, will be screened by state
and Territorial committees
made op of nrominent citizens
and Naw officers. About 20O0
will be selected bv these com-
mittee to en tor the program.
Students enrolled In tne
NROTC program will be defer-
red from Induction under tne
Selective Sendee Act pending
completion of their" academic
course
tal of 37 villages, settlements and
farms were visited.
No additional yellow
fever
the total of 31 fatalities publish-
ed as of September 20, clearly in-
dicating that the yellow fever
tide ln Costa Rica has been stem-
med.
In presenting the tokens of ap-
preciation to A>r Force person-
nel. Dr. Cabezas said, "that the
airborne Inoculation project ac-
complished just what he had
planned" and, indeed, more than
he dared hope. The health mlp-
lster further declared, "In my
opinion, this is the most effective
ca will continue under the guid-
ance of the Ministry of Public
Health and the Health and Sani-
tation Division of the Institute of
Inter American Affairs.
Canada Would Build
St. Lawrence Seaway
WASHINGTON, Sept. 28; (UP)
Canada offered today to build
the Saint Lawrence seaway
and Truman agreed to support
kind of Inter-American coopera- the offer If Congress does not
tion and cannot be but of mate- act soon on a plan for joint
rial aid la further cementing re-
lations between the people of
Costa Rica and the United
States "
Whiie the mission of the Air
development.
Prime Minister Louis -Saint
Laurent of Canada made the
offer ln a 30-mlnute confer-
Force is terminated, the fight a- ence with Truman at the White
deaths have been reported since gainst yellow fever In Costa Rl- House.
USE
FOR THE IN YOU LOVE TO TOUCH
Try a Woodbury Facial Cocktail. With a
toft cloth and lukewarm water, rub up a
thick lather of creamy Woodbury. Smooth
on, then rinse wsnn and cooL Delicately
fragrant Woodbury will make your tkia
feel satiny-smooth, so fresh and clean. Foe
rruly senile oomplexion can, make your
Woodbury Facial Cocktail a daily ritual
Set your
Completion glow!
Woodbury
FACIAL SOAP
Have a fresher, more YTd complexion with daily
Woodbury care. Woodbury, made by elan scien-
tists, contains a rich beeutty-tnam mgredient for
extra-mildness. No "kin-buni" oten to extra-
sensitive skin. Woodbury't creamy lather gently,
thoroughly removes dirt, oily film, dead skin
particles... helps guard against dogged pores
and marring skin
faults. #ee, it'e
yours... a lovelier,
more romantic com-
plexion with a daily
Woodbury Facial
CfrsfctdL
WO "8KIN.BURN" WITH EXTBA-MILD WOODBUBY
AGENCIAS W. H. DOEL, .A. Apartado 322, Panam