The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01230

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"*BRANIFF
AN INDEPEND
i^lBfekr
NEWSPAPER
..
CHICAGO
ONI WAY......$141.00
ROUND TRIP....$2M.40
Panama Am^rtcan
"Let the people know the truth and the country is gafe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-SIXTH TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1951
Defense Secretary
4For Personal Reasons Other Than
--------r---------------------:---------------------------------------------~-------------------_---------------.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
l/ty Inviting Full Scale War Peiping Radio
i
Cry Against 'Killer Drives
By 8th Army On Korea Front
TOKYO, Sept. 13 (UP). Peiping Radio complained bitterly
today that General James A. Van Fleet's United Nations 8th
Army was openly inviting lull scale war by its present vigorous
killer" attacks on the Korean front.
This broadcast, by the mouthpiece of the Chinese Commu-
nist Government, is thought to confirm Van Fleet's frontline
claim a few hours earlier that the Reds are hurt and in bad
shape.
Van Fleet predicted: "The Communists will want peace be-
fore the winter before we are through with them."
Snakebite Victim Snatched
From Chagriwank by 'Copter
A short hour after a Panama-
nian employe of the Panama Ca-
nal Company was bitten by a
fer-de-lance at the Chagres Riv-
er Hydrographlc office, an. Air
Force helicopter was on its way
to effect the rescue mission.
Cornelius Pennycott, a 33-
year-old observer at Chico, which
is located about 25 miles from
Madden Dam, was in Gorgas
Hospital emergency section at 11
this morning and his condition is
considered "good."
<
Star Propagandist
Against VOA, BBC,
Slain In Warsaw
WARSAW, Sept. 12 (UP) Ste-
fan Martyka, Polish Radio's star
propagandist against the Voice
of America, was reported today
to have been shot to death Sun-
day.
Warsaw newspapers declare
him to have been "shot from be-
hind a comer by secret Fascist
brigands."
The purpose of Martyka "s pro-
gram, known as "Wavelength
49," was to ridicule the Voice of
America, the BBC and other for-
eign programs and to crush local
anti-government rumors.
Announcers on "Wavelength
49" regularly Interrupt normal
programs with announcements
denountlng "the falsehood, de-
celt and entire hldeouaness of
propaganda hostile to Poland."
Current unofficial reports say
two men rang the doorbell of
Martyka's downtown apartment
Sunday morning and pumped,
bullets Into him when he open-
ed the door.
These reports say; the murder
was the result of a decision by
an underground tribunal.
The tone of press articles
today suggest Martyka will be
dramatized as a martyr.
Col. Eton To Aid"
Yellow Fever Work
lieutenant Colonel Norman
W. Elton. Chief of the Board of
Health Laboratory of the Health
Bureau, his gone te Costa Rira
at the invitation of the Costa
Rican Government to serve as
advisor on the current yellow
fever outbreak in that countrv.
He left today aboard an Air
Force plane and will be gone
about ten days.
The invitation from the Costa
Rican Minister of Public Health
requested that Dr. Elton check
the control measures that have
been taken and recommend
additional measures against
the disease.
Pennycott was bitten by a fer- bar. Rescuers had to swim a-
de-lance In the right foot at 8:30
this morning while at work (he
is the only man at the Chico out-
post). He telephoned the Mad-
den Dam Station and they di-
rected him to apply a tourniquet
while they Issued an emergency
call for help.
The Flight "B" 1st Air Rescue
helicopter was piloted by Capt.
John F. Miller, with surgeon
Capt. Glen B. Doan aboard
and carried Asst. Chief Hydro-
grapher W. H. Esslluger who
served as guide.
The helicopter, escorted by an
Albrook SB-17, landed In about
six inches of water, over a sand-
Rainfall In August
Lowest In Balboa
In Last 22 Years
Rainfall wag below normal all
along the line of the Canal
durjjftff August with the month-
ly tcfSls at Balboa Heights and
Balboa Docks the lowest since
1922. according to the monthly
report of the Meteorological
and I.'ydrographlc Branch.
The runoff from the Gatun
Lake Drainage, basin totalled 19,
985 million ubis feet, which
was ten per cent below the Au-
gust average. v
The monthly rainfall at Bal-
boa Heights 'ai 2.90, which
was 4.7J inches below average;
3.33 at Balboa Docks, ,4.19 be-
low normal; 1295 at Cristobal,
2.37 below normal; 9.19 at Ga-
tun, 4.74 below average; and 8.
80 at Gamboa, 4.08 below aver-
age. Only -Madden Dam had
more rain than the average,
12.72 inches, .98 above normal.
The monthly mean tempera-
ture at Cristobal was 79.9 de-
peres; and was 61 degrees
Balboa Heights and Madden
Dam.
-------W-U-----------------
Street Workmen
Strike Coal Mine;
Housewives Cheer
HIGH GREEN. England,
Sept. It, (UP) It takes a
fair amount te excite citi-
zens of this Yorkshire town,
bat a coal mine in the mid-
dle of the street sent them
scurrying to carry away
what they could.
Workmen had torn up a
street te lay a new water
main. They struck a vein of
good quality coal; so bouse-
wives ran with sacks and'
hatketa to pick up the lumps
as they were tossed out.
cross a deep stretch of river to
bring Pennycott aboard.
Esslinger was left at Chico, and
the plane landed back at Al-
brook at 10:41. A Panama Canal
launch will bring Essllnger back
later today.
Capt. Doan meanwhile had
lanced the bite and applied a
auction apparatus. A Gorgas
ambulance, accompanied by Dr.
L. Parker, met the helicopter at
Albrook. Pennycott was Immedi-
ately given an anti-venom shot
called soro antl-botroplco (which
comes from Brazil) and taken to
Gorgas.
Air Force officials said that
the snake, definitely identified
as a fer-de-lance was killed by
Pennycott and will How be add-
ed to the extensive collection of
snakes at 1st Air Rescue Squad-
ron headquarters in Albrook.
Pennycott, who is listed as a
resident of Gatunclllo, has been
with the Hydrographlc Office for
two years.
Pope Plus Appeals
To All Christians
In Attack On Reds
HIS MAJESTY'S CANADIAN
SHIP ONTARIO pictured In the
rain and fog this morning as
she steamed up the canal
channel to dock at Pier 18,
rived t the pier werFWs-
cretary and Public Information
Officer of the British Legation
Jasper Leadbttter. Pro-Consul
of the British Legation 8. Wise,
Capt. LB. Col
Staff, 15th Naval District, re-
and Capt. LB. coley, Chief of
VATICAN CITY. Sept. 12
(UP)Pope Pius XII, In a
thinly veiled attack on Com-
munist persecution of the faith-
ful, appealed today to all Chris-
tians to unite under the flag
of the Catholic CbAirrh, to fight
those who "threaten to destroy
or root otit. all that is divine
and Christian."
The Pope's appeal was made
In a 7,000-word encyclii .1 letter
sent to the Catholic episcopate
throughout the world.
Written In Latte, the en-
cyclical was entinad "Sempl-
. rernus Rex" Eternal King
at ai*fr ,ts opening words
The Pope said there were
reasons of "great urgency" that
called upon "all ranks called
Christian to units- and fight as
soon as possible under a single
flag against the stormy assault
of the enemy."
Although the Popa did not
mention Communism by name,
there was no doubt as to his
meaning when he Hated the
suffering and persecution now
prevalent "in many lands."
The Pontiff Issued tils en-
cyclical to mark the lSOBth an-
niversary of the Council of
Chalcedon, which met in the
year 451 to denounce the doc-
trine of Monophlsm. That was
the school that held there -vas
only one nature In Jesus Christ,
that his humanity was entirely
absorbed In his divinity, and
that his body was not of one
substance with that of man-
presenting Rear Admiral Albert
M. Bledsoe.
The vessel came alongside
the dock to the music of the
combined U.S. Army and the
U.S. Air Force bands. Warrant
Officer Eugene A. Deiter led
the 776th Air Force Band and
Warrant Officer Thomas E.
Golder directed the 71st Army
Band.
The Royal Canadan Navy de-
stroyer Huron followed the On-
tario.
_______(U.S. Navy pbst-'
Breaks In Protocol
Tell Britons Story
Of King's Condition
LONDON. Sept. 12 (UP)
Breaks in the iron protocol of
royal tradition today brought
realization to Britain that King
George VI Is far from well.
Black headlines splashed across
front-page pictures of the King's
drawn and tired face told the na-
tion the monarch had been forc-
ed to cut short his traditional
Scottish holiday and return to
London for treatment of his "lung
condition."
The King's return Is expected
at the end of the week, following
his virtually unprecedented trip
from Scotland last week end for
a 90-mlnute examination at the
London office of one o; Britain's
leading X-ray experts.
The doctor's diagnosis which
recalled King George from the
Scottish moors to the vicinity of
his medical advisers and Lon-
don's well-equipped hospitals
and surgeries itlrred fresh spec-
ulation that he may have to can-
cel his January visit to Austra-
lia unless his health improves.
As late as one month ago,
Buckingham Palace told the
United Press there were no plans
under consideration to call off
the royal family's Australian vis-
it.
2 Notional Guard
Divisions Recalled
To Duty By Army
WASHINGTON, Sept. 12. (UP)
-* The Army announced here
today that two more National
Guard divisions are being call-
ed to active duty.
They are the 37th, from Ohio,
and the 44th, from Illinois.
This will bring to eight the
total of National Guard in-
fantry divisions called to active
duty *lnce the Korean War
started. "
Peiping Radio complained:
"Van Fleet openly admits the
United States forces are taking
advantage of ihe breaks they
have forced in the truce nego-
tiations to launcH attacks in the
hope of grabbing more Korean
territory.
"He has made It clear he Is for
war, not negotiations..."
This broadcast stressed the be-
lief here that despite all their
blustering, and their incessant
allegations that the United States
Is trying to wreck the truce ne-
gotiations, the Reds really need
and want peace.
Van Fleet has made a series of
statements on the military sit-
uation,, emphasizing that he has
nothing^tp do with the armistice
negotiations, but has the job of
killing Communltss.
ping Radio saldj.
ly "
_ erfcana are now open-
ting war in as attempt to
attain their aggressive objectives
through new military adventures,
following the exposure of and
firm protests concerning then-
provocations In Kaesong. ".
"The Invaders have exposed to
the world their hostility to peace,
and have proved that every pro-
vocation since the start of the
truce negotiations has been
nothing but a result of their pre-
meditated plans."
Meanwhile on the battlefront
today United States Marines
fought the Communists with
point blank tank fire, flame
surged ahead for miles against
the Chinese.
The Marines on the eastern
front used their tank fire to crack
Red strongpolnta.
Then they moved In with
flame throwers, hand grenades
and bayonets to clean out bitter-
ly resisting survivors In hand to
hand fighting.
Troops, tanks, artillery and
planes have Joined In a new Un-
ited Nations assault on the cen-
tral front.
French Dismiss
Russian Charge
01 Pad Violation

PAR, Sept. W TOP) -w.fcrs
elgn Office sources today dis-
missed as "Just another attempt
to split the West" Russia's ac-
cusation that France Is violat-
ing the 1944 Franco-Soviet Pact
The accusation was contained
in a note handed to French
Charge d'Affaire Jean Brlemnval
by 8ovlet Foreign Minister An-
drei Vlshlnsky In Moscow last
night.
It charged that both the Ple-
ven and Schuman plans are lead-
ing to the remilitarization of
Western Germany and therefore
constituted a violation of the
spirit of the Franco-Soviet Pact
throwers and bayonets in one OfI stu^^&ifi&foWff
?enslves VMM ^^ *" S3 ?SWBS sources
femhee United State, forces I %&*" M "' Urpriw '<* n
WASHINGTON, Sept. 12 (UP) Defense Secretory
George C. Marsholl resigned today and will be succeeded
by deputy Defense Secretary Robert A. Covert.
The announcement was made from the White House.
Marshall quit for personal reasons other than health.
His resignation came a year to the day after Presi-
dent Truman nominated him to succeed ousted Louis
Johnson.
William C. Foster, presently
head of the Economic Coopera*
tlon Administration, has been
selected to succeed Lovett as
deputy defense secretary.
Richard M. Blssel Jr., now
deputy EC A Administrator, will
become acting ECA Adminis-
trator.
Marshall bid goodbye to the
regular Pentagon press corps
half an hour before the White
House announcement.
He said that when he took
the Job a year ago he agreed
to stay only till June, but re-
mained' longer because of the
Korean situation and the San
Francisco Japanese Peace Con-
ference."
Marshall, who will be 71 Dee.
31, appeared in excellent health.
Mr.- Truman-, who regareis
Marshall ss the- greatest living
American, accepted the resigna-
tion -'with wry great reluc-
tance"
The resignation Is effective
today.
USE MAIHAM., Pre-

Chester Bowles
Envoy To India;
Henderson To Iran
WASHINGTON, Sept. 13 (UP)
Chester Bowles, ex-governor
of Connecticut and one-time
Price Administrator, was today
nominated by President Truman
as Ambassador to India, to
serve also as Ambassador to
Nepal.
At the same time Mr. Tru-
man nominated Lloyd W. Hen-
derson, now envoy to India and
Nepal, to succeed Henry F.
Grady as Ambassador to Iran.
Lovely Wives Reveal Recipes
For Quelling Husbands Yawns
(NBA Telephoto)
PBETTY PENNY Mrs.
Penny Duncan wears her
new crown after winning
the Mrs. America title. The
New York City entrant won
on the basis of her home-
making ability and beauty.
ASBURY PARK. NJ.. Sept. 1J
(UP) Lovely contestants In
the Mrs. America contest con-
ceded today that even their curv-
aceous measurements are not
enough to keep their husbands
from getting bored now and
then.
Thirty-two finalists drew a
roar of applause from apprecia-
tive males as they swayed down
the runway of convention hall
attired in bathing suits today.
But backstage they admitted
that they use everything from
black lace underwear to home-
made apple pie to turn a hus-
bandly yawn Into an admiring
glance.
Mrs. New York City. Penny
Duncan, the ultimate winner,
said she encouraged her hus-
band tc invite his friends in
the house for card games when
she noticed his attention was
wandering from ber.
"Then I make something won-
derful for all of them to eat.
wear something pretty form-fit-
ting and Just let his friends sell
me all over again." she said.
"My husband is a professional
weight lifter," said Ruth 8. Po-
gor. Mrs. Califonda.
"Whenever I want to flatter
him, I wait until he has his shirt
off and then pat his big bulgy
muscles."
Blonde, blue-eyed Juanita Ke-
restezy, Mrs. Ohio, said her hus-
band Is a television-bug and in-
clined to spend too many of his
evenings watching variety shows.
"I Just wear something that
covers me from head to foot,"
she said.
"After he gets finished looking
at those Dagmars on TV, I want
him to be curious about me. and
It works-
Mrs. Ann Elisabeth Prultt. the
Alabama eptry, said she over-
came a case of husbandly casual -
ness by cooking a special meal of
fried chicken and bringing out
her fanciest black night gown.
She said a wife can recognise
a growing case of boredom In a
mate by noting "whether be
shaves on Sundays."
On the other hand. Mrs. Iowa,
Elaine M. Evans, said a bout of
indifference on her husband's
part was usually signalled by
his decision to go "fishing with
the boys on week ends and hav-
ing them In for poker a little
too often."
She said she relied on steak,
French fried potatoes and
homemade apple pie to put a
glint back in Mr. Evans' eye?
Details Given
On Purchase Plan
For Furniture
of the plan under
- Go
Details
which Company Government
employes who have been renting
furniture may purchase this fur-
niture were given in a letter, sent
this week by R. I. Wot. Chief
of the Panama Canal Company's
Housing Division, to approxi-
mately 2,300 employes on the
furniture rental list.
The rental furniture may be
purchased throughout the month
of September for eight times the
rental paid during August. The
purchases may be made either in
cash or by a single payroll de-
duction. t
Furniture which is not pur-
chased outright becomes the
property of the renter after pay-
ment of eight months of an in-
creased rental.
But Marshall is
holding himself read? for
suit stive assignments in' the
future because he said to Mr.
Truman:
J'l will abjargh available f
Big Three Meeibig
To Work Out Peace
With Wesl Germany
WASHTNOTON, Sept 13 (UP)
The Big Three Foreign Min-
isters today opened their for-
mal negotiations on a "peace
contract "with Western Ger-
many, while Russia sought In-
directly to upset the proceed-
ings.
Also on the Foreign Ministers'
agenda were proposals to re-
vise the Italian peace treaty
In order to permit a rapid
buildup of Italy's skeleton Ar-
my, Navy and Air Force.
United SUtes Secretary of
State Dean Acheson, British
Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor-
rison, and French Fo reign Min-
ister Robert Schuman are be-
lfevedly aimln for a definite
agreement on the German con-
tract at least before their two-
day conference ends.
The Kremlin has apparently
been keeping a close watch a
the conference here. In Mos-
cow, Russia handed France a
note charging at with working
contrary to the spirit of the
Franco-Soviet Pact by working
for West Germany's rearma-
ment.
One of the problems facing
the Foreign Ministers is how
German units should be em-
ployed in General Dwight Ei-
senhower's Atlantic Pact army.
The French are said to want
assurances that the first Ger-
mans to enter military service
since Germany's 145 collapse
should so do so as European
soldiers, not as Germans.
Iran Threatens
Crackdown On Press
Opposhif Mossadeoh
TEHJBUN. ept. U (Tj>)--
The banian government has
threatened to crack down on
newspapers opposing Ota re-
gime of Premier Mohammed
Mossadegh.
An official announcemept
warned of "serious" action, un-
less opposition newspapers cease
to "Indulge in excesses which
endsnger freedom"
Some opposition papers re-
cently printed a report that
Mossadegh leader of the oil
nationalisation battle against
the British Interests wag
planning to establish a repwbUsV
A





FlGE TWO

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
Cargo and Freight-Ships and PlanesArrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine News
TERRY AND THE PIRATES
WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 12, 1M1
NO HICKORY LIMB AVAILABLE
I.
I .
El r
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. Chiriqni ...................................Sept. 16
S.S. Mayari ....................................Sept. 17
S.S. Manaqul ........... ......................Sept. 29
S.S. Chiriqni ...................................Sept. 30
< Hind Tin, Rrfrljf rninf fhlllfii and Oanaral Carlo)
Arrives
New Vork Freight Service__________ Cristbal
S.S. Tlvives ....................................Sept. 15
S.S. Cape Cod .................................Sept. 16
S.S. Hibueras ..................................Sept. 22
S.S. Cape Ann .................................Sept. 23
rttruly SailUgri lo NM Vork. Loa Aagclaa, San tnnriwn. nit
(irrational Sailing* la New Orlear and Moblla
(Tin Sltamrn In Ihli wrvlca arc limited in rwelve panenfer
rrriinrni rrelihl Salllnf* from CriMnhai in Went CoaJt Central America
Cristobal to New Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
Arrives
Cristbal
S.S. Chiriqui -----(Passenger Service Only).....Sept. 18
S.S. Chiriqui ....................................Oct. 2
TELEPHONES:
( KISTOHAI 2121 PANAMA 1-2804 COLON 20
PRECKLE8 AND HIS FRIENDS
Call for a Medicine Man
I MERRILL BLOSSEB
OBptek a puff at 7e
TklBAL PIPE, BELLS KIN*-
IN LARDS HEAP /
a*33
GRACE LINE
FROM NEW YORK TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA
K' 'S/SSSA CECIL1A" ...........Due Cristbal. Sept. 13th
8.8. "SANTA MARGARITA" ..... Due Cristobal. Sept. 19th
.FROM WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK
6.8. "SANTA ISABEL" ...........Sails Cristbal. Sept. 14th
8.8. "8ANTA LUISA" .......... Sails Cristobal. Sept. 17th
FROM U.S. PACIFIC & WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA TO BALBOA & CRISTOBAL
S.S. "SANTA ADELA"
-8.8. "SANTA ELIANA"
Due Balboa, Sept. 17th
. Due Balboa. Sept. 29th
FROM CRISTOBAL TO WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA TO U.S. PACIFIC
M.S. "ANCHOR HITCH" .........Sails Cristbal. Sept. 26th
Balboa Only.
PANAMA Ai^^^S. On
Cristbal 2144 2135 Panam 2-15S6 0557 Balboa 1507 2159
Skint-
**.
n 20 minutes-
NO RUBBING!
CUa,.nr..,_th. bright.,,, long.,,
MTteg wa.-flni.h your car av.r had
with revolutionary CAR-PLATe'
*" "-y-'-oM can do an Mr*rt
b;l20 minu,"! Jhn,on, CAR-
fLATL protect, color. d ,uri.c.
from MMfaar Ctoan ear /,, mM
g* Wt *4 you,.
""OUCn! 0t CAR-PLATE!

Johnson's CAR-PLATE
Johnson's CARNU
"t'.S.A.brtfc.
Distributors:
***** or Jotaoaoo'i Waa.
SS23nE3^^
Mr. P.A. Want Ad' attracts
a following
Of prospects mighty fins!
What's mor ... he signs
them quickly
On the dotted line!
Your classified ad will it-
tract a parade of good pros-
pects because everyone in
Panam and the Canal
Zone reads P.A. Want Ads
regularly. Try them now
... the results will surprise
you I
4
ritE FABRICATED BOW PIECE of a British tanker is being
lowered Into position at the Vickers Limited Shipyard at
Barrow. The entire unit weighs 47 tons.
IS THERE A MEDICINE MAN IN TNE
HOUSE- T XM SEASICK /
HEY.' donY xjo RCMCMoeit MeT lard
SMITH ,-lOUR. fiAITHFUL BELLHOP/
ALLEY OOP
Big League Stuff
W ?..*. BAMirff
British-Built Tankers
for World Made From
Pre-Fabricated Unit
The tanker fleets of the world
which suffered tremendous loss-
es during the war are being re-
placed by British shipbuilders
whose main task has been to fill
the gap left by wartime losses.
British shipbuilders are em-
ploying methods which make for
accurate and speedy construction.
Multiple drilling, automatic
welding and the pre-assembly of
large pre-fabricated units in the
production sheds before their
dispatch to the berthside, are all
characteristic examples of these
methods. Tankers are being built
for Sweden, Norway and the
United States of America in Brit-
ish shipyards.
Convenient Panagra's South
America Tourist Class Flights
Result of Schedule Change
Faster, more convenient tour-
ist class flights from South Ame-
rica to the United States will be
made possible by Panagra (Pan
American-Grace Airways) as a
result of new schedule changes
which have been filed with the
Civil Aeronautics Board.
The new schedule, which is ex-
pected to become effective Sat-
urday, will provide a more di-
rect connection for passengers
transferring at Miami to domes-
tic coach flights to New York and
other key cities.
Panagra DC-4 flights will leave
Lima, Peru, at 7:15 p.m., Instead
of 10:05 p.m.. and arrive in Mia-
mi three hours earlier, at 9:15
a.m., the following day.
The advanced departure time
at Lima will also provide imme-
diate connections for passengers
on Panagra's DC-6 flights from
Buenos Aires, Santiago, Antofa-
gasta and La Paz and enable pas-
sengers from Guayaquil to leave
at a more convenient hour than
was possible before.
Air Safety Trophy
Awarded to B.O.A.C.
The Cumberbatch Trophy for
1949-1950 has been awarded to
B.O.A.C. for its "great work and
success" in building and operat-
ing the North Atlantic air serv-
ice from 1946-1950an achieve-
ment described as "an outstand-
ing milestone in British civil
aviation."
Air safety is the main basis for
the award of the trophy, which
is presented annually by the
Guild of Air Pilots and Air Navi-
gators of the British Empire to
organizations or groups within
an organization.
H.R.H. Princess Elizabeth the
Grand Master of the Guild, has
consented to attend the ceremo-
ny, to be held later in the year,
at which the presentation will be
made.
Building Engineer, is one of the
passengers scheduled to leave the
Isthmus Friday on the SB. Pan-
ama, according to the advance
passenger list from the Panama
Line offices at Balboa Heights.
There are 107 passengers sche-
duled to sail on this ship.
The complete advanc epassen-
ger list follows:
William S. Acheson; George P
Allgaler; Oscar P. Arias; Mrs.
Edith F. Bailey; Judge John R.
Bartell; Paul Bidstrup; Miss
Jacqueline Blau; John J. Boyer;
Mrs. Alice P. Boynton; Mrs.
wilma F. Brody; Miss Carol L.
Brentner; Mr. and Mrs. Carl J
Browne and two children; and
Mrs. Margaret Burgoon and son.
Martin W. Carmody; Daniel J.
Considine; Mr. and Mrs. Wen-
dell G. Cotton; Alberto A. Davis;
Miss Gladys K. Donegan; Geo.
R. Downing; James C. Draw-
baugh; Timothy G. Dyas; and
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald C. Early
and son.
Mrs. Rebecca R. Fall; Miss
Maria A. Francis; Miss Barbara
L. Fritz; Sheldon W. Grinnell;
Howard W. Hanners; Basil D.
Harrington; Mrs. Jeanne R.
Heinselman and son; Mr. and
Mrs. Roy T. High; Miss Hilda J.
Hinz; William H. T, Howe; t Mr. and Mrs. James M. Hunter.
Miss Beatrice Johnson; Nor-
bert S. Jones; Mrs. Elizabeth A.
Jorgensen; Louis G. Kehoe; Mr.
and Mrs. William H. Keller and
son; Miss Sybil C. Kelly; Karl W.
Kern; Mrs. Hazel L. Kilbey and
daughter; Pfc. Robert E. Kunkel;
Miss Thelma Lelgnadler; Cpl.
Walter J. and Mrs. Lemay; Miss
Elizabeth C. Lembke; and Miss
Elaine Lombard.
BOOTS AND HER BUDD1
Same Bey
BT EDGAR MARTI*
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M*Nfc.KT
sw> v*.\
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vou'at
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WAV/9 .SON*.
First Flight Made
of 125 h.p. Diesel
Aircraft Engine
First flight of a 125-horsepow-
er diesel aircraft engine for light
planes was made in a Model 18
Taylo.-craft recently. The four-
cylinder engine, weighing 235
pounds, has not yet been certifi-
cated by the United states Civil
Aeronautics Administration. Op-
erating on diesel fuel and burn-
ing alxnit one-third the amount
of fuel required by gasoline en-
gines, the engine is expected to
make possible more economical
opration, higher payloads and
greater range.
Charles F. Magee, Jr.; Robert
F. Maloney; Mr. and Mrs. Wal-
ter E. Marek; Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas McNeill; Miss Hope B.
Menendez; Mr. and Mrs. Her-
man Minke; Mrs. Lillian Molbe-
gott; Miss Jane Morrell; Mrs.
Mary Newcomer; Ms. and Mrs.
Walter R. Ohloeft and daughter;
Marc Qulnn.
Mrs. Helen N. Rarabaugh; Mr.
D. S. Ratliff;. Mrs. Usa E
Reyes; Mrs. Xenla Reyes and
daughter; Mr. and Mrs. Ponce
A. Rojas; Sheldon A. Salisbury
and daughter; Edward G
Schnake; Mr. and Mrs. Harold
A. Shafer; Mr. and Mrs. W. S
Shafer; John P. Smith III; Will-
lam C. Stanke; Cpl. Juergen
Strauss; Sgt. and Mrs. George A.
Strine. Jr. and two children; Ro-
bert L. Sulsman.
Miss Jane Thistle; Mrs. Helen
H. Thomas; Mr. Robert L
Thompson and two children-
William B. Walker; F. Walter
Wlebe; Mrs. Agatha Wikran; and
Mrs. Julie M. Ballweg.
* 9vl*a TfcVfl
GOOD CMJt Of
P.MMV'. AM*J '.
CAPTAIN EASY
Right to the Point
or mTS
BY LESLIE TURNEA
I OWE SOU
AW APOIOGV,
MR.McTIGG.
I BORROWED
lOVR. kEY5l
HERE THEY
ARE
THE PADLOCK KEV?
THAT'S THE OWLV OWE
WHOSE LOCK X HAONT
IOCATEP. SUH-.UWT*.
A MOMENT MO 1
VIC rLlNT
I CAN UN0ER5TAMP THAT! IT WOULD K TOO)
SAP IF TME OWNER Of THAT EMTTf NOUS
ACROSS THE AlLEy CAME MCW TMUWtOlU .
ANO K-MO TO MISSUS CAt.AAO MOMV,
-Tj-^g rMH.OCKED IN KW OARfVSC!!>
6-30
Progress
BY MICHAEL OVAIXII
107 Booked Northbound
for 'Panama' Sailing
Osrl J. Browne, Assistant
Imported
Canned Hams
PEK
DREWS
KRAKVS&
ATALANTA BRAND
are offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Coln
HOME DELIVERY
NO MO*e 1VTUPID, NO MORE-
LEPTY/, I AM TWE: COUNT OP
WONTS,. CRrSTO, AND THE WORLD
Ift WIN/
WE POUND THE BODY ..
TEN MILE* OUT IN TH
SOUN
I It KUAUOlMi UULiSL
itn
MAJOR U'tOfLM (ill Otm WAY
St J B WILLIAMS
0tlfV
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TNI THING TO USI IS
UNGUENTINE
'egad,tvJics'A h?eDj
LETTER r>AV IK) MV
1 PCutTFUL CARB6R-
DELNERlMS VfeU FGOrA
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-OMf HANM/MV
SMOTlOKS
1 ALMOST DMER-
iCOMC M.e/
3!
'TMArJk:^ A MILLION
FOR SPRINGING ME,
M A30R.' THAT GOES]
FOR VOUR NEW-FOUND
C0U6IM TOO/~ WHcrD
EXPECT 1b FlrOD A
COPV OP "iDO NOSE
UP HERE INTHE
HILLS?SArAE
STOPLIGHT,
axoRTOO,
I MOlMnaj. ondtapHc
UNCUtNTINE 4 k>.
IlllVf PAIN
Ml INICIIOH
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MOONSHlrJERSi
M3U WERE MV r
crry^iM, MAJOR!
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/MOUNTAIN
8ouncefj
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-a-..j< "^MBas*
'-sSil^U^^S^.
jiirB*rEruAB' ..-^-^1- -
BBB1
J____




DNF.8DAT, SEPTEMBER 12, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPE

PAGE THREE
Red Magazine Derides Denials
That Oatis Worked In Spy Ring
\

MOSCOW^epTl^pT^EefirsHoveHo^^
the imprisonment of William Oatis in Czechoslovakia
d yesterday that the American newsman was "incrimin-
id by indisputable evidence."
The "unmasked" spy confessed publicly and told the
krt about his crimes," the Trade Union organ Trud said.
ut Washington still considers him as innocent as a
Northern Bruin
Answer'to Previous Puzzle
re.
The Oatis case was cited as an example of-American
bionage throughout the world. Trud said it was being
rried out in cooperation with the former Fascist, Nazi
t> Japanese intelligence services.
he Trud article was written
Boris Isalcov, a correspondent
New York.
he aid that despite the well
)Wn facts about the esplon-
) operations, "each time a
v band Is exposed and Ameri-
spies and wreckers go on
1, the people on the other
of the ocean think l\ Is
ssarv to issue a hot'denial
the facts.
The President, the Secretary
State, diplomats, generals,
aton and journalists deny it.
All take a pose of injured
ocence and behave as If the
v idea of American spies
fjpply offends the American
ers."
The article then cited the
le of Oatis, Associated Press
respondent sentenced to
prison in Prague after trial on
espionage charges.
"An especially big racket was
raised in Washington in con-
nection with the recent trial of
the William Oatis spy group,"
it said.
"Oatis was incriminated by
Indisputable evidence, among
which, for instance, was a cer-
tificate Issued by an American
Intelligence school."
Citing a report that the
American spy setup possesses 22
buildings in New York alone
and supplies President Truman
with a dally report of Its ac-
tivities, the article said:
"Apparently Truman gets his
dally report, then goes to a
press conference where he Is-
sues a routine denial of Ameri-
can espionage abroad."
HORIZONTAL
1,8 Depicted
animal
10 Philippic
11 Armed forces
15 Brazilian
macaw
14 Asiatic nation
16 River in
Virginia
17 Cushion
18 East Indian
palm sap
18 Roof flnial
VERTICAL
1 Freebooter
2 Mouth ward
3 Musical note
4 Mine entrance
5 Nevada city
8 Thrash
7 Measure of
type
8 Military
assistant
9 Harvester
10 Animal
11 Help
I 1MISH1BU7J li U'ill^
I JQ :MMll-UJIul'JiVfcJ
i-mil UIIUI:tai L-JUeJ
I JUS >!I;JMUUII !'-'e -J '
i^i-; -;-H'7|,II I -:'
BOLL
/EEVILrM
U[.j M MHBl J;.< H'.J
UiJ->L;yU:U'll-U isllJ
UkaHd^LJI sUi=JL-1 "I'll 1U
UMiifbJ, -It-J MGIMIi-'S
-liVVfcJUlSfc-lil hati
heriff Won't Say What He'll
po About Ku Klux Klan Rally
JAPTNEY, 8. C, 8ept. 12
P>Cherokee County Sheriff
Ian B. Wright was tight lip-
today concerning the part
office will play in policing
Ku Klux Klan rally near here
Ught.
iut the State Constabulary
the Highway -Patrol have
d their men will b* present
the rally 10 miles from here
Highway 11, five miles from
einee.
(And Chief of Police .William
II said Wright had requested
ree city policemen to help
erlffs deputies at the Klan
Iky.
\
Ing the highways clear unless
called upon bv local officers.
In the letter to Wright, Watt
suggested that officers check
the driving licenses of everyone
that drives to the rally. The
names should be recorded. Watt
said. And as near a complete
list as possible of everyone at
the rally should be made.
"In the event any violation
of the law Is attempted to be
placed on the Klan at this meet-
ing or at a later date, you will
have this Information available
for future lnvestlgatlor!,, Watt
said. ..-
20------has white" Shreds
^ 15 Accomplish
21 Epistle (ab.)
22 Depend
23 Red planet
27 Whirlwind
28 Correlative of
either
29 Symbol for
sodium
30 Three-toed
sloth
II Asseverate
33 Church part
38 District
.attorney (ab.)
37 Four (Roman)
38 Qualified
40 Lighting
devices
45 Peer Gynt's
mother
46 Genus of
meadow
grasses
47 Propel
48 Source of light
49 Vagrant
51 Reiterate '
53 Let it stand
54 Utopian
25 Complaint
26 Operatic solo
31 Rearrange
32 Mists
34 Perceptible
35 Happening
39 Tense
24 Period of time 40 Fluff
41 Amount (ab.)
42 Military
police (ab.)
43 Persian fairy
44 Wipter vehicli
45 Bewildered
50 An (Scot.)
52 Hebrew lettei
Paratrooper Caught In Swamp
After 3 Months As Deserter
CHARLESTON, 8. C. Sept. 12
(UP)A young paratroop de-
serter, who has been sought for
months, was captured yesterday
by a heavily armed posse led
by bloodhounds after he was
wounded in the dense Caw-Caw
swamp near here.
The youthful deserter was
Identified as Claude Maynard,
about 18. of Charleston.
He told officers he was as-
signed to a paratroop unit at
Ft. Benning, Ga., when he de-
serted last June. He said his
regular army station was Ft
Campbell. Ky.
An FBI spokesman said May-
nard has been the object of a
search for several months for
deserting the Armv and "steal-
ing cars while dodging arrest."
Officers picked ud Maynard's
trail late Monday when he and
a young companion were spot-
ted driving a stolen automobile
near here.
Highway patrolmen chased
the youths at top speed over
back country roads and over-
took them.
The two fugitives escaped In-
to the dense swampland but
Maynard's companion, 17-year-
pld Ansel Tlsdale, was captured.
Maynard slipped awy from
a 30-man posse of officers and
civilians who thought they had
cornered him In the swampland.
Several hours later, residents
of an area 11 miles away saw
a man roaming the woods.
Two Charleston County pat-
rolmen answered the call and
fired at Maynard when they
thought he reached for a gun.
Maynard was then captured
but was unarmed except lor two
knives.
He was transferred to the
Naval hospital here where his
condition was termed not crit-
ical.
He told a reporter in the hos-
pital that he worked for a time
in Anderson, s. C, after desert-
ing at Benning in June,
them went to New York.
Last week, he returned In a
stolen automobile and reached
Savannah before doubling back
to his home town of Charleston.
Stardust Melodiers
To Repeat Review
At Club Tropical
COLON, Sept. 12 The Star-
dust Melodiers are happv to an-
nounce the repetition of their
'RevleWat the club Tropical
next Tuesday.
There have been many re-
quests for a repetition of the
show that proved a success at
the Camp Bierd Theater last Au-
eust and arrangements have fin-
ally been made for the presenta-
tion.
Tickets are now on sale at pop-
ular prices.
Slate Depl. Plans
Two Big Transmitters
For Voice of America
WASHINGTON, September 12
(UP)The 8tate Department
reported today that two new
and powerful radio transmitters
will be constructed on the West
_ and East coasts to beam Voice
and of America broadcasts direct to
i Russia.
A Department spokesman said
one transmitter will be erected
in the vicinity of Seattle, Wash..
and another In North Carolina.
The exact sites, he said, have
not yet been determined and
are "still under negotiation."
Construction will begin In the
"very near future." as soon as !
the land has been purchased.
The spokesman said the
transmitters will have an out-
put powerful enough to reach
listeners in the Far East and
Asiatic Russia from the Seattle
site and in European Russia
Africa and Latin America from
the North Carolina site.
A Prism-Lite Pcrfectionl
DIAMOND RING
Reg. Trade Mark
TAHITI
THE JEWELRY STORE
137 Central Ave. 137
Wright snapped "no. com- &
Swh^ asked to ver,
l'bexffao
I have/0rd so much B
JeY>slck of It," he amid.
the sheriff had re-
ment on a letter
enth Circuit solicitor
m R. Watt suggesting that
'ight's men obtain the names
everyone attending the rally,
jfcle refused to say whether an"
his men would be at the
ly and told reporters "You'll
ve. to wait and see."
Wright was also mum con-
ning a statement in Colum-
from Chief O. L. Brady of
State Constabulary that
right had requested help from
le tonstabulary In policing
meeting.
Fhe Highway Department
d Wright had not requested
Ip from the Highway Patrol
d the patrol's duties at the
ly would be limited to keep-
Klan Boss
ton of Lees*
another on
"night near
omfle L.
se;
d said
for 8;
Mulitas.
mil-
i\ Approves Federal
obe of Indictments
lainsl Newsmen
.AKE CHARLES, La., Sept. 12
P> Investigation of Indlct-
nts against five Lake Charles
fwspapermen will be welcome
Calcasleu Parish officials,
trlct Attorney Griffin Haw-
is said today.
*We have nothing to hide,"
iwklns said, referring to a
ive in Washington to get the
partment of Justice interest-
In the case.
Senators Estes Kefauver. D.,
nn.: Lester C. Hunt. D., Wyo ,
d Charles W. Tobey, R.. N. H.,
ted .U. 8. Attorney General
ward McGrath to investigate
defamation indictments of
newsmen.
|The newsmen and three pri-
e citizens were Indicted by
parish grand Jury for "de.
ning" jury members and par-
officials in the paper's antl-
nbllng crusade.
Isthmian dm a
WALLACMiTSr. and Mrs. ctar-
ence of Silver City, a daughter,
Sept. 6 at Colon Hospital.
MANNING, Mr. and Mrs. David
of Gatun, a sno .Sept. 6 at Colon
Hospital.
BROWN. Mr. and Mrs. E. C. of
New Cristobal, a son; Sept. 7 at
Colon Hospital.
McFARLANE, Mr. and Mrs. A.
N. of Camp Blerd, a daughter,
Sept. 7 at Colon Hospital.
GRAHAM, Mr. and Mrs. Leon-
ard Of Rio Abajo, a daughter,
Sept. 7 at Gorgas Hospital.
BRATHWAITE, Mr. and Mrs.
Alejandro of Panam, a daugh-
ter, Sept. 8 at Gorgas Hospital.
SANTIAL. Mr. and Mrs. Oeorge
.of Diablo, a daughter, Sept. 8 at
Gorgas Hospital.
SMITH, Mr. and Mrs. Richard;
of Curundu, a daughter, Sept. 8
at Gorgas Hospital.
PAONESSA, Lt. and Mrs. Rob-
ert of Fort KooDe, a aaugiucr
sept. 8 at GOrgas Hospital.
ESPINOSA, Mr. and Mrs. Gus-
tavo of Panam, a son. Sept. 9 at
Gorgas Hospital.
OUARRO, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar
J. o Paraso, a son, Sept. 9 at,
Gorgas Hospital.
TORRES, Mr. and Mrs. David of
Paraso, a son, Sept. 9 at Gorgas
Hospital.
YARD, Mr. and Mrs. James 8.
of Panam, a daughter, Sept. 9
at Gorgas Hospital.
TORitES, Mr. and Mrs. Fernan-
do of GatunclUj a son, Sept. 9 at
Colon Hospital.
TORRES, Mr. and Mrs. Lionel
of colon, a son, Sept. 9 at Gorgas
Hospital.
MANNING, Mr. and Mrs. A. L.
Of Sliver City, a daughter, Sept.
9 at Colon Hospital
STENNETT, Mr. and Mrs. J. B
of silver City, a son. Sept. 9 at
Colon Hospital.
DEATHS
JOHNSON, Garnet, 66 of Ga-
tun, Sept. 7 at Gorgas Hospital.
8QUIRE8, Mclva A., 11 months
of La Boca, Sept. 9 at Gorgas
Hospital.
. JACOBY ON BRIDGE
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
NORTH
VM8752
? 7B2
+ W3
--fcr BAST (D>
AKIOt AAQJF""
IOS VAQJ864
? K10 8 4>QJ ,_A
+ KJ92 None ^T1
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84
Non*
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AQ10865
Neither aide vuL
South Was* Maria
2 Double Past A
Pass 2
with his last spade, and Sputh
rufs in his own hand. Now South
leads a low trump, and West Is
obliged to win and return a
trump.
" No matter how the defense
goes, South is pretty sure to
catch West in some sort of end
play. West will eventually have
to win a trick with a trump and
return a trump, thus losing one
of his trump tricks.
This could be avoided If East
had at least two trumps, for then
East could-lead trumps once or
twice during the early play.
Without those trumps East can-
not cooperate properly in the de-
fense; and his side can get only
100 points on a hand In which
they have an easy game.
Raat
1*
Pass
Opening leadV 10

ibxciting cfashions..,
JUST RECEIVEDI
DRESSES
and SKIRTS
"Carole King" "June Dobaon"
"Dori* Dobton"
L I N C E R I E
nylon rayon
SHOES
mart and comfort
SANDALS at 3.75
LA MODA AMERICANA
112 Central Avenue, Panama
Special Sale
This Week
formerly NOW
Gowns............ 3.50 2.40
Gowns............ 5.95 4.50
Gowns. y........ 7.50 530
Nylon Panties...... 3.75 2.95
Panties........... 95< (jQg*
Slips............. 3.50 2.40
Slips............. 4.50 350
MADURITO'S
i
/. L. MADURO JR.
100 Central Avenue

1

.





ARKET
B Ave. and 21st Street TeL2-J82I
JUST ARRIVED Al.
DANISH BUTTER ,
ALSO
Pauls Pepperoni
[l '." ygry 00d fof *PZhetti
We began a discussion of pen-
alty douoles earlier in the week,
and today we-continue It. Sup-
pose your partner opens the bid-
ding with one of a suit, and that
the next player makes an over-
call. What should you hold to
double that overcall for penal-
ties? Assuming that you double,
what course should your partner
adopt?
In yesterday's hand1 we saw
what was necessary for the dou-
ble. The west hana of i ers a per-
fectly reasonable double of two
clubs. The South and West hands
are the same today as they were
yesterday, but we have made a
change in the North and East
hands.
What should East do after his
partner has doubled two clubs?
East should pass If he can coop-
erate in the defense against two
clubs. Otherwise he should take
the double out.
In this case, East was unable te
cooperate in the defense because
he had no clubs. He should have
bid two spades, knowing that his
partner was bound to have
strength in more than one suit.
If West happened to have good
four-card spade support, the
partnership would get to game in
spades. Otherwise, they would
probably get to game In hearts
or no-trump.
If East bids two spades. West
naturally raises to three spades.
Then East goes on to four pades
and makes his contract without
the slightest difficulty.
At two clubs doubled. South is
pretty sure to make seven tricks.
For example, West opens the ten
of hearts, and South ruffe. De-
clarer takes the ace of diamonds
and gives up a diamond. The de-
fenders take two rounds of
spades and their good diamond
and get out with a third spade
(as good a defense as any).
Dummy ruffs the third spade,
and South ruffs a heart. South
next leads his last diamond, and
West must ruff with the nine to
shut dummy out. West gets put'
Ik* diUfiw***, qoe& *c*4e tho*t SkfcW&eep
Nobody wonders what you're driving The power is different-eager and sure.
when you roll by in this one. Buick's high-compression Fireball
engine does wonders with fuel and
Helps You Overcome
FALSE TEETH
Looseness ond Worry
He longer be annoyed or (Ml ll|-at.
oaae became of loo... wobbly fate* tooth.
FASTTETH. an Improved atkatftae (non-
cld) power, prinkled on your plato
hold! thorn firmer ao they feel more
comfortable Soothing and cooling to
sum made ore by exceative add mouth
Avoid embarraaanent eauaed bv lau
pUrto. Get FASTimi **. ., y J^J
In the 1951 line-up, its brand-new
front-end styling stands out with a
beauty all its own.
\bu're the proud owner of a Buick
and the whole world knows it.
But you-at the wheelenjoy a long
list of differences that go far deeper
than looks.
The ride is differentlevel and true.
\bu sit the road with special assurance
because Buick's torque-tube drive
keeps rear wheels firmly alignedsoft
coil springs on all four wheels soak up
the bumps and bobbleshonest weight
keeps you on a steady keel.
no matter what you demand in emer-
gency, there's horsepower to spare.
Handling is different-this car seems
to steer itse{f on straightaway or curve
and swing's lightly into parking spots
inches shorter than you'd think you
need.
Capping it all, there's the silken versa-
tility of Dynaflow Drive,* that takes

all the tenseness out of driving -
responds to your slightest wish with m
surging swoop of power. *
No doubt about it, what you get in a
Buick is far more than just a new car
it's a whole new experience in get-
ting pleasurably from here to there.
So why not explore this difference?
Gome, take a Buick over and find out
how very much satisfaction smart
money can buy.
f_|_ _i iiaaL........a Siaiiifaiiir---------y'-----^_j^awa.
No other ca provides mil tkisi
DYNAFLOW DUVP
4-WHffl COIL SPRINGING
PUSH-BA* K>r-ONT
WHITi-GlOvV 1NSTMMINTS
FfftflAU fOWlR
DUAL VENTILATION
TOftOUE-TUU DMVf
. DMAMUNf STYUNG

OOV Y TISHtK
S-a"*J i IOAOMASTF. jewel a' wo ear e a*m Vie
WHIN t*TTK AUTOMOUUS AM WILT WICK WhU HM* THVi ,

SM00T & PAREDES
Panam
SM00T & HUNNICUTT
Coln
^^
*^




PAGE POUR
!
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
Radio Programs |N HOLLYWOOD
WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER Vt,
Some of the members of THE THEATER GUILD responded
promptly to Armed Forces Radio Station's request for actors
to dramatize a series of First-Aid programs that will be given
to all civilian residents on Army posts. Directed by Rufus
Smith, (left), the group comprised (from left' Jay and Ste-
wart Clemmons. J. B. Clemmons, T. O. Greevey. Lollie Madu-
ro. Mrs. Gene Simpson, and Peggy Smith. Appreciation to
the actors was expressed by AFRS for their speedy response
and cooperation.
(U.S. Army Photo)
Mop-Armed Housewives Take
Roundhouse Swing At Railroad
BOSSIER CITY, La., Sept. 12 (UP) Sixty housewives,
whose laundry problem has been referred to the U.S. Supreme
Court, got impatient and went to the source of the trouble, the
Illinois Central Railroad's Bossier City roundhouse.
Carrying dirty mops and signs proclaiming: "Down with
soot,'' the women marched on the roundhouse last night.
They cornered E. E. Schlottman, superintendent of the
railroad at Bossier City, and told him it was a terrible way to
run a roundhouse.
Schlottman said the company
would do everything in its power
to see that the soot was held to
a minimum.
"You've been telling us that
for seven years," one woman
shouted. "Let's see you do some-
thing thie time."
Mrs. J. B. McCraw. who led the
women, said she woke up every
morning to find her bed full of
soot and her face black.
"We can't even sit out In our
own yards in the evenings," she
said.
"This is me worst thing I know
of." Mrs. C. M. Brown said.
"We just don't live like human
beings. One night last week, it
looked as If someone were stand-
ing outside my window, throwing
dirt la by the shovelful."
Schlottman said there were
never more than three or four
steam locomotives in the round-
house at one time.
But this did not completely
placate the women, among 156
persons who took the problem to
U.S. District Court in Novem-
ber. 1948.
U.S. District Court awarded
the 156 soot-plagued plaintiffs
$43,863 34 damages, with five per
cent interest until It is paid.
The Illinois Central Railroad
appealed to a U.S. Court of Ap-
ACOBT.on
CANASTA
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
When the discard pile Is bom
frozen (that is. when the dealer
turns up a wild card or a red
three), a long struggle often de-
velops. Very often neither side
will meld until the pile can be
grabbed at the same time.
However, occasionally one play-
er will meld from his hand for
one reason or another. For ex-
ample, he may develop four or
five of a kind and may think
that a fast out is better than a
continued struggle for the pile.
When your partner makes such
a meld, give up the idea of fight-
ing for the pile. Not only has
your partner reduced his hand
and thus weakened his power to
fight, but also his meld is a sig-
nal that he doesn't have a good
fighting hand.
As the melder's partner It is
up to you to add natural cards to
his meld if possible. It Is also ad-
visable to put down a meld or
two of your own. Do all you can
to help your partner go but, but
preserve one or two safe discards
just in case your partner still
needs a few plays before he can
finish the hand
If an opponent melds In this
situation your course depends on
your position. When the melder
Is at your right you must discard
with great caution. The oppon-
ent who follows you has his full
hand (for at least one'play) and
has no worries about making the
count.
When the melder is at your
left, you should make the initial
jneld if possible. This is especial- ,
rv true if the opponent has used
aix or more cards in his meld.
In this situation you are very
unlikely to give away the pile to
the melder. He has onl ya few
eards and probably has only one
other pair In his hand. Hence It
Hoes not hurt you particularly to
deplete your own hand.
Your meld relieves your part-
ner at the necessity of acquiring
br keeping the count. It gives him
Information about safe discards.
It glfes your side credit for red
threes and protects you against
a complete defeat If the oppon-
tntsaneld out In a hurry. Finally,
n rate cases, it may fit your
bartSrr's hand so beautifully
that tie can meld out himself.
peals, which upheld the judg-
ment.
The railroad has now asked the
U.S. Supreme Court to review
the decision.
Shrimping Pirates
Liable To Seizure
Off South Carolina
COLUMBIA. S. C. Sept. 12
(UP)The Attorney General's
office today upheld the right of
the State Board of Fisheries to
seize shrimp boats which
operate within the three mile
coastal limit without a South
Carolina license.
In a letter to the board of
Fisheries, assistant Attorney
General James 8. Verner said
the law makes it a misdemeanor
for a shrimp boat to trawl
within the three mile limit
without a state license.
"Any boat trawling for shrimp
without a license shall with all
its rigging and equipment, be
forefited to the state," Verner
wrote.
He said that any shrimp
which are "unlawfully" caught
by a boat which Is not licensed
may also be taken by the in-
spector for "evidence" or for-
feiture.
Verner said Inspectors have a
right to search boats to see if
laws are being violated.
He said the Inspectors also
have the right to make arrests I
for violations without a war-
rant.
The attorney general's office
wrote the letter concerning
shrimping laws after a Georgia
sh.imp boat was seized by the
State Fisheries Board last week
near Beaufort because It did
not have a South Carolina li-
cense.
The license fee for shrimping
within the state's three mile
coastal limit Is $1 per foot of
the length of the shrimp boat
keel.
Verner said the Georgia
shrimp boat, owned by Fred
Sanders of Savannah, had been
returned to the owner upon
posting of a cash bond, payment
of the South Carolina license
fee and payment of a criminal
fine.
CELEBRATE TOGETHER
HUNTINGTON, W. Va. (UP.)
A birthday cake with 31 can-
dles did the work of three in the
Walter A. Reed home. Three
sons, each born on July 21,
reached the ages of 13 10 and
eight.
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Who, 100.000 People MeM
Presents
Today, Wednesday, Sept. 12
3:30Collector's Corner
4:00Music Without Words
4:15French in the Air (RDF)
4:30What's Yaur Favorite
6:00Lean Back and Listen
6:15Evening Salon
7:00The Lady on the Screen
(BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary by
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Twenty Questions (VOA)
8:45Science Digest (VOA)
9:00The Jo Stafford Show
(VOA)
9:15Radio Forum (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports and News (VOA)
10:00The BBC Playhouse (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidnightSign Off.
Tomorrow, Thursday, Sept. 13
A.M.
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Jerry Sears Presents
9:00NEWS
9:15SACRED HEART PRO-
GRAM
9:30As I See It
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00NEWS
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
NoonNEWS
P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
1:45EXCURSIONS IN
ENCE
2:00Call for Le3 Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Debut
3:15The Little Show
3:30Let's Dance
4:00Music Without Words
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00PAN AMUSJCA STORY-
TIME
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:30BLUE RIBBON
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00World News (VOA)
8:15Cross Country, U. S. A.
(VOA)
8:45Jam Session (VOA)
9:00Meet Eleanor Roosevelt
(VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports Tune of Day and
News (VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Take It From Here (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
BY ERSKINK JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent)
SCI-
HOLLYWQOD (NBA) Be-
hind the Screen: Raucous-voiced
Betty Hutton, the human air raid
alarm, has a new mellow and
sexy singing style and she's
shouting it:
"Blossom Seeley and that oper-
ation are the two greatest things
that ever happened to me."
The operation (for the removal
of a wart In. her throat) and Blos-
som's vocal coaching for Betty's
role of the Broadway star in
"Somebody Loves Me," have low-
ered her voice four notes.
"It's marvelous," Betty told me.
"I sing and I don't blow out any
fuses. The lights dont even flick-
er."

"Fourposter,' I'm happy to re-
port, will be "Fourposter" and
there will be no last minute title
switch by Producer Stanley Kra-
mer to "Two Two Pstera" or
"Twin Beds."
Hollywood's long-time twin bed
decree for the preservation of
movie morals and audiences'
temperatures has been waived by
the censors for the Rex Harrl-
son-Lilll Palmer movie about a
man, a woman and a bed.
The plot never gets' out of the
bedroom as it tells a Mr. and Mrs
story from wedding night to
death, but the censors remained
firm on the double occupancy an-
gle.
Most "daring" shot: LUH let-
ting out of bed just as Rex gets
in.
rled, but it's Bob who is shopping
fer the drapes and rugs for Ma-
rie's new home.

Francis X. Bushman has with-
drawn his autobiography,
"Grandma's Pin-Up Boy," from
interested publishers and will
moth-ball the manuscript. He
claims that despite his frank rev-
elations on his first marriage and
romance with Beverly Bayne, the
publishers insisted on added ma-
terial of a spicy nature.

Despite his newspaper headline
career, Bob Walker left a fat es-
tate to his two sons. The small
fortune includes a big MGM re-
tirement fund insurance policy.

There's a laugh In the romance
items about Steve Cochran and
Marl Aldon, his leading lady in
"The Tanks Are Coming." Their
growling and snapping at each
other during th" picture was the
fiercest since Kathryn Grayson
and Marib Lanza last faced the
cameras together.
Fun Out off Doors
SPORTS
Independent producers are be-
sieging Hedy Lamarr with offers
for movies, but the big catch is
that they want Hedy to invest her
own money. She's saying "No."
She lost half a million of her own
green stuff with "Dishonored
Lady" and "Strange Woman."

Hollywood's new put-it-on-film
attitude about TV: "Do it live
and you're dead."

That lazy movie exhibitor
booked "Show Boat" and "Meet
Me After the Show" and mar-
queed the double bill:
"Meet Me After the Show Boat."

John Derek's Columbia con-
tract is no longer shared by his
discoverer, Humphrey Bogart.
And he's already been told that
he'll star in "From Here to Eter-
nity."
The Romeo who is lighting up
Gloria Swanson's orbs these days
is grey-haired Louis Williams, a
racehorse breeder with millions.
He's on the set of "Three For
Bedroom C" every day...That
was a heart attack that hospital-
ized Hattie McDaniel. Doctora are
prescribing a long rest and a pos-
sible bow out from her Beulah
. show.

Marie Wilson and Bob Falln
insist they are not secretly mar-
Ann Dvorak is vetoing the ru-
mor that she'll re-wed Director
Leslie Fenton, whose divorce
came through a few days before
her own.
"Just a coincidence," she In-
sists.

Time Flies Dept.: Ted Donald-
son, the former moppet star, has
turned 18 and Is in a khlrl over
U. S. C. lovely Eve Fleltman.

There was a delay In shooting
"Phone Call From a 8tranger,"
the Shelley Winters-Gary Mer-
rill picture at Fox while Shelley
yakked on the telephone with
Farley Granger.
"If this keeps up," one of the
crew growled, 'this picture will
be released as "Phone Call From
a Granger."

Pat Neal parted with $2500 for
three Grandma Moses originals.
.. .RKO has ordered Jane Russell
to skip the Scriptural quotes in
interviews. Her Sunday School
pitching doesn't jibe with her
movie roles.
Explosives To Toppli
Coal Cranes, Bridge
Take a tip from Vera-EUen,
star of RKO, and spend as
much time as you can out of
doors.. The dancing star has
fun at the zoo feeding a South
American klnkajou.
. CALL ME KNUCKLEHEAD
FORT WAYNE, Ind. (UP)All
members of a local sof tball team
answered roll call except Johnny
Jones. When the manager shout-
ed, "Jones, are you here?" he no-
ticed the smallest boy on the lot
holding up his hand.
"Are you Jones?" the manager
asked.
"Yes. sir."
"Well, why didn't you answer?"
"Because my name's Knuckle-
head," the boy answered.
12:00Sign Off.
TOMORROW AT THE
CENTRAL
LUX THEATRE
4

TOMORROW
WEEK-END RELEASE
HOT
NEWS!
"THE BOMB THAT
STALKS ITS PREY
BALBOA
-opening SATURDAY!-
It's NEW nd
COL y
TECHNICOLOR, too!
M-u-lt present
the mighty musical
of the Mississippi!
- -Joe e-Brown Ha rge no- Cower Champion
ROBERT STERUNG AGNES MOOREHEAD WILLIAM WAJfflOD
[torn.
LUX
TODAY!
"KARNIVAL OF KOLOR
KARTOONS &
K0MEWES"
Explosives will be used to de-
molish the north reclaiming
bridge of the Cristobal Coaling
Plant to expedite salvage opera-
tions on this part of the plant
which has been sold for scrap.
The demolition will take place
m about a week, with the exact
time to be scheduled so there will
be no tankers at the coaling pier
when the charge is set off.
Detailed plans have been work-
ed out by the subcontractor do-
ing the salvage work and the
Canal to assure that no damage
win be done In the pier area.
The salvage work is being done
by Isthmian Constructors, Inc.,
for the Loudee Iron and Metal
Company, inc., of New York Ci-
ty, to whom the bridge and two
of the unloading towers have
been sold. The unloading towers
have already been dismantled.
The general plan for the de-
molition provides taht the deto-
nation of demolition blocks will
cause a part of the bridge and!
two large cranes to topple into
the coal pit below the bridge, I
where the salvage work can be
done more easily and econc
cally.
Demolition blocks will be p
ed about 20 feet apart near
center of the bridge struc
and between two large br
digger cranes which rise 35
above the top of the br
structure and 100 feet above
floor of the coal pit.
The detonation is expectei
sever the top of the bri
structure, causing that por
of the bridpi- and the two li
cranes to fall into the pit be
Order of succession to the i
sldency: vice president, spe;
of the House, president
tempore of the Senate.
"labia. Bac keehe, L PWn*V
of Vigour. Nervoueneee or 12
S">-" ahould help yourProatat
Gland Immediately with ROQENA
KSStS. JLout '"tarruptfon. O*
TROPICAL
TOMORROW
ONlGNTOFlOHTWlTH...ONfGllll.TOFr5HTFOI
J^ OOtdfaM^ruM WARNER IROS. 9
JUUE LONDON RORY CALHOUN JACK HOLT mi he 3
STARTING
TOMORROW!
17 REEL!
TAJ
TOM and JtJlRY
And Tow Favorita
Characters! '-
See:
"JERRY* DIARY*
"VENTRILOQUIST CAT"
"sports ODDrrnes"
"TEA FOR TWO"
"TENNIS CHUMPS"
"LITTLE RURAL
RIDINQ HOOD"
"JERKY, and THE LION"
And Many Morel
Including:
The Three Stooges, in
"LADY KILLERS"
TRe
FLYING
Panama y^anal (clubhouses
Showing Tonight
WANT TO HAVE PUN... GO TO THE MOVIES!
BALBOA
Air-Condltloned
:lt 1:1
Joel McCREA a Shelley WINTERS
"FRENCHIE"
Abo Showing 'Thursday I_____
DIABLO HTS.
:1 I-.M
REVEALED ON THE SCREE*
FOR THE FIRST TIME!
W i yne MORRIS Lola ALBRIGHT
"SIERRA PASSAGE"
Thursday "EVE WITNESS"
COCOLI
PEDRO MIGUEL
T*a P.M.
GAMBOA
TMi>a
G A 1 U N
Ml
a
MARGARITA
f:l A :
CRISTOBAL
Alr-Condltlened
:U I H
Robert MONTGOMERY Patricia WAYNE
"EYE WITNESS"
Thursday "THE APTA1BS OP SALLY"
(MeW)
"EXCUSE MY DUST"
Larralne DAY a Robert RYAN
"WOMAN ON PIER 13"
Thursday "BORN YESTERDAY"
(Friday)
"LULLABY OF BROADWAY"
SONS OF NEW MEXICO" and
"MARY RYAN DETECTIVE"
____Thursday "BARBABY PIRATES"
Bette DAVIS Barry SULLIVAN
'PAYMENT ON DEMAND"
Aleo Showing Thursdayl
Mil* $AL
TICA
W^'MW^'\mm.'WM\m-wm\
Always keep entic
SAL HEPTICA
-the Isxstivc that suits
your convenience in
your medicine chest.
Don't feel tlu-gish and
miserable. Don't let
headaches spoil your day.
SAL HEPTICA bring.
you jentle, speedy relief,
usually within en hour.
Antead SAL HEPTICA
sweetens e tour stomach.
BELLA VISTA LATIN DAY!
Shews: 1:1, I:. _l:Mf I:*, T:le, i< aja.
A violent lory of Suspense and Passion!...
Eully MORENO Carlea THOMPSON, m
"LA NDESEABLE"
LUX THEATRE
KARNIVAL OF KARTOONS
AND KOLOR KOMEDIESI
Featuring
TOM aad JERRY
IS Reel of
Real
Entertainment I
The Ideal pro-
gram for chil-
dren from S
to Mi...
CENTRAL
Presents today "a release
picture from RKO Radio I
J. HOWARD Jean DIXON, In
"EXPERIMENT IN
ALCATRAZ''
Experimento
Nizir
Alcatraz"
Come And Enjoy Yourself
Por t Hour I
CECILIA THEATRE
The thrilling adventures of the
king of swordsmen I
Douglas Maria _
FAIRBANKS, Jr. MONTEZ
" T H E" E X I l"
TROPICAL
lint story of the F B.I's fury filled
counter-attack I...
Frank LOVUOY Dorothy HART, la
"I Was A Communist For The FBI"
ENCANTO THEATRE
Alr-CItteaed
AT 9:00 P.M.
FAKIR URBANO
Also: A Grand Show with
PEPE DUARTE
O RAT CABRERA
ZOILA GONZALEZ
THE SPINELLA
And Two Pictures I
TtVOU THEATRE
* BANK DAT lltM
Cash and free at S and t p-m.
Humphrey Bogart hi
HIGH SDXRRA"
Bette Davis, la
VIM PI CITED
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
SUrta The New Serial
"SUPERMAN vs. .
ATOM MAN"
Chapters 1-t-S
- Also: -
"Doolini of Oklahoma"
"VIGILANTES RIDE"
VICTORIA THEATRE
"SEA HAWK"
Chapters g and
- Also: -
"Renegade* l The Safa"
"PACIFIC ADVENTTJRE*


I
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGI

T~ '
Pacific ^bcietu
ff/ii Sheila Calkoun
2oxi94 Batloa JJ,i9l,U Vet Panama 3-0943
T
UNITED STATES AMBASSADOR AND MRS. WILEY
HOSTS FOR A TEA IN THE EMBASSY RESIDENCE
Yesterday in the afternoon. United States Ambassador
to Panama and Mrs. John Cooper Wiley tendered a "fet
acquainted" tea at the Embassy Residence on La Cresta.
Thirtv guest Included educational people from the Point
Four Program, members of the Armed Forces Radio, visitors
from Louisiana State University, and officers of the United
States Embassy. ,
Returning from Lima
Mr. Edward Stone Is returning
by plane today from Lima, Peru
and will spend about a week In
Hotel El Panama.
'--------
Vacationing in Taboga
Miss Eva Vallarlno, Miss Viola
Icaza Miss Isabel Burgos, Miss
Adellta Caldern. MLss Marcelita
Estrlpeaut. and Miss Rita Jime-
nez are spending a week in Ta-
boga.
Leaving for College
Mr and Mrs. Ronald L. See-
ley sailed on Monday aboard the
U.N.8. Henry Gibbon for the
United States en route to Denver
University, Denver, Colorado,
where Mr. Seeiey will finish his
education and major in business
administration. ,
Mr. and Mrs. Seeiey both at-
tended Canal Zone Junior Col-
lege. She Is the former Jolle Ann
Kllbey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
C. W. Kllbey of Balboa. He Is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. M. 8ee-
RUTH MILLETT Says...
"The source of most husbands'
fieevishness Is a firm conviction
hat all women are parasites"...
from the soon-to^be-publlshed
book, "The Intelligent Man's-
Guide to Women."
Like so many generalized state-
ments about men and women,
this one doesn't stand up well.
Sure, some men thfhk women
are parasites. But usually the
man who feels that way about It
Is either married to a parasite or
to a woman who Isn't smart
enough to let him know Just
what she does to earn her way.
Approximately half of the
women who hold Jobs today are
married women. Theli husbands
certainly couldn't look on wom-
en as parasites.
Of the stay-at-home wives," the
majority do their own work.
If they do It even reasonably
well, their husband, if intelli-
gent, couldn't possibly regard
their wives as parasites. After all,
a woman who cooks- and keeps
house and looks after children
puts in mor hours at her Job
than any so-called self-support-
ing worlcfcig girl a" man might
campare her with.
Am* wften you get right down
to the history of this country,
yoi hawWoTdmit that -from ttie
start American women have been
partners.
The pioneer women, were part-
ner to taelr men. willingly
sharing work, worry, danger,
hardships and privations. -
And as soon as women had
their home burdens lightened
and there were jobs available to
them. In great numbers they
went to work, both single and
married, women.
Natnrally. as long as there are
men with enough money to af-
ford wives who do hothlng but
pamper themselves, there are
going to be some women who are
parasites.
But those aren't, the women
you r your husband are likely to
know. You're much more, likely
to life in a neighborhood where
some of the women work either
full Or part time and where the
rest put in a full working-day
at home.
ley of Pedro Miguel. Both, of
them were employed by the Ar-
my Quartermaster at Corozal be-
fore they left lor the United
States.
Wedding Plans of
Miss Dorothy Smith
Mrs. Dorothy M. Smith of Dia-
blo Heights announces the forth-
coming marriage of her daugh-
ter, Dorothy Elaine, to Fred R.
Saunders of Gamboa. The wedi
ding will take place on Saturday
morning, September the 29th. at
9:00 p.m. in St. Luke's Cathedral
in Ancon. Any of their friends
are invited by the young couple
to attend the ceremony.
A small wedding breakfast for
the bridal party will be served In
the Fern Room of the Hotel Tl-
voll.
Miss Smith is the granddaugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. R. K. Mor-
ris of Bella Vista. Mr. Morris
will give his granddaughter in
marriage. ______
Betrothal Announcement
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Abrey of
Everett, Massachusetts, have
made known the engagement of
their daughter, Emily Jane, to
Boyd W. Ferry, son of Mr. Lou
Ferry and the late Mrs. Ferry of
Wellsboro, Pennsylvania.
The wedding couple are both
residents of Ancon. Miss Abrey,
a graduate of Whldden Memorial
Hospital in Everett. Massachu-
setts is a member of Gorgas Hos-
oital staff. Mr. Ferry Is with the
Canal's Building Division.
Invitations are Out for
Salterio-Ibanes Nuptials
Invitations are being issued for
the marriage of Miss Alba R.
Ibaez, daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
Hernando Ibaez of Colon, to
John Arthur Salterio, son of Mrs.
Carlota A. Salterio and the late
Mr. Thomas A. Salterio of Ca-
ble Heights.
The wedding will be solemnized
at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Septem-
ber the 22nd in the Immaculate
Conception Cathedral of Colon.
Return from Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. William B. Mal-
low and their two children re-
turned aboard the S.S. Panama
on Monday from a vacation of
two-months spent motoring to
MinrrfsotsLlennessee and North
Garden Mb Barbecue
About'ixtjy memberr. of the
Crdena River Garden Club
were present last evening at the
C. P. Morgan residence for their
monthly meeting and barbecue.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Dunn were
guests of honor at the party.
After dinner Mr. Dunn gave a
talk illustrated with colored
slides entitled "Panama In The
Past."
Federation Christian Service
to Hold Meeting and Luncheon
Branches of the Woman's Aux-
iliary of the Episcopal Churches
of St. Luke in Ancon, St. An-
drew's in Cocoll and Chureh of
Our Saviour in Cristobal will be
hostesses for the Panama Fed-
eration for Christian Service,
which will be held Thursday,
September the 20th, at 8:45 p.m.
for a half day session ending
with luncheon. There will be
mldjmomlng recess for refresh-
ments-.
Mrs. H. I. Tinnln. President,
has arranged an Interesting pro-
gram consisting of special guest
speakers, Rev. A. A.. Shaw and
Right Rev. R. H. Gooden and
Mrs. L. H. DaVis, who will tell
about experiences In a Japanese
Prison Camp. A special musical
trio composed of Mrs. H. P. Bev-
lngton, Mrs. J. Brown and Mrs.
Clara Barber, accompanied on
the organ by Mrs. J. R. McLa-
vy, will also be on the program.
Literature samples will be on
sale. All ladles who are mem-
bers of organization affiliated
with the Federation and any
others interested are extended a
cordial Invitation to attend by
the president. A fee of 50 cents
will be charged for the luncheon
to help defray expenses.
Duplicate Bridge Tournament
Members of the Ancon, Balboa
Duplicate Bridge Association ga-
thered in the card room of the
Hotel Tlvoll on Monday evening
for their weekly tournament.
Seven tables were set up in the
Howell Movement. Winners were
1st, Mr. and Mrs. W. Norris;
2nd, Mr. and Mrs. H. G.. Rob-
inson; 3rd, Colonel and Mrs. N.
Elton; 4th. Captain and Mts.
Day; and 5th, Mr. and Mrs. W.
Kennedy.
Lutheran League
to Meet Thursday
The League of Lutheran Wom-
en will meet at the home of Mrs.
J. L. Myers, House 474-D. in Co-
coll on Thursday evening. Sep-
tember the 13th. at 7:30 p.m. in
order to sew articles for the
forthcoming bazaar In October.
Mrs. Frank Morgan,
Actor's Widow,
Due Here Tomorrow
Mrs. Alma Morgan, widow of
the late Frank Morgan, longtime
Hollywood actor, is due to arrive
on the Isthmus tomorrow aboard
the SB. Moldanger from Califor-
nia for a brief visit.
Mrs. Morgan will be entertain-
ed during her stay by Mr. and
Mrs. Daniel Pagenta of Las Cum-
bres.
WHAT'S IN A NAME
UTICA, Mich. (UP.) Fancy-
titled clubs are nothing new to
Michigan state park managers,
who welcome a wide variety of
organizations each year. A visit-
ing group to the Rochester-Utica
recreation area was the Order of
Deodorized Skunks of Detroit.
NO DUTY CHARGES
20Jo ^- 20]o
DISCOUNT ,
On all MAHOGANY FURNITURE
manufactured in Panama.
JOilS OUR CLVB ,
-ENTRALAVE.at21,tE.ST. PHONES^ 2-1830
& 2-1833
SUMMER SPECIAL
Why Have a Home
Permanent?
.... with Inadequate facilities,
no certain finished look, and
no guarantee hen you can
have a professional one com-
plete for only $7.50! It will
last longer, and look better I
These can be had
MONDAY thru THURSDAY
Make your \ 1 Af A
Appointment /-/tj7
Early! *###
BALBOA
BEAUTY SHOP
Mrs. Bates Wleman, Mgr.
Open 9:N a.m. to :M p.m.
Balboa Cltihhauu, unlaid.
Now, with the now, improved
Mode*, you cm enjoy greater com-
fort than you ever dreamed was
possi b\ecomfori-in-actio.
For the new Modeu is to luxury-
oftso truly comfortablethat 8
out of 10 women in a recent teat re-
ported no chafing with Modes*.
And there's a triple safety shieM
for extra-long protection.
Diacover neVfreedom with
SO'TtK, SA'ft
MODESS
"HI BIG BOY!"A featherweight bird with a heavyweight's
nerve gets a nose-to-nose view of the hippo in the London
(England) Zoo. The hippo's whiskers, thinks the birdie, might
make a good nest.
.. w.y.V'WSXvJSM.....
M %' \ VJv.
( Panama's social center 1

f
BACK AGAIN
BY POPULAR DEMAND
f
::

H



KEN DELANEY
* """HOWi tiis Orchestra ** V v~ ** *


who made such a hit with
that sweet, beautiful rhythm
in the Delaney style, is with
us again, playing nightly on
the BELLA VISTA ROOF
(Sundays in the Patio)
Starting tomorrow night
-
Jrvfltna
R. J. Cunningham, Gen. Mgr.
^ftlantic S5c
octet
t
>ot 195, L/alun Uelephone C/alun 378
MISS IBAEZ TO WED MR. SALTERIO
Invitations are being issued to the marriage of Miss Alba
R. Ibaez, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Hernando Ibaez, of Co-
lon, to Mr. John Arthur Salterio, son of Mrs. Carlota A. Sal-
terio, and the late Mr. Thomas A. Salterio, of Colon Heights.
The wedding will be solemnized on Saturday, September
22, at 7:30 a.m. at the Immaculate Conception Cathedral of
Colon.
In the community room of
Clubhouse. All council mem
are urged to attend.
Mrs. Leignadier Entertains
for Miss Menendez
Mrs. Humberto Leignadler was
hostess for a beautifully appoint-
ed tea given at her residence in
Colon Tuesday afternoon to hon-
or Miss Hope Menendez.
Miss Menendez will leave this
weekend to make her home in
the States.
Mr. and Mrs. Strong
Visiting on the Isthmus
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Strong, of
New York arrived by the United
Fruit Liner Tuesday. for a visit
on the Isthmus before continuing
their trip to San Francisco next
Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Strong and Mr.
John Gorin were the luncheon
euests of Mr. and Mrs. William
E. Adams of Brazos Heights
Tuesday, before driving to the
Parific Side where the visitors
will register at the Hotel Tlvoli.
Mr. Strong's stay at the Ho-
tel Will bring back many memo-
ries, as he was employed as man-
ager of the Hotel in 1906 before
Joining the United Fruit Compa-
ny. He was stationed on the
Isthmus with the company until
1923 when he was transferred to
their New York office, where he
Is now the General Passenger
Agent.
Mr. and Mrs. Strong will re-
turn to the Atlantic Side before
their departure for California.
quarters recently vacated by Mr.
and Mrs. David Howe.
Colonel Bowen
Returns to'Quarters
Colonel James E. Bowen. flgj
who has been seriously ill In tf
Coco Solo Hospital, returned.!
his quarters at Fort Gullck
ing the weekend.
House arming for
Mr. and Mrs. Engelke
A group of friends surprised
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Engelke.
of Margarita, with a housewarm-
ing"at their new home during the
weekend.
The friends presented thehon-
orees with a table lamp. Those
In the party included: Mr. and
Mrs. Ross Cunningham, Mr. and
Mrs. John E. Erikson. Mr. and
Mrs. Thomas L. Rankin, Mr.
and Mrs. Waldo Gilley. Mr and
Mrs, Maxwell Sanders and Mr.
and Mrs. Charles H. Bath, Jr.
Gatun Civic Council Meeting
The Gatun Civic Council will
hold its meeting for the election
of officers tomorrow at 7:30 p.m.
Recent Arrivals
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Hamil-
ton of New Cristobal and chil-
dren. Kay and Robert, returned
Monday from a visit in New
York, Washington and Illinois.
Mr. and Mrs. M. L. McCullough
and children also returned Mon-
day from a States vacation.
Miss Gwendolyn Ka r 1 g e r,
daughter of Captain and Mrs.
Gordon Karlger of Fort DeLes-
seps returned from a visit with
relatives In Norfolk. While there
she made an automobile trip to
various points of Interest in the
States.
Mr. and Mrs. William B. Mid-
dlemas of Brazos Heights, arriv-
ed during the weekend ftom New
York. They visited their son and
daughter-in-law. Lt. and Mrs.
W. B. Middlemas. Jr.. in Fort
Benning. Ga and other rela-
tives in Maryland.


Only New ODO-RO-NO
Cream gives you off
these advantages!
1Stops perspiration quickly safely.
2Banishes odour instantly.
3Its protection lasts for one to three days.
4Does not irritate normal skin use it daily
Absolutely harmless to all fabrics.
4Never dries up, never gets gritty
or hardens in die jar as ordinary
deodorants often do.
Millions of lelitfied women use
0D0-R0-N0 Ctnam
Tfct deodorant without a doubt
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Asbury,
if Gatun and daughters, return-
ed from a vacation spent with
relatives in Carlsbad. New Mexi-
co, and other cities of the south-
west.
Commander and Mrs. Benja-
min W. Clark arrived during the
weekend, and are residing on the
Coco Solo Naval Station.
Commander Clark will assume
the duties of Chief of Surgery at
the Coco Solo Naval Hospital.
He comes to the Isthmus from
the U.S. Naval Hospital at San
Diego, California.
Visitors Entertained
Mrs. Tom Barnett and Mrs. H.
Duggan were the dinner guests
of Mr. and Mrs. William E. Ad-
ams of Brazos Heights during
their short stay on the Isthmus
Monday.
The visitors were returning
from Golfito. where they had
visited Mrs. Barnetts brother
and sailed Monday evening to re-
turn to New York.
Change of Address
Mr. and Mrs. John Clay tor. of
Pedro Miguel, have moved to
Gatun and are occupying the
Youth Grabs Escort,
Wrecks Car. En Route
To Reform School
LANCASTER. S. C, Sept. 12
(UP)An 18-year-old Cherokee
Falls youth was Injured near
here today when he caused the
wreck of a car in which he was
being returned to the state in-
dustrial school bv a probation
officer.
Lloyd B. Welchel. probation
officer for Cherokee County,
said he was taking James Sre-
phenson Pugh back to the boys'
industrial school at Florence
when the youth forced the
wreck.
Welchel said he was putting
on a pair of sun glasses when
Pugh grabbed him in a "bear-
hug."
Welchel said he lost control
of the car which plunged down
a 10 foot embarkment and over-
turned twice. The bov was in-
jured slightly but Welchel was
unharmed.
Pugh admitted that he tried
to wreck the car.
"I'd rather die than go back
down there," he said.
Pugh was paroled from the
school In April but was being
returned, for violating his
parole.
He was sentenced to the
school in 1948 for store-break-
ing. He was to serve until he
is 21.
i, M
.3
Notice to Elks
Members of Cristobal
Lodge No. 1542, who have c
dren 12 years of age and undC
are requested to complete and
return the Children's Christmas
Party Questlonalre which t
received recently from the A
vities Committee.
The gifts for the children aro
being ordered from the States to
assure delivery before December"
23. A list of the children's names,
ages, etc.. must be In the mall
by Friday, September 21. If par-
ents wish their children to re-,
ceive gifts they must see that^,
Uie forms are returned to the
Activities Chairman by Wednes-
day. September 19.
Captain and Mrs. Forrest
Residing in Norfolk
Captain and Mrs. Kenneth For-
rest, who left the Isthmus last
month are now residing In Nor-
folk. Va., at 4W1 South Quail,
Street.
Captain Forrest resigned hi
position with the Panama Canal
and Is now employed as pilot and
tugmaster with the McAllister ,
Shipping Co.
m&
aKouCdarbo
NEW HrUAW PRODUCT

THE COUNCIL OF THE HEBREW CONGREGATIONS OF
PANAMA COLON AND THE CANAL ZONE
URGENTLY solicit the presence of its delegates as well as
all the Members and their Ladies of the Congregations
SHEVET AHIM BENEFICENCIA ISRAELITA KOL
SHEARITH ISRAEL JEWISH WELFARE BOARD
UNION ISRAELITA CENTRO ISRAELITA CULTURAL
KAL KADOSH JANGACOB and all non-affiliated Jews
to a General Assembly on Wednesday September 12th at
8 p.m. at the Community Hall K.S.I., Panama. This meet-
ing will deal with matters related to the Bonds for Israel
Drive.

MR. MIRON J. SHESKIN
Special Representative of The Bond Drive
will address the assembly. No solicitations will be made in
this Session.
THE PRESIDE1ST.
r*
^


PAGE SIX
1 THE PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER B, 1951
SZS2&& rSlS?^*" &*?
Leave your ad with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SKRVice
No 4 Tlroll Ave.
mmiw t-ari
tUUSKO UK LESSEPS
Parque ds t,li|l
MORRISON'S
No. 4 Pearth at* Jarj An
Ph.ii* 2-M4I
BOTICA CARLTON
10.05 Mflindei At*.
Phon- JMColas
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
N H Wat Ittk Street
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
Ko. 17 "H" ItfUl Paattal
No ILlTt Central Ara. Cala.
Mnimum for
12 words
3* each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE:Westinghouse refriger-
ator. 9 cu. ft. 25 cycle, $150.00.
ator. .
Phone 83-2195.
MUST: SELL: 8 piece mahogany
bedroom surte, olmost new. with
inner spring mattresses. 2141-A,
Curundu.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SAE:1949 Buick Super con-
vertible, Hydromotic. Radio, low
m.leage. Tel. 2-3341 0528-A,
Ancon.
MISCELLANEOUS
0 you ho a aVinkhtg eroblsm?
Writs AlcoKalic. tawpw
Bo. 2031 Aecea, C. Z.
FOR SALE:Refngerotor Frigidoire,
60 cycles, Underwood typewriter,
smoll desk, youth bed, baby crib.
Phone 916, Colon.
FOR SALE: Washing machine,
tables, chair?, lamps, bicycles, ond
other household and miscellaneous
items to be sold ot Public Auc-
tion to the highest bidder. Tues-
day, September 18. 7 p. m.
0851 Balboa Road. Balboa. Phone
2-3602.
FOR SALE:9 ft. Norge ol porce-
lain 25 cycle refrigerator. Excel-
lent condition. $100. 860 Mor-
gan Ave. Balboo. Tel. 2-3156.
FOR SALEDiningrocm table, 3 ex-
ttnsion leaves. 8 metal choir,
leather covering $35.00; Buf-
fet $6.00; Porcelain top table.
6 metol chairs. $3500; Simmons
innarspring studio couch $50.00;
Twin beds with innerspring mat-
tresses, $30.00 each; Metol dres-
sers $10.00. Oak dreser $7.00
Quartermaster beds with mattres-
ses $10.00. Complete household
equipment. reasonable. 608-A,
Ancon Boulevard. Telephone Bal-
boa 3349, "upstairs."
FOR SALE:25 cycle putomotic re-
cord player. Also porch blinds.
Navy 2231.
FOR SALE:9 cu. ft. Coronado, re-
frigerator, 60 Cyl. Like new. See
at 233-B. Gotun.
FOR SALE:Horton electric ironer
table model, used 6 months. Phone
84-6138. Fort Kobbe.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
NEW YORK
CHEVROLET
6 WEEKS DELIVERY
ST. LOUIS
Smoot-Paredes
Panama 2-0600
FOR SALE:1948 Plymouth 4-door.
Cleon, excellent mechanical con-
dition. 82-2285, days, 83-5296
evenings.
FOR SALE:1949 Tudor Chevrolet.
Cristobal 3-1900 ofter 4:00 p. m.
FOR SALE:1949 Nash Ambosso-
dor with radio, 4 new tires, plas-
tic seat covers. 5433-C, Diablo
between 3 p. m. 7 p. m.
FOR SALE:BARGAIN! First class
portable RCA Radio in short ond
lenq wave. Brand new man's wotch
with luminious dial, 15 jewels.
German moke $9.50. 86 Ancon
Avenue, apartment I, Tel. 2-1490
until 7 p. m.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
NEW YORK
CHEVROLET
6 WEEKS DELIVERY
ST. LOUIS
Smoot-Paredes
Panama 2-0600
FOR SALE:1941 Chevrolet 2 door
sedon. Good tronsportation. Phone
ofter 12 o'clock 2-1658.
USED CARS
Larga selectien of
LATE MODELS
a BARGAIN PRICES
CIVA, S. A.
Your CADILLAC-PONTIAC Dealer
Do you own o Lauson Air Cooled Four
Cycle Engine that may need ser-
vice or spare ports? If so, coll
the Universal Service Inc. Phone
2-2624 Panama. Complete service.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE Lorge Quonset Hut
complete ready for assembly $450.
00. Phone Shrapnel, Balboa 2820.
FOR SALE:National HRO-7 Com-
munications Receiver. Speaker,
coils, 25-60 cycle power supply.
Tel. 2-3341 0528 Ancon.
FOR SALE:1 Worthington Aircom-
pressor, 1 H. P. motor 60 cycle;
1 Dodge Truck 1 1-2 tons. A-l
condition, dual wheels on rear,
also two spore wheels and tires;
one, 300 gallon tank with bean
high pressure pump; one shore
stock Panama Golf Club. 151 Wil-
liamson St., Gamboa, C. Z.
RESORTS
Phillip. Oceansld cottages, Santo
Clara. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Ponoma 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673
HOTEL PAN-AMERICANO In El Va-
lle. Special room rales for Septem-
ber. $35 per month, $20 for 2
weeks. Meols a la corte. Telephone
Ponoma 2-1112 for reservation.
Houses ON BEACH at Santo Cloro.
Phone SHRAPNEL Balboa 2820
or see Caretaker there.
Gromlich'* Santa Cloro beoch-
cottoges. Electric lea boxes, gas
stoves, moderate rates. Phone 6
541 oi 4-567.
Williams Sonta Claro-Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms, Frigidoires, Rock-
gas ranges. Balboo 2-3050.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR SALE:Full set Sears premium
royon 6:00 x 16 tires. Cristobal,
3-2408.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:1939 Bliick Convert-
ible coupe, new paint, tires good,
with all accessories. 2010-C, First
St. Phone 83-3148, Curundu. .
We have few CHOICE BARGAINS
left in USED CARS. Ceme in and
see them before you buy.
NASH AGENCY Tivoli Crouma
Panama.
FOR SALE:Plymouth 1941 $225.
00. Inquire Pedro Miguel Barber
shop.
FOR SALE
Motorcycle
FOR SALE:Light Englirh motor-
cycle. 3 speed. Villers engine.
Speed up to 60, new tires. Phone
4-323.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:21 Ft. Boot with 1950
8-horse Champion outboard. Good
for river or outside equipped and
licensed for 7 in C. Z. First
$300.00 gets it. 3-2408 or 378-
8748.
10 New Apartments
Being Assiqned
Today In Diablo
The first ten apartments to be
completed in the new develop-
ment on Enoicott and Morrison
Streets in Diablo Heights will be
signed at the close of business
today, it has been announced by
the Canal's Housing Division.
The houses to be assigned in-
clude six two-bedroom cot ages;
two three-bedroom breez. vay-
type cottages; and one duplex;
which are all located on Morri-
son Street.
The new houses, all masonry
construction, were recently turn-
ed over to the Canal by the con-
tractors. Isthmian Constructors,
Inc. and are the first to be com-
eeted in a group of 22 buildings
the new development.
T.ie completed houses are no
loncer open for public inspec-
tion
a
FOR SALE:1951 Ford 4 Door Se-
dan. Custom De Luxe, 8 cylinders.
4,000 miles $1.850.00. Phone
Balboa 2984.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
NEW YORK
CH EVROLET
6 WEEKS DELIVERY
ST. LOUIS
Smoot-Poredes
Panama 2-0600
CIVA, S.A.
U-ar CADILLAC 4c PONTIAC
Dealer
5 Latin American
Lands Get Loans
From World Bank
WASHINGTON, Sept. 12 (SIS)
Five. Latin American countries
were among the eleven nations
which received loans from the
World Bank during Fiscal 1951,
the United Nations Institution
has reported.
Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, Ni-
caragua and Uruguay were the
Latin American republics which
received loan during the year,
the Bank's sixth annual report
shows. The other countries with
which loan agreements were
reached In the 12-month period
ending last June 30 were Austra-
lia. Ethiopia, Iceland, Thailand,
Turkey and Union of South Afri-
ca.
Amounts of the loans to Latin
America and the purposes for
which they were granted are as
follows:
Brazil a loan of $15 million
for electric power development.
.Colombia three loans total-
ing $22.6 million for electric pow-
er development and highway
construction and rehabilitation.
Mexico a loan of $10 mil-
lion for financial assistance to
small enterprises.
Nicaragua two loans total-
ing $4.7 million for highway
construction and for Importation
of agricultural machinery.
Uruguay a loan of $33 mil-
lion for development of electric
power and expansion of telephone
facilities.
Of the total of 21 loans grant-
ed to all countries during the
year, the Latin American coun-
tries received eight.
WANTED:25 cycle washing mo-
chine. Phone 83-3278.
WANTED:To purchose or rent 35
mm camero. Write Joseph Livins-
fon, Ancon. C. Z.
V's-titH Position
European woman desires position as
house keeper, good cook, willing
to sleep in. Apartodo 1833 Pon-
oma.
FOR RENT:Furnished house, La
Cresta, 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, swim-
ming pool, hot water, bar, cool.
B. 3 50.00. Coll Panama 3-4630,
between 12-2 P. M.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished apart
ment. Contact office No. 8061. 10th
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386, Co-
lon
FOR RENT:One bedroom, sitting
ond dlningrcam aportment, fur-
nished with beautifully carved ma-
hogany furnitures, made by
Cowes, also with refrigerator ond
stove to responsible party. No. 23
Nicanor Obcrrio, Apt. No. 7.
Position Offered
Americon business executive requires
very capable, experienced, Span-
ish-English secretary correspond-
ent; oble to toke fost dictotion
in both languages and write own
letters olso. Mole or female. Ex-
cellent, permanent opportunity for
oble, willing worker. Write in de-
tail, stating experience and stort-
ing salory desired to A. B., Box
134 Panama.
Help Wanted
WANTED:Good cook, must sleep
in. Excellent salary. Bring refer-
ences. No. 11 Cuba Avenue, "Nes-
tle" Building upstoirs. Entrance on
28th Street.
WANTED: General house maid.
Must cook. Good solory. House
771-B San Poblo St. Balboo.
WANTED:Experienced cook. Must
speak Spanish. House 1423-B,
Carr street, Balboa.
WANTED: English speaking mold
to core for two children and
house. References prefered. 5443-
C. Diablo Heights.
FOR RENT:2 bedroom apartment,
living-diningroom, screened, $60.
Key 85 Cuba Avenue, telephone
3-0841.
FOR RENT:Furnished opertment,
two bedrooms, livingroom, kitchen,
bath. Tel., balcony, $105. Tel. 3-
1648.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT:In Bella Vista, beau-
tifully furnished rooms, all con-
veniences. Ave. Mexico 69 near
43rd Street. Phone 3-0553.
LESSONS
ATTENTION TEENAGERS: Stort-
ing Sept. 15 from 9:30 to 11:00
ft*, m. 3 month ballroom dance
course for $15. Fox trot Jitter-
bug Rumbo' Mambo
Manhotton Swing. Register Tues-
day or Thursday 4:30 p.m. Bal-
boa 'Y' Harriett b Dunn.
COMMERCIAL fir
PROFESSIONAL
IF YOU THINK PRICES
Are High in Panama
GET A LOAD OP THIS
advertisement we received la
a foreign trade Journal:
CHLORDANE
CONCENTRATE
NOW IN ONI OUNCI BOTTLXS.
Thli remarkable Chlordane Concen-
trate mixed with a full qsjeri J
water ma)ces a very effective!
Insect spray. Retailing at ji.no th-2
one ounce bottles are now available
to dealers at only $6 00 rn nnr
WE PAY ALL SHIPPING CWARGS
(name of Company deleted in pity)
OUR HETAIL PRICE
for a 5* ounce bottle
That Makes ONE GALLON
85c
(sorry, we don't pay shipping
charges)
GEO. F. N0VEY, INC.
n Central Ave Tel J-I4#
Polaroid
Land Camera
INTERNATIONAL
JEWELRY INC.
, ,.1U Cent'I At*.
(adj. International Hotel)
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
tmrjedlate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
. 22 E. 28th St
PANAMA BROKERS Inc.
HAS FOR SALE-
STOCKS FROM
Abattoir Nal.
Fuera y Lus f Prefer red)
National Brewery
Tel. 3-471 3-JMf
Rabbi Witkn
To Address
Colon Rotary
COLON, Sept. 12 Rabbi Na-
than Witkin. Field Director for
the JWB Armed Services Divi-
sion, Caribbean Command and
Director of the USO-JWB Armed
Forces Service Center at Balboa
will be the guest speaker of the
Cristbal-Colon Rotary lunch-
eon tomorrow at the Stranger
Club.
Rabbi Wltlcln will peak on the
new State of Israel.
Rabbi Witkin served as Rabbi
in Red Bank, New Jersey from
1927 to 1933 and was a member of
the Red Bank Rotary Club from
1929 until 1933. For the next two
years, 1933-35. studied in Pales-
tine, at the Jewish Seminary and
the Hebrew University.
Subsequent to his studies in
Palestine. Rabbi Witkin was ap-
pointed Chaplain with the CCC
Camps where he served from 1935
to 1937.
In 1937 the Rabbi was appoint-
ed to his present Poet m the Ca-
nal Zone where he has been for
the pact 14 years. Rabbi Witkin
is a member of the Panama City
Rotary Club.
QUALITY
TROPIDURA 8
St. George's Postpones
Sunday Gatun Concert
The Women's Auxiliary of"Bt.
George's Church, Gatun. C. Z.,
notifies the public that The
Concert, Oolden Hour, which
features the Lorelei Ensemble,
and was planned for Sunday
at the Chagres Theatre in Ga-
tun, C. Z., has been posieoned
until October 14. due to an un-'
forseen circumstance.
The Choral Body which has
sen rehearsing strenuously for
this occasion promises a splen-
did program.
i
Educators From RPr
42 Nations In US
To Study Schools
WASHINGTON, Sept. 12 (USIS)
More than 350 teachers and
school officials from 43 countries
will begin study or training pro-
grama in educational institutions
In various section* of the United
States following a week's orien-
tation courses here.
The visiting educators were
welcomed Monday by UB. Gov-
ernment officials who Included
John L. Thuraton, Deputy Fed-
eral Security Administrator; Earl
James McGrath, UB. Commis-
sioner of Education; and William
E. Johnstone. Jr., Director of the
Office of Educational Exchange
of the State Department.
They will study U.8. teaching
Methods and observe the na-
tion's educational philosophy
and practice for several months.
This Is one of several exchange
groups now In the United sutes
under several programs designed
to Improve international under-
standing programs that Include
engineers and scientists, youths,
young farmers and scholars.
Europe, the Middle East. Afri-
ca and the Far East aa well aa
the Western Hemisphere are re-
presented by the educators.
Those from Latin America re-
present Panam, Bolivia, Brazil,
Chile, Costa Rica, Colombia, Cu-
ba. Dominican Republic. El Sal-
vador. Haiti, Honduras, Mexico,
Nicaragua, Per, Uruguay and
Venezuela.
The visiting educators were
brought to the United States as
part of the government's pro-
gram "to develop international
understanding by bringing the
truth about America to the peo-
ple of other countries," said Os-
car R. Ewlng, Federal Security
Administrator, whose agency's
office of education has planned
and will conduct the projeet un-
der supervision of the U.S. State
Department.
_The chief Justlee of the United
"'ales receives an annual salary
$2^ 500. Associate justices re-
ceive $25,000 each.
"Crossman"
RIFLES
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PISTOLS
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1 m sth ot May Plaza
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KEROSENE. Absolutely Safa It
cannot Explode Require no gener-
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So Simple a Child.Cas Operate It
$9.95 Lowest Price
ever Offered In Panam.
AH Parta Available.
On Sale la All RARO W A MK aad
FURNITURE Stares
Distributor: -
W0N0 CHANO, S. K.
Coln eta St aalbee ve
Te| Ml
Panama SS Caatral Ave.
Tai. a^ittf \
PANAMA BROKERS. INC.
Wants to bay following
Stocks:
Abattoir Nal. Ceca Cala
Nat. Brewery Paaraa r Las
Clay Prodacu PaaaaU <
Panama Insurance Company
1-471 S-ISM
Come to Tampa. Plcala tar vaca-
tion or for good. I eaa help yea lo
buy or real aeaeai, property, araaara
gravea, hJekra farms, hotels, ate,
at aU prisea sad Unas. If Interest-
ed write to Baimaa Klecfkeas. e/s
George W. anadea. Real Estate Brok-
en, M Franklin Street, Tampa 2,
Florida.
oaifl la c
INSTANT
Fat-fret Powdered MOk
(fortified with Vrtemta D)
ee lee water.
On Sale la PC Co. Cimiaaarlai
U.S. Looks For
Largest All-Crop
Harvest In History
WASHINGTON, Sept. 12 Des-
pite floods in the Midwest and
droughts throughout the South-
west, the United States expects
its second largest all-crop harv-
est In history.
The overall crop Is now 33 per
cent above the 1923-1932 aver-
age. r
Although it barely tops the
1949 mark, the Agriculture De-
partment noted In this month's
report Chat it Is exceeded only
by the bumpei year of 1948.
Agriculture experts say that
the September forecast usually is
fairly "firm" but they are not
sure about the remainder of the
growing and harvesting seasons.
- The large crops in prospect are
needed to fill the nation's re-
serve bins against emergency.
US-German Court
Gives Czech 6-Year
Term For Smuggling
FRANKFURT, Sept. 12 (UP)
Gustav Davldovic, a Checho-
slovakian government econo-
mics official, was sentenced
here today to six years, 10
months and 10 days In prisin
for smuggling strategic goods
from Western Germany to
Czechoslovakia.
The sentence was Imposed by
the United States High Com-
mission Court.
Officials said Davldovlc's con-
viction meant the breaking up
of one of the most Important
rings engaged in smuggling
strategic industrial, goods to
Iron Curtain countries.
CZ Youngster Hurt
In Fall Off Bike
An eight-year-old American
girl was Injured slightly yester-
day afternoon on Tavernilla
Street in Balboa when she fell
from her bike.
Sandra Elaine Wallace was
treated at Gorgas Hospital for a
deep laceration of the left Jaw
then sent home. *
The girl had been coasting
south on San Pablo Street when
she attempted to make a left
turn. However she lost control Of
the bike, ran over the curb, and
fell against a "no parking" sign.
Sandra Is the daughter of Stu-
art Wallace,.an employe at the
Finance Bureau In Balboa
Heights.
COMPOSER ERWIN KENT gives Dorita Borrel, beautiful life-
guard at El Panama, a copy of the new dance hit "Dorita"
be has Just dedicated to her. Kent has been directing his
orchestra nightly In the Bella Vista room of El Panama since
June and la returning to New York to confer with his pub-
lisher on publication and recordings of the songs he has com-
posed while in Panama.
Ken Delaney well known to El Panama clients will begin
an engagement in the Bella Vista Room tomorrow night.
Rejected Suitor Stabs
Sweethea rtAtWorship
DES MOINES, la.. Sept 12 (UP)
A rejected suitor stabbed his
sweetheart four times yesterday
with a hunting knife as she
walked toward the communion
rail at St. Ambrose Cathedral
here during a mass.
The girl, Terry O'Conner, 24,
suffered two deep wounds in the
shoulder and two slashes on her
arms from the knife wielded by
John A. Masterson.
Inspector Jack Brophy said
Masterson surrendered meekly to
other worshippers who witness-
ed the attack upon Miss O'Conner
in the Roman Catholic Cathe-
dral. ^
- Masterson told Brophy that he
had been in love with Miss O'Con-
ner but that she recently "broke
off relationships" with him.
The young man followed her
yesterday as she rode by bus from
her home to the cathedral.
When she alighted from the
bus. Masterson tried to talk to
her but he said she was "cool" to
him.
Masterson watched the girl aa
she proceeded to a pew. genu-
flected, and listened to the mass.
WHATLL YOU'HAVET^-',
Defending tennis champion Art I
Larsen cooled off with steins of 1
beer between matches in the .
United States singles cham-
pionship at Forest Hills. (NEA) J
Edith CaveU Society
Will Meet Tonight
The Secretary of the Edith Ca-
veU Friendly Society has re-
quested the presence of all mem-
bers at a special meeting tonight
at their regular meeting hall at
8 p.m.. to discuss matters of vi-
tal Importance.
Hurricane relief for Jamaica
will also be discussed.
East Prefers Black
FLINT, Mich. (UP) Eastern-
ers apparently are more conserv-
ative than westerners, at least
when It comes to buying automo-
biles. Buick reports that black Is
the leading color choice across
the country, but It is nearly twice
as popular In the east than in
per one selection.
TROPICAL CLEANERS
DRT CLEANING
DYING
General LAUNDRY
Phono S-eSTl
Mam Plant Via basis
reach Caatral Ave. Ittk St.
Hirohito Asks
Increased Funds
TOKYO, Sept. 12 (UP)It
has been reported In Tokyo that
Emperor Hirohito has asked for
more money to run the Imperial
household, now that the Japan-
ese peace treaty has been
signed.
The funds would be needed
partly to defray the expenses
of receiving diplomatic repre-
sentatives and other such cere-
monies once the treaty Is rati-
fied, according to press dis-
patches.
The imperial household was
said to have asked for $750,000
nearly double its appropria-
tion for this year.
Then, as she walked toward the
altar raH,Ao accept communion,
he lunged at her with the five-
inch blade of his hunting knife
flashing In the candlelight.
Other members of the congre-
gation screamed and two men
ran forward to subdue Masterson
as he stood over the girl who lay
on the floor, bleeding severely
from the knife wounds.
Masterson gave up quickly to
the two men and quietly handed
one of the mthe knife. They held
him until police arrived.
Miss O'Conner was taken to
Broadlawns General Hospital
where doctors described her
wounds as "serious."
Brophy said Masterson prob-
ably would be charged with as-
sault to do great bodily harm.
One Dismissed,
One Bound Over
In District Court
One case was dismissed ana
another was bound over this
morning in the Balboa Magis-
trate's Court.
Ass*. District Attorney Row-
land K. Hazard moved for dis-
missal of the charge against Ro-
dolfol Causadlas, a 30-year-old
Panamanian. Causadlas had
been charged with- stealing a
spray gun valued at $14.31.
The defendant was represent-
ed In court by Woodrow. de Cas-
tro.
Also on the agenda today was
a preliminary hearing In the
case of Antonio Jimenez, a 26-
year-old San Bias who Is charg-
ed with returning to the Canal
Zone after deportation.
Probable cause was found and
the defendant was ordered bound
over to the U.8. District Court
for trial.
LISTERINE
ANTISEPTIC
AS SOON AS YOU CAN
USTfJHM AaHeepHc, full strength, kill
million! of germs on throat surface. It
attacks than germs associated with colds
before they attack you ... keeps them
from starting serios trouble. Take the
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cations gargle with LISTERINE Anta-
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IN TESTS OVER A 12-YEAR PERIOD, DARY USERS
Of USTERINI ANTISEPTIC HAD FEWER COIDSI
e*a_
la-i, r




WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1S51
>
TVE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEM
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWHID MO ru>ui>Hlo y TM MNAM AMMICAN rmum*. INC
roUNMD BT NIUON KOUNSEVILL IH WM
HARMODIO ARIAS. IOITOO
7 H TKirt P. O BOX 1S4. PANAMA. *.*>
riHWONI PANAMA NO S-0740 I LINI >
CAl ADDKtlt. PANAMBMICAN. MANAMA
COLON OPFICli II 17 CINTRAl AvCNUf 1IIWHN lTN AND ISTM STMUT
roMIIMN PltPltfatJfTATtVt. JOSHUA B. PCWIPIS. INC.
S4B MADISON AV., NIW VOW. t7 N. V.
LOCAl n HAIL
MONTH. IN t 70) I.BO
OH III MONTH, IN APVANCt B.SO IS.OO
O I-. VIAM IN *-T '" bO 24 OO
Broadway and Elsewhere
By Jock Lcrit
THE U. S. BUREAU of Internal Revenue, In Its 8pcclal Tax
Fraud Drive, sometimes referred to as the "racketeer drive," has
been turning up underworld cheaters without courting publicity
or permitting It, except in cases which have had to be exposed
In open court.
Under direction of Gen. John B. Dunlap, the new Commis-
sioner of Internal Revenue, thousands of Investigations are being
processed and more than as many are In prospect.
The official purpose Is to collect taxes covered up or brazenly
left unreported. But an important by-product Is criminal prose-
cutions where grounds can be substantiated. I shall have more
to report on that subject soon.
One of the field agents ran Into this enlightening discovery. In
a matter of description of occupation.
He had recently inspected the retaras of an Individual
who Is suspected ef being a strengarm stagger for a book-
making and wire service syndicate. On his retara, this
taxpayer Usted his occupation as "physiotherapist." Physio-
therapy is defined as "dealing with nonatedleal remedies,
such as heat and massage.'' peculiarly apt and realistic.
A FORMER CHIEF of police, as a result of one of these In-
vestigations, was convicted on a willful attempt to evade and de-
feat income taxes due, and was sentenced to two-and-a-half years
In the Federal Penitentiary, plus a $2,500 fine.
In passing sentence the court commented:
"Last month, In this Judicial District, a notorious character., a
representative of most that Is disreputable and sordid in American
life, was convicted of income tex evasion.
"The able and discerning Judge who tried that case stated that
the activities of that defendant had been carried on with seeming
acquiescence of authorities.
"This somewhat oblique reference to the honesty of some pub-
lic officials, who aid and abet gangsterism, comes to our atten-
tion with the unfolding of the sordid story In this case.
"This defendant did not deal with so-called big time gangsters.
but in a small city he carried on, in a small way. precisely the
low and despicable practices carried on In our larger cities, whtch
make possible our A ICapones and Mickey Cohens.
"He not only cheated the Government of its Just' due, but he
also, as Is implicit in the verdict of the Jury, accepted bribes from
denizens of the underworld.
"He has betrayed a public trust. He has brought disgrace to
himself and shame to the innocent members of his family."
A NEW NAME on the Fraud Unit's list of suspected
racketeers was pat there because one of his customers
carelessly got his finger in the wrong digit on the tele-
phone dial. As a result, ha accidentally got a deputy col-
lector, a new man on the racket squad. The caller asked
questions that were not In the province of a tax In-
vestigator.
The alert deputy inquired what number he had dialed, and
was told the one the caller had Intended to dial
He had missed the exchange abbreviation by one hole on
the dial. ^L.*. a
It was not difficult to locate the premises, which turned out
to be an unmarked pool and billiard parlor, with th most an-
tiquated of equipment Infrequently used. \
The proprietor Is now under Investigation by a racket squad.
WWBpe^ffitiehaSve'ib> lht*re*te*'fa a>mm1en trker"
who advertised his business by printed circular, in which he of-
fered to accept wagers without limit on all major racetrack* In
the United States. tj tu
He advised his customers that he could supply them with
Itemized statements of their transactions for anv day. He used
a public wire service to receive and transmit the beta.
The wire service Kept detailed records of all funds received
for the "broker" and paid out In his behalf, making weekly set-
tlements In currency of small denomination a state official got
a search warrant and found a secret safe in the basement con-
taining well over $100,000 In small bills.
The taxpayer reported leas than IIO.MO income as a
commissioner broker" daring the year tnvolevd, bat the
investigating agents have recommended the assessment
of additional taxes and penalties exceeding $200,oe, and
criminal prosecution for attempted evasion.
These are a few Items. Some honeys will soon crop up.
THIS IS TOW 90HUM TMI MAMRS OWH COtUMN
Capitalism,
US-Style,
Touted For UK
By Bruce Biotsat
a
THE MAIL BOX
fae Mea Bes a eeee rara o. naasn at The mmm
LrtHn at* receivei tratera* in. are baaslsd to raeM* et*Hesatlei
H r*s atiajtr, letter satri sapstssa N teeta* appear
art toy. Utters ere Beatabas tat arder latirvss.
Pisse try to ass Hm totters Hrarres to peas to
latatMv or tor rrsters a hoto to rfrict.it iSBtleeaaa
fat sswipepsi asearas aa raspeas*!! fat
(VLpiNtsM M Mfttft from P*Mtri.
VENOMOUS BALDERDASH
La Boca, Canal Zone.
Mr. Editor:
The article on "UJi*" which appeared In last Friday's issue
k,t your venerable paper and which was purported to nava been
written by "A Local Rate Parent" stank to highest hoaven. It
turned the stomachs of many intelligent and decent members
pi the colored community who are constant readers of this pa-
per, and only served as the smelly receptacle Into which its
writer" spewed the venom which seems to have saturated and
ilsoned his system to a point defiant pf description. Pity. Mr.
liter, you altowe dthls unthinking bigot to take advantage of
ur generosity by allowing his balderdash to appear In public
t. You certainly allowed your democracy to get the better
you that time.
Just what "A Local Rate Parent" hopes to achieve by his
elees display of treachery Is beyond me. I would say, how-
ver, that he has undoubtedly succeeded in making himself and
fellow Negroes the butts of many a side-splitting Joke among
bur neighbors on the other side of the racial fence. How they
ust scream with laughter whan they see how much time we
fcpend TRYING to ridicule and hillttle each other.
In closing. Mr. Editor, I must express my conviction that "A
Ste Parent" is a highly eligible candidate for some psy-
c institution and I can only hope the Rods will come
his rescue before it Is too late. Thanks.
"Quite Disgusted."
$16 REWARD FOR CAT-SLASHER
itor, Mail Box.
PANAMA AMERICAN,
r Sir:
Some savage bully, residing In the San Juan area In Ancon,
twice slashed a pet "tat belonging to me. On both occasions
succeeded In cutting the animal open to the extent that It
tas necessary to have him sewn by a veterinarian, The first
le was a couple of months ago and the second time last
This matter has been reported to the Canal Zone police with
rhom I have made a formal complaint. The police, after an
nvestigatlon. were of the opinion that the attack on the animal
as made by a whip.
This is an Inoffensive animal, over ten years old. and has
ten castrated so does not annoy residents by yowling and creat-
ig disturbances.
I am herewith offering a reward of $25 for Information lead-
nf ^r.* *"** conviction of the perpetrator of this cruel
,ct. Information will be treated In the strictest confidence. I
7 nerew*th warning the individual that besides procesut-
nim to the fullest extent of the law. I will personally en-
aavor to separate him from his front teeth, an operation I feel
Z ,comDetant to perform. I don't like perverts who are cruel
'- helpless animals.
Philip L. Dada,
Most Americans take their ca-
pitalist economy for granted.
But in Europe, even where It Is
still fairly well entrenched, ca-
pitalism is under a cloud.
Many Europeans see it as the
enemy of social welfare and
progress.
Yet too few of them have
understood that the capitalism
they have known Is vastly dif-
ferent from the brand we live
under.
Theirs has usually been
marked by low wage, short-
sighted profit policies, and
cartels which, fix price
and production quotas. Our
has been distinguished in
recent decades by the
growth of enlightened wage
and welfare policies, by vi-
gorous competition and ima-
ginative expansion of pro-
duction. '
Our enterprisers hare moved
ahead adventurously, taking
risks, while European capitalists
generally have sat by, trying to
hold what they had.
Seen in this frame, the gains
of socialism In Europe are easier
to understand.
The peoples of Europe have
been turning away, not from
an American-style economy, but
from a backward system which
mo far has stubbornly declined
to adapt Itself to their needs.
Though the example of Ame-
rica has been steadily before
them, they have remained large-
ly ignorant of the bright pro-
mise of a more progressive ca-
pitalism.
This Is due in part to the
shocking general Ignorance of
the United States in foreign
lands; and In part' to the in-
evitably strong Impact of the
bad example Europeans saw at
home.
Confronted by the march
of socialism, most of them
have visualized no decent
alternative. Only a handful
have dared cry out for a
rebirth of capitalism; to
the rest this sounded like
turning the clock back.
Thus It comes-ilke a breeze
from the mountains to hear
that Britain's Conservative Par-
ty has now determined to cam-
paign against the socialist Lab-
or government with an Ameri-
can brand of capitalism.
The theme of this offensive
will be expansion, to create
more wealth and make Britain
stronger and more prosperous.
It's almost the first time in
history we have had talk of
this sort from Europe.
For years the approach in
Britain and on the Continent
has been marked by gloomy ne-
gative, imaginative and for-
ward-looking. It holds out hope
that re-armament can be achiev-
ed without plunging weary Bri-
tons once again into grim aus-
terity. .
No sensible American be-
Heves that Britain or any
other nation must copy our
economy closely to moka a
real go of capitalism. The
pattern must vary to fit the
country. The important
thing is to infuse European
capitalism with a new spirit,
to lay stress on creation, on
growth, on more wealth
and higher living stand-
ards. Those are the real
marks of an enlightened
free economy.
Britain's Conservatives have
made a historic decision.
They have embraced a pro-
gram that could well recom
mend itself to a people dead-
tired of controls, of wealth-
sharing instead of wealth-pro-
ducing, of the professional
gloom-mongering of a Socialist
government.
From Here to Eternity?
Fighting Talk
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK. The greatest prop to Britain's
pride since Sir Francis Drake slapped down the
Armada seems to be young Randy Turpln, who
is over here ostensibly to repeat the same sort
of feat against Sugar Robinson tonight.
Young Mr. Turpln perpetrated Indignities on
the carcass of our best fighter in London, and
Is valiantly present In this hostile land to see
kin he do it again.
Mother England has not been running in the
bast of luck, lately, what with losing India,
fouling up In the oily East and keeping the
Labor party in office.
And after turning out the most awful canvas-
backs in the history of boxing, they have finally
come up with a commodity of which they can
be proud.
not of the international significance of the
Japanese treaty parley in San Francisco.
It is mildly remindful of the great hubbub
that was raised when Max Schmellng came back
here to face Joe Louis, after knocking him stiff
in a previous engagement.
Nationalism was running high In those days,
too, when the Nazis were fierce and proud, and
every third person you met seemed to be a
German spy with a Leica hanging around his
neck.
The tumult reached proportions where the
honor of two nations were literally at stake,
with Schmellng bearing whole weight of the
Nazis' 100 percent Aryan philosophy, and Mr.
Louis, a cotton-picker's boy, more or less speak-
ing lor the right of the individual to appear
Nationalism Is at." a fever peak in this in- proudly in any color and espouse-Jiny creed he
stance. r -chdleT*
There It a fresh firmness to the expatriate We might have had some Inkling then of the
British chin, a new stiffness to the lip. Nazi's eventual down-fall.
The umbrella is bit more tightly furled, and
the bowler cocked at a slightly more Jaunty
angle.
Visiting Britishers who have not appeared
publicly since Winston Churchill exited are pop-
ping out from under rocks, and the crunch of
the scone Is heard around the land.
I lunched with three such stout fellows the
other day, and I am firmly convinced that if
Turpln wins again, Britain will declare war on
Russia, retake India, and Institute proceedings
to have America legally returned to status of
colony.
Mr. Turpln, a mild and pleasant young man,
has achieved the modem stature of St. Oeorge
merely by wounding this dragon, Robinson, and
I should not be surprised If he were knighted
at the next Investitures If he succeeds in pro-
tecting his crown.
Britain rewards Its heroes with titles for va-
liant work performed in time of strife, so at
least a baronetcy should be his meet If he slaps
the stuffings out of Sugar over here.
Trie art of the moused eye has more or less
been on decline In public interest since Joe
Louis passed his peak, and it Is pleasant to see
a gentle furor stirred over an Incident which is
Louis stepped in and threw a fist clean
through the Schmellng kidney. Max screamed
like a horse and collapsed.
He went back to Germany strapped to a
board, and the cotton-picker's boy had set back
the cause of pure Aryanism some several hun-
dred years.
Schmellng, the hero and defender of Nazi
purity, went back home to disgrace and obscur-
ity.
As I recall, some newspaper wag, the day
after the momentous defeat, prepared an Item
for his paper as follows:
"Berlin It was authoritatively reported here
today that M. Schmellng, former boxer, had
been discovered to have had a Jewish grand-
mother."
No such grim Issues as Nazism and racial
persecution are Involved in tonight's go be-
tween Randy and Sugar, but national pride It
once again Involved.
For the sake of Merrie England's self-respect,
I hope her boy wins again.
Although I must confess that in the heat of
Side of country I was suckered Into betting
e Marquess of Mllford Haven, at insane odds
of 12 to one In favor of our tiger, the nimble
Mr. Robinson.
^niy WASHWGTOH
MERRY-GO-ROUND
y drew
MAXSON
*3"aaBBBaB
Matter Of Fact
By JOSEPH ALS0P
KOREA, MANCHURIA, SIBERIA?
BEST-TRESSED OAL-Bsm-
boo blonde and a yard high is
the three-pound coiffure worn
by Joyce Ma thaws to show bow
It was with a French lady of the
Louis XVI period on a New York
television show. Atop die waves
is a ship, commemorating a
Franco at val victory.
WASHINGTON. Without exception, the
American leaders still believe that the Soviet
leaders do not want a general war, and they
are "holding that thought," at the pep lecturers
used to say.
None the less, it is also true that the fever
chart is currently rising continuously and per-
ceptibly, because of the Increasing signs that
the enemy In Korea meant to end the Kaesong
truce talks with another all-out offensive.
The signs are not conclusive. The offensive,
if it comet, may perhaps be limited in scope.
But on the whole. It the Chinese and North
Koreans resume fighting in deadly earnest, It is
expected to be a vastly more serious matter
than the mere dragging continuation of the war
on the old, pre-Kaesong basis.
For one thing/ If the hopes raised by the Ma-
lik proposal and the Kaesong talks prove to be
false, American public opinion It likely to be so
outraged that the whole precarious concept of
limited war will come apart at the political
seams.
Yet the main danger is undoubtedly In the
air, and It Is a greater danger than most peo-
ple think.
If this air danger materializes. It will do so
In two stages, as it were.
The first will be simple enough. The 400 to
500 Soviet Jet fighters, and the 500 to 700 older
model Russian fighter bombers and medium
bombers now In Manchuria will be thrown Into
the battle at the beginning of the enemy of-
fensive.
This Chinese and North Korean force (which
is quite probably piloted largely by Eastern Eu-
ropean "volunteers") may well achieve substan-
tial initial successes, since our troops in Korea
have no experience of enemy air action.
In any case, the issue of counter-attacking
the enemy air bases In Manchuria will at once
be tquarelv posed.
Thus the second stage of the danger will open.
Last December, when Prime Minister Attlee
flew to Washington to plead with the President
to limit the Korean war. his greatest fear was
that Oen. Douglas MacArthur would be allowed
to attack the Manchurian air batee.
At that time the British participants In the
White House talks claimed to have "hard in-
telligence" that American air attacks on Man-
churian targets would bring the Soviet Air Force
in Siberia into the fighting.
This had been specifically agreed between Mo-
lotov and Mao Tsc-tung, so it was claimed, when
the Chinese Intervention in Korea was first
planned.
For one thing, the American Chiefs of Staff
have thrashed out with their British and French
< opposite numbers the hypothetical question,
"What to do if enemy air enters the Korean
fighting in heavy force?"
The agreed answer, decided upon, to be sure,
some time before the Kaesong truce talks, wat
that counter-attacks beyond the Manchurian
border would then become unavoidable. Thus
It is now official policy, if need arises, to take
the action that British "hard intelligence" said
would brine the Russians Into the war.
Perhaps knowledge of the Anglo-Franco-Am-
erican agreement may also have altered the
Soviet Intentions reported by Prime Minister
Attlee last December.
High level Pentagon opinion at the moment
It that even after all-out air fighting begins,
the Soviets will not send In their own Siberian
air power unless the Chinese and North Korean
air units sustain a severe defeat.
If that should happen, however, (and natural-
ly all hopes and expectations are that It will
happen) the Soviets will have a hard time hold-
ing aloof much longer.
Finally, If the 8oviet air power In Siberia Is
thrown into the fight. It will be an incalculably
serious business In the simplest most local mi-
litary sense.
Counting Army, Navy and Marines together,
the UH. forces have perhaps eighteen to twenty
air wings now in action in the Far East.
But in addition to the Chinese and North
Korean Air Force of over 1.000 planes, the So-
viets have over 3,000 combat aircraft on their
Siberian bases, on a great arc reaching from
Vladivostok into central Siberia.
These Soviet air units In Siberia have lately
had their obsolete aircraft largely replaced, and
a great effort hat been made to build up their
formerly low stocks of fuel and other supplies.
In short, the Soviet air power in the Far East
today Is greater than our own.
(Copyright, 1951, New York Herald Tribanc Inc.)
Senator O'Conor says: Crime control now hinges on local'
officials; Washington cannot solve all the problems;.
Television will continue to keep the public informed. '
(While Drew Pearson Is an a brief vacation, the Washing-
ton Merry-Go-Roond Is beinr written by distinguished guest
columnists, today's being by Sen. Herbert R. O'Conor, chair-
man, Special Senate Committee to Investigate Organised
Criase la Interstate Commerce.)
WASHINGTON.Out of the Investigations and hearings of
the Senate Crime Investigating Committee two questions of far-
reaching importance suggest themselves
1) Will local enforcement officials arise to their opportunity,
as presented by disclosures of crime syndicate operations, etc., to
rid their localities, their states and the nation of the octopuslike
crime system which is threatening the Judicial processes of our
country, and
2) Will television, which served to arouse the people of
America to the crime situation, be generally accepted as another
and a most potent means of keeping the citizens of our country
to close touch with the functioning of our government?
Local enforcement must be the reliance of law-abiding
citizens.
If there It one development which millions of our people do
not want to see. It is further encroachment by the Federal Gov-
ernment upon the local activities and affairs of our communities.
All too much, In recent years, has there been a disposition
among states and cities, as well at individuals, to look to Wash-
ington for solution of problems which seemed difficult of handling
at the local level.
Naturally, therefore, when the Senate committee successively
made its disclosures about varolus phases of criminal operations
throughout America, some were ready to tread the path of least
resistance and transfer to the central government the Job of
combating lawlessness.
But as one who has always fought against further intrusion
of the Federal Government Into local affairs, and as a former
prosecuting attorney, I am convinced that the answer to the
nation-wide crime problem will be found only In the localities.
The people themselves are the final authority in this respect.
Only as they demand, and continu to demand, from local
enforcement officers honesty and dutiful enforcement of the
criminal laws, will the reign of the mobster and the crime syndi-
cates be ended.
It would be very, consoling to think that there is some one
agency to take the lob out of the hands of all the millions of
pepole affected and by some magic Federal process eliminate the
corruption which makes possible the operation of gangsters and
racket organizations.
But such wat not intended to be America's way of handling
problems.
Moreover, it never would be successful even if the people of
America were inclined to seek such a solution. Which they
are not!
With regard to the second question, a by-product, so to
speak, of the investigation, there will be much controversy, un-
doubtedly. But I think the answer is a relatively simple one,
Television Is new. As the New York and Detroit hearings, and
the later sessions in Washington, proved, television can have
a tremendous effect upon the public consciousness.
It is, however, merely another method of dissemination of
information.
It It an extension of radio, a personalizing of the newsreel,
both of which have been generally accepted now, along with the
newspapers, the magazines, and photography at media for trans-
mitting news to people everywhere.
Protest has been raised against use of television In Con-
gressional hearings, at an invasion of the rights of those to be
questioned.
Some of the witnesses have been quick to seize upon the
question thus raised. They have refused to testify before tele-
vision cameras on the ground that it was an Invasion of their
personal rights.
This Involved several considerations by our committee.
First, there wat a question of the individual's alleged right to
refuse testimony on such grounds, as opposed to the right of
the American people in general to be furnished fullest Informa-
tion regarding the functioning of the committee, operating as an
arm of the Senate.
A second and important point involved the question as to
whether the possible Information to be gained from the witness
was of such Importance as to negate the right of the general pub-
lic to see and hear the proceedings.
In this connection it must be realised that it It possible fqr
a witness to be to distracted by news devices, such as television
and .newsreel cameras, at to Interfere with the giving of
testimony.
This mutt be taken tato consideration by the committee
whose primary purpose for holding the hearing it to ascertain
the facts as the basis for future legislation.
The committee recognised this phase of the matter, and
took steps to reduce the amount of the equipment in the hear-
ing room.
Owing to the limited space available, however. It was not
possible to place the equipment so that it could function without
offering some disturbance to the witness.
Thus, at times, and because of protests by witnesses against -
the use of television, etc., the committee was forced to the deci-
sion that the tesimony of the witness was more Important than ;
the transmission of that particular testimony by television to
the public, and cameras were ordered to be turned away from
the witness during the taking of testimony.
The TV controversy, while centering upon the crime hearings,
did not stop there.
Its implications spread to the field of congressional hearings
in general. And there were some who were disposed, apparently,
to the belief that it wat unfair to a prospective witness to be
required to testify before the TV camera.
Provision of more modern facilities for handling television
and newsreels, possibly In soundproof glass rooms, might well re-
move many of the objectlnt thus far raited to the use of such
media in public hearings.
The committee's reaction with regard to the matter. In
which I concurred completely, can be stated briefly, as follows:
1) Television should be permitted In open hearings by con-
gressional committees, on the same basis that newsreel cameral,
radio, flashbulbs, photographs and newspaper and magazine re-
ports of the hearings are permitted.
2) At the same time every precaution should be taken to
safeguard the rights of witnesses to at to assure that the wit-
ness's ability to testify It not unduly hampered by the presence
of news disseminating equipment.
To afford satisfactory conditions under winch the witness
may testify undisturbed, provisions should be made so that newt
equipment is not conspicuous and is so operated aa not to distract
or Interfere with the functioning of the committee.
(Copyright, 1051, By The Bell Syndicate, Inc.)
Costs Less To Sell
House This Way!
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PANAMA
AMERICAN
*



PAGE EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN mDEPENPFNT T)ATI,Y NEWSPAPER'
' _
Lowly Browns Knock Yankees Out Of
St. Louis Bops New York
Twice While Tribe Splits
'Wednesday, septembh 7'
---- o ----
By United Press
NEW YORK, Sept. 12 Last night the Browns rose
up from the frustration of accumulated! years and twice
knocked out the Yankees 4-3 and 6-3 to win their first
doubleheader in Yankee Stadium since 1945.
The Cleveland Indians had a
grand chance to take a compara-
tively firm hold on the lead In
Philadelphia and they acted like
champs bv coming from behind to
top the Athletics 8-5 In eleven
lnnines In the opener.
In the second ame, however,
they let the Athletic., score five
runs In their half of the eighth
and go on to win 9-5 after the
Tribe had tallied four times In the
upper eighth to take a 5-4 lead.
The Boston Red Sox was I he
onlv contender to show a solid
profit for the day, yet the
mighty Red Sox sluggers could
muster onlv three hits in their
4-3 win over the fifth place
Detroit Tigers.
The St. Louis Browns' rookie
Jim McDonald won his own game
by singling In the winning run
of the opener with two out in the
ninth. Then two especially frus-
trated ex-Yankees. Cliff Mapes
and Tommy Byrne, went to work
in the second game.
Mapes hit a three-run homer
to put the Browns in front for
good and Byrne received credit
for his fifth victory even though
Satchel Palae had to come in and
pitch one-hit relief ball for the
last three and one-half Innings.
The Browns beat rookie Tom
Morgan and ace Allie Reynolds,
treating Reynolds like a second
rater until they finally knocked
him out.
Yogi Berra hit homers in
each game for New York for
their lone bright spot to bring
his season's total to 26. Benny
Taylor and Earl Rapp homer-
ed for St. Louis in the opener.
" The Indians won the opener
'When relief pitcher Early Wynn
tripled to score a tie breaking
rui and receive credit for his
J8lh victory.
In the second game after Luke
Easter's two-run double high-
.Hghted a four-run Cleveland ral-
4y. the spoiler Athletics burst
Those with a succession of singles
and won going away.
" The Red Sox scored three runs
In the eighth inning after De-
troit had used a triple play to
cut them off in the previous
frame. Ted WUliams delivered a
two-run single for the key blow
as rookie Leo Kiely won his sixth
fame although he needed a little
e'p from'Ellis Kinder.
In the only other American
League game, Sam Mele singled
home the winning run In the
tenth for a 7-6 Washington vic-
tory over Chicago that broke a
Bine-game losing streak.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
The Brooklyn Dodgers went six
games in front of the New York
Giants when rookie Clem Labine
pitched a six-hit 7-0 victory over
the Cincinnati Reds while New
York was splitting at St. Louis
winning 10-5 and then losing 4-3.
Faces In
The Majors
| The Pniladelphia Phils edged
the Pittsburgn Pirates 3-2 as
I Robin Roberts pitched a five-
i hitter for his 19th victory while
1 the Cubs outslugged the Boston
i Braves 13-11 at Chicago.
Andv Pafko paced a ten-hit
Dodger attack with three singles
as Labine struck out four and
yielded no extra base blows.
Wes Wcstrum's third grand
slam of the year set the pace for
the Giants in their opening vic-
tory as Dave Koslo won his
eighth game but Cliff Chambers
held the Giants to five hits In
the second contest while the Car-
dinals made 14, giving up only
two safe blows until the ninth
when Bobby Thomson homered
to spark a three-run rally.
Playground
Sports
BASKETBALL STANDINGS
TEAMS Won Lost Pet.
Cyclonia...... 3 O 1.000
Victor........ 2 1 .667
Lake View...... 1 2 .333
Pico.......... 0 3 .000
Frank outh's Cyclonia settled
their feud with Tom Lowe's Vic-
tor 5 to hold on to first place in
the Paraso Basketball League by
trouncing the champs, 39-29.
In the first quarter the score
was tied 4-4. Frank South and
Scott had two baskets apiece. In
the second quarter Scott picked
up one point and South three
with the help of Gonzales, mak-
ing the score 10-5.
In the third quarter Gonzles
caught fire shooting five baskets.
In the last quarter Tom Lowe
tried everything in the books but
failed.
High pointer was School Boy
Scott with nine points. For Cy-
clonia Frank South and Gonz-
les were high pointers with 12
and 17 respectively.
Lake View crawled out of the
cellar by defeating Pico 39-29.
Roy Gooden starred with 25
points. Gilbert Maynard scored
nine points for Pico.
Army Sports
The 65th AAA Group Bowling
team, selected after an elimina-
tion period of from two to six
weeks, was announced today by
Group Headquarters. The team
will Lomoeie In the USARCARIB
Bowling Tournament to begin on
Sept. 17.
The Ack-Ack team will be rep-
resented by the following keg-
lers: Sfc Robert Pugh (team cap-
tain), 168; Sgt. D. L, McLeod, 167;
Sgt. C. L. Smathers 182; Capt.
Walter Skeistaitis, 161; Capt. E.
L. Wells, 161; Cpl. J. A. Bejerano,
157.
The Group team represents an
over-all average to date of 162.66.
A.F.B. SHEET TEAM Albrook's newly organ!
feated Balboa Gun Club and Fort Kobbe teams
team made up of Major William A. Clarke, le
Truman F. Cadwell and George Watrous, right,
Balboa scored 348. Fort Kobbe placed third in
mlngs of the Albrook team and Fogarty of Bal
of 75 hits. Twenty-five gunners took part in
were represented by a five man team while B
top scores were computed.
zed Skeet Team, Saturday toppled the unde-
in Its first competitive meet. The Albrook
ft. Capta. Max Sanslng. Lawrence Cummlngs,
scored a total of 352 out of a possible 375 while
the three team meet with a total of 338. Cum-
boa tied for Individual high score with, a 73 out
Saturday's meet. Both Albrook and Fort Kobbe
alboa used 15 gunners of which only the five
(Photo by Albrook AFB Photo Lab.)
Madison Square Garden Hoop
Schedule *Cui* By Scandals
Sam Dente
in Romano
7
NEW YORK. Sept. 12 (UP)
There will be fewer college bas-
ketball games at Madison Square
Garden this season because of
the scandals that have rocked the
sport all year.
Promoter Ned Irish has releas-
ed the 1951-52 Garden schedule
and It shows 13 double headers.
That's the smallest schedule
since the 1944-45 wartime season.
The Garden has billed at least 21
double headers every year since
then with the record high of 29
set In 1947-48.
The reduction is due to scan-
dals which hit both Long Island
University and City College of
New York. Both schools had been
regular host teams at the Gar-
den, but LIU-nas given up bas-
ketball and City will play only a
small-time schedule this year.
Three other New York teams-
New York University, St. John's
and Manhattan Collegewill be
host teams this year to 31 out-of-
town opponents.
Twenty-one of the 46 visiting
teams of last season will be back
again. The schedule also includes
10 of the 12 National Invitation
Tournament teams.
There also are a number of no-
table absentees. Neither Ken-
tucky's .. CAA champions nor
Bradley University, which also
was hard hit by a scandal on Its
campus, will be back. Others
which will not return this winter
are Canlslus, Cornell Yale, Dart-
mouth and all the Pacific Coast
Conference schools.
Four schoolsSt. Bonaventure,
Dayton, Louisville and lona Col-
lege of New Rochelle, New York
will play in the Garden for the
first time.
The season opens Dec. 1st with
NYU meeting William and Mary
and Manhattan playing Siena
College. The program of double
headers will continue until Feb.
28 and will be followed by the
National Invitation Tourney, the
East-West All-Star game and the
Olympic trials.
Sports Briefs
BY UNITED PRESS
Doctors at Camp Plckett Hos-
pital In Virginia announce that
Private Art Houttemanformer
Detroit pitching starwill be dis-
charged In a few weeks. Army
doctors recommend the discharge
because Houtteman suffers re-
curring headaches. The Tigers
probably won't be able to use
Houtteman this season, since he'd
need weeks to get back Into
pitching shape.
American League
TEAMS Won Lost
Cleveland. 9 52
8fi
81
75
fi:t
New York.
Boston .
Chicago. .
Detroit .
Philadelphia 60
Washington 54
St. Louis 63
.
51
54
4
75
81
81
93
Pet. G.B.
.631
.629 1
.600 5
.536 13
'.457 264
.426 29
.460 32
.316 414

Today's Game
Detroit at Boston.
Chicago at Washington (N).
(Only Games Scheduled.)

Yesterday's Results
Detroit 101 001 0003 8 0
Boston 000 10} 03x4 3 0
Stuart. Bearden (3-4), Trout
and Swift; Klely (8-3), Kinder
and Rosar.
National League
TEAMS Won Lost Fct. G.B.
Brooklyn 88 48 .647
New York. 14 56 .600 6
St. Louis 72 64 .529 16
Boston ... 68 68 .500 20
Philadelphia 66 73 .475 234
Cincinnati 60 M .429 30
Chicago. 58 81 ,417 314
Pittsburgh^.. 17 8J .407 33
FIRST GAME (Twilight)
St. Louis 010 200 0014 9 1
New York 110 010 0003 7 3
McDonald (4-0) and Batts;
Morgan, Ostrowskl (6-4) and
Berra.
SECOND GAME (Night)
St. Louis.......... 6 9 0
New York.......... 3 7 2
Former Chicago White Sox
pitcher Monty trattonwho lost
a leg la a hunting accident at
the height of his careerwill go
to work for the Texas Engineer-
ing and Manufacturing Compa-
ny. Stratton. despite his handi-
cap, made a brief comeback In
1946. Tht was eight years after
his accident, and he won 18 and
lost four with Sherman, Texas,
of the Big State League. In 1948
he quit baseball to act as advisor
on the filming of his life story.
The Pittsburgh Pirates have
announced the release of first
baseman Glen Nelson to the Chi-
cago White 8ox on waivers. Nel-
son played In 71 games for the
Pirates this year and batted .263.
FIRST GA'.ME (Twilight)
(Eleven Innings)
Cleve. 002 001 200 016 10 1
Phila. 000 230 000 005 14 2
Garcia, Gromek, Brlssle. Wynn
(18-12) and Tebbetts, Hegan;
Zoldak, Martin (10-5), Schelb
and Tipton.
SECOND GAME (Night)
Cleveland........... 5 7 2
Philadelphia........ 9 12 0
NIGHT GAME
Chicago............ 6 14 2
Washington.....? .. 7 15 1
Today's Games
Boston at Chicago.
Brooklyn af Cincinnati.
New York at St. Louis.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh.
11a.
Yesterday's Results
FIRST GAME (Twilight) .
New York 010 110 30310 12 6
St. Louis 100 200 101 5 9 0
Koslo (8-9) and Westrum; Sta-
ley.Bockelman (2-3),Kriegerand
Sarnl, Rice.
SECOND GAME (Night)
New York.......... 3 5 0
St. Louis.......... 4 14 2
NIGHT GAME
Philadelphia........ 3 6 2
Pittsburgh......... 2 5 0
NIGHT GAME
Brooklyn.......... 7 10 1
Cincinnati.......... 0 8 0
Boston 002 342 00011 14 4
Chicago 060 200 23x13 19 1
Wilson, Burdette, Paine, Chip-
man (4-2), Estock and St. Claire;
McLish, Dubiel, Leonard, Lown,
Kllppsteln (6-6). Rush and Bur-
gess.
TODAI. WAVE
University, Ala. (NEAV
Thirty-five of the boys whc>play-
ed In the Alabama All-Star high
school football game have en-
rolled at Alabama.
LOOK YOUR
President Ford Frick of the
National League says the loop has
bought the contract of Umpire
Tom Gorman from the Interna-
tional League. Gorman is a for-
mer New York Giant pitcher. The
"1-year-old umpire will get his
first assignment in the National
League at Chicago.

BUNT 1.05
LARGE MK
PERSONAL 15(
VI PERSONAL 15<
aseline
THADI MAMK
f ALINK to ik* raftourW ._ .
rfitoOMlMUHItCsCx
GUN CLUB
NOTES
Top honors In the skeet team
shott held at the Balboa Gun
Club Saturday afternoon, Sept.
8, went to the Albrook Air Force
boys who defeated both the Fort
Kobbe team and the Balboa Gun
Club group, i Congratulations to
Captain Watrous for his excel-
lent selection of his team of Col-
onel Coates, Major Clarke, Cap-
tain Cummlngs, Captain Sansing
and Captain Cadwell.
Regrets were expressed by all
the shooters that Colonel Coates'
illness forced him to drop out af-
ter the second event. The air-
men's total of 352x375 broken
targets was four birds higher
than the score of 348x375 made
by the Balboa Gun Club team.
The Army team which Is hadly
disorganized by the loss of some
of its best shooters through
transfers and discharges, regis-
tered a score of 350x375.
Leading In the big artillery dis-
play of the day were Capt. Cum-
mlngs, USAF, and Tom Fogarty
Balboa team, with 73x75 each!
Capt. Sanslng, USAF, and Capt.
Spencer, Fort Kobbe, were on
their toes to finish with 72x75
each. Judging from the attend-
ance of 25 shooters, more and
more Interest Is being displayed
In these team events which ar
becoming Increasingly popular.
Farewells were said to Tom
McNeil who will leave Sept. 14
with Mary via the PRR boat lor
New York with a stop at the Vir-
ginia State Fair, and possibly
some gun clubs In the States, be-
fore departing for a visit with
relatives in England and Ireland.
They will return on New Year's
Eve in time to wish us all a Hap-
py New Year. We'll miss you at
the shoots, Tom and Mary]
All shooters were invited to the
shoot to be Jieid at the Gamboa
Gun Club. Sunday, Sept. 16,10:30
a.m., for a session with skeet and
trap targets! but for the benefit
of those notiat Saturday's shoot,
we will be 'expecting you too.
There will be plenty of hot coffee
and coffee cake to provide that
extra stimulus.
Scores:
Total Score
t (75 Targets)
Captain Spencer .. 72
M-8gt. Carter .... 64
Lt. Col. Marsh.. 4. 64
cpl. Pagel...... 64
Cpl. Taylor ...... 66
Captain Sanslng .. 72
Major Clark*.. .. 67
Colonel Coates .. 45x50
Captain Watttus,. It
CaptamjCumiung*, 73
Captatoa4i|b;At flfc* -*.
Tom McNeil., f. .. 64 v
Tom Fogarty ...... 73f
T. J. Tassln. ..T. 87
Raymond Norton.. 67
"Pop" Sanders;. .. 68
"Chief" Chester .. 66
Herbie Norton .... 55'
Ed Francis...... 66
Moore......... 62
Archie Turner.. .. 53
Gramly........ 87
Diette......... 59
'Charlie' Disharoon 71
Quljano.......1 69
HAIR
:r ionic
XT
HITTING HIGHSandy Sad-
dler sjngs a high note and
swats a high wallop at punch-
ing bag In training for defense
of hl| featherweight crown
against his old rival. Willie
Pep, at the PoloGcouhds, Sept.
26. (NEA)
---------------------------1*---------
Navy Sports
The Fifteenth Naval District
(Pacific side) Bowling Cham-
pionship is scheduled to com-
mence at 7:00 p.m. today at the
bowling alleys located on the 15th
Naval District Headquarters Re-
servation, Fort Amador, accord-
ing to an announcement today
from Headquarters, 15th Naval
District.
Entries have been received rep-
resenting the following activi-
ties within the District:
U.S. Naval Communication Sta-
tion Balboa; Headquarters, Fif-
teenth Naval District; Second
Guard Marines; Farfan Radio
Station; Summit Radio Station;
US8 ACM 12; Headquarters De-
tachment and First Guard Ma-
rines; VS. Naval Station, Rod-
man; U88 Recovery; Military
Sea Transport Service.
CUBAN WELTERWEIGHT CHAMPION Charolito Splritua-
no strikes up his fighting pose. The hard-hitting Cuban
147-pounder Is the early favorite to whip Panama's Tit Des-
palgne in their scheduled ten-round match Sunday night at
the Panama Gym. The boxers have signed to make a limit
of 151 with a forfeit of $50 for each additional pound over
the weight. A top-notch wrestling match between the best
heavyweight grapplers of Cuba (Negro Badu) and Mexico
(Charro Azteca) will be an added attraction, li
NOW VIA MIAMI


or Houston
For your convenience, Braniff now offers
two routes to, the United States. Via Mi-
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Panama to Miami). Your choice of quick
connections to any city in the eastern half
of the U. S. or Canada. Via Houston, you
fly direct to the heart of North America
with the best connections to California and
the West Coast.
.
^ Maw
4
'
For information and reservations, ,
call your travel agent or Braniff |
offict.
City Tickst Offlct
Tivoli A vs., 18Tal. 2-3728
El Panam Hotel
Via Espaa 111
Tel. 3-4726 or 3-1160,
extension 130
"Tocumsn Airport
Coln Ticks*Off ear
. Calls 10 No. 10,118
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'W.W
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n. im
>*>-
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AS INOETENDENT DAI1T VEWSPAPEB
PAGE NINB
Turpin-Robinson In Big Title Fight Tonight
Urzetta Leads 'Name* Players
In National Golf Amateur Play
BETHLEHEM, Ps Sept. 11
(UP)Ltd by Defending Chtm-
pion tern TJnetta of Rochester.
Ntw York, all the name playen
but one advanced Into the third
round of the National Amateur
Oolf Championship. The only up-
set yesterday taw 11-year-old Bill
Pbardton of pr oRenry Heard
dump two-time champion Wil-
lie Turneaa S and 2.
The play generally wat potty
over the .ffl-yard Saloon Val-
Je? Country Club court* at Btth-
lehem. Pennsylvania. Ursettt
mushroomed to a three over par
In beating Jack Selbv of Dallai
The Rochester atyllit went l-up
at the turn, and than doted out
the match on he -16th with a
and 3 victory.
Picardwhose dad held the
PQA crown in 1W*came from
behind to upset the American
Walker cup captain and National
Amateur king in 1M and 'I.
Turn isa contributed much to' hit
own defeat. First. Wee Willie tr-
rtved late at the flrat tee to for-
feit the hole.
Tumeea blrditd the aecond
holt to even the match, then won
the fifth to go ahead. Then the
former tltlcholder bogan spray-
lng hU thou. They made the
turn all even and Picard won four
of the next five holet. Turneaa
couldn't control hit drlvet and
approach hot, constantly hcok-
lnglnto the trees.
The INI championCharley
Co* of Oklahoma City and
Walker Cupper Jimmy MeHele
bath advanced into the third
round at the 300-man field wat
cut to M,
The day't best round was turn-
ed in by Billy Joe Patton of Mor-
gbnton; North Carolina. The Ca-
rolina Open Champion routed
Mike Dudlk of Johnson City, New
York, and 5. Patton who up-
set 1*M Champion Ted Bishop
NBA To Strip Titles From
Champs Who Fail To Defend
CHICAGO. Sept. U (UP)The
National Boxing Association has
voted to enforce its ruling to
strip the title from every cham-
pion who fails to defend his
crown at least ones every six
months.
Commissioner Abe Greene, whs
was re-elected at yesterday's clos-
ing session of the. Chicago con-
vention, warned delegate! tbat
the "six month" rule must be en-
forced. Greene said the NBA mutt
have proper machinery to make
this rule, which has been on the
association's books since 19, an
effective one. Delegates promised
their individual state commis-
sions would cooperate
Greene ays champions Who
have not signed for a title de-
fense within three months of
their last title fight will be warn-
ed.- If that Warning Is ignored,
the NBA will refuse to recognise
title-holders after a six-month
layoff.
In other action yesterday, the
NBA voted to set up a "warning
list" about fighters who should
be retired.
The next .convention was
awarded to Montreal, home of the
newly-elected president, Dave
Rochan.
. Vice-presidents elected were
George Barton of Minneapolis,
Andrew Putka of Cleveland, An-
thony Petronella of Providence,
Lou Radtlenda of Chicago, Floyd
Stevens of Detroit and Jamet
Holmes of Baltimore.
Harry Landry of friars Point,
Mississippi, was re-elected treas-
urer, and Dr. Ward Wile of Mul-
lin. WCat Virginia, was named
medical director.
Tommy Henrieh. the id pr, was saying its the dwgeut be-
fore the start ef the ral-curtailed Yaakfe-BjgL Box series: "If
we dent w K we sat name aaysitjpgH
any key nan lajariet and we have M ef ear
here in the, Stadianst."
And that's how it looks. If the. Yankees ara good enough
they can make It three in a row for Casey Stengel and- thus
turn him over to posterity at a mastermind despite his protesta-
tions that he has no lofty respect for the type of genius that is
associated with baseball thinkers.
An excellent way to land up In a squirrel cage is to try to
figure out what's likely to happen on the basis of what it left of
the schedule at this time of the season. The Indians, for ex-
ample, would seem to have all the worst of the schedule since
they must play 17 of their remaining II games on the road. Yet
It is quite conceivable they could win merely in the rokt of an
Innocent bystander.
This possibility U pointed up by the fact .that the Yankees
and the Red Sox have eight hand-to-hand encounters left, in-
cluding the two which were washed out Thursday. While they
arc knocking each other off, If that's the way it- should turn
out, the Indians would be In a position to profit by the after-
effect of common futility.
As the old pro points out, the fate of the Yankees Is strictly
In, i.ieir own hands. To win they must take a majority of the
Red Sox games. And there can be no guarantee that tW will.
The season's count stands 4-W against them. They haven't won
In Boston all year. And they didn't look at all Impressive in
dropping the one Same here the elements permitted.
e
j .
GOODMAN*. THE KEY MAN
In the Yankees favor Is the strength they traditionally show
when the chips are on the Une, Conversely, the Red Sox history
In similar situations Is not complimentary. Making it close, then
folding it an old Red Sox custom.: But Conditlont have a way of
changing. This could be a dlffetent Yankee team, lust as it
could be a different Red Sox team.
I thought I perceived a greater degree of hustle and,team
effort in the Red Sox performance the other night. Even Ted
Williams sear-ocred about in his ungainly fashion with unac-
customed-api V and after hitting a homer, his first this year in
the Statfum, he condescended to accept a congratulatory hand-
shake at the plate, a social gesture he usually ignores.
Somehow the Bad Sox always appear to be a more sprightly
force when Billy Goodman Is in the lineup. It was hit flrat in-
ning double Mutt put the Red Sox in front, a position they never
relinquished. I believe Joe McCarthy, when he managed there,
considered Goodman the most valuable player on the team. "He
gets you that important hit," McCarthy told me.
Thit was another way of saying the young man was stanch
in ths dutch. Ooodman has had a singular career- with the Red
Sox In that he has never had a- regular position. You might say
he never knows from one day to the next where he's going to
play. When he appeared at third base the other night it was the
ninth time he had changed positions this year. He's played ev-
erywhere except catch, pitch and center. And last year he led
the league In hitting with JM.
A very remarkable young man whose pay check must come
close to $10,000, er only about $76,000 lees than Ted Williams gets.
MCCARTHY COMBS BACK HOME
Incidentally, they honored Joe McCarthy at the Stadium
Saturday at an old-timer's gala. J find It easy to agree with Id
Barrow that baseball never knew a mere able manager. A stickler
for high standards as well as high talents, the Irishman'! con-
tributions to the class and character of the great Yankee teams
of the past were substantial. They were McCarthy teams and
they played McCarthy baaebell-whieh u te say they never beat
themselves.
In Bis heart McCarthy never left the Stadium and, of course,
if it hadn't been for a change in front office management which
the Irishman found unpleasant he would still be running the
teas today A group Of New York writers were dining with him
in Buffalo late last summer. We were there for the Chtries-
The Yankees were trailing by some five james and pitying
pctlly. One of the wr.ters, who had Jftt left the Yankees, re-
mtrkod that they were through. You would have thought the
writer had uttered a personal insult. "They'll win when they have
to," McCarthy snapped sharply. "They always do." An observation
wavering. Yankee fans might find comforting at this time.
Ths records show McCarthy could not win a pennant in three
trlet with J'si Red Box. Bat records do not always tell the com-
plete story, i thought McCarthy's handling of the Red Sox in
'4$, particularly, whs the ton managerial Job of his entire career.
He drove a third-place club te a tie for the pennant and lost
the playoff game simply because he was down to fourth-string
Mondaynext goes up against
McHale.
Patton fired a two-under par
for the IS holes It took him to
eliminate Dudlk. His approach
shots were pin splitters as he
went out in S4 on the first nine,
and coasted home for the victory.
Chunky Bob Hunts of Larch-
mont, New York, who scored that
stunning upset over pfe-tourney
favorite Prank Stranahan, con-
tinued his advance. Hunts elimi-
nated John Cameron of Houston,
3 and 2.
Also advancing Into the third
round were Public Links Cham-
pion Dave Stanley of Montebello,
California, and John Ward Clay
of New York, a seml-flnalist last
year. Stanley walloped Herb Em-
anuelson of Orange, New Jersey,
7 and $, and Ward eliminated
Bob Brownell of Chevy Chase,
Maryland, 3 and 1.
The going gets rougher today,
with two la-hole rounds on the
schedule. That will narrow the
field to 1$. There are. two more
rounds set for Thursday, the 36-
hole seml'flnais on Friday, and
the finals on Saturday.
,..,--------------*---------1--------- .
NO EASY RACKET Dog-
tired but happy. Beverly Baker
retted against an official'! perch
after defeating Margaret Var-
ner of El Pato in the United..
States women't tingles tt Porest
Hills. The Santa Monica mite
perspired under conventional
attire because of U.S. Lawn
Tennis Association objections
to the daring garb the helped
popularize. (NEA)
BIC WHEELNino De Rossi,
world amtteur pursuit race
a cling champion, speeds along
Isn't Vogorelli Stadium track.
The Italian pedaler dose four
kilometers in 4:59, plans te com-
pete ia England. (NXA).
COLORADO SPRINGS Colo-
rado, Sept.Former Army quar-
. .; act Bob Blaik and one other
e::-eadet Involved In the Wast
. o:nt cribbing scandal have en-
rolled at Colorado College.
College president says the Ar-
my football coach's son and Leon-
ard Delue of Denver, both of
whom resigned from West Point,
were admitted under probation
Neither U eligible to piar ball this
year. A transfer student must
wait one year under Rocky
Mountain Conference rules.

Sugar Ray 8 1-2 To 5
Favorite Over Randy
""ly UniHd Pms
NEW YORK, Sept. 12 World Middleweight Cham-
pion Randy Turpin ef Great Britain meets Former Cham-
pion Sugar Ray Robinson tonight in the richest non-heavy-
weight title fight in ring history.
Thousands of fans poured into the city from other
states and countries to join the throngs seeking frantical-
ly for "good" seats at the big international battle in the
Polo Grounds in which Robinson is an eight-and-one-half
to five favorite.
Promoter Jim Norrls, snowed
under by appeals for seats In the
sold-out field sections, boosted
his gate forecast from $600,000 to
"over $650,000." Tonight's total
proceeds may approximate S*00,-
003, including movie right*.
Robinson, although the chal-
lenger, will receive SO per cent of
the total net proceeds tonight
while Turpin will get only 39 per
cent. Robinson's eui may exceed
$200.000 the largest purse of his
career.
It It likely that each will try
te tear the ether down with a
for the demand for choice $30
seats was so great they were
commanding as nigh as $140 each
In the scalpers' market.
Bookmakers reported the
heaviest fight-betting since Joe
Lenis and Maxie Beer met at
Tanker Stadium in 1939. They
believed the inereasine. support
for Turpin might drop the
price te 7-5 by ring time: IS
p.m. (EDTI, S p.m. (Panam
time.
The tremendous all-round in-
terest in this return lS-round
scrap reflects tne general uncer-
Staady Tareist
body attack in the early rounds
far each has a reputation ef
"not liking it in the midrof f."
Robinson Is favored in the bet-
ting largely because many sports-
men doubt that the all-time
great who had lost but one of 131
fight before meeting. Turpin at
London could suddenly have fad-
ed out completely. They believe
that two months of rest and care-
ful conditioning will have re-
charged his batteries and restor-
ed his prowess.
Such great middies as Bob
Fltzslmmons, Tommy Ryan, Kid
McCoy, Stanley Ketchel and
Mickey Walker never engaged in
a bout that attracted such world-
wide interest and so much mon-
ey as will tonight's return clash
of the two Negroes.
With 16,000 seaU set up on the
field, the ball park will be able
to accommodate 70,000 fans If
necessary. It could be necessary;
Spalding Doubles
Finals Slated For
This Afternoon
The finab) ef the Spalding Cap
Doubles Tennis Tournament is
slated te be played at 4 p.m. to-
day at the Olympic Tennis Court
between the Webb Hearn-Capt.
Jim Hampton and Bill Hele-Jn-
lio Panilla combination!.
The Beam-Hampton duo, pre-
sent favorites te cop the toarney,
advanced to the finals by virtue
of their victery ever pre-tonraa-
ment cholees Lt. Claude l.uke-
Ueorge Metta in one ef the twe
semifinals.
The Hele-PinUU combine
whipped.Harry. Willit and Angel
DelvaUe in the ether semifinal
match.
The Winners of this afternoon's
finale will be presented with a
beautiful trophy by Artnro Mad-
ure.
In case ef rain the finals will
be played' tomorrow aftsrncoav.
Fight Dope
BT UNITED PRESS
Bar Bobina
talnty about whether Turpin's
sensational upset victory over
Robinson at London on July 10
was a "fluke."
HOW THEY COMPARE
TURPIN ROBINSON
tt Age 31
158'.* Weight in
ren" Height '"
e- Chest Normal 864"
44*" Shest Expanded S8"
7W Reach 714"
I" Neck 154"
SI" Waist SO"
IS" Biceps IS"
It 4" Pista 114"
SI" Thigh IS"
lew" Ankles V
-74" Wrist 74"
tfH" Forearm 16%"
IS" Calf IS
NEW YORK, Sept. ISUnbeat-
en Oil Turner of Philadelphia to-
day demanded a abet at BUS Gav-
tlaa's welterweight title, palatine
to his tenth round technical
knockout ef former Lightweight
King He WHttsaas for emphasis.
HU manager, Oeerge Kate,
hinted, however, that if a title
bout with Gaviln la not availa-
ble bMSMdiarely ho is willing to
send Tamer i
Billy Graham.
Turpin, 33, was given so little
chance against "unbeatable" 31-
year-old Robinson in July that
even British bettors made Randy
a 4-1 underdog. But the burly
young scrapper from Leaming-
ton, England, amazed the world
by carrying the fight to Sugar
Ray in every round, gashing his
left brow in the seventh session,
and winning the decision by a
comfortable margin.
Despite that defeat, Robin-
ton ie favored te win tonight
because many boxing men be-
Here he waa "stale** for the
London boat after a fight-a-
we ek Ea rope an tour that In-
cluded toe much night-club-
bing.
The London defeat was Ray's
second In 132 professional fights.
They believe liobinson was not
only stale but was unprepared for
Turpin's tricky style, and was
fearful of using his own ripping
body attack lest he be disquali-
fied for low blows. And they
doubt that an American referee
will permit Randy to clinch a to-
tal of 18 minutes tonight, and
use what appeared to be "rabbit
punches" te the back of Robin-
son's neck.
However, the Turpin backers
point out that the muscular
champion is "coming" while vet-
eran Robinson appears to be "go-
ing." The slightly deaf English-
man is stronger than Ray In the
clinches.
Ray U expected to weigh 187 at
today'! weigh-ln; Turpin, 1564.
BOMBBB BATCH
ITHACA. NY. (NEA) It-
haca College, facing a seven-
gave football season, has 86 can-
didates exclusive of .freshmen.
SHORT-SIDEDCoach Earl Blaik looks over West Point footbtll candidates limbering up on the
practice field. Prom these 52, hslf the normsl number of tryouts. Army must replace the power*'
> hniiM wiaml out bv a cribbins scandal. (NEA) '
HELD OVER BY INSISTENT DEMAND
THE AMERICAN CLUB
I happy to announce the
CONTINUED ENGAGEMENT OF
DON & LOYAL RAYMOND
The Musical Comedy Favoritea
end
The Town's Current Sensation
CHARLES BOURNE
The Wizard of the Piano
ENTERTAINMENT EVERY NIGHT
in the
ZEBRA LOUNGE ond BAMBOO ROOM
THE GAYEST SPOT IN PANAMA
The American Club
Facing Dc Lesaeps Park
Down by the Tivoli Hotel
a


There is no Problem .
?bea brean mitt faifa, for other raaaoaa bonk finta., fa
Doeton recommend, "Pat your Bab? oa LACTOCEN."
LACTOCEN pr.i f~J Steps .oeemar, tstfafy it* sa*b ef Us fe* pc^iTft-
oy: food to make rood W boac; aoud teeth; fir, li.he moaefai
arrea; a happy diepooitioa .J ,, ^fMum emjtCJajaJaa,
tj&ift
A MBTur MO0UCT sejPAKH) BMCUUV K* insant
P. A. CLASSIFIEDS


I


TITLE FIGHT MAY DO SI
Odds On Robinson
Soaring Again
NEW YORK. Sept. 12. (IT)
(UP) Middleweight Cham-
pion Rand Turpin had an ad.-
Tanlacr of one-and-one-half
pound when he weighed hi
today for tonight's 15-round
title fight against Ray Robin-
son. Turpin weighed 159
pounds. Robinson 157'i.
The weight was believed per-
fect for Robinson. He had tried
to build up to that figure because
he believed he was stale and off
form at 154'2 pounds when he
lost hi* title to Turpin In London
July 10. Turpin scaled three-
quarters of a pound more than
he weighed in London.
Robinson, who had been favor-
ed at 8'2-to-5, immediately be-
came a longer choice at ll-to-5
alter the weigh-in. There were
Indications that he would go in-
to the ring at 9 p.m. (Panama
time) at still better than two-to-
one.
George Gainford. Robinson's
manager, asked Boxing Commis-
sioner Eddie Eagan for a clarifi-
cation regarding the controver-
sial "rabbit punch" which Turpin
was accused of using in the Ju-
ly 10 fight.
Eagan said. "The 'rabbit
punch.' naturally, is barred in
clean boxing. The rabbit punch
Is a blow not struck-with the
knuckles but rather with the side
of the fist or hand."
(See earlier story on sports
page.)
AN INDEPEND
DAILT NEWSPAPER
Panama American
'Let the people know the truth and the country is aafe" Abraham Lincoln.

TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR
PANAMA, R, P.. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1951
FIVE CENTS
Czech Engineer Ties Throttle
In Dash Out Of Iron Curtain
Lowly Browns
Shock Yankees
The League's Best
(Includes Last Night's
Games)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Stan Musial, Cardinals.....368
Richie Ashbum, Phillies. .. .340
Jackie Robinson, Dodgers .336
Roy CarnpanelU, Dodgers .. .329
Johnny Wyrostek, Reds.....313
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Ferris Fain. Athletics......331
Ted Williams. Red Sox.....324
George Hell, Tigers.......323
Orestes Mioso, White Sox.. .322
Gil Coan, Senators.......317
(SPORTS PAGES: 8 & 9)
Materials Conflicts
Adjustable, Says
International Bank
WASHINGTON. Sept. 12
The International Bank for Re-
construction and Development
ays in Its sixth annual report
that It believes conflicts in the
allocation of scarce materials
and equipment- can be resolved
without serious damage to the
US-Wide Alarm Out-
Gambler Eludes Cops
NEW YORK, Sept. 12 (UP) Brooklyn's Dis-
trict Attorney issued a nationwide alarm today for
gambler Harry Gross confessed $ 1,000,000 briber of
police who escaped custody on the eve of testifying
as a star witness in the trial of 18 policemen accused of
bribe-taking.
Gross was last reported emplaned for New Mexico.
The one-time head of a J20,0()0,000-a-year gam-
bling syndicate escaped from two detectives attached to
the District Attorney's office last night while visiting his
wife at their summer home at Atlantic Beach, Long Is-
land.
He had been free under $25,000 bond while await-
ing sentence on his guilty plea to 65 counts of bookmak-
ing and one of conspiracy to violate the grmbling laws.
But he had been given a continuous guard.
Gross up until last night had been a model of co-
operation in Brooklyn's sensational investigation of po-
lice tie-ups with gamblers.
CLU To Pick
New Officers
Nomination of officers to be
elected at the October meeting
will be the chief business before
the Central Labor Union and
Metal Trades Council at their
monthly meeting on Sunday.
The Margarita Clubhouse Is
the CLU-MTC meeting place this
month. The meeting is to start at
8:30 a.m.
NFFE Local 595
Meets Tomorrow
The regular meeting of Local
595. National Federation of Fed-
eral Employes will be held to-
morrow at 7:30 p. m. at the
clubhouse on Chiva-Chiva trail.
At this open meeting the
latest information regarding
leave and pay Increases will be
discussed. Light refreshments
will be served.
HOF, Germany, Sept 12 (UP) A Czechoslovak rail-
road engineer cut the emergency brake cord, tied down
the throttle of his locomotive and crashed his train and
its 106 Czechoslovak passengers through the Czech fron-
tier barriers into free West Germany yesterday.
Austin Martin,, U.S. resident officer for the nearby
town of Rehan, said 25 of the passengers were "in" on the
engineer's plans for the "journey to the promised land"
and promptly asked for asylum as political refugees.
Included among them were the engineer's wife and
two children.
Sea-Level Factor Is Asset
To Canal Suez Engineer
continuity of
development.
world economic
The report, as approved by
executive directors of the bank,
were presented to the Board
of Goiernprs at their annual
meeting here by the Banks
President, Eugene R. 'Black.
The sixth annual meeting of
the Boards of Goevrnors of the
International Bank for Recons-
truction an dDevelopment and
the International Monetary
Fund Is being held here dur-
ing this week. The governors
are for the most part the Fin-
ance Ministers of heads of cen-
tral banks of their respective
countries.
The report reviewed the
Bank's operations over the past
fiscal year, when its activities
were at a higher level than In
any previous fisra! year of the
banks existence. It also discus-
sed the impact of recent world
developments on the opera-
tions of the bank.
Gamboa Pool
Closed Tomorrow
The Gamboa swimming pool
Will be closed all day tomorrow
for cleaning, it was announced
todary by the Pnysiral Education
r Recreation Branch.
TO BETTER REMEMBER their wonderful weekend In Hotel
El Panama, USARCARIBs "Soldier of the Month," Corporal
Felix Z. Riera (left) and his buddy Corporal Jose R. Carras-
quillo (right) decide which souvenirs to buy from Miss Rosa-
rip Perez, of the hotel's staff.
Riera was elected as the outstanding soldier for the
month of August. As a reward Riera and his buddy were
given a weekend lit the Hotel.
The men are both from Headquarters and Headquarters
Battery. f<04lh Field Artillery Battalion, Fori. Kobbe.
The remaining 82 persons, who
found themselves roaring
through the Iron Curtain at 60
miles an hour, registered imme-
diate protests, police said, and
all of them were expected to de-
mand to be returned to Czechos-
lovakia.
Seventy-five persons, Including
several children, made a quick
decision to go back, police said.
Two Czech .-i.ldiers and a mem-
ber of the SNB (security police)
were taken into custody, by Am-
erican Intelligence officers.
Several others of the "reluc-
tant" passengers Were undecided
about their plans, German police
said. They quoted several of the
men as saying they would like
to remain in West Germany, but
didn't know what to do about
wives and children who would be
left behind.
The train normally runs along
a route skirting close to the Am-
! crican zone of Germany.
Yesterday P. halted at a siding
inside Czechoslovakia.
It chugged off again, ostensibly
on its scheduled run.
Suddenly it began to gain, speed
and swerved onto an unused spur
line that runs across the forbid-
den and barricaded border se-
parating Communist Czechoslo-
vakia from tne U.S. zone of Ger-
many.
Its whistle screaming, the train
raced toward the wooden bar-
ricades, at Selbploessberg. Start-
led border guards scrambled for
safety.
The engineer kept the throt-
tle down until he approached
the German town of VVildenau
where he brought the engine,
three passenger cars and a
mail car to a screeching stop.
Startled passengers streamed
from the c,ars ana tliose who hud
joined in the escape plot shout-
ed with joy when West German
police u-s.suri (i them that they
were safely inside the American
zone.
The engineer told Martin the
escape had been "easy."
He said he simply halted the
train long enough to throw the
switch shunting the train onto
the unused -spur line.
"Then I uncoupled the brake
line, so no one could pull the
emergency cord and stop the
train," he said. "I tied down the
throttle and let her go."
The train, he said, began Its
journey In Prague. Its destina
lion was the oorder town of Asch.
which'is only a few miles from
the frontier.
Martin said the engineer was a
41-year-old Czech whose name
was withheldvThe fireman was
not in on the escape plot, the
engineer said, and he told Mar-
tin he had a hard time making
him obey orders.
U.S. Army officials were sent
to the border to investigate the
runaway train and interrogate
the passengers.
They said the engineer asked
asylum for himself and pointed
out the other 24 persons who
were in on his plot.
The Czech government has
made representations for return
of the locomotive and train.
U.S. officials said the Czechs
specified that they would sup-
ply "a different engineer."
A German station officer at
Wildenau received a phone call
soon after the Czech train had
."topped at his station.
He returned from his office
beaming broadly.
"That was some Czech officials
calling from across the border,"
he said. "Thev raised hell about
their missing train."
Marlin Fish Fry
At PM Boat Club
A marlin fish fry will be held
at the Pedro Miguel Boat Club
next Saturday evening for mem-
bers and their guests. The party
will begin at 8:30 p.. m. and
music will be provided for
dancing after the fish fry.
Tlie club is now under new
management, officials said. The
new manager Is Paul Dukas?,
already known to members only
bv his first name.
No Change In
Army Civilian
Leave Status
Good news for all civilian em-
ployes of united States Army Ca-
ribbean Is contained In yester-
day's announcement by the
Headquarters Civilian Personnel
Officer.
There Is no change In the a-
mount of annual leave given ci-
vilian employes of the U.S. Ar-
my, working outside of the Con-
tinental United Slates.
The regulations in force allow
for leave on the following basis:
Permanent full-time employes,
whose post of duty is outside the
continental United States, ac-
cru eannual leave at the rate of
26 days (208 hours) each calen-
dar year. Temporary employes,
whose post of duty Is outside the
conemental United States, ac-
crue annual leave at the rate of
two and one half days (20 hours)
for each full month of service.
This clarification of regula-
tions was contained In a letter
received by the USARCARIB Ci-
vilian Personnel Officer, from H.
J. Wright acting director of Ci-
vilian Personnel, Department of
the Army, Washington, p.C
28 Killed In
Indonesia Spree
Of 200-Man Ganq
JAKARTA, Indonesia, Sept.
12, (UP)Twenty-eight persons
were killed and 12 wounded
when a 200-man gang fought
Indonesian troops and police
for nearly five hours at Tjipa-
ray, near Bandung.
The gang looted a hospital,
set fire to over 50 houses and
' f--l <'-' 100 prisoners who
were In jail.
JAPAN: Rebirth of o Nation (6)
U. S. aid is olto
being pumped into
' jjjj fne ""row but all-
\ l^^r nnpoitunf veins of
' Jopon's on field.
fM^~ fia? H*"r* emphosis hoi
5 *> e^bV ~. making Jopon self-
V, cool, needed for
n-^ .. making of iron and
jj -r steel. Thanks to im-
proved blasting and
drilling methods,
future Jopon may
' also be self-sufficient
in sulfur, pyrites
and zinc.
lustrated by Ralph Lane
"It Is the duty of any canal
engineer to know what the Pan-
ama Canal is working on In nav-
igation and hyoraulic problems,"
and for that reason Paul A. Blan-
quet who is chief engineer of the
Universal Company of the Mari-
time Canal of Suez is visiting the
Isthmus today lor the first time.
Blanquet, a charming graying
gentleman who speaks with a
British accent tinged with French
overtones, said yesterday at a
short press conference that the
people who work on the Suez Ca-"
nal know a great deal about our
Canal here. Many unfamiliar
facts that he brought out seemed,
to indicate that the reverse
axiom is not true.
He enlightened reporters by
explaining that the Suez Canal
is about twice as long as the Pan-
am Canal, encompassing 100
from sea to sea. It takes 12 hours
to pass throi/gh, and the ships in
an average convoy are from eight
to 12. Althougn there Is no cus-
toms, they must pass quarantine.
Although he said the "Suez Ca-
nal is open to any ship during
time of peace or war," Blanquet
refused to answer any political
questions which were asked,
claiming that diplomatic offices
were mofe qualified than engi-
neers to answer them.
In 1950, Suez passed exactly
11.571 ships against 6,171 in 1938;
and two-thirds of their traffic is
tankers. Although the tolls are
slightly higher than those of the
Panam Canal, there was a 10
per cent reduction effective Sept
1.
A curious fact Blanquet reveal-
ed was that the administration
of the Canal la handled in France.
The board meets in Paris, and of
course all their correspondence
Is carried on In the French lan-
guage.
The Suez Company leased Its
canal area from the Egyptian
government for 99 years. Their
lease will expire In 1968 at which
time the property reverts to
Egypt. Blanquet said his com-
pany has succeeded In maintain-
ing a high standard of sanita-
tion.
Commenting on the fact that
a sea-level canal has been stu-
died here, he said: "Apart from
strategical reasons, a sea-level
canal is definitely an asset"
IB 1948 the Suez Canal Com-
pany decided, on a larger im-
provement scheme to carry any
future draft of ships in their ca-
nal up to 36 feet, requiring the
deepening of their channel ,by
Italy To Send
100 Bed Hospital
Unit To Korea
UNITED NATION8. N.Y.. Sept.
12 (USI8) An Italian hospital
unit will soon join medical de-
tachments of other nations in
serving the United Nations Forc-
es opposing the Communist ag-
gressors in Korea.
Italy Inlormed the United Na-
tions Monday that the hospital
unit will leave for Korea about
October 10. It will have a capa-
city of 100 beds and will Include
doctors, nurses and medical
equipment. It will be available
for civilian as well as military
patients.
Hospital units or hospital ships
from Denmark, India, Norway
and Sweden already are serving
theU.N. forces operating In the
Korean area.
Report 100,000
Interior Chinese
Headed For Korea
TAIPEH. Formosa, Sept. 13
(UP) The Nationalist China
Union Press reported m Taipeh
that 100,000 Red troops under
Generals Pang Teh-Jul and Nieh
Yung-chun were deployed to
Manchuria from Inner China
early this month, presumably for
the Korean theater.
The dispatch said rail traffic
from Pelplng to Mukden was
jammed with troop movements
and military supplies.
two feet. This Is very Important
on a 100-mile strip.
That work, is part of a five-
year program, and will be com-
pleted at the end of 1*53. The
second part of the program was
to open a new 7-mile cut half-
way between the Bitter Lakes and
the Mediterranean, which would
make the crossing of ships far
easter and quicker.
Tnls new cut has just been
completed and will be named
for King Farouk at the formal
opening Nov. 1. They are also
going to add 10 more "moving
berths," and are lengthening
the 30 berths they now have. A
new fishing harbor they are
building will be an annex to
the Port Said harbor, will great-
ly aid the Egyptian fishing in-
dustry
They employ about 500 em-
ployes (some are Europeans),
and 3,000 workmen, as well as
140 pilots for the Canal.
Blaquet. who has Just com-
pleted an extensive tour from
New York, Washington, Balti-
more. Philadelphia, to the Mis-
sissippi and Houston, hopes to
stop In Cuba and Florida where
he would like to see the dredg-
ing work.
He wajTrreatly Impressed with
(he great work done in the
States for flood control and he
said. "It was been a lesson to
me." t
Blaquet also added that he
would leave the Panama Canal
with "very important informa-1
tlon. especially about dredging.'*)
Tolls Earnings Of Pan Canal
Down 7^o Per Cent This Yeai
Panama Canal transit* and
tolls were higher during August
than during the previous month
but the business volume as indi-
cated by tolls earnings for the
first two months of the fiscal
year as compared to the same
period a year ago has decreased
about ten per cent, according to
traffic statistics from the Man-
agement Division.
Transits by ocean-going, tolls-
paying vessels increased from 463
In July to 490 In August, averag-
ing 15,8 dally last month as com-
pared with 14.9 during July.
A total of $2,107.398.32 was col-
lected In tolls durlpg August In
addition to a credit of $297.462.02
for transits of U.S. Government
vessels which transited free be-
fore the establishment of the
Lnew Panama Canal Company in
July. July tolls were $1,984,612.25
in addition to a Government cre-
dit of $208.914.80.
The decrease In actual busi-
ness volume this fiscal year
from the same period a year
ago is attributed primarily to
considerable deereasea In tank-
er traffic between the East and
West Coasts of the United
SUtea.
Tolls for the present fiscal
year, including those actually re-
ceived and those credited for
transits of Government vessels,
total $4.589,836. For the same pe-
riod a year ago. the tolls figure,
adjusted for purposes of compa-
rison to Include charges for pas-
sage of Government vessels at
that time, was $5,094,960, or
$505.124 higher than the figure
for this year.
There was slight variation
during the month In Hie major
trade routes, the greatest belne
a drop in trade between the East
Coast of the United States and
Central America and an Increase
in the trade between Europe and
Australasia.
ILO Director
Outlines Migration
Plan For Europeans
UNITED NATIONS, N.,Y., Sept.
12 (USIS) _,A five-year plan
under which nearly two million
of Europe's surplus population
could be transferred to the
Western Hemisphere and Aus-
tralia Is now before 30 member
governments of the Interna-
tional Labor Organization, a U.
N. specialized agency. These
governments, ILO Director Gen-
eral David A. Morse, noted In
a weekend press conference,
have been Invited to take up
the plan at a special migra-
tion conference beginning Oct.
2 in Naples.
Morse told newsmen that the
Latin American countries, Ca-
nada and Australia art willing
to receive Europeans- anxious- to
emigrate if funds can be found
to house, transport and train
them. He pointed out that im-
migration into the United States
would be governed by the U.
6. quota system.
A support gives way. A wall roars loose and
death tumbles into a mine shaft. The owner
shrugs his shoulders. Shocked by on appalling
accident rat* and the irresponsibility of mine
owners, SCAP bos established e rigorous
safety cede and inspection system that bos
drastically reduced Hie accident roll.
COAL
Lft
CRUDE OIL
coma ho.
_V> 30,000.
K Metric Toes
IMS
22,000,000
Metric Tom
if
40,000,000
Metric Toes
KttoJ itcrt
YMTES IMS
/- 6M.0O0
Mr\ Metric Tons
A
1*51 (BTIMATFl
1,540,000
Metric Tons
Chert illustrates the spectacular results
ochwved by SCA in increasing erodeetioii of
peieHly needed minerals, metals end
eeheJeeni. Note tnot production or
pyrites, vrtol to the fertila
\ -* U
gain in on pro-
duction has been
less soeerocular but
, SCAK long reeji
petroleum exploro-
J tien program is ex-
I peered to bear fruit.
National recovery
experts feel that
Japan's industrial
I destiny may well de-
1 \.tni upon her suc-
cess in unearthing
underground riches
along the rood

U. S. R0YA1
cushions and protects
you nd your car
fi/iMt\ PANAMA AUTO S. A.
Apartado 1913, Panama
s


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