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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01232
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01232
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
BRANIFF
HOUSTON
ONI WAY....$117.00
ROUND TRIP .. 210.60
Wh &>,


x -
"Let the people know the truth and the country it safe" Abraham Lincoln.

itvuto7(d(t!C%e&'
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR
PANAMA, K. P., FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 14. 1M1
FIVE CENTS
Marines Chop Reds To Pieces In
Relentlessly On Deep Into North Korea
---------------------------------;---------------;-----------:----------------...........------------------'------------.''. '"--------------*- -----------------------------------------------! ,,.,,---------------------------------_--------------------------;--------------------
.________-__ ------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------- -----------o
Relief Planes
Pouring Aid
Into Jamaica
VARIATIONS ON AN OLD THEME -. A differe nt view of Washington crossing; the Delaware?
No, it's UN correspondents crossing the Imjln in Korea. The newsmen had been to Kaesong
when a flash flood washed away their bridge, forced them to Daddle their own boat back to
camp. (USAF photo from NEA.i_______,_____________________________________
Big'3 Rings Air Quarantine
Around Czechs On Oatis Case
PARIS, Sept. 14 (UP)The i on all flicht ey Ciech planes
United States, Britain and over Western Germany.
France today completed the The ban Cut off 14 Czech
aerial quarantine of Czechoslo- flights weekly to and from
vakla in retaliation for the [ Paris, Brussels and Amsterdam.
Prague imprisonment of Asso-
ciated Press correspondent Wil-
liam Oatis and other Western
njfcmals.
'Ww France, France's nation-
alized airline, today halted all
to Czechoslovakia.
European Airw
ided its "
lasf May 31
United States planes have
not been fly in* into Czechoslo-
vakia for a month.
The Air France more came
on the heals of yesterday's
Allied High Commission ban
ausea air
flEded
Newsboy Strike
Instigators Get
CZ Court Warning
Elseo Augusto Salazar. 17 and
Rolando Augusto Ruiz, 14, both
Panamanians, were placed on
a year's probation this morn-
ing for taking 18 copies of the
Panama American away from
newsboys near the cable office
in Balboa, yesterday afternoon.
They appeared in the Bal-
boa Magistrate's Court before
Judge E. I. P. Tatelman.
Both had been caught when
fleeing on bicycles with the
stolen papers, after a scuffle
in which a group of boys tried,
by throwing rocks and grab-
bing the papers, to prevent
newsboy delivering The Pan-
ama American.
Judge Tatelman cautioned the
pair to "keep In mind your own
welfare, and not follow the Ins-
tigation of your elders."
Newsboys could identify only
Salazar and Ruiz out of 12
vouths herded Into the Balboa
Polk 8tatlon yesterday, after-
noon on suspicion of 'taking
part in the disturbance. '
Only a* long, costly and com-
mercially Unpractical detour
through Austrian air corridors
and the route to Scandinavia
across Poland and East Ger-
many remain open to the
had rejected a suggestion that
87 Czech rail passengers, who
were hauled intd West Germany
against their will In an escape
plot, be held as hostages for
Oatis' release.
The 87 Czechs were aboard a
train which crashed across the
frontier barriers into West Ger-
many on Tuesday in a break
for freedom arranged by the
train's engineer and 38 pas-
sengers.
The Czech "Casey Jones,"
Francek Jarda, and bit 2S
fellow plotters were granted
political asylum in the U. 8.
Zone of Germany. This tee
was expected to Irritate- the
Czech regime.
The "reluctant" 87 Czech
passengers aboard the "refugee"
train were returned to Czechos-
lovakia at the crossing point
at Wildenau yesterday after-
noon. The train itself remain-
ed at Selb.
A U. S. High Commission
Court administered another
blow to the Czechs Wednesday
by sentencing, a Czechoslovak
Sovernment economics official;
ustav Davidovlc to six years,
10 months and 10 days In pri-
son for smuggling strategic-West
German materials to Prague.
After Dayidovic was sen-
tenced. United States authori-
ties in Frankfurt revealed that
a West German firm involved
in the "" "fflef HMTfir
KINGSTON, Jamaica, Sept. 14
Relief planes are landing day
and night at the Kingston air-
port, bringing help for the strick-
en^ island of Jamaica. The hur-'
ricane which struck this British
colony on Aug. 19, the worst in
living memory, killed 151 people,
smashed houses and crops to the
extent of nearly $60 million, and
threatened the orie-and-one-
half million inhabitants with di-
sease and malnutrition.
The help which Is pouring In
from all over the British Com-
monwealth, and from the U. S.,
has staved off the threat of epi-
demics or mass starvation, but
great risks and hardships remain.
The wall of wind and rain which
swept across the island, snatch-
ing up houses and bridges, de-
stroyed nearly ail the crops of
the island, including all the great
banana plantations. It will be
years before the Island is back to
full production again.
The British Government has
made a preliminary grant of
$708,000. The Governor of Ja-
maica's Fund is being generously
ipported, not 'only by the more
Deadly Mushrooms
Fatal To 5 Of 7
In German Home
ITZEHOE, Germany. Sept.
14 (UP)A dinner of poison-
ous mushrooms has brought
death to five of a family of
seven.
The mother died in hospital
here today.
Four of her five children
died earlier in the week.
shall Aid.
The firm, the Frorrtp Machine
Works of Rheydt, In the British
zone, smuggled a 80-ton preci-
sion lathe to Czechoslovakia.
This lathe, valued at $88,000.
is capable of turning out tank
turrets.
CAirC Vrobe
To Fix Blame
In Block Fall
Air Force officials said today
that a "full Investigation" was
still under way In connection
with the heavy wooden block
that fell from an identified air-
plane Wednesday afternoon and
landed at the feet of a Balboa
resident. '
The officials said that It has
not yet been ascertained whe-
ther It was an Air Force plane
that flew over Balboa and drop-
ped the block on Barneby Street.
Mrs. Oliver Bowen, who had
been walking with her 3-year-
old grand-daughter, said she
heard a terrific noise and sud-
denly saw a big wooden block hit
the roof of a garage and crash
to her feet.
Police who had been called to
the scene took the 21-inch long
block to the Balboa station.
Air Force officials today also
said that "appropriate action will
be taken" when the investigation
is completed, adding, "if any
action- Is deemed necessary."

Mis
has already touc!
mark.
The only bright spot of the
picture Is the fact that the resort
areas in the northern part of the
island, including the world-fa-
mous Montego Bay, were hardly
damaged, and they are already
functioning normally. The tour-
ist dollars earned by these areas
will prove of great help in re-
storing the threatened economy
of Uie island. The resorts In the
north escaped damage because
they were protected by a moun-
tain chain.
The American Red Cross hits
allocated $10,000 to the Island,
and the Canadian Red Cross has
sped relief of food and medical
supplies by plane.
The help wnlch is coming In
from all over the British Com-
monwealth ranges from checks
from the King and Queen to
thousands of 50-cent postal or-
ders from poor people.
The British minelayer Apollo
was due in Kingston yesterday
carrying 1,500 large tropical tents
from Britain, enough to shelter
18,000 people. British troops Have
spearheaded the bulldozer oper-
ations which are clearing the is-
land roads. Gifts from British
firms include an ambulance,
meat, vegetables, building mate-
rials, cement, etc.
The people of Jamaica are
working In shifts around the
clock to rerbuUd their Island. Es-
sential services, such as gas, wa-
ter, and ejeotriclty are slowly
coming Into "operation, but for
be a bitter struggle for many
years to come.
Pope Asks Equal
Treatment For
Church Schools
Britain Opens
New 'Abadan'
On. South Coast
FAWLEY, Englsnd, Sept. 14.
(UPiPrime Minister Clement
Attlee opened the largest oil
refinery in Western Europe here
today with a warning to Iran
that long delay in settling the
Anglo-Iranian oil dispute may
lose Iran the markets for her
oil. *
Attlee spoke at the dedication
of trie $1.060,000,000 Esso re-
finery here. Britain's new "Aba-
dan."
The refinery is one of Brit-
ain's answers to Iran's nation-
alization of the Anglo-Iranian
OH Company.
Attlee said Britain and the
< United States had arranged for
the people of Jamaica life will Unlt*d States companies to re-
place most of the 33,000,000
tons yearly production lost
through the closing of the huge
Anglo-Iranian refinery at Aba-
dan.
The Fewley refinery is IS
miles, from Southampton, on
the south coast of Britain.
It will produce 8,800,000 tens
of oil yearly.
Six other refineries to be
completed in Britain by 1953
wUI boost the nation's output
of refined oil products to 30,-
000,000 tons yearly, six times
the output of 1048.
8TH ARMY HK., Korea, Sept. 14 (UP) Waves of
screaming Communists today failed to halt the United
States Marines" advance on the eastern front as the Unit-
ed Nations forces drove relentlessly on into North Korea.
Fighting was heaviest, in the east, where the Marines
led a drive which has token United States troops deeper
into North Korea than any other push this year.
From dusk to dawn last night the Reds poured should-
er to shoulder against the Marines in one attack after
another.
But barbed, wire and murderous concentrations of
mortar, artillery, machine-gun and rifle fire chopped them
to pieces.
Son, 65, Backs
Pop's Claim He's
Age 65 -r Plus
MIAMI, FU., Sept. 14 (UP)
James F. MeCnteheon
brought living proof rff his eli-
gibility today when he applied
for social security benefits.
Unable to produce a birth
certificate proving he was over
65, McCutcheon brought along
a witness his son, Robert,
age 85.
Marine casualties were ex-
tremely light.
On the central front United
Nations troops gained three
quarters of a mile northeast of
Kumhwa and their drive conti-
nued. These troops shot down
one enemy plane.
United Nations pilots reported
Communist road traffic in North
Korea Is diminishing, undoubted-
ly because of the terrible toll Al-
lied air raids have taken of Red
supply columns.
The box score for the first IS
days of September is 7,400 Red
vehicles destroyed or damaged.
Rail traffic In North Korea has
been stepped up, to compensate
{or this loss of vehicles. .
Five, locomotives and 100 wag-
ons vare destroyed or damaged
last night.
Naval saa and air units shot
up much of North Korea yester-
day.
In the nan River estuary the
British frigate HMS Cardigan
Bay last night practiced her spe
clalty of Illuminating the coun- across Korea.
tryslde with starshells so that
she and companion ships could
blast Red concentrations and
gun emplacements.
The United States destroyers
Parks and Craig, and the United
States destroyer escort More pep-
pered Wonsan throughout the
day. The heavy cruiser USS To-
ledo wss fired at by shore batter-
ies, but was not hit.
At Songjln the British destroy-
er Charity, the United States de-
stroyer escort Naifeh shelled
three hidden trains with telling
effect.
At Kosong the United States
destroyer Perkins eliminated
eight small vessels.
Also near Songjln a flight of
Corsairs and Skyraiders from
the United States aireraft car-
rier Boxer left a rail bypass a
shambles.
Navy planes from the United .
SUtes carrier Essex and United
States Marine planes from the
carrier SteBy also shot up target*
Top Scientists Speak Pieces on Birth,
Old Age, Food From Sea, Cancer Cure
BY PAUL F. ELLIS
United Press Science Editor
Another question: What about
the world's food supply?
Virtsnen:' We have the cheml-
Bere were the experts, repre- agricultural blo-chemlatry In
senting some of the biggest acl- 1945.
vfw vripv *t ia f?n entitle minds In the world: All the scientists were here to
Six Nobel Pri're winner. p~ r Wendell M Stanley, of the attend the International Meet- cal tools to double our food sup-
fSpSSS" a^urirToVh'o" pS^nner'in^'Kr- fT ** """* S ^ ""
Ttr^?m .t0d.aI' .. oneering work In virus research.
ion TlfSn unPrecedented ce*- Piter Debye; native of the
sloni in science. Netherlands, but now an Amerl-
The scientists, along with Dr. can citizen. He won Ws Nobel
Jarnes Bryant Conant. president Prise in chemistry in 19S
of Harvard University, surten- *
dered to some 20 science writers Dr. Adolf Butenandt. of Oer-
The first question popped
was abost b|rth control, and
whether the scientists knew of
any substance that could be
taken la the diet to cut down
fortuity.
Butenandt: He knew of no
most^m aua* t^J %..L ^ 5KS ?on ]&Mobel Prtae to such research work going on. but
evernaw ""^ tata conerences chemisto, k ls. but Hitler said there were quite a few sper-
!'i.H- ... v..... m*de Wm **> "" ward.
The scientists talked of birth
hss the means to feed 4 billion
people. There are about 2 and
>/2 billion In the world now.
Stanley:' The present day
method of farming is using on-
ly one per cent of the total so-
lar energy received by an acre
of land. .It could be pushed up
to A* per cent, thereby increas-
ing feed crops.
Tlsellus: The sea covers most
control, how the world can feed
itself, utilising the sea for food,
possibility of eaneer cure,
new sources of energy and the
micldal agents.
- r^ui? JH?1,1'i0.f,,wedea- *Ot: A magician Is never of the surface of the earth. Per-
Me won rus Nooei Prise in ehem- asked to explain his magic. haps fishing is not the only way
m3 ^ Jut w He was referring to his pradic- to make use of the oceans.
a m ILS^S1- * *B*" Uo of lut w**k ***** ** **- Another question: What's com-
Sr.Wl.tU"EJSl0" 21 .***** Ws Nobel cast that by the year 2000 there me^pln csneerT
--I. fiTSSSLJFtZLr *J? ln.h,mU,S' m 1M7 wouW world-wide birth con- 81? ;Robe? H. f
r- s me continue* to length- Dr. Artturi Vlrtanea. of Fin- trot -with anti-fertility substan- around a comer Is a
land. He won bis Nobel Prije In cas being taken In the diet.
feels that just
ii discovery of
(Continued on Page 8, Cohans 4>
CAATOBL Of
Sept 14 (UPPope
day called on all detnoflHeJ
countries to adopt legislation giv-
ing Roman Catholic schools equal
privileges- with public schools.
Addressing delegates for the
first international congress of
nun teachers, the Pope raised the
Issue of state aid to Catholic
schools.
This has been a controversial
question In France, the United
States and.other countries.
He said that /many Catholic
parents Were unable to fulfill
their desire to send their children
to Catholic schools because there
is a shortage of these Institutions.
"One must expect from those
who have a pars In the forma-
tion of scholastic legislation a
sense of Justice, and we would
like to say a democratic sense to
meet the will of parents in such
a way that schools founded and
directed by religious institutions
are not put in a worse position
than state schools, and that the
freedom necessary for their de-
velopment be recognized."
The Pope also said: "Modem
youth Is now irreverent towards
many things which In their
childhood they regarded with the
highest respect.
"But modern youth does not
bear the entire fault for this at-
"It has lived Its years of child-
hood through horrible things,
and has seen with its eyes the
miserable fall and failure of
many Ideals once regarded as
highly precious."
Rain Tops 7-Year
Pacific Side Fall
The rain that blew In off Pa-
nama Bay late yesterday and
this morning was no record
breaker but it was the heaviest
since August 1944 at Balboa
Heights.
The total fall was 4.40 inches
at Balboa Heights and 4.50
Inches at Balboa Docks in a
period of three hours and 15
minutes starting about 11:30 p.
m. and ending about 3 a. m.
today. On August 27 and 28.
1944. 5.36 Inches were recorded
in a 24-hour period.
The water collected in the
flat areas of Balboa and spread
mud from the newly graded
area across from the Ancon
Masonic Temple over Balboa
Road, slowing traffic in the
area this morning. Municipal
Division workmen were hosing
down the road all morning.
The record rainfall for a per-
iod of 24 hours was 7.23 Inches
recorded on May 12 and IS,
1S12 Rainfall tor the entire I
month of August was 2.90 Inches
st Balboa Heights.
The rainfall was light at all
stations except on the Pacific
side of the Isthmus. 1
UN Air Chief Predicts AF Could
Cross Ya'lu To Meet Big Attack
5TH AIR FORCE HQ., Kores, another push like the one they
Sept. M (UP) Major General tried last spring when we had
Prank F. Everest, commanding
officer of the 5th Air Force, said
their fighters, which occasion-
ally attack 5th Air Force night
virtually uncontested air supre- bombers;
macy. 2) The Red pilots are probably
"Personally I would like to see of mixed nationalities. The mat-
the Reds try an afr offensive, ority are Russian-trained Chine.'
They would cause us some em- and North Koreans. Language
barrassment, but the only way difficulties can prevent European
we can get at them is if they Red pilots from taking an actual
come over the Yalu." part in operations.
Everest repeated the Air Force
maxim that the best form of de- t) The Red Air Force will soon
fense against air attack is coun- be strengthened by pilota who
terattack against enemy air underwent extensive txalnlng be-
bases, fore or early to the Korean war;
But the majority of Red air 4) The Reds are building air-
bases lie within the sanctuary of fields in North Korea at an In-
d- tenslfled rate, perhaps to exploit
den territory for United Nations the fiction that offensive opera-
He said the Communists would planes. tions would be launched from
rely heavily upon their beefed- Everest gave the following these bases Instead of from Man-
up, Soviet-trained air force if summary of present and poten- churla. But the best of these
they decided to launch another tial Red air strength: fields can take care only of light
big ground offensive. 1) There' are' indications that n.iwi planes and an occasional
"I do not think they would try the Reds now have radar In fighter.
today that he assumed an all-out
Communist air attack In Korea
would leard to the lifting of pres-
ent restrictions on United Na-
tions planes bombing Red air
bases In Manchuria.
There are increasing signs that
an all-out Red air attack may be
Imminent;
Everest estimated that the
Reds now have more than 1,100
jlanes, mostly jet fighters, but
ncluding light bombers of lm- Manchuria, which is now ior
proved world War II types.
Art Is Where You Find It Even in the Army I
Favorite of "avant garde"
is foxhole, at once ^primi-
tive'* and strikingly func-
tional. Clay and crude dirt
re popular mediums.
Study in motion, usually
alow C apt u re s inspired
simplicity of modern living.
Empty canteen is modern
example of hollow rolling
sculpture, especially when
kicked into the underbrush
by precocious recruit.
Dynamic curve of helmet ia
pure abstraction and fan-
tasy, particularly when
worn by pinheaded PFC
dame abrupt about-face.
Cripping surrealism. If you
dilly-Dali on the mess kit
line, you may wind up with
everything but a limp watch
in your chow.
But for truly futuristic art,
modern-day Cl's know that
nothing stacks up with the
classic curves on an old-
fashioned calendar.
When New York's Museum of Modern Art let its long halt down recently with the announce-
ment that the OI. Jeep "IS one of the few genulne expressions of raaetont art," an NBA artist
blew his beret! Contending that the museum overlooked many other examples of esthetic In-
spiration in Armv life, this garret-dweller supp orted his argument with the above Illustrations.
He admitted, however, that when one's critical faculties nave been dulled bv long hours of
sculpturing spuds, there's nothing like the trad ltionai "barracks art" at lower right.
&'



HGE TWO
THB PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAIT.T NEWSPAPER
Cargo and FreightShips and Planes-Arrivals and Departure;
.UNITED FRUIT COMPANY I Shipping & kitlim New.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1951

'

1 I .
Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. Chiriqni ...................................Sept. 1
S.S. Mayari ....................................Sept. 17
S.S. Manaqui ..................................Sept. 29
S.S. Chiriqui ...................................Sept. 30
(Handlist Refrigerated Chilled and Central Care
New York Freight Service
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. Tivives ....................................Sept. 15
S.S. Cape Cod .................................Sept. 16
S.S. Hibneras ..................................Sept. 22
S.S. Cape Ann .................................Sept. 23
eVeeki. Sailings to New f urn, Los Angeles. San Francisco. Seattle
Occasional Sailings to New Orleans and Mobile.
fThf Steamer In IM aeivlfa are Mended to twelve passengers)
ereoueni t relent Sailing Irani Cristobal to West Coast Crn.rai America
Cristobal to New Orleans via
Tela. Honduras
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. Chiriqui ....(Passenger Service Only).....Sept. 18
S.S. Chiriqni ....................................Oct. 2
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON 20
SODA-FOUNTAINS ON. THE RUNWAY Joseph Cunning-
ham. Manager of Hotel El Panama, right, and Elton Todd,
Pan American World Airways' manager for Panama, were on
hand at Toeumen When the world's first flying soda-foun-
tains were unloaded from a Miami plane. Uncrating the
shining equipment was'the next step. Within a few weeks
the dispensers Hill be firmly set at El Panama ready to
provide chocolate, vanilla or a cup. of hot Boquete "java" at
the Hotel's new coffee shop.
MAERSK LINE
accepting passengers for
NEW YORK
BY
m.s. 3RETE MAERSK"
SAILING SEPTEMBER 16th.
(Every room with connecting bathroom)
C. B. FENTON & CO., Inc.
Tel.: Cristbal 1781 Balboa 1065
Suez Canal Engineer
Transits Pana amCanal
Paul A. Blanquet, chief engm-
eer for the Suez Canal who Is
visiting here for several days
took his first trip through the
Panama Canal yesterday aboard
the Ciudad de Medellln. Wilford
McKay, local agent for the ship's
operators F'lota Mercante de
'Gran Colombia said that Blan-
quet was accompanied by a re-
presentative of the Port Cap-
tain's office.
: frerfiofytigais Classified
FEELING DULL?
...due to temporary sluggishness
Relieve that dull feeling ... let
sparkling, good-tasting Eno help
you two ways: At bedtime Eno
quickly helps neutralize excess
stomach acid; eases that upset, full
feeling. Safare breakfast Eno
works as a quick-acting, gentle lax-
ative.
1. PLEASANT as a glass of spar-
kling, bubbly soda water!
2. ANTACID relieves sourness, gas
and heartburn promptly.
3. LAXATIVE relieves temporary
sluggishness qyickly. (Take be-
fore breakfast when needed.)
Used by millions. Sparkling Eno is
also good for sick headache, acid
INDIGESTION, CONSTIPATION and
OVERINDULGENCE.
At all druggists-Get Eno today.
Two Rare Birds Transported
By K.L.M. Dutch Lines
K. L. M. Royal Dutch Airlines
recently transported two very
unusual passengers.. These were
two quetzals bound for the Avi-
fauna, the famous Dutch garden
aviary In Alphen ad Rljn. The
quetzals made the trip in card-
board boxes on board the Flying
Dutchman from San Jose, Costa
Rica.
The quetzal is regarded as a
symbol of freedom In Guatema-
la as it usually dies soon after It
is caught. Although almost ex-
tinct in Guatemala, there .are a
few still In Costa Rica and as far
as is known, no specimen so far
exists in any European zoo or
Aviary. K.L.M. had to give the
greatest attention and care to
these two delicate passengers
and they followed minutely the
instructions: Keep the quetzals
cool and feed them on cherry
juice. After a journey of 12,000
kilometers, the birds arrived in
Amsterdam safely and in good
condition.
ICAO Committee to Study
Airline Liabilities'
WASHINGTON, Sept. 14
Changes in the Warsaw Conven-
tion of 192 lixing airlines' lia-
bilities in regard to passengers,
baggage and cargo will be con-
sidered at the Eighth Session of
the International Civil Aviation
Organization's Legal Committee.
The meeting opens in Madrid
this week. Several of the more
than 40 nations subscribing to
the Warsaw Convention are
seeking changes designed to
broaden its scope in the field of
airline liability in cases of acc-
dents. They hold such broaden-
ing Justified by development* in
aviation during the 22 years since
the Convention was adopted.
New UN Budget
Es $1,230,300
Under 1951
N. Y.,
A 152
TAKE GOOD-TASTING ENO
YOU CAN SEND
Almost Anything Almost Anywhere
Always Faster and often Cheaper...by
Vlippfr cargo?
Grace Line Ship
Lists Prominent Passengers
Aboard the S.S. Santa Cecilia
yesterday when she docked at
Cristobal were the following pas-
sengers: Dr. Perez-Castro, direc-
tor and publisher of the Guaya-
quil dally "El Universal," Colonel
David Terrazas, Military and Air
Attache of the Bolivian Embassy
in Washington, Miss Marta VI-
vallo-Lagos, Director of the
Spanish House of Bucknell Uni-
versity and Col. Osvaldo Croque-
vielle. of the Chilean Military
Mission to the United States. The
ship is bound for Valparaiso.
UNITED NATIONS,
September 14. (USI8)
United Nations budget of $1,-
230,000 less than that for 1951
is. being proposed by U. N.
Secretary General Lie.
The U. N. official has an-
nounced a budget estimate for
1952 of $46,568,300 in a report
which will come before the
General Assembly next Novem-
ber. The approved budget for
the current year, 1951, totaled
$47,798,600.
Estimated income for 1952 is
$5,812,100 which would leave a
net expenditure for 1952 of
$40,756,200. The Secretary-Gen-
eral explained that a saving of
$1,858,000 would result irom
holding next year's' General
Assembly at U. N. headquarters
here and that additional large
savings are expected on the
assumption that sessions of the
various councils and commis-
sions will likewise be held here.
EASI AS PIE FOR HER
LURAY, Kan. (U.P.I Ar-
rangers of a Luray community
fish fry made the right choice
when they asked Mrs. C. L. Beach
to provide some of the pies. A
cafe cook. Mrs. Beach volunteer-
ed and baked all 84 pies used In
her spare time.
Now Many Wear
FALSE TEETH
With Little Worry
Eat, talk, laugh or sneeze without fear
i of Insecure false teeth dropping, slipping
i or wobbling. FASTEETH holds plates
| firmer and more comfortably. This pleas-
ant powder has no gummy, gooey, pasty
taste or feeling. Doacn't cause nausea.
,lts alkaline (non-acid) Checks "plate
odor" (denture breath). Get TASTEETH
st any drug store.
Whatever your business, it will pay you to investigate the many
advantage which "Currn Canco offer. Not only do your
shinment arrive faster, but you also uve substantially on packing
and insurance, storage and inventory-on numerous other expenses
Having (pent more than 20 yean In developing chis important
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that's because they are
U. S. ROYAL
MASTER
PANAMA AUTO S. A.
Apartado 1913, Panama



"
FRIDAY,. SEPTEMBER 14, lgl


THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER


Top National Sporting Figures
Link In Anti-Gambling Crusade
PAGE THREE
Russian-Born Belgian Runs
Amok in Research Institute
WASHINGTON, Sept. 14.(UP)A-nine-man
committee of national sports figures outlined a five-
point anti-gambling crusade yesterday calling for a
ban on sports betting pools and the "policing" of
players' associates.
- j
At the same time President Truman promised
the committee whatever federal help it needs in its
plans to keep sports free of the influence of gamblers.
After a White House visit the committee said Mr.
Truman expressed a vital interest in clean sports.
1
The committee, headed by Ath-
letic Director Francis T. Murray
I the University of Pennsylva-
ia, held it first meeting yes-
erday and laid plans for a full-
Ires conference next month in
mnectlon with the Justice De-
irtment's- second annual con-
irence on crime.
The committee adopted this set
"tentaUve" recommendations:
1). A program to emphasize the
ed for enforcing present laws
states and cities against sports
mbling.
21 A method of policing the
latee of players, coaches,
im owners and others directly
uiected with professional and
__jateur games to make certain
they are not associated with the
"rackets."'
3) Steps to abolish football,
baseball and basketball pools.
4) A campaign to make people
realize that the money they gam-
ble on sports contests can be
ised to corrupt players.
5) Improvement of self-disci-
pline by various branches of
sports,
T Murray said the committee
may find that, a uniform state
law is needed to police gamblers
out of the sporting world. But he
saW some members thought lo-
cal authorities might "avoid" en-
forcing, the law.
Members also were said to fa-
vbr tone form of Federal law
ti> atlaw Interstate transmis-
m. f gambling information,
ch legislation is pending In
Congress.
[The committee decided to in-
fe to its meeting here next
month representatives of the
Rational cojleglate Atheltlc As-
sociation, the Thoroughbred Rac-
king Association, the American
Football Coaches Association, the
Jockey Club, and the Conference
of Commissioners which repre-
sents college conferences in var-
ious sections f the country.
The committee was Joined at
its meeting by Don Miller, one of
the original "Four Horsemen" of
Notre Dame University and now
U.S. District Attorney at Cleve-
land..
While the Justice Department
has never said so,' the commit-
tee grew out of the recent bas-
ketball scandals in Which col-
legs players were bribed by
gamblers.
The House Rules Committee
will consider today resolutions
calling for investigation of
sport* and gambling.
A committee source also said It
is sure to look into the ban on
general television and radio
broadcasts of the Ray Robinson-
Randy Turpln middleweight
championship fight in New York.
Ford Frlck, National Baseball
League president, said the con-
ference "over the long pull Is go-
ing to be a very helpful thing."
Besides Murray and Frlck, oth-
er committee members are for-
mer heavyweight champion Gene
Tunney, L. 8. McEvoy, repre-
senting Will Harridge, president
oT the American League; Alfred
Gwynne Vanderbilt, horse rac-
ing; Ned Irish, operator of Ma-
dison Square Garden, profession-
al basketball; Everett Dean.
Stanford University basketball
coach; President Bert Bell of the
National Football League and
Dana X. Bible. University of
Texas athletic director amateur
football.
President Awards Acheson
Long-Term Contract In Job
WASHINGTON, Sept. 14. (UP)^ President
Truman said yesterday that Dean Acheson will re-
main as Secretary of State "as long as I am Presi-
dent."
And he added that may be a good" while-yet
YOUR
SOCIAL CENTER
'Let El Panama's
experts solve your
entertaining problems,
do the work
wh"ther for
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Ceramic Swan Wan Vase........ 0J5
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Plastic Canasta Tray a.*,. Pad 1.40
Huy Second Floor 5a Avenida
He made the statement at his
weekly press conference when
asked about speculation that
Acheson may soon follow Defense
Secretary George C. Marshall In-
to retirement.'
Authorizing direct quotation of
his words, Mr. Truman said:
"As long as I am President of
the United States, he Is going to
be Secretary of State."
As an afterthought, he added:
"That may be a good while
yet."
-Pouncing on the offhand re-
mark as an indication he plans
to run for reelection in 1932 re-
porters asked Mr. Truman If they
could quote him directly on that
sentence too.
He said n. that he did not
want to make any announce-
ments today.
A reporter then asked if Mr.
Truman would define a good
while as four or five years
(enough to cover, another White'
House term).
The President said that was a
shot-gun question, and advised
the reporter to do his own spec-
ulating about how long is a good
while.
He cut off further questioning
on the subject by saying Ache-
son will be Secretary of State at
least until Jan. 30, 15Swhen
Mr. Truman's present term ex-
pires,
The Chief Executive has often
said he would never yield to de-
mands, from Congressional Re-
publicans that he fire Acheson.
but h.e has never come quite as
far as he did yesterday.
' Some observers had believed
Acheson might decide to.step out
now in a blaze of glory after the
San Francisco peace conference.
Even GOP senators, who had
demanded his oustejr, have Warm-
ly praised his condupt of the.
treaty signing ceremonies.
There also have- been persis-
tent report. tha^lfc^MSrtf
might name a Republican to suc-
ceed Acheson, in a bid to restore
bipartisanship in foreign policy.
But he spiked that speculation,
also.
When a newsman asked if he
might main his Cabinet "a bit
more bipartisan" in the near fu-
ture, he said firmly that the Ca-
binet Is as bipartisan now as It
is going to be.
There are no Republicans' in
the Cabinet at the moment.
The latest addition-to tha of-
ficial family, Secretary of De-
fense. Robert A. Lovett, has no
political affiliations.
When the give-and-take fin-
ally got away from Acheson and
his 1952 political intentions, Mr.
Truman announced proudly that
he considers himself cracker-
Jack bookseller.
During a speech Tuesday, in
which he vigorously defended his
spending program against Con-
gressional criticism, Mr. Truman
urged the public to buy for 20
cents and read a booklet called
"The Budget in Brief k" published
by the government printing of-
fice.
He said he has been Informed
that the booklet has since be-
come a best-seller.
A reporter noted that some Re-
publicans had greeted -Mr. Tru-
man's speech with derisive cries
Of "nonsense."
He. replied by quoting a Mis-
souri farm expressiona stuck
hog always squeals.
On rhf subfects, he said:
1) The Japanese peace treaty
Win be ouuu.iuuu to me Senate
for ratification as soon as possi-
ble. He will ask for prompt ac-
tion, but In the Senate that may
mean next year.
2) He hopes Congress will hur-
ry up and act on his $400,000,000
flood relief program, which he is
pressing as hard as he can.
S) He fired Llewellyn M. Wil-
liams as Secretary of the Terri-
tory of Alaska because he con-
sidered him incompetent. Pollti-
Glands Made Youno
-Vigour Renewed
Without Operation
If you faal old before your tima at
utter from narra, brain an* physical
raaJmaaa. you will find naw happlneee
and haalth la an American medica)
iaoovary which raatoraa youthful
*laur and t"
land operation
treatment In ta_
by an Amarleaa Doctor. Ahaolutaly
harmlaaa and eaey to taka, but tha
awaat and moat powerf al Invla-oura.
ter known to cianea. It nota din
an your tianaa,
Sim, build in..,
orka ao faat that ,-------- ... .
l now body powar and vigour. Be-
aauaa of Ita natural acUon on gland
and nrvea, your brain powar, eaam-
ry and eyeefght oftaa Improve aaai-
lagly.
And thla amaalng paw (land and
vigour reetorer, callad Vi-Taba, haa
baan taatad and provad by thoaaanda
and la now available at all chemlita
hara. Q.t VI-Tana today, rat It to tk,
teat. Saa tha bit", quick implement!
Taka th. full bottla, which laata eight
laya. It will make you full at
lsour, energy and vitality, pad.
al yaara younger. A apaclal
bottla of 41 Vl.Tih. eoat'nula
Vi-Tabi SM"
vigeur and vitality ~a]u1cke~r~the~a
land operation.. It la a atala hama
treatment In tablet form, dfecovered
iraotly
nerve, and vital or-
ar. pura blood, and
at you can eee and
foraa
_ MK
chemlet today
cal reasons did not enter into' It,
he said, adding that Williams was
a Democrat, butwas Just incom-
petent.

BRUSSELS, Belgium, Sept. 14
UP) a Russian-born research
professor at a government re-
search institute here yesterday
shot and killed one of his col-
leagues, woundde two others and
then killed himself as a special
committee was trying him on
charges of Insubordination.
Boris Tcherouklne, a 40-year-
old naturalized Belgian connect-
ed with the Institute of Food Re-
search, whipped out two automa-
tic pistols he was carrying In a
brief case and fired a dozen shots
at the 20-man committee which
was hearing the charges against
him.
Police said he fired with both
hands.
He fired the last bullets Into
his own head. He died Instantly.
Raymond terck, director of the
institute was Killed.
Marc Henry Van Laere and
Raymond Ebrant, two institute
officials were wounded seriously.
Ebrant was shot in the head,
C/asnione
the woman
i
DRESSES
>
SKIRTS
LINGERIE

SHOES



and other apparel
......
police said, and four bullets
struck Laere in the stomach.
A spokesman for the institute
said Tcheroukine was ordered to
appear before the committee on
charges of chronic breaches of
discipline.
Two lawyers were defending
him against possible dismissal.
The professor went to the
speaker's stand to plead his own
case, witnesses said.
He told his accusers:
"Now I am going to give you
some really overwhelming argu-
ments."
He reached Into his briefcase
and came up with a gun in each
hand.
He began firing wildly with,
both guns and committee mem-]
bers, lawyers and witnesses
scrambled under tables and
chairs.
The professor fired 25 shots,
witnesses said.
GREWSOME SIX
DURHAM, N. H. (UP.) Six
University of New Hampshire
students have their own idea of
what constitutes fun. They made
an 8,400-mlle transcontinental
trip In a 1937-model hearse.

LA MODA AMERICANA
1 lz Central Avenue Panam.
Tomorrow Saturday Last Day
OF OUR
SUPER COLOSSAL SALE
Don't Mist It!

ZIG-ZAG
108 CENTRAL AVENUE
Open from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and during noon hour.
NEK LUCKY STRIKE SUPER CONTEST
' '' ;
!
-




rAGE FOUR
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSFAPEB
^itiantic S^>ociet\
M
'J
, m
Bo, 195, Qaiun
'Ion ot T/mtk
Jt'tpllOKO Qalun 378
MRS. WHITAKER HOSTESS
FOR TEA AT CONSULATE
Mrs. Charles H Whitaker complimented several friends
with a tea fiven at the American Consulate Wednesday, after-
noon. These who shared honors were two brides-elect, Miss
Anne Rose Leigh and Miss Collette Ferrett, and Miss Hope
Menendez and Miss Thclma Leignadier who are leaving Fri-
day for the States.
The tea table was centered
with a cluster of orchid corsages.
which were presented the honor-
ed guests. Mrs. Edmund R.
MacVlttle and Mrs. J. M. Wll-
kerson presided at the tea and
coffee services.
The guests also included: Mrs.
Humberto Leignadier, Mrs. Rob-
ert Leigh. Mrs. Charles Perrett,
Sr., Mrs. Fritz Humphrey, Mrs.
Alexander Lim. Mrs. Winifred
Ellis. Mrs. John Kernick. Mrs.
Rafael DeBoyrle. Miss Helene
DeBoyrie. Mrs. Samuei Puller
and Mrs. T. G. Relihan.
Friends Share Honors at Shower
Mrs. H. W. Hankel and Mrs.
Gordon B. Patton shared honors
at a shower given Wednesday
evening by Mrs. R. E. Hum-
phrey and Mrs. Robert Stump at
the Humphrey residence at Fort
Gulick.
Baskets woven from palm
fronds were suspended from
posts by pink ribbons and con-
tained the gilts. Each basket
was numbered, with the honor-
ees having the corresponding
number.
The refreshment table was
covered with a pink table cloth
and centered .with white coffee
roses, flanked by pink tapers.
Mrs Myron Smith served cake
and Mrs. Clayton Moore presid-
ed at the tea service.
The other guests were: Mrs.
Henry S. Taylor. Mrs. James
Bowen, Jr., Mrs. James Pumpel-
ly. Mrs. John Hipson. Mrs. Or-
ville Shaw. Mrs August Zilkle,
Mrs. Maurice Webb, Mrs. Hol-
11s Preiss. Mrs Richard Carle,
Mrs. Denver Heath. Mrs. R. A.
Hayden, Mrs. R. J. Noll, Mrs. R.
L. Norton. Mrs. L. E. Montgom-
ery, Mrs. Byron King. Mrs. C. I.
Thompson. Mrs. Mllo Gardner,
Mrs. S. H. Roberts, Mrs J..E.
Homann and Mrs. K. B. For-
rest.
man; Associate Matron. Mrs. Au-
relia Hadarits: Associate Patron,
John Leach. Secretary. Mrs. Ida
May Cotton; Treasurer, Miss
Grace Williams: Marshal, Mrs.
Lorev Wray; Chaplain, Mrs. Ma-
rv Engelke; Organist, Mrs. Vic-
tor May. Jr.. Adah. Mrs. Wilhel-
mina Rudge; Ruth. Mrs. Mary
Slocum; Esther, Mrs. Peggy
Smith; Martha, Mrs. Gladys
Conley: Electa. Mrs. Marilyn
Marsh: Warder. Mrs. Ruby Mann
and Sentinel. Mrs. Earl Orr.
Other guests were: Mrs. Alice
Eaton. Worthy Matron of Orchid
Chapter. No. 1. of Balboa and Mr.
John Muller, acting Worthy Pa-
tron of Fernleaf Chapter in Pe-
dro Miguel.
Catholic Daughters
Sponsoring Card Party
The Catholic Daughters of
America will hold a card party
in the Parish Hall of the Mira-
culous Medal church, Monday at
7:30 p.m.
There will be table and door
prizes and refreshments will be
served. Tickets are fifty cents
each and may be obtained from
Mrs. Eugenia Borden. Mrs. Bd-
ward White, Mrs. Lucia Blades
and Miss Blanca Beverhoudt. For
further information contact Miss
Beverdoudt at Colon 405.
ACOB
CANASTA /5Pj
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
Mr. and Mrs. Leignadier
Hold "Open House"
Mr. and Mrs. Humberto Leig-
nadie- had "open house" at their
residence Tuesday evening for
their children who are leaving
this week for schools In the Uni-
ted Slates.
Friends called during the af-
ternoon and evening to bid good-
bye it o Miss Olga, who left by
piarte the next day to enter the
Oolle e of St. Mary of the Woods
In Indium; and to Miss Thelma
and Humberto Leignadier. Jr.,
who are leaving during the week-
end. She sailed today and will
enter the Katherine Glbbs School
In Boston and he will return to
Marquette College In Milwaukee,
Wisconsin, to complete his senior
year.
Coral Chapter O.E.S.
Has Sister Chapter as Guests
Royal Palm Chapter No. 2. Or-
der of the Eastern Star of Cris-
tobal was the guest of Coral
Chapter. No. 3, of Gatun. at their
stated meeting Tuesday evening.
Mrs. Ruth Clement, served as
Worthy Matron for Coral Chap-
ter, in the absence of the Wor-
thy aMtron, Mrs. Mae Fahnes-
tock. The visitors presided at the
stations after the opening of the
meeting.
The lodge was beautifully de-
corated for the occasion with
palms and brilliant heliconla
sprays.
The visiting officers were:
Worthy Matron, Mrs. June May;
Worthy Patron. Walter Freudig-
Mexican Heads
Inter-American
Cultural Council
MEXICO, Sept. 14 (USIS)
Mexico's Secretary of Public Ed-
ucation. Manuel Gual Vidal now
heads the new Inter-American
Cultural Council, which Is being
organized at a 15-day conference
here. Vice President of the Coun-
cil is Flix Diambois, Minister of
Education of Haiti. The Council
is the third and final major tech-
nical organ of the Organization
of American States to swing Into
action.
The two officers of the Coun-
cil were elected at the first busi-
ness session of the Conference.
In addition to uls permanent du-
ties as president of the Council
until the next conference meet-
ing, Gual Vidal will preside over
the present conference, sched-
uled to end September 25.
All of the 21 republics of the
Hemisphere were represented as
the conference began the work
of organizing the Hemisphere's
efforts to combat Illiteracy and
to cooperate on development of
its cultural life. Chief accom-
plishment of the first plenary
session was adoption of a plan of
organization proposed by the Sal-
vadorean delegate, Dr. Aristldes
Palacios, Director General of the
Instituto Tropical de Investiga-
cin Cientfica.
In response to the Salvadorean
proposal, the conference was di-
vided Into three working com-
mittees on (1) organization and
relations,. (2) Illiteracy and edu-
cation, an*' (31 science ahd'cul-
ture.'
Funeral Services
For Leslie Allen
Set On Saturday
Arrangements are being made
for funeral services to be con-
ducted for Leslie "Chino" Allen,
well-known local resident, who
died In the Santo Tomas Hospital
Wednesday evening, following a
brief ilmess. He was 35 years old.
Burial will take place in the
Herrera Cemetery, Saturday af-
ternoon and relatives and friends
are invited to attend the servic-
es. The cortege will leave his re-
sidence at No. 8. Twenty-First of
January Street, at 4 p.m.
Surviving relatives on the Isth-
mus are his mother. Mrs. Leal
Frazer; three sisters, Mrs. Ina
Lino. Mrs. Iris Daniels and Miss
Ethel Frazer; two brothers, Ivan
and Edgar and one daughter,
Merceeds Allen.
Commander and Mrs. Vincent
Residing at De Lessen*
Lt. Commander and Mrs. Wal-
ter M. Vincent and their chil-
dren, Walter Russell, twin daugh-
ters Phyllis Evelyn and Gall
Mar] orle and Martha Louise, ar-
rived recently and are occupying
quarters at Fort De Lessens.
Lt. Commander Vincent has
been stationed at the Boston Na-
vy Yard and will assume the du-
ties of Assistant Superintendent
of the Industrial Bureau, the po-
sition formerly held by Lt. Com-
mander I. J. Frankel.
Debonair Club
Sets Plans For
Halloween Dance
COLON. Sept. 14 The Debo-
nair Social and Sporting Club
completed all arrangements for
the holding of their annual
Hallowe'n Frolic on' Saturday
night. Oct. 13, at the spacious
Club Tropical.
The services of Luis Alarcon
and his "Ideal" orchestra have
been retained to supply Latin
American dance music from 9
p.m. to 1 a.m.
The one and only Armando
Boza and his "La Perfecta" or-
chestra will continue from 1
ajn. to 6 a.m.
A gala time is in store for all
who attend.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
W. 100.000 tapl* M.ti
Presents
Sept 14
Starring In "United States Mefl",
NW11 Picture
V-8 Has lively Havor and
| Wholesome Goodness
no %slnqjejutce can match J
3:30Music for Friday
4:00Music Without Word
4:15David Rose Show
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Lean Back and Listen
6:15Evening Salon (request)
7:00Mayor of Casterbrldge
(BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:46Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00NEWS and Commentary-
Raymond Swing (VOAt
8:15Musical Notebook (VOA)
8:45Facts on Parade (VOA)
9:00The Jazz Club (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Time for Music (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
' In V-8 there are 8 delicious juices
of garden-fresh vegetablesnot just
' one. Thaf why V-8 has lively flavor
' and wholesome goodness no anile
juice can match. Each juice adds its
own tempting flavor plus vitamins
A, B, C calcium and iron. Your
family will love V-8. Serve it often.
ef V-i U a illdlll alead ef:
Catery pain Carrots "ertley
mum
U-U fcr **-*" W O-rWii Ww.. v-s t..
Saturday, Sept. 15
A.M.
6:00Sign On
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Jazz Salon
8:15NSW8 (VOA)
8:30Crock of Gold (BBCi
8:45The Duke 8tepsOut
9:00NEWS
9:15Women's World (VOA)
9:30As I See It ,
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00NEWS
PJH.
12:05NEW TUNE TIMEPAN-
AMUSICA
12:30Popular Music
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Tour de France (RDF)
2:00Latin American Serenade
2:15Date For Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Band concert
3:15The Little Show
3:30McLean's Program
3:45Musical Interlude
4:00Music for Saturday
4:30What's Your Favorite
: 00Guest Star
:15Masterworks from Farnce
(RDF)
6:45American Folk Songs
7:00Gay Paris Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam 8esslon
8:00 Newsreel US.A. (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Battle Report (VOA)
9:00Radio University (VOA)
9:15Stamp Club (VOA)
9:30Radio Amateur Program
(VOA)
9:45Sports and Tune of Day
(VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
Explanation of Symbols
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
I RDF- Radtodiffusion Francalse
In our last article we watched
a Canasta expert begin the play
of a hand. Now we look again to
see how the play has developed
The player to the right has
just made the Initial meld from
his hand. He has melded:
Joker-K-K-K. 8-8-2.
Both sides need 120 points, the
discard pile has grown to a hef-
ty size, and our hero holds the
following cards after he has
drawn a card:
A-A, K-K-K, Q-Q. 8, 4-4. 2-2.
Our expert can make the count
of 120 points if he wishes to do
so. He would have to meld.
A-A-2, K-K-K, Q-Q-2.
This would leave him with an
eight and a pair of fours, with a
discard still to be made.
Does he do so?
No. He is unlikely to make a
canasta In kings considering the
fact that the other side has al-
ready melded three kings. The
aces and queens are a sheer gam-
ble, so lt doesn't seem likely that
a canasta can be made very
quickly.
In the absence of a good play
for a fast out. our expert doesn't
want to reduce his hand so
sharply.
If he doesn't meld he must, of
course, discard. What should he
throw?
Kings and eights are out of the
question. Anything else may give
the pile away to the next player
if that worthy has a matching
pair or even Just one matching
card and a wild card.
The only possible course Is to
discard a deuce, thus freezing
the pack. This gives up the
count, of course, but it Is better
to give up 'he count temporarily
(or even permanently) than to
give up a large pack.
Now our expert can probably
discard kings safely. He should
be safe for the next three rounds
at least, after which the play will
probably indicate additional safe
plays.
It Is unlikely that the other
side can make a canasta ana go
out because their kings are hope-
less and the eights are none too
promising. There is a very good
chance that our expert can keep
discarding safely until his side
wins the discard pile. That, will
probably win the whole game,
considering the sise of the pack
and the fact that both aides are
in the 120-polnt range.
17 ALL
PALMER. Mass. (UP.) Five
members of the Walter Burford
family celebrate birthday on the
17th of the month. Mrs. Burford
was 17 when she was married.
_ .. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1951
JUST FOR You!
*Nv.r bafora has a Wuriltz.r piano
offered such ton, beauty and performance.
The new Wurlirzer Modal 2300 reveals
quality In ovory line-every musical nota.
We cordially Invito you I
the entire family to our
> room to Impact the now
Model 2300 for yourself. It Is
mm outstanding instrument In
detail and It modralo
pott It well wjthirt the
of your family budget.
Pieee Meeel MOO.
KAMI.
741 Bolvar Ave. COLON Tels. 40 1164
People bi v r\ ''inos than thoso ol any ct
IPanama K^anal Clubhouses
BnV-^ Showing Tonight fH| A (
WHY NOT ENJOY YOURSELT??? AND CO TO THE 1IOVH8III
BALBOA
Alr-Ttt
_ 4:e : 8:ZS
riorence MARLEY Robert PAYTON
"TOKYO FILE 212"
Starts Saturday "SHOW BOAT
DIABLO HTS.
:1S CM
COCOLI
:I 1M
m
PEDRO MIGUEL
7:0 P.M.
___Luallle BALL a Iddle ALBERT
"THE AFFAIRS OF SALLY"
Saturday "AT; WAaj WITH THE ARMY" -
Wayp MOMO, ..Lola ALBRIGHT
"SIERRA PASSAGE" Y
Sshuday. GAMBLING HOUSE-
Red SXXLTON Sally rORRBST
"EXCUSE MY DUST"
SataJday aTHK WEST POINT STOBT"
GAMBOA
Ml
< Saturday)
AFFAIRS OF SALLY"
G A 1 U N Dorl* DAT Gene h*lson
L U" "LULLABY OF BROADWAY'
Sattrrday "GAMBLING HOUSE"
MARGARITA
:1 A (tM
f
Audi MURPHY Wanda KENDRIX
"SIERRA"
Saturday "BORN YESTERDAY"
Tk&te No Dt About ft-
i
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY
YOVR DINNER SET,
CRISTOBAL
Atr-Ciadtttad
:1S I:1S
Rod CAMERON Cathy DOWNS
"SHORT GRASS"
Saturday "TAKE CABE OF MY LITTLE GIRL"
BECAUSE:

DURING SEPTEMBER
WE ARE OFFERING' VERY ATTRACTIVE


BELLA VISTA
IM, t:St, l:f, +M, 7:1o, t .
Abbott and Costello
"MEET THE
INVISIBLE MAN"
IN BONE CHINA AND EARTHENWARE SETS!
*AII manufacturers have raised their factory prices from \S/a to 20%
""^^SJ^JMgE wTwK BE ABLE tVo3&
intat SPhCIAL PRICES on quality dinnerware!

FROM 46.50
(Complata service for twelve)
IMPORTANT: Replacements for all our patterns are available throuih
better stores in the United States, from coast to coast!
The French Bazaar
LUX THEATRE
For tha first tuna
on tha creen
one of our most
7| valuable secret
, weaponil
Olcu
I FORD. In
"The Flying
Missile"
with -
Vivera
LPTOPORS
-CENTRAL
New Tarzan Adventures!
"TARZAN'S PERIL"
with UX BARKER sad
VIRGINIA HUSTON
ar
FILMED in ajpHICA!
COLON
JUAN PALOMERAS
COLON
CECILIA THEATRE
The fumnleet Cuban picture ever madel... The
Tornado that will kill you of laughter I
"Cuando Las Mujeres Mandan"
Starring:
Tin-Tan and Marcelo Gaido aad PUkra
d^CubMl^j^fansUesand^^pai^^
TROPICAL
In Technicolor I
A aood one for action fans, with
"RETURN OF THE
FRONTIERSMAN"
ENCANTO THEATRE
Atr-CswdWIad
AT :S0 P. M.
NATIONAL MAMBO
CONTEST!
with
ARMANDO BOZA
Bad His Orchestra
^Aisj^TworteTtrMB^^
TIVOLI THEATRE_
BANK DAY I1O0.O
Cash rnt at I and t pas.
Victor Matura. In
-aAMBUMG BOUSE"
Danny Kaye, In
-r w
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
A Great Doable Programl
"HUNT THE MAN DOWN
- Also: -
Law Ayrea Tareas
Wright In
THE CAPTURE"____
JAPTURl
VICTORIA THEATRE
Spanish Doubt* Program 1
Ttn-To. Ill
"EL NINO PERDIDO"
Tito Guiar, In
"En Los Mm* Me***-
J.


m

;-
Friday. September m. mi
***

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT OAILI NEWSPAPER

PAGE PTVB
r-acific ^ocietu J

haum
VU $Ua Calk
&, 194 Balloa Jiiaku ZJtl Panama 3-0943
REAR ADMIRAL AND MRS. BLEDSOE ENTERTAIN
COMMANDING OFFICERS OF VISITING NAVY SHIPS
Rear Admiral Albert M. Bledsoe, Commandant tf the
15th Naval District, and Mrs. Bledsoe were hosts for a lun-
cheon yesterday in honor of the commandinf officers of the
Royal Canadian and United States Naral ships visiting- in
Balboa.
The luncheon wa sheld in Quarters A on the Headquar-
ters Natal Reservation.
Honor guests were Captain E.
P. TisdalT, R.C.N., commanding
officer of the H.M.C.S. Onta-
rio;. Commander T. G. Madg-
ick, R.C.N., commanding of-
ficer of H.M.C.S. Huron; Com-
mander Frank T. Schwartz,
U.S.N., commanding officer of
United States Navy task unit;
Lt. Commander Armlsted Den-
nett, U.S.N.. commanding offi-
cer of U.S.S. Woodson; Com-
mander Anderson, commanding
o fleer of U.S.S. Haas; and Lt.
Commander William M. Weath-
erly, U.S.N., commanding offi-
cer of the U.S.S. K.M. Willett.
Included among the guests
ere His Britannic Majesty's
Charge d'Affalres and Mrs. Alex-
ander H. B. Hermann.
-jvirs. Walter Eder
Visiting Here
Mrs. Walter Eder of Call, Co-
lombia and her son are visiting
in. the Isthmus. They are stay-
ug at Hotel El Panama.
Peruvian Embassy Dinner
nr General George Rice
His Excellency, the Ambassa-
dor of Peru to Panama and Dean
f the Diplomatic Corp, the
loriorable Emilio Ortiz de Zeva-
llos and Mrs. Zevallos tendered
a dinner in the Embassy resi-
dence on La Cresta last evening,
honoring Major General George
Rice.
Present at the dinner were the
Italian Minister to Panama An-
tonio Rosset Desandre and Bar-
oness Desandre. Counselor of the
United States Embassy and Mrs.
Murray Wise. Colonel and Mrs.
Carl Lowry, Mr. and Mrs. Man-
uel Caldern, Mr. and Mrs. Adol-
fo Arias. Jr., Mr. and Mrs.
Emanuel Lyons,, Jr., Colonel R.
W. Satterthwaite. Mrs. Adela C.
de Sosa, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Wat-
son, Mr. and Mrs. Tore Korch,
Mr .and Mrs. Carlos Alfaro, Mr.
and Mrs. Javier Ortiz de Zeva-
llos, Miss Rutl Ehrman, Miss
Glorela Calvo, Miss Nelly Mor-
gan. Secretary of the Nicaraguan
Embassy, Mr. Jorge Sandtno,
Dr. Harold Trapldo and Mr. Ro-
bert Rice.
Returns from Central America
Mr. Octavio Mndez Guardia
has' returned from an extensive
business trip to Central America.

Birthday Celebration
And Coffee Party
A surprise birthday party and
P
r
BUY FURNITURE MADE IN PAKAMA!
HELP THIS COUNTRY...
* *
Your Good Neighbor
Mahogany
Furniture
is the best
and cheapest.
Sold in Sets
ar open stock.
MR. AND MRS. W. CARL
.ZEECK of.Lamesa, Texas, an-
nounce the engagement of
their daughter, Joyce Evelyn,
to Private Lester L. Pyeatt of
Fort Collins, Colorado, and
Wickenburg, Arizona. The wed-
ding will take place after the
graduation of Private Pyeatt
from Air Cadet School. Miss
Zeeck is a graduate of the 1949
Class from Balboa High School.
The Zeecks are former resi-
dents of Pedro Miguel.
coffee party was given in honor
of Mrs. Carl E. Hall of Balboa
at the home of Mrs. Joseph W.
Casey in Balboa yesterday, with
Mrs. Casey and her mother. Mrs.
P. Ansell acting as hostesses.
Mrs. Ray. Caldwell presided at
the coffee table.
Guests' included Mrs. Ray
Caldwell. Mrs. Nicholas Ellch,
Mrs. Craig Huddeston, Mrs. F. H.
Gregory, Mrs. John Morales,
Mrs. Henry Carpenter, Mrs.
Warner Hoyle. Mrs. Robert Herr;
Mts. Robert Harrison, Mrs. Ar-
thur Blystone. Mrs. Max Schoch,
Mrs. J. D. Fission and Mrs.
William Lierman.
Join our Club
_ TurMITURE
IRreALAVE.21-ESr. ? WONES. 2-18M
Rabbi and Mrs. Witkin
To Be Feted at Reception
Rabbi and Mrs. Nathan Wit-
kin will be honor guests at a re-
ception to be given on Sunday
evening from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00
p.m. at the Hotel Tivoll. Jewish
groups in Panama and the Ca-
nal Zone are sponsoring the
event.
Those Interested In attending
the reception are asked to con-
tact Mrs. Ruth Leland. Balboa-
6386; Mrs. Sidney Kay, Balboa
6322; Mrs. Joel Shrager. Balboa
370; or Mr. Sam Friedman, Pa-
nama 3-1568.
Return to School
in United State*
Miss Elaine Lombard plans to
jail today aboard the S.S. Pana-
ma for New York en rout* to Mt.
Holyoke College in Hadley. Mas-
sachusetts, where she will enter
her senior year. Miss Lombard
has been spending the summer
with her parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Eugene C. Lombard in Balboa
Heights.
Miss Jacqueline Blau will sail
on the same ship to enter Bryn
Mawr College in Bryn Mawr.
Pennsylvania. She is the daugh-
ter of Swiss Consul to Panama
and Mrs. Juan Blau.
Miss Jullane Fogarty will leave
i by plane tonight for New York
i to continue her studies In Mary-
i mount In Tarrytown. She has
been spending the summer vaca-
tion with her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. John T. Fogarty of La
Cresta.
.
&w+^*&2-u
JminutM.JustacM
\
O \ ^N?r<* NfPvdrfffifs/
**Nnu
W*-rM4^rU^vryU..^'
MEDICAL TEST PROVED
this stop* treat to rah* "KHMOK"
FEMALE PAINS
with uncomfortable fullness
Are you troubled by distress of female func-
tional monthly disturbances? Does this
make you suffer from pain, ftel so ntrvoui
restless, cranky, weakat such times? Then
do try famous Lydia R. Pinkhams Vegetable
Compound to relieve such symptoms!
In a recent medical test it proved remark-
ably helpful to women troubled this way
You owe it to yourself to try it.
Pmkham's Compound is what Doctors
call a uterine sedative. It has a grand sooth-
ing effect on one of woman* moit important
organs. Taken regularlyPinkham'a Com-
pound helps build up resistance
Ft. Kobbe Wives Club
Has MeetiriR-Coffee Party
The monthly coffee party and
business meeting of the Fort
Kobbe Officers Wives Club was
held recently at clu bheadquar-
ters. Mrs. Frank Llnnell and Mrs.
Joel Hollis presided at the coffee
services.
Mrs. O'Hara was Introduced as
the guest of her daughter. Mrs.
C. A. Rockwood. Mrs. La Bree
and Mrs. John Davis were guests
of Mrs. Paul Gttuger. Mrs. C.
Stewart had as her guests her
mother. Mrs. Adkisson, and her
aunt. Mrs. Sullivan, both visit-
ing from Texas.
'Mrs. J. T. Davis was Introduc-
ed as a new member of the club.
DID HIS BIT
WESTOVER FIELD, Mass.
(U.P.) Hearing a Red Cross
appeal for funds, the 12-year-old
son of a Navy petty officer sta-
tioned here staged a two-night
puppet show in his father's gar-
age. Donald Maldlow showed up '
at Red Cross headquarters the
following day to contribute the
proceeds$1.07.
^UfK-E.
against such distress. Also a great
stomachic tonic!
NOTE: Or yea may prefer LYDIA ,
B. riNKHAM S TABLETS with [
added iron.
T
JOg
s VEGETABLE COMPOUND
'J
2),
Complete a~.....nt of
DOG SUPPLIES
at
IS Tivoli Ave. Tel. 2-31*7
LARGE SELECTION OF
ten Crystal
^rrent
SAINT tOlilS
mi f INIIT CtYITAt MASS
* All Patterns In Open Stock
* Easy Terms Available
16 Tivoli Ava.
faetut,
from
Panama's Modern Shopping Center
SWIFT'S QUALITY PRODUCTS
BROOKFIELD POWDERED MILK
1 lb. .69 2Vz lbs. 1.49 5 lbs. 2.99
SWIFTS NEw'zEALAND
SJSk
Butter....................................
SWIFT'8 SILVERLEAF
Lard
....................'*"/...............v
SWIFT'S ORIOLE
Bacn

.65
.30
ft lb. pkg. .34
RAISIN BREAD JO
ORANGE en SESAME SEED ^j
CAKE J7 ROLLS......doz. .4
CHERRY PATTIES .05 NAPOLEON SLICES JO
Old CrOW Bourbon or Rye ............... 4.75
John Haig Scotch.....................3.95
Fundador .......3.75
Agewood............>..............u. 2.80
Williams Baby Sets / C
2 Soap lOi! 1 Powder............ Oj
Ronson Type Lighters.....95
""-MEATS
Corned Beef.....
Sirloin Steak ....
.....ib. 42
.....ib. .49
Porterhouse Steak ___Ib. -57
Fecho ................Ib. .23
Try Our
"Kitchen Fresh"
BARBECUED
BEEF & PORK
Potatoes Lie..........lb. .06
Arturo Sauce.............19
Macaroni ............... .14
Spaghetti .....':..........14
Pork Beans II ox....... .10
Pear Nectar 12 or........13
Llrfta Beam IS oi....... .27
String Beam 16 ox........26
OPEN DAILY ...7 a.m. to 8 p.m.
SUNDAYS......8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
13th St. A Via BeUaario Porras
San Francisco Golf Crab Road
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
TON I
REX
Beauty Salon
takes pride in announcing
their new "coiffure"
TON I
Famous Italian hairstylist
just arrived from Argen-
tine! Specialized In
Permanente Hairstyllng
Cats Tints
Call for appointment
2-3346, Panama
REX BEAUTY SALON
No. S 4th of July Avenne

Panama's
Swill
Center ,.
i
#;
'::;
SUNDAY BUFFET
DINNER DANCE
Who can resist Chef Douthe's groaning
board?..-. None who's seen itnone who's
partaken. The most appetizing array of
dishes awaits your approval every Sunday
at 7 p.m. in THE PATIO.
Music by KEN DELANEY orchestra

i v
S3.5 x*r person
ChiUre. 1.7

V..V. -.*,
FOR BABY'S
TENDER SKIN!
Use Johnson' Baby Powder after
baths, at diaper change*, and in be-
tween times, too. It
soothesprotects!
HSTFOfSABY...
imtroitrou
THE BALBOA BAR
where good friends meet every day at
5:30 p.m. to relax together to the melodi-
ous strains of Avelino Muoz' organ
while El Panama's canape wagon brings
you snacks on the house. ______,
I
The Cocktail Hour
5:30 to 7 p.m.

Mflma
fleA*>OH4ofcn>gtt
g" ......."eawiiiiiav.ai.ata.
At bath t, wash baby with gentle,
fragrant Johnson's Baby Soap. Ask
lar it todayl
1. R. Canainghaai, Gta. MfT.
a
Everybody Reads Classified
.=
.J4
.....
. it
It


*
A waterproof watch for
people who don't swim?


Whn we at Rolex perfected the first
waterproof watch in the world, we didn't
do it just for the benefit of Channel
swimmers. Water is certainly the most
insidious enemy of a watch, but there are
others. Dust, humidity, perspiration, fice-
powder they will all harm a watch's
delicate movement, and a case that is im-
pervious to water is impervious to all these
other enemies.
A waterproof watch, jn other words, will
remain accurate longer than one in an
ordinary case; that was why we originally
developed our Rolex Oyster. And what a
success It has been! Every test to which
the Rolex Oyster has been subjected, it has
passed with living colours. Although man-
attempts have been made to emulate its
remarkable success, it can still claim the
tide of the first waterproof watch in the
worldand the best.
FOR VISITORS TO EUROPE. If yju're
J visiting Europe this year, what finer J
* memento of yoor visit than a Rolex *
J witch ? There's a Rolex agent in moat of I
J the principal cities of Europe. Why not J
see what be has to offer?
J And if you are going to Italy, write for i
* your free copy of the 44-page "Guide *
J to Good Eating in Italy." J

4

ROLEX
n

OYSTER
rorld'sjirst waterproof wrist-watch
tSVvCci/a fa/tlich
JEWELRY HEADQUARTERS
PANAMA
STORE




m*."~ s\
THF PANAMA AMIKCAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILV NEWSPAPER
1
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, l5t
lfgfo%5JS^fctr*fstej*
Leave your od with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SKRVICE
No 4 Tl' oil A-c
Phnur -S2f|
MiiM.ii .il LfcSSrJPS
rarqur It UMtM
flniw
MOKKISON'S
No. 4 rourlh of Julj An
rhane 3-9441
BOTICA CAKLTON
id.as Mrlndn \n.
Psm- W-Cola
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
No. U Waal 121b Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
H*. 17 "K" SlrrrlPinim
Na. 12.171 Centra) An,-4tolo.
Minimum for
U words
3c each additional
word.
. JR SALE
Hoittebul'l
FOR SALE: 9 ft Norge cl pcrce-
la-ii 25 cse'e refr.gerctcr. Excel-
lent condition. SI CO. 860 Mor-
gn Ave. Balboa. Tel ^-31 56.
FOR SALE:S cu it. Coronodo. re-
ftigerotc-, 60 Cyl. Like new. See
ot 233-B. Gatun.
FOR SALE:Hortcr electric ironer
table model, u.ed 6 months Phcne
8-5-CI28. Fort Kcbbe
FOR SALE:Refrigerator Frigidoire.
60 cycles. Underwood typewriter,
small de;k, youth bed. boby crib
Phone 916, Colon.
FOR SALE:Small Silvertcne table
rcd'C Philco portab e. sh;ef.ka es
Isiztt 6v. men's Sport coct. brown
& ton size 38) ? sirg'e metc.ll
beil I cotlcn mottresr. I metol
Chiffonier. 0814 Plonk St.. Bol-!
FOR SAL.Snge n-ah>g;nv bed|
with detachable sides fcr moking;
into vOuth's bed. Re. igeratcr,
p3r:elain. 9 cub c teet box in e<-
ce''*nt condition. Need new unit.
TV 2-2494. house 122 Ridge:
F..-2 I. Bolboo Hgts.
FOK SAL5 -Wosjjing maclvne. 23.
cyc'l. 2 floor lomps. table kitchen,
folding steel chcuse lounge fcr
Iswn Cr porch. 2 steel choir*. Tel.
4-2fi^
fC SALr' -25 cycle washing ma-
r'rt'nf ond refrigerator (porcelain)
30. Ancon. C Z.
Kir. AtF:Cining t-b!e. 6 choirs, j
S15.C". Dresier $i.C0. Wcrd-,
rebe S25.C0. etc. Bc'boo 2-1503.
FOR SALE
Automobile?*)
FOR SALE:1949 Norli Ambosso-
dor with radio. 4 new tires, plas-
tic seot covers. 5433-C, Diablo
between 3 p. m. 7 p. rr
MISCELLANEOUS
0o you ho>. unking piob'em?
Write Alcoholics Anonymou
Bo 2031 Ancon. C. Z
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
NEW YORK
CHEVROLIT
6 WECKS DELIVERY
ST. LOUIS
Smoct-Poredes
Ponom 2-0600
FOR SALE:1947 Fraier Manhot-
nn. overdrive, new brakes, new
battery, perfect condition. Phone
3-1467, Margarita 8020-A.
FOR SALE:1939 Bu.ck Convert-
ible coupe, new paint, tires good,
with oil accessories. 2010-C. First
St. Phone 83-3148. Curundu. .
Morgarita Nursery School. Call Cris-
tobal 3-1430 or 3-1701.
FOR SALE
MiscellaneouA
FOR SALE: English Austm in per-
fect condition. $900.00 cash or
terms. Phone 3-2506 ofter 5:30
p. m.
FOP SALE1949 Buick Roodmast-
er, 4 door sedan, 5 new W/W
tires and tubes. Excel'ent condi-
tion Con be finonced. Coll Ccro-
zol 85-2145 ofter 5:00 p. m.,
S1.8C0.C0.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
,NEW YORK
CHEVROLET
6 WEEKS CELIVERY
ST. LOUIS
Smoot-Paredes
Ponomi 2-0600
FOR SALE
'hc'vi'!"-
FOR SALE:Liqht Enqli-h motor-
cycle, i 'Deed, Villers engine.
SoeeH up to 60. new tires. Phone
4.323
FOF XA1E:Motor -rcoter. Model
5" Price $100.00. Call Botboa
3252.
FOR SALE:1948 Plymouth 4-door.
Clean, excellent mechanical con-
dition. 82-7.285. days, 83-5296
evenings.
USED CARS
It Looklni Uied Con
in town! All reconditioned
like new!
Eoiy Terms
Check our Prices
nd COMPARE!
CIVA. S. A.
Your PONTIAC Dealer
Ponomi Automobile Row
*tr
IM'l NOTICE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
CANAL ZONE
^'Uaitnt St-tU District Court For Tin
DUIrirt 01 Tho Canal Zont
Diviiiaa el Balboa
, Ke n;: T. > o-.
Plaintiff.
VI.
II rnirl Taylor.
irftndant.
SliJI.MdNs
Cai* No. 3lo
Civil Dotktt !
ACTION FOR DIVOKCK
.To the above-named de'endant:
Von hei-aby required to appear
ond anawar tha romplaint filed In the
Obove-ontitled action ilhm ninety rfs>.
after the first publication.
In caae of your fatl'ira to en aaaaar
nd answer, juda-ment will he taken
rair.t von by default for tha relief
lamanded in the complaint.
W1TNKSS tha Hunorab'e JOitPH J
HANCOCK. Judfe, United Statas Di-
trirt Court for tha District of thr
Caal Zone, this 1-th day of Suit
11(1
C T. MeCormkk. Jr
Clerk
(SEAL)
By Sara de la Pena
i Chief Deputy Clerk
To Marearn Taylor
Tha foregoine- lummonl in aerved
Opnn roil by publication pursuant to
tk orJer of the Honorable JSF.PH
J. HANCOCK, Judre. United Statet
District Court for the District of -n-
Canal Zone, dated Sept. II. 1901 anl
ntered and filad in this action in *hr
office of the Clerk of laid United
fairs District Court for the Division
at Halbea. on bei>l II, 1J1.
C. T. McCarnalck. Jr.
Clerk
By Sara dr la Pea.
Chief Deputy Clerk I
FOR SALE;Interested in buying a
good used car? Reliable service lo-
cates automobile of your choice
and in your price brocket. Have
list of good used cars available In
Canal Zone and Ponoma. No ex-
tra chorge to buyers for above
service. Con also arrange finance.
Call Cristobal 3-1900.
FOR SALE:National HRO-7 Com-
munications Receiver. Speaker
coils, 25-60 cycle power supply'.
Tel, 2-3341 0528 Ancon.
FOR SALE:-! Worthington A,r~oo7r^
pressor, I H. P. motor 60 cycle-
1 Dodge Truck I 1-2 tons. A-
condition, dual wheels on rear,
also two spore wheels and tires;
one 300 gallon tank with beor
nigh pressure pump; one shore
stock Panama Golf Club. 151 Wil-
liamson St.. Gamboo, . Z.
FCR SALE: Victo," 16 r,'.r
Sound projector. Excellent condi-
hon with tew films $150.
00. Tel. Panama 2-2759.
INVITATION FOR PROPOSALS FOR
OPERATION OF FARFAN
BEACH PAVILION
The Ponama Canal Company in-
vite; proposals for operation- of
bathhouse and refreshment facilities
ot Farfon Beach Pavilion. Sealed
bids will be received in the office
of the Supply and Service Director
ot Ba'boo Heights until 10:30 A
M., September 28, 1951. when they
they will be opened in cjublic. Forms
of proposal with full particulars moy
be secured in the office of the Sup-
ply ond Service Director. Balboo
Heights.
RESORTS
Gramiich'j Sonta Claro beoch-
cottogev Electric ice boxes, ges
stoves, moderate rates. Phone 6
541 oi 4-567
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
Williams Sonto Clora Beach Cottoges.
Two bedrooms, Frigidoires, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboo 2-3050.
Phillips. Oceonside cottages, Sonta
Clara. Box 435. Balboo. Phone
Panama 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673
HOTEL PAN-AMERICANO in El Va-
lle. Special room rates for Septem-
ber. $35 per month, $20 for>2
weeks. Meals a la carte. Telephone
Panama 2-1112 for reservation.
FOR RENT
Apartment*
FOR SALE:60 cycle child's pho-
nograph $7.00. 60 cycle electric
hair clippers, $3.00. Like new.
536-A, New Crislobol.
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Vlodern furnished-unfurnished 'apart
ment. Contact office No. 8061, I Oth
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386. Co-
lon
THE ROOSEVELT HOTEL |ust off
4th of July avenue, NOW UNDER
NEW MANAGEMENT, has 5
suites availoble, private bath, run-
ning cold ond hot water, com-
pletely furnished, best hotel ser-
vice. Information call 2-0700.
Poonma.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT:Furnished room with
private bathroom and entronco.
Kitchen privilege. 43rd Street No
13.
FOR RENT:Furnished rooms with
or without board. Cool, ideal, rea-
sonable. 48th Street No. 7, Bella
Visto.
FOR SALE220 Volt Hot Plate in-
cluding 2 extra burners and boxes.
Windshield wiper, complete 1937
Nash. Norge refrigerator parts;
Cold Controls, Gaskets, Hardware,
etc. Motors 25 cycle, 1-4. 1-5,
1 -6 H. P. Garage behind Pedro
Miguel Police Station, Saturday 10
o. m. to 5 p. m
FOR RENT: Room with meals,
$70.00 monthly. No. 34, 45th St,
Telephone 3-3921.
FOR RENT:Cool room on balcony.
4th of July Avenue No. 5, Tel.
2-4448, Ponama.
IP YOU THINK PRICES
Are High In Panam
GET A LOAb OF THIS
dvertitement w ree.lveo>to
foreign trade Journal:
CHLORDANE
CONCENTRATE
NOW IN ON.r OUNCE BOTTLES
rnse"s^!HeU^S,Tdv
one ounce bottles areVow .vilSbu
.'V"'"9 al only S6.00 pranni
(name ot Company deleted In pltyi
OUR HETAIL PRICB
for a 5'i ounce bottle
That Makes ONE GALLON
85c
(sorry, we don't pay shipping
charges)
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC.
"* Ce.tr! Ave TeL j^,,#
FOR SALE:Boby crib, mottress &
carnage, reasonoble. Qtrs. 313-B
87-5128.
FOR SALE: Underwood type-
writer desk model. Retina II ca-
mera, flash attachment case. 2-
1471 after 4:00 p. m.
FCR SALE:-1951 Ford Victoria with I L t-d^P T I Y^' 28 1
rodx. and new cor guarantee. I c?L7t^^<'^n\^
Owner leaving. Coll Cosmos Agen-! c'05^^^, r'^630' '483
cies Inc. Phone Panamo 2-4721 _C Dhrm0n St' BalbD0
Automobile Row. No, 29. | FOR SALE: Webster Phonogroph 60
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
NEW YORK
CHEVROLET
6 WEEKS CELIVERY
ST LOUIS
Smoct-Poredes
Panomi 2-0600
CyclM. Will sell ot very" reason-
oble pnce. Quorters 257-fi, Go-
tun.
FOR SALE:-- One Swift Engl,;h bi-
cycle, one American bicycle with
gear-thift. House 878, Morgan
Ave. Bolboo.
FOR SALE
final- & Motors
WANTED
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:63' M/V Owl, oshore
or Poitilla. for sole to best im-
mediate offer as is where is with
all her ports and gear now at
Van Beyer's Shrimp Installation
Owner Horris, Box 216, Gotun
phone 5-455.
LOST & FOUND
FOUND:Lost June, white female
dog. Medium tiza, short hair. 2-
2^74, 1453-C, Balboa.
WANTED: Unfurnshed" 2 or 3
bedroom opurlment or house in
Bella Visto or El Cangrejo for
occuponcy \r. November for long;
term rental. Box 64, Ft. Cloyton
c. z.
WANTED:25 cycle woshing ma-
chine. Phone 83-3278.
Wanted Position
-

L
RUSSIA'S
*fcgsz?>
Did you know that the Kremlin hat i
a C*9M aabiUon by iang conlrol of i
IcnOBMn oulpoM? Ihat from it Hums*,"
ut lubmarlne* to wrtak hcvoc with
and eon cal off Tito kom tho a?
Uar all about thi* dOQcfi, jfa* MUivAi Jn
- rorealu* ticlo now in Colll.r'., UaSlfcw
wnolo nation i. boing looi.d oi otWccl v,ar
oyot oi the Alliool ^^ *
* : t.":-'. ISrit frx. NOW ON SAL!
S x
Bilingual secretory. Excellent refer-
ences. Permonent or temporary.
Appointment. Telephone Panama
3-2267.
LESSONS
TOP SCIENTISTS
SPEAK PIECES
(Continued on Paje 6, Col. 2)
importance in cancer; that an
anti-growth factor will be found,
Butenandt: He believes that
the problem may be solved
through better ways to prevent
cancer in the first place.
Stanley: Virus as a cause of
cancer is being more seriously
considered.
Another question: What new
sources of energy do you expect.
-^That stumped the scientists,
but Sir Robert said it might be
possible to tap the tides, or the
oceans around our shores.
This correspondent asked one
of the last questions. It was:
How many of you believe that a
cure for cancer or hardening of
the arteries will be found. Stan-
ley and Sir Robert held up their
hands The others said they on-
ly had hope.
Another question was what
will we do with our aging popu-
lation when the life span may be
100 years.
Stanley and Sir Robert said old
people are being made happier
every day and that they will be-
come even more happier in the
years ahead.
New
with
synchro compur shutter
INTERNATIONAL
JEWELRY
It* Central Are.
(adjoining Intern. Hotel)
PANAMA BROKERS, INC.
Want to buy following
Stocks:
Abattoir N.l. Cot Celt
Ctay ^ct. r..a cement
rnmi laeuranc Company
'Phone*: 3-471 3-1SM
Come to Tampa, Florida for vaca-
tion or for rood. 1 can help you to
buy or rent houses, property, oranre
roves, chicken farm.-,, hotels, etc
at all prices and terms. If Intcreal-
ed rile to Herman Kleefkeni, e-'o
Georfe W. Blades, Real Estate Brok-
ers. *04 Franklin Street, Tampa t
florida. *^
TROPICAL CLEANERS
DRY CLEANING
DYING
o General LAUNDRY
Phone 3-M7I
Main Plant via Espaa
Branch Central Ave. 24th St
ATTENTION TEENAGERS: Stort-
ing Sept. 15 from 9:30 to 11:00
. m. 3 month ballroom dance
course for $!5. Fox trot Jitter-
bug Rumba Mambo __
Monhotton Swing. Register Tues-
day or Thursdoy 4:30 p.m. Bal-
boa 'Y' Harnett & Dunn.
Piano Instruction given to adults or
children privotely. Bennett's Stu-
dio. Tel. 2-1282, PonamJ.
- C
BV'S
QUALITY
TROPIDURA Li
SERVICE
CIVA, S.A.
Vour CADtL' AC & PONTIAC
Dealer
Panamon Automobile Row.
FOR SALE:
24 GALLON
GARBAGE CANS
as prescribed
bylhe
HEALTH OFFICE
ALADDIN
KEROSENE Mantle Lamp
0 Candle Power of Modern White
Light. Burns 50 Hours On 1 aL of
KerOMne. Uses U% AIR Only 69i
KEROSENE. Absolutely Safa L ft
cannot Explode Requires do gener-
ator or pump. No Smoke nr Odor
So Simple a Child Cao Operate It
$9.95 Lowest Price
. ever Offered In Panam.
All Parta Arallabla.
On Sale In An HAKDWAIE and
FURNITURE Starca
Distributors!
WONG CHANO, S. A.
Coln th St. A Balboa 4va.
I M Central A**,
TL 2-MM
THEY LANDED TWO OUT OT
32 black marlin caugjit this
year in Isthmian waters. Above,
Lt. Col. H. W. Cooley, of Fort
Clayton, with his 481-pounder
caught oft San Jose Island
Sunday. His wlte. right, earned
herself the distinction of being
the first woman In 10 years to
catch a black marlin In these
waters.
Husband-Wife
Team Of Clayton
Sel Angling Nark
Within one week, a husband
and wife fishing team here
caught two black marlin, con-
sidered the world's hardest fish
to catch.
Owners of the rare distinction
are Lt. CoL H. W. Cooley, and
his wife Agnes, of Fort Clay-
ton.
Expert fishermen say that
about one In every ten tha't are
raised Is caught and one in
every three that are hooked
Is landed.
On September 2, Mrs. Agnes
Cooley. fishing about three
miles from San Jose Island,
battled a 345-pounder for one
hour and fifty minutes. It turn-
ed out to be a world's record
women for 80-pound test Une.
On September 9, Lt. Col. H.
W. Cooley, commanding officer
of the 748at Army Signal Unit,
fought a 481-pound black mar-
lin for one hour and 29 minutes
about eight miles from the spot
where Mrs. Cooley made her
catch. Col. Cooley's marlin mea-
sured 129 Inches in length and
60 Inches in girth. His, how-
ever, Is no world's record.
Both black marlin were caught
from Ken Middleton's boat
'Soutura."
The Cooleys" two catches rais-
ed to twelve the number of
black marlin caught this year
in Isthmian waters. With the
exception of those caught by
the Clayton couple, all have
been landed off Pinas, Darlen
Province.
Mrs. Cooley's black marlin was
the first caught by a woman in
local waters in ten years. The
previous catch by a woman was
in 1941, when Mrs. Tex Stabler
landed one.
At
STim
74V+
83 North Ave. Tel. 2-S610
Martin Sou No. 3
Tel. 3-1424
s
a n a I a c
INSTANT
M
(fortified with Vitamin D)
WHEN PROPERLY DILUTED
CONTAINS:
Protein.............. 38.9%
Lactose ............. 51.0%
Fat................. I.*.
Calcium ...'......... 1.2!%
Phosphorus ......... l.tt*
Sodium Oxide....... .7*
Potassium Oxide .... 1.78%
Niacln ____ 4.2 mg. per lb.
rhiaminr .. 1.6 mg. per lb.
Riboflavin.. 9.2 mg. per lb.
Calories ....... 3M per qt.
Vitamin D 4N units per qt.
On Sal* in P.C. C* Caasmlaurle*.
as -
Communists Tear
Down Spanish Flags
Al Vienna Fair ^
VIENNA, Sept. 14 (UP) The
Communists today removed two
Spanish government flags which
had been hoisted along with
dozens of other national flags In
connection with the current
Vienna Trade Fair.
Flags that were waving from
E)les in fn.nt of the Opera
ouse, and the Soviet Sector
Square were iorn down and re-
placed by the flags of the Span-
ish republicans.
Later, a Communist delegation
tried to lodge a formal protest
over the display of Franco's col-
ors, with the city's Socialist Ma-
yor Franz Jonas.
Jonas refused to receive them.
Police did not Interfere with
the Red Party action and no de-
cision has yet been taken as to
whether the Spanish government
flags are to be reholsted.
/raras I rtdt-Hsrt ft *.rvW */ mlf-u.
Th Mai that makes y irr
t.th look Sail If Aelaf
pas 4s atsy| I
psaalin ismhi HI
UerfooAy feads Clastf fieti*





FRIDAY, SKPTF.MBER 14. 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNtO NO u, FOUND V NELSON OUNlIUll IN II
MARMOOM IA. IOITOK
7 m Strut p o box tJ4. Panama. m
TiLiAHONi Manama no 3-O740 ' linio
Casli Adda, panambmican, Manama
Colon Offpcsi ta I7t Cntai Avinui iitwiin tm ano 1tm Ikiki
'IHN KlAMAENTATIV, JOSHUA POWERS. INC
S4B MADISON Avk NtW VOH. "" ** V
LSCAI NAIL
PIP MONTH. IN "mii-l 1 70 t t.SO
O ! MONTHS. IN """" SAO 1300
pop on y*AS. IN ""> mo 14 00
-----------------------------------------------------------------'---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------
Walter WineheJI
In New York
ONG FOB L08T LOVERS
The.ea,n ."?.",n*.!,*nd **H we rtU "member
v When all the bitterness of yesterday
to foe. the elaging alienee * September
Will resurrect the glory that was May.
We shall not soon forg et the wild insistence
That surfed within our hearts not lone ago.
And through the purple hare of time and distance
The yolce of .love will whisper soft and low.
Your eyes, perhaps, will fiance In new directions
And seek another realm of ecstasy.
let even if you transfer your affections,
Some moment In the day you'll think of me...
And I shall make of all the bitter-sweet
A tone for boys to whistle In the street.
___________ Mitchell Parish
Gen. Mac Arthur and hls.W^fe. who hadn't seen a Broadway
show for over 16 years, have been relishing, them all since their
return.
The cast of "Call Me Madam" (starring Ethel Merman
?Ui dffife^?Td bec*u* * MacArthurs appeared to be dodging
their hit. I guess" one of them said, "people told him our
ioniL.They LUte Ike! wou,d embarris him."
The other night the MacArthurs finally witnessed it and the
troupe quivered wondering how Mac would take the terrific poli-
tical plug for Eisenhower.
The MacArthurs oved it and laughed lustily. Later they went
backstage and shook hands with everyone in the show.
Headline: "Baruch Attends Graduation of Cripples."
Re knows that one of them may be another PDB.
PAGE SEVEN
Labor Mews
And
(eminent
Bryan Foy, the movie expert, encountered a StarJet at a coast
party, who complained: "This is a very dull party. I think 111 go
nome.
"That," stifled Foy, "ought to help."
.,. J"r at Nieky's Blah- House on 5th street where the Top-
Flifhters in show business were groaning about high taxes. Joe .
Lewis got them laughing again with this sum-up- "Oh, what
good Is money? After taxes and gambling there's nothing left!"
-%&&* '*rt*"d Ch0rine M*,B *h" * "*
"He couldn't keep me and the Government."
In Lindy's last night some of us were dlscssslng Broadway
successes who forget those who gave them their Big Breaks
"That" boomed James Cannon, "la known as Millionaire's
Amnesia!
'~L A" the D,rtT JokM to Print: From the N. Y. Times Sept.
6th: -Gromyko's Idea of American humor: A lady goes to a
doetor. who says: 'Mrs. Jones I have very good news fc ryou.'
" My name is Miss Jones."
" "Miss Jones,' saya the doctor, 'I have very bad news for
you.'"
By Yutor Riesel
Two "young" Turks quietly
flew in from Istanbul this week
to report to American labor
chiefs on progress in a maneuv-
er, there In the gateway to the
Orient, that will save thou-
sands of GI lives, get guns and
ammo to our troops swiftly and
prevent the turbulent Near
Eastern Moslem kings and pa-
shas from ganging up on us
under needling from Soviet
agents.
As we talked with Ismail
Aras and Mehmet Inhanll we
found that they preferred that
their translator tell more about
their willingness to fight the
Soviet army on their East-
ern border, just a few hours
from their home, rather than
discuss their part in the sensi-
tive and Intricate process of
winning over a part of the
world which pulsates with
death threats, assassinations,
bribery, wild political rioting
and tribal revolts all fin-
anced by the Russians.
We finally did draw from Is-
mail and Mehmet the details of
their work. They are truly
"young Turks."
Thev lead the world's young-
est national union movement
Just about two years old.
Slowly, and with the help
of the AFL's international
"scarlet pimpernel," Irving
Brown, who prefers the ess
romantic title of AFL Eu-
ropean Represen fa fft>e. these
Turks have been (treating
the first important Moslem
unions in the Near East.
If they succeed, they'll be-
come a powerful force to
fight the- kind of under-
ground operation which So-
viet agents paid for and
received deliver on in the
Iranian oil crisis. This deal
^why WSHIMGTOH
.. __ i. mil*.
MERRY-60-ROUND
y ORCW
PtARSON
Matter Of Fact
By JOSEPH ALSOP
WALLACE'S RE. OST ON CHINA
WASHINGTON.Customarily, this space does
not present documents claslstled top secret, no
matter how Idiotically.
Today, however, it is given to the report on
China to President Roosevelt by Henry A. Wal-
lace, long famous Indeed allegedly infamous
of *S8i o7 bane7rff 3 * *tiU fflclal locked awa* * *-
.i. ^Hl (T'ckot Broker) Socaire' description of Strindberg
Plays: "Stringberg is what closes Saturday night."
Quentin Reynold* qn_page 007 of hi book' "Courtrooms":
Newspaper corporations are not eleemoaynary organisations "
(Hes trying to say they ain't charitable. .Tom Bradv in the N
Y. Times: "The monastic, semi-sacredctal character.'' (Tom
means like a monk or priest, fer heaven's sake!)...A. J. Lieblln*
in the New Yorker: "It is like the potato which is only a succeda-
ntum for something decent to eat." Couldn't resist usina a sub-
stitute for substitute).
"The Art of Readable Writing" by Rudolph Flesch (Harper's)
has an entire chapter on Just The Thing this colyum has been
calling "Show-Oafs." Dr. Flesch. the consulting expert on Read-
ability (for the Associated Press), reports: "Most of the long com-
plex words in modern prose are not labels for things in the world
around uslike radio activity.. .but condensed expressions of ab-
stract ideas that can be expressed Just as well in two or more
shorter words.
i.t *.!? \.?e co"nsel '!' * all young writers fcy author
will be to get rid of your vocabulary."
Jay Robinson tells about the two swishes who were motoring
A motorcop stopped them. "You're drunk," he said, taking them
to the station-house. ,
The Sgt. behind the desk drew a white chalk line across the
floor and ordered the Petunia to walk It atralght or stand accus-
ed.
He did it magnificently. Just like a show girl, and was freed
Outside he said to his pal; "Didn't I walk that line like a
doll?
.... ^'Xou never wouId have made "" hrieked the other gleefully
"if I hadn't whistled A Pretty Girl.la Like a Melody'1"
Bul Doll's farewell t Ashton Stevens, 50 years a drama critic
for Hearst, reminded you of his own approach to criticism Ash-
ton said: 'To be right if possible; to be read If poesibler."
Mr. Stevens was in a feud with a great star long before other
critics. He once asked Richard Mansfield if he Intended to in-
clude "Arms and the Man" In his repertoire.-"If I did," fang'd
the actor. "I'm afraid you wouldn't understand it"
/'Ohi." said Stevens casually, "I hoped your diction had im-
proved.
of
vital gasoline a day.
If such a Moslem national
union federation can succeed
In Turkey, it can win the al-
legiance of workers abound the
Suez Canal, in North African
ports and even in Iran.
In other words, it's our friends
Ismail and Mehmet and their
colleagues, agelnst the Soviet-
financed, anti American and
anti-British nationalist forces
In the Near East, cockpit of
the. next war.
The Turks reported that they
will tell their friends at the
AFL'a.,70th annual convention
In flan Francisco next week
that there are some 375,000 in-
dustrial workers iri their home-
land. Of these, bout 75,000 are
sl"frl up In unions.
But so young are these out-
fits that they have not yet
found time to organize a na-
tional federation su;h, as the
AFL or CICs They have no mo-
ney.
Mehmet. who ,is vice president
of the Istanbul Federation of
Labor, and Irving Brown re-
vealed that this unit i operat-
ing on about MO a week.
Its president Zuhtu Tedey,
Is still a working electrician in
a flour mill and runs the union
office in his spare time after
leaving the plant.
The new unions, which were
launched in 1050. cover only
coal digging, textile, service
trade, transport, the waterfront
and the shioysrds where the
underground Communists have
Infiltrated and run some wild-
cat strikes.
He once asked Willie Collier: "Are critics too harsh?"
"Not compared with actors." said the star. "No paper could
print what actors say about other actors' acting."
NOW you can FLY to MIAMI
via Costa Rica and Cuba on LACS A
(PAA af)tluUe) for only $83 one way,
$153.75 round trip.
Enjoy All Day Time Flying; Make Your
. Travel Dollars Take You Farther! \
3 Flights weekly from Tocumen 7:45 i.m.
i Tn-e., Thors., Sit.
To COSTA RICA $30.
(round trip)
PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICE
Incidentally, the unions have
Kit won the right to strike,
t under the law have no
right to political action.
Their importance in the
world struggle is tremend-
ous in an area of Soviet
espionage. The government
is slowly revamping itself
into a democracy and it
needs Turkish labor's help.
It has 700,000 excellently
trained men ready to bat-
tle on the Soviet-Turkish
border. This is, a terrific
economic burden and has
been so since 1942. Yet the
government doesn't -want
to crack down on its work'
ers' seeking higher wages.
Therefore, a fret labor
movement is necessary to
reconcile the needs of the
working man and the need
for standing guard where
the iron Curtain actually
rests on the edge of the
Western World.
ed files.
Aa Introduction, a few words are needed con-
cerning the original circumstances of the Wal-
lace report.
It was written at Kunming and cabled from
there to Washington in the late spring of 1944.
at the close of Wallace's Vice-Presidential tour
of the Far East.
Free China was then convulsed by the Japan-
ese offensive in East China, which was so
threatening that the American Army Head-
quarters at Chungking were actually making
plans to evacuate the Generalissimo's wartime
capital.
The report begins with an analysis of this
crisis and its immediate and potential long
ranee effects.
Pointing out that a prolonged diet- of heavy
defeats might lead to the actual "disintegra-
tion of the Chungking regime" (as indicated by
the American headquarters evacuation scheme),
the report argues that this' may "leave a va-
cuum" which will be "rilled in ways you under-
stand" in short by the triumph of the Chi-
nese Communists. .
This is proof, says the report, of "how seri-
ous" the situation has become.
There follows a friendly reference to Chiang
Kai-shek. At their parting, the Generalissimo
had asked Wallace to request the President to
name a "personal representative" at Chungking,
who would serve as liaison between Chiang and
Roosevelt as Gin. Sir Adrian Carton de Wlart
served as liaison between Chiang and Winston
Churchill.
The report transmits this request from Chiang
with warm approbation.
It remarks that Gen. Joseph W. Stilwell. then
theater commander in China Burma India,
would be an unsuitable choice for the new as-
signment, since he did not "enjoy (Chiang's i
confidence, because of his alleged inability to
grasp political considerations."
There follow the recommendations for action,
which are the report's significant passages.
Here ls^the verbatim text:
"Assignment (of the President's personal re-
presentative) should go to a man who can:
"1) Establish himself in Chiang's confidence
to a degree that the latter will accept his ad-
vice In regard to political as well as military
action:
"2) Command all American forces in China:
"3) Bring about full co-ordination between
Chinese and American military efforts.
"It is essential that he command American
forces In China because without this his efforts
will have no substance.
"He may even be Stilwell'a deputy with a
right to deal directly with the White House on
political questions; or China mav be separated
from General Stilwell's present command.
"Without the appointment of such a repre-
sentative you mav expect the situation here to
drift continuously from bad to worse. I believe
a representative should be appointed and reach
Chungking before East China is finally lost, so
that he can assume control of the situation be-
fore it degenerates too far.
"While I do not feel competent to propose an
officer for the Job, the name of Gen. Wede-
meyer has been recommended to me. and I am
told that during his visit here he made himself
persona grata to Chiang."
Such was the Wallace report from China.
There are two points to note about it.
First, it seems in the long run to have in-
fluenced President Roosevelt.
At any rate, that summer Maj. Gen. Patrick
Hurley was sent to Chungking in the capacity
suggested by Wallace; as the President's "per-
sonal representative"; and that fall, when Gen
Stilwell was finally removed from command,
the man chosen to succeed him was Gen. Al-
bert C. Wedemeyer. also suggested by Wallace.
Second, however, in the present climate of
our politics, the Implications of this Wallace
report from China are vastly more interesting
than Its effects.
When Wallace cabled so urgently from Kun-
ming, Gen. Stilwell was obstinately refusing to
take any serious counter-measures against the
Japanese offensive in East China.
.Hi wa.8 tctuaUy Planning to take advantage
of the Generalissimo's weakness, resulting from
the East China defeats, in order to force Chiang
Kai-shek to grant him unlimited authority over
au military forces in China and all distribution
of American aid within China.
And when he gained this authority. Stilwell
already intended to inaugurate a new policy of
lavishing American military equipment upon the
Chinese Communists. *
If Stilwell had gained these ends, there can
A Government Official soys: Good men have been driven
out of government; Competent replacements cannot
be found; Congressmen should reform *heir own eel-
leagues.
(While Drew Pearson is on a brief vacation, the Washing-
ton Merry-Go-Round is being written by distinguished ruest
SiESSKr 2W! Ftt't "' ta wrien by a high rederal
offlcla on behalf of himself and a number of his colleagues
in various agencies. It is unsigned for obvions reasons.)
WASHINGTON.-To members of the Congress:
nrov.0." BwenuSSff in ,Con*rea* are now conducting what may
ernmem g tUdle8 0 m0rals and etnlc ln *0"-
On behalf of myself and others who are striving to bring good
5 Congr0ess0iUefmWlt' X rMp*ctiully ur*e i w look caie?ully
<..nt!Clflcally' T'1 yo" uke a 00d look at th*t mall per-
!53AE y C0lle*i" who are effectively driving able men
away from government? A few illustrations will tell trie story
tJsS? *, DrUUant young American executive who, in'hi*
early 20s, made a careful study of Communism.
,.!?, aly cur.iou- ne Purposely exposed himself to Com-
Vh .h.Cr,Ul,ter''lUstened t0 aU tnelr laments. and argued
with them late Into many night*.
.h..Ao aomf months ! thl* he emerged with the conviction
lS .uU?hiD1mW.aS a,ra?d- I* became a vigorous anti-Com-
te"king~abut effective because he knew what he was
aoi.rifler.,th1. '&.0. 3(tron*lv on the "b^ct that, at substantial
sacrifice, he recently took an important Job in the Cold War
bill of heaTth CUrSe' lnvMtigated fuUy-*nd he received a clean
Soon, however, he heard that two members of Congress were
preparing to attack him publicly. "
Clean bill of health or not they laid plans to lambast him
as one who admits he once tonsorted regularly with known,
card-carrying Communists." ^
HrAthhls'.#the ifLc.,al t00k stock of the interests of his chil-
dren his wife and his own reputation. He left government
Today he is a key executive in a major U.S. corporation Hia
government post is filled now by a colorless, cautious mediocrity
f J-fc" a 3pec'alJst ln njehly complex and technical govern-
ment work. Except for a few years in private enterprise aa
a young man, he has devoted his entire career to government
Working his way up through the ranks, he gained such a re-
pctatlon that he has been offered private Jobs paying far more
than his government salary.
4,ni5J! was s0. looted to his work that he stayed on at hU
$10,000-a-year job, even though he has a family of five to sup-
But this year he came up as a witness in routine hearings
before a hostile congressional committee.
He found himself being ridiculed because he was doing
a major government job "without ever having held any import-
ant assignment in private enterprise.'' Disgusted. Mr Y will
probably leave government soon to take a S22,000-a-year executive
job on the outside.
His superiors have no idea where they can find.a competent
replacement willing to work for federal pay.
One veteran chairman of a special appropriations subcom-
mittee Is known for his merciless bludgeoning of government wit-
nesses. He frequently attacks their loyalty and integrity without
apparent reason.
When one official replied to the attacks in kind, the appro-
priations for his entire agency were decimated.
Such, as you know, is" the llfe-and-death power of the typical
committee chairman. And. of course, regardless of chairman'
conduct, it is unheard of to remove him so long as his oartv la
ln power. ^ .
One able executive from private business came into govern'
ment for patriotic reasons.
He made aremarkable record as a conscientious public serv-
ant. Recently he found himself publicly and bitterly attacked by
a key committee chairman as an unenmu-innihi minM.i.ar'n<
key committee chairman as an unconscionable squanderer" of
public funds. ,
The only known motive for the attack was that the chair-
man, facing re-election troubles, felt he needed to make head-
hnea as an "economizer." He picked the first handy victim.
If the victim had answered back as he wanted to, vital legis-
Latlon n,eeded by h'a agency would have died in committee. So
he bit his lip and took It.
Mr. C. a few months ago was Just about persuaded to give
up a top-filght outside position to perform a vital job in the
national emergency.
Before actually making the change, however, he read the
record of his able predecessor's appearances before several con-
gressional committees. He found some of them all right but
two were shocking.
When he finished reading the transcript of vitriol, insult and
i personal-abuse in these two cases, he said "to blazes with it He
be no doubt whatever that the Chinese Com- remained in his more lucrative, comfortable, and secure private
munlsts would have come-to full power in Chl-JP081-
na before the end of the war. Ye. Mr. Congressman, you and most of your colleagues want
to see able and conscientious public servants bearing the enorm-
ous burdens of government today.
But a relative handful of your colleagues, some spoiled by
aecure tenure ln positions of enormous congressional power, are
doing their best to see that good men are kept outor driven
outof government.
While you are in a reforming mood, please take a good look
at the conduct of some of your own colleagues on Capitol Hill
Perhaps you can find a way to help those of us who are striv-
ing desperately to get and keep able executives ln government.
And if President RoosevWt had acted more
promptly on Wallace's recommendations, super-
ceding Stilwell and sending Gen. Wedemeyer to
China immediately to contain and partlv pre-
vent the fearful Chinese Nationalist losses* of
that summer Chiang Kai-shek would probably
be ruling China today.
In short, surprising as It may seem In view
of Henry Wallace's later vagaries, this much
whispered about, never before published Wal-
lace report on Chipa was one of (he really strik-
ing and decisive antl-Communlst acts of the
war period.
As such, it Is so Important a commentary on
current attempts to reconstruct the history of
American policy in China, that the subject must
be pursued further ln subsequent reports.
(Copyright. 1951. New Tost Herald Tribune Inc.)
Japans/Economy
By Peter Edson
SAN FRANCISCO(NEA)Anyone who ima-
gines everything in the Far East Is going to be
m good shape because the Japanese peace treaty
has been signed has another thought coming.
If not the worst, there is at least plenty of
bad yet to come.
Everything* will have to go on as usual till
the treaty Is ratified by the government of the
countries whose foreign ministers signed it.
In the case of the United States, that means
the treaty has to be'ratified by the U. S. Sen-
The government needs Turk- j ate
lsh labor's help, too, in another
Soviet-created crisis.
Moscow has ordered Bulgaria
to deport 250,000 Turkish-speak-
ing Bulgars aoross the border
Into Turkey. Some 56.000 have
already been torn from their
homes and dumped Into the
land of their ancestors.
Turkey must find Jobs and
food for the newcomers.
It must also weed out the
spies planted by the Russians
among the Involuntary Immi-
grant*.
To handle this economic and
internal security problem, the
government needs the aid of
Intelligent labor leaders,
t They are also needed at the
other end of the nation, where
there's a constant entry of So-
viet agents across the border
ln the guise of working men.
Hundreds of these are picked
up regularly and tried in ul-
tra-secret sessions in unknown
Xruzum, Eastern Turkey.
There la little chance the Senate will get
around to hearings and ratification before the
scheduled Oct. 1 adjournment.
That means the matter will be held over as
unllnlahed business for the new session conven-
ing ln January 1952.
There Is a provision ln the treaty that it must
be ratified within nine months by a majority
of the signers. That would put the date off till
July. 1S52.
If not ratified by a majority then. Individual
countries may separately ratify this or any
other treaty suitable to the Japs.
Even if the San Francisco conference had
blown wide open, the United States would prob-
ably have made a separate peace with Japan.
The U. S. had already begun to relieve Japan
of some responsibilities as a defeated enemy
and an occupied country.
The purpose of this was to help prepare Jap-
an to stand on its own feet, economically. For
several years, maybe longer, this Is going to be
nip and tuck.
American aid to Japan was ended last June
If the approximately five years since the
5n(L?..the war tms *A has amounted to nearly
$2 billion. It was begun as a relief program.
Later It was turned to Industrial rehabilita-
tion and the sendnig of Japanese officials, busi-
nessmen and students to the United States for
education ln democracy.
On top of tfaia, considerable Indirect aid ac-
crued to the Japanese. U. S. armies of occupa-
tion stationed In Japan were paid there and
spent a lot of money ln that country.
There are no reliable data on how much this
aid amounted to.
Coats of the military occupation were borne
D.y the Japaneae government. This was a con-
siderable drain on the Japanese economy.
.iO"1" S" c0,t t*ne Japanese government over
S V.S"11011. a '*-" or between $1.5 billion and
sz DUlion since the end of the war. Effective
last Aug. 2, th eU. 8. cut this bill ln half.
How much the Korean war has nelped Japan's
economy is. shown by the export and impon fig-
ures. In June. 1950. Japans exports were valu-
ed at $M million. A year later they were $120
million.
While these figures show an unfavorable trade
balance. Japanese foreign trade for the calendar
KVJSfi * P^ted to balance off at about
$1.8 billion..
Importa of tail volume will be offset by com-
mercial exports of $1.5 bulln plus invisible re-
ceipts of $150 million and American troop pay-
menu of $250 million.
H Japan can maintain these levels of trade,
she can at least pay her own way and get by
without outside economic aid.
If U. 8. troops are withdrawn, the story will
be much different.
Where the rub comes is that Japan's whole
trade pattern has to be readjusted.
Before the war. Japan told silk to the U. S.
and bought cotton. Now the silk trade U pret-
tv well shot by synthetics. But Japan still needs
cotton.
The peace treaty will merely make Japan a
new economic frontier.
Japan can't Just be turned loose if it's going
down the economic drain.
(Copyright, 1951, By, The Bell Syndicate. Inc.)
Canine Breed T
HORIZONTAL S Anger
I.SDtpicUddog*|Y* UPomirun. 525.15
F mi rune
appellation
14 Gastropod
moilusk
15 Pastry
18 Engine
18 Insect egj.
18 "Coyote State
(b.)
20 Tree
21 Novel
23 Doctor of
Answer to Prtvioo Puzzle
rjMWWi uuiuaisiMt.:
ui ^-v*^ini^Siji-tjks
u^iiatJLiisQOM i.-jf.''"
us iiks''_ edging
7 Black
Unusual
8 Right line
(ab.)
10 Charged atom
11 Geralnt's wife 2 Prayer
in Arthurian 27 Elapsed
legend
12 Injures by
exposure
ACORN
ftfi
Ml ir.-" -;
l-ltJlC!-*L
n>: iKdUSSmu\r:...mi
J: l^esLWUlkB'^fc:!
45 Musical
quality VT
21 Grafted (her.) 4 Road (ab.) I
20 Social insect
22 Obnoxious
plant
24 Trying
experience
I 25 Daybreak
| (comb, form)
j 27 Egyptian
month
!'28 Great Lake
i 32 Also
! 33 Filth
i 34 Pace
j 38 Oriental coin
, 37 Rip
; 3 Final passage
in music
39 Behold!
i Article
: 41 It------noted
for Its
\ fa meneas
4S Deep holo
48 Groove
48 The gods
50 Ntw (comb,
form)
51 Highways
84 Insane
55 Containers
87 Muse of
58 Makes
melodious
M Repulse
VaTRTICAL
lUttle demons
v | Incursion I
30 Angered
31 Volcano in
Sicily
35 Support
38 Feline
41 Quechuan
Indian
42 Chair
44 Press
47 Employer
48 Palm fruit
49 False god
51 Scrap
53 Onager
54 Cartograph
58 Tungsten
(cb.) i
58 French islanl



I

PAGE FIGHT
THE PANAMA AMEKICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
_
-.i-"^ --.i
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1M1
Bob Porterfield Nips Bob Lemon 1-0 In Duel
Powells Cop First Game
Of Atlantic Hoop Series
In the first game o the best
to" out of tnrec' series With
Westinghouse for the cham-
pionship, Powells managed to
edge out Westinghouse by a one
point margin. Tnroughout most
of' the game Westingaouse held
the lead but, failed o keep it
till the end of the game.
Trailing by se\en points go-
ing hito the lasl quarter. Pow-
ells with some timely lield goals
along with the fact that West-
lnghouse's star player Cham-
bet' fouled out, hung up the
GUN CLUB
NOTES
The Balboa Gun Club held a
.38 Time Fire shoot lasl Sun-
day that was very well attend-
ed. Since some of the shooters
fired several times only their
high score is shown below:
Score
Irvin Krapfl i Balboa' 189
Col. Turton < Marines i 1V2
Bturtevant Todd iBalbc 181
Fred Wells (Balboa i 17fl
Mr. Stewart (Cristobal) 179
Bill Jaffray (Alb.-Cur.i 179
Curtis Peterson (Alb.-Cur i 178-
Wayne Lucas (Balboa 177
Archie Turner (Balboa t 174
Vernon Brisson Balboa' 171
Mr. Barch (Cristobal) 170:
Maj. Crumpacker i Balboa) 162!
I.t. Haynes (Marines' lGr;
Roy Perkins (Cristobal' 163
Otto Undo (Balboai 1611
Lt. Councilman 'Marines' 154
Mr. Fettler (Cristobal) 153
Lt. Pratt (Marines' 149'
Mr. Anderson (Crlstoba! 137 i
Col. Tucker (Marines' 136!
Mr. Truxton (Cristobal I 98!
Mr. Morton (Cristobal' 80
Mr. Dale (Cristobal) 711
game by the one point margin,
61 to 60.
Westinghouse who played
without two of their main play-
ers put up a good fight and
almost managed to win the ball
game. For the victorious Pow-
ells Manning was high point
man with 17 points to his cre-
dit while in a magnificent at-
tempt to keep his team in the
game lt was Dick Chambers of
Westinghouse with a grand to-
tal of 28.
Powells needs to win only one
of the two remaining games
left to play while Westing-
house needs to win both if they
expect to get the champion-
ship trophy.
Box score of the game:
Powells Hi FT TP
Bailev........ 4 1 9
Brady........ 3 5 11
Gibson. N..... 3 2 8
Manning...... 6 5 17
Wilson........ 0 o 0
Bryant ...... 0 0 0
Anderson...... 2 0 4
Allgaier...... 3 1 7
Simons....... 2 1 5
Smith........ 0 0 U
Totals........23 15 61
Saturday7
Program
1st Race "F-l" Natives*i Fgs.
Purse: $275.00Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1El Mao
2Campesino
3Don Sizzle
4Risita
5Hercules
6El Mono
7Domino
8Aqu Estoy
O. Chanls 120
R. Ycaza 106x
K. Flores 117
B. Moreno HI
A. Vergara 107x
G. Grael 115
E.Sllvera 108
E. Ortega 108x
2nd Race "F-2-
Purse: (275.00 -
Second Race
1Lonely Molly
2Cacique
3El As
4Avlvato
5Dandy
6Callejera
7Miguelito
8Exlto
Westingnouse FG FT TP
Chambers......11 6 28
Ibaez....... 1 0 2
Salas........ 0 1 1
P. Magdalene ..2 2 6
L. Tom....... 0 0 0
C. Magdaleno. ..5 2 12
Kuhrt........ 0 0 0
Lam......... 0 0 0
Castillo...... 0 0 0
Rios.......... 4 3 11
Totals........23 14 60
Standing of the Series
TEAMS Won Lost Pet.
Powells .. >1 0 1.000
Westinghouse ., 0 1 .000
3rd Race "F-2"
Purse: $275.00-
One
1Norma
2Tap Dancer
3Pon La Olla
4Cafetal
5Jota Jota
6Tapsy
7La Venada
8Conde
Natives4 !j Fgs.
- Pool Closes 1:15
of the Doubles
R. Vasquez 114
G. Cruz 110
F. Avila 110
F. Rose 111
R. Ycaaa 107x
E. Silvera 110
J. Cadogen 110
E. Campbell 107x
Natives4'2 Fgs.
- Pool Closes 1:45
-Two
O. Chanls 11.7
A. Vergara 117x
E. Ortega 112x
A. Enrique 107x
C. Iglesias 110
F. Avila 111
R. Ycaza 107x
B. Moreno 110
Bosox Gain Full Game;
Spahn Hurls 1-Hitter
By UNITED PRESS |
NEW YORK, September~14. The Yanks and
Indians did it again yesterday. First, the Yanks took
it on the chin from the Tigers 9-2 for their third
straight loss. That gave the Indians a chance to
boost their league lead from one game to two but
they went right out and lost a night game to the
Senators 1-0, getting only three hits off Bob Porter-
field who bested Bob Lemon in a red hot mound
duel.
4th Race 1-2Imported1! Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 2:20
Quiniela
1Cotillon
2Armeno
3Alabarda
4Jepperin
G. Cruz 113
F. Rose 114
J. Cadogen 115
A. Soto 120
5 Bien Hecho A. Enrique lllx
6Astoria
7Haydn
8Bartolo
C. Bovil 120
B. Aguirre 120
O. Chanls 120
1PANAJACK" SPORT COAT
especially made in out own tailor shop
for only $17.50
THE AMERICAN BAZAAR
(Founded in 1W)>
COLON:
Opposite the R.R. Station
PANAMA:
25 Central Avenue
7] Central Ave. A Hotel El Panam
5th Race "B" Natires 7 Fgs.
Purse: $350.00 Pool Closes 2:55
1Tin Tan E. Silvera 110
2Grito y Plata V. Castillo 115
3Lollto J. Rodriguez 116
4Helen B. B. Aguirre 116
5Don Pitin O. Alfaro 122
6Amazona K. Flores 122
Meanwhile, the Boston Red Sox
whipped the St. Louis Browns
and their ace pitcher. Ned Carv-
er, 5-4 in ten innings to gain a
full game on both clubs.
The Yanks certainly looked
listless in their loss to the Tigers.
Ed Lopa!. bidding for his 20th
victory, was belted for nine hits
five in a row in a big seven-
run fifth inningand the Yank-
ees made four errors.
Virgil "Fire" Trucks, mean-
while, hurled seven-hit ball for
his 100th win in the majors and
his fourth over the Yankees
this year. Vic Werti hit a
three-run Tiger homer and
'Mickey Mantle homered for
New York.
Porterfield, an ex-Yankee hurl-
er, twirled a fine game for the
Washington Senators to beat
Lemon. The only run Lemon al-
lowed was unearned when Bobby
Avila committed a two-base er-
ror on Irv Noren's grounder and
Noren scored on Mickey Vernon's
single. But the Indians couldn't
score at all off Porterfield who
lost* three-hitter to the Yank-
ees his last time out.
These were the only American
League games scheduled.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
The St. Louis Cardinals did
something yesterday that no ma-
jor league team has done since
1883 by playing two different
teams on the same day.
They beat the New York Gi-
ants in an afternoon game 6-4
and then were stopped with one
hit in the night game by War-
ren Spahn of the Boston Braves
2-0.
Spahn's game was really a
classic. The only hit he allowed
was a sixth inning pop single by
Card pitcher Al Brazle that drop-
ped between the second baseman
and right fielder. The only other
Card baserunner was Chuck Dier-
ing on a third inning walk as
6th Race "G" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $450.00 Pool Closes 3:35
First Race of the Doubles
1Guarina
2Sismo
3Piragua
4Own Power
5Troplcana
6Tamesls II
7Delhi
8Apretador
F. Rose 112
A. Soto 120
A. Enrique 106x
B. Moreno 112
B. Pulido 120
B. Aguirre 113
E. Silvera 104
R. Vasquez 120
7th Race"D" Imported6*2 Fgs.
Purse: $600.00 Pool Closes 4:05
Second Race of the Doubles
1Pamphlet G. Alfaro 120
2Milros C. Iglesias 109
3Gaywood) E. Silvera 110
4Avenue Road) K. Flores 116
5Mr. Foot M. Arosemena 104
6Lacey J. Samaniego 112
American League
TEAMS Won Lost
Cleveland. 89 53
New York
Boston .
Chicago.
Detroit .
Philadelphia 60
Washington 55
St. Louis . 43
. 86
. 83
. 76
. 64
52
54
64
To-
ll
82
94
Pet. G.R.
.627
.623 1
.603 V--
.543 12
.453 26
.426 29'i
.401 SI'-*
.316 44! 2
8th Race 1-1 Imported6' Fgs.
Purse: $375.00 Pool Closes 4:40
Quiniela
1Bendigo
2Zevelania
3El Mago i
4Glory's Acei
5Mete Bulla
6Baby Roi
7Mon Etoile
8Hit
V. Castillo 115
E. Darlo 106
F. Rose 120
A. Enrique 109x
C. Iglesias 106
O. Chanls 108
B. Pulido 116
K Flores 115
9th Race "H" Imported1 Mile
Purse: $400.00 Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Hob Nob) F. Rose 112
2Doa Eleida) F. Avila 114
3Belfarset G. Prescott 120
4Pincel G. Sanchez 120
5Picon A. Enrique 107X
6Sun Cheer R. Ycaza 103x
7Sans Souci V. Castillo 120
10th Race "E" Natives' 7 Fgs.
Purse: $275.00 Pool Closes 5:40
1Luck Ahead E. Silvera 110
2Manolete K. Flores 114
3Rio Mar E. Ortega 104x
4Tap Girl C. Iglesias 106
Today's Games
Chicago at Philadelphia (N).
(leveland at Washington (N).
St. I.ouis at Boston.
Detroit at New York.
Yesterday s Results
Detroit 001 170 0009 11 0
New York 100 000 1002 7 4
Trucks (10-81 and Swift; Lopat
(19-8), Morgan, Hogue and Berra.
Ten Innings)
St. Louis 100*001 020 04 11 0
Boston 000 031 000 15 10 0
Garver (16-12! and Batts; Par-
nell, Kinder (10-2 and Robinson.
NIGHT GAME
Cleveland COO 000 0000 3 1
Washlngt'n 001 000 OOx1 10 1
Lemon (17-12) and Hegan,
Tebbetts (8); Porterfield (8-8)
and Grasso. -
Only Games Scheduled.
5Golden Babe F. Rdse 112
6 Torcaza) R. Yoaza 105x
7Duque) A. Enrique 117x
8Volador) J. Rodriguez 114
9Bijagual O. Sanchez 110
11th Race "C" NaUves 7 Fgs.
Parse: $325.00
1Bagalefto R. Ycaza 107x
2Elona M. Zeballos 119
3Casablanca G. Alfaro 120
4White Fleet J. Rodgz. 120
5Mr. Espinosa B. Aguirre 113
National League
TEAMS Won Lost
Brooklyn . 88
New York. 84
St. Louis . 73
Boston ... 69
Philadelphia 66
Cincinnati I
Chicago. . 58
Pittsburgh 58
49
57
64
68
74
80
82
83
Pet. G.B.
.642
.596
.533 15
.504 19
.471 234
.433 29
.414 31 Va
.411 31
Today's Games
Boston at St. Louis (N.
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (N).
Brooklyn at Pittsburgh (N).
New York at Chicago.
Yesterday's Results
New York 000 020 2004 8 2
St. Louis 060 000 OOx6 10 2
Maglle (20-8), Kennedy, Kohl-
kowskl, Corwin, Spencer and
Westrum, Noble; Poholsky, Bock-
elman (3-3) Staley and Rice.
NIGHT GAME
Boston 100 000 0012 9 0
St. Louis 000 000 0000 1 1
Spahn (20-12) and Cooper;
Brazle (6-3) and Rice.
Only Games Scheduled.
Joan Franco Tip?
By CLOCKER
1Don Sizzle Domino
2Dandy Lonely Molly
3Norma Cafetal
4Jepperin Alabarda
5Don Pitin Helen B.
6Piragua Tamesis II
7Lacey Avenue Road (e>
8Hit Mon Etoile
9Belfarset Hob Nob (e)
10Manolete Torcaza
11White Fleet Mr. Espinosa
ONE BESTNorma.
Withdrawal From
Organized Baseball
Would Wreck PCL
By LEW BUYER
NEA Special Correspondent
COLUMBUS, O., Sept.. 14
(NttA)Those funny noises you
hear In the west are made by
Pacific Coast League magnates
talking through their hats.
They're threatening to with-
draw from organized baseball
unless drafting of their players
by the majors is eliminated.
I'll bet even Coast League
Prexy Clarence Rowland Has
his tongue in his cheek as he
waits lor the general reaction
to that threat.
Rowland knows, as does any-
one else In baseball, that the
Coast League needs organized
baseball more than OB needs
the Coast League.
If they witndraw, they lm--
medlately lose Nail the benefits
of the national organization.
Their players would forthwith
be free to sign with the club
oifering them the most money
despite their contracts with
the Coast League clubs. There'd
be no national organization to
back up and enforce the re-
serve clause in their contracts.
In fact, any man playing in
their league would be risking
lifetime suspension from organ-
ized ballas were the Mexican
jumping beans who left OB to
go to the Mexican League a few
years back.
Someday, some sort of ad-
justment must be made so that
Coast League cities like Los An-
geles and San Francisco can
nave major league baseball. But
the other six cities in the Coast
League aren't major league ci-
ties, by any stretch of the im-
agination. And* no amount of
blowing off steam will make
them major league cities.
It's Just another case of the
tall trying to wag the dog.
Citation, Coaltown Retirement
Won't Bankrupt Calumet Barn
the stylish lefthander recorded
his 20th win of the year.
The Cards drove 20-game win-
ner Sal Maglle of the Giants to
cover with six runs in. the second
inning of the afternoon game.
The Slants kept pecking away
at that margin as Monte Irvln
drove In three runa with a hom-
er and a triple but the loss drop-
ped the Giants six full games be-
hind the Idle league leading
Dodgers.
No other games were sched-
uled________________________
16-Year-0ld Player
Reaches National
Amateur Semifinals
BY OSCAR FRALEY
United Press Sports Writer
BETHLEHEM, Pa., Sept. 14
Sixteen-year-old Tommy Jacobs
of Montebello, Calif., became the
youngest semi-finalist in 47
years today as he led a New York
lawyer, a Pittsburgh real estate
man and a Texas college student
into the seml-iinals of the U.S.
amateur golf championship.
Jacobs, a blond, blue-eyed high
school Junior who won't be 17
until February, shared the spot-
light with his rival in today's 36-
hole semi-windupJoe Gagliar-
dias the 39-year-old attorney
from Mamaroneck, N. Y., kept
right on rolling after an upset of
Defending Champion Sam Urz-
etta to oust 1949 Champion Char-
ley Coe of Oklahoma City.
Reaching the round of four in
the other half of the bracket
were Big Jack Benson, a 40-year-
old 220-pound slugger from the
smoky city, and chunky Billy
Maxwell, 22-year-old redhead
from Odessa, Tex.
NEW YORK, Sept. 14 (NEA)
Tne retirement of Calumet
Farm's high-powered, double-
barreled stakes hunters, Citation
and Coaltown, Is not llkelv to
throw the great racing establish-
ment into bankruptcy. Not while
Trainer H. A. "Jimmy" Jones has
another pair of promising young-
sters like Hill Gail and A Gleam
in his string.
Some turf experts consider Hill
Gail another Citation"or even
better." That's biting off quite a
chunk of cherry pie and there
might be some pits in it. Never-
theless the colt has won some
mighty good races and was a
bang-up second to Oh Leo in the
Washington Park Futurity. He'll
represent Calumet In this year's
Belmont Futurity, in which he
will meet six other equine stars
on Oct. 6.
Many of the Hill Gall fans al-
ready are saving up their shek-
els to wager on him in the winter
book to win the 1952 Kentucky
Derby. This may prove a Jinx for
the colt, because it's a matter of
turf history that the horse un-
lucky enough to attain the posi-
tion of favorite in the winter
books usually fails even to get to
the post, much less win the Run
for the Roses.
TOUTED TO WIN
MATRON STAKES
AS for A Gleam, there's a filly
that bids fair to carry on in the
best Calumet tradition. In fact,
her admirers vow she'll equal her
retlred'stablemate Bewltch's rec-
ord, and it is known to one and
all that Bewitch retired as the
world's money winning mare with
around half a million dollars to
her credit.
A Gleam tangled with Lygla,
which had a winning streak of
five, and beat her; this happen-
ed one day after Louis B. Mayer
BY NED BROWN
NEA Special Correspondent
o
bought Lygla for a price reported
on good authority-to total $100.
000. Some of the hardboots al-
ready are touting A Gleam as the
probable winner of the Matron
Stakes.
For students of geneology lt
might here be noted, for what
it's worth, that Hill Gall's sev-
enth dam, Angelica, by Galopn,
was a full sister to the unbeaten
St. Simonno relation to Simple
Simonand that she (Angelica)
in.turn produced Orme, the sire
of Flying Fox. And don't say I
didn't tell you!

From Chet Smith, baseball or-
acle and sports editor of the
Pittsburgh Press, comes the fol-
lowing comment of an English
guest at a major league baseball
game. In the matter of balls and
strikes, his British friend ex-
plained:
"If the batsman doesn't like the
way a ball arrives he permits it to
pass by unmolested. If he could
have hit it, It's a strike; if he
could not have hit it. It's a ball.
The umpire decideshow, I don't
know. Neither does the crowd."
(There's true erudition for you
brother.) But here's more:
FINDS UMPIRES UNPOPULAR
"Umpires appear to be unpop-
ular people.Four balls result in a
decision in favor of the batsman,
and he Is 'walked' to first base.
The past tense" is purely figura-
tivehe really proceeds to first
base under his own power.
"If the pitcher appears to be
making things too easy for the
batsman, there's a lull In the
game during which other mem-
bers of his side talk the situation
over with him. very quietly, look-
ing at the ground and kicking the
turf. If they decide against the
pitcher he's sent to the bath."
To the showers, men I
ordoiis
Stands Suptewjz^
RACES SATURDAY and SUNDAY
DOUBLES
1st, 2nd 6th. 7th RACES
ONE-TWO
3rd and vth RACES
COLON:
For the convenience of
our patrons we are now
operating both at the
"COPACABANA" and
"SAVOY."
*r c
UL%rJ-\.J\to
^\ t **jp,m&-&^fjJ&&M
QUINIELAS
4th and 8th RACES
SATURDAYS STELLAR RACE
7th Race "D" Importeds 654 Fgs.
Purse: $600.00 Pool Closes: 4:05 p.m.
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
1. PAMPHLET...............C. Alfaro 120
2. MILROS.................C. iglesias 109
3. (GAYWOOD...............E. SUvera 110
4. (AVENUE ROAD........... K. Flores 116
5. MR. FOOT............M. Arosemena 104
6. LACEY................;. Samaniego 112
wztt franco 'Race Vrac
CHILDREN ARE NOT ALLOWED
AT THE RACE TRACK
SUNDAYS FEATURE RACES
5th Race "Chilean Bred Horses" 7 Fgs.
Purse: $1,000.00 Poof Close*: 2:55 p.m.
'REPUBLIC OF CHILE CLASSIC"
1. GR1SU____..............____A. Soto 128
2. POLVORAZO..............K. Flores 120
3. PRESTIGIO..........------A?Enrique 97
4. BEDUINO............ E- Silvera 102
5. CORAGGIO....... .......O. Chanis 108
7th Race "C" Importeds 7 Fgs.
Purse: $650.00 Pool Closes: 4:05 p.m.
SECOND RACE OF DOUBLES
1. MICROBIO.............____F. Rose 120
2. PARAGON...............V. Castillo 117
3. RIDING EAST............ C. Iglesias 112
4. CARMELA It................A. Soto 112
5. SILVER DOMINO.........B. Aguirre 116


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1951
...... -.....--------------
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
. i-
PAGE NTN|
Balboa High School Inter-Squad Game Tomorrow
V. ------- --------------7T-S==^-7T7----------'?-------------------------------------

Kickoff Slated For 7 P.M.
Between Red, White Teams
At east th BHS football team will get a"good
test of what it can do in the mud this Saturday night
when the Red and White warrior tangle in their
annual Inter-Squad game.
The team has been divided into the Red and
the White outfits with Frank Bryan, veteran guard
acting as Capt. of the Red team, and Carl Meissner,
senior and letterman tackle, Capt of the White
group.
The Whites, will have a 26 member squad and the
Reds will line up with 25 boys on their squad. This
will be the first test for the Bulldogs, and will give
the fans a chance to see the entire 58 man squad in
action, with one or two exceptions due to injuries.
Game time is 7 p.m. with the officials changing
assignments each quarter so that they all can see
action in this first test of the season. Admission
charge will be 25 cents to all non-student associa-
tion members.
Bulldog fans are also reminded of the picture
taking that will take place this Saturday at 9 AM.
Any and all who would like to take pictures of the
Bulldogs may do so at this time.
Regents Board Threatens
Action On Georgia Tech,
Georgia U. Aid' Programs
DOUBLES CHAMPS The top
picture hows a scene irom yes-
terday 'i doubles finals as the
Bill Hele-Jullo Plnllla team
copped the Spaldlng Cup Tour-
nament from Webb Hearn-
Capt. Jim Hampton m five
I hrilling sets. The first two sets
were played Wednesday and
halted because of rain with the
winners leading fl-4. 9-7.
Hearn-Hampton took the next
two sets 3-8, 4-6 but Hele and
Plnllla came back to take the
final set 6-4. The bottom pic-
ture shows Felipe Motta pre-
senting the winners with the
trophy while sponsor Arturo
Maduro looks on.
ATLANTA. Sept: 14 (UP)
The Board of Regents of the
university system of Georgia
threatened to step In on the
athletic Qrants-ln-Ald pro-
grams at Georgia and Georgia
Tech unless they correct a "bad
situation."
The regents adopted a sur-
{'rtsf, though modified, resolu-
Ion deploring "exaggerated"
help offered athletes by the two
senior colleges of the system
and called upon officials oj the
schools to clean house. Other-
wise, the system authorities in-
dicated they were ready to take
formal action, possibly to the
extreme of ending grants and
other expensive facets of big-
time football. -
The resoluthw-oMd' the
Board's services to Tech and
Georgia In stralghtenlrig-out
the athletic program and pro-
mises it would seek cooperation
Of other SEC schools in similar
crack-downs.
The resolution by Regent
Sandy Beaver, as offered, would
have allowed the regents to
grant athletic scholarships but
no other aid. That feature of
the proposal was eliminated.
"Under the present system."
Beaver declared, "athletes are
looked upon as a stable of fine
horses. But it can be worked
into a dignified proposition If
handled correctly.1"
Chancellor Harmon Caldwell
told the regents they must take
a stand soon'.
"We' have either to condone
or condemn It," he said. "There
is no in between."'
"We are going to be terribly
embarrassed at what Is going
to happen at Tech and at the
University of Geargla in the
next few years." chairman Rob-
ert Arnold said.
"We want to say to the offi-
clals of those schools that.. If
they will move to put things on
a proper basis we will help
them."
Georgia and Georgia Tech are
bound by rules of the South-
eastern Conference Grant-In-
Ald program which allows ath-
letes tuition and living ex-
penses.
Spirituano,
Despaigne Set
For Sunday Tilt
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With only two days left before
the anxiously awaited Cbarolito
Spiritusno-Tito Despaigne ten-
round clash Sunday night at the
Panam Gym. interest is still in-
creasing.
Charolito, whose real name is
Orlando Cepeda, worked four
fast rounds in an exhibition at
the Panam Gym's regular
Thursday night amateur card. Re
Impressed fas with his great
hitting power.
The Cuban has announced that
he will be in there Sunday trying
his best to end hostilities as soon
as possible because of Tito's rep-
utation of being a deadly punch-
er.
Deipaicne, 0n the other band,
has been concentrating on bet-
tering his timing and is said to
be ready to employ a body attack
en his opponent.'
Spirituano is the early favorite
in the betting but his margin is
so slight that by fight time the
betting is expected to be even and
might swing in favor of Des-
paigne.
Meanwhile, wrestlers Negro
Badu of Cuba and Charro Azte-
ca of Mexico have ended their
training and are ready to give
fans an unforgettable perform-
ance in their 45-mlaute hand-to-
hand match. This match will be
decided on two-best-out-of-three
falls.
Pidel Morris, hard-hitting San
Bias Indian, takes en Reeky Mc-
Cree In a four-round 126-pound
preliminary.
The program win be rounded
oat with another four-rounder
a lM-poand prelim between Al
Hostin and Cisco Kid.
Army Sports
Lt. Gen. William H. H. Morris,
Jr., presented the Inter-servlce
Tennis Championship awards to
Lt. Col. Weldon Lafche. 7470th
AU USARCARIB School, at Fort
Gulick. runner-up In the recent
tennis tournament singles, 1st Lt.
Claude Luke, AIbrook Air Force
Base, singles champ, Col. Laiche
and Capt. Herbert Keith, Fort
Gulick Dental Clinic, who were
doubles champs, and Lt. Luke and
M-Sgt. John Tally, doubles run-
ners-up.
The awards, wrist watches to
the match winners, and sterling
silver carving set* to the run-
ners-up, were issued by the Unit-
ed States Army Caribbean Spe-
cial Services Section. Lt. Col.
Frank H. Linnel. newly appoint-
ed Chief of Special Services, was
present at the ceremony.
Galindo And Wood
Rule Favorites In
Gold Coast Tourney
Semi-finals of the first flight
of the Altantlc Side Invita-
tional tournament will be play-
ed tomorrow at the Brazos Brook
Country Club, -
Favored to come out on top
in the Chrysler-Plymouth com-
petition are Anbal Galindo and
Charlie Wood.
Galindo will probably have, to
shoot on? of his better games
to down Frankle Day, who late-
ly has been at the top of his
game.
Wood should have rather
smooth sailing against Ma].
Gardner after his sterling per-
formance of last week In eli-
minating Mike Kullkowski.
Gardner, however, could up-
set the applecart, especially If
he came up with another par
round like his qualifying ex-
hibition which earned the
medalist honors.
SOUTHERN ACCENT
New York(NEA)Here are
the top nine college football
teams for the 1941-50 period,
in order of effectiveness: Notre
uame. Army, Michigan, Texas,
Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama,
Oklahoma and Penn State.
'ReP Says Turpin
Will Agree With
TKO In Few Years
CHICAGO, Sept. 14 eree Ruby Goldstein says Randy
Turpin will be glad In a "few
years from now" that he stopped
his defense of the middleweight
championship Wednesday.
Goldstein, who awarded Sugar
Ray Robinson a technical knock-
put and the title rather than al-
low Turpin to absorb more pun-
ishment said the English fighter
"didn't know what he was doing"
at the end.
"He couldn't even roll with the
punch anymore," Goldstein said
on a radio broadcast last night.
"A few years from now he'll be
glad I stopped that fight," he
concluded.
Two Amateurs Lead
6th Women's Annual
National Golf Open
ATLANTA, SeprnrtTP)Two
amateurs have taken the lead in
the sixth annual Women's Na-
tional Open Golf Championship
in Atlanta.
At the head of the field of 75 is
shotmaker Polly Riley of Fort
Worth. Tex., and Kathy McKin-
non of Lake Worth, Fla. Miss
Rileywho was a runner-up lnl
the 1947 Openfired a 34 to share
By JOHNNY McCULLUM
NEA Special Correspondent
NEW YORK, Sept. 14 (NBA)
Rarely does the collecting mania
take a more bizarre form than in
the case of Ralph Kennedy a
collector of golf courses.
The veteran Scarsdale, N. Y.,
- golfer's unique
hobby doesn't
lean to digging
up divots and
storing them In
his cellar.
What the pen-
cil concern exec-
utive does Is go
around playing
golf courses. He
preserved a. card
for each course
played since he
rirfc_i started In 1910.
* ajrawoM He ralged hl. tQ_
tal to 3000 when h'e toured his-
toric old St. Andrews, birthplace
of the Royal and Ancient not
long ago.
Does that make you blink? The
average golfer plays no more
than 50 different Uns In his life-
time. Bobby Jones could count
fewer than 250 courses which felt
his biting irons.
Joe Kirkwood, trick-shot exhi-
bitionist, once remarked casually
that he had played 1900 differ-
ent courses. Challenged by Ken-
nedy, a zealot In defending his
record, Joe could offer no proof.
Pinned down, Kirkwood could re-
call only 450 courses actually
played.
' There's no guesswork about
Kennedy's 30O0 courses. He can
open a safety deposit box In a
New York bank and fish out
tangible proof, each card attested
by some reputable and disinter-
ested official of the course lt rep-
resents.
Kennedy has no Illusions con-
cerning the Importance of his
achievement.
"It will neither Improve the
breed of golfers nor make this
world a better place to live In. It's
Just a hobby, about as significant
as flag-pole sitting or oyster eat-
ing records," he admits.
Kennedy has been at it now for
40 years. He was 28 when he
played his first round of golf on
the Van Cortlandt Park public
links in New York. His record,
phenomenal though lt be. Is not
out of reach of any golfer who
gets out early In life with enough
traveling money to make a busi-
ness of playing golf courses on a
quantity basis.
the honors with the 18-year-old
Miss McKlnnon.
Helen Hampton of Chattanoo-
ga, Tenn., followed close behind
with a 85.
And branched at 36 wereDe-
fending Champion Mrs. George
(Babe) Zaharias of Tampa, Fla.;
Marlene Bauer of Midland, Tex.;
Bea McWaln of Birmingham;
Dorothy Kir by of Atlanta; Pat
Garner of Midland, Tex., and
Betty Dodd of Fort Sam Hous-
ton, Tex.
In hot climates


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"I doubt If ever his record will
be equalled," says George Trevor,
noted former golf writer and
close friend of globe-trotting
Kennedy.
"A man would have to be a
single-track minded fanatic with
a rugged constitution. Only a
Methuselah could play every golf
course .In America there are
some 5700let alone cover all of
the world's 8250 courses."
Kennedy has seen some odd
things In -his golf wanderings.
The strangest-course would be
the one at Quayaqull, Ecuador
under water six months of the
year. It has to be rebuilt after
every rainy season.
And there's no turfthe fair-
ways are made of baked clay,
which dries out In cracks that-
would stump a Swiss mountain-;
eer," explains Kennedy. "WIto
the ball lodges In one they let
you lift it without penalty, which
is the least they can do."
Ralph Kennedy's name appears
in no list of champions, but he
has hung up a record which
sftould stand as long as Bobby
Jones' grand slam.
Aptly do his South American
friends hail Kennedy as "El hom-
bre fle las mil Cancnas"mean-
ing: "The man of a thousand
fields."
There is no Spanish word foe
golf course.
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SPAHN HURLS l-HITTER FOR NO. 20
Bob Porterfield
Handcuffs Indians
3rd Straight For
Bosox In Tenth
The League's Best
(Includes Laol Sight's
Games)
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Ferris Fain. Athletic*......331
Orestes Mioso. White Sox .. .323
George Kelt. Ticers.......321
Ted Williams. Red Sox.....320
Gil Conn. Senators.......316
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Stan Musial. Cardinals.....363
Richie Aslihurn. Phillies . .339
Jackie Robinson, Dodgers . .338
Roy Campanella. Dodgers .323
Ralph Kiner. Pirates.......315
Monte li viii. Giants ......315
(SPORTS PAGES: 8 & 9)
AN P^EPENDET^^f||Bs( Panama American
"Let the people knoiv the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1951
FIVE CENTO
Anti-Red Rioting in Leipzig
Pits Irate 3,500 vs. Police
BERLIN. Srpi. 14 (UP* Bit- injured and 100 arrests werebore out the Recounts of mount-
er anti-Communist rioting in made, the anti-Communist or-
Leipzig and open defiance of Red ganization sa^d.
rule at Halle and other Soviet "The West, Berlin newspaper
Local 595, NFFE
To Choose Officers,
Build 'Ranchilo'
A nominating committee to
name a slate of officers for
Local 595. National Federation
of Federal Employes, for the
coming year, was appointed by
John Kennedy, president, dur-
ing; yesterday's meeting held at
the clubhouse on Chiva Chiva
trail.
The men named by Kennedy
were Joseph M. Burns. Chair-
map. Aaron Sigfred. Samuel
Grandln. Stephen Hovan. John
Gibson. William Webster, and
W. Graharif.
Plans were also announced
for the construction of a "ran-
chito" and a modern barbecue
pit which will be made available
for families of members with-
out charge. Parking facilities
are also being improved.
Other items of vital Interest
to Armed Force* civilian em-
Sloyes were discussed by the
arge group present.
Venice Binge
Branded Insult
To Italy's Poor
ROME, 8eDt 14 tUPi The Gov-
ernment was asked in Parlia-
ment today why it permitted a
Spanish millionaire to give a
$50.000 housewarmlng party in
Venice.
Five right-wing socialists. In
filing the question, described the
party as "an insult to the misery
of millions of Italians."
The Vatican newspaper, Os-
servatore Romano, had previous-
ly denounced the party, which
was given bv Spanish millionaire
Carlos de Bestegui.
zone centers were reported today
by an anti-Communist. West
German intelligence agency.
The "Fighting Group Against
Inhumanity" said resistance to
Communism in Bast Germany
has approached open warfare In
some instances and is being met
by the Soviet zone government
with arrests, imprisonment,
censorship and a Communist
brand of "thought control."
Most serious of the disorders,
the agency said, occurred Mon-
day In Leipzig where 3,500 irate
citizens stormed a police station
and battled 400 Communist
Peoples Police" and three fire
brigades in an attempt to free
two German youths arrested
without cause.
They attempted to beat down
the police station doors and pelt-
ed police with stones, the "fight-
ing group" said.
The meager information leak-
ing to the West did not disclose
the fate of the two youths.
Many police and civilians were
Telegraf reported that workers
at a buna (Synthetic rubber)
plant at Halle attempted to
storm the factory grounds to
stage a mass meeting of protest
he the Communist regime lm-
poaell new working conditions
calling for more work and less
pay.
Police were ordered out to oc-
cupy the plant and its grounds,
the paper said The incident was
said to have occurred Sept. 8.
Reports from Soviet sources
Catholic Priest
May Face Death
In Bucharest Trial
BUCHAREST. Sept. 14 (UP)
The. death sentence was de-
manded here today for four
men. Including a Roman
Catholic clergyman. In a mass
spv trial.
In denouncing the defen-
dants, who are accused of spy-
ing on behalf of the Vatican,
the Italian government and the
Western Allies, the prosecutor
attacked also "the new pre-
tenders to world domination,
those beastly, warmongering
adventurers, the Americans."
4 Catholic Priests
Arrested In Shanghai
HONG KONG. Sept. 14 (UP)
Catholic sources said today
that four more Catholic priests
in Shanghai were arrested Sept.
6 on undisclosed charges.
They Included one Irish, one
Cervecera Nacional
Adds $250 lo Aid
Hurricane Victims
The Cervecera Nacional. S.A.
heads up this week's donations' raell bonds.
ing resistance to Red rule.
Soviet zone courts have Invok-
ed a provision of the East Ger-
man constitution outlawing "an-
ti-Democratic" activity.
Severe penalties have been Im-
posed under this law In an obvi-
ous effort to stamp out opposi-
tion.
In its first move to stamp out
anti-Communist thought, the
newly" created "State Commis-
sion- for Artistic Affairs" order-
ed 140 East German book stores
closed.
They were charged with neg-
lecting to display the works of
'progressive" (Communist) writ-
era.
Israeli Bond Sale Launched
Here by Hebrew Communities
"Could you picture the econo-
mic shock If Panama's popula-
tion were doubled in a short pe-
riod of three years?" Mirn J.
Sheskin posed this hypothetical
problem to Panama's President
Alcibiades Arosemena early this
week during his visit to discuss
his special mission of selling Is-
to the Jamaica Hurricane Relief
Committee with a check for $250.
This remittance which brings the
week's collections by the Com-
mittee to $451.68. was covered by
a letter from General Manager
Ernesto de la Guardia. Jr. "as a
gesture of goodwill on the part
of this company to help alleviate
the grief of the people of Jamai-
ca on account of the violent re-
cent hurricane which have
struck that Island.
A total of $103.10 was collected
at Juan Franco Hippodrome last
Sunday through the combined
efforts of Misses Clara Robert-
son. Claudlne Wilson. Evelyn St.
Laire. Pearl Graham. Bertha
Thlrwald Mrs. Rosa Jump de
Nix and Mrs. C. Moulton.
Collections through the Pan-
ama Tribune were: $50.60 from
Rev. S. N. Brown of the Pana-
ma Baptist Church $18.10; Lin-
coln Lodge No. 44 (IO of GFI)
$15; Harold G. Phillips. $2! Roy-
al King Edward Lodge No. 13
IUOSMi $10; Primrose Society,
$5; Doris Gayle. $0.50.
Collections through N. Alex
Reid were $47.78 from local rate
employes (Naval Station at Rod-
man) $34 78: Servicio de Lewis,
8.A. $5: John J. Alexaitls. $5: C.
Belgian and two Chlenese F. Burke. $2: Fabian Valentine,
Sheskin is here in Panam as a
representative of the American
Financial and Development Cor-
poration for Israel, and Is mak-
ing the purchase of bonds avail-
able through the Chase National
Bank.
He tried to give a clear picture
of Israel's terrific immigration
problem to both the President,
and to members of the local press
yesterday. New Immigrants to
Israel pour in at the rate of SCO
each day, bringing the monthly
priests.
' $0.50; Cecil Roach, $0 50.
Civic Council
For Pacific Side
Calls Meeting
The Pacific-Civic Council will
hold a special meeting on Sept.
24 at 7 30 p. m. in the Board
Room. Administration Building,
Balboa Heights. C. Z.
This meeting is being called
for the purpose of considering
certain amendments to the By-
Laws of the Council proposed
by the Rules Committee in its
report to the Council on the
question of reorganizing the
present system of committees.
The Rules Committee Is com-
posed of Rufus If: Loveladv.
Chairman. Douglas 8. Johnston.
Arthur Donaldson and Dr. H. C.
Deering.
_______________
French Plane Lost
2 Days Ago Sought
Over Mediterranean
PERPIGNA, Frane. Sept. 14
UP French and Spanish
'ivil and military planes and a
French naval vessel today con-
tinued their vain March for
a French DC-J airliner, now
missing more that two days
with 39 people aboard.
The plane disappeared over
the Mediterranean on a night
from Southern France to North
Africa.
Israeli Coalition >
Government Certain
TEL AVIV. Sept. 14 (UP)
The formation of an Israeli
coalition government with Ma-
pal general Zionist progreaslves,
Hapoel Hamizrachl. was almost
certain to be completed next
week, according to well-Inform-1 King Naif, la seeking a divorce
i ed sources here. are "absolutely untrue.'"
total to around 30.000. Since May
1948. when Israel became a free
and Independent state, they have
doubled the population.
The company Sheskin repre-
sents is headed by former Sec-
retary of the Treasury Henry
Morgenthau, Jr., and is design-
ed to raise $500,000,000 in gov-
ernment issue bonds to help
make Israel self-sufficient
within three years.
The money goes only Into pro-
duction within the country, not
to buy clothes or food for the
refugees. The bonds will be sold
only In- dollar-free countries,
since most of the funds will be
reinvested In purchasing mate-
rial and equipment from the
United States.
An Indication of how much Is-
raeli agriculture has progressed
was shown by comparative fig-
ures Sheskin gave. In the last 60
years, 250 colonies had been or-
ganized. But In the last 13
months, 273 new colonies came
to life which began filling the
country with their agricultural
products. Every year they sell 50
per cent more electricity for In-
dustrial enterprises.
Sheskin explained that Israel
is the Crossroads of the Middle
East, and "100 per cent connected
with Western democracies." He
pointed out. that although the
stream of conitant refugees are
screened only for police records,
or if Information points them
out as Communists. Soviet Rus-
sia's principles have not infil-
trated the country. Out of 120
members in, their Parliament
("Knesset") only five are known
Communists. Free speech and
free press are stressed.
Israel's representative, who has
spent several months In the
States before coming to Pana-
m. Was overwhelmed with the
enthusiastic reception of non-
Jews as well aa Jews to the bond
Issue. He said that to date $75,-
000,000 has been Invested. He
mentioned the fact that Israel's
open-door policy permits, with-
out limitation, the Influx of
Christians and Moslems.
Sheskin said that Canal Zone
Attorney Woodrow de Castro was
appointed from the New York of-
fice as Panama's representative
for the company. Albert J. Lindo
Is chairman of the bond drive
committee here. The committee
itself Is the Council of the He-
brew Communities of Panaml,
and bonds will be sold through
the Chase Bank.
He leaves for Cuba within a
few days.
THE END OF A CHAMPION
World Middleweight Cham-
pion Sugar Ray Robinson lands
a terrific right to, the Jaw of
Randy Turpln as he opens his
onslaught against the British
champion in the tenth round
(above) of their record break-
ing title clash at the Polo
Grounds In New York in which
Ray regained the world crown
from Randy. (Right) Turpln Is
shown lying on his back after
crashing to the canvas after
receiving a solid Robinson
smash to the jaw. A deep gash
over Robinson's left eye spur-
red the Harlem sharpshooter
to do-or-die effort.
Flay IBC For
Radio Blackout
Of Title Fight
BY STAN OPOTOWSKY
Jordan Scoffs at Rumor
Queen Seeking: Divorce
CAIRO, Sept. 14 (UP)The
Jordan legation here announced
today that reports that Queen
81wrrlf. wife of Jordan's new
NEW YORK, Sept. 14 (UP)A
storm of protest was unleashed
against the International Boxing
Club today for keeping the Ray
Robinson-Randy Turpln middle-
weight championship fight "se-
cret" through a radio and tele-
vision blackout.
In Washington, Rep. Pat But-
ton. D., Terin., protested the
blackout and suggested that the
House Interstate Commerce
Committee investigate it. "This is
a right that should not be de-
nied the taxpaylng public of A-
merica and something that must
be cured," he said.
In Cleveland, the TV Owners'
and Viewers' League announced
It will "boycott the RKO Palace
Theater and the fight people un-
til justice is done on behalf of
private TV set owners."
The fight was not permitted to
be broadcast or televised, except
that 13 theaters In 11 cities tele-
vised the fight over closed cir-
cuits for admissions running up
to $2.60. A United Press survey
revealed that some 33,000 persons
saw the bout this way, and many
more were turned away. At Chi-
cago throngs rioted, smashing
through three plate-glass doors
of the State-Lake Theater when
It sold out.
But the International Boxing
Club stuck by its guns despite the
protests.
It said that It will "take ap-
propriate action" against the
British Broadcasting Corpora-
tion, which defied the radio
ban and broadcast the fight
from wire reports.
The IBC said it had offered the
radio and TV rights for sale, but
that no sponsor would put up the
money required. The sponsor
would have been forced to buy at
least three nights of network
time to protect himself against
bad weather postponements since
the bout was staged outdoors at
the Polo Grounds.
Not even a $30 ticket was good
enough to see the bout In some
instances. The Polo Grounds fac-
ilities were overcrowded and
many ticket holdersand non-
ticket holdersjumped fences
and smashed past turnstiles in a
frenzied crush.
Because of the radio and TV
ban, the fight was "secret" to
most of the out-ln-the-cold fans
despite the thousands Of words
filed to newspapers from the
ringside. Western Unkm reported
Its 41 direct circuits,from ring- it but failed.
side carried 169,213 words to U.S.
and Canadian papers and 45,968
words by cable to foreign coun-
tries.
The New York Times said It re-
ceived 417 calls In a two-hour
period after the fight. The New
York Dally News said It received
"uncounted hundreds." The In*
ternatlonal Boxing Club switch-
board operator croaked in a
hoarse whisper yesterday. '
Some 95,000 persona saw tha
fight, either at the Polo Grounds
or In the TV theaters. Many
times that number wanted to see
$59 Billion For Forces,
But Flight Pay Slashed
Travel farther, travel safer wit.
AIR-FLIGHT DE LUXE TIRES
The tread is broad and flat, th. caress, tough -* *"*
rZmm th. re..on. why thi. modern r. .ford. grt*r
SZ choo* Air-Fhght D. Lum T.re. for esh-e u-f *
txtrM ufety!
RISK Tires
agencias r**Mmcm* m.
Call* Estudame No. W
Panama R. de "
Distribuidor Exclusiva
Strippers 50-G Bosom Bumps
Matrons Into "Shedding" Ban
Y JULIAN GRANGER chairman of the Nashville een- all Is said and done she Is left
sors, wouldn't talk but her col- with a "reinforced net bra. trlm-
KNOXVILLE, Tena.. Sept. 14 league, Vice Mayor Milton Rob- med In rhlnestones, and a pair
'UPiStripper Evelyn west's erts, said Miss West appeared to of theatrical panties, reinforced."
$Vi,ooo bosom bumped into trou- have "nothing on" from where She calls her act an "exotic
ble from Knoxvllle's matron- he sat In the back row. dance," but Roberts said all she
dominated censor board and .appeared to do last night was
caused an "emergency" at City When the six members met to "stand out there and take off all
Hsli u>day before she agreed to voU, however, a hitch developed, her clothes."
shed less clothes The seventh member, policewom- "Maybe she did a little pranc-
Four women and two male an Mary Allan, was out of town, Ing, but that's all," Roberts
members of the board gave Miss and only board actions which are said. _;.
West's act at ttw Tennessee Val- unanimous may be enforced. Miss West Indicated that she or
lev Fair the official once-over So Robert* directed City Law her managers had done some
last night and decided II'wa* "In- Director R. C Smith. Jr., to draft censoring of their own before the
decent." She could "witHe," but an "emergency" ordinance per- board moved in. Twice, yester-
ihe needed more on mlttlng a simple majority to rule, day and today, she cancelled her
* The cBy council was expected to matinee, performance because
Mice Was* whose lw',i-lneh approve it tonight. only boys who appeared to be no
bust u insured forlM^ofi. Un- "They f^'tTave *_! iBi$J^iil,howed taM'-
nruui tab., rumwnti iii like ordinances, the ravennaired ing for tickets.
?sMon hen KStuid re- SJssaWOst said through her man- BWe just cant let the little boys
'entlTst"th? UteMffirto Dm asm 'Well change the show in." be said. "We've got real tal-
ifouua any way the want us to." ent In our show, but if for adults
Mr*. Cmott m. Godfrey, ft, *MlMwoe*maintainsthatwhen only."
WASHINGTON, September 14
(UP)The Senate passed a re-
cord peacetime $59,508,009.630
Armed Services Appropriations
BUI today after making a last-
minute 2V per cent across-the-
board economy cut. The vote
was 79-0.
The cut. If sustained by the
House which voted even a lower
figure, meant a reduction of
$1,525,846.000 In fiscal 1952
funds for the Army, Navy and
Air Force.
Approved after four days of
debate, the bill now goes to a
conference committee io adjust
differences between the House
and Senate versions.
As passed bv the House, the
bill .carried $66,034,717,200.
The bill carries $20,000,000,-
000 for the Army, $15,000,000,-
000 for the Nvy and $20,000,-
000,000 for the Air Force, with
the rest going to the Defense
Department, the' National
Security Council and the. Na-
t i o n a 1 Security Resources
Board,
The Senate Appropriations
Committee had boosted the
House total to $81.103,856,030.
chiefly by adding $5.000.000.000
cash to start building the Air
Force above the present 95-
group goal.
Some o the money presum-
ably will go for the "fantaatlc"
weapons mentioned recently W
President Truman and other.
The chamber approved. 40
to 31, an amendment by Sen.
Paul H. Douglas, D., Id,, to
eliminate extra "flight pay"
for administrative officers of
the Air Force. Douglas estim-
ated it would save $100,04H),000
a year.
He explained that rated fly-
ing officers now can collect 60
per cent extra pay, even though
they are assigned to regular
ground duUes. If they put In
as much as four hours flying
time a month.
Under his amendment, at
least 20 hours of actual flying
time a month would be re-
quired. n v
Douglas complained that .too
much of the taxpayers money
Is "going to the ohalrborne
corps."
In ordering the 2V4 per cent
cut, the Senate Instructed the
Armed Services to make the
reduction with the "least pos-
sible" effect on national de-
fense.
Experta Discuss Atom
Secrets in Washington
WASHINGTON, Sept. 14 (f/P)
United SUtes. British and
Canadian atomic officials met
here today to discuss ways and
means of securing atomic se-
en which must be kept, ad
of declassifying others which
may safely be published. t

ii