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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01227
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01227
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Sunday supplement
        Supplement 1
        Supplement 2
        Supplement 3
        Supplement 4
        Supplement 5
        Supplement 6
        Supplement 7
        Supplement 8
        Supplement 9
        Supplement 10
        Supplement 11
        Supplement 12
Full Text


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"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
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PANAMA. R. P., SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1951
TEN CENTS
Ten-Year Plan Aiming

Automobile Prices Up,
No One Knows How Much
(NEA Telephoto)
_ilDGE IS VULNERABLE Two railroad cranes fight to save thcRock bland1 bridgeat Tope-
5 Kan as trie flooding Kaw River washes debris against It. The part of the bridge where
Se crane, are working was washed out In the big July flood, and since rebuilt. Heavy rain.
I Kansas were threatening a repeat performance of the earlier toasters.
(NEA Telephoto)
CATTLE THAT'LL RATTLE One lone steer (arrow) remains In Kansas City's stockyards as
yard officials ordered an embargo on cattle hlpmenta to prevent a recurrence of the July
i tragedy when 12,000 livestock died In the flood. _________________^
Jobel Prizewinner Says Virus
lesearchAidsCancerProblem
YORK. Sept. 8 (UP)
Wendell M. Stanley, a Nobel
Be winner In chemistry, said
lay that new, discoveries a-
t virase has opened a "most
kltful experimental approach
[the general cancer problem."
es are submlcroscoplc
its that cause such dls-
as polio, mumps and prob-
the common cold.
Stanley, now of the virus
oratory, University of Cali-
lla, and recognized as the
man In virus research, told
diamond Jublee of the Arner
Chemical Society that
ses can be changed gerretl-
by elimination or, Intro-
ion of one or more' amlno
-the so-called building
cks of nature,!rom the virus
r ucture.
"These results," he aid, "have
great significance for biochemis-
try for genetics, and for medi-
cine.
"Although there Is no ex-
perimental evidence that viruses
are responsible for human can-
cer as generally experienced,
there are several experimental-
ly proved examples of virus-
Induced cancers in animals and
plants.
"This fact, coupled with the
constantly Increasing fund of
biochemical knowledge of vi-
ruses, suggests that a most
fruitful experimental approach
to the general cancer problem
la provided by the viruses.
"This and especially the pro-
blems of virus reproduction and
virus mutation provide areas of
great promise for biochemistry."
Stanley described viruses" as
(Continued on Pane 8. Col. 2)
lut
>f This
'orld
ttlng the rest
the world go
Is 10-month-
Kelth Con-
ay of Dalston,
(ondon. Eng.,
a visit to
surnem o u t h.
1th a cap to -
de bis eyes
the sim's
i and a paci-
er stack firmly
i his mouth, lit
ile Keith Is con-
ant to snooze
[the day away.
KKK Suspected When
Negro Bible School
Blasted by Dynamite
SWANSEA. S.C., 8ept. 8 (UP)
A white Baptist minister call-
ed off a Bible School for Negro
children today at the request of
frightened parents after a dyn-
amite blast rocked the Negro
church last night.
The Rev. C. A. Edwards, pas-
tor of the White Baptist Church
here, pinned the blame on the
Ku Klux Klan whose Grand Dra-
gon Uves a few miles away at
Leesville, S.C., in the same coun-
ty.
Edwards said a stick of dyn-
amite was hurled at the church
from a speeding automobile while
the Bible 8chool was In progress
under his direction. None or the
occupants, including more than
50 Negro children, was hurt.
State and local officers were
Investigating. But Chief O. O.
Brady of the State Constabulary
said he has nothing to report as
yet.
Klan Boss Thomas L. Hamilton
quickly denied that the Klan was
Involved. He denied knowledge of
the explosion but admitted wrlt-
1 lng a letter to Edwards protest-
ing the Bible School.
Hamilton, who said he had pro-
tested the Bible School as a ''fel-
low Baptist," said In his letter
that he considered the school as
"blaspheming my Lord and Sav-
iour Jesus Christ."
He said he favored "Evangeliz-
ing the world for Christ'r but
.that any sort of mixed gather-
ing "Is a step toward mongrellz-
lng the world."
Idwards said the stick of dyn-
amite was hurled at the church
while the school was in session
and that the blast broke up the
class.
"Some members of the Ku Klux
Klan drove by and exploded a
stick of dynamite," he laid.
"Some of the Klan members had
tried to Intimidate us previous-
ly."
WASHINGTON, Sept. 8 (UP)
The Office of Price Stabilization
has granted automobile manu-
facturers price Increases of about
five to six per cent, but agency
officials today were unable to say
how much the hike will cost new
car buyers.
While the order Is effective Im-
mediately, manufacturers may
not raise prices until five days
after filing their new rates with
the government.
A companion order permitting
dealers to pass on the increase
to their customers plus their
customary 25 per cent markup-
will be Issued "shortly."
The new and higher prices pro-
bably will hit dealers' showrooms
by the end of next week.
OPS officials seemed confused
by their own order.
They issued It In the absence
of Price Chief Michael V: DISaUe
who had said prices would go up
about 7 or 8 per cent, or a range
of $84 to $200 per car at the fac-
tory.
The orders are at least partial-
ly a result of the so-called Cape-
hart amendment to the new con-
trols law.
It permits manufacturers to
add to their celling prices all cost
increases, including overhead and
advertising expenses, from June
94,1950 to July 26, 1051.
But 0P8 said tbt, for toe
sent. i la alfla||pg:Tha*rtrla
ers to add^n *W their eeUihg
prices only cost increases which
they had through March 15,1*61.
The agency said higher prices
will be permitted later if they are
warranted. ,
DISalle had said that retail
buyers of new automobiles pro-
bably would have to pay from $80
to $250 more per car depending
Albrook To Gel New
Services Center
With Full Facilities
Colonel Phillip D. Coates, Com-
manding officer, Albrook Air
Force Base, today announced the
opening of bids for the construc-
tion of the new Service Center
Building to be erected at Albrook.
The mailing of bidding notices
to contractors for the proposed
construction was completed this
week.
Bids will be opened Oct. 18. at
10 a-m-vln the office of the Cus-
todian of Non appropriated
Funds, on the first floor of the
Airmen's Club at Albrook.
The new Service Center Build-
tag will be located to the vacant
area Just In rear of the present
Base Exchange Building, adja-
cent to Beam Stadium and oppo-
site the Albrook Swimming Pool
on Godfrey Boulevard.
Present plans call for a low
one-story building with a partial
second story which will house the
Airmen's Club with lounge and
recreational faculties for Airmen.
Facilities on the first floor will
contain all Base Exchange fac-
ilities including a tobacco coun-
ter, toilet article counter, soda
fountain, shoe repair, watch re-
pair, tailor shop, beauty parlor,
bowling alley, post office, library,
barber shop and clothing store.
Colonel Coates stated further:
"Contractors who have not re-
ceived official notice of the con-
struction project are invited to
submit bids. Individuals desiring
further Information are request-
ed to contact Captain T. F. Cad-
well by telephoning 88-5136."
Governor Would Be
Marine Officer
PARRIS ISLANDS. 8. C (UP.)
Governor Edward Webb wants
to become Lt. Governor Edward
Webb.
Webb u not a politician. He is
Governor is his first name and
he is waiting for his commission
as a lieutenant- in the marine
co*** -------L_t-.
on the make and model. But a-
gency officials said his estimates
appeared to be "too high."
The officials explained that the
whole situation is vague because
cost Increases since the Korean
war have varied widely from
company to company.
Here Is the way the new regu-
lation works:
Each automobile manufacturer
will calculate his cost increases
for labor and materials since
Korea on the best selling car in
each line he makes.
In general he may add to his
celling price all labor and most
material cost increases from
June 24, 1850. to March 15. 1951.
On. certain other materials, the
cut off date is Dec. 31,1950.
OPS officials said that on dif-
ferent-priced cars the new ceil-
ings "might" be anywhere from
three to seven per cent higher
than at present, and that the av-
erage probably would be between
five and six per cent.
The automobile industry pro-
duced 3,000,000 cars in the first
half of this year with a total
wholesale value of about 15,250.-
000,000.
Production in the present
quarter was cut to about 17200,000
because of material shortages.
The industry is scheduled to
produce about 1,100,000 new cars
in the last three months of 1951,
but some auto men doubt they
will hit that figure In view" of the
recent copper strike and the in-
creasing scarcity of steel, alum-
inum and other materials needed
for defense production.
Inventories of new passenger
cars in dealers' showroom, ware-
houses and in transit are estima-
ted at something less than 380,-
000 cars compared to 385,509 a
month ago. 448.306 on July 1 and
about 400,000 a year ago.
The average is about eight and
a half cars per dealer, which In-
dustry spokesmen say Is the low-
est in two years.


m
Bermuda Steeled For
Severe Hurricane Lash
Islands has taken extensive
protective measured against the
dangerous hurricane heading
that way at a speed of 150
miles per hour. It was expect-
ed to hit Bermuda late tonight.
More-than 37,000 residents of
these British Islands are work-
ing feverishly towards forti-
fying the doors, windows and
roofs of their houses.
The V. 8. Air Force transmit-
ted a bulletin today at noon
advising of the approaching
danger. Signals were hoisted
on the flag-pole of the town
of Hamilton, capital of Ber-
muda, to Indicate the coming
of the storm.
The hurricanethe fifth, and
most severe of this year is
advancing towards the islands
from an area about 250 miles
away, and Inhabitants are al-
ready exposed to heavy rain-
storms.
The hurricane has produced
waves of about 100 feet in alti-
tude and one strong wave was
lashlne furlosly at the 6.111
ton ship. African Grove, during
the last four hours.
The Air Force bulletin said
that they were expecting the
strongest Intensity of the hur-
ricane to hit at 10 P.M. Ber-
muda time.
Authorities say
is headed east southeasTof the
Islands. They say that this
hurricane, travelling at about
100 miles an hour Is practical-
ly insignificant compared to
the violent hurricane expected
tonight
Composer Bernstein
To Harry Chilean
BOSTON, Sept. 8. (UP).
Conductor-Composer Leo nard
Bernstein will mary Chilean-
born television actress Felicia
Montealegre here tomorrow.
Bernstein, 33, was the protege
of the late Serge Koussevitzky,
conductor emeritus of the Bos-
ton Symphony Orchestra.
He was graduated from Har-
vard In 1939 and studied piano
at the Curtis Institute In Phi-
ladelphia, and at the Berkshire
Music School at Tanglewood,
Lenox, which was founded by
Koussevitzky.
LONDON, Sept. 8 (UP) Soviet planners hare work-
ed out a ten year economic plan aiming by 1960 to raise
Russia's industrial production to a level almost twice as
high as that of 1950.
An official Soviet publication today showed that So-
viet plans for their output of coal, steel, oil and pig iron
hove been recently boosted to ensure that the production
originally planned for 1965 will be attained five years
earlier.
considerable progress had alrea-
dy been achieved In mechanising
the coal mines through the gen-
eral Introduction of coal com-
bines and through large scale re-
training of miners.
Similar development; are now
being speeded up in other Impor-
tant branches of Soviet Industry,
and are clearly a part of the gen
eral plan.
In addition to this, Soviet in-
dustry will be able to command,
during the next several years, an
increased influx of new workers
who will be free due to the re-
cently launched reconstruction
and mechanization of Soviet a-
grlculture. j
U.S. Signs Up
To Guard Japan
From Enemies
The 1960 production targets
aimed at by Soviet planners are
as follows: coal. 500.000.000 tons,
steel 60,000,000 tons. oil. 60.000.000
tons and pig iron 50,000.000 tons.
According to a report Issued
earlier this year by the United
Nations Economic Commission for
Europe Russia produced 260 mil-
lion tons of oil and 19,600,000
tons of pig iron in 1950.
The new goal figures were con-
tained in an official Soviet text-
book "Economic Geography of
USSR," published by the Minis-
try of Education. The somewhat
vague way in which the textbook
gives the date of the plan's ter-
mination, is explained by the
thick curtain of secrecy surroun-
ding the Soviet economic activity
since the completion of Its five- j
year plan in 1950.
In spite of this a letter was
written to Marshal Stalin bv the
Soviet miners, and was pubNJied
in Moscow's Pravda recently. This
is seen here as evidence that the
ten-year plan is already in op-
eration. The letter said that 8.3%
more coal was produced hi the
Soviet Union in the first seven
months of 1951 than in the cor-
responding period last year.
rate of Increase Is
ductloh wfff 6air*4BD million
tons, which will be 20,000,000 tons
more than last year.
Mining experts here were
doubtful as to whether the
stead t yearly Increase of se,-
OOO.tOO tons could be achieved
in the SoTiet Union, and this
increase Is necessarv if the I960
target is to be reached.
Reports in the Soviet Press
however, made lt evident that
Russia Is making the maximum
possible effort to speed up her
expansion of Industry and the
production of raw materials.
According to these reports,
He has been guest conductor
of the Boston Symphony Orch-
estra, and was formerly the
director of the New York Phil- I mat ion. The King planned
harmonic Orchestra. 'return to Scotland tonight.
King George Has
Thorough Checkup
LONDON, Sept. 8. (UP).
King George was x-rayed today
by a specialist as part of a
"through" medical examination.
The' King, who arrived this
morning from Scotland, drove
to the office of Doctor George
Cordiner, one of two specialists
who flew to Balmoral last week-
end.
Buckingham Palace described
the doctor's trip as a "routine"
visit.
Cordiner had treated the
King in June for a lung inflam-
to
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. .
The United States and Japan
signed a security pact this af-
ternoon permitting the use of
Japanese bases by Americans
Armed- Forces. The U.S. forces
are for Japan's protection since
irresponsible militarism has
not been thrown out of the
world yet."
The extensive pact stlpult-
ed that U.S. forces could sup-
press "mutinies and internal
disturbances on a grand scale
in Japan caused by instigation
or intervention" of strong for-
eign powers.
The defense pact is the Unit-
ed States' answer to whatever
Communist. menace might
threaten Japan's Independence.
The treaty provided that Jap-
and would not grant bases or
rights to any other power with-
out the previous consent of
the Ultited Stotes.
This clause also contained
the prohibition of any third
power to bring military or na-
val troops into Japan.
Dean Acheson said during the
signing ceremony: "This Se-
curity Pact between the Unit-
ed States and Japan is part of
a defense program for peace
in the Pacific zone. This step
adds another link in the se-
curity chain against aggres-
sion is one of the most im-
portant regions of the world."
A Marine, A .45, A Red Machinegun Nest
m -V
By DOUGLAS LARSEN
NBA Staff Correspondent
WASHINGTON, Sept. 8 (NEA)
The first four days after the
Inchon invasion the drive toward
Seoul had gone along with only
moderate resistance. On the fifth
day, the Marine platoon headed
by 1st Lt. Henry Alfred Com-
mlskey of Hattlesburg, Miss., be-
gan running into stiff opposition.
It was 5 p.m. Commiskey's ob-
jective, while there was still
light, was the end of a cigar-
shaped ridge. But just as he was
about to lead his men to the top,
they were pinned down by mur-
derous enemy lire.
Commlskey called out the
names of 10 men, whom he led to
a protected hollow on the far side
of the hill. An enemy machine
gun nest was 50 yards above
them. He told his men to "cover
me," and ran toward the position
brandishing only his .45 pistol.
Hall-way to his objective, he
trippedJust as an enemy burp
Sun began pouring lead over him.
e jumped to his feet when the
burp gun jammed and reached
the machine gun nest in a few
long stride*.
Heroes Of Korea (1)
Inspired by the courageous ac-
tion of their leader, the 10 men
quickly caught up with Commls-
key and together they began the
ilffl
the vital crest. By nightfall the
difficult mopplng-up necessary to
rive the incomplete command of
First of a series on the ingre-
dients of valor that won the
Congressional Medal of Honor
the nation's highest award
in Korea.
bine, with which he killed the
last one.
That was the start of an excit-
ing few minutes which were to
make Commlskey one of the out-
standing heroes of the Korean
fighting and the first Marine to
receive the Congressional Medal
of Honor since World War U,
Another
placement was
strong
close by
enem
^
em-
ardly
area was secure. Commlskey and
his men had a perfect jumplng-
off place for the next morning's
final move into Seoul.
At least 100 North Koreans,
heavily armed, had attempted to
hold the hill against Commis-
key's valiant charge. Now there
were 80 enemy dead. The rest
were wounded or captured. Com-
mlskey was unhurt and only two
of his men were wounded slight-
ly.
Seven days later. Commlskey
was wounded by flying shrapnel
in Seoul, but was able to re>ln
his platoon for action around the
Chosln Reservoir. ,
As he was leading an escape
party from the reservoir to the
sea, escaping the trap there, a
mortar blast blew Commlskey off
a cliff and knocked him 30 feet
down an icy bluff, ripping open
his right knee.
After hospitalizaron, he reeov-
waltlng to catch his breath. Com- end sufficiently to get back on
He shot the burp gun soldier mlskey dashed forward again as active duty in the U. 8 .
first, then killed three others in
the nest. His gun empty, he
fought hand-to-hand with the
fifth North Korean until one of
his men reached him with a car- mouf laged hole.
lead spattered all around. Ha Commlskey had served as an
clambered over the rocksmira- enlisted man in World War II and
culously, without being hit, and was wounded at Iwo Jlma where
killed the two enemy In the ca- ha was awarded the Letter of
Commendation.
MARINE LT. COMMISKET: He
hardly stopped for breath.
Two months after his discharge
at the end of World War II, he
went back into the Marines and
won a commission. He's now the
father of two children.
For the action outside of Se-
oul. Lt. Commlskey one year lat-
er was presented his Medal of
Honor by President Truman.







t AGE TWO
TBK SUNDAY AMERICAN
"I

Radio Programs
Your Community Radio Station
HOG-840
Where 100.000 People Meet
Presents
UNDAT, SEPTEMBER 9, 1151
Sands?, Sept
" AM.
' 8:00Sign On Musical Inter-
lude
8:15Newareel U.S.A. (VOA)
9:30Hyrnns of All Churches
8;00BIBLE AUDITORIUM OF
THE AIR
9:15Good Neighbors
0:30London Studio Melodies
(o
10 ooin the tempo of Jazz
10:30Your American Music
11:00NATIONAL LOTT E R Y
(SMOOT AND PAREDES)
11:15The Sacred Heart Pro-
cram
11:30Meet the Band
IS: 00Invitation to Learning
(VOA)
ML
12:30Salt Lake Tabernacle
Choir
1:00The Jo Stafford Show
1:16The Chorallers
1:30Rev. Albert Steer
2:00Opera and Symphony
Hour
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00The Half Century (BBC)
7:00American Round table
(VOA)
7:30Story of the Christian
Church (BBC)
7:45 Radio Varieties U.8.A.
8:00Sport* Roundup and News
(VOA)
8:15Report from Congress
(VOA)
8:30Almanac from America
(VOA)
8:00United Nations Review
(VOA)
9:30The Bing Crosby Show
(VOA)
10:00American Symphony
11:00Sign Off
Monday, Sept. 19
AM
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:J0Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Stand By For Adventure
. 9:30As I See It
10:00News
10:05-Off the Record
11:00News
11:05Off the Reeord (Cont'd)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
ML
12:05Luncheon Music
12 JOPopular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade .
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15It's Time To Dance
2:30 Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Collector's Corner
4:00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose Show
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Lean Back And Listen
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Kellog Program
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary.
Raymond Swing: (VOA)
8:15Platter Parade (VOA)
8:45Battle Report (VOA)
9:00Story U.SA. (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Di c e s t
(VOA)
9:45Sports and News (VOA)
10:00The World At Your Win-
dow (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidnightSign. Off.
Tuesday, Sept. 11
AM.
6:ooSign On Alarm Clock
Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30-Crazy Quilt
8:45Hawaiian Harmonies
9:00News
9: isSacred Heart Program
9:30As I See It
10:00News
10:05Oil the Record
11:00News
11:08Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
2:00News
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
PJL
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Rhythm and Reason
2:00A Call From Les Paul
2:15 Date for Dancing
2:30Spirit of the Vikings
2:45Battle of the Bands
8:00AH Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
8:30Let's Dance
4:00Radio University
4:15Promenade Concert
4:80What's Your Favorite
6:00PANAMUSICA STORY
TIME
6:15Evenlnr Salon
7:00Ray's A. Laugh (BBC)
7:30PABST SPORTS REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
:00NEWS (VOA)
8:15What's On Your Mind
(VOA)
f;45Time for Business (VOA)
f:00Symphony Hall
i:30Commentator' Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports World and Tune of
Day (VOA)
10:06HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:18Musical Interlude
10:8OVariety Bandbox (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00Sign Off
Wednesday, Sept 12
AM.
6:00Sign On
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Stand By For Adventure
9:30As I See It
10:00N-*ws and Off the Record
10:05Off the Record
11:00News and off the Record
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News and Luncheon Mu-
sic
P.M.
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15It's Time to Dance
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Notes on Jazz
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Collector's Corner
4:00Music Without Words
4:15French in the Air (RDF)
4:30What'8 Your Favorite
5:30NEWS
5:35What's Your Favorite
(Contd.)
6:00Lean Back and Listen
6:15Evening Salon
7:00The Lady On The Screen
(BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00NEWS and Commentary-
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Twenty Questions (VOA)
8:45Science Digest (VOA)
9:00Jo Stafford (VOA)
9:15Radio Forum (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports and Tune of Day
(VOA)
10:00BBC Playhouse
11:00The Owlrs Nest
12:00Sign Off
Thursday, Sept. 13
Friday, Sept 14
A.M.
6:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
7:30Request Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
9:15Stand By For Adventure
9:30As I See It
10:00News and Off the Record
10:05Off the Record
11:00News and Off the Record
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
P.M.

12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00American Journal (VOA)
2:15Songs of France (RDF)
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Collector's Corner
4:00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose Show
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Lean Back and Listen
6:15Request Salon
7:00Mayor of Caster bridge
(BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Musical Notebook (VOA)
8:45Facts On Parade (VOA)
9:00The Jazz Club (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports and News (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade Of America
(VOA)
10:30Adventures of PC 49
(BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m. Sign Off
Enlarged Pores
Yield To Diet
AM.
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15NEWS (VOA)
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Jerry Sears Presents
9:00NEW8
9:15SACRED HEART PRO-
GRAM
9:30As I See It
10:00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00 NEWS
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
NoonNEWS
PJM.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00NEWS
1:15Personality Parade
l:45-EXCURSION8 IN SCI-
ENCE
2:00Call For Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00American Debut
3:15The Little Show
3:30Let's Dance
4:00Music WlthoufWords
4:15Negro Spirituals
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00PANAMUSICA 8 T O R Y
TIME
6:15Evening Salon
7:00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
7:30BLUE RIBBON 8PORTS
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00World News (VOA)
8:15Cross Country. U.S.A.
(VOA)
8:45Jam Session (VOA)
9:00Meet Eleanor Roosevelt
(VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports Tune of Day and
News (VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Take It From Here (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
12:00-Slgn Off
Saturday, Sept. 15
AM.
6:00Sign OnThe Alarm
Clock Club
7:30Jazz Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Crock of Oold (BBC)
8:45The Duke Steps Out
9:00News
9:15Women's World
9:30As I See It
10:00News
10:05Off the Record
11:00News ',
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet The Band
12:05NEW TUNE TIME (PAN-
AMUSICA)
12:05New Tune Time
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15personality Parade
1:45Tour De France (RDF)
2:00Latin American Serenade
2:15Date For Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00March Time
3:15The Little Show
3:30McLean's Program
3:45 Musical Interlude
4:00Let's Dance
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Guest Star
6:15Masterworks from France
(RDF)
6:45American Folk Songs
7:00Gay Paris Music Hall
(RDF)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Jam Session
8:00Newsreel USA. (VOA)
8:15Opera Concert (VOA)
8:45Battle Report (VOA)
9:00Radio University (VOA)
9:15Stamp Club (VOA)
9:30Radio Amateurs Program
(VOA)
9:45Sports, Tune of Day and
News(VOA)
10:00HOTEL EL PANAMA
10:30The HOG Hit Parade
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m.Sign Off
BY ALICIA HART
NEA Beauty Editor
Of all the small beauty worries
that women endure, enlarged
pores are among the most both-
ersome, chiefly because they are
a condition that outlasts the
blemishes of adolescence and
continues to plague even In ad-
vancing age.
Before plunging madly into a
program designed to rid yourself
of them, it's a good idea to con-
sider just what enlarged pores
are. A good definition is offered
by Dr. Mary MacFayden, who
describes them as "dilated open-
ings of the oil glands." She dis-
tinguishes them from the true
pores, which are. she says, the
mouths of the sweat glands.
Since enlarged pores usually
indicate oiliness of the skin. Dr.
MacFayden suggests two main
weapons in your attack wpon
this condition: cleanliness and
diet.
She recommends plenty of
green vegetables and fresh fruits,
and from six to eight glasses of
water daily. Some authorities
also prescribe cutting out rich
foods and high seasonings.
As for cleanliness this means
throughly scrubbing your face
several times a day. as often as
you begin feeling greasy. As a
follow-up, Dr. MacFayden sug-
gests rubbing cotton-wraped ice
over your face, concentrating
upon the areas that are most af-
fected. She prefers the ice treat-
ment to astringents, which she
claims are expensive and offer
only temporary effects.
Although Dr. MacFayden re-
cognizes, in common-sense fash-
ion, that it's usually futile to for-
bid a woman the use of powder,
she does point out the fact that
better results are obtained if Its
use is kept to a minimum.
Never should this type skin,
she stresses, be powdered when
there's already a coating of dirt
and oil or old cosmetics. Apply
powder over a clean skin, patting
the powder on with a fluff of
cotton rather than grinding It
Into your pores with a puff. 'A
second square of cotton may be
used to dust away excess powder
and coax the remainder into a
smooth, velvety effect.
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
Urgent
BE EDGAR MARTQ
CAPTAIN EAST
Strange Goings-on
Annie Oakley's Cabin
Saved From Wreckers
MINSTER. O. (UP.) It has
taken a lot of maneuvering but
a tiny log cabin, in which the
sharpshooter Annie Oakley spent
much of her girlhood, will be
saved from the inroads of pro-
gress. "
The cabin. 16 feet wide and 27
feet long, had to be moved be-
cause of the widening of a state
highway. It had been out of the
Oakley family since 1908 and
appeared headed either for an
historical society or destruction.
The state bought the cabin,
where Annie, as a girl of about
16, lived with her family, but
could find no society which was
willing to foot the cost of mov-
ing it. However, a niece, Mrs.
Annie Fern Swartout finally took
the relic off the state's hands for
$75 and plans to move it near
her home.
Even after the cabin Is moved,
a memento will remain to mark
the spot where the one-time circ-
us performer and co-worker of
Buffalo Bill spent her early
ve*f- A Plaque, donated by the
Hollywood actress Barbara Stan-
wyck, who starred in a film based
on Annie Oakley's life, "Little
Sureshot," will mark the spot
after the modern highway Is put I
through.
Explanation of Symbols:
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting
Corp.
RDFRadiodiffuslon Francalse
Washington, USA,
Discovers Crass
Of Hardy Species
WASHINGTON (UP.) A
"lawn grass for the man who
cares has been discovered by
the Agriculture Department,
working with the U. 8. Golf As-
sociation.
What crab grass likes, so does
U-3 Bermuda, experts say, plus
lots of sunshine and hot humid
weather. In 13 years of observa-
tion, insects and diseases have
not, caught up with It.
Policeman Doubles
Is Preacher Role
WARNER ROBINS. Ga. (U.P.)
Lota of folks hold down two
jobs but this community's as-
sistant police chief has an un-
usual combination of duties.
J. C. Harris Is policeman and
preacher. He serves as minister
at the local Methodist MUsfen.
"tome folks (thlnk.tfle combin-
ation is rather odd* said tjfe
graduate of People's Theological
Seminary in Greensboro, N* C.
"To me, the two jebs seem to
go together. Helping promote
Christianity Is certainly conduc-
ive toward building a law-abid-
ing community."
Harris has had considerable
experience in both Jobs. He
worked his way through theolog-
ical-school by serving as a police
officer during summer vacations.
1 Ride Converts
Dog Into Taxi hound
WORCESTER, Mass. (U.P.)
Cicero, a ferocious looking 70-
pound bulldog, likes cats'and
babies and taxlcabs.
Miss Marie N. Scola, his owner
said he acquired his fondness for
cabs when he was sent home in
one after having been found
wandering three miles away.
Now, Miss Scola, said he de-
liberately gets himself "lost" so
he can Indulge in his favorite
pastime.
HeTplul Hints
BE LESLIE TURNEA
To launder a small cotton rug
at home, try this routine. First
remove loose dust and grit by
vacuuming or shaking the rug;
then set it to soak for 10 to 15
minutes In a basin of warm soap-
suds. This preliminary soaking
will make it easier for your
machine to do a thorough clean-
ing job.
After removing it from your
washer, spin-dry it, or run it
through a wringer, taking care
to feed it into the wringer
straight and evenly. The next
step is drying. This should be
done In the shade, with the rug
tossed over two lines, not one.
when It's almost dry, brush up
, nap' or 8hake ll unt11 It's
fluffy.
However, it must be mowed and
other difficulties as well. U-3
grows no seeds but must be
grown from stolens. spring or
plugs of sod. The department will
furnish lists of spring sellers to
"the man who cares."
AIR-MINDED
BATON ROUGE, La, (NEA)
Norman Stevens, Louisiana
State quarterback, threw 18 pas-
ses last year for 42 completions,
551 yards, four touchdown*.
If your vacation is to last three
weeks or longer, electrical equip-
ment experts advise against leav-
ing your refrigerator running. It
will fare better while you're a-
way if you turn It off, remove all
food, clean it thoroughly. Leave
the door open while you're gone
to keep it well-aired.
Anyone who's ever tried to pry
hardened paraffin from the top
?.* J.y i1*** wm *PPreciate
tnia tip. Before pouring the
paraffin over freshly-made jelly,
placo a piece of ordinary string
across the ton of the glass or
jar. With the two dangling ends
the paraffin can be easily re-
moved when it's time to serve the
sweet.
To get rid of the white stains
that frequently cloud flower pots
after a few months' use. try
scrubbing at the discoloration
with a stiff-bristled brush dipped
in foamy detergent suds.
Rabbit Couldn't
Bark; Sounds
Alarm Anyway
BRAINTREE, Mass. (UP.)
The barging dog that arouses
the sleeping family is a com-
monplace feature of fire stories.
Here's something new.
When Charles Laneu's home
caught fire It was his pet rabbit
that spread the alarm. The rab-
bit's squeals were mistaken by
neighbors for the crying of a
baby. They arrived In time to
rescue the hare and put out the
blaze.
Too Many Slogans
HONG KONG (Uf.)' The
Shanghai Bankers' Guild has
asked the municipal authorities
to quit messing up checks with
propaganda slogans, according
to the Shanghai newspaper Sin
Wen Pao.
The bankers said the checks
have so many slogans stamped
across them it is often difficult
to determine the amount, of
money and the payee specified.
They said that if the Commun-
ists must use checks for that
purpose to please use the back
rathei than the front.
Science knows more than 1JW0
species o fireflies.
Try the> mall but mighty want
ad
It's the wonder selling aid
Gats resulto to fast, so cheaply
When you want to sell or trade!
You'll free P.A. Classifieds are
SUPER, too, for buying, seibos,
renting;, trading, hirinc. or what-
ever your oeed is!








fit'NTlAY, SEPTEMBER 9. 1!?1
*HE SUNDAY AMERICAN
-AGE THRO
Margaret Truman: Goodwill Ambassador |T Whjlp SwailS And A CoiintrV Fair
ly DOUGLAS LARSEN AND "She was so tired and bewlld- sengers remember her stroHIng has wisely shrugged them off. ^" "" 1 lilil vllllllll I ml IW ^BW%*1 Jj %m
B-y DOUGLAS LARSEN AND
ROSETTE HARGROVE
The face that Margaret Tru-
man showed Europe was a smil-
ing, opmposed, self-confident
one. But there was one Parisian
who 'saw her break down and
cry. v
There were reasons for, tear*.
She had wanted her -trip to be a
vacation; she wanta to.be an
avera, tourist and see the
sights. But she's the daughter
of In? President of the United
States. An'l her trip turned out
to be a semi-official one. "with
.all the strain and fatigue that
goes with such an excursion.
In Paris one day, It all got top
much for her. At Jacques Grlffe,
a fashion salon, saleswoman
Anne Copplnger was showing her
the latest Paris creations.
ered," recalls Mile. Copplnger,
"that suddenly, in the midst of
a fitting, she burst into tears.
She quickly re6overed. and im-
plied that she had been under
considerable strain. Otherwise,
she was lust so gracious and
polite, thanking everybody for
their trouble."
Mile, copplnger was one of
the few persons to see Miss Tru-
man off her guard. Everyone
else, from the stewards and bell-
boys on the ship that took her
overseas to the clerks and cham-
bermaids in the European hotels
where she stopped, recalls her as
a warm, friendly, pleasant per-
son.
oOo
The most freedom she en-
countered on the trip was the
ocean voyage itself. Fellow pas-
AMBASSADOR: In Paris, Margaret was greeted by French
President Auriol (center) and General Eisenhower at a pre-
sidential reception. Standing behind her is French Premier
Rene Pleven.
*""**: Smiling and self-confident. Margaret Truman
waves a greeting as she arrives in England. She wanted to
l^ .... .....t^e luu.iii, cue her trip turned out to be a semi-
official visit. '
SIGHTSEER: In England, Margaret (center! took in the
sights at the Festival of Britain, but she got little chance
to visit the landmarks her lather had told her about
, before she left.
on the deck, thoroughly enjoying
herself. It wasnt complete free-
dom, of course. There were al-
ways autograph-seekers, and she
was a gracious victim. And there
were two Secret Service men,
following her wherever she went.
As the big, beautiful SS Amer-
ica slid toward the dock In
Southampton, England, all the
passengers leaned against the
rails to get a glimpse of England,
sparkling in the morning sun.
Margaret Trumn stared just as
hard as any of them.
But minutes later, the Presi-
dent's daughter was in a packed
room ashore, answering the
questions ot British reporters. In
that time, she was forced to
change from a carefree Amer-
ican girl on a boat trip, to the
daughter of the Chief Executive,
oh a scml-official tour.
oOo
From that point en, she was
the object of stares and ques-
tions. No American girl has ever
toured Europe so thoroughly en-
cased in a fish-bowl. Her trip
was expertly purged of any
chance for romance or adven-
ture.
Before Margaret left she and
the President had talked over
some of the famous cathedrals
she should visit. He mentioned
several he had seen as an artil-
lery officer overseas during World
War I. However, the old world
pomp and the formal receptions
so cluttered up Margaret's sched-
ule that she only managed the
most cursory visit to a few land-
marksto her and the Presid-
ent's disappointment.
Her stay In Parts is a perfect
example of what she was up
against. She did almost every-
thing that most girls who visit
Paris dolunched at Maxim's,
saw the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre.
Versailles and a couple of dress
shows. But everywhere she was
watched, acepmpanied and chap-
eroned. And there were certains
official duties she had to fulfill
lunches, press conferences,
dinners, state functions where
she was a guest.
oOo
One woman reporter asked
her, "Miss Truman, did you buy
any other Paris dresses than
those you bought at Jacques
Griffe?"
"You should know," Margaret
Truman answered, with her
everpresent smile, "because ev-
erywhere I have been I have seen
you following me."
Everyone in Paris liked her.
They appreciated her gracious-
ness. her ready laugh, her sim-
plicity, her sense of humor and
the obvious Joy she gets out of
life. But they decided she had
no "oomph" or grace or dazzle.
One Frenchwoman put it this
way: "The freshness of extreme
youth has gone and she has not
yet attained the full bloom of
maturity."
Surprisingly, Parisians approv-
ed of the way she dressed. They
had expected the worst, since
she was once voted (along with
Rita Hayworth) one of America's
worst-dressed women. Paris
thought she had no real chic, but
nevertheless was an intelligent
chooser of clothes.
oOo
Some day when Margaret Tru-
man writes her memoirs read-
ers may really know to what ex-
tent the role of President's
daughter was a personal incon-
venience. Right now the most
obvious fact about that role is
the faultless perfection with
which she is playing it.
Voluminous reports from the
American embassies and consul-
ates In cities she visited, which
are filed in the State Depart-
ment, testify to the good-will Job
she really did on her European
trip, as the current climax to her
other accomplishments.
Now she Is back home, rested
from the trip and preparing for
an extended fall season of sing-
ing. TV performances and radio
shows. She has become one of
America's most respected per-
sonalities. Not the slightest taint
of any scandal has ever touched
her. She la completely gracious
and charming.
has wisely shrugged them off.
She didn't ask to be the daught-
er of the President. She Is Just
making the best of the situation,
all that anyone would do. But
she can be consoled by two solid
facts.
There is pretty general agree-
ment that she now can go on
making a good independent liv-
ing in radio. TV. or the concert
stage or even In the movies, aft-
er her father leaves the White
House. She has made the pro-
fessional grade.
Irt spite of the varied critic-
isms of the technical perfection
of her voice, practically no critic
has reported that an audience
failed to enjoy one of Margaret's
concerts, even though the per-
formance may have been but-
tressed by her great poise and
pleasant personality.
oOo
At 27, Just about the only ma-
jor accomplishment left to her is
the' winning of a husband. From
reliable reports of her good
friends, she could have done that
any number of times in the past
few years. But she has chosen to
wait.
On the matter of romance
By ARTHUR B. RICKERBY
DANBURY, Conn., Sept. 8 (NEA) In the Gay 90's
there was a highly popular ditty which went like this:
I went to the Danbury Fair,
The birds and the beasts-were there.
And the old baboon
By the light of the moon,
Was combing his auburn hair.
Thia month the old baboon will come out of wraps
again. Mounted on a pedestal which bears the words of the
eld ditty, it will be on hand to greet the customers at the
1951 Danbury Fair and stand as sort of a symbol of the
country fair season, now reaching; its annual peak all over
the U.S.
The Danbury version, which
has been going for a long time,
is now one of-the biggest in the
East. It is also typical of the
great American fair except for
one thing: it is probably the on-
ly one In the country that is
completely a one man operation,
run without any state subsidy.
Impressario at Danbury Is
Margaret's ability (to walk the John Leahy, a self-styled Con-
straight and narrow line of dign-
ity and graclousness has been
most severly tested. She has nev-
er faltered. Her statement that
she has many boy friends, all of
whom she is fond of and enjoys
being with, appears to be the
complete truth.
She has never lost patience
in denying the numerous rumors
of engagements with various
eligible men. She has plenty of
time left.
necticut Yankee operating some-
what in the tradition of the fab-
ulous P. T. Barnum. who also
hailed from Connecticut.
In tattered work pants, scuffed
saddle shoes and an old tennis
hat, Leahy looks like Just an-
other workman around the
sprawling fair grounds. In a way,
he is. He basses the whole show
and also attends to some pretty
mall details, too. even to re-
placing fuses or getting new cast-
Wardens Fish With Radar
To Net Illegal Fishermen
ELECTRONIC WARDEN: Capt. Kenneth Hooker, California
Fish and Game patrol craft skipper, uses radar to catch
the violators.
AN
By NEA Service
FRANCISCO. Calif.
There has been much specula-
tionsome barbed and outspok-
enabout Margaret's chances of
attaining her present high-sal-
aried place in the entertainment
world If she hadn't been the
daughter of the President. She
PERFORMER: A personality In hef own right, Margaret
plane a busy Fall season of concerts. TV and radio. Here
she i shown backstage with Tallulah Bankhead deft) and
Lucienne Boyer.
Experts Claim
St Louis Isn't
On Mississippi
ST. LOUIS, (UP)It may sur-
mise many people to know that
this big midwest city isn't on the
Mississippi River. The Army
Corps of Engineers and the Oep-
luLlcal Survey can prove It.
The engineers say the stream
that flows past St. Louis, which
the maps say is the Mississippi.
Is actually the Mlsourl. The
Mississippi can be found about
halfway on the other side of the
river. *
The engineers explain It this
way: the Missouri enters the Mis-
sissippi 16 miles north of St.
Louis. The Missouri is full of silt;
the Mlsslsippl above the conflu-
ence Is comparatively clear wa-
ter.
Below the confluence the
stream is divided about in half;
the western or Missouri side is
plain muddy,' the eastern side Is
clearer. This characteristic is
visible from the air.
It is only at a point about 36
miles south of here that the two
streams become thoroughly mix-
ed to form one big river, the Mis-
liissippi.
(NEA) One dark, quiet night
off the beach at Santa Barbara
a fisherman steered his small
motor boat In close to the break-
ers. He settled down to a highly-
profitable evening of illegal net-
ting.
He heard a patrol boat from
the Fish and Game Division
prowling the waters nearby, but
it didn't worry him. He knew
from experience that at night a
low boat near the breakers can't
be seen by another boat cruising
offshore.
But h'e didn't know that this
boat was the 63 foot Marlin, new-
ly-equipped with radar. Instead
of passing by, as usual, the pat-
rol craft thundered straight to
the violator and pinned him in
the beam of a powerful search-
light.
Assistant Chief of Patrols Tom
W. Schilling figures this violator
had been getting away with his
breaker-hugging trick for 20
years. And, since they didn't ac-
tually see him until the spotlight
hit him, he'd be still getting a-
way with It without radar.
Radar has been working to
drive Illegal fishing from Calif-
ornia's coastal waters for three
years. And the electronic device
has done the Job so well that
conservation law violators have
been virtually swept from the
state's 1000 miles of closed wat-
ers.
Only one boat, with nine crew-
men aboard, has been arrested
this year. To officials, this indi-
cates that illegal activity has
practically ceased. Last year, 18
boats and 186 crewmen were
arrested, with 736,500 pounds of
fish confiscated. But the Division
wasn't interested in arrests, as
such as much as it was in driving
the waters clear of violators.
"With our radar," says Schil-
ling, "we could have made ten
arrests a night last sardine sea-
son, though we were more in-
terested In warning violators be-
fore they actually started fish-
ing."
Kenneth looker, skipper of
the radar-equipped Bonito,
thinks the preventive aspects of
the radar fleet vitally Important.
"They know we can always see
them now. miles away, any time
of the day or night," Hooker
says. "They're very leery about
coming inside the closed areas."
Before radar, night or a heavy
fog gave illegal fishermen their
chance. The only thing conserva-
tion boats could do was to stop
and listen for boat engines, or
watch for a careless crewman to
show a lamp or light a cigarette
on deck.
Radar changed that. Now the
Division's craft follow any boat
in the closed area no matter
what the visibility. They often
wait until the suspected vessel
makes for shore, then nab it with
a big haul of illegal fish.
"As long as a fisherman felt
he had a good chance to get a-
way with a few illegal hauls."
says Schilling, "he was willing to
chance an occasional arrest. Now
he figures the risk Just isn't
worthwhile. In a few years, an
old-fashioned red-handed case
will be hard to find."
-----------------1
'Mr. P.A. Want Ad' attracts
a following
Of prospects mighty fine!
What's more ... he signs
them quickly
On the dotted line!
Your classified ad will at-
tract a parade of good pros-
pects because everyone in
Panam and the Canal
Zone reads P.A. Want Ads
regularly. Try them now
... the results v. ill surprise
you!
ers for- the office swivel chairs.
He is also a millionaire oil dis-
tributor whose full-time hobby
happens to be running the fair
as its landlord and* sole owner.
"As a boy I had three ambi-
tion," Leahy says, "to own a pair
of white swans, a new car with
whlte-walled tires, and to make
money."
At 56, he has achieved all
three, and is a country tycoon in
the city where he grew up and
went to work after the eighth
grade for $4.25 a Week. At 18, he
bought a lathe and went into
business for himself.
The machine shop he started
In those days Is still running, but
his oil distribution business Is
the big money maker, having
gotten that way because Leahy
would deliver fuel to customers
in storms or at hours when other
companies wouldn't.
While the oil brings In the
money, for the last eight years
The Great Danbury Fair has tak-
en up most of his time and
energy. He talks unceasingly a-
bout It to anyone within earshot
workmen, visitors, farmers,
small children, and probably, if
no one else is around, his two
pet swans.
Leahy claims he doesn't know
whether the fair makes money or
not, but Danbury businessmen
who know him are sure that if
Leahy isn't making money on his
hobby, he's not losing any. either.
His idea of a fair is first to
present farm products to show
agricultural progress, then to be
educational, instructive and en-
tertaining, in that order.
"Why, over in that shed," he
points out, "we have the original
wood-burning pioneer railroad
engine the Daniel Nason. It
was running in 1858 when Lin-
coln was nominated. Took me
two and a half years to buy that
one. Just think of the history
lessons that teaches."
Another of Leahy's ideas is an
aversion to free passes, a policy
which is strange to the enter-
tainment business and which
nettles a number of people a-
round Danbury. He thinks if his
fair is worth coming to. it's
worth paying for, and would
gladly pay his own way lntO"one
of the exhibits of which he's
proudest.
That's the P.T. Barnum shed,
where a number of the famous
stunts and animal attractions
ACHIEVEMENT: One of Leahy's three ambitions was to own
a pair of white swans. They're his pets at Danbury Fair
grounds now.
he made famous have been re-
created. Leahy, for whom Bar-
num is something of an idol,
spent $3000 to build a life-sized,
electrically-operated model of
Jumbo, the giant elephant.
Leahy got into the fair busi-
ness because a woman gave him
a share of stock to pay her bill.
The fair wasn't doing so well
then, so he was able to buy up
the stock, saved the grounds and
buildings from being foreclosed,
and took over control.
This summer Leahy also be-
came a producer, coverting the
steel and concrete grandstand
Into a theatre where revivals of
Rose Marie, Naughty Marietta,
and other musical comedies and
operettas were staged. He in-
tends to keep it up.
"People lore old music and old
songs," he says. "It's a great
thing to bring them to people."
He has another idea' about
bringing things to people, too.
"I'd like to dramatise the
Great Danbury Fair on Broad-
way with real animals, special
staging, a big production. Real
big."
Leahy likes to do things in a
big way, like country fairs.
Liberty Bell Twin Still On Display
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. (UP)
One of the first things most
tourists want to see in Philadel-
phia is the Liberty Bell In Inde-
pendence Hall.
Rarely does a tourist travel to
Vlllanova College near Philadel-
phia to see the Liberty Bell's
"twin." Few persons know It ex-
ists.
The history of the twin bell
was recalled during preparations
for the observance this year of
the 175th anniversary of the De-
claration of Independence.
The "twin" Is known as the
"London Bell." It was cast In
London when the Liberty Bell, at
that time not known by its pres-
ent name, cracked on its first
ringing.
By the time the second bell ar-
rived here, the Liberty Bell had
been repaired. So the London
Bell was hung in Philadelphia's
state house and was used to
sound the time during the years
1753 to 1828.
It eventually passed to the
Brother Hermits of St. Augustine
and they hung It in St. Augus-
tine's Church near the Delaware
River.
In 1847 fire destroyed the
church and the bell melted. What
was left of the metal was cast In-
to, a new bell, less than half the
size of the original.
The half-size bell was used at
Vlllanova College and later by a
Jamaica, L. I., church founded by
the Augustinlans.
Recently the Augustinlans re-
turned it to Vlllanova. where it
has been placed on view In the
college's new library.
Turnpike' Is Old
As American Roans
WASHINGTON, D. C. Th
name "turnpike" for toll high-
ways is as old as America's roads,
the National Geographic Society
says.
It arose from the type of gate
used on early toll roads, a long
pole studded with pikes. This
barred the way until travelers
paid the required fee. then was
turned aside.
ONE NO GOOD...
SHELBYVTJAE. Ind. (O.P;)
Albert Patterson, 65, arrested
while walking through town hi
his stocking feet, told police
he lost one shoe, got disgusted
and threw the other one away.
.
STARTING
TOMORROW!!
Fabrics
V&tKi
THOUSANDS OF YARDS
BELOW COST PRICE!
Silks! Cottons!
Crepes! Rayons!
Plaincolors Stripes .Prints
COME EARLY!
ALMACN S. DAYAN
CENTRAL AVENUE corner "H" Street
iinaiefiairiiriii- *!
.


rwt pora
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
Tuna Good Source of Protein.
BY (AYNOK M VI.IMIV
NEA Staff Writer

w
omen s
World

fig ^>tote Kide Jaihion s Crest
S^koulder ^Aft
cceone
oDraw *y?<
raw ^smporian
*0&
SErTEMBEJt J, 1M1
Seeing Double For Beauty;
Glamor Specs Aid Looks
TUNA TETRAZZIM. m wonderful bmUmi treat that will help
reaeedy the scarcity or the high price of meat.
Don't let the scarcity or high
rice of meat get you down,
here are lots of other foods,
more plentiful and less expen-
sive, that can give your family
the protein and sense of satis-
faction they need to be strong
and happy.
Canned tuna is as good a
source of "complete" protein as
meat and there is an abundant
supply of it in our markets. In
this unusually delicious recipe,
tuna is combined with the new
instant chicken cubes, milk, eggs
and flour to. produce a dish man-
fully supplied with top quality
protein.
Tuna Telrazaini
i* servings)
One-half pound thin spaghetti,
*4 cup butter or margarine. 1/4
cup flour. 1/8 teaspoon pepper.
1 teaspoon paprika, 5 instant
chicken bouillon cubes. 1 cup
wafer, 1 tall can evaporated milk.
1 7-ounce can tuna, flaked; 4
hard-cooked eggs, coarsely chop-
ped; 1/2 cup minced green pep-
per. 1/4 cup grated Parmesan
cheese (optional.
Oook spaghetti in boiling salt-
ad water until tender; drain. Melt
butter or margarine in ton of
double boiler; blend in flour,
pepper and paprika. Add instant,
chicken bouillon cubes; crush]
and blend in. Add water and ev-
aporated milk: stir over low heat
until smooth and thickened. Cov-
er; cook over hot water 10 min-
utes. Divide sauce in half; to 1/2
add spaghetti; blend well. Add
tuna, eggs and green pepper to
remaining sauce. Arrange spa-
ghetti in serving dish; top with
tuna mixture; sprinkle with
grated Parmesan cheese. For a
summer luncheon, deep sea
chowder offers a protein rich
treat.
Deep Sea Chowder
(S servings i
One-eighth pound fat salt
pork, diced; 1 medium onion,
chopped; 2 instant chicken bou-
illon cubes. 2 cups hot water 3
medium potatoes, diced; 1/8 tea-
spoon pepper, 1 7-ounce can
tuna, flaked; 2 cups milk, min-
ced parsley.
Fry salt pork in saucepan un-
til crisp and golden brown;
drain on absorbent paper. Cook
onion in salt pork drippings un-
til soft but not brown. Dissolve
Instant chicken bouillon cubes in
hot water; add with potatoes
and pepper. Simmer until pot-
atoes are tender (about 15 min-
ute) Add flaked tuna and
mu*; heat but dp not boil. Garn-
ish with pars!" and crisp salt
pork.
to.f/M,.,carTe*_ f?.r 'V r*n*" from th Practical to the glamoroas.
A brilliant red knit (left) i, touched with white "ch&aaawlr?
eb,2dery Lust'on Un <>e center) makes a pair of Roman -
i striped scarves. On* is threaded through the neckline: the other
wrapped cummerbund-fashion. A sheer pleated chiffon stole (right
center) is looped through the neckline and belt to farm drifting
panels. Bright red terse, .tote (right) has tana* aetehai poeketo
studded with matching wool poaa-pems. This hi a stole that cm Id
heraldic pins are teamed with these stoles.
ku. 25?beln*the caae-the
small touches that-add to a wo-
man morale have an import-
22 iar greater than they might
eem to have at first glance
There a something about a brand
ShTowdresa ,or an old ne i"
thV<^m*0?1 hM conildence)
mmJ^*1 *ltow that a"ecU a
woman s entire appearancethe
riVx CUFI hers'i. her fa-
cial expression, the lilt In her
voice. '
Jlfam thIn* i* true when
Ph? JSK k.nOW" sne u wearing
tnLrSht *laMM- Her attitude
net ?v,.heVPeCtaClM "ectS,
more than the practical-minded
would admit, the way she actual-
ly looks in them.
Fortunately It's possible today
to obtain such becoming frames
that the. modern miss is able to
to about her dally activities with
no feeling that her looks are be-
ing spoiled.
There are stin a number of
women, however, who feel bellig-
erent toward their glasses when
they're dressed up for an Im-
portant evening. The spectacles
that they accept quite cheerfully
for daytime wear suddenly be-
come an encumbrance when
they're going all out for "glamor.
For women with this psycho-
logical set, special evening glas-
ses have been designed, featuring
gleaming metal .and glittering
fake Jewels. So handsome are
these designs that the donning
of these glasses is an occasion
for pride and rejoicing.
One company offers dress-up
frames, in a special lightweight
metal, which you may choose in
color to blend with vour costume
or in an attentlon-laggint gold
plate. At one side is.attached.*
ellcate ornamentation of naeu-
o-Jewels rhinestoncs. jjearte.
Mphlres, rubles, esmeralda and
x variety of combinations
Delicate, jewel-adorned glasses
complement evening wear, add
to wearer's sense of glamor.
CL CU _
BY GAII.E DUGAS,
NEA Woman's Editor
NEW YORK (NEA) Stoles
and scarves for fall, in brilliant
colors to play up basic clothes,
are foils for jewelry touches, for
heraldic emblems, oversized fake
pearls or brilliant red, blue, or
topaz rhinestones.
The stole has at last come into
its own. It's riding high now,
going everywhere. By spring.
there may be a different story.
Now. it's big.
Stoles, as designed by Olentek
this autumn, are good compani-
ons for everything from a suit
to a short evening gown. They're
worn indoors and out. They're
for all ages. Bright red jersey, a
good accent for gray or black,
makes a stole that has big poc-
kets trimmed with puff-ball wool
pom-poms.
Satin, seen as one of the shin-
ing and significant accesory fa-
brics for all. is used by Glentex
idr a pair of bold Roman-striped
scarves cued to a simple black
dress. One of the pair can be
looped through a neckline: the
other wrapped about the waist,
cummerbundstyle.
One of the dressiest stoles by
this house is in sheer pleated
cliffon. hem-length and full so
that it forms two floating panels
FOOD NEWS
\Jraanau ^ta
when it's looped through the
neckline and belt.
Costume Jewelry, designed by
Coro and used to aecant these
stoles and scarves, is dramatic.
Olant saucer earrings that are
fake pearj can be worn clipped
to the ears or clipped, in a pair,
at the neckline of g dress An-
tique gold heraldic emblems,
authentic replicas of royal court
others, make pins and clips.
by h
naundju.
A weeMy cotema of
!/-
L-riip for tKain (Jr __%**
ana costs ess than half as much pereup asboWr 82 klnd'
shake for in-between snacks and mealtime, e L7, y ES mllk
dijferetlt it is! meainmes....see how satlsfylngly
t #-k, v Postum Mi,k Shake
3 tablespoons hot water 2 tahle 1 tablespoons nstant F0*7g^%
and milk, and shake or blend well. Makes 3 seA'Ss *** SUf?ar
KX^Tols-ti! sQsVff --
then add milk and a sliced ba- m! h "uts or coconut
nana. Post Toasties are so much fan"? T n^VJI"^ There
better than ordinary corn flakes that L.Euddi"Vn the world
they have a special, buttery ! rfeffiT ^"f Puddlns
goodness all their own. And they all-round ', cream'ness. and
don't get soggy in the bowl be- Jfi^?L*S*- So **
fore you can lift a spoonful to the nacka^.,0 the .name on
your mouth! The new Trip-L- red tetto?" prlnted in bi
Wrap package brings Post Toast- S-
les across the miles guaranteed CAKE PANS FOR 15.. apikvfi
fresh Try delicious Post Toast- That's a special offer to^Sf
les with the fla-or of ripe ba- ers of thb mi" mn (if w 7
nana.enioy them for breakfast your order in while he snnv
tofnorrow. asts!. We were able to K
COOL ORANGE JUICX is a vhiCh lX! thMe ?s-
wonderfully refreshing beverage Bakeware a &inU.m J1venex
. and so popular at breakfast and 7 fnrh iw" '= dlameter
time that many home makers "aije [rfev'r P~.50un,d ln
keep a container of it ln the re- cak^an .?. *Ular layer-
frigerator There's almost no- to useTr ^?. I Vf0 8u,table
Work to preparin.. it any more. mhmta!LSVLt9a* sheeU'
since tarn- Birds Eye .Quick- heat auS SfKS. down.They
Froien Orange Juice appeared shinV and n. ?SeCau* they're
. on the market. No more oranges S aflnndri "e,w thei "fleet the
to squeeze (o- carrv home in broin d^Ll"?* i.he cake to
heavy bags from the grocery S L nKftf1V'J8lnce best re"
, store., no more worries about Sw hS ?"1? Lyou "" the
getting the sweetest ones only KMyh* ''" they're ridged
ln certain seasons. Birds Eve dt-atiyhiS the sides, to in-
Orange Juice is extracted from hoW T "" they'"
the finest, tree-ripened oranges "Sf' S^JKZL** De sult"
and then quick-frozen minutes courJ"it'. i f needs' of
later. Fresh, pre-squeezed. and *?%L 1" aways lmPortant to
so concentrated that you can a,ft w y.ulir reclpe calls ,0-
make several glasses from one Sua? "to'S"'^11 pa" ls a
small tin! To prepare Birds Eve {al n.n, iffi f because me-
, Orange Juice, empty the con- miu5fnJl'ylu80On ** at a P-
i tents of its container into a chan^ .i?' yU t0 have a
shaker or glass jar. add 3 parts vour bakln.gn..H.ner0rtW0.for
cold water, and shake hard ?kL . g needs We've priced
Yru can stir, but shaking's bet .^T.,,*! reasnably as suppfy
ter. One tin make, six average "?vou?Pn25.C't'^L*110* To
f servings of juice. fit- 5an.?' aend the coupon
i0W/nd 15t Ior each pan
STUCK FOR DESSERT TO- ordered.
NTOHT? Not if vou've a package ,^
of Jell-O Puddin and Pie Fill- FRANCES BARTON
lng on your shelf. This wonder- BOX 893- Panama. R. de P.
package gives you two delight- KnCinA ,. ..
fnl choices: pudding, or pie. kV^fn?-* Please send m
The easy directions are on the c*ke pans'
package, but we'll tell you this
much: whether you make pud- Nom<--------------------------------
ding or pie, you only need add
two cups cf milk to ma^e the Addrts^____________________
smoothest, most luscious dessert '
^B ever tasted. You can buy____________^^_
Culture Cut
NEW YORK NEA) In
this season of sheer dresses, or-
gandy that stays permanently
crisp is pretty to look at and
pleasant to wear. Organdy with
this permanent finish never
wilts ln the sun. needs no starch-
ing, keeps its stiffness and lustre
after each' washing.
The tunic ensemble by Pauline
Trigere (left) la two shades of
gray. The basic sheath is in dark
gray, has a belted overtunic in
pale gray. Accesories. too. are in
permanent-finish organdy. The
small pleated hat in dark gray
Is a Laddie Northridge design;
there is a matching bag. Even
the shell pumps by Capezio are
of organdy.
Organdy in the rain seems an
anomaly, like a straw hat worn
in winter. But it's not. Lawrence
of London turned permanent-
nnisn organdy that's also water-
repellent into a duster fright)
with deeply-cuffed sleeves and
billowing back. A matching hood
ties on under the collar. The
parasol ls for sun and shower; It
works well both ways. It's dark
gray lined in light gray.
RIDE RETURNS
TO MOTHER

Those Heavenly
JERGENS Colognes
You'll led anything but anjelk when ton
oh, they are heavenly fragrance.. Crian u
fresh a, a clear .urm night i. Fmk Frosting,
Morning Clory n y d Ufh, b^^"
laughter .. and Zfa hint, of mystery -u-k*
your own .pecUl charm and to keep him
remembering a lovelier yon.
AGENCIAS W. M. DOfcL, SjL
Box 322 Panim
Outgrow Your
Early Accent
Some women flaunt their ac-
cent, l-jfa home-town banners.
5*^"*. spnt the nm t*'y*rg
..lh?r.UTes m BMton, they
pahk their cahs for the neat sev-
enty years-whethfr they're liv-
ing in Texas or Timbuetoo. o-
thers cling, for all of their adult
"*es ln Yankee territory, to pre-
adolescent drawl and y'alla they
Packed up In the cotton country.
The same holds true for dial-
ecif'.JNo matter how fond an
uidlvldual is of the Irish, grand-
mother, there's no need for per-
petuattcg a brogue once new af-
fairs have left behind the wear-
ing of the green.
There are several reasons, for
these transplanted speech man-
nerisms. Sometimes it'a sheer
laainess; It takes effort to a-
chleve a speech that doean't label
you by section or ancestry.
In other cases, distinctive
speech ls nursed as a conversa-
tion piece, from an urge con-
scious or unconsciousto attraet
attention. Unfortunately these
women find, in most cases, there's
usually less notice paid to what
they're saying than to how they-
're saying it. '
A third reason is. loyalty to old
S..*",^ *refusal to lose in-
dividuality by going whole-hog
Roman three days after arriving
in Rome. Instincts are right in
this case. There are few things
more disturbing, for instance,
than southerners who. after a
week in a northern summer re-
sorts have broadened their A's to
the extent they go around proc-
laiming their birthplace as Ala-
bah-ma.
A mlddle-of-the road policy is
best. Adapt your speech to that
of those who surround you, re-
membering to pick up the best
they have to offer, rather than
the worst. The ideal, of course, ls
to evolve a cosmopolitan speech
which marks you as a woman of
cultural, not geographical, dis-
tinction.
- againrt
aes. Jamb.jr,toak/orMul2i,
MEXSANA
sung clan of the Out-thru jaw
-umber of women are raAg
Often, if more a matter of
posture thari of vulnerability In
ELaTOrePfr* proudly- *J
bead held high, many succeed
only in elevating their chins. The
with its head thrown back to
drink.
To check your own posture, try
having a snapshot taken as you
stand, side-view, in a relaxed po-
sition. Now. with a ruler, draw
on your picture a straight line
from the crown of your head to
the center of your heels.
If this lirie's aslant, chances
are you need to change your
manner of atapdlhg.
Wx in your mind's eye the way
the pencil Une should runfrom
your crown, down through your
neck, straight through your tor-
so and legs to your feet. Adjust
your body to this stance, and
remember to keep this imagin-
ary plumb line vertical through-
out the day.
,,


Happy Harvey!
Bebu Harvey, all hi well,
A job yoa found, as we can tell!
Our Want Ad yea answered to a
Seom job'H be president, wait n
News. . for your
BEAUTY BUDGET!
COLD WAVE
Special 7-50
Imagine a new WIWii
hair-do... light an*
airy as a breeze___
. at ucb a low, lew price!
Mike your \ 1111
APPOINTMENT I'iiU
Ancon Beauty Shop
LOUISE HARTMAN, Manager
Old Ancon Theatre Bldg.
V
"WORDS CANT DESCRIBE THRILL
OF GETTING SigmtuAfi,
,y 6 a SILVERWARE"
OUrtt
OI
COTY
** (etaae-i vaatVf Mctv
aeMearaeeam -
.MSI...W.M,
TVl.egw(eWeai>
Casal |sg
t iiMJIUAtJk Hii it 1IJIJ


/
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER . 1951
_
THE SUNDAT AMERICAN
page rm
racihc S^ocLetu
MM

OR. AND MRS. LAWRENCE JOHNSON FETED AT DINNER
TO CELEBRATE THEIR 25TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY
At m dinner iren yesterday evenin* in their honor by m
Kup of friends, the Superintendent of Schools, Dr. ^Lawrence
inson, and Mrs. Johnson celebrated their twenty-fifth wed-
ding anniversary. .
The Fern Room of the Hotel Tivoll was the scene or the
dinner.
Included were Mr and Mrs. T.
F. Hotz, Mr. and Mrs. Roger
Hackett, Mr. and Mr*. Frank
Castle, Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Hain-
lng, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Colllnge,
Mr. and Mrs.,S. E. Esser. Mr. and
Mrs. C. A. Batalden. and Mr. and
Mrs. G. C. Wright.
The Harry Srnnotts
Give Buffet Supper
Mr. anl Mrs. Harry Slnnott
entertained a group of friends at
a buffet supper at their residence
In Ancon on Friday evening.
Visitor From Mexico
Mr. A. R. Wichtrlch-of Mexico,
former resident of the Isthmus.
is spendln* a lew days at Hotel
El Panam.
Visiting in Taboga
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Bennett
are spending the holidays In Ta-
boga with their children.
Returning to College
Mrs. Albert Johnston of Balboa,
son of Mr. and Mrs. C. L. John-
ton on Braniff at 2:00 a.m. on
onday for his senior year at the
nlversity of Illinois.
>
Vacationing in El Valle
Mr. and Mrs. John Moses of
Sella Vista are spending a week
El Valle.
enwomen Give Tea
Tor Local Artists
About one hundred guests were
[present at the tea given yester-
(day by the Canal Zone Chapter
[of the National League of Pen-
omen, honoring artists and
rlters of Panam and the Canal
Bone.
Special guests at the tea were
Irs. Alciblades Arosemena, wife
Bf the President of the Republic
Bf Panam, Mrs. John Cooper
/lley, wife of the United- States
Ambassador to Panama, Mrs.
Francis K. Newcomer, wife of the
Governor of the Panam Canal,
Mrs. Ricardo Bermdez. wife of
the Minister of Education, Mrs.
Fernando Alegre, wife of Acting
Foreign Minister, and Mrs. Octa-
vio Mndes Perelra, wife of the
Rector of Panam University.
Mrs. Evelyn Moore, president of
I the chapter', received the guests.
Members of the chapter alter-
nated at servingSnd pouring tea.
Mrs. Dorothy Mallon and Mrs.
Helen Wells were
tickets.
Highlighting the tea was an
exhibition of ceramics and hand-
icrafts by the well-known Pana-
manian artist, Diana Chtarl Gru-
ber.
Change of Residence
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hall- for-
merly of Pedro Miguel, have tak-
en up residence at the Hotel Tiv-
oll. Mr. Hall retired from "the
Panam Canal several years ago.
"Cuquie" Arias Has Piata
To Celebrate Birthday
Dr. and Mrs. Gilberto Arias
gave a piata in honor of their
daughter, Cuquie (Hilda). and to
celebrate her third birthday at
their home In Golf Heights Sat-
urday.
The Bembeneks Announce
Birth of Daughter
A daughter was born on Sun-
day, September the second, to
Mr. and Mrs. Ted John Bembe-
nek of Curundu at Gorgas Hos-
pital. The child will be named
Teresa del Carmen.
A Daugher to Mrs. Ruis
A daughter, their first child,
was born to Mr. and Mrs. Fran-
cisco A. Ruiz, G., of Perejil, in the
San Fernando Clinic on Septem-
ber 5th. The child will be named
Dlan Jane.
Mrs. Ruiz is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Kllle of Bowl-
tag Green. Ohio, and the grand-
daughter of Mr. Ralph Kllle of
the same city.
Mr. Ruiz is the son of Mrs. Ma-
ria- Gonzalez de Ruiz of San
Francisco de Veraguas.
The baby's maternal aunt. Mrs.
Joanne Kisse of Bowling Green
is visiting here. -
Crdenas River Garden Club
To Hold Meeting-Barbecue
Members of the Cidenaa River
Garden Club will gather at the
C. P, Morgan residence on Tues-
day evening, September 11, for
their monthly meeting and bar-
becue. The meeting will begin at
5:30 p.m. Guests of honor at the
party will be Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Dunn.
After dinner Mr. Dunn will
give a talk on "Panam In the
Past," illustrating it with slides.
Theater Guild Auditions
For "Laura" to Begin
The Theater Guild will begin
in charge of' casting auditions for its new play,
"Laura." at ?:30 p.m. on Monday,
September 10, and Tuesday. Sept.
11. Tryouts will be held at the
new guild workshop, formerly
Diablo Dispensary, on the corner
of Hataes Street and Walker
Avenue.
The head of the guild requests
that members be present at these
auditions.
Illusion Helps
Imperfect Chlnline .
BY ALICIA HART
NEA Staff Writer
All superstition aside, three Is
a lucky number when it's ap-
plied to your face. You've got a
head start on beauty if yours can
be divided into perfect thirds.
A woman's face Is considered
classically proportionate if the
measurement from her hairline
to the base of her nose is the
same as that from the base of
her nose to its tip. These, in turn,
should be the equal of the dis-
tance from the end of her nose
to the tip of her chin.
Since the features of very few
conform exactly lo these. It's a
wise woman who lSarns a few
tricks to make her face appear
proportionate.
Almost every woman has work-
ed out hair-dos that aid in con-
cealing a too-high or too-low
forehead; thus bringing the up-
per third of her face nearer the
ideal. Many women are aware,
too. of the value of darker make-
up for shortening an over-long
nose: But when ft comes to a dis-
proportionate chin or upper lip,
many tend to give up.
This isn't necessary. With a
lipstick brush and a bit of skill,
you can learn to camouflage un-
lovellness in these areas also. If
your nose-to-lip measurement is
more lengthy than it should be,
try building up the outline of
your upper lip to give an illusion
of shortness. If this measure-
ment Is already too short, edge
your lipstick down the merest
fraction to give needed extra-
length.
Work this trick in reverse for
a nof-qulte-perfect chin. Broad-
en your lower lip a bit'if your
problem is excess length. If you-
're struggling with an insuffi-
cient chin, make certain your
lip-line extends no further down
than it absolutely must.
Oysters Blythely Switch Sex
In Middle Age, They Do So
-Mtlanlic S^ocieL
V
&,
ffU ML, JL fU
195, Qal** ZIMpkon* (/alun 378
i
T
fSphynx Has Seen About All
i
T/iere Is in 5,000 Years
WASHINGTON,. D. O. Sept.
| For 5,000 years the great Sphinx
[ of Egypt at Glza has watched the
antics of mankind with an
| amused, slight smile on his lips.
Although said to be suffering
I from old age and presently uo-
Idergoing plastic surgery, the
|human-headed, lion-bodied fig-
I nre seems in good enough health
I for several more centuries of
I observing his human neighbors,
[notes the National Geographic
Society.
That sport.began about 3,000
| years before the birth of Christ
| ih the days of Egypt's Old Klng-
| dom and its great pyramid build-
ers. The Two Lands as the
| nation was known were then
strong and wealthy. Wars were
not yet the fashion. If one his-
torian is to be believed, and
farmers had time' from their
I labors to gratify their rulers' de.
(sires for indestructible tombs.
Contemporaries of the Sphinx
I in the Old Kingdom already had
la Book of Surgery in which it
(Best Se/t,
ert
(Compiled by Publishers'
Weekly)
FICTION
FROM HERE TO ETERNITY
James Jones.
THE CAINB MUTINY
L Herman Wouk.
[RETURN TO PARADISE
James A. Mlchener.
I THE FOUNDLING
Cardinal Spellman.
[A WOMAN CALLED FANCY
Frsnk YertaL
NON-FICTION
CON-TIKI
Thor Heyerdahl.
ASHINGTON CONFIDENTIAL
fack Lait and Lee Mortimer.
> SOLDIER'S STORY
, Omar N. Bradley.-
lARTNO'SBTORY
Duke of Windsor.
| THE SEA AROUND US
Rachel Carson.
| HIS EYE IS ON THE SPARROW
Ethel Water and Charles
Samuels.
was written that a broken neck
was "an ailment not to be treat-
ed." And words of wisdom were
readily available in the Proverbs
of Ptah-hotep "Be not ar-
rogant because of thy knowledge,
and be not puffed up for that
thou art a learned man; He who
giveth good counsel is an artist,
for speech is more difficult than
any craft."
Then, as now, such words had
limited effect and the Old King-
dom dissolved into 400 years of
political turmoil. In the words
of writers of the time, "Yester-
day is perished*, and violence is
come upon all men. Behold, he
that possessed wealth ribw spen-
dest the-night athlrst. Behold.
noble ladies go hungry. What
was prepared for them goes to
sate the butchers. Verily, the
children of princes are dashed
against the walls."
Into the revolutions, about
2000 B. C rode the strong man
of his day, Amenemhet 1, who. in
the fashion of dictators coun-
seled his son thus: "That thou
mayest be king of the earth,
harden thyself against all sub-
ordinates. The people give heed
to him who terrorizes them; ap-
firoach them not alone. Fill not
hy heart with a brother; know
not a friend."
The Sphinx saw the Middle
Kingdom die and the Early Em-
pire (1580-1375 'B.C.i rise and
fall. Across the sky of the Later
Empire, which lasted until a-l
bout 1000 B. C. blazed the per-
sonality of one of Egypt's most'
remarkable men.
King Ikhnaton wrote hymns
to the sun and dreamed of a un-
iversal god, to whom he spoke,
"Even createst thou men for
thyself, Lord of them all, who
art weary because of them. Thou
art in my heart. Thou art life-
time thyself, and men live in
thee."
Not long thereafter conquerer
after conquerer Persians,
Greeks Romans, Arabs,- Turks,
Frenchswept Egypt, and his-
tory Indulged, time and again,
in its penchant for repetition
under the inscrutable gaze of
the Sphinx.
"HERCULES"
tmdt ft*! MtHCtOtEti
Ufen MtloU H. I
tax ~, Sim **.
WASHINGTON. D. C. Sept. 8
That versatile mollusk. the
oyster, is back on the menu in
the Continental U8A.
I As September arrives, restaur-
ants dust off signs reading "Oys-
ters R In Season." Shuckers hone
their heavy-handled oyster open-
ers. September with its "r" ca-
tapults U. S. oyster consumptlon,
and opens a new season for a
$30,000,000-a-year fishery.
Stranger than fiction are
the life and habits of Cras-
sostrea virginica, chief com-
mercial American oyster. It
can blithely switch sexes in
middle age.
Through the swinging door of
Its stony shell it can pump 100
gallons of water a day, and It has
a southern cousin that climbs
trees, says the National Geogra-
phic Society.
The erroneous belief that oys-
ters are poisonous from May
through August (The R-less
months i probably arose in the
days of wagon transport. Though
thinner and less meaty than in
winter, summer oysters are per-
fectly edible. But long, unrefrl-
gerated journeys in summer heat
and dust turned the taste of in-
land-bound oyster to something
less than the tang of the sea.
The popular taboo thus founded
may have saved the oyster from
extinction.
Oysters spawn ih summer,
when the water temperature
climbs to 65 or 70 degrees. Un-
less beset by such enemies as the
oyster drill or tingle which bores
an eating window right through
the oyster's shell; or the starfish
with clinging arms and a stomach
that can be turned inside out to
devour its prey, a female oyster
can produce several hundred mil-
lion eggs in a single season.
Floating in the water, few of
the eggs are fertilized. If it' were
not so, Chesapeake Bay world's
greatest oyster bar would soon
be a solid mass of bivalves. Even
fewer of the infant oysters live
through their free-swimming lar-
val stage to "set," as tiny shelled
"spat," on bottles or old boots or
the empty shells which oyster-
men sow as "cultch."
Microscopic plants- and ani-
mals, plankton strained from sea
water, make oysters rich in cop-
per, iron, iodine and vitamins.
How long the nutritious mollusk
has been enjoyed as food Is not
known, but by 100 B.C. various
species were under cultivation by
Arrangements Set
For Junta All-Star
Show Tuesday P.M.
All the necessary arrangements
have been completed by the Jun-
ta Femenina de Beneficencia for
I the All Star Benefit Show which
they are sponsoring Tuesday
night at the Pacific Clubhouse
for the purpgse of raising twsstU
for the Jamaica hurricane vic-
tims.
With David Constable as Mas-
ter of Ceremonies and Victor
Reld and his orchestra furnishing
the music, the public Is assured
an evening of unsurpassed enter-
tainment.
The group offers such well
known artists as Johnny and
Wally, tap dancers; Vincent
Douglas, Dolores Leacock, Val
Reid, Dickey Griffith. Betty Will-
iamson, the Jitterbugs, Jean-
no te Crelghton, Dorothy Davis,
Johnny and Jean, ballroom danc-
ers; Eddie Pond, Toms Rosado,
Reggie and Marva, tap dancers;
Alberto Thompson. Roy Parker
and Ivan Porter.
The public is asked to attend
and contribute toward the suc-
cess of this worthy cause. Ad-
mission will be fifty cents.
i both Chinese and Roman sea-
farmers.
Today they are grown all over
the world, except on shortes wash-
ed by polar seas. The French like
green oysters, and fatten them
ta water thick with green plant
food to tint their flesh. Japan
harvests oysters from-thickets of
bamboo sticks thrust Into tidal
flats of the Inland Sea.
America's small, seldom-
marketed "coon" oysters si-
milarly "climb trees" by
growing on the roots of man-
groves which rise from the
water twice a day as the tide
falls.
U.S. oystermen lead all other
countries comolned by dredging
or tonging 75 to 80 million
pounds of oyster meat a year,
two-thirds of the world's produc-
tion. Here as ta other countries,
however, oyster yields have de-
clined sharply since the turn of
the century fiom overfishing,
pollution of coastal waters and
lack of proper cultivation. Once
oysters stood proudly as the most
valuable of all U. 8. sea harvests;
now they trail tuna, salmon and
shrimp in dollar return.
56 Gulick Students
Register In Army's
New LSU Program
FORT GULICK, C.Z., Sept. 8
A total of 56 servicemen, their
dependents and U.8. government
civilians enrolled at the army ed-
ucation center at Fort Gulick
yesterday in the Louisiana State
University Caribbean program.
Many signed up for more than
one course. There was a total of
91 enrolments.
Registrations were held from l
p.m. to 8 p.m. at the center.
The classes offered are mathe-
matics I, the first course in col-
lege algebra; English I, a course
in general English composition;
and history II. a continuation of
the first semester's history I.
Classes will begin Sept. 17.
Thirty-two students signed up
for mathematics 1; 27 for English
I; and 32 for history II.
"The number enrolling far ex-
ceeds the expectations on the
first day of registration." said
Professor G. F. Mathes, adminis-
trator of the LSUCP, "and the
persons interested in the pro-
gram, in addition to those alrea-
dy enrolled, will probably occa-
sion the addition of several sec-
tions to the classes originally
scheduled to be held at the Fort
Gulick education center. A sur-
vey of the courses offered on the
Isthmus will be made in an. at-
tempt to provide additional
classes On the Atlantic side."
MISS VILMA TREVIA LASSO
BECOMES BRIDE OF MR. ALBERT HUSTED
In an impressive ceremony at the Miraculous Medal
Church in Cristobal, Miss Vilma Mercedes Trevia Lasso,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Silvio A. Trevia, of Colon, became
the bride of Mr. Albert H. Huated, of Panama City, son of
the late Mr. and Mrs. George Husted, of that city.
The double ring ceremony was performed by Rev. Father
Vincent Ryan, C. M., at 7:0v o'clock last evening, in the pre-
sence of a large gathering of friends and relatives from both
sides of the Isthmus.
White gladioli and white or-
chids were used to decoratcii the
altar and chancel of the church,
with li&hted tapers.
The weddicg marches were
played by Damion Carles, who
accompanied Miss Lidia Bcnaser-
aff who sang "Panis Angelicus"
and "Ave Maria."
The bride entered upon the
arm of her father, by whom she
was given in marriage. She was
lovely In her wedding own of
white satin and Chantllly lace.
The gown was fashioned with a
high neckline formed by a lace
yoke, which extended to form
iong, fitted sleeves. The full skirt
had a front panel of lace. The
cathedral train of lace was form-
ed by the back panel of the skirt.
Tiny white satin button trimmed
the front of the bodice. The fin-
gertip veil of illusion fell from a
net and satin coronet which was
caught over the cars with orange
blossoms. Her bouquet of gla-
dioli and orchids and diamond
earrings, for Jewelry, completed
her wedding ensemble.
Miss Haydee Heana Mata serv-
ed as maid of honor. The brides-
maids were: Misses Sylvia de Cas-
tillo, Chlchita Ibaez, Cuqul
Boyd, Edith Carlos. Cecilia Lina-
res, Yolanda Penaherrera, Tita
Montoya and Delsa Garuz. The
attendants wore gowns of nylon
net In pastel shades, over match
taffeta. The strapless dresses had
very full skirts. The matching
graduate of Balboa High School
and Is employed by the P. A.D.
oo (Briefs
headdress of net and taffeta and
carried red gardenias.
The junior bridesmaids, who
accompanied the adult attend-
ants were: Freddie Ann. Sargent
Gallardo, who wore a coral dress
and accompanied the maid of
honor. The other Junior brides-
maids wore short white nylon net
dresses. They were: Evita Orrio-
la, Lucy Boyd. Laury Morales,
Leslie Ann Dugas, Angelita
Brennan.
Edita Estinoz and Judv Von
Tress, in matching white dresses,
preceded the bride and carried
sliver baskets of rose petals.
Carl Ender carried the rings In
a white satin rose and Alcldes
Arosemena, Jr., carried the coins
in a silver basket.
The train was carried by Emi-
lia Q'iesada, Margaret Watson
and Annette Perada, who were
also drersed in white.
Mr. William MacArthur served
as best man for the groom. The
groomsmen were: Messrs Robert
Puello. Antonio Linares. Jack
Mallia, Raul Torres. John Gilbert
and Camilo Gonzalez.
The sponsors for the ceremony
were the parents of the bride
with Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hus-
ted. Mr. Rocco Morro. Mrs. Adi-
lia de Mata, Mr. and Mrs. Carlos
A. Lasso. Mr. and Mrs. George
Miss Sonia Welch Weds
Corporal Joseph Dietrich
Miss Sonia Welch, daughter Of
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Weich of
Gatun. became the bride of Cor-
poral Joseph Patrick Dietrich,
son of Mr. and Mrs. William
Dietrich of Riverton, New Jersey.
in a double ring ceremony at the
Immaculate Conception Chapel
in Gatun. The service was per-
formed by Rev. Father Francia
Lynch. C. M. Saturday evening at
7:00.
White lilies and carnation!
with lighted tapers were used to
decorate the church. Mrs. Joseph
Hcnrlgan played a prelude of ap-
crcjjriate music and the tradl-
..onal wedding marche;.
The bride entered upon the
arm of her father, by whom she
was given in marriage. uhe was
charming in her gown of white
jersey. It was made with a small
standing collar and long fitted
sleeves, pointed at the wrists.
The bodice was shirred and trim-
med down the front with tiny
self-covered buttons. The very
full skirt was ballerina length.
The fingertip veil of Illusion waa
held in place by a small white
cap. She carried a white prayer
book and .rosary. ,
Miss Dora Weich was her sis-
ter's only attendant. Her dress
was of chartreuse nylon marqui-
sette over matching taffeta. The
sleeveless bodice was made with
a round neckline and the full
skirt was ballerina length. She
wore a small white hat and white
accessories and carried a white
fan showered with ribbons.
Mr. Dan Toomev was best man
Husted. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hus- for Corporal Dietrich.
ted. Mr. Humberto Vagllo. Mrs.
Dora Woodman. Mr. and Mrs.
Carlos A. Morales, Mr. and Mts.
Antonio Linares. Mr. and Mrs.
M. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. C. H.
Fairbrother. Mr. Francisco Mata,
Miss Carmen Mata, Mr. and Mrs.
D. E. Myers. Mr. and Mrs. Ja-
vier Soriano. Mr. and Mrs. Juan
A reception was held at the re-
sidence of the bride's parents fol-
lowing the ceremony. Palms,
white lilies And greenery were
used in the decorating of the
home.
Mrs. Weich chose for her
daughter's wedding a blue lac*
afternoon dress with an orchid
Pipfessor James E. Armstrong.
of the LSU faculty, who Js cur-
rently assigned to the Caribbean
Btogram, will be t the Fort Gu-
nek Education Center Sept. 14,
to accept additional registrants.
If it is possible to get another
Instructor from the main campus
an additional class in mathema-
tics I will be organized.
Coal Mine Hauls
By 'Rubber Railroad'
CLOVER. Pa. (UP.) Nor-
mally a coal mine attracts few
sightseers. A mine here has been
drawing visitors for mote than
a year.
The point of interest is an
elaborate underground "rubber
railroad." It carries a thick
stream of coal from the face of
the mine to the tipple, a distance
of more than three miles, in less
than an hour.
The -rubber railroad," actual-
ly a 30-inch conveyor, can haul
up to 3,000 tons of coal a day.
Officials of the Ebensburg Coal
Co., which uses the "rubber rail-
road," say the mechanization
has resulted ta better working
conditions for miners and in-
creased production. Locomotive
cars formerly hauled the coal
to the surface.
By UNITED PRESS
The Communist conquest of
China has resulted from a surge
of the Chinese masses and the
rise of a vigorous, new ruling
group to power, Benjamin I
Schwartz emphasizes in Chinese
Communism and the Rise of Mao
(Harvard) a critical study by an
assistant professor of history of
Harvard University. Schwartz
makes it clear also that Mao Tze-
tung rose to his leadership In
Peiptag on the basis of a pea-
sants', not a "workers'" revolu-
tion such as Marx foresaw.
This study leaves the future of
Chinese Communism and the fu-
ture of Chinese relations with
Soviet Russia to history. Its chief
value lies in its clear analysis of
the origin and development of
Communism in China...
oOo
Shadows Move Among Them,
by Edgard Mittelhoelzer (Lip- .
ptacott). is a delightfully dlf- Dr'"es k,
I dreamed I went
to a formal it
IjiUT Jreaiired ^Art Collection
IS NOT COMPUTE.....WITHOUT
m Portrait Sltetct
by Dzlenczarski
(drawings made from photographs or pese)
'Phone Panam 3-0553 for appointment.
Maidenette Strapless bra
If a big occasion is on your cal-
endar, this dream of a bra is
designed for you! Maidenette
Strapless is the most fashion-
able party-goer ever! wonder-
ful under bare-shouldered
evening clothes or cocktail
dresses, Maidenette* Strapless
gives excellent figure "control.
Dainty insets make it extra fem-
inine; feather-light boning sup-
ports your curves from below.
In white or black in your favor-
ite fabrics.
Genuine Maidtiiform bniiitrct
arc made only in ibe t'nitnl Slain
of America.
TberA a Ifaien Torn
for every type of figure.
MM ..!. >r. -
2? *
NEW ZfALANP PRODUCT
ferent novel about life in, a Brit-
ish Guiana Jungle settlement
ruled paternally by a self-ap-
pointed British missionary. His
unique creed is based on a mix-
ture of myth, nature, culture and
self-discipline. To this jungle
paradise comes Gregory, a nerve-
wracked English veteran of the
Spanish civil war. He arrives a
sophisticateoVcynlc. but stays on
to find surcease, love and hap-
piness. ..
oOo
The Desert of Love, a novel
wrlten by the great French writ-
er Francois Mauriac more than
20 years ago. has been published
ta English translation by Pelle-
grini it Cudahy. The absorbing
story deals with the effect upon
a father and his 17-year-old son
of their love for the same woman,
the mistress of another man.
The skillful way in which Mau-
riac deals with the emotions of
his handful of characters con-
firms him as one of the best of
modern writers...
oOo
The Man from the Tunnel,
Theodora Benson (Appleton-
Century-Crofts):
A collection of readable short
stories, with locales ranging from
Theodora Benson's native Eng-
land to the tough old 4th Ward
of New York City each with
it's own little "twist." Some of
Miss Benson's short stories leave
an American reader slightly baf-
fled, but all Intrigue and amuse.
Among the better ones in this
collection are the title story
"The Man from the Tunnel;"
"The Frog and the Lion." "The
White Sea Monkey" and "The
man with the phony Tin Foot."
oOo
The Limit, by Ada Leverson
(Norton), is a satirical novel of
the frivolities of Edwardian so-
ciety In London. It concerns the
beautiful and amusing but
thoughtless Valenta, her wor-
shipping but inhibited husband
Romer, and her handsome cousin
and lover, Harry de Freyne. Miss
Leverson was a younger friend
and contemporary of Oscar Wilde
and Henry James and to many
her humor will seem artificial
and forced and her dialogue
dated...
oOo
The New Man by Maurice Nl-
coll (Hermitage: A Scottish
psychologist's interpretation of
some of the parables and mir-
acles ot the New Testament. Dr.
Nlcoll regards the four gospels
as a guide to the inner develop-
ment of man. with their pro-
found spiritual truths disguised
In terms of everyday life. His
knowledge of the Bible and Its
background plus his medical
training make his a clear and
cogent writer in. what, at best,
is a difficult subject.
Montoya. Mr. Ricardo A. Melen- corsage and a matching hat ana
harmonizing accessories.
The bride's table was centered
with a four tiered wedding cake
around whic'.i were pedestals
holding confection baskets of
flowers. A miniature bride and
'loom stood within an arch
formed by confection lilies. Mrs.
Reginald Armstrong served the
cake after the bride and groom
cut the first slices.
Corporal and Mrs. Dietrich left
later in the evening for a short
honeymoon to be spent at the
Hotel International. The bride's
and aoing away costume was a pink
linen suit, with which she used
whit eaccessories.
Upon their return Corporal
and Mrs. DietrlchwlH reside with
Mr. and Mrs. Weich in Oatun.
dez. Mrs. Aurelia de Harrison.
Mr. and Mrs. Julio Melendez,
Mr. and Mrs. Carlos de Bieber-
ach. Mr. and Mrs. Gilberto Me-
dina, Mr. Ramon Escala, Mrs.
Aurora Iltaeca, Mr and Mrs.
Carlos Gallardo, Mr. and Mrs.
Raul J. Roman. Mr. and Mrs.
Claudia Endura. Mr .and Mrs.
Herbert Toledano. Mr. Gilbert
Caldern. Mrs. Julia Emillanl,
Mr. Carlos Morales. Mr. and Mrs.
George Estinoz, Mr. and Mrs.
Marco A. Morales, Mr. and Mrs.
Aderaldo Urrlola. Mr. and Mrs
Lenidas Morales and Mr.
Mrs. Julio Quljano.
A reception for two hundred
guests was held at the Strangers
Club following the ceremony. The
buffet table held an unusual
white wedding cake in four-tiers,
representlngr the sun. Each tier
was decorated with confection
symbols. Mrs. Edward Husted
served the cake and Mrs. Carlos
Morales was in charge of the
Mrs. Trevia chose a black din-
ner dress for her daughter's wed-
ding. She used a corsage of or-
chids as her only ornament. Mrs.
Edward Husted. who served as
mother for the groom, also wore
a black dinner dress with orchids.
The bride's going away cos-
tume was a light blue linen suit,
with which she used pink acces-
sories. After a week's honeymoon
at Santa Clara. Mr. and Mrs.
Husted will reside ta Curundu.
Mrs. Husted attended St. Ma-
ry's Academy. Mr. Husted is a
Farewell Danoe
A farewell dance and buffet
supper was given at the Sttmwg-
era Club. Friday evening, to hon-
or Miss Olga and Miss Thelma
Leignadler who are leaving this
month to enter college in the
United States.
Hostesses for the affair were
Miss Margarita Barcenas, Miss
Lucia Nino, Miss Nancy Saaso
and Miss Hercilla Herrera.
The guests were: Misses Vilma
Rosania. Frances Gerl. Vilma
Sasso. Lolita Qulroz. Marcela Qui-
re*. Margot Gomila, Hercili He-
rrera, Gioconda Apolayo. Dalys
Apolayo, Veyra Villalaz, Tuta
Jan. Dora Perret, Anne Rose
Leigh. Chlchita, Ibaez, Tita Iba-
(Continued on Page 6IX)
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8ATTJRDAY, SEPTEMBER 8," 1SH
New Teacher, Ex-Pilot Feels
At Home After Fiji, Florida l
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE:Living dining, bedroom
and kitchen furniture, also 1941
Ford two dcoi sedan. Excellent mo-
tor, tires, $300. Zoffmann, Tel. 3-
3179
FOR SALE:Weiti.-iflhouie refriger-
ator. 9 cu. ft. 25 cycle. SI50.00.
Phone 83-2195.
FOR SALE:Refngerolcr. washing
machin, ironer. radio phonograph
console, desk type work bench,
perch screens, folding bed and
mattress, record albums, stroller,
baby carriage, fans, clocks, pmg-
pon gfcb'r. orm choirs, misc.
items. 235 Pedro Miguel, next to
Police Station.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
IUICK
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Paredes
Panama 2-0600
FORD O MATIC
Sat it new at
Me Milln A- Eogon S.
Colon. Tel. 446.
A.
FOR SALE:1949 Cadillac convert -
puncture proof tubes, radio, heater,
defroster. Twin spotlights rear win-
dow. iDore set General W/W tires
S2.995.00. Call Coco Solo 380 or
write Bo; 282. Coco Solo.
Write Alcohol,ci AaejayaMoM
la. 2031 Aneen, C. X.
An
y commission acceptable domes-
tic, overseas. inter plonetary.
Write Goylord Mully. Box 734 An-
een. Canol Zone.
FOR SALE:Corner mahogony cobi-
net. Venetian blinds. electric
clocks, books. $0 25. smoll tables,
crystal punch bowl. 12 glasses,
. many ether items. Hagzord 769,
San Pablo. Balboa
FOR SALE:Cabinet model Singer:
sewing machine. Perfect condition.!
complete attachments and button- |
hole maker Albrook 2123.
FORO O MATIC
See it new et
Me Milln b Eafen S.
Celen. Tel. 446.
A.
FOR SALE:Leaving city. Buick Su-
per, new. 2 door sedan. 3.000
miles. Duty pold. Mis. Marvin.
Tivoli Hotel
You hove heard of the Boston Bar.
Now is the time to drop in. George
onginolly at El Rancho, is there
to give you the best of service.
Drinks at half-price Monday and
Thursdav frcm 5 p. m. to 7 p.
m. Welcome to Army, Navy end
Air Force personnel.
FOR SALE:Twin beds dresser chif-
fonier, dining table sideboard
desk. Itvingroom. table bed couch.
Bedside stands, kitchen table .all
steel, ice refrigerator, wicker chdirs.
tab'e rodio. miscellaneous items.
503-D, Cocsli.
Position Offered
WANTED:Gr.outy operator,
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
IUICK
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Paredes
Panama 2-0600
FOR SAE:1949 Buick Super con-
vertible, Hydramotic. Radio, low
milecge. Tel. 2-3341 0528-A-,
Anccn.
SUMMER SPECIAL Cold Wave. $7.50.
Why have a home permanent?
..with inadequate facilities, no
certain finished look, ond no guar-
antee when you can have a
professional one complete for only
$7.50! It will last longer., and
look better! The* con be hod
Monday thru Thursdoy. Moke your
appointment early! Tel. 2-2959.
Balboo Beauty Shop. Open 9 CO
a. m. to 6:00 p. m. Balboa Club-
house, upstairs.
Williams Sonta Clara Beach Cottages.
Two bedrooms, Frigidaires, Rock-
gas ronges. Balboo 2-3050. *"
hilliet. Oceonside cottage, Santa
Clara. Box 435. Balboa. Phone
Panama 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673
FOSTER: Cottages for rent'by
day. week or month between Santo
Clara ond Rio Hato. Tel. 2-3142
or see core taker.
Gramlieh' Santa Claro beoch-
cottoges. Electric ice boxea, gas
stoves, moderte rate Phone \6-
54t or 4-567.
FOR RENT
Apartment*
AlHAMIRA APARTMENTS
Modern fum shed-unfurnished apart
ment. Contact office No. 8061, lOsh
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386. Co-
lon.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FORD O MATIC
See it new et
Mc Millan & Eooen S.
Colon Tel. 446.
A.
rienced. Wosh.ng.on Hote.^Co" I ^f Tf 6 ta2 ^ A*"
Icn. Phone CnstoL 3-21.6. | r% . *stfi A ^^
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE:For mwith .woter
fruit trees, olso cherry pick
further informotion 206-A,
Gronde. Pedro Miguel.
and
"P.
Rio
FOR SALE1951 Pcnt.oc convert-
ible. 6.000 miles. hydramotic,
white side wall tires, radio, $2.-
250. Cosh or financed. Call 2-
2550 or 2-6319 Balbca.
400-DAT (ANNIVERSARY) CLOCKS
Just in time to send home for Christ-
mas. Eight beautiful models at at-
tractive prices! THE FRENCH BA-
ZAAR. COLON.
FOR RENT:Nicely furnished opart-
ment. screened, tiled, porch, par-
lor-diningroom. kitchen, bedroom
$50.00. Apply 112 V/o Bel-
sono Porros. Near Roosevelt Thoo-
tre.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR SALE: Pedigreed Doberman
Pmscher Puppies, one month old
Cristobal 3-1284.
Atlantic Society...
M'ln-tiniird From Par F1VE>
ftez. Gloria Castillo. Changele
Grimaldo. Cecilia Van Kirk. Ana,
Rita and Mary Fisher, and Grace
Von Kirk; and Messrs Dick Les-
ter, Rolando Villalaz, Richard
Sasso, EduardoCostano, Tonln
Cordovez. Bruce Motta. Manolin
Castillo. Bob Rosanla, Nene Iba-
ez. Aldo piieri, Foty Caradelu,
Baby Salas. Nelpy Jimenez. Juan-
cho Diaz. Nicky Stokes. Bernie
Herring. Morris Leon. Ivan and
Javier Romero. Rocer Maduro.
Joe and Jack Katallnas, Qucko
Leignadier. Bob Turner. James
Fernandez. Eloy Jan. Bill Car-
doze. Jorge Gallardo, and Paul
and Martin Cain.
ISTHMIAN DATA
FORD O MATIC
See it new et
Mc Millan & Eaaan S.
Colon. Tal. 446
A.
FOR SALE:1947 Buick Super 4-
door sedan. Excellent condition,
new tires, radio, new plastic seat
covers, white rims. Tel. 2-3284,
Balboa.
FORD O MATIC
See it new at
Mc MHIan Y Eaaen S.
Colon, Tal. 446.
A.
Births
GRANT. Mr. and Mrs. Victor
of Panama, a daughter. Sept. 4
at Gorgas Hospital.
CLARKE. Mr. and Mrs. Sam-
uel o Panama, a daughter. Sept.
4 at Colon Hospital.
BALLENGER. Mr and Mrs. R.
of Panama, a daughter. Sept. 5
at Gorgas Hospital.
PHILLIPS. Mr. and Mrs.
Adolphus of Colon, a daughter,
SeDt, 5 at Colon Hospital.
BRITO. Mr. and Mrs. Fran-
cisco of Silver City, a daughter,
Sent, s at Colon Hospital.
THOMAS. Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Of Panama, a boy, Sept. 8 at Gor-
gas Hospital.
HYATT. Mr. and Mrs. George
S. of Red Tank, a daughter, Sept.
6 at Gorgas Hospital.
JUDY. Mr. and Mrs William
of Cocoli. \ daughter, Sept. 6 at
Gordas Hospital.
JOHNSON. Mr. and Mrs. Am-
brose of Panama, a daughter,
Sept. 6 at Gorgas Hospital.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
IUICK
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Poredes
Panama 2-0600
Deaths
HARRIS. James. 69. of Colon
on Sept. 5 at Colon Hospital.
QUALITY
TROPIDURA
NOBEL
PRIZEWINNER
(Continued from Page 1)
disease-producing agents "which
le In a twilight zone between
Iivlno and non-livin? entities."
"They are resconsible for the
last unconquered area of infec-
tious disease, he said.
Most of the bacterial disease?,
such as nneumonla. and dac-
terial infections can now be
controlled bv the new "wonder
drugs." but there is no drug
that goes after the viruses.
Stanley's report indicates
that the famous chemist be-
lieves a good anti-virus drug
will be produced. There have
been several with some anti-
viral activity, but home so far
that kills as Is done against
bacteria.
FRu^LE:-2 single beds, dressing
table mirror. Girl's bicycle 1941
Hudson Sedan. Full length mir-
ror Quarters 2126-B, Curundu.
Tel. 83-5240.
FOR SALE:Potted Flowers, frai-
la, steel tobies. House 723, Co-
coli.
FOR SALY"_~Cin7"Kodair8~m^:
gazine movie camera. $85. Ma-
hogany 5 ft. bar, $40. Dinette
toble with leal. $20. Wedge-
wood Queensworc, white with
blue, embossed border service or
six. $100. Automatic portable re-
cord player 60 cycle with over
200 records. $100. Wing chair
ond slip cover. $20. Misc. book-
shelves, small tobies, child's fur-
niture. Call 86-3108.
FOR RENT:Furnished rooms with
or without board. Cool, ideal, rea-
sonable. 48th Street No. 7. Bella
Visto.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
IF YOU THINK PRICES
Are High In Panam
GET A LOAD QF THIS
advertisement we received In
foreign trade journal:
CHLORDANE
CONCENTRATE
NOW IN ONE OUNCE BOTTLES.
This remarkable Chlordan r
gate rnlxjd with TftR'jSFS
'Ier makes a very effective 2"
Insect spray. Retelling at MOO th^i
one ounce bottle are*now avilhwi
dealers at onlv tim ml ___?_
wi pay all sSnrfm *%
("me of Company deleled ta"?.^
OUR rfETAIL PRICE
for a S'i ounce bottle
That Makes ONE GALLON
85c.
(sorry, we don't pay shipping
charges)
GEO. F. NOVEY, INC;
Central Ave
Tel 3-tua
HelpWonted
WANTED:Woman to cook oncf
wash. Federico Boyd No. 4, Apt.
I. Apply after 6 p. i{i.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED: tarpaulins: to cover
merchandise on trucks. Make of-
fers: F. Icaza. Co.. 79 B Avenue.
WANTED: Washing machine, in
good running condition. Coll 3-
3708.
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-171?
22 E 29th St
Wonted Position
FOR SALETux white black trousers
new. 42 tall. $25, over coat 40
$10.00 and small tobies, Balboo
769, San Pablo Hagiard.
WANTED:Work at baby sitter,
mother's helper or practicol nurse.
Box 443, Ancon, C. Z.
WANTED:25 cycle washing ma-
chine. Phone 83.-3278.
SERVICE
INSIST ON
WLTHAM
IIBST VlMtPICAN
_ never tba palna of Rheuinatlem,
Arthritis, Neurltle. Lumbafo. 8cl-
tica, tiff muiclea and ewolltn
tolnta maka you miserable, set
lOVIIXP from your dralat at
once. f'.OMlND quickly brlnaa far-
teatlc relief ao you can sleep, work
end Uva In comfort. Don't auffei
tjaedJaaaly. Oe EOaUND today.
Stamp Collection
Transformed Into
Works Of Art
""CAGO U.P.) Robert
Calender. 82. has been collecting
atamos for 60 vears but not to
file In a collection.
Callender pastes them on pap-
er so that their varied colors
form pictures, usually of flowers
or animals.
One picture he sent to Princess
Alexandra when she was Prin-
ts of Wales was used to help
aise funds for an English child-
ren's hospital. As a weddlne gift
he sent Princess Elizabeth a
picture of two carnations in a
vase made up of British anniver-
sary stamps.
'Paper' Weddin* Spree
Good While It Lasted
ST. LOUIS. Sept. (UP) Jay
Brown, Jr.' "paper" wedding an-
niversary the first consisted
mostly of traffic tickets and
peace disturbance complaints.
The 24-year-old man was fined
1350 and costs for the ruckus he
raised when he started out to
celebrate his first year of mar-
riage.
He pleaded guilty to eight
:harges which Included striking
Ms wife, runnlne his car into a
.ire Dluo. sldeswipino a street
*ar. hitting a nurse at a hospital
'i)re he took an intoxication
-eat, and resisting arrest. j
American Plays
Now Top Hils
With Germans
By GEORGE F. GAAL
FRANKFURT, Germany (UP.)
American plays have become
one of the most favored forms
or entertainment introduced un-
der occupation in western Ger-
many since the war.
Their popularity with the Ger-
mans about equals that of the
classics, traditional top favorites
in German theaters.
Those who know the theater
also noted that post-war Ger-
man plays are almost non-exis-
tent because of what they term-
ed "the general demoralization
and apathy resulting from the
military defeat, from which
creative genius has not yet re-
covered."
With Broadway-type runs here
impossible and ticket prices
t?Io|InLbetween cents nd
$1.90 this gross is a strong in-
dication of the success of mod-
ern American theatrical art in
Germany.
Leading the field of top gros-
ses has been the Russell Crouse-
Howard Lindsay comedy. "Life
With Father," followed by John
Van Druten's "The Voice of the
Turtle.' Emmet Lavery's "First
Legion," Tennessee Williams "A
Street Car Named Desire"
George Abbott's "Three Men On
a Horse." and Thornton Wild-
er^ "The Skin of Our Teeth" and
"Our Town."
"The Voice of the Turtle" was
especially favored.
Last year's undisputed top'suc-
cess was "Street Car." while
"Death of a Salesman" also a-
rhieved top rating. "The Glass
Menagerie" and Miller's "All My
Sons" also did well. So did Max-
well Anderson's "Star Wagon"
and "Anne of a Thousand Days "
John Steinbeck's "Of Mice and
Men" and Clare Booth Luce's
"The Women."
Clifford Odets* leftist play
"Golden Boy" has been a success
in East Berlin.
On the reverse side, Stein-
beck's "The Moon Is Down Van
Druten's "I Remember Mamma"
and G. Hugh Herbert's "Kiss and
Tell" all flopped. So did William
a'oyan's "Time of Your Life,"
hich the Germans considered
' confuted.
Lillian Hellman's "Watch on
Varied Diet
Too Rich
For Captive Fish
LOS ALAMOS. N. M. (UP.)
Two youngsters opened the fish-
ing season by feeding the 1,500
rare tropical fish in James P.
Murray's 18-bowl aquarium. The
menu, according to police, con-
sisted of bicarbonate of soda,
fish food, birdseed, aquamarine
salt, washing bleach and "vario-
us and sundry other prepara-
tions,"
Murray returned home to find
the children's parents fishing
out the goldfish to keep them
from dying, and despite their
efforts 30 fish did die.
Murray told police he had been
on a fishing trip.
Airlift Saves LIveV
Of Orphaned Moose
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (UP.)
The Fish and Wildlife Service
has devised a unique "moose-
lift" to prolong the life of or-
phaned moose calves.
A moose calf whose mother
falls victim to wolves or a hunt-
er's bullet usually does not live
long, it wanders the lonely Alas-
ka tundra In search of the cow
until starvation or a wolf pack
ends its life.
But now Fish and Wildlife
agents keep an eye peeled for
the moose orphans. When found.
they are brought to a central
location near here, fed dally out
of a milk bottle, and then flown
to the lush meadows of the Coop-
er River near Cordova, where
they are released.
Clarence Rhode, Fish and
Wildlife director for Alaska,
started the "mooselift" as a game
conservation measure. So far It
has worked out well.
the Rhine." showed shortly after
the war. has been a disastrous
flop. The play was later banned
by the State Department.
Other foreign hits last vear
were Jean Giraudoux's "Mad-
woman of Challlot," Franz Kaf-
ka's "The Trial" (produced after
the dramatization of the late
Andre Olde) and classics, top hit
among the latter being August
Strlndberg's "The Father."
Crossman"
RIFLES
22 Cal.
COJ and pumping action
PISTOLS
#0ALfiG
Sth of May Plaza
PET HOSPITAL,
erees Ike ariose ea the rt#w.
,;', ""E*"-' Ka veterinary
lesu! a.aa. is ana* -Sam s
Pfcje* s-3l reaasaa
. CO- Bos IS Panama
Red Tank Church
Lists Services
The Bethel Mission Church of
Red Tank will observe a mission-
ary service today at 3 pjn. and
Monday at 7:30 p.m.
A special feature will be the
"Famous Church Leaders Rally"
Monday night.
Biographical addresses will be
given by Messrs P. 8. Martin F.
N. Walter, B. M. Springer, H.
Dawson, E. L. Fawcett and Miss
I. Marshall.
The community Is invited to
hear the well-known church
leaders representing different
nominations.
This season's bright new flor-
41 print dresses endow their
wearers 1th all the freshness
and color-appeal of a well-
tended summer garden. Thafcis,
of course, provided the dresses
themselves have a well-cared
for look.
There's really no excuse for
wearing dlgy, wilted-looklng
prints when you consider that
you can do up your patterned
silks, rayons pr delicate cottons
In half an hour.
To keep your washables clear
and bright, try these sugges-
tions offered by the Cleanliness
Bureau. The most Important
rule for success in washing
prints is to check before pur-
chase to determine whether
garments are color-fast and
washable. Labels or the sales-
woman should reassure you on
this practica) point.
It's a good idea to save tags
that give washing Instructions.
A simple envelope marked "la-
bels" tucked awav in a desk
drawer or a letter file will pro-
vide a handy means of keeping
them together.
Lacking such foresight. It's
best to test for color-fastness
before washing a print for the
first time. Snip a small bit of
the material from an inside
seam, from the belt and, a
matching shoulder pad cover or
from under the hem.
Soak this briefly in a glass of
warm water, then pat Jt dry be-
tween folds or clean cloth.. If
there is little or no discolora-
tion or color iuzziness around
the edges of the pattern, it's
safe to go ahead with the wash-
ing.
The next step is to remove
non-washable buttons, buckles,
trimmings and shoulder pads.
Lined belts are best sponged
off instead of going into the
suds. Close zipper fasteners.
Silk, rayons and sheer cot-
tons should be saueezed through
plenty of soapsuds in water that
is lukewarmelbow tempera-
ture, as for a baby's bath.
Washing Jut one piece at a
time, work quickly, keeping the*
garment under water as much
as possible. Avoid wringing or
twisting.
Rub two well-soaped fingers
gently over spots or along col-
lar and cuff line streaks. In
case of considerable soil, repeat
this washing qnicklv hi a sec-
ond clean, suds water. Rinse
well, also In tepid water, and
squeeze out excess moisture.
Finally, roll the garment In a
bath towel for a brief blotting.
Unroll, shake i[ out and place
It on a hanger to get partially
dry.
Presa while somewhat damp,
using a moderate iron on the
wrong side of the material. If
it's naeessary to touch up pock-
ets', pleati or other trimmings
on the right side, use a clean
presslnr cloth, or tissue 'paper
to prevent shine. To save time,
don't try to iron the fabric bone
dry. Just arrange the garment
carefully on a hangei to finish
dryine v after you've pressed it
smooth.
r-r-
"My daughter was disappoint-
ed With her first day in school
said a young man "she wondered
why she couldn't read and write
after being In school one day.
What could we tell her?"
The puzzled parent was a new-
ly arrived Math and Physics
teacher, Kenneth W. Martin, who
aside from his daughter's over-
anxiety, thinks Panama is a
"wonderful place." Very similar
to the climate of the Fiji Islands
and to Floridawhere they met
and marriedthe Martins feel
right at home.
During the last war, Martin
was a pilot in the Navy for four
ing picked up by a destroyer. He
heard about it after he came
back from leave.
Martin believes in the princl-4
pie of "show me and I'll believe T
it since he hails from Missouri.
Besides his BS. degree from Cen-
tral Missouri state College and
an MA. from the University of
Oklahoma, he did additional
work at Florida state Unlverslti
and the University of Florida?' '
He taught at Wentworth Mili-
tary Academy in Lexington, at ,
the University of Georgia and I
also in Merriam, Kansas,-.
Martin looks forward to get-
- ting plenty of his favorite sports
VSSnFSR!1* v n.lhe 8outfc -te* and swimming. Daugh-
f/"iJ?rrowe*e?Sa.Peie ter Kathy had her indoctrina-
tion course; in swimming aboard
ship on the way down here.
Students at Balboa High School
will be meeting him. in Uieir
math classes and the Jr< Cjlle-
gtates will encounter Martin in
their physics studies.
remembers happened while he
was on rehabilitation leave in
Sydney, Australia. His squadron
was transferred to New Hebrides-,
and his usual plane developed
engine trouble. The men floun-
dered at sea two days before be-
Glqss Sandwiches To Save
Documents Of Forefathers
To beat off a siege of Syracuse
by the Roman general Marcellus
two centuries before Christ,
Archimedes designed a spectac-
ular c-ane which could grapple
attack .ig galleys, hoist them ln-
L J e.2lfv8'-,J then P,une thm
beneath the sea.
We Are
Headquarters
for famous
SHERWIN
WILLIAMS
FAINTS
(cover the earth)
Come and see for -
yourself the host
of colors for your
every need we have
at your disposal.
She May Be Little
Buf She V Good
AKRON. O. (UP.l Mrs. Betty
Capps, '44 Is the only woman in
Akron who can claim to-be both
a truck driver and also a trained
crane truck operator.
The five-foot-one woman,
weighing 104 pounds, hot only
handles trucks In her husband's
business but keeps house, does
her own washing and cleaning,
and is an efficient mother to
three stepchildren.
She asks no favors and takes
care of herself. Last winter, she
made a 22-hour truck trip In a
2Va-ton truck chassis all by her-
self to pick up a new crane. She
came back in a blinding snow-
storm and was stalled when she
lost two wheels from the truck.
She did the onlv thing possible:
she lit flares-and waited for pol-
ice to show up. '
The patrolmen said it was a
testimony to good driving that
she didn't lose control of the
truck when the wheels came off.
A cosmetics surrey shows that
women under 30 are the best cus-
tomers for shampoos, perfumes,
lipsticks and kindred toiletries.
WASHINGTON, Sept. (UP)
Scientists of government and
Industry, after years of re-
search are completing plans for
a big ceremony on Constitution
Day. Sept. 17. The nation's two
most Important, documents will
be Dlaced In glass sandwiches.
The documents are the orig-
inal engrossed and signed ma-
nuscripts of the Declaration- of
Independence and the Constl-
Independence, just to be on
the safe srde.
The facsimile has had a
workout in all respects .' The
glass enclosure was filled With
helium to an exact amount. The
humidity in the enclosure was
fixed precisely. The glass was
selected to ensure air-tight con-
ditions. A
Special backing substance for
the documents was provided to
tution of the United States. The ; compensate for moisture absorp-
sandwlches are an adaptation I tion during different seasons of
of the modern, picture window, | the year. A suitable filter was
a window consisting of two selected to eliminate harmful
panes of glass ,sealed with a
dead-air space between the
panes to provide maximum in-
sulation while permitting you to
look through to the" out-of-
doors.
To seal the historic docu-
ments Inaide such a glass
sandwich, the Library of Con-
gress and the. Bureau of
Standards first had to take
several precautions.
Foremost consideration had to
be given to a process requiring
a minimum of heat to avoid in-
juring the documents.
Government officials were as-
sisted by technicians of the
Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Co.
who perfected the sealing tech-
nique of hermetic sealing to be
used. The temperature to which
the documents will be subjected
during the sealing operation was
determined In the company's
laboratory.
. It already has been* tested ]
by a trial sealing of a facsi-
mile of the Declaration of
effects of light radiation.
Finally, the Bureau of Stan-
dards selected a leak detector.
If anything did happen to.
change conditions Inside the
glass enclosure, thev will know
about it. Any change In the
composition of a gas-can be ob-
served by measuring the change
in its thermal conductivity.
So the nation, in its 175th
anniversary of the signing of
the Declaration of Independ-
ence is about to attain com-
plete protection of Its historic
documents.
"Every resource of science and
technology." said Luther H. Bv-
ans. Librarian of Congress, "has
been applied in the effort to
make these precious documents
as permanently secure as the
principles thev proclaim."
GROWS IN BOTTLE
SPARTA. 111. cumber fully matured inside, a
small bottle which had been
tossed into a garden here when
the cucumber vines were small.
M North Ave. Tel. t-NIS
Martn Sosa Street
Tel. J-1424
*,
(NEATelepbi
TAKE YOUR TICK. Here's this year's crop of aspirants for the title of Miss America,
up in Atlantic City, N. J* on the first day of the beauty contest. Who do you like for the



e/s

ISUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9. 1951
THE SUNDAY. AMERICAN
PAOB SEVEN
Flying Missile' Is First Action
:ilm of Super Weapon; Due at Lux
TlK"to* secret" label has. at
been ripped from the flying
)e, most revolutionary weap-
ln recent history, which in-
IrBd "The Flying Missile," tb*
W Columbia picture starring
Jlenn Ford and Viveca.Lmfords
nd coming Thursday to the
-ux Theater.
For seourlty reasons, the De4-
oartment of Defense kept under
vrirps the experiments on the
_ mlssUe. Finally, Columbia
Pictures was authorized to film
verythuv r>bou the super-
weapon, on that would not. aid
and comfort a potential enemy,
for a motion picture whose prim-
ary purpose was entertainment.
Authoritative sources feel that
"the flying missile" may. In time,
make the big bomber obsolete,
The bomb Is guided unerringly
by radar echoes. If a missile is
fired in the wrong direction, It
can be made to change its course
while in flight so as to hit its
target. This spectacular value of
the weapon is thrlllingly demon-
strated in "The Flying Missile,"
THE BOMB THAT STALKS ITS FREY keeps Glenn Ford
pretty busy In Columbia Pictures' "The Flying Missile," which
also stars Vlveca Llndfors due at the Lux Theatre. The film
was made with the cooperation of the U. S. Department
of Defense.
during scenes of "war games"
staged by the U. s. Navy. Ford,
as a submarine commander,
guides a flying missile towards
another, distant submarine
which in turn "aims" It at an
aircraft carrier, and "sinks" the
ship.
It is known that the Joint
Chief of Staff were so impres-
sed by the astounding weapon
that they earmarked millions of
dollars for experimentation and
production. The Navy is carrying
out a project of converting cruis-
ers and smaller vessels, includ-
ing submarines, into gulded-mls-
slle carriers. Army experimenta-
tion also is being carried on in
unified fashion.
The only flying missile which
can be fully described is called
the Lark. Designed by the Navy
to counter Japanese kamikaze
threat during World War II, the
Lark has two liquid rocket en-
gines, uses acid and aniline fuel,
and can operate outside the oxy-
gen layer.
When the Lark nearg a target,
a second independent electronic
system picks it up and guides it.
A proximity fuse sets off the
bomb, which weights 1.20
pounds, is 15 feet long, and has
two pairs of right angle wings.
A special weapon like the fly-
ing missile calls for special men
to experiment with It. Glenn
Ford enacts one of these men in
the new Columbia film, tracing
some of the danger, excitement
and romance in this top-secret
work. Vlveca Llnfords co-stars
with Ford in "The Flying Mis-
Isle," and the supporting cast is
headed by Henry O'Neill, Carl
Benton Red and Joe Sawyer.
"The Flying Missile" was pro-
duced by Jerry Bresler and di-
rected by Henry Levin. Richard
English and James Gunn wrote
the screen play.
-
n's Peril' Set
Central
Take Care Of My Little Girl'Is Balboa's
Week End College Story In Technicolor
Patrons Meet Invisible Man'
it Bella Vista Thursday
Pink And Blue
"TARZAN'S PERIL." Captured by Jungle warriors, Tarzan,
portrayed by Lex Barker, is threatened bv scoundrelly Afri-
can chieftain Frederick O'Neal, (righti, in Edgar Rice Bur-
roughs' thrill-adventure, "Tarzan's Peril," co-starring Barker
and Virginia Huston, and produced by Sol Lesser for RKO
Radio release. It's due at the Central Thursday.
Bud Abbott and Lou Costello
passed a mirth milestone with
the filming of their new Unver-
sal-Internatlonal comedy re-
lease, "Abbott and Costello Meet
the Invisible Man," opening
Thursday at the Bella Vista
Theatre.
The new laught hit marked
their 38th movie together, their
16th years as a comedy team and
their 11th year in Hollywood.
The comedians announced
ihortely after the start of pro-
duction on their current film
that they're all through with
such anniversaries and aren't
going to have any more birth-
days, either. ,
"Why should we make people
think we're old men?" reason
the pair. "Especially when we're
. Bud and Lou also announced
they planned to take out insur-
ance against the breaking up of
the team for any reason, and
stated further that they were
toying with the idea of insuring
Everybody in their audiences of
illions against "dyfng laughing
I an Abbott and Costello plc-
LThe team which soon will pass
the $100,000,000 mark In boxof-
fice receipts from their films
owes its success to a simple for-
mula"they always get into trou-
ble and then get out of it by the
skin of their teeth, with Bud
playing It straight and Lou talk-
ing the falls.
Lou makes more of those falls
than ever before in his career
in "Abbott and Costello Meet the
Invisible Man," and had to be In
the best condition of his life for
the fall guy role In the new
comedy hit.
He is knocked all over a prize
ring by a bruising middleweight
and pushed around by mobsters
from the start to the finish of
the film.
Both Bud and Lou point with
pride to the fact that they have
never made a picture that didn't
score a success at the boxofflce.
They also have one burning am-
bition:
"To make a movie called
'Abbott and Costello Meet Abbott
and Costello'."
"Abbott and Costello Meet the
Invisible Man" was directed by
Charles Lamont and produced
bv Howard Christie,____________

rvw
The healthier
>ird

fend
"""HwrltU,
V
FOR CUTS
AND BURNS
swwsj rarer
w*n ramoui
W. ?*
THIS ELASTICIZED pink and
blue swlm-sult Is .a favorite of
RKO's Jane Russell. For an even
tan, the halter straps which ore
buttoned in place, can be re-
moved.
OFF THE CUFF
HORNINO IN Dan Dalley
was up to his old tricks again
during the filming of "People
Will Talk" at 20th Century-Fox
studio. Never so happy as when
he is pulling a rib on somebody
he selected Cary Grant as his
particular target for the day. Ca-
ry was leading a 60-plece or-
chestra for a scene in the picture
and Dan bribed the trombone
player to let him take over dur-
ing a rehearsal. Every few sec-
onds he would deliberately blow
a few sour notes. Cary Grant fin-
ally got so annoyed that he ap-
Eealed to Director Joseph Man-
iewlcz to do something about It.
Wh~ Cary discovered his tor-
mentor was Dan Dalley he chas-
ed him off the stage to the great
amusement of all present.
There's an eld saying on
the Hollywood movie sets
that any workman called on
for a difficult; task prefaces
hi! complaints "with "This is
a grip's job." This is because
the grip is the backbone and
sinew of the industry. He's a
muscle man who does what
no one else can do. or wants
to rio,
JAMES MASON, who portrays
Field Marshal Krwin Rommel in
'The Desert Fox", Is currently
writing a screen play which he
will personally produce: with
himself .In the star role.
First "Tarzan" adventure film
to present actual picturesque
locales of the story In British
East Africa, "Taraan's Peril"
stars Lex Barker and Virginia
Huston as the "ape-man" and
Thursday.
The plot centers around the
his mate Jane respectively.
It's coming to the Central
the famous "ape-man's" efforts
to break up an attack by the
fighting Yorango tribe on the
peaceful Ashubas. A villainous
white man, long Tarzan's enemy,
runs a cargo of rifle's and am-
munition through the Jungle and
sells them to the Yorango chief,
who theupon launches a.war on
his poorly armed Ashuba neigh-
bors and their queen-
How the Jungle herp helps the
Ashubas turn the tables on their
enemies, and finally manages to
send the gun-runner to his well-
deserved death, forms the stir-
ring climax of the offering. Ac-
tual war dances and tribal cer-
emonies of the Wakamba, Thar-
aka and and Mombasa natives,
filmed especially for the picture,
and spectacular Jungle and river
scenes with Barker and his nat-
ive allies, enliven the Sol Lesser
production which RKO Radio Is
distributing.
George Macready, Douglas
Fowley, Glenn Anders, Alan
Napier, Dorothy Dandridge and
Edward Ashley have prominent
roles. Byron Haskln directed the
picture, based on the character
created by the late Edgard Rice
Burroughs. Samuel Newman and
Francis Swann wrote the screen-
play, with additional dialogue by
John Cousins.
As Jane, the jungle lord's mate
In "Tarzan's Peril," Sol Lesser
production for RKo Radio, love-
ly Virginia Huston glitters with
bangles of gold and precious
stones. This marks the first time
that anything but her natural
beauty has enhanced Jane, in
the Edgard Rice Burroughs ad-
venture series.
Wakamba natives of British
East Africa were hired to do a
spectacular tribal dance for
"Tarzan's Peril," Sol Lesser film
for RKO Radio. When the cam-
eras, were stopped there was no
stopping the wild dancers. They
went on with their leaping and
stamping for six .hours, before
exhaustion halted them.
Blanco Nieve y Los 7 Enonos" (Snow White)
LUX and CECILIA THEATRES
\|<^
THE NOTED BROADWAY
stage actor, Leo G. Carroll, por-
trays Field Marshal Von Rund-
stedt in 20th Century-Fox's "The
Desert Fox." story of Field Mar-
shal Erwln Rommel, played by
James Mason.
r -J.------:---------------------------------------
EVIDENCE DOG UP
AUBURN. N. Y. (TJ.P.)
State police literally dug for
evidence to find out who dump-
ed a whole truckload of rub-
bish alongside a road near here.
They sifted through the rub-
bish to find old papers bear-
ing names and addresses which
led to the arrest of Charles S.
Garret, 39, on a charge of mal-
icious mischief.

CENTRAL
Show: I St, 2:U, 4:53, _ p i_
GREGORY PECK
BARBARA PAYTON. In
'ONLY the VALIANT
The itorv of alx who fought
.____ Ilk i|x hundred!_______
ENCANTO THEATRE
_______Alr-Conaitiened _
Two Pictures In Technicolor!
Joel McCrea Shelley
Winter, In
"FRENCHIE"
Diana Lynn Charla
Coburn. In
PEGGY"
TIVOLI THEATRE
Spanish Double Program!
Hat Agulrre Rafael Baledn. In
"UNA MUJER DECENTE"
Rom Carmina. Ib
._____ "CARNE VIVA"_______
TROPICAL
Action and Suspense 1
STEVE COCHRANE
DAVID BRIAN. In
"Take care of My Little Girl,"
today at the Balboa Theatre,
propels onto the screen for the
first time the snobbishness of
college sorority Ufe. Told against
an entertaining college back-
ground with a cast peopled by
attractive young folk, and pho-
tographed In Technicolor. "Take
Care of My Little Girl" reveals
the controversial aspects of the
sorority issue without assuming
the pattern of a "problem" pic-
ture. Essentially, the new Twen-
tieth Century-Fox film, which
stars Jeanne Craln in her first
screen appearance since "Cheap-
er by the Dozen" well over a year
ago, Is designed to capitalize on
the freshness of its theme while
emphasizing the youth and
brightness of colorful campus
life.
The scene of "Take Care of
My Little Girl" takes popular
star Jeanne Craln back to the
mood of her initial trlump as
"Margie." In returning to the
screen after an absence during
which the still sweet-sixteenish
Miss Craln gave birth to her
third son, she takes the role of
the daughter of a Greek letter
society member who enters a
mid-western university idealis-
tic about membership In her
mother's sorority but becomes
disillusioned by first-hand learn-
ing of its Inequities and lnflr-
mltes.
Co-starred with Jeanne Craln
In "Take Care of My Little Girl"
are Dale Robertson, rancher
turned actor who here emerges
into a male lead from promising
performances in the backgrounds
of "Two Flags West" and "Call
Me Mister"; Mitzi Gaynor, who
burst upon the screen with a de-
lightful glow In the musical, "My
Blue Heaven," and here essays
a debut in a non-musical; and
Jean Peters, the slim, sleek lovely
who actually won her chance via
a college popularity contest,
parlayed into a film test, term
contract and now a true-to-type
assignment in "Take Car of My
Little Girl."
Derived from the authentic
experiences of Peggy Goodin,
who wrote a novel about them
on which Julius J. and Philip
G. Epstein based their screen
play. "Take Care of My Little
Girl," was given Technicolor
production by Julian Blaustem,
the newcomer producer on the
Twentieth Century-Fox lot whose
brilliant record Includes "Brok-
en Arrow" and "Mister 880."
Handling director's chores on
the college film was Jean Negul-
esco, whose cover-girl wife. Dus-
ty Anderson, appears m the film
In a bit part as a cashier. That
arrangement Is coming to be a
Negulesco trademark.
Supporting Jeanne Crain, Dale
Robertson, Mitzi Gaynor and
Jean Peters in "Take Care of My
Little Girl" Is an array of young
faces going places: Jeffrey Hunt- Peterson. Carol Bran non, Natalie
er, Betty Lynn and Helen West- Schafer, Beverly Dennis, Kath-
cott. the more prominent among leen Hughes and Peggy O'Con-
them. Also featured are Lenka I nor.

IN HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent)
HOLLYWOOD (NEA) - Ex-
clusively yours: James Craig is
the happiest guy In town ovei
his Impending release from his
MGM contract. He was signed as
a threat to Gable but turned out
to be so good MGM put him in
the deep freeze. Now watch his
jets.
Actor John Eldredge and his
wife, Eleanor, have separated
after five years of marriage. He's
In "Angels In the Outfield."...
Hoot Gibson's friends are wor-
ried about the former screen
cowpoke's health.
Eyebrow-raiser: Guy Madison
and wife* Gall Rnssell have sep-
arate business managers to count
their money.
On The Records
"INSIDE THE WALLS
OF FOLSOM PRISON"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
A DOUBLE PROGRAM I
Prohibited for Minen!

"NUDISMO EN EL
TRPICO"
Abo:
"DEVIL'S SLEEP" s
VICTORIA THEATRE
Tyrone Power, in
"AMERICAN GUERRILLA"
Dan Dalley, In
"CALL ME MISTER"
Popular Music
NEW YORK (U.P.) Decca
has released a memorable long
playing album of George Gersh-
win's famous "An American m
Paris" and "Rhapsody In Blue,"
featuring Arthur Sandford. on
the piano with the Klngsway
Symphony Orchestra conducted
by Salvador Camarata. The In-
terpretations are lively and on a
par with the many other good
recordings that have been made
of the two compositions.
Lovely Mary Ford sings and
plays the guitar with Les Paul
and hi* multi-instrument tech-
ique on six taes in a new Cap-
itol album "Vol. 2 Les Paul's
New Sound."
The old favorites chosen for
the set show up well on the un-
usuel treatment. They Include
"Three Uttle Words." "I'm For-
ever Blowing Bubbles." "That
Lonesome Road." "Moon Of Man-
akoora," "In The Good Old Sum-
mertime" and "La Rosita."
Doris Day sings some good old
tunes in the Columbia album
"On Moonlight Bay." from the
motion picture moslcal version of
Booth Tarklngton's Penrod stor-
ies.
Some of the better songs are
"Moonlight Bay," "Tell Me,"
"Cuddle Up a Uttle Closer"
and "Love Ya,"
New Singles:
Radio's Don McNeil and TVs
Frank Allison are combined on a
pair of religioso sides "May the
Angels Sleep on Your Pillow" and
"What Is God?" (RCA)... Peg-
gy Lee and Mel Torme duet on
two so-so tunes "Don't Fan the
Flame" and "Telling Me Yes,
Telling me No" (Capitol)...
Louis Jordan has four good vocal
sides with his Tympany Five I
Can't Give You Anything But
Love, Baby," "You Will Always
Have a Friend." "If You're So
Smart, How Come You Ain't
Rich" and "How Blue Can You
Get?" (Decca)...
Perry Como's latest Is "Sur-
rising" (RCA Victor)... Singer
ane Powell has a very pleasant
number In "Paris" (M-G-M)...
Nellie Lutcher doesn't seem to
have- her old bounce with hef
new "The Song Is Ended" and
"Humoresque" (Capitol)...
Frank Sinatra is up to par in
"Try a Uttle Tenderness" (Co-
lumbia) ... Dick Haymes does a
competent job of singing on "Tell
Me" and "Who'll Take My Place?"
(Decca).
David (. Whitney.
Producer talking about a tem-
peramental star:
"She's a very high-clash type
of girl."
June Haver on her romance
with baseball star. Dlno Resteill:
"He's a friend, but a very, very
!;ood friend. But people will have
t the other way. No, we're not
going to be married."
Marilyn Maxwell and Andy
Mclntyre. who were at the snarl
stage at the time of their divorce,
have now decided to observe Hol-
lywood tradition and be the best
of friends.... Grid star. Glenn
Davis is branding as "ridiculous"
a printed report that he gave a
"terrific physical beating" to a
movie executive in an affaire
d'honneur.
The "Sonny Boy" of Al jolson's
cradle song fame has become a
man. The baby Jolson and Ruby
Keeler adopted and named Al.
Jr., spent the summer working
as a deck hand on a Newport
Beach, Calif., fishing boat. He's
now 16 and is known as Al Lowe.
He was legally adopted at the
age of nine by Ruby's second
husband, contractor John Lowe.
Uta Grey Chaplin is now U
per centlog a horse. The nag's,
name is Uttle Son and he makes
his film debut in "Lone Star" as
Clark Gable's own Trigger.
There's a report, by the way, the
MGM will retitle the Gable-Ata
Gardner film, "Come and Take
It."
The wags are telling about tha
atomic scientist who installed a
video set at his home near Oak
Ridge and found that he had
telefisslon.
It's supposed to be hush-hush,
but 8heldon Leonard Is playing
a role patterned after the lata
Bugsy Siege 1 In "Young Man In
a Hurry" at MGM.
Bob Stack made his first ap-
pearance, on three dimensional
TV in England.
"It was awful," he groans. "The
viewers can reach right out and
strangle you."
ff><
anama
C^anal (clubhouses
Showing Today
WHY NOT ENJOY YOURSELF??... AND GO TO THE MOVIES!!
DIABLO HEIGHTS
IM :li S:St
Academy Award Winner...
Judy HOLI.IDAY
"BORN YESTERDAY"
Mon GAMBLING HOUSE"
COCO LI
1M *M 8:*
Red SKELTON
Solly FOREST
"EXCUSE MY DUST'
Technicolor 1
Men. "When You re Sealllnfl
PEDRO MIGUEL
1M P.M.
1
Lucille BALL Eddie ALBERT
"THE AFFAIRS OF SALLY'
BA | r, f\ A Air Conditioned
ALSU r\2.30 4:30 6:30 8:30
o-icdb, JEAN NEGULESCO *****
Dale ROBERTSON
Jean PETERS
JULIAN BLAUSTEIN
GAMBOA
im r *
Dean MARTIN Jerry LEWIS
"AT WAR WJTH THE ARMY"
GA TUN
I
David BRIAN
Frank LOVEJOT
id BRIAN Frank LOTUO
BREAKTHROUGH"
air WOMAN OMPtBR IS
Tbay ,-WOM
MARGARITA
!:M 15 1:11
Doria DAY
Gene NELSON
"LULLABY OF
BROADWAY"
Technicolor!
CRISTOBAL
Alr-Cendrtieoed 2:M. S.'IS, S:M
Gregory PECK
Virginia MATO
CAPTAIN HORATIO
HOeXNaLOWEK"
Tachnlcolor!
Abo Showii
StSSim
i


It
t .

-: I ...
*'' '
*GE KtO'HT r I
a *- i i... -..
BE SUNDAY AMERICAN

.......
----........
' T "
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, IN
Thompson-Chocolate II To Clash At Panama Gym
Tonight's Card Includes
2 Six, One Four-Rounder
Unbeaten Louis Thowpsorr, r*6n0m'$ hottest 135-
pounder at resent, will be out t extend his string tonight
yhen he tackles Former Isthmian Featherweight Cham-
pion Kid Chocolate II (Colon version) in a scheduled ten-
round feature bout at the Panamo Gym.
The boy* signed to make ii Interest in tonight'si fight pro-
wist limit of 131 pounds. It to gram will not be limited to tbe
Imoit certain, however, that n..rt horn. Fufare _ajn*toa*Jo
Thompson III have a light ad-
vantage when they tip the aoales
at 11 .m.
The les* experienced but much
taller and harder punching
Thompson I* a iolld twoto-ene
fyoritf to heat Chocolate. The
experts apparently are of the
opinin that Thompson Is on the
way up while Chocolate's best
drs are behind him.
This, however, is the opinion
of be majority of Colon fan
who. will journey oTer to the cap-
ita,! t* root their bey heme. The
Atlantic siders claim that "Cho-
co" in, teems to be hit form-
er self. .
Since piacinc himself under
the able hands of Aubrey Woo-
druff, Choco has retained his
speed, punchinr PtwCr *nd moat -
fpJkJUa confidence. He will be and Melanio Pacheco will sound
a hard man to bent tonight, out the card..
see how much the hard-hitting
Leonel Peralta has" Improved
since he also was taken over by
the crafty Woodruff.
Peralta Is an odds-en choice
lo K.O. the once promising Beto
Scantlebury In a lS-pound six-
round semifinal. Scantlebury,
who flashed Into prominence
with four straight wins including
one dter the then unbeaten Joe
Andrade. has been unable to
triumph since whipping Andrade.
This topractlealty door-die
assignment for. him. .
The.-erratic Lape Panche and
the Ispeedv but short-winded
Victor Arflines will meet in a six-
round ld-T*wnd special.
A four-round preliminary be-
tween lll-potmders Al Marshall
Yankees, Red Sox Triumph In Junior Circuit
1st Race "P-l" Natives 7 Fgs
Purse: $275.40Pool Closes 12:45
First Race of the Doubles
1Risita B. Moreno 108
2 Don Joaqun E. Ortega 105x
3Eclipse O. Chanis 10
4LittleLulu a. Sanchez 110
5Manolete K. Flores 120
SCosa Linda O. Cruz 112
7Villarreai A. Enrique llSx
8Contrabando E. Darlo 105
2nd Race "F-2" Natives', . Fgs.
Purse: $275.06 Pool Closes 1:15
Second Race of the Doubles
lpeggy F. Avila 120
2Carilimpio H. Alzamora 112
3Don Catallno O.Cruz 116
4Poltico M. Hurley 120
5El Moho J. Baeza, Jr. 117r
Fonseca O. Orael 116
I
Lopat Hurls 5-0 Shutout
While Parnell Wins 17th
I y United Press
NEW YORK, Sept. T~ fhe Yankees retained their
margin at the top of the American League, pending the
result of the Indians-Browns night game at St. Louis, by-
whipping the Senators 5-0 behind the five-hit hurling of
by
JOE WILLIAMS
Oov. Tom Dewey has directed his personally appointed boxing
commissioners to investigate the, circumstance* surrounding the
.death of George Flores, the youthful prize fighter he was wound-
ed fatally In Madison Square Garden last week.
.The Governor directs the Commissioners to "determine If
there were'any precautions that could have been taken and if
-It. (Flores'"death) was In any way avoidable." The Governor adds
that the death-of the young dfise fighter was a "tragedy."
- ", There are many ho will agree that It as a tragedy>, In*
deed, particula'rly the young prizefighter's ife'and Infant. There
a"Te many' more" ho will not agree that turning this matter
over'te the'-commissioners, presumably 'for-flrial disposition, Is
either bright'br proper, '.' '..
Since the formal certification of the dead youngster's physic-
al flSnessand .fightingnquallflcatlons were entirety In the hands
of the commissioners to begin with, 4b hardly Vems likely these
. gentlemen would go to-extraordinary lengths to place themselves
In an embarrassing position. This is not a procedure which Is
uniformly -pracUeed by the human race. '
What is needed here is not an investigation by-the .boxing
commissioners but an investigation of the boxing commissioners.
What the Governor's attitude amounts to is an invitation to offi-
cial whitewash and the dismissal of another ring fatality as "Just
one of those, deplorable occurrences-that couldn't be helped."
If this Is as far as the Governor intends to go, then the time
has come to abolish prize fighting: In this atate, for It toa warn-
ing that ronciit ions' will et worse before they get better. Jt to
Almost a certainty that'even an impartial investigation would con-
firm that 11 the routine precautions were observed, but that
Ould tell only a part of the story. There are precautions which
the book, from which the commissioners work, do not prescribe.

IS -THERE A EAW AGAINST COMMON SENSE?
Despite contrary belief, there Is no rule in the book which
imposes a 30-day. layoff for a flghier who has been knocked
but. Young Flores had been stopped twice In a month's time
when he,-as booked into the Garden semifinal which led to his
death. An I he was only 20 years old! Plain common sense. If not
simple humane cbnsiderat.ons. should have been sufficient to
convince the commissioners this youngster had no business fight-
ting at that time.' ,
In explanation of Into shocking indifference, would the Gov-
ernor be satisfied with the Information that the book was not
violated? I doubt that anybody who has regard for human Ufe
or interest in the ring as a sport land, there are many) would be.
Yet this" is the sort of thing that' may be expected from the
Governor's casual directive to, his hand-picked commissioners.
A 30-day rest for knocked-out fighters can be no guarantee
against' ring fatalities. Actually it Is a minor safeguard. Lveme
Roach, for example, laid off a full year following a brutal beat-
ing at the hands of Marcel Cerdan, yet when he returned he was
knocked out and expired from the resultant Injuriesor, what
Is more likely, from the original injuries which' had never healed.
> But a compulsory rest period is at least indicative of con-
cern. Following the ring deaths-of Leverne-and Sonny Boy West,
battered gladiators were drydocked* for just such a period, this
oh recommendation of the medical advisers. Would the Governor
expect,the.Commissioners to ask themselves, hy it'was dis-
continued?'- ;'.. '..-
-
A ULL-SCALE INQUIRY IS IN ORDER
Reports that Dr. Frank Ferlanio, who headed up the medical
board when It -was first appointed, reslghed because of obstructive
tactics seem well authenticated. This to a- serious matter. Who
(and' for what purpose i would maneuver to Impede a profession-
al man .who was working to minimize injuries? Does the Governor
anticipate the commissioners will look Into. this curious matter
at this late date?
What e need and should' have Is a full-scale Investigation
of the. prize ring, Including, or even beginning with the commis-
sioners' conduct of the business. Their character and 'integrity
are unquestioned. Admittedly their assignment to not a simple
one. -Two of them serve for free. Only Eddie Bagan, the- chair-
man, is-s flailed. All have other business. Interests. It would be
reassuring in,this cristo to learn that they we en qualified.
Row to an excellent time to find out.
The- lates, medical theory is that young Flores' death was
caused by Ufe jarring impact when hJs head hit the ring floor.
There is surely no disposition here to question scientific findings.
But X have wen any number of fighters hit the floor 1th just
' as much .violence and suffer no more than -stunning shock, and
i I have to. wonder if the. condition Of the stricken fighter at the
; tUhe, isn't,* vital contributory,cause. .
Perhaps if young Flores had not been punched around In his
two .previous fights, both within the month, h might haye been
able to shake off the effects of the impact. It seems to me that
, if the. comrntosioners had been Tnore knowing and more aware
they simpjlv wquid not have permitted this, youngster with his re-
cen background and uncomplimentary reputation as a punching
bag to enter,f,h.e ring no matter hat the medical tests showed
. I,t-thyre at negligence that's where it was add If the Oovernor
; expects the commissioners to admit itwei'-,, then I will finally
Ijogn tc^ijftftrsta \ \ how, he. lost to Mr. Truman.
i Me teal fe To Wisconsin Hall Of Fame
3rd Race "H" Nativey, Fgs.
Purse: S3S4.M Pool Closes 1:49
One-Two
1Grito y Plata M. Hurley 115
2Lolito 8. Garcia 117x
3Helen B. B. Agulrre 110
4Golden Tip A. Valdivia 115
5Casablanca A. Enrique I02x
White Fleet K. Ycaza lOSx
4th Race "Ew Natives 414 Fgs.
Purse: $275.48 Pool Closes 2:28
Quiniela
110 Mar J. Baeza, Jr. 108x
2Golden Faith C. Chavez 105x
3Golden Babe E. Silvera 120
4El Mao O. Chants 109
5Romntico H. Alzamora 120
6Torcaza A. Enrique 105x
7Bijagual T. Medrano 107
8 J. Huincho G. Sanchez 114
aTap Girl C. Iglesias. 110

5th R*cr "A" Imported6' Fgs.
rnrsef fl,tta.ePool Closes 2:55
Jorftu I E Dario 10
2Dictador V". CastlO li2'
"3Binard .O. Chanto 119
4Royal Coup K. Flores 120
5 Ph. Apollo E Silvers 103
6-J\ill T. Medrano 108
Eddie Lopat.
Meanwhile, the Boston Red
Sox kept pace with the leaders
by taking an easy 6-1 decision
from the Philadelphia Athletics
behind the four-hit pitching of
Mel Parnell who chalked up his
17th success.
Mickey Mantle aided Lopat
score his 19th victory bv blast-
ing his-tenth homer of the sea-
son. Bob Porterfield, who drop-
ped his eighth decision for the
Senators, allowed only throe
hito.
In the only other afternoon
American League-game, the Chi-
cago. White Sox came from be-
hind to edge the Detroit Tigers,
3-2. Lou Kretlow and Luto Alo-
ma combined to limit the Ben-
gals to five sale ties. Aloma got
credit for his sixth win. Freddie
Hutchinson was the loser.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Big Don Newcombe Jolted the
pennant hopes of the New York
Giants by stopping them Ith a
two-hit 9-0 whitewashing at-Eb-
bets Field. Jim Hearn started for
the Giants but didn't last long.
Jackie Robinson i.tarked the
Dodger attack by getting three
of their eight hits in four offi-
cial trips to the plate.
The St. Louis Cardinals won
their 12th game in their last 13
by beating the Pittsburgh Pirates
4-2. Alpha Brazle was the win-
ning pitcher. Mel Queen, ho
started for the Pirates, was the
loser.
Chet Nichols spun a 5-0 six-hit
job for the Boston Braves against
the Philadelphia Phillies. Bubba
Church, who went the first ejght
innings for the Phils, was the
losing hurler. The win as Nich-
ols' ninth against six losses.
The Cincinnati Reds edged the
Chicago Cubs, 4-3, in twelve in-
nings as Willard Ramsdell, Har-
ry Perkowski and Howie Fox
Joined forces to nip Paul Minner
who went the route for the Cubs.
Fox was credited with the vic-
tory.
------------1------------------------------.--------------1---------------
TEAMS
Brooklyn
New York. 12
St.' Louis .. 9
Boston 46
Philadelphia 65
Cincinnati 58
6th Race "M" Imported7 Fgs. p'"Dur4h

National League
Purse: S375.ee Pool Closes 3:35
First Race Of the Doubles
1Zeveiania E. Dario 112
2Mete Bulla J. Chuna I09x
3Rlnty J. Samanlego 11s
4Haydn B. Agulrre 110
5Gran Dla V. Castillo 120
8In Time B. Moreno 120
7Black Bull K. Flores 11L
8Mon Btolle
9Hob Nob
A. Valdivia 118
M. Hurley 119 9
7th Race "E" Imported 7 Fgs.
Purse: $550.04 Pool Closes 4:5
Second Race of the Doubles
"Jamaica Relief Handicap"
1Curaca A.Enrique 113x
2Lacey J. Samanlego 118
3The Dauber K. Flores 118
4Wild Wire
5Galante ID
6Caribe)
7Minio
8Martocallto
A. Soto 128
E. Silvera 104
O. Chanto 112
B. Agulrre 120
E. Darlo 120
8th Race "('." Imported6li Fgs.
Purse: S450.M Pool Closes 4:4
Quiniela
1Delhi
2Tamesis n
3Piragua
4Lituana
5 Hechizo
6ans Souci
7-^Fnltal
8Plneel
9Guarina
10Nljihsky
E- Silvera 112
B. Agulrre 110
A. Enrique 103x
F. Rose 110
G. Sanchez 114
A. Bazan 112
H. Reyes 113x
O. Chanis 110
K. Flores 120
G. Cruz 112
*th Race "F" Imported1 Mile
Purse: ISOO.OI Pool Closes 5:15
One-Two
1Beduino B. Agulrre 112
2^Fright F. Rose 120
3Apretador E. Silvera 109'
4Troplcana A.Enrique llOx
5 Sismo G. Cruz 110
6Roadmaster C. Chavez 114x
7Asombro) V. Arauz 112
8 Pepsi Cola O. Grael 114
9Scotch Chum V. Castilloll2
10Coraggio O. Chanto 108
Chicago.
Won Lost Pet.
.87 47 .848
55 .5*9
a .523
7 .487
71 .47
78 .428
SO .418
79 .411
58
G.B.
17
mi
23
se
IVA
Today'* Games *
New York at Brooklyn.
Philadelphia at Boston (2).
St. Louis at Pittsburgh (2).
Chicago at Cincinnati (S).
i
Yesterday'* Results
Ne York 000 000 0000 2 1
Brooklyn 000 202 50x9 8 2
Hearn (13-7). Jones, Spencer,
Konlkowski and Westrum: New-
combe (18-8) and Campanula.
American League
G.B.
TEAMSr-
New York
Cleveland
Boston .
Chicago .
Detroit
Philadelphia 57
Washington 53
St. Louis. 41
Won.Lost Pet.
84V 49 .812
51
52
83
73
84
7
91
THE CLUTCHJt was quiet Clyde Vollmer, more than any,of the name players, who found the
home-run range and batted in runs in key games to keep the Boston Red Sox in the American League
race. Hers-,are eyes, stance and grip that earned the Cinclnnatian the nickname, The Clutch, (NBA)
PENNANT PI LOTS.... No. 6
Game Changes With PersonnelRichards;
Video Popularizes Players, Adds Pressure
s<
se
74
83
.28
.ees.
.541
.441
.414
.442
411
1
12
22>i
2
sett
42W
Philadelphia 000 000 0000 8 1
Boston 000 002 21x5 3 1
Church US-10), Thompson and
Semlnick; Nichols (9-6) and St.
Claire.
St. Louis 000 HI 1004 7 1
Pittsburgh 010 000 1002 8 1
Brazle and Sarnl; Queen, Wilks
and McCullough.
19th Race '.'F-2" Natives4!i Fgs.
Purse: S275.04 Pool Closes 5:40
1Danubio
2Brochacito
3Jota JOta
4Conde
5xito
6Miranda
A. Vasquez llOx
M. Hurley 113
C. Iglesias lio
B. Moreno 111
A. Enrique 107x
J. Avila 120
MILWAUKEE. Sept. ii (NA>-
Ralph Metcalfe, Marqutte's
"World' Fastest Human" o the
. 1913-36 era, has been named to
'Wisconsin's Athletic Hall of
. Fame at Milwaekee. .,
MatenHesmettork! college ca-
: rear included winning the Na-
'" < V k
*-
pna). Collegiate and Amateur
thl*Me Union championships,
sides equaling or breaking
cry sprint record in the hooks,
tpld Ralph 4tarred as a member
O the 1911-seoiympic teams. He
new is a member or the Illinois
Bute Athletic Commission
-' t '
11th Race "C" Natives 1 Mile
Purse: $325.00
1Taponazo A. Vergara lllx
?Bagalefto E. Ortega 107x
3Elona M. Zeballos 118
4Tin Tan H. Agulrre 112
5Mr. Espinosa M Hurley 110
Juan Franco Tips
By Cl.Ot.KF.K
(Twelve Innings)
Chicago 000 210 000 00&-3 12 0
Clncl. 000 210 000 0014 12 1
Minner (5-5) and Owen;
Ramsdell, Fox .(8-13) and Pram-
esa.
Muluel Dividends
Juan Franco
Today s Games
Boston at Philadelphia (2).
Cleveland at St. Louis (2).
Washington at New York (2).
Detroit at Chicago (S).
.Yesterday^ Results
Washington 000 000 000"0 5 0
Ne York 000 000 31x4 S 0
Porterfield (5-8) and Ouerra;
Lopat (19-7) and Berra.
Boston 004 001 1006 10 2
Phlladelp'la 010 000 0001 4 1
Parnell (17-10) and Robinson;
Fowler (5-10), Coleman, Kucab
and Tipton.
Detroit 100 000 1002 5 0
Chicago 000 001 1013 9 0
Hutchinson (9-9), Trout and
House; Kretlow, Aloma (6-1) and
Nlarho*.
1Manolete
2Politico
3Helen'B.
4Torear
.S-L-ltyarCoup
1 4Men Etoile
7Lacey
aTamesis U
5Boduiao i
1Brochacito
11Mr. Es p in o i
ONE BESTRoyal Coop
' ." --------r^~
MAC'S MARK
lift)*- Lulu
Don Catallno
Golden Tip
Juan Huincho
Grisu
>i Time
The Dauber
Pincel
Coraggio
Jota Jota
Tin Tan
NEW

YORK -i (NEA)
"oach Pr*T!c McOuire of Brook-
yn ft. John's basket ba'l team
iai a. four-year-record of 78 vlc-
^>ie, *u defeats.
';
FIRST RACE
1Luck Ahead 8*-40, 83.20, $2.20.
2Don Sizzle S3, $2.40.
3Annie N. $2.80.
SECOND RACE
1Don Teml (excluded from
betting).
2Filigrana $4.20, $2.40.
3Sixaola $2.60.
First Doubles: (Leek. Ahead-
Filigrana) $12.
THIRD RACE
1Diez de Mayo $2.80, $2.20, $2.20.
2La Negra $2.20, $2.20.
3Monteverde $2.20
One-Two; (Dies de Mayo-La
Negra) $4.88.
FOURTH RACE
1Caaveral $8.80. $2.80, $2.60.
2Norma 83, $2.60.
3Tapsy $3JO.
Quiniela: (Caaveral-Norma)
$10.49.
FIFTH RACE
1Riding East te i $12.20. $4.80.
2 Milros $8.
* SIXTH RACE
1Bendigo $7.60, $3.40, $2.60.
2-'Cotlllon $4.20, $3.
Ii Almeno $2.40.
SEVENTH RACE
1Glory's Ace $11.60, $4.80. $2.60.
2Costina $4.2U, $2.20.
3Athos $2.20.
Second Doubles: (Bendigo-
Glery's Aee) $41.40.
EIGHTH RACK
1Prestigio (el 89.60. $2.80, $2.80.
2Belfarset 83.80 $2.60.
3Porter's Star (e> $2.80
Quiniela: (Prestigio (e) -Bel-
farset) tue.
NINTH RACE
l-Ls Chata $17.00, SIS JO, $9.
2 Baby Betty $6, $5.60.
3Baby Rol $12.60.
One-Two: (La Chata-Baby
Betty) $124.89.
TENTH RACE
1Hortensia S3, $2,20.
2Tully sab $3.40.
ELEVENTH RACE
1Poleckas $480, $3.40, $2.20.
2 Hanna.SS $2.40.
3-Tm-tufo $S.
CLEVELAND at 8T. LOUIS
(Night 6ame>
' .'----------:--------
Playground
:. Sports
PARASO ,
Basketball
The second half of.the Paraso
Basketball League opened Wed-
nesday with all four teams par-
ticipating. Cyclonia took the first
gante ove Pico by a' score of 46
to 34. High pointer for Cyclonia
was B. Buval with 22 points, and
Alder with 14 lor Pico.
In the second 'game Tom
Lowe's Victor 3, first half cham-
pions, continued to'in as they
took an easy victory from Lake
view 64-41. Schoolboy Scott led
Victor, making 24 points.
Wap Jordan and Spider May-
nard gave the fans a laugh walk-
ing on the court, 1th the young-
stars throwing the ball around
them. Gooden as high point
man for Lake View with IS.
Archery
The Paraso archery group de-
feated the strong Lake View Red
Tank boys and girls in a tourna-
ment.
Results
Boys over 16 years, 30 yards: 1)
J. Johnson; 3) F. Brooks; 3) F.
Bowen. Olrls- over 14 years, 20
vards: 1) M. Worrell; 2) T. Jim-
enez; 3f J. Allen. Boys under 14
years, 20 yards: 1) B. Walker; 2)
^. *,.. ^.; at a. Blades. Bdys 12
years and under 10 yards: It C.
Uarnett; 2) O. Maynard; 3) A.
Blades. Boys over 16 years. 40
yards: 1) J. Johnson; 2) F. Bow-
en; S) T. Glasgow. Girls over 14
years, 30 yards: 1). M. Worrell;
21 G. McClure; S> J. Allen, Boys
under 14 y:ars, 26 yards: 1) B.
Walker; 2) E Blades: 3) L.
Blades. Boys U years and under,
20 yards: DO. Maynard; 2) C.
Oarnett; 3) A. Blades. Boy* over
IS years, SO yard: ' * ;
2) /. Johnson; Si T. Boweh. Boys
under 14 yeexi. SO yards: 1> B.
walker; i) -L. Biades; S) I.
- Meeting
The board of directors of the
Canal Zone Local Rate Amateur
BasebaU League flj meet to-
day at 11:00 a.m. at the Paraso
Gymnasium to make arrange-
ments for this coming baseball
Lost of six dispatches by mati'
agers of leading major league
clubt written for NSA Service
By PAUL RICHARDS
White Sox Manager
Bttsebal lphanges every 10
years ith the players. <
Television has a tremendous
influence on the mental work-
ings of the player of today.
Not too many years ago. be-
fore the owners dreamt they'd
be plagued by such Frankens-
tein monsters as radio and vi-
deo, clubs, especially losing ones,
more frequently than not play-
ed In comparative privacy on
midweek afternoons.
First, radio; and now TV,
changed aU that.
Win. lose or draw, millions of
eyes are constantly pressed on
the players.
The'athlete today to a per-
sonality. ,
Knowing hii every move Is. be-
ing etched, the playe no has
the advantage of crowd psychol-
ogy- '
This makes1 him more deter-
mined to turn in htobest A
pitcher, for instance, does his
utmost to avoid the humiliation
Of being knocked from the box.
Like all other hands, he's stark-
ly aware tha't millions, not Just
his teammates, members of the
other side and a comparative
handful ..of spectators, are
watching.
This increases the pressure,
snd tboseiho respond to it ill
Improve.
There to the financial side.
Take the cae yr Orestes Mloso.
With the Cleveland club, Mln,
ny Mloso was Just another
name on the roster.
Mlfioso became a star over-
night with the deal that brought
him to the White Sox.
Within only a few days, the
versatile Cuban was .paid an
addlonal $25,000 for endorse-
ments. '
With such lucrative, rewards,
a player naturaly stays in shape,
tries harder and continues striv-
ing to expand hls'potentlalty.
When the players share dl-
Sports Briefs
BY UNITED PRESS
BASEBALLFor the first time
in history the World 8eries will be
televised from coast to coast.
THe president of a television
network (Joseph McConnell of
NBC i says tbe series games will
be sent into areas lib a total
population of 85 million. Anoth-
er network (Mutual) ill broad-
cast the series over 545 radio sta-
tions for the 12th straight year.
' BasketballThe Big sev/n
Conference has started a "back-
to-the-campus" movement In
basketball.
Faculty representatives met In
Kansas City yesterday and voted
to boycott basketball arenas in
big cities. They agreed Big Seven
teams should play "wlthin the
city of and on grounds owned by
one of the schools involved." They
also voted that all games HI be
conducted under college manage-
ment.
In another move, Big Sevan of-
ficials ruled that any player ho
competes on organized teams
during the summer 111 be ine-
ligible.
HORSE HACINOTop eight
of 124 pounds has been assigned
Battlefield for the $20,000 Dis-
covery Handicap today at the
Aqueduct track In New York. Also
in the field of 10 three-year-olds
wiU be Uncle Miltle.
Paul Richard
LEADERP*nl Richards does
his utmost to get 25 per cent
more out,of White Sox. (NEA)
rectly in the radio end televi-
sion. World Series money, I can
see the day when, an individual
winning share will jump from
$6000 to $60,000.
As for the playing of the
game, its great to win bv the
book, but there to positively no
Percentage in losing by it.
..There is a great advantage In
the element of surprise.
The first thing a manager
must do is sell himself to his
players^
They must be convinced that
they are sure to get Justice.
rough or smooth.
A manager has to be a male
nurse, father confessor, bar-
room bouncer and a psychiatrist
all rolled into one.
He must know personalities.
Players are different, require
different handling.
The era of the iron fist is
gone. Players can't be whipped,
threatened and fined any-more.
Yet the manager-must be ths
boss, run the works ith a firm
hand, and at the same time
nave the respect of his men.
A manager's Job to to lead.
Reporting to a major league
club doesn't necessarily mean a
player to a finished product.
You learn more about baseball
as long as you are in it.
The superior players everlast-
ingly try to Improve their weak-
er points.
Building morale begins in
spring training and in the club-
house rather than on the field.
It's the foundation of success.
Ifs another word for loyalty,
or interest in the club and Job.
Many a mediocre club beats a
stronger one 1th a superior
esprit de corps.
A pennant inner, it has beea
said, must be 25 per cent strong-
er than the others. I could sub-
scribe to that.
By building morale and de-
termination and enforcing dis-
cipline, I can't see why a man-
ager can't get 25 per cent more
effort out of his Club.
Above all else, a manager
must make his players hustle.
One loafer can slow down the
entire operation.
Remember, there's nothing be-
low first place.
fal/CWM^

ASK FOR
Haig
SCOTCH WHISKY *^


IS
I
)At, SEPTEMBER 9, 1951
THE STJNDAT AMERICAN
AGE SVm
t .
rzetta Defends U. S. Amateur Over Physically Perfect Saucon Valley
LONDON BRIDGE TO CROWNA wrestlers bridgeU eluded
in Randv Turpins setting up exercises at Grossinger s, in the C-
-t Atttfr\ti it\0
skills, 100 miles irom New York. The British Negro defends the
world middleweight championship against Sugar Ray Robinson
1 in the hottest match n years at the Polo Ground- Sept 12. (NEA)
65th AAA Cops Eight Of Ten
Bouts In Army Boxing Season
Opener At Fort Clayton Gym
A near capacity crowd of some
200 persons In the Fort Clayton
Igymnaslum Friday night saw the
f65th AAA Group cop eight out of
[ ten bouts in a season warm-up
with the 45th Cavalry Reconnais-
sance Battalion. In an eleventh
kbout, 33rd Infanutry Regiment's
[Donald Tatro knocked out light-
iheavywelght Eugene Tate of the
B5th Group in the first round.
. One of the highlights of the
/evening was the bout between the
I USARCARIB 1050 Champion
Lightweight Jim Reyna of the
45th Reeon Battalion and Jess
Caldern of the 65th AAA Group.
h The first round opened with each
I man feeling out his opponent.
[ Caldern took full advantage of
his "southpaw" nature and con-
' tlnually kept his right hand in
' the face of the Champ thus mak-
| lng Reyna's left labs largely In-
effective. Calderon'8 right hand
>. seemed to be preventing the
}: Champ from getting in close.
The second round found itself
a repeat with Reyna beginning
to come in under the right hand
of Caldern and landing many
telling blows. When the bell for
the third round sounded both
men left their corners with a
II knockout in mind and engaged
in toe to toe slugging. Reyna was
I, the first to draw blood as he
1 opened a cut over Caldern's right
J j eye. Caldern, ignoring the cut,
began to pound Reyna with
rights to the head and lefts to
the body. Both men were swing-
ing at the final bell. Jess Cal-
dern took two-thirds of a. split
decision on this fight.
The Artillery-Cavalry fight
card featured two first-round
knockouts. John Rtva of the 65th
AAA Group won a charging
knockout over Mick Vargas of
the 45th Recon Battalion. At the
opening bell Rivas waded into
Vargas with a flurry of rights and
lefts to the body and head, send-
|* lng Vargas retreating to his cor-
ner. Rlvas caugftt Vargas with a
sharp right to the Jaw, flooring
Vargas for the count. It was the
general consensus of opinion of
the fight fans that they were
looking at the future U8ARCAR-
IB flyweight champion in Rlvas.
The second knockout came in
the fifth bout of the evening in a
flat 32 seconds of the first round.
David "Santiago, lightweight of
the 65th AAA Group floored Noel
Parkinson of the 45th Recon Bat-
talion with a right to the jaw.
The other bouts .of the evening
were: Bantamweight Angel Co-
ln, 65th Group" decisioned Paul
Eller, 45th Battalion: Rodrguez-
Rodrguez, 65th Group decision-
ed Featherweight Carman Bean,
45th Cavalry; Lightweight, Is-
mael Soto, 65th Group, decisioned
Theodore Leone, 45th Cavalry;
Lightweight. Richard Barnhart.
65th Group, decisioned Edwin
Hall, 45th Cavalry Battalion;
Ivan Hhodes, 45th unanimously
a^cltegf Lightweight Robert
Edgafr66th Group; Middleweight
Louis Brado, 65th, won a split
decision over Stinson flail, 45th;
James Veronee, welterweight of
the 45th. unanimously decisioned
Robert Ortega, 45th Group.
The biggest slugfest of the eve-
ning was between middleweight*
Louis' and Stinson Hall. Both
boys stood toe to toe for three
rounds slugging it out. Although
65th Group's Brado had a slight
edge on his opponent, both men
put up a good fight and deserve
Watching in future bouts in
which they may participate.
The smoker was held as a pre-
season warm-up to try the met-
tle of the ack-ackers and tankers
who have so far showed promise
on their respective boxing teams.
From the results of Friday night's
exhibition It Is clear to the train-
ers that thl sflstlc season will be
tops for the USARCARIB.
Training the 65th team are 8fc
Ted "Greek" Rounls, 8fc Bob
"Red" Blevins and former US-
ARCARIB lightweight champion
Cpl. Willie Palou. Trainers for
the 45th team are WOJG Wil-
liam Larsen and Sfc Frank Cecl.
Stranahan In ,
Sixth Try With
Relaxed Swing
Bv JIM HART
NEA Staff Correspondent
BETHLEHEM, PA. Sept. 8.
(NEA) Frank Stranahan. To-
ledo, o.'s weight-lifting golfer,
gets his sixth crack at the elusive
United States Golf Association
Amateur championship at Sau-
con Valley Country Club, down
the road a piece from Bethlehem,
Bept. 10-15.

Dick Chapman Frank Stnoahxn
The strong-man millionaire
has hauled in nearly every hon-
or, the non-professional game
offers, including Walker Cup
victories and two British Amat-
urs. He has beaten the best pros
in their own tournaments.
But the jinx which plagues
him In the Amateur compares
awfully with Sam Snead's Open
dilemma.
Last year, for example, Strana-
han waded through the field at
Minneapolis to the final, where
he met Rochester's Sam Urzetta.
The unknown basketball player
forced him into a sudden death
Slay-off, beat him on the 39th
ole.
"What do you have to do to
win?" Handsome Frank mum-
bled dejectedly in the clubhouse
after that one.
ALTERED SWING /
Stranahan may answer his
own question this year. During
the months that followed last
year's bitter disappointment, he
changed his swing. With what
keen observers have called a
smoother, more relaxed ap-
proach, Frank was low amateur
in Chicago's Tarn O'Shanter,
won the Western Amateur.
Not since the incomparable
Lawson Little did it in 1935 has
an amateur champion succeeded
himself. Malcolm Ward won the
Amateur twice. In 1939-41; Willie
Turnesa In 1938-48. But Urzetta
could be the first one since Lit-
tle to win two years hand-run-
ning.
Bam, one of the youngest play-
ers around, Is described by quali-
fied appraisers as the soundest
champion In recent memory.
Graceful and consistent, he
won't beat himself, you may be
sure.
The other Walker Cuppers,
Bill Campbell. Charlie Cos. Bob
Knowies, Jimmy McHale, Harold
Paddock, Turnesa and British
Amateur Champion Dick. Chap-
man are among the 200 starters
left from a record 1422 entrants.
Bill Mawhlnney, Canadian
champion, Dave Stanley, Public
Links champion, and Tommy
Jacobs, U. S. Junior tltleholder,
are m the lineup.
TOUGH AND BEAUTIFUL
William Dynamite Ooodloe.
Valdosta, Ga.'s fat and funny
flashly dresser, will be on hand
to provide fireworks and a few
laughs.
Dale Morey. whose fellow-Ok-
lahomans thought was slighted
when the Walker Cuppers Ignor-
ed him, brings one of the best
tournament records in the mid-
dle west to the beautiful course
at Saucon Valley.
Savannah, Ga.'s Hobart Man-
ley, North South champion, and
Bo Wlnlnger of Philadelphia
are likely dark horses. Touring i
professionals call Wlnlnger the
best amateur to appear In medal
play tournaments this year.
The Amateur has been played
on tougher and easier courses
than Soucon Valley, but never
on one so physically perfect, ac-
cording to USGA Executive Se-
cretary Joseph C. Dey, Jr.-
Despite its well-groomed ap-
pearance, though, none of the
players will be spoiled. About 100
traps dot the layout. Listen to
this description of the 586-yard,
dogleg sixth hole, a typical one:
"To the left of the tee are
woods, out Of bounds. An accur-
ate second must follow a well-
Slaced drive In order to carry a
uge trap that cuts Into the
fairway and continues some 100
SaiSj on the right. After passing
le desert, the approach la to a
partly shielded green on the
right-
Match play wont make things
any easier.
ALL IN DRUG STORKS
WORCESTER, Mass. (U.P.)
Four members of a Worcester
family are graduates of Mass-
achusetts College of Pharmacy.
They are Timothy Shea and
three sons, William, Robert and
Richard. The Sheas own three
stores In Worcester.
IE CHAMPION AND THE TE8TSaat Unette defend, the
United States Antatenr Championship over the Saucon Valley
CwsaUy Club eanrsc, BstMafi, ft., Sept. lt-15. The yeaag stylist
,, T., If Mperimpoaod on the approach to the lgtfc,
greca, with fee clnbnoaae in the baekgroond. (NEA)
Walcott Takes Bad Box-Office Lacing,
Bjit New Champ Wows 'Em For Free
By JIM HEYROCK
NEA Special Correspondent
INDIANAPOLIS, Sept. 8.
(NEA) What started out to be
a gravy train for Jersey Joe
Walcott is turning into a slow
freight.
There is a possibility the re-
maining exhibition matches
scheduled for the new heavy-
weight champion will come to a
screeching halt
| >r undergo dras-
lc changes.
Walcott and
entourage took
\ financial lac:
ng In Indiana-
>olis, when a
otal of 1853
jersons bought
ickets to see
.he champ per-
"orm in a four-
ound exhlbi-
ion against
Tackle Burke of
Joe Walcott Brownsville, Pa.
wi..tu.v .i..it some $700 as^hls
share. It's doubtful If this sum
would even come close to paying
expenses for the six-man Wal-
cott group.
The Walcott cap took a loss In
Columbus. O., the night before,
when only 538 persons turned out
for the exhibition.
Somehow accounts of the Co-
lumbus appearance failed to
mention that Walcott went out
and gathered 1300 children and
let them come In free to watch
him box.
Walcott and Burke donned
headgear tor the exhibition,
which Included a display of the
champion's boa lng ability,
punching power and a Httle
clowning.
It was a sad night for Promo-
ter Norb Updike, who said:
"I don't believe you could draw
more than 1500 persons to a
fight In Indianapolis if you had
every champion In the world on
the same card."
It takes only a few minutes
with Walcott to realize that the
promise he made after winning
the title was by no means a Ka-
He said he woud devote the rest
of his life to the youth of Amer-
ica.
"Any veterans hospitals near-
by?" inquired Joe after a visit
with the governor of Indiana. It
was a matter of minutes until
a sheriff's car, siren screaming,
was taking the group to Billings
Hospital.
Walcott made a short talk in
the auditorium and the proces-
sion was off to the Fiarmer
House. As Joe passed through a
day nursery room, a sleepy-eyed
four-year-old piped, "That's Joe
Louis!" Walcott gave him a
playful punch on the chin.
All along the way Manager
Felix Bocchlechio. an easy-to-
ftet-along-wlth fellow, gave away
arge badges which carried a
picture of Jersey Joe.
Walcott insisted upon going
somewhere else. The County Jail
was picked. Prisoners were as-
sembled in the mess hall and Joe
spoke. He gave sound advice to
men who don't like to be ad-
vised and they listened so at-
tentively that the only sounds
were Joe's voice and a dripping
water faucet.
With this type of operation,
the boxing sport will prosper
more than Walcott, but he un-
doubtedly will Join the ranks of
all-time popular champions.
As Jersey Joe Walcott said over
the public address system fol-
lowing his exhibition with Jackie
Burke:
"Whether some people like It,
whether some people think I'm
an did manI'm still heavy-
weight champion of the world."
Weill Stays On As Matchmaker;
Only Two Successors' In Sight
By NED BROWN
NEA Special Correspondent
NEW YORK (NEA) The
time has cycled around again for
Al Weill to deny the recurrent
rumor that he is about to quit
as matchmaker for the Inter-
national Boxing Club.
"I ain't got the slightest idear
of resigning." said Al, as he
glowed healthily in his Madison
P"-'ar* o-irrip" office. "The re-
port that I'm
about to retire
as matchmaker
on account of ill
health Is a base
canard. It's
made outta
whole cloth, and
is Just another
knock from the
enemy."
The "enemy,"
m Al's case, be-
ing the Boxing
Managers' Guild,
Al WelU euphon eously
pronounced
"Guilt" by the rotund match-
maker.
"Rumors, you can't stop 'em,"
went on the wily one. "They're
originated by disgruntled man-
agers. A guy can't satisfy all of
'em so you do the best you can."
The point is, the managers'
"guilt" accuses Weill of doing
the best he can for certain fa-
vored parties only, leaving other
worthy but less favored parties,
out in the cold so far as the IBC
is concerned. Which Weill vigor-
ously denies.
"There's a lot of liars In this
business," continued Weill hi
philosophic vein, "but the best
liars are the ones that tell the
truth.
"Not ALL the truth, of course,
but Just enough to give the
wrong impression.
WHAT'S A DOCTOR FOR,
ANYWAY?
"About my health, f'rinstance:
It's true I'm under my doctor's
care, but a lotta guys are walk-
ing around and doing all right
who are under their doctor's
care. What's a doctor for, any-
way? To keep you fit! And that's
why I'm under my doctor's care.
"I've done a good Job here. I
got three shows In the Garden
and two for the Polo Grounds
in September. The Garden shows
are Walter Cartier, of Oreen-
wleh Village, and Billy Kilgore,
of Birmingham, on the seventh;
Silent Halrston. Bronx deaf-
mute, and Harold Green, of
Brooklyn, on the 14th, and a
third on the 21st. And of course,
Turpin and Robinson on the 12th
and Pep and Saddler on the"26th
at the P. G. I've now got Mar-
ciano and Louis all set for Oc-
tober 11 at the Polo Grounds.
This, one will draw nearly as
good as the Turpin-Robinson
fight. But 1 don't wanna blow
my own horn. Ask Jim NorrlS or
Harry Markson about me."
Signing of Marciano to fight
Louis marks achievement of one
of Weill's great ambitions, Al's
stepson Marty, is manager of re-
cord for Marciano, but wagging
tongues bruit It about that the
wily step-daddy is the manager
In fact when it comes to piloting
the powerful young heavyweight.
This Is one of the main reasons
for rumors that Weill's match-
making days at IBC are num-
bered.
Messrs. Norris and Markson.
were lavish in their praise of Al
Weill as matchmaker, and aver-
red he "can keep the Job as long
as he wants. He has no contract
because he doesn't want one. It's
up to him."
MORE "SUCCESSORS" IN
OLD DAYS
Naturally, such rumors al-
ways supply successors for the
Job; in this case. Billy Brown,
capable programmer of fights
for the St. Nicholas Arena, and
Larry Atkins, Cleveland promot-
er, are the names mentioned.
That's a dearth of candidates,
and In comparison with rumors
of such changes In the past, far
below par for the course.
Years ago. when rumor became
rife that Jimmy Johnston, the
late Boy Bandit, was to be oust-
ed form his job with the Garden,
would-be successors sprang up
like mushrooms on the lea after
a rainstorm. All along what was
then Jacobs' Beach groups were
gathered, each containing at
least two sure-thing successors.
Along came a well-known
character who was conceded by
the fight mob to be punch
drunk. He inquired what all tha
palavering was about, and when
enlightened, remarked airily:
"You guys are all wrong.
There's only one guy gonna get
that Job."
"Who's that?" came the chor-
used question.
"Me," replied the character, at
he tottered toward the Garden.
P. 8.Johnston wasn't ousted.
RECORDStanley "roll <
Chicago displays a 5-poun
muskeUunge taken frc-n Little
Winnie Lake, near Gr.-nd Rap-
ids, Minn. It is believ d to be
he largest this year, r iy well
,tand as the 1951 rtcorc. (NEA)
Baylor's Isbell Presses
Parilli As Top College
Kentuc
T Quarter
m
..;.
ck
By TOM SILER
NEA Special Correspondent
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Sept. 8.
((NEA) Coach George Sauer
of Baylor seldom overlooks an
opportunity to acclaim the great-
ness of Larry Isbell, his own T
formation quarterback.
Bake rama
Larry Isbell
"You can have Babe Parilli or
anybody you want," Sauer will
tell you. "Just give me isbell. He
is the greatest quarterback I ever
saw, college or professional."
Sauer played on a fine Ne-
braska team 17 years ago, later
started with the Green Bay
Packers. The latter outfit fea-
tured a clever aerial duo, Cecil
Isbell to Don Hutson. Larry is
Cecil's youngest brother.
Sauer's unqualified endorse-
ment of his own star checked
with a dosen newspapermen from
Texas. The least enthusiastic
said simply,, "Well, Isbell Is cer-
tainly the best in the southwest,
a section which breeds talented
throwers."
Thus, Isbell is the challenger
for All-America honors at T
quarterback. Kentucky's Babe
Parilli is the defender.
ALL-AMERICA MEN
T quaterbacks have hogged
the field general's spot on All-
America selections since World
War II. A moment of reflection
brings to mind Arnold Tucker of
Army, Charley Conerly of Ole
Miss, Johnny Rauch of Georgia,
Johnny' Lujack of Notre Dame.
Arnold Oaliffa of Armyall T
quarter backs.
West coast partisans insist that
the quaterback battle can't be
limited to a two-man affair.
They refuse to believe that Is-
bell or Parilli is better than
Washington's Don Heinrlch.
Statiscally. Parilli had an edge
on both of them last year.
att. comp. int. yds. tds.
Parilli 203 114 12 1627 28
Heinrlch 221 114 9 1846 14
Isbelll 187 134 9 1220 15
This trio have a few things In
common. Each is the dynamo in-
tended to carry the offensive
team to steady touchdown pro-
duction. Each is fortunate in be-
ing on a title contender. Baylor
is the favorite In the Southwest,
Washington Just behind favored
California In the coast circuit,
and Kentucky ranks close to the
top n the Southeastern league.
FAVORED TARGETS
Isbell Is thrice-blessed. The
slender senior has two favorite
targets back from the 1950 team
Harold RUey and Stan Wil-
liams.
Good receivers make good
passers and vice versa.
Parilli'8 1951 tosses must go. a
good part of the time, to new-
comersone of whom Is Steve
Melllnger, a big hunk of brawn
and speed from Pennsylvania.
Al Bruno and Dom Fucci are
gone.
Heinrlch's most effective tar-
get in 1950 was Joe Cloldt. Joe
has departed, too, leaving Phil
Glllis and Tracy King as the
down-and-put runners who
must make or break Heinrlch m
1951.
Dixie observers consider Par-
illi, despite a poor record against
Tennessee, the most adroit ball
handler and T formation faker
his section has produced.
Texans way lyrical over Isbell's
pressure aerials, yet they insist
his cagy generalship Is more im-
portant.
Babe Parilli vs. Larry Isbell
might be a fair cotton Bowl at-
traction come January!
Recipe For Pro
Grid Success-
Go To Kansas
NEW YORK. Sept. 8. (NEA)
Steve Owen must think of
KaiTsas as farm club for the Na-
tional Football League Giants.
Coach Owen had four ex-
Jayhawkers lined up to start
the season for the American
Conference New Yorkers
Johnny Amberg, Otto SchneO-
bacher, Forrest Griffith and Red
Ettinger. The latter, a guard.
Jumped to the Canadian League,
Mike McCormack. Ysnkee
tackle, and Dick Tomlison, Steel-
er guard, are former Kansas
stars, as is S. P. Garnett. who
was with the 49'ers until called
to the colors.
Man ...What Pulling Power
P. A. CLASSll:lEDS puU sales faster... cheaper!
Waat to sell a cara refrigerator a caera,
cottage, carpeta WANT AD in THE PANAMA
AMERICAN will do it quickly .. easily!


...... . _


-r
\

LOPAT'S 19TH KEEPS YANKS ON TOP
a
Red Sox Romp
Behind Parnell
.
Newcombe (18th)
Stops Giants Cold
The League's Best
7e SU NO A Y
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" - Abraham Lincoln.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Ferris Fin, Athletics
.343
George Kail, Tljer.......3Z
Ted Williams. Red So.....SM
Orate* Miosa, White Sox, 334
Oil Con, Senators .. .... SU.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
SUn Muslal, Cardinals.....Ml
Rk-hie Athbum. PhllUM.....333
Jackie Robinson, Dodger .. .333
Roj Camaanella, Dodgers .. 427
Carl rnrillo, Dodgers.. .. Jl
SPORTS PAGES: 8,4 9)
Gromyko
Ridicules
Treaty
TWENTT-SIXTH TEAK
PANAMA. R. P., SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1951
FIVE CENTS
Japanese Peace Treaty
By 49 Countries
8AN FRANCISCO, Sept. I,
(UP) Soviet Deputy Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko told a
press conference that the Japan-
aae peace treaty atened by 40
nations today would not:
1) Prevent a revival of Japan-
*e militarism;
8) Provide for peace and se-
curity In the Far East; -,
f) Provide for the independ-
ence and sovereignty of Japan.
Gromylco called John Foster
Dulles, architect of the treaty, a
warmonger.
' Gromyko said today's treaty.
sponsored toy The. United State*
and Britain, ^excludes the parti-
cipation of the Soviet Union and
China."
Reading his tatrnent tn a
monotone Gromyko said:.....
"This separate peace treaty of
Japan 1 In violation -of national
agreement made at Yalta and
Potsdam. * .
"It is a gross injustice to Chi-
na the 5O0,00O/)0p people of
China shall not forget this vio-
,tion of their indisputable rights
bv American dictators."
He said tht Conference was
ridleuioaa. since China was ab-
sent and countrie like El Sal-
vador and Nicaragua were pre-
sent.
"The treaty seeks the unleash-
ing of a near war. The United
States wants to use the Japanese
people as cannon fodder for their
aggressive imperialistic designs."
- In conclusion he said:- "The
Soviet Union cannot agree to
such actions certainly not.
V'The Soviet Union Is dlssoci-
fitig Itself from the preparation
if plans for a new war'in the Far
r. and warns those responsible
the consequences of such a
tap-"
Gromyko, after reading his
Jftatement. answered questions
- A Japanese correspondent ask-
ed about the 340,000 Japanese
prisoners of war said to be still
lield in Soviet territory.
Gromyko replied: "That's a
scandalous allegation. Entirely
groundless. The Soviet Union has
already explained that there are
no Japanese prisoners of war in
she Soviet."
5 He was asked whether .the Pil-
are of 532 concentration camps in
Russia was correct The refer-
Sice was to a map shown Gro-
yko on the peace conference
floor this week by Congressman
*K Armstrong.
It would be Interesting to
know who Is the author of this
Map," said Gromyko abruptly.
?Armstrong said the map was
(prepared and distributed by the
American Federation of Labor.
*' GIVES HUBBY REBATE
| ALBANY, N. Y. (UP.) An
Albany woman won a separ-
ation decree and a $10,210
Judgment against her -husband
but had a change of heart and
established a $2.500 bank ac-
count in his name. Mrs. Anna
JSsary. 47. relented because she
did not want to take all her
husband's money, her attorney
Raid." .
rt---------------------------------:-----
SAN FRANCISCO. Sept. 8 (UP)
A treaty of peace ending the
war between Japan and the Al-
lies was signad today in the room
where the United Nations was
born.
Argentina's Hiplito Jesus Paz
was the first to sign. Then 48 oth-
er nations followed In alphabe-
tical order.
Russia, Catchoslovakia and Po-
land refused even to witness the
signing.
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minu-
ter Andrei Gromyko told a press
conference that this treaty would
never provide peace and security
in the Far East.
Japanese premier Shigeru Y fi-
sh Ida was the last to sign.
Today's signing ceremony cli-
maxed a week In which the So-
viet Woe was thwarted at every
turn tn Its efforts to stall the
meeting, kill the .treaty or a-
mend It.
. The treaty becomes effective
-when the majority of Japan's
wartime enemies ratify it.
The treaty:
i 1) Recognizes Japan's status as
a sovereign nation;
3) Requires.occupation troops
to be withdrawn from Japan
within 90 days of the treaty be-
coming effective, but permits bi-
lateral agreements for the maln-
talnance of foreign troops on
Japanese oil,
. Si Waives allied claims for re-
Cations. through it recognises
damage and suffering eaused
by Japan;
- 4) Requires the return of Jap-
anese prisoners of war to their
homeland;
5) Renounces Japan's rights
.and Interests In China, Korea,
Formosa, the Kuriles and other
Island possessions.
Brig. Gen. Hays
Army's New Deputy
Surgeon General
Brigadier General Silas B.
Hays, MC, recently assumed his
duties as Deputy Surgeon Gen-
eral of the Army following a
brief ceremony in the Wash-
ington D. C. Officer of Major
General George B. Armstrong,
the. Surgeon General.
In his last assignment as
Surgeon of the Japan Logistic-
si Command, General Hays was
responsible for management of
Army hospitals in Japan, the
evacuation of all casualties
from Korea, and the furnish-
ing of medical supplies and
equipment for both Japan and
Korea. He succeeds Brigadier
General Psul I. Robinson who
will take command of Fitesi-
mons Army Hospital at Den-
ver. Colorado.
General Hays, a native of
St. Paul, Minnesota, began his
military career in the Medi-
cal Corps Reserve following
graduation in 1928 from the
University of Iowa Medical
School. During World War II
he served as chief of Medical
Supply for the European'Thea-
ter. He was awarded the Le-
gion of Merit with Oak Leaf
Cluster, the Croix de Ouerre
with Palm, and the Order of
Sante' Publique from France
for his work tn that country.
Upon his return to the United
States he was appointed Chief
of the Supply Division. Office
of the Surgeon General, where
he remained until his aslgn-
ment to the Far East Com-
mand-in May 1950.
General and Mrs. Hays have
two children, Ellen. Carol and
James M.
. INEA Telephoto)
BIG JOB A newspaperman tried to question Australian
Ambassador to the . 8. Percy Spender as he arrived with
his wife for the Japanese Peace Treaty Conference. Spender,
who said he was in a hurry, is vice-chairman of the
conference.
Britons Are Quietly Digging
Deep A-Bombproof Shelters
LONDON, Sept. 8 (Ij?) ernment does not intend to
Britain has apparently given demolish the A-bombproof for-
up hope of a quiet atomic age tress commanding the Mall
and has thrown into operation a half mile boulevard which
a civil defense program that starts near Trafalgar Square
is honeycombing the ground and runs past Marlborough
under the major cities with House, home of Queen Mary,
100 deep shelters. St. James Palace. Clarence
House, home of Princess Ell-
The fact that the plan was zabeth and the Duke of Edin-
underway leaked out when cu- burgh, to Buckingham Palace,
rlous Britons tried to find out This grim brown fortress was
why laborers were tearing up built during the last war when
recently repaved streets In a German invaolon Teemed
London's High Holborn. probable.
Sidewalk superintendents soon Though at that time the atom
discovered that this was no bomb was siV-11 only a project
ordinary street repair Job. the fortress was made so
strong it can withstand any-
Foremen In charge of the thing but a direct atom hit.
work admitted their men were it covers subterranean Ins-
sinking deep shafts, but said tallstions which might be a
they were pledged not to reveal possible refuge for the Royal
the Intended purpose of the Family and for top Govern-
shafts. ment officials not assigned to
Jl . the Whitehall shelter.
All workers on the project
had passes, and instead of the in London these deep shafts
usual lleaurely pace of British street repair work the laborers way system, which in many
hacked away with great ener- areas ts already deep enough
87. to resist atomic assault.
Then similar shafts were dis-
covered under construction on The plan for these shelters
Whitehall, near the No. 10 has been in existence for some
Downing Street, home of Prime time but British optimism
Minister Clement Attlee and the that some worldwide develop-
center of a vast complex of ment would make them un-
Government buildings. necessary has evidently be-
lt is also clear that the Gov- gun to run out.
UN's Trygve Lie
Calls On Reds
For Sincerity
UNITED NATIONS, N. Y.,
Sept. 8 (UP)-^Unlted Nations
Secretary-General Trygve Lie
challenged the Communists to-
day to prove they are "serious"
about a Korean armistice by
agreeing to change the site
from Kaesong and resume talks
promptly.
Lie told the Reds "the time
has come" for them to show by
"concrete steps" that Russia's
June 23 cease-fire proposal was
genuine.
He called on them not only to
accept Gen. Matthew B. Ridg-
way's' proposals for re-starting
the ruptured talks but also to
take measures that would make
possible "real progress" towards
an armistice agreement.
In a news conference, the
hefty Norwegian also predicted
there would be no world war
this year and welcomed the
signing of the Japanese peace
treaty as a step in the right
direction.
He favors prompt admission
of Japan to the U. N. when the
treaty is signed, but warned
that a vetomeaning Russia's
could block such a move.
L|e said:
"Like you, I have been dis-
appointed and disturbed at the
lack of progress in the Korean
armistice negotiations and by
the present suspension of the
talks by the North Korean and
Chlenese commanders.
"Difficulties and suspicions of
all kinds must be allowed for
in such negotiations, but there
can, it seems to me, be no ques-
tion in the minds of the other
side of the genulness of the
desire...of the U. N. command
to seek a Just and reasonable
military armistice and cease-
fire.
If the other side also genuine-
ly desires such an outcome,
then it should promptly take
concrete steps that will make
possible both a resumption of
the talks as Gen. Rldgway has
been urging and thereafter real
progress toward negotiating the
ease-fire and armistice agree-
ment. .
"The time has come for de-
finite proof whether or not Mr.
(Jacob A) Malik's proposal,
which roused so much hope
around the world for peace,
was indeed a serious one, as I
bleleved."
TWO ON THE ROSTRUM Polish delegate Stefan Wierblowskl (at rostrum, back to*camera)
refuses to yield to Kenneth Younger, the British delegate, during a shouting match that mark-
ed the opening business session of the Japanese Peace Treaty Conference In San Francisco.
Secretary of State Dean Acheson (presiding at rear) had recognized Younger.
Enemy Troops Oust Factories
As No. 7 US Air Force Target
Convicts Enjoy Their
Little Brown Jug
ATLANTA, Sept. 8. (UP).
Police Chief Herbert Jenkins
today Investigated reports that
illicit liquor was smuggled, In
a paddywagon to the city pri-
son farm where inmates drank
It.
Jenkins said that two weeks
ago a patrol wagon made a
routine trip to the farm and
trusty prisoners there saw a
prison guard remove a con-
tainer of liquor from the van
and put it In his car.
Prisoners then stole the liquor
while the guard was elsewhere
and had a party.
They got so gay that Prison
Superintendent H. H. Gibson
reported the matter to Jen-
kins.
Jenkins said the liquor ap-
parently came from the police
station storeroon "h" <-n-
flscated whisky is kept and a
7ift to the guard from some
friend in the department.
WASHINGTON. Sept. 8 (UP)
Strategic bombing plans bas-
ed on destruction of 70 Rus-
sian Industrial centers in event
of war are being reexaminer
because of new developments
in atomic warfare, it was re-
vealed today.
The "70-target" plan was de-
vised by the Joint Chiefs of
Staff in the days before there
was an Atlantic Pact military
force and before Russia was
known to have the atomic
bomb.
Military men determined that
a strategic bombing offensive
was the best. If not the only.
way to retaliate against pos-
sible Russian aggression.
Now, Air Force sources said
today, emphasis Is shifting be-
cause of Russia's development
of a long-range air force and
a stockpile of atomic bombs,
and because of the belief that
atomic weapons now can be*
used directly against large land
forces in a .combat zone.
The Russian long-range air
force is Judged capable of deal-
ing violent blows to the Unit-
ed States and quick destruc-
tion of the Red air force in
event of war thus becomes the
No. 1 goal of the strategic air
command, according to high
Air Force sources.
At the same time, a new air
mission has entered the pic-
ture, owing to the more plen-
tiful supply of atomic weapons
and development of supersonic
Jet bombers. ,
Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg, Air
Force Chief of Staff, calls this
"retardation" on the battle-
field. It calls for use of atomic
bombs directly against large
enemy ground forces.
Qne Air Force source ven-
tured that "retardation" con-
ceivably might be so success-
ful as to stop Russia's vast
armies in a war and thus make
A-bombing of industrial tar-
gets unnecessary.
That would be a "more hu-
mane" way of fighting a war
if it works, he said, and would
prevent the kind of destruction
that was heaped on Germany
if World War H.
But he hastened to say that
the atomic wallop will be kept
in readiness regardless bar
cause "we know it will work."
The tinted States aim Is to
develop bases from which to
deliver the atomic wallop. Latest
link was the agreement sign-
ed between United States and
Portugal Thursday which gave
the United States new rights
to bases on the strategic Azo-
res Islands.
Another strategic link is ths
use of bases In Greenland
which the Air Force announ-
ced two months ago were be-
ing put in shape with the
consent of the Danish govern-
ment. ,
Cemeteries Shifted
For Atomic Plant
AUGUSTA, Ga., Sept. 8 (UP)
The exodus of the dead was be-
gun today from the big H-bomb
plant area In western South Car-
olina.
,+
The Atomic Energy Commis-
sion said removal of 399 graves
from 22 cemeteries In the Savan-
nah River project area has be-
gun and that eventually 4,500
graves In 150 cemeteries will be
moved.
The bodies will be reburied
near the rim of the 202,000 acre
area.
Blind Workers And
Students To Show
Their ApNMes
An exhibition has been plan-
ned to celebrate the third anni-
versary of the commencing of the
Panam School for the Blind..
It will take place Tuesday, 4
p.m. to 7 p.m. In the Masonic
Temple, 13th Street West, Pana-
m City.
The public is Invited to see the
blind students using the Braille
system for reading, writing and
arithmetic.
New writing machines from
England will be on display and
the library of Braille books, from
Spain and South America, can
be Inspected.
Panam history and geography
books, which have been trans-
cribed by teacher Andrea Toro,
may also be seen.
Crafts will be on display and
may be purchased. Included will
be mats, belts, and weaving by
blind men. Blind girls will dem-
onstrate on a sewing machine.
MILITARY BUDGET SMASHES PEACETIME RECORD -
APAN: Rebirth of a Nation (3)
; r-------------------------

s eideat enemy
s
e**MBiMn
iwiM ils eadafee
aa^leaiwe.
)faa-est*af*
Illustrated by Ralph Lane
IqJh'ii 11 tee* tea I] per!
eat ef SCATs fr* tote at t, r
< iim^mijm*losirtitidi seatsad see.
V ! fiMflpf 9BMptrtafiBBe m forracMV and

Hm km i at gate W| ii itertlia i iltei'i.
!
Until SCAP stepped into Km tena picture,
speilope ranked high en the empire's list ef
PeWic Enemies. Lacking lefiigoiotioo reali-
ties, wtele carlead of potatoes often retted
m transit. SCAP Ixked the problem by
eraizmg ancient methods of drying, pickling
and salting vegetables, and constructing
rodent proof, oir- But bast news for the former wot the new
government's purchase of 4.6 million ocres
* from feudal landlords. When the land was
^ sold at lowered interest rates, some 3,000,000
long-exploited tenant formen lecomi land
owners for the first time w their lives, ronnof-
conrrolled cooperatives and democratically-
elected land commissions dealt a final death
blow to the eld i
Fiscal year 1952 will go down as the year of the biggest- peacetime military spending
in U.S. history. Whatever the final figure approved by Congress now considering a
committee-approved $56 billion budget military costs are certain to exceed the $45
billion spent in 1946 as the aftermath of World War II. The Newschart above com-
pares current spending with that of the pas t several years. Congressional experts on
military affairs warn that even the $56 b Ilion may fall short of this year's demands,
and that requests for more funds will come from the armed forces before June 30,
1952. Ntwscharts below show fund breakdown among three major services, as con-
templated by the House Appropriations Committee. Figures do not include amounts
alloted to the office of Secretary of Defense, the National Security Resources Board
or the National Security Council. Neither do they cover military aid for our allies nor
the cost of an armed forces program of building bases around the world.
te-
re.


Here is an unusual view of the Caja de Ahorros (Panama
Savings Bank). It is taken looking at the Central Avenue
side of the building.

Supplement
PANAMA. S. P.. SUNDAY. SF.PTEMBKR 9, 1*51
>:
-
i


Review
The Week
______________________________
fv
I
ISTHMIAN
WORLD-WIDE
we..-
e ANYONE PASSING THE Balboa Railroad Station
Thursday, in the early morning hours was treated to
a strange sight. Young men in civilian clothes lounged
on long hard benches and exchanged views on life,
love and the possibility o being called into the ser-
vice. They were all between the ages of 18 and 26, and
had one thing In common they were about to re-
gister lor the draft.
Following dose on the heels of Income tax, selec- '
. tive service on the Canal Zone was still another "first"
lor Isthmians. Over 241 youths signed up, ready for
Uncle Barn's call to arms.
Ten special registrars all volunteers helped
keep the wheels rolling, while four were on hand in
Cristobal on Registration Day.
Only unusual circumstances" Panam Canal of-
ficials revealed, would require a request for defer-
ment of an employe.
uihough some were anxious to get In "as soon as
possible," most of the young eligiles felt it was not
up to them to decide, anyway. "If my country really
needs me, I'll go" was the general attitude expressed.
Younger-tban-draft-age-Zonites' thoughts were
turning to schoolbooks and homework. This year the
record for Canal Zone schools reached a new peak as
5,161 youngsters trooped through the school's portals
to top all previous highs. The new increased tuition
rates for non-government employes seemed to have
little or no effect on enrollments as American educa-
tion ranked high.
About 38 new teachers arrived Irom the States In
time for the new school year.
Crime definitely didn't pay, for a 19-year-old bur-
glar who found himself sentenced to 10 years In the
penitentiary Monday to pay for a series of burglaries
that he committed in the Tlvoll Hotel. Steve Williams,
a Panamanian youth who claimed he had never work-
ed in his life, was caught red-handed by watchful Ca-
nal Zone police last week, climbing out of a second-
llcor guest room.
"tal loot that Williams managed to accumulate
was a $1,400 diamond ring, a $150 watch, cash of over
ssoo, and various trinkets. Within a six-week period
ne had beeh in and out of Tlvoli guest rooms while
the occupants slept, gaining confidence when no re-
ports on his activities were published. Jails will be
nothing new to the youthful offender who started his
career at age 14, and had alreaoy gathered an lm-
p. r-iive record In the Panam "crcel."
..nother case terminated In the U.S District Court
on i'crm Day was that of American undertaker, Wayne
Ectmore. Charged with conspiracy to obtain pro-
perty under false pretenses, his lenient sentence of a
oou fine was suspended on condition that he leave
tci Canal Zone within three days.
.. $46,000 admiralty suit filed against the Lucken-
K-.i Steamship Company was closed as attorneys
M.. ->vin and Ramirez awaited the Judge's decision.
The suspicious death of a young Army wife turned
ou to ne due to natural causes alter a coroner's re-
port at Oorgas. Cpl. Ernest Cardona found his 22-
;-ear-old wife, Olga, dead this week in their Cocoli
nome. It was learned that she had been a patient at
tne psychiatric ward at Clayton, and was taken out
against doctors' orders.
Although there was no scarcity of accidents
over the Labor Day week-end, they were all slight
in nature. As one GI crashed his car 197 feet into
the jungle, another rolled his vehicle over an
embankment on Thatcher Highway. Both walked
sway from the accidents with minor cuts and
bruises. While an L-17 was being tested on the
Kobbe air strip by an Army Sgt. It smashed a
gasoline storage shed causing the left wing to be
completely torn from the fuselage, and other dam-
ages, but none was hurt.
Police needed witnesses to an auto accident lnvolv-
_lns a retired Panamanian who was struck oh Shaler
R^rd. Mortimer Fields was on the seriously ill list all
we:k from lacerations he received when a hit and run
i->\er left him bleeding on the road. The case is be-
mg further Investigated.
Other News in Brief: News reached the Isthmus of
tr.i death of two oldtimers, Rose Outberlet and Ruth
Z. Bailey, who both died this week in New York..
To missing Ketch Drake arrived early in the week
V.Ol the three American youths safe but hungry. The
t cut alert had been sounded on their behalf as
s.iipj and planes searched the area vainly for signs
p; the craft.... The first post-war cntertlnment troup
n:r.ed by beauteous Rhonda Fleming came and left
in a whirlwind tour of Army, Navy and Air Force bases
t outposts. Observed a sage MC: "There are more
cclor.els on the Isthmus than In the Pentagon."...
. ------o------
Bulls, steers and cows were in Panam headlines.
The week started with the first Spanish bullfight to
te presented in the Capital City in 20 years. A Costa
F.tean "banderillero" was painfully but no seriously
gored while 4,000 fans watched from the portable bull-
ring assembled in San Francisco de la Caleta. A few
minutes later, fans tnemselves were scrambling In a
heap as one section of the ring collapsed. Seven were
Injured, four hospitalized. Several bulls were killed.
At Paltilla not far away slaughtering of steers
and cows started at mltf-week in Panama's big, brand
new abbatolr, said to have the most advanced type of
labilities for converting cattle into the Juicy steaks
that not only feed the Banam populace but bring
m Canal Zonlans over the line to put down ready
cr
' much cash one Zone agency the Panam
C' Railroad twins put down during the past
fiscal year was officially announce'. Omitting salaries
paid, the total expenditures came io $1,525,000, broken
down as follows: Meat. $395,000; agricultural pro-
ducts, $815,000; industrial produCs. $325,000; bever-
a-2s, $110,000; forest products, $53 000; and miscel-
laneous. Including advertising^ $335 000. .
A threatened crisis In President Alclblades Arose-
en
SPORTS
PAGE W.0
MAYBE IT WAS a week of fate. Maybe a week of
foolishness.
The Western world, like any porting crowd, was
delighted to see its favorite villain, Andrei Oromyko,
take a beating.
The combined enthusiasm and apprehension with
which this achievement, accomplished in the arena
of the Japanese peace conference in Ban Francisco,
was regarded gave proof that In popular fancy An-
drei Oromyko has this in common with Sugar Ray
Robinson.
Though he has recently been licked, popular opinion
still holds him the champion
After all, it was something of a compliment to
Gromyko's ability that the rules of an International
conference should be drawn up with the pre-eminent
objective of stopping him talking.
Apart from the momentary elation of victory, what
has been achieved by licking Groin at San Francisco.
He knew when he went into this fight that it was
stacked against him, referees, judges and all.
So why did he take It on, except maybe to get on
the record, for later exploits among the underprivileg-
ed sections of Asia.
The diplomats at Washington, almost frighten-
ed te win for fear of the consequences ef Jee Sta-
lin's rage, are still watting for the belt te fall,
punishing them for their presumption.
Maybe the war in Korea will flare up again but
there seems no special reason why this should be link-
ed with the Red loss at the San Francisco conference.
Joe Stalin is too practical a campaigner to be much
carried way by any notions of swashbuckling revenge.
If the war In Korea starts again it could as well
be because the Reds had planned it that way. ever
since the truce talks got them a breather.
It is much to be doubted whether the squelching of
polemicist Oromyko on the debating floor has shifted
any pins In the map room in the Pentagon, or caused
any lightening of the burden on the United States'
top military planners
Speaking to the Jap treaty during the week, repre-
senttives of at least two countries, Indonesia and the
Philippines, said they signed in a spirit of consider-
able less forgiveness than did the Americans.
The Pacific defense pact which the United
States has already signed with New Zealand and
Australia is the price the United States bad to pay
for the reservations in the loving kindness felt
by those two countries for the Japs who came to-
wards them with bombs and bayonet.
As Russia's next big anti-US play looks likely to be
among the people of South East Asia, it might be less
silly than some of Its policies if the State Department,
and the United States as a whole, paid heedful ear
to the disgruntlements of the region.
Having done which. It might be politic to have a
better solution on hand for these grievances than the
Russians can produce.
In the Korean war the action hotted up.
Striving for something ominous with which to sha-
dow the truce talks breakdown, the Korean corres-
pondents corps came up with tales of Caucasian (i.e.
European) specialists gathering behind the Red lines,
ready to play a part In the next push.
Tankers artillerymen, radar operators.
This is interesting, but a few Europeans are
. hardly more ominous than a few million Chinese,
who still remain the great present threat.
(The Russians are the great absent threat).
There" is a feeling that the United Nations ground
forces, long accustomed to 100 per cent United Na-
tions air dominance, might get a few nasty, bullet
torn shocks before learning whit to do about any
substantial air strength the Reds put Into the fight.
It ever has been so, for quite a few wars past.
In another direction there was a revelation which
might point some contused kind o." a lesson.
The United States Senate, which has often said or
implied Britain was way behind in its assessment of
the menace of the Kremlin, recently cut Civil De-
fense appropriations to the bone.
Yesterday Britain was found to have been ex-
cavating A-bomproof civilian shelters for quite a
time, while saying nothing.
A further surge of flooding in the Kansas River
(Kaw to Kansans) brought back fears born in the big
flood of July. But the river was held more or less in
check.
Mr. Truman, according to political observers, began
to look more and more like a man running for re-
election.
But most of the observers pointed out that IT the
President looked like a man readying to quit his
Job no one would listen to turn for the remaining 18
months of his term anyhow.
So he has to get a hearing somehow.
Hurricanes started sweeping out of the Atlantic for
another season year. The fifth of the season, at last
reports, looked set to hit the British Island of Ber-
muda about noon tomorrow.
Reports said it was fiercer than No. 3 which took
154 Uves on the British island of Jamaica._________
menas administration was apparently averted, at
least deferred, when six political parties claiming 28
of 42 Assembly votes, came to his support after Dr.
Francisco Filos sought his impeachment for having
allegedly exceeded constitutional authority in con-
nection with an appointment. The complicated poli-
tical interplay boiled down to a slash by Filos at the
Patriotic Front Party which attacked him relentlessly
at the time of the signing (and rejection) of the
Hines-Fils Defense Site Pact in 1947.
From San Francisca came word that the Panam
delegation did not have authority to sign the Peace
Treaty with the Japanese. (The (Panam American
had noted this a week earlier). RP Ambassador to the
US made assurances that authority would be gained
and the pact inked later by Panam.
'' "Stilt*rutfod SupptaMM
e COLON'S KID CHOCOLATE U wlU make a combaek
try tonight in a feature ten-round against unbeaten
Louis Thompson at the Panam Gym. The two boxer
signed to make a limit of 131 pounds.
Leonel Peralta meets Beto ScanUebury in the six-
round semifinal at a 138 pound limit. In aaethr six-
rounder, madcap Lape Pancho win swap punches with
Victor Ardines.
A four-round preliminary between Al Marshall and
Melanio Pacheco rounds out the four bout program.
Australian net star Frank Sedgman powerd his way
to a 6-4, 8-1, 8-1 victory over Vic Selxa Tuesday at
Forest Hills to win the National Singles Tennis Cham-
eahlp. Bedgman is the first foreign entry to win
American title in 15 years.
The Philadelphlan who had gained the finals
with three straight upset victories never had a
chance against Sedgman. The Aussie so dominated
the play the match required only 50 minutes. It was
the most lopsided final win since 1931.
The Australian star's serf ensaes dimmed hopes
for a Davis Cap victory this year. Sedgman Is the
nimbcr ene player of the defending ehampisne.
The way Seixas had ripped threagh each stats as
Ken McGregor, HerbTe Flam and Wimbled
Champ Dick Savltt, had raised hopes he might
- keep the string alive against Sedgman.
But after that first set the gallery of 11,000 at
Forest Hills 8tadlum knew Sedgman was the master.
The Australian reeled off five straight games In that
second set. in the third, after Seixas held his first
service, Sedgman breezed through the next six straight
games for the set and the championship.
A major upset took place on that same center court
Immediately before Sedgman and Seixas got for their
match. Sixteen year-old Maureen Connolly beat top-
seeded Doris Hart, Wimbledon Champion, 6-4, 6-4.
The belter from San Diego became the youngest
women's finalist in the 70-year history of the tourna-
ment. The match was started Monday, with Miss Con-
nolly winning the first set. Then rain halted play
until Tuesday afternoon.
That upset shattered the dreams of Miss Hart, who
twice before had been runner-up, and was favored
this year when Defending Champion Mrs. Margaret
Osborne Du Pont skipped the tourney.
Miss Connolly beat Shirley Fry of Akron, Ohio, In
the finals to be the youngest champion in history.
Helen Wills was 17 when she won in 1923.
The world of boxing Is in mourning. The ring claim-
ed another victim, a 20-year-old welterweight named
George Flores. The New York scrapper died at 1:20
(EDT) Monday morning in St. Clare's Hospital in
New York from blows received in a fight last week
Wednesday night.
Flores is the first American professional boxer to
die of ring injuries this year. However, a professional
from Australia and eight amateurs have died through-
out the world this year.
Thirty minutes after Roger Donoghue of New
York kayoed Flores with a left hook to the chin he
went Into a coma. That kayo came in the semi-final
to the Billy Graham-Kid Gaviln welterweight title
fight in Madison Square Garden, New York.
Rrom that time on, Flores never regained consclous-
ne.
Dr. O B. Powell, acting chairman of the New York
State Athletic Commission, says a preliminary Inves-
tigation shows that all commission regulations had
been followed.
"The last three medical examinations of Floree in-
dicated nothing that could be remotely associated
with the accident," says Powell. "Also examined were
'the ring, ring padding and the gloves used in the
fight. The check-ups showed all requirements of the
commission has been fulfilled as were also all the
rule* and regulations of the state advisory board."
It was the third time in less than one month
Flores hsd been kayoed. Johnnv Cerky stopped
Flores on July 31st, and Donoghue bad kayoed
Flores, also in the eighth round, on August 14th.
The New York District Attorney's office has or-
dered a grand Jury investigation. All the principals
will be questioned including Donoghue, Referee Bar-
ney Felix, the managers, the seconds and other offi-
clf's connected with the fight.
A spokesman for the District Attorney's office em-
phasizes that such an investigation is the usual pro- .
cedure. It's not expected that charges will be placed
against Donoghue, who was in constant attendance
at Flores' bedside and Is reported ready to quit the
rlr"? because of the tragedy.
Shortly after being kayoed last week Wednesday,
Flores was taken to St. Clare's hospital for a brain
operation. Saturday night another operation was per-
formed to aid his breathing. After .that one, the New
York fighter was put in an iron lung where he died.
His 18-year-old wife. Elaine, who had given birth*
to a son just three weeks ago, his aunt, Mrs. Mary
Flores, and his vilfe's parents were at the bedside when
Flores died.
"Oeorgle begKed me for this fight" says his man-
eager. Louis Breitbart. "He was sure he could lick Do*
noeliue this tune."
Breitbart says he noticed something was wrong
when Flores was returning to his dressing room.
"He walked from the ring all right," says Breitbart.
"But then he complained that his lee was stiff and
he couldn't move it very well. Dr. Vincent Nardlello
tested his leg reflexes and they were poor. Dr. Nar-
dlello asked Oeorgle to put out his tongue and hs
couldn't do it. Then he Just faded out."
The Chicago White Sox own the most valuable play-
er in the Pacific Coast League.
Cenferfleld Jim Rivera of Seattle has been voted
the tops In a poll of 23 league managers and sports
writers. Rivera received 14 votes, nhie more than bis
team-mate, pitcher Al Lyons. The four other votes
went to Manager-Second Baseman Joe Gordon of Sa- /
cremento.
Rivera, who will report to the White Sox when the
Pacific League playoffs are over leads the circuit
with a .352 batting average. The 30-year-old New
Yorker has the most hits 219 20 homers and 105
runs battle In for the first place Seattle club.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1951 \


-
<*
(SIMMERING STENOCAfter 12 days of 100-degree-plus Texas
temperatures, Dallas secretary Mildred Walston was ready to try
almost anything to beat the heat. Here, she's experimenting with
two fans and a pan of cool water to slosh her feet in.
Signs May Be
Deadly, Highway
Men Believe
CHICAGO,, Sept. (U.P.)
Big -advertising signs along
highways Imperil motorists, Wil-
liam J. Mortimer, assistant sup-
erintendent of the Cook County
highway department, says.
A motorist traveling at mod-
erately high speeds will travel
500 feet In the time It takes to
look at one. he told the Cook
County Traffic Safety Confer-
ence.
Cat Crosses
Country Sealed
In Box Car
andover. Mass., Sept.
(UP.i A cat showed up here
and Boston Si Maine railroad
men were sure it had nine lives.
The cat spent 17 days sealed
in a box car of wool without
food or water on a trip from
Arizona. When the door was
opened the cat walked out, ate
some food and drank water fur-
nished by employes of a wool
warehouse.

MONARCH
THE FAMILY FAVORITE FOR
ALMOST WO YIARS
Monarch finer foods
re today the stand-
ard of quality all over
the world. They are pre-
pared in the most modern
manner... but retain all the real
old-fashioned flavor. Five generations
have proved Monarch finer foods... the
BEST by TEST. There are over 500
Monarch finer foods. Ask for them in your
grocery store. If your dealer does not
stock Monarch finer food, inquire of:
Premier Sunday Cross-Word Puzzle
Ml
It
IS
17
54
IO
91
5t
81
Jl
TO
20
BO
45
75
2S
71
IS
2
n
ti
M
H
Jo
ST
85
21

S3
77
112
lot
111
IS6
MO
to
72
z
113
27
12
47
78
120
134
18
31
7s
84
114
*t
121
37
7
121
32
46
61
17
115
16
22
#*
137
146
iT
17
42
ss
101
12*
87
I Jo
T
di
>
1Small
bunch
of straw
9Point of
orbit
10 -Deposit at
mouth of
river
1&Footleas
animal
19Tune
20Tie or
lash
MBring-to
bear
S2Assumed
23-Toy
24Mellower
25Yuccalike
plant
28Trunk of
tree
27Slight
convexity
of shaft
of column
28Piece of
meat
SIHaving fiat
surface
32Warehouse
35Wagon part
37Harden
88Out of bed
41Siesta
43Tapestry
48European
coin
49Belonging
to
spring
51 -Ruin
83Man's
same
HORIZONTAL
85Half-
shrubby
mint
86Win
87Restaurant
60Of an acid
from a
substance
from cork
62Forbid
63Bag
65VLynx
67Renew
68Soothing
exclama-
tion
71Of a Anger
73Return to
74-Feign
76Negative
77Mountaln-
VEKnCAL
78 Rainy
80Rich in
row*!
sounds
84Normal
87Amountof
assessment
81Insulator
83One em-
ployed In
surveying
08Rounded
division
of leaf
86-Tin
07Meeker
90 Of the roof
ofmouth
101Craggy hill
102Exchange
premium
104"River of
Africa
106Brazilian
money of
account
107Spanish
city
100Slice again
Ill-Gem
carved
in relief
113Doctrine
118Heavenly
body
116Excel
118Warm
admirer
120Relating
to tone
128Formative
126Sandpiper
128Long,
heavy
wavea
132Erudition
133Fleshy
under-
ground'
stem -
138Win all
tricks from
(piquet)
137Adjoin
138West
Indian
shrub
130Volcanic
tuff
140Official
decree
(Russia)
141A color
142Outcry
143 Lessen
144Leas
common
148Think
1Walk 36Newer 86Buddhist column
through 38Stay
water (naut.) 88Clan
2Metal 30Biblical symbol
3Sediment word 89 -Place of
4Legendary 40Vestige residence 90Dormouse
hero 42Nonpareil
8 Sheeted 44More 02Stately
home reliable 04Burmese
(of sails) 46Basket spirit
Jail for figs 98Most
7Absorb 47Pea tree distant
slowly 48Principle 100Not broad
. 8One who 80Varnish or general
frosts gum 103Exceed
fGoatlike 62Narration In value
antelope 84Strength 108Opposite
10Servios. 88Poor 108A follower
at meal 60Make of Wycliffe
11Public knotted 110Toddler
12Lease lace 112At an end
13Pace of 1Hide (poeUc)
horse 64South 114Surly '
14Bearer African- 117Songl ess
of great village bird
burden community 110Happen
1SMayflower 6Ceiling again 1-124One who If records
I*-Contribute of sunk
to common panels
fund 68Essential 122Theatrical
17Pot 70Glory presen-
1*Wd 72Siren tation
animal 78Person of 123Solitary
28Pointed super- 124Seed coat :
mass of human 128Restrain
ice in strength 127New
broken 78Buddhist Zealand
glacier of Tibet parrot
30Exclama- 80Clergyman 129Central
tion of 81Sioux American
mockery 82Round and tree
32Cot tapering ISOArtifice
34South to a point 131 Stalk
American 83Funny 134Bleat
marmoset 88-Cant 136;Face value'


A>era( ll*t f 111: 7 !>*DUlrUwied by King rW Syndic*!
(Answer to be found elsewhere ha the Sunday American)
MONARCH
World's Largest Family of Finer Foods
Distributora in the Republic:
COLON Tigaropuros, S. A. Tel. 1000
PANAMACa. Panamericana de Orange Crush
HOME DELIVERY Tel. 3-3219
Chains In Doorway
Keep Flies Away
SOUTH HADLEY. Mass. (U.P.)
Two restaurateurs, Alfred J.
Countl and Antonio Lucchesi
claim they've chained the files
out of their luncheonette.
"Better than a screen door,"
Couti said, displaying a. curtain
of eight-foot chains that form
a barrier at the shop's door.
Contl got the idea while travel-
ing in Italy, where chains are
hung In doorways to discourage
inbound files. The slightest
movement of the chains, even by
a breeze, he said Is enough to
chase the flies away.
The chains used by the restau-
rant here are aluminum and
painted red, white and blue.
Roads Geared To Hum
At Careless Drivers
CHICAGO (U.P.) Streets
and highways that protest out
loud when drivers go on the
wrong side of the road are be-
ing adopted in many places
throughout the nation, the Am-
erican Public Works Association
says.
The warning device is a 24-
inch wide concrete separator
with a scored surface, -placed
flat between the traffic lanes.
It emits a loud hum when tires
run over it and thus warns
careless drivers to-get back In
the right lane.
First used experimentally In
New Jersey, it now is being
installed In the reconstructed
six-lane New London turnpike
in Cranston, R. I., the associa-
tion taid.
Empire State Matches
Texas Flag Waving
SYRACUSE, N. Y.. Sept.
(UP.) Mayor Thomas J. Cor-
coran has taken sides In a small
flare-un In U. S. ranks In Ko-
rea.
The mayor sent a New York
State flag to Lt. Nicholas H.
Mevrovlch of Syracuse and his
field partner, a Texan.
Mevrovlch asked for help in
the form of a flag from the
Umpire State, explaining that
his partner Insists on flying a
Texas flag from their tent.
Mayor Corcoran said he was
glad to oblige, pointing out that
he was a Navy veteran of World*
War I associated with the Texas
habit of continual praise for
anything associated with the
home state.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1951

t^^rfW^i-VW*"^
i
PAGE JHKEE



THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OW.-3 AND PUBLISHED BY TNI PANAMA AMMICAN PS. INC.
FOUNDEO V NIUON NUNUVIU IN IS3B
HAPMODIO ASNAS. EDITOR
7. H Street P o Bo 34. Panama. R. or P.
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Cable Aod*ebs> pamambrican. Panama
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foreign Pefresentative. JOSHUA a POWERS. INC.
348 MAOIBON AVI.. NEW YORK. 11/I N .
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RFR MONTH. IN "tM"1^' 9 1.70 f S.SO
FOR SIX MONTHS. IN "*M^" BO 13 OO
FOR ^ fc" VEAR IN arwAm- 18.BO 94 OO
POETS' CORNER~

Don't Let Anybody Fool You, Son!
WREATHS FOR THE PHOENIX
(From The Beloit Poetry Journal)
In August, when the laurels
quench
Their leaves in dust, the phoenix
dies;
Over the still green leaves he
turns
His shielding breast, September
bums;
October scatters from the pyre
Yellow flakes of phoenix fire.
November, when the ivies clench
The creviced rock, the phoenix
sighs:
But what chilled listener will care
For ashen sorrows on such air?
December. January deep
Fold the laurels to their keep.
While inch on inch the ivies
wrench
Stone from stone In subtle prize:
Then the phoenix, born to praise
Birth In ivies, death Hi bays,
Leaps to find them greenly grown
And calls the (jlossy wreaths its
own. LOUIS KENT.
LINES FOR A MAP, 1677
("Descriptions of the Province of
West Jersey in America and pro-
posals to such as desire to have
property therein.")
i From Furioso)
Tobacco, fish and iron, nothing
lacks
For anyone's delight, the mead-
ows arable.
The trees of the country crowd-
ing, ash by
Elm, by oak, by fir, the wild vine
Twisting ,about them, on their
mast and fruit
Battening the deer and swine
And plethora of fat fowl;
The climate of the air, the
ground's
Sweet savor, flash of delectable
springs, _
Commend themselves to English
senses;
Not half such rich content
Rises from any shire in England;
Nor has he seen the true Cock-
ayne
Who has not taken ship that
sails
Westward to his reward. Inquire
in Paternoster Lane
Of Richard King for full details.
ERNEST KROLL
Sunlight played where the river
ran.
Moss plumped out in a spongy
cushion
And a froth of fern like a scal-
loped fan
Rippled and broke where the
slope began
Whipping the air to a green con-
fusion.
Here in the lucent summer sun
The sleeping beauty dissolved in
fancy,
Nell and Maria had just begun
To think that boys were a lot.
of fun
Oeorge was first in the heart of
Nancy.
The willow proffered a trysting-
place
To shelter its own whom it loved
so dearly.
Eyes said Yes! in a laughing
face.
Blushes followed a quick em-
brace
And bird song sounded late and
early.
Winter's tangle of care unwound,
Summer captured the bold and
free.
Rustling leaves were the only
sound
Circling softly round and
round
And sighs in the willow's sighs
were drowned
Under the dome of the great,
green tree.
MARY BALLARD DURYEE
FIRED CLAY
FROM "FALSE SPRING"
(From Voices)
Fairest tree in that northern
wood
Steeped in the wealth of its sum-
mer tresses,
High on the bank the willow
stood
And bided its time in a gentle
mood
Whispering back to the whisper-
ing prasses.
(From The Christian Science
Monitor)
All day, all day
the aluminum sky that promised
but withheld rain:
: and now, one Instant before sun-
down itself, the sun
shears through low clouds with
blazing crash
as of a suddenly struck gong:
flame spire and pinnacle; burn
molten bright t
| ambiguous facades, for this brief
hour
in this ethereal and peach-bloom
light;
ill suddenly transformed the
harsh hard city
Into most exquisite of porcelains;
the tiny figures
sharply etched, transfixed, the
birds, the leaves, the grass
as in clear amber; always to be
remembered.
But, time suspended long enough.
the lilac shadow crawls
all imperceptibly, implacably, up
stone and stone;
rame fades coincident with seven
evening cniraes.
FREDERICK EBRIGHT
Broadway and Elsewhere
By Jack Lait
Herewith And solution to Sunday Crossword Pux-
zle. No. 389. published today.
GHOST TOWN ON THE HUDSON
Everybody's went away for Labor Day. The
long week-end devastated the Big Burg. It's
evacuated.'My favorite restaurant was dark. A
man found a place to park. All manner of weird
wltcheroo distorted the familiar picture with its
switcheroo... Cops, firemen and reporters, and
the faithful preaching exporters were about
the only people" here and the laugh is that we
don't draw time-and-a-half... Well, I have a
self-service elevator, and so. I don't have to
sleep in a hallwav like the bums on Skid Row,
and I didn't have to battle to grab me a cruis-
ing taxlcab. So I did a bit of o. k. in my lone-
some Robinson Crusoe way... I could turn up
the TV at last all the way and not get a blast
from the neighbors above, next door and be-
low, a lot of people I don't know, whom I see
onlv In the halls and hear only through party
walls... Until Tuesday nothing doing at the
Stork. Yes. plenty of solitude in New York
deserted, abandoned and bereft. I bet there
weren't more than 6.000,000 of us left.
Judy Garland starred in twelve movies in
which she made or didn't make the Palace,
vaudeville's flagship, on Broadway. Thats one
compelling reason for her reopening the house
as a big-time, two-a-day theatre, Oct. 18, at a
financial sacrificeif vou can call a potential
$15,000 tor $20,000 a week giving her all for sen-
timent.
I am washing it with extreme care now, not
only because I am in love with a sweet, charm*
ing, pretty and intelligent girl, but because I
have married her. My wife's maiden name waa
Ruth Fagan."
Bernice Parks, the warbler who hit her
peak in the engagement at the Savoy Hot-
el, London, and could play here forever, Is
back. She laves America. After some televi-
sion appearances she will open a tour in
Chicago, hometown of Townsend Netcher,
the department store heir with whose name
hers was associated in many a gossip para-
graph.
.
Jack Deaapsey is due for a return match at
Johns Hopkins Hospital. Baltimore, Sept 24.
for more research around that spot which has
never been right since Firpo knocked him out
of the ring.
w 1 S I A P s i : E I i AHA T o D
A R 1 Al T R 1 c EIE X E R >>. o L 1
D O L 1 ft 1 p E rBs O T 0 L o I j
1 N T a[s S K o AS T r A u L A 1
DTE p o V hIe E l| S E T
MUslUU U1U12 MUUHH QOl&Ufl
OBD UB BHU GH
?HBLUfci ancBB naa heeqq
nQLJB amuiiu auaau uumn
tsaua uuufj auauu nauii
aULIU ULlUklU IJUULiU IJLl.m
DtStfltRltBS Bf BJM WSfBJ
El Morocco tidings: Call Me Merman dining
with very social Harry Cushing... Macaco, with
Camilfe Covin. and apparently over his case
on Liza Van. the good hope from South Africa.
James McKinlev Bryant and wife, on a holi-
day from their big Texas ranch, en route for
Europe... Singer Harvey Grant and Patricia
Marlowe announced their engagement in one
of the zebra-striped corners...
A government project of uttermes} se-
crecy is being constructed in the farAre-
tic wilderness wastes... Already, M.tM.see
has gone into it and that is only a frac-
tion of the appropriation... It is a vital
work, and whatever it costs will be spent
for security .. But. because of the unusual
conditions, the Isolated location, all-air
transportation, short season of light and.
weather for work, common laborers are be-
ing paid at the rate of SM a day. seven
days' pay for a six-day week, running, with
overtime, about $50* per man per week.
Ye* can buy an eartheuake-finder (not
a seismograph, but a home gadget that !
reeerds up to 1,000 miles away) for Slat.
It's a St. Louis product.
Sien en enterprising psychiatrist's door: "Twv
couchesno waiting."
Yolanda Betbeze, Miss America, 1951. is here
at a modest hotel. The reservation was arrang-
ed by Fred Plttera. a New Yorker, who is now
directing the Rhode Island Exposition of Pro-
gress. Plttera long-distances the beauty every
night, and one confab lasted two hours. Is that
Progress?
Paramount is playing around with "The
Great Houdlni," a picture based on the life of
the late Harrv Houdini. the escapist and magi-
cian. This Is to advise that' studio that Flor-
ence Lee. widow of Joe Lee, who was Houdinl's
advance-man and confidante for years, has his
trunkful of data, which could not be gather-
ed from any other source, in her" home at 1280
Lemay St.. Detroit.
Maxwell Bodenbeim. the Greenwhlch Village
poet, about whose eccentricities and whose vte-
ts&itudlnous romantic and matrimonial adven-
tures much has been written, communicates
this prose: "I have always washed my face, but
Denise Da reel, Louise Carlisle and many o-
ther stars will entertain at the Damon Run-
yon Cancer Fund benefit In the Mosque Thea-
tre, Newark, on Oct. 28. The cltv heads, the
cops and leading businessmen are behind the
WW promotion of mercy.
Many letters about Mr. 8. Chase, whose, por-
trait adorns our $10.000 bills .. I threw my
last one away, ao can't check right ouick .
But It seems the steel engraving is of Salmon
P. Chase. 8ecretarv of the Treasurv. 1OT1-63.
and Chief Justice U. S. Sunreme Court. 1864-73.
Not Samuel Chase. Associate Justice of that
impeached and aeouttted by the Senate in 1806.
PAGE, jvpUK
!
4m2h
Wp *mtr ^f*
SUNDAY, SEPTJElriBER 9, 1961



Labor News
And Comment
By Victor Riesel
HEARD ON THIS BEAT:
WASHINGTON.Pishing boat captains from the waters from
Mexico to Alaska converged on famed San Francisco Bay to
picket long distance the Memorial Opera House where the
grand signing of the Jap Peace Treaty was to take place.
The angry fishing captains run tuna fleets which pulled
enough dl the big fish out of the seas last year to pack 9,000,000
cases worth $112,000,000.
And now thev sav that the peon labor In Japan is killing
off their living from the sea because the Oriental fisherman
works for 80 cents a day (about six cents an hour), which makes
tuna fishing In Nipponese waters so cheap that American boat
owners can't compete.
This Is ruining our own $100,000,000 tuna Industry which
feeds 23,000 families In the Northwest.
And Washington's Congressman Russell Mack here tells me
that he will blast Mr. Truman on the floor of Congress, right
during the peace treaty signing, unless these families are pro-
mised a protective tariff to give our fishermen a fifty-fifty
chance to live...
Recently, this column reported that Teamsters' leader Dan
Tobin said that Franklin D. Roosevelt had urged him to back
Henry Wallace for Vice-President in '48. which, of course, would
have left Mr. Truman a relatively unknown Senator.
CIO people here dispute that. They say that when Philip
Murray went In to see Mr. Roosevelt, just before leaving for
the Chicago nominating convention, the CIO chief urged sup-
port of Henry Wallace and was told by FDR:
"Oh, ypu want that Yogi man."
Mr. Murray reported to his colleagues that. Mr. Roosevelt
told him to foreet Wallace...

Talking aoout presidential campaigns brings up Sen. Taft,
who apparently will have considerable support in Hollywood,
including some labor leaders and movie stars.
A close friend of the Republican Senator from Ohio Is Louis
B. Maver, movieland pioneer and, until recently, head of the
M-G-M Studios. Mayer has been talking with Mr. Taft.
And the Benator did not hurt himself with the film people
this week when he and his labor aides here went out of their
.way (along with G. O. P. Sen. Nixon of-California) to help the
(AFL) Screen Actors Guild.
Its competent and highly Informed spokesmen. Jack Dales,
Jr. and debonair movie star. Richard Carlson (world traveler
and ex-magazine writer) flew here to ask for special revision
of the Taft-Hartlev law where It was hurting the union.
The labor law says that no person need join a union un-
less he works SO days in an industry.
During the past three years, about 2,750 people had acting
parts In pictures, earned a considerable aggregate sum at a
time when unionized actors needed jobs to carry tbem over
between picturesand never Joined the Screen Actors Guild, i
So when Dales, Carlson and Roy Brewer of the Stage Hands
arrived here. Sen. Taft agreed to push/amendments cutting the
time from 30 days to 48 hours, during which a man can work
in anv.Industry without joining a union.
What Ta/t won't do is give any union an absolutey closed
hop.
At the same time, he's working closely with the AFL Build-
ing Trades, agreeing to wipe out the clause calling for union
shop elections in that field.
The White House is concerned over the inroads Sen. Taft
is making in some AFL circles.
Watch the AFL convention in three weeks out in San Fran-
cisco for an Administration move to cut Into this. Secretary of
Labor Tobin will make the significant speech...

There Is talk among the Industrialist representatives here
that a political fund will be raised to finance a businessman's
Political Action Committee to match the CIO's and AFL's re-
search, radio, writing, and oratorical divisions in key elections
aonMnwatrv...
..
During tne tina! minutes of the Senate's Crime Committee
life, its "mother" committee, the Senate Commerce group, told
Senator Wiley In closed session late Wednesday afternoon, that
it sure would like to probe crime in the waterfront unions and
the bombings of Chicago's Teamsters' leaders.
The decision will be made shortly and the crime probe Is
by no means dead... It will push a law cracking down on
mobsters trying to muscle Into the trucking business...

In a few days, a three man "flying" committee will fan out
among radio, movie, television and theatrical industries to dis-
cover for the Salary Stabilization Board whether there should
be a ceiling on wages for those who entertain America.
There'll be no public hearings, for the three men. Roy Hen-
drlckaon. Philip F. Biff, and Nell Agnue, will simply walk
through the fields talking to both employers and unions.
Their decision will affect about half a million people. The
decision on professional athletes' salaries is due In -a week...

Watch the next organizing drive of the foremen's unions.
They are moving into John Lewis' coal fieldsand expect
to sign up 16,000 coal mine supervisors, thus becoming the first
force to dispute old John's supreme power over the black fuel.
This Foremen's Association of America is an aggressive,
Imagnate union, which recently used 200 circus size posters in
one Pennsylvania mining area to get people to its organizing
mass meetings. It's Independent of the AFL and CIO...

This is the .story, still untold, of how the powerful supreme
Joint labor command died quietly In Washingtonafter pre-
dictions that it would lead 10.000,000 AFL-CIO members Into
a strong political coalition next year.
- The AFL leaders, Bill Green. George Meany. and William
C Doherty (of the AFL Letter Carriers), came in and quietly
told the CIO's soft-spoken Art Goldberg, fiery Walter Reuther
and the debonair Intellectual Jack Knight (of the OH Workers),
that the United Labor Policy Committee was finished.
Goldberg and Reuther argued that it was wrong to break
up such a combination and asked for reasons.
Green and Meany said that the only way to get together
was by the CIO coming Into the AFL.
But. said Goldberg and Reuther. why not keep the In-
fluential policy committee functioning, It was such a success-
ful, hard hitting unit. At which point Doherty saM:
"I came to bury Caesar, not to praise him."
That did It.
(Copyright 1951. Post-Hall Syndicate. Inc.).
"CHURCH" FOR THE AUTO AOEThe Rev. Dr. Ernest Lyman Mills, pastor ot Dorchester
Methodist Church, conducts services at Boston's first "drlve-ln-church." The congregation, many of
, them In bathing suits and play clothes, heard the sermon through Individual speakers hooked into
! autos m the same manner as for open-air movies. The drive-in-church is an idea taking hold in
I more and more cities as ministers seek to compete with the Sunday driving urge.
Pearson's Merry Go-Round
CORPORAL FRANCISCO SAYS: KOREA IS
MOUNTAINS, LONELINESS AND DEATH;
WE ARE FITHTING A STRANGE WAR;
THE AMERICAN SOLDIER IS NO MA-
CHINE.
*
(While Drew Pearson Is on a brief vacation.
The Washington Merry-Go-Round is being writ-
ten by several distinguished guest columnist, to-
day's being by Corporal Charles Francisco, with
the VS. Army's Seventh Division in Korea. Cor-
poral Francisco, a native of Urbana, Illinois,
was inducted in September 1050, and sent to
Korea as a machlnegunner shortly thereafter.)
oOo
..WITH THE 17TH INFANTRY REGIMENT,
7TH INFANTRY DIVISION, U. S. ARMY KO-
REA.What Is It like in Korea? What is it like
to the men who are here?
I think of three things around memoun-
tains, loneliness and death.
I think of rotation and home and the future.
And I know that those -things are in the
minds and bones of most Infantrymen In Korea.
As a soldier lies in his foxhole and tries to
peer through the mist that covers the top of
a mountain he thinks of -many things.
This- is the war in Korea as I see it.
It seems to me that civilian writers covering
the war have not made enough mention of the
hills.
At any rate, the hills have a major bear-
ing on the job of the Individual soldier and
the entire tactical situation.
Put yourself in the place of any man here.
You're no military superman, you're just an
average guy carrying around 50-60 pounds of
equipment on your back.
Your job is to climb, sometimes two and
three thousand feet almost straight up. find
the enemy, and either kill him or drive him
off.
There are no paths or footholds so you
usually are forced to walk the ridge lines.
That puts vou right In the enemy sights. It's
just a matter of when he decides to .open up.
It seems to me that the fighting in Korea is
much like the island warfare In the Pacific.
Here each hill is an island fortress. Artil-
lery and air soften them up, and then the in-
fantry must go it alone.
Mountains and weather... enemies which
"have proved as effective against the U. N.
forces as the Reds themselves.
Last winter it was cold and snow. You've
heard about that.
8o far this summer the temperature has av-
eraged In the humid eighties.
When it isn't hot. it's raining... steady down-
pours for two and three days straight.
It's a strange war here In Korea. It's a
strange soldier we fight.
Reports from Intelligence speak of such
things as "the Chinese may be waiting for a
full moon" or "expect an attack if we get three
straight days of rain."
The Chinese are supertltlous. They frighten
easily and thev fight fanatically.
Everv soldier dreads nightfall.
The Reds love to lnfllltrate at night and
launch Wild whistle-blowing Banzai attacks.
The enemy uses his artillery most at night.
Unlike most wars there are no clear cut front
lines In Korea. The enemy can be any place
at any time.
A combat infantryman doesn't have much
time to think about the grand philosophy of
But the American soldier Is no machine. He
walks hand-in-hand with death.
No matter how brave or patriotic or religious
he might be he can't forget that each minute
could well be Mb last.
I remember the first man I saw killed. We
had been joking about how easy we had it.
Then the artillery came in. He was dead. The
same shell was close enough to have gotten ne
but it didn't.
Incidents like these encourage the foxhole
faith you read about in civilian life.
When you're a part of a war the casualty list
isn't just a row of numbers.
Every figure Is a man who wanted to live
and do something with his lile Just, as you do.
The next digit could be you.
Then there's the matter of heroes.
Before I entered combat I thought heroism
was a rare and individual thing. Long ago that
was true.
Put today any man"who performs his dutut
well under fire is a hero for my money. A
knight of old may have singlehandedly slain
dragons hut a modern soldier cannot do hand-
to-hand battle with shrapnel.
At least one good thing comes of war...
teamwork.
I don't mean the military teamwork of In-
fantry, artillery, air. etc. Even more signifi-
cant is the comradeship of men In battle, s
In my own regiment (17th infantry racial
or religious prejudice is unheard of.
A man soon learns to appraise the guy be-
side him by his courage under fire. That's
where men are made.
I sometimes wonder if war isn't more of a
personal fight than It seems.
A man seldom has time to consider world
ideals. It usually narrows down to kill or be
killed. There Is no pretense among men In bat-
tle.
The will to live tears away the protective
Tell we sometimes wear in civilization. Every-
one is afraid at times. But most men fight
fear as they fight the enemy.
Korea today Is not onlv a deadly place but
also a lonely one.
There are no cities, as we know them, in
the battle zone. Only hills and wilderness.
The Infantry would thrill to see such simple
things as telephone poles, paved streets, brick
buildings and stores.
Many men now In the front lines were only
recently removed from civilian life by the
draft.
Thejt dream about getting back to the work
they love. Thev worrv about the long delay in
their chosen careers. They wonder how it will
affect their future.
Soldiers, as always, have their gripes. Rota-
tion is wonderful, but sometimes it seems aw-
fully slow in coming around. When they see
stateside papers with Korean news mentioned
briefly on page 3 they wonder If the people
back home,know or care why this war is being
fought.
The men here know why they're fighting.
I'was amaaed when I first arrived in Korea
at the difference In attitude about the war.
Sure vou hear: "Whv not give them the place:
it Isn't fit to live in anyway."
But when vou talk seriously with these same
men. most of them will admit they were only
letting off steam.
After the last big Allied offensive we dis-
covered we can defeat the Communists no
matter how many men they have. We threw
back everything the Reds had to offer and we
had them running when the ceasefire talks
opened.
We. as no one else, prav for peace. But if
It doesn't come, we can still whip them.
. One thing is certain. Everv man here has
learned the horror and waste of war.
We're happv it's happening to us instead of
those we Jove.
Our only hope is. that in waging this isol-
ated war. we have proved to our potential en-
emies that It will not pay to test our strength
In our own backyard. "
(Copyright. 1951, By The Bell Syndicate. Inc.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1961
Sunday Amtkm Suppl.l
'..
. PAGE F1V1


Local Rate Little League Overcomes

rn

W:
FERGUS LA BOCA CUBS, THIRD PLACE WINNERS Standinr (1. to r): Antonio Howell,
Karl Sinclair, Cecil Griffith, -James Howard, D. Jolley, and W. Barnaby. Kneelinc (1. to r.):
Allan Gavie. W. Forde, E. Wilson, Alfred Brown, Alfred Bowen, and Rudolph Brown. Mascot:
Ricardo Ilowell.
MONTICELLO GAMBOANS Standing (L to r.): R. Fennell, H. Warren, S. Duncan. L. Fardin,
J. I'rriola. Kneeling (1. to r.): C. Baxter, S. Levy, C. Welch. A. Jones. M. Orant, P. Malcolm.
S- ..-,:. -

IFILL LA BOCANS. CHAMPIONS Standing (L to r.): Ralph Mendec, coach; A. Watson, P.
Wellington, H. Pate. Leaterie If ill (Sponsor): G. Payne. Leroy I fill. A. Spencer, and Erlin
Conliffe, manager. Kneeling (I. to r.): Alfred Lord, Earl Best, Carles Caddie, R. Brown, and
R. Inniss. ,
Pacific Side Local Rate Little
League Baseball has hurdled a
series of formidable barriers In
its surge to top rating as a at-
traction and well-organized
activity of the Local Rate Play-
grounds.
Heeding the call for Little
League sponsors, early In May.
Leroy Fergus, former resident of
La Boca, gave $100 towards the
outfitting of the Fergus La
Boca Cubs. This gesture was
duplicated bv another La Bocan.
Lesterlo Ifill. who donated for
the Ifill La Bocans.
During this period. Cleveland
Small and H. Lvalas were
scouring Paraso and Red Tank
for nickels and dimes to equip
the Twin City Rookies. A great
from the Summer Recreation
Filnd pushed them over the
hump.
Over at Santa Cruz, the Mon-
ticello Club oledged support to
the Montlcello Oamboans.
An Inspiring spirit of coopera-
tion was displayed when the
two La Boca sponsors Dermitted
their funds to be used in May
to buv materiales for the mak-
ing- of uniforms and caps for
all four teams. Funds for the
Twin City and Montlcello teams
were not available until late in
June, after the start of the sea-
son.
The cost of uniforms and
caps was cut to a minimum
when O. C. Wright, principal
of the La Boca High School,
gave the green light for the
making of the Hollvwood-stvled
uniforms and car In the school
tailor shoD under" the dilrection
of A. G. Blake.
Each team bought from the
united States one dozen bats,
two dozen official Little League
balls, baseball stockines, and
comDlete catcher's outfit.
Elected to govern the league
were: H. Lvalas, president:
Leroy Fergus, vice-president: V.
Sampson. secretary-treasurer;
and A. M. Parchment, adviser.
The youngsters, who ranted
from ten to twelve yean, then
waded Into their stiff 36-
game schedule with snch keen
comnetitive spirit, insplrint
*nort*manship. and astound-
ing baseball know-how that
attendance records were shat-
tered at all the Local Rate
ball ip*.
Twin City Rookies, manae>d
. by Cleveland Small, fmlcklv
Jumned Into the led but were
overhauled bv the If'M T. B*-
cans. undr the leadership o'
Erlin Conliffe. The Ifill ball
hawks kent up the pressure and
annexed the first half-season
tl"e.
It was a wide open race in
the final half-season battle.
Fergus La Boca Cubs trot off to
a flving start with Twin dty
Rookies In close pursuit. The
Rookies then eased into first
Dlace but rellnoulshed to the
Montlcello Gomboans. In the
homestretch. Twin Cltv Rookies
drew awav, to capture the sec-
ond hlf-*Pson chamolonshlp.
In the fl*p-sme champion-
shin serie*". Ifi L- Borons cao-
tured the Cyril Alexander
championship tronhv bv down-
ing Twin City RoolMes, three
gpms to one.
Manv a promising vongster
was unea/thed durlrn the sea-
son. The most valuable Dlaver
was Robert Pate. Jr. who won
the bnttlng crown with-a .4*4
average: was runner-up in
pitching with on 8-4 record
during the reeu'nr season and
a 3-1 effort in the chamnion-
shlo serles; and played like a
veteran or first base, shorts*on.
center field. pnd behind" the
plate.
.Mr. Pitcher of the Iood wai
Pnrron Jime"e. r'"ht.-handed
ftre-baller from Twin O**"
Rookies. Jimenez, who snorted
an 8-4 record, starred also at
third base and In the outfiled
The most oooular ,'aer s
nint-sl*ed. ton-vear-old Rudolph
Brown, second baseman of Ifill
La Bocans. Brown, known as
"Sam Jethroe." was the most
pol*hed lnflelder In the circuit.
Other lmoreislve teener were
H. Wsrren. Montlcello Ditcher
and catcher: R. Grant Montl-
eello short*ton: Karl Sinclair.
Fercus Cubs i">nthnaw: Pedro
Wellington, IfUl La Bocans
Robert Pate, most valuable
player of league. Leading
pitcher of Ifill La Bocans, he
won the Walter Watson cham-
pionship batting award with a
.444 average and set record by
bitting four home runs in four
times at bat during the second
game of the championship se-
ries.
Herrick Holder, slugging out-
fielder of Twin City Rookies.
Karl Sinclair, southpaw
pitching ace of La Boca Cubs.
southpaw; Herrick Holder, Twin
City outfielder; and Earl Best,
hard-hitting Ifill La Bocans
shortstop.
The success of the Pacific
Side Local Rate Little Leaguers
has inspired the Atlantic Side
teeners to organize a loop which
Is scheduled t oswlng Into ac-
tion this month.
The Pacific Side midgets be-
gin a five-game Isthmian cham-
plnship series today with the
Panama City All-Stars from the
Panama Liga Infantil. All games
will be played at the Santa Rita
Park, in Panama City.
pAtfjy six
I
i .1
SwM*y hmutum juppim
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, WX


I* T
/
Obstacles To Gain Top Gate Billing
'
Cyril Alexander
hip Trophy.
y
Champion-
Championship Series
TEAMS Won Lost Pet.
If ill La Bocans .... 3 1 .750
Twin City Rookies .. 1 3 .250
Fergus La Boca Cuba wound up
in third place by defeating Mon-
tlcello Gamboans, 11 -to 2, in a
playoff game.

' First Half-Season Standings
TEAMS Won Lost Pet.
If ill La Bocans .... 7 2 .778
Twin City Rookies.. 6 3 .687
Fergus M'nt'cello Gamboans 2 7 .222
Second Half-Season Standings
TEAMS*- Won Lost Pet.
Twin City Rookies. .6 3 .667
M'nt'cello Gamboans 5 4 .558
If ill La Bocans.... 4 5 .444
Fergus (LJ3.) Cubs.. 3 6 .333
Final Batting Averages
AB
A. Jones (MO)... .44
ROBERT PATE (I). 63
Carlyle Layne (I). 16
W. Barnaby (F) .. 39
Earl Best (I)......57
Herrick Holder (TC) 59
R. Samueis (TC).. 43
Ivan Lord (I).....63
L. Blades (TC).... 60
Carlos Caddie (I).. 43
Cecil Griffith Ram. Jimnez (TO 59
Leroy If ill (I) .. ..
O. Maynard (TC).
R. Grant (MO). ..
G. Payne (I).....
H. Warren (MO). ..
Did not have minimum appear-
ances at plate for official rec-
ognition.
51
9
31
45
49
H
18
28
7
16
14
23
16
24
21
15
19
20
17
a
10
14
IS
Ave.
.450
.444
.436
.436
.421
.390
.372
.369
.350
.349
.346
.339
.333
.333
.323
.311
.306
Leading Pitchers [
W L SO ERA Ave.
R. Jimnez.. 8 3 42 1.56 .727
R. Pate.....8 4 63 2.34 .667
J.Allen.. ..5 3 30 3.66 .625
K. Sinclair .. 6 5 79 3.85 .545
Ramon Jimenez, lea d i n g
pitcher of leagne, member of
Twin City Rookies.
OTHER LEADERS
Earl
HITS: Robert Pate, 8;
Best, 24; Ivan Lord, 24.
DOUBLES: Robert Pate, 8; R.
Jimnez, 4; L. Blades, 4; James
Howard, 4.
TRIPLES: Many players with
one each.
HOMERS: Waiter St. Louis, 3;
C. Griffith, H. Holder, R. Jimn-
ez, and Robert Pate, 2 each.
RBI'S: Robert Pate, 16; H.
Holder, 15; Earl Best 13; Ramn
Jimnez, 13.
STRIKEOUTS: G. Moreno, 17;
W. St. Louis, 15; C. Baxter, 14; G.
. Payne, 14.
BASES ON BALLS: W. Forde,
19; R. Mollnar, 14; J. Allen, 14.
SACRIFICES. H. Gil lings, 5; R.
Jimnez, 4.
HIT BY PITCHER: A.-Brown,
R. Samuels, E. Best, G. Payne, 2
each.
8TOLEN BASES: R. Molinar,
and S. Duncan, 2 each.
TOTAL BASKS: Robert Pate,
42; Ramn Jimenez, 32; H. Hold-
er, 31.
Leroy Fergus, first to heed RUNS SCORED: A. Titus, 21;
the call for sponsors. R. Pate, 17.
t
Faltering Philip \
Philip's lire is tilled with raises.
Well-worn step and nsgs he oses
Repairs would leave his borne like new.
r. A. Classifieds, fast the right clue!
-:-

BJ

SAFE IN CLOSE ONE Robert Pate scoring against Twin City Rookies.
'r

NABBED AT PLATE Antonio Brown, (Fergus Cubs) is tagged out by H. Warren (Monticello).
TWIN CITT ROOKIES Standing a to r.): R. Jimenes, R. Molinar, R. Paddy foot, O. May-
nard, C. Small (Manager), C. Garnett, G. Timlin*. XT Blades. Kneeling (L to r.): H. Lvalas,
H. Holder, A. Titus, H. Gilling*. E. Del Rio, G. Moreno, R. Blades. Mascots: E. Holder, C. Small.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9,. 1951
Sunday Ajmtkm SiippHiwn
i rt ****
PAGE SEVEN


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AMAZED AT THE CALM EFFICIENCY WITH WHICH
THE SAILORS Of HIS VESSEL PREPARE FOR THE
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PAGE EIGHT
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SUNDAY,1 SEFfEMBER $' 1951'


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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1951
Sunday Aaenun Sttpptemefll
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4:30 to 6 p. m. DAILY over Your Community Station /-| Qj ^ Q 4 0 ^CS*
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PAGE TWELVE
S#a4*y AntfKM Smmcmmi
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1H
i