The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:01224

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
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INDlgENDE^I^yllgS^DAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
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TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR
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PANAMA, R. P., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1951
FIVE CENTS
All-Out Red Push In Korea Believed On:
Chinese Using Russian Tanks In Thrusts

Newest Hurricane
Nears Puerto Rico
THE FIRST ZONIAN to register on the Pacific Side for the draft, Edmund Stanley Coe, 20. of Gamboa, Is slimed up by Emle
L. Payne while A. C. Medlnger, state director of Selective Service. Marc P. Qulnn. deputy state director, Lt. Governor Herbert
D. Vogel and Executive Secretary Eugene O. Lombard (from left to right) look on. The time was 8:00 sharp this morning.
140 Zonians
For Draft
THE FRONT END of this L 17-B liaison plane was smashed
in, and the left wins; completely torn from the fuselage yes-
terday afternoon when Sgt. Warren A. Howk, who had been
testing it on the Ft. Kobbe air strip, lost control and smash-
ed the plane into a gasoline storage shed. Howk was not
injured. The right wing.was also partially torn loose from
the fuselage. Army officials are investigating the accident.
BROTHER JOSE-DE GUADALUPE, famous In secular We as
the Latin American singer Jose Mot'.ca before the Joined the
Franciscan order, bid goodbv to Panamanian friends as he
Doarded the BranlfT Airways "El Conquistador" last night at
Tocumen Airport. Shown with Brother Jose are two other
members of the Franciscan orcr v ho travelled with him on
his journey to raise funds for seminaries. At left. Alberto
r ,; 1S*- ,nd nert ^ *"='" :*olca is Ernesto Arauco
'> ". They returned .o their Convento of San Francisco
in Lima, Peru.
Police Seek Evidence
Of How Retired PC
Employe Was Hurt
Mortimer H. Fields, 65, of Pan-
am, who was struck by an auto-
mobile last Saturday night on
Shaler Road near the Intersec-
tion to Tivqli Avenue, was still on
the seriously ill list at Gorgas
Hospital today.
Fields, a retired Panam Canal
employe, was found sitting on
the curb bleeding profusely, with
his head resting In his hands,
at about 8:00 p.m. on Saturday.
Examination at Gorgas Hospi-
tal revealed a deep laceration
over his right eye and several
small bone fractures.
Canal Zone police today Issued
a call to any witness who saw
Fields' accident to report imme-
diately to the Ancon police sta-
tion.
Any person having knowledge
of the accident is also requested
to present himself there.
One witness said he saw the
old man hit by a car going to-
wards Panam.
A passing driver tried to per-
suade Fields to get In, but the in-
jured man refused help. Police
finally brought him to the hos-
pital.
i_______________.
Britain Urges
Cremation Of Dead
LONDON, Sept. I (UP)Hugh
Dalton. Britain's Minister (
Town and Gauntry Planning.
urged today that Britons should
be cremated instead of buried.
"The urgent claims for hous-
ing, industry, schools, playing
fields, and other open spaces
make It more, than ever urgent
that we should check the
spread of cemeteries," Dalian
told a meetm* of burial and
cremation authorities
Almost 140 Canal Zone youths
signed up for the draft accord-
ing to reports received at 11:30
this morning from both the At-
lantic and Pacific local draft
boards.
The first "eager-beaver" arriv-
ed at 6:30 and sat outside the
Draft Board office in the Balboa
HelRhts railroad station until
8:00 a.m. when Local Board No.
1 opened for business.
He was 20-year-old Edmund
Stanley Cae of Gamboa who
wtsnts so jt into the Air Force
Reserve as soon as his papers are
fixed. Right now he Is an Ap-
prentice with the Canals Dredg-
ing Division. Edmund spent
most of his life down here and
attended both Cristobal and Bal-
boa High Schools. His parents
live in Las Cumbres.
Second m line this morning,
arriving only 15 minutes after
Coe, was a 25-year-old ex-veter-
an. James Arthur Thompson,
who served In both the Army and
Air Force in the Philippines and
now works as a mechanic at Co-
rozal.
"If It's really necessary," he
said. "I won't mind obis;, but It'll
be hard on my wife and two
children."
Another early bird took a des-
pondent view. Albert EdwirrWil-
son. 22. of Balboa, said "I don't
object going, but 111 probablv be
classified 4-F." Most of the
young men questioned agreed
that their country comes first,
but several ex-veterans shrug-
ged hopelessly at the idea of be-
ing; called back into the service.
A good-looking fellow with a
crew haircut and an intellec-
tual air said "It certainly mess-
es up my career." He had in-
tended returning to school to
become an engineer, but will
stay here now and continue
working with the Inter-Ameri-
can Geodetic Survey.
On the Atlantic side. Loca'
Board No. 2 registered Thomas
Anthony Brennan, 18, and Tho-
mas Newton Stewart. 25, simul-
taneously. Both arrived at 7:30
this morning.
The rtport from Selective
Service headquarters here show-
ed tha't 98 men were signed up on
the Pacific side and 40 on the
Atlantic side by 11:30 this morn-
ing.
At a meeting called by the
Chief Registrar Ernie L. Payne
Tuesday afternoon, the volun-
teer registrars executed an oath
of office and a waiver of pay.
They were Mrs. Clara Rail, L. F.
Hartman, Pat Ryan, Mrs Pay
Ryan, t. F. -Mcllhenney. Frank
B Naughton. Mrs. Erlene Tyre,
Mrs. Kalherlne Lesslack. Mrs. i
E. M Krveger and Mrs. A. M
Thompson |
MIAMI. Sept. (UP) The
season's sixth and newest hur-
ricane, is reported 440 miles
northeast of San Juan, Puerto
Rico, moving west northwest.
Altogether there are now three
twisters studding the hurricane
belt, one of them packing 135
m.p.h. winds.
As hurricane "Dog"No. 4 of
the seasonsimmered down to
a 40 mile an hour gale in the
Western Caribbean Sea. No. 6
popped up 1,400 miles off the
coast of Africa.
Between them was lethal No.
5. astride the South Atlantic
shipping lanes.
The Miami Weather Bureau
labeled "Easy" a dangerous hur-
ricane with a 135 mile an hour
punch coiled around Its core
and warned ships to avoid it.
None of the three storms me-
naced land.
Hurricane No. 6 five days a-
head at last year's record pro-
duction of 11 hurricanespassed
about 1,700 miles east of British
Antigua In the Leeward Islands.
Mysterious Death
Of Soldier's Wife
Here Being Probed
Canal Zone Police today are
Investigating the mysterious
death of a 22-year-old wife of
an Army soldier after a call was
received at 3:35 this morning at
the Cocoli station.
Cpl. Ernest O. Cardona, who
lives in Cocoli first notified the
Officer of the Day at the Clay-
ton Hospital that his wife Olga
Dionisia Atenclo de Cardona was
dead, and requested that an am-
bulance be sent to his quarters.
The OD then relayed the infor-
mation to the Cocoli police. She
was pronounced dead by Dr.
Russell H. Mitchell of Gorgas;
Hospital.
The deceased had been under
psychiatric care at Clayton
when she was taken out about
a month ago, against the advice
of physicians there. Since that
time she was confined to bed
at the home of her parents in
Chorrera, and had been back
In Cocoli only one day.
Cpl. Cardona said he knew
she had been dead for almost
nn hour before calling the po-
lice. A medical board at Gor-
gas Hospital is investigating the
cause of death.
She is survived by two chil-
dren. Jorge, 5 and Edgar, 3. Cpl.
Cardona is with "C" Battery of
the 764th at Fort Amador. Mrs.
Cardona was a Panamanian, but
was born in Puerto Rico.
Hurricane No. 4, which swept
Martinique with 115 mile an
hour winds Sunday and threw
a bad scare into the storm-bat-
tered British island of Jamaica,
1 ad fizzled down to an area of
squalls.
The Miami Weather Bureau
last charted lt in the vicinity
of Swan Island, south of Cuba.
Labor Leader Says
Rising Prices May
Bring Down Attlee
BLACKPOOL. England. Sept. 6
(UP) A union leader warned
today that rising pricesand
not the disputed issue of West-
ern rearmament will bring
down Britain's Labor govern-
ment at the next elections un-
less costs ar curbed.
The warning came at the
fourth session of the powerful
Trades Union Congress (TUC)
conference here.
It came amid other storm sig-
nals of union discontent with
the wage, price and social poli-
cies of Prime Minister Clement
Attlee's government.
The warning was issued by E.
P. Pill of the Agricultural Work-
ers Union. P1U was seconding a
resolution attacking the "out of
date and wasteful" marketing
and distribution system, and
urging better organization to
help bring down prices.
Another sign of the union
delegates' temper came when
the Government policy of charg-
ing for false teeth and spec-
tacles under the National Health
Service narrowly missed defeat.
It was over this issue that
left wing leader Ameurin Bevan
cult the Cabinet.
8TH ARMY HQ.f Sept. 6 (UP) Chinese troops and
Rursian-made tanks smashed three miles into the United
Nations lines, on the western front in Korea today in an
ominous thrust down the classic invasion route towards
Seoul.
It is possibly the first move of the awaited all-out
Red offensive.
A force of 2,500 Chinese, backed up by two full
Chinese divisions in the immediate area and thousands of
Soviet "puppet" troops a few miles to the west, cut off one
United States unit.
The United States unit fought its way back till it met
two other United Nations units sent to the rescue.
The Red attack moved down
the broad vallev west of Yon-
chon, 35 miles north of Seoul,
then swung east over a border-
ing ridge line and cut behind
Allied forces holding the north-
ermost positions of the United
Nations line in the area.
The trap was closed by a Red
regiment backed by Russian-
made T-34 tanks.
An Allied armored column
twice ran the gantlet of heavy
Communist fire to reach the
surrounded putfit and bring
back its wounded.
The attack was the first by
either side on the auiet western
front since before the Kaesong
truce talks began July 10.
The attack subsided to small
arms fire by nightfall, but
Chinese reinforcements are ap-
parently lying in close behind
the Red spearheads to exploit
any soft spots found in the
Allied lues.
The Red attack wa about K
miles- east of Reasons
Just 13 mus nortlrorKae-
song 5.000 Soviet puppet troops
(believedly European volun-
teers) stand ready to drive
south parallel to the Chinese
drive, or move east to Join the
Chinese.
A United Nations briefing of-
ficer said there are 70 T-34
tanks In the area, though air
spotters today saw only eight.
United Nations warplanes
were again -in the air over
North Korea all dav today,
blasting Red supply lines.
They hit the railroad and
marshalling yards at Chongju,
and a railroad bridge at Slnan-
Ju.
A flight of Royal Australian
Air Force Meteor Jet fighter
clashed briefly with 12 Russian-
built Mig-l5s but no damage
was done to either side.
United States Sabres rang-
ing over Mlg Alley, near tha
Manchurlan border, sighted a-
bout 30 Migs, which fled back
across the Yalu before tha
Sabres could catch them. .
Ridgway Asks
New Site For
Peace Talks
World Serie
Dates Set

NEW YORK. Sept. 6 (UP)
It was announced this after-
noon i:>t the World Series will
begin Wednesday, Oct. 3, if the
New York Yankees or Boston
Red Sox win the American
League pennant.
The Series will get underway
Thursday, Oct. 4 if the Cleve-
land Indians trlumoh or if it
is necessary to hold a playoff
ramp.
Boy Sings At Tent Revival
Then Stabs Teasing Friend
BRISTOL. Tenn.. Sept. 6 (UP)
A 15-year-old mountain boy
sang the Lord's praises at one
moment of a tent revival and the
next turned and stabbed to death
a teasing young friend, police
said today.
"I don't know whether the Lord
will forgive me." said sandy-
haired Jasper Frltts as he admit-
ted killing Billy Joe Cox, 14. "I'm
too scared to pray.
Young Frltts said he sank his
knife deep into Billy Joe's abdo-
men during the services last night
because the younger boy had
been spitting on him and on
Jasper's little brother, Elmer.
Billv Joe also hit him with a
hymn book. Jasper said.
The knifing came Just after
the Baptist Congregation in the
tent tabernacle at Hickory Tree.
Tenn., had finished a round of
singing hymns including "Are
you washed in the blood?" and
"Power in the blood."
Bob Morrell, the first of three
missionary preachers due to
speak, sang a solo, and started
his sermon when there was a
slight rustle in the back benches
where the teen-agers sat. John
Buchanan, another preacher, no-
ticed Billy Joe leaving the serv-
ice.
The youth walked a few steps
and collapsed.
Some women fainted and oth-
ers cried out as men rushed to
aid the stricken boy. But Billy
Joe died without a word, a vital
artery pierced by the blade.
The preachers, calmed the
crowd and resumed the service
with a prayer. Most of those
present did not realize Billy Joe
was dead.
While one of the elders picked
up Billy Joe's body and took lt
home. Jasper's mother, who had
noticed the scuffle, confronted
her son and asked him what he
had done to the boy. officers
said.
Jasper produced the bloody
pocket knife and said "I cut him
because he had been spitting on
mv little brother and he hit me
with a song book."
At first. Jasper said. "I felt
like I had to do it. and I'm not
sorry." But later he began won-
dering how he stood in the Lord's
eyes.
TOKYO, Sept.g. (UJP>..4.
Nations Supreme Commant__
General Matthew; Ridgway today
demanded a new site for the Ko-
rean ceasefire conference, and
has told the Reds to halt their
"constant deceit" unless they
want to break off the ceasefire
talks for good.
In his latest note to the Reds,
Ridgway threw back as false and
malevolent the Red charges that
United Nations forces have vio-
lated Kaesong's neutrality.
He said the Reds themselves
manufactured the evidence of
these violations.
In the name of the United Na-
tions he called for an end to
"these despicable practices which
have received worldwide con-
demnation ."
Ridgway said United Nations
representatives are ready to meet
Communist liaison officers at
any time to discuss the selection
of a'new conference site.
He said: "It Is obvious that
Kaesong, situated as it Is with-
in the Communist lines, and po-
liced solely by Communist forces,
does not provide the neutral and
uncontroversial site necessary for
satisfactory discussion betweeu
belligerents."
Peruvian Sub Spotted
In Gulf Of Guayaquil
QUITO, Sept. < (UP) The
Government of Ecuador charged
today that a Peruvian submarine
entered Ecuadorean territorial
waters In the Oulf of Guayaquil
last Sunday.
Anti-COP Truman
Loses Elephant
CAPE TOWN, Sept. fi (UP)
The elephant which the King
of Cambodia was sending to
President Truman died aboard
ship here today.
The bodv will be dropped
overboard in the harbor.
Convair Gets Air Force Nod to Build
Plane for GE's Atom Powered Engine
BY LOUIS CASSELS
WASHINGTON, Sept. 6 (UP)
The Air Force announced today
it has awarded a contract to Con-
solidated Vultee Aircraft Corp.,
to help develop an atomic pow-
ered plane that could circle the
earth non-stop at Incredible
speed.
The San Diego, Cal., firm,
which makes the huge B-36 In-
ter-continental Bomber, will be
primarily responsible for build-
ing the body or "airframe" of
'he plane, which probably will be
lie largest ever built
General Electric Co., already is
working on the atomic engine,
under contracts previously an-
nounced.
The Air Force said Consolidat-
ed will carry out Initial develop-
ment at its Fort Worth, Tex.,
plant.
Authoritative quarters said the
plane Is a "long-range project"
ot anywhere near as far along
I the atomic-powered submarine
which Westlnghouse Electric Co
and the Electric Boat Co. are
building for the Navy.
Authorities, who believe this
country is far out in front in de-
velopment of atomic engines,
predict that the plane and sub-
marine together will revolution-
ize all concepts of air and sea
warfare. Their great advantage
over all existing craft will be the
fact that nuclear power plants
can go on operating for days or
even months at a time without
refuelling.
The Air Force announcement
came on the heels of President
Truman's statement. In San
Francisco Tuesday, that the
United States is building "fan-
tastic" new weapons
The atomic plane presents In-
finitely more difficult technical
problems than the atomic sub-
marine. That Is why it is still in
the "development" stage while
the sub Is undergoing actual con-
struction.
The big trick In building any
atomic engine Is to find a way to
convert the Intense heat gener-
ated tn a uranium pile into elec-
trical energy which can drive
ship or plane oropellors
This requires boilers and tur-
bo-generators which can be fitted
into a submarine much more
readily than Into a plane.
Another problem is the heavy
lead shielding required to pro-
tect the operating crew from the
d?adl" radiations of the atoirle
(Continued on Page Column 4)
J.




I*\GE TWO
JHK PANAMA AMFHICAN AN INDEPENDENT OAIL? NEWSPAMtB
Cargo and FreightShips and PlanesArrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine News
MPMPAT. SEPTEMBER 1951
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
New Orleans Service
Arrives
Cristobal
S.S. La Play ..................................Sept. 10
S.S. Chiriqui ...................................Sept. 16
S.S. Mayari ....................................Sept. 17
S.S. Manaqui ..................................Sept. 29
(Haadlln nfrl(trtird Chlllrrt and General CartoI
>
*
Arrives
New York Freight Service________ Cristobal
S.S. Cape Ayinof ...............................Sept. 5
S.S. Cape Cumberland .........................Sept. 9
S.S. Cape Cod .................................Sept. 16
S.S. Cape Ann .................................Sept. 23
S.S. Cape Avinof ...............................Sep!. 30
Vcckl) Sailing* lu Srm fork. I.o Anirirv San rranrtar* Sratlli
Orr>inn.l SalMnr lo New Orltai and Mnhllr
(Th Steamer In ihi> tarvaM art llmllea lo Iwcfw oauenstrs)
Krtqoem rrflfhl Balitas* Iram < rtatohal lo Hal Coast Central Ammo
Cristbal to New Orleans via
------------------------------------------. Arrives
Tela, Honduras___________________ Cristobal
S.S. Chiriqui ...................................Sept. 18
S.S. Chiriqui......(Passenger Service Only)......Oct. 2
TELEPHONES:
I R1STOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON 20
SWEDISH TRANSATLANTIC LINE
Accepting Passengers For
LOS ANGELES
via
AMAPALA, LA UNION and LA LIBERTAD
by
nas. "PARRAKOOLA"
SAILING SEPTEMBER 7th
C. B. FENTON & CO., INC.
Tel. Cristbal 1781 Balboa 1065
Taft-Hartley Injunction
Breaks US Copper Strike
[DENVER. Sept. 6 The
Government yesterday obtained
a temporary injunction order-
"4WMg the International Un.on ol
Mine. Mill and Smelter Work-
ers to end Its 10-day-old copper
walkout.
The Union said It would no-
tify its locals in 52 towns and
cities to comply irunediately.
The temporary restraining or-
d:r. Issued by Judge Alfred P.
Murrah of the 10th U. S. Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals, was re-
ouested by Attorney General J.
Howard McGrath under provl-
ions of the Taft-Hartley act i
at the direction of President
Trrman.
Two special assistants in the
Attorney General's office who
flew here from Washington to
file the injunctions submitted
affidavits signed by high-rank-
ing Government offic'als that
the strike was crippling the
nation's defense program.
One affidavit signed by Mo-
bilization Chief Charles E. Wil-
ton asserted that If the .strike
continued "for even a short
time," It would cause "Irrepar-
able damage' to the nation's
ec-nomy.
Oher affidavits citing the
Pr'ency of resuming copper
pred-ctinn were signed by Mc-
G-r'h. Secretary of Commerce
Charles Sawyer. Defense Pro-
duction Administrator Manly
Flelschmann; John D. Small,
chairman of the Defense Muni-
tions Board, and Undersecre-
tary of the Interior Richard
Searles.
The temporary injunction will
remain effective through Sept.
15. At the same time Murrah
Issued the temporary order, he
scheduled a hearing for Sept.
14 on whether the order should
be made permanent.
The order was not limited to
the union alone. It directed the
union to send its 58,000 strik-
ing members back to their jobs
at once, but it also ordered
both the union and the 31 non-
ferrous metals companies to
rey-me collective bargaining.
A total of 100,000 workers
have been affected by the walk-
out, which began An". 27 The'
otler 42 000 who did not walk-
out were thrown out of work
by the strike.
A formal stalement Issued by
the union said ^Taft-Hartley
Injunctions fettle nothing" and
"merely serve to help convince
our members that the Truman
Adminisiratlon is determined i
to keep wapes of metal work-
ers down while profits of the |
metal corporations rise to new
lanas:lc heights."
"Pacific Shipper"
Says Insolent Crews
Cut Passenger Traffic
Under the heading of "Kicking
Passenger Liners Out," the latest
issue of Pacific Shipper carried
the following article:
' There aren't many passenger
liners left on the Pacific any
more, if you don't count freight-
ers with limited accommodations
for%passengers (which may be
passenger ships in a sense, but
certainly arc not passenger lin-
ers i. This is a simple truth that
has been largely overlooked in
the \arious studies of Pacific
Coast shipping'* postwar difficul-
ties, even when these difficulties
have been subjected to a fairly
fine-toothed comb.
"Of the prewar foreign-flag
passenger lines, mostly Japanese
and British, only one remains-
Canadian Australian Ling which
operates a single vessel between
Canada and Australia-New Zea-
land via Hawaii. Of ail those un-
der the United States flag, only
American President Lines main-
tains service at all comparable
with its erstwhile pretensions.
Gone are the one-time luxury-
liner services of Panam Paclilc
Line (United* S.ates Lines Com-
pany) and Panam Mail (Grace
Line in the intercoastal run
and of The Oceanic Steamship
Company iMatson Lines i in the
Australasian route. Passenger
service to Hawaii is much re-
duced, because of the immediate-
ly foregoing reason, and other
reasons. But in the Hawaiian run
there is still Matsons Lurllne
representing the modernized best
of our prewar liner fleet; and
that, with A. P.- L.'s service and
C.A.L.'s Aoranei is just about all
tnere is. For the rest, passengers
move by air. if at all.
"There is no other element in
transportation m which labor is
as important as in passenger
traffic, and this is true from the
basis of the cost sheet and satis-
faction of the customer. The car-
rying of passengers entails more
employes and the conduct of
these employes is reflected di-
rectly in patronage.
"This examination of the broad
c'atus of passenger ships in the
Pacific has been Inspired bv the
recent disruptions in the service
of the liner Lmline by reason of
jurlsdictional disputes. The dele-
terious effects on ship travel of
this sort by union interference
with the orderly flow of com-
merce can not be denied, nor is
there any gainsaying the rela-
tively high cost of passenger
operations arising from the high
ratio of payroll per $1000 of In-
come. However, we are not going
to maintain that high crew wages
or strike Interruptions to service
or insolent conduct on the part
of crewmen are alone responsible
for the tremendous decline of
ship-passenger business in the
Pacific. On the contrary, we ad-
mit that there have been other
factors, too numerous to itemize
and largely beyond the control
of anybody in the Industry.
"Nevertheless, we hope that
this admission will strengthen
rather than weaken what we do
contend,-which is that the Lur-
line incidents cut further ground
from underneath a sadly tattered
relic of a once proud enterprise,
that at one time was an adorn-
ment of our Pacific Coast ports
and gave employment, afloat and
ashore, to thousands of men
Navy Palrol Bomber
Crashes, Explodes
Exercising With Sub
QUONSET POINT, R.I.. Sept
?,,UP| ~ Seven crewmen were
Killed last night when their
twin-engine Navy patrol bomber
plunged into the ocean near a
submarine and exploded 57 miles
southeast of here.
m
JACOBY ON BRIDGE
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
The P2V was engaged la night
exercises with a submarine out
of New London, Conn., when the
tragedy occurred.
The submarine immediately
began a search for survivors bat
found none.
The plane crashed and ex-
ploded some distance south of
Martha's Vineyard Island.
Search planes were sent from
Floyd Bennett field in New York
an dtwo more subs put out from
New London. Coast Guard ves-
sels also Joined the hunt.
The crew aboard the plane
were attached to Patrol Squad-
ron 5, which Is based perman-
ently at Jacksonville, Fia., and
had been at Quonset several
weeks for training.
28
NORTH
48
PA 14
? QJ10 7 2
? K984
WEST EAST
AQ1072 AA9653
10852 K73
? K83 4>4
*102 *J763
80UTH(D)
AKJ4
VQJ9
? A965
*AQ5
Both sides vul.
South West North
1N. T. Pass 3 ?
3 N. T Pass Pt
Opening lead%2
East
Pass
Pasz
ACOB u on
CANASTA
Marine Device
HORIZONTAL
1,9 Depicted
marine device
13 Worshipful
14 Italian river
15 Goddess of
infatuation
II Command
18 Scold
1 Nickel
(symbol)
SO Descended
suddenly
22 Guinea (ab.)
23 Tall
28 Chille
27 Dry
21 Kind
29 Preposition
10 weekday (ab.)
21 Hypothetical
fare*
3JAnent
23 Bargain event
25 Ages
M State
29 Dispatched
40Six (Roman)
41 Spades
47 An (Scot)
48 Girl's name
50 Expunge
11 Dutch town
S2 Egyptian river
4 Regarded
Insert
7 Breastbones
TUtnCAL
, 1 Trademarks
' 2 Goto bed
Slfight before
an event
4 Eye (Scot)
8 Demigod
7 Within (comh
form)
8 Pace
9 College dsgiec
(ab.)
10 Vase
11 Wild ass
12 Curdled milk
product
17 Concerning
20 Wastrels
21 Sorrow
24 Song bird
26 Cling
33 It is used for
life-------
Answer to Previeu3 Puzzle
lUldWI-lCriHMULL.
HW.lilMl-J^RUMIZlMIf'
ISWlU
Mifl .-- ^'JMMrVl;, >-..|J||
IHi ill SW131SM LJH
uifuiNraxuijiiui-i
H0rauifflHfciHi-:
Egg substance
Garland
Horses
Pronoun
Mineral rocks
Immense
Italian town
48 Ogle
49 Winglike par!
SI Australian
ostrich
53 Diminutive
suffix
55 Half an em
"i-lease settle a percentage
Drooitm, requests a Ban Jose
reader. -My nusoana piayed the
cputn hand at three no-irump.
i-.- t?* lla Pecd a spaae,
*ed ha\e been oeaien almost
beiorc we coulq Ret siaried. But
west gee us a cnance bv lead-
ing a heart.
1."f-v,'ora and master decided
tn-t this was a good time to
Wic.se tne heart, so he played
low iron, the ouniniy. Last nat-
urally won witn tne king of
near.s and shilted to the five
ol spades.
"It was almost worth being
set just to see tne look on mv
jifsoands lace. Down two on a
nand we should have made
in'""l0ieJ C0uld sav a word
lanci I had quite a lew ready to
deli'.en. my alibi expert said
mat oerccn.age favored the fi-
nes*?; that even if the heart
fine .,e lost all was well If the
dian ond finesse won; that even
wit 1 cotb kings wrong all would
be veil if East had both the
ace and queen of spades or
more than live spades.
"Could he possibly have a
poirnor is this.) ust his regular
doutle talk?"
He had a pointbut It's not
quite good enough, if South
puts up the ace of hearts at the
first trick and goes right after
the diamonds,, he cannot be
beaten. At worst he is sure of a
heart, four diamonds, and three
clubf; .nd then nothing can
prevent him from developing
either a heart or a spade for
his linth trick.
Th immediate heart finesse
will gain only one overtrick as
aguirst putting up the ace. If
the finesse loses. South may
lose the 800 points for game
and rubber together with an
extra 100 points for being set
In short, South risks 700
points to gain 30 points. He
needs better than 20 to 1 odds
to take such a risk. He had
pretty good chances, as he
pointed out. but the contract
was not even close to a 20 to 1
shot.
All the same. I'm happy to
* that the spirit of adventure
still Lves in our Western male!
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
"I don't believe in luck,"
I writes a correspondent, "espec-
'ially when that luck continues
I for a very long time. My next-
door neighbor and his wile
keep winning, so I know they
must be better than we are.
But I can't discover the secret
; of their success.
"Here's what happens in about
one deal out of every three. My
wife and I get the first discard
pile and get down with a few
| nice-looking melds. It looks as
| though we ought to make at:
; least one canasta very quickly
I and perhaps run up a really
DUE score.
Suddenly the hand collapses.1
One of our friendly enemies]
puts down a meld, and in one
or two more plays the hand is.'
over. Their hands always seem
to match, and one of them is
able to meld out before we can
pile up a decent score.
"This doesn't happen when
they get the first discard pile.
My wife and I often have to sit
i through a long drawn-out hand
without being able to meld out.
; Meanwhile the neighbors score
, a bushelful.
. "What's the answer How do
thev do it?"
i Mv correspondent is the one
, card olaver in a thousand who
doesn't complain a*-out luck
I when he Is being outplayed. The
: secret is falrlv simple, and even
an average player can make
use of it.
| There are only eleven possi-
ble ranks that vour side can
meld In-from the aces down
to the fours. You are not like-
ly to make a canasta In any
rank melded by the enemy. You
are not likelv to make a canas-
ta in anv rank that your part-
ner discards (unless you have
control of the discard pile).
At the beginning of a hand.
vou cheek off th* ranks that
are improbable. Your partner
discprds iacks, nine, and sev-
ens, let us sav. You have a very
bad hand and cannot out up
anv serious .fight for the dis-
card pile. All riihtgive uo.
Dlycrrd exactly what your part-
ner has thrown. This will often
give un the pile.
You and voit cf-'n'r "*i" till
have twenty-two cards between
vouand neither one of you
has anv lacks, nines or sevens.
Perhaps vou also discard an-
other rank. Do you see what is
bound to happen?
The partnership hands must
accumulate more and more
cards in the same few ranks.
As soon as one player makes a
meld, the partner can match it
to complete a canasta. The
whole hand can usually be end-
ed In one or two more playa.
CAPTAIN EASY
A Letter for Yancey
BX LESLIE TURNS*
WE WANT*.
. TALK TO EMMETT
McTtGS A6AIW. HE
IVU6HTA TRIEO TO
SHIELD HIS BROTHER
Mr MOT TOLD US
EVER'TWMG!
WE GRILLED HIM AS AIM, RUT
HE STICK* TO HIS STORY. ALSO
UESTIONED HIS NEIGHBORS
ALOKfi THE STREET, AM> fCWIp
MOTrftUG TO CONTRADICT IT!
OWE FELLA SAW "Xp AUVOMC SEE IF
YANCEY DRIVING VsMKEV WAS ALONE
^^P.ZZXPV1*m"tovEOFf. /euERvowe
SAID HE ARRIVED y'-^^sWSMftED BV THEM
AND SAW
M0THRJ6
SINCE VOU BOVS ARE GOING OUT TO
PLAY DETECTIUE, MAYBE VOUU PASS
THIS LETTER ALCWS TO HIM. IT CAM*
FOR YAMCEV TODAY. I OPEM6P IT,
BUT THERE'S WO CLUB M IT TOR US
VIC FLINT
Lefty Has Ideas
BY (MICHAEL O'MALLEx
OUK BUAHUINU HOUSE
fsRBAT CAESAR / HOvJ
DIO I SET OP HERE ? THIS
, WOULD BC A Mk?HTy LEAP
FOR AM OLYMPIC STAR.'
-~ MV OLD ATHLETIC SWlLL
MUST HAME RETURNED WHEN*
X LOOKED OP FROM THAT
FOOTPRlKrr TO MEET THE .
BEAR'S EVE HOT 6\< ^ <:
^Br/VlNCHES AyJAV/y -
ftsAIOR HOOPLC oirr IIITB **
WILLIAMS
um.' coold x HyPNcrnze
kTHE BEAST ? IF I HAD A
soiTAR, the music
MIGHT SOOTHE HIM.'-*-^
WOULD HE SET SLEEPV
AND DEPART IPX
^CROONED 8RAHMS*
\LULLA8y f
Ki
Y
H

js\
' SSJON'T
TRY
SHAkilMG
HAMD6 .
V4ITH HlM
9QJTHHrry>BAR6-rooso

. I p
~>L,Ljmi>'i"i\BgMi>

raUKSDAT, SEPTEMBER 1951
fHE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE THREE
Atomist Peers In Plastic Bowl;
Sees Peaceful, Fruitful Future
NEW YORK, Sept 6 (UP) Dr. James- Brydnt Con-
tint, one of the scientists who made the World's first ato-
mic bomb, said yesterday that he has no fear of atomic
war and predicted that solar energy would prove more
valuable than atomic energy.
.Dr. Conant, president of Harvard University, made a
unique report to the Diamond Jubilee meeting of the Amer-
ican Chemical Society.
He took the scientists some 18,000 of them
into the future.
The Harvard scientist admitted he was using a "plas-
tic crystal ball," and that he could be called a skeptic.
However, here are orne o' the
things he predicted would occur
lp the years ahead of this 20th
century:
1) A vasainr out of the ato-
nde age, and instead the use of
io)ir energypower from the
nunto produce power for in-
dustrial uses;
2L Russia wll| be afraid to
tari a war as the Atlantic trea-
ty nations reach their full mili-
tary might;
3) The end of liquid fossil fu-
els and the beginning of a new
era of synthetic fuels and oth-
er substances, including syn-
thetic win*, beer and distilled
spirits; .
41 The cheap conversion of
salt water into fresh water,
with the result of turning de-
sert areas into fertile land;
S) World-wide birth control,
with.religious groups approv-
ing.
Of hit predictions. Dr. Conant
aid:
"I see neither an atomic holo-
caust nor the golden abundance
of an atomic age.
"On the contrary, I see worried
humanity endeavoring by one
political device after another to
find a way out of the atomic age.
"And by the end of the century
this appears to have been accom-
plished, but neither through the
triumph of totalitarianism nor
by the advent of world govern-
ment."
He said that the next fifty
years will show that human na-
ture is "tough and unyielding to
a high degree."
He said he was confident that
New York. Paris. London, Berlin
or Moscow would not be destroy-
ed by atomic bombs.
He predicted that by 1985, man
will have accomplished the feat
of cheaply converting sea water
Into fresh.
He said that atomic research
has shown that man can tap the
resources of the sunand he be-
lieves that solar energy will be
available within the next 50
years.
Of birth control, he said:
"The problem of over-popula-
tion, while not-solved, promises
to be In hand before 2050."
He predicted that by the mid-
dle of the 1950s balanced forces
would again be at the disposal of
the Atlantic Treaty nations.
"It is then clear In Moscow
that there can be no easy march
to the channel ports."
'.
Brannan: Big Things
Ahead In Southland
8PARTANBURG, S. C, Sept. (UP) Agriculture Secretary
Charles F. Brannan predicted yesterday that the South will be-
come the aatlen's livestock producer In the "not too distant fu-
rore."'
Brannan, speaking at the presentation of awards in the
Piedmont communities oil conservation contest, said opportun-
ities for agricultural advances in the South are the greatest in
the nation.
FOR WHOM THE SHELLS TOLL MaJ. Roy Dunford, of
Vancouver, B. C' Canadian Army chaplain, uses this unique set of
chimes to summon men of his unit to church services. The chimes
re made from the empty cases of shells fired by the famous Cana-
dian artillery unit, "Hell's Bells."- .,
Truman Worries AsNew
Floods Threaten Kansas
KANSAS CITY. Mo., Sept. 28
(UP) President Truman la
worried over new flood threats
in Kansas and Missouri.
He has scheduled a personal
tour of the danger area, still
sodden and mud-laden from
the disastrous torrents of last
July.
This afternoon he plans a.
motor tour through Kansas and
Missouri low lying lands threat-
ened anew by rising waters.
Particularly he wants to see
bridge In Topeka, where 9,000
persons already have fceen driv-
en from their hornea.
The river, swollen by six days
of steady rain throughout Kan-
sas, was rising toward a pre-
dicted crest of 31 feet here.
Engineers said this was four
feet above the "critical" mark
of 27 feet.
One of .those on hand to sur-
vey the latest flood threat was
President Truman, who flew
raced to keep ahead of the ris-
ing water, piling more earth
atop low points of the levees
and reinforcing danger spots
with sand bags.
The flood struck as cities In
the endangered area were only
half way through with the
giant clean-up Job left by the
July floods.
Flood waters at that time did
an estimated 33,500,000,000 dam-
age In Kansas and Missouri.
Railroad service again was
disrupted by the high water
and some highways were flood-
ed. The Kansas City stock-
yards imposed an embargo on
cattle shipments into the' area.
Livestock Exchange President
Cliff Kaney ordered steps taken
to safeguard cattle already in
stockyard pens. He said some
cattle would be shipped to
points out of danger.
After the July flood, the car-
casses of more than 12,000 ani-
mals killed by the flood were
found scattered throughout the
oentral Industrial district.
The Santa Fe Railroad an-
nounced yesterday in Chicago
that It was halting virtually all
freight movement through the
endangered Kansas City area.
A railroad spokesman said
"Instructions were" issued to our
people to hold up freight trains
from the east and west" ex-
cept for a few trains which
will be ordered to try to buck
through the danger as long as
possible.
The line said it also has or-1
dered all rolling stock out of i
its Argentine yard in Kansas
CHy. Kans.
Waters tore loose about 400 j
feet of a bridge that was being,
replaced near Lawrence, Kans. i
The Topeka bridge which wasi
washed away waa a temporary
Structure which the Rock is-
land Line erected after the July
flood.
There were few persons to
heed the drainage board's or-
der to evacuate the Armourdale
district in Kansas City, Kans.
Only seven weeks ago 3.000
of Its 4,000 homes were destroy-
ed bv the floods. Large firms
in the district were back in
operation, however, and faced
possible new lasses.
Our
SUPER COLOSSAL
SALE
CONTINUES
DON'T MISS IT!
ZIG-ZAG
108 Ceilral Avenue
Ope i from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. arid during noon hour

I. L. MADURO Jr.
100 Central Avenue
For Sale
first quality
STEEL
in the following sfzea ...
r 762.00
r
ton
766.00
Tels. 2-2864
ton
2-2844
particularly ne wants 10 see 0Ter ^ endangered area today
the multi-million 'dollar flood en rout^ t0 h,f homfc t *.
relief plan in action.
Residents and business firms
were warned to evacuate three
Independence, Mo.
Bulldozer crews were rushed
to Kansas City, Kans., to bols-
n?. 1rdU?hi',iriSt"ir.-iter and ralse "* which were
&d*y.w" ihA,K."?JKaW. damaged and weakened by the
>
At a news conference before
the ceremonies. Brannan ad-
vised' cotton farmers to take
advantage pf the Federal loan
program and exercise proper
judgment In the final market-
ing of the 1951 btlnrper crop.
He failed to see any Incom-
patibility between the present
gloomy price outlook and the
Government's request for a big
cron thia vear.
"The desirability of stock-
piling cotton Is still under very
active consideration." Brannan
told a renorter. But he declin-
ed to elaborate.
Brannan, urged the nation's
farmers to go all out to in-
crease Droductlon for the ra-
tion and out allies 1" the battle
ag'^nst Red aeress!o.n.
- More than 821.000 In prizes
.were given to the farmers who
took nart in the two year soil
conservation contest from
Snartanbure. Lauren*. Chero-
kee and Union counties. 8. <"".,
and Butherford and Polk, N.
C.
Brannan said "renewed
strength in the land" Is urgent-
ly needed In the oresent world
crisis in which "free men are
in grave danger" from Com-
munist aeeresslon.
"Agriculture faces the im-
mediate challene of producing
enough to mionW the "nation's
growing military forcea with
food and clothing, the crowing
defense industries with raw
materials, and a ranldlv grow-
ing civilian population with
food, clothing and shelter,"
Brsnnan declared.
The Agriculture Recretary
said American acrteuliure con
meet these demands onlv
through bulMlne uo farm lands
through soU conservation.
He warned that existing
acreage must produce more
abundantly because no new
land* afe' available
"There is no doubt about it."
i aald. "Strength In the land
always has been the found-
lon for .building strength In
he nation.".
He cltled the Piedmont soil
onservatlon contest as one
.e-< of nromotlne the re-
siding of the land.
"Tour nrogreas. and similar
progress in 'other Darts of the
lourrtry, demonstrate what can.
done thro'"rh conservation
arm'v" he Hd.
"Brannan nolnted out new
farming trends In the South,
luch as mechanization and
Hvrsllcation. and aald the
oath hu greater opportunity
or agricultural advancement
an the nation aa a whole.
He aald climatic conditions in
he South are well suited to
he-production of livestock and
hat Dixie soils can be made
ilghly productive.
River threatened to stage a re-
peat performance of July's dis-
astrous floods.
The evacuation warning came
shortly after the rampaging
river, ripped out a railroad
i n i i "
save
more
50% on your
WARDROBE!
WATCH FOR

INTERNATIONAL
SEWING WEEK
LANTERN LOADED
BUFFALO. N, Y. (UP)Carry-
lg a lantern cost Samuel Jorm-
on $50 in court.. Police found
hree books of policy slips In the
item
July flood. Engineer teams
Pauls Market
READY TO EAT
FRESH JUICY
BROILED CHICKENS
PREPARED THE INEW INFRA WAY
ALSO
CHOICE EYE OF THE ROUND
FRESH LETTUCE CRISP
FROM CERRO PUNTA
DELICIOUS
RICOTTA CREAM CHEESE
Dog Tired Dave!
David was a busy fellow,
shopping never left him mellow!
(J J lVorn out- *'eary tired and brave.
iVrn not read our Want Ads. Dave?
ki Prism-Lite Perfection* Dia-
monds the only 100% fully
polished diamond in the
market.
Pay as little as $5.00 a month.
TAHITI
THE JEWELRY STORE
137 Central Aye. 117

They Like it a Million!
100 years
of service is
your guarantee!
OCTOBER 1 to 6
IN ALL
SINGER
SEWING CENTERS
SINGER SEWING MACHINE COMPANY
97 Central Avenue Tel. 2-1545 Panam
7485 Bolivar Avenue Tel. 141 Coln
1
-
JLsast week Buick set a proud record.
The millionth Dynaflow Drive* was
delivered to a happy owner.
That's a new peak in popularity for
modern drives which take you from
a standing start to any cruising speed
desired with a smooth, unfaltering
swoop of power.
"The biggest advance since the self-
starter" is what the motorwise press
called this Buick development back
in 1948and now a million owners can
tell you how right that proved to be.
Here, they found, was a basically
different way of delivering power.
It was the first drive to get completely
away from any gears which function
in a series of fixed stagesthe first to
apply supercharging principles that
did new tricks with spinning oil.
And how folks loved it!
They loved the freedom from strain
in traffic. And the new "sweetness"
of ride which every passenger could
enjoy.
They loved the command it gives
them of every traffic situation and
the relaxation it contributes to a long
day's drive.
They loved its extra safety in slippery
going, and the improved control in
mud and snow.
As they piled up experience, they
rout rrr ro oktc* vaiue
loved the unexpected savings of
rear tire wear and the reduced strain
on all driving parts, from engine to
differential.
And finallythey loved what it does
for the value of a Buick, as reflected
in the extra dollars that Dynaflow*
adds to the resale price of a car.
Have you sampled this driving
sensation?
There's no time like the present for
discovering the thrills that more than
a million Buick owners already know.
Etmipmnt. imwi in. mm ni modtU mrt >[ M wkm
MftM, l&irnndmni KoADMASTKR.W*at at ntr* mHtm
Smo^Boi^BcAicIt
with
DYNAFLOW
ORIVE


=
I WHIN IITTIR AUTOMOIHIS All lUILI HOICK WILL 1UILO TNIM
SPECIAL SEDAN.cz. off-floor-$2439.00


SMOOT & PAREDES
Panam
SMOOT & HUNNICUTT
Coln




,-----------' \





page roo
mr. PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
THTTRSDAT, SEPTEMBER 151
^Attlantic J^>c
letii
&
I9
LjuIu
'Ion cJ.ii
It !
1U
( /a1 un 3 78
y
' .
held on Saturday, September 29.
The committee members are:
Mrs, Albert Motta. Mrs. Robert
Leifih, Mrs. Gunther Hlrschfeld
and Mrs. Isaac Osorio.
Mrs. Hartwig
Returns from Vacation
Mrs. Henry A. Hartwlg. of Fort
Davis, with her sons, Gary and
Eric, returned during the week-
end from a vacation spent in Mi-
ami and Cincinnati.
5MISS VILMA TREVIA. and Mr. Albert H. Husted. whose wed-
dinff on Saturday will be of interest to a wide circle of
friends in Panama and Colon.
! oOo
( <>< KT.YII. PARTY COMPLIMENTS POPULAR NURSES
I Miss Hope Menendez, and Miss Betty Lempke, popular
members of the nursing; staff of the Colon Hospital, who are
leaving the Isthmus next week, were honored with a cock-
Jtall party given Tuesday evening by Miss Arva Mead at her
apartment in Cristobal.
The friends who gathered for this social hour were: Mrs.
4.0US Maurer. Miss Florence Edbrook, Mrs. H. C. Walbridge,
IVlrs. Mae Dodson. Miss Dorothy LaMetre. Miss Judy Ammons,
Mrs. Melvin Lea. Miss Jane Holcomb, Mrs. Richard Wilson,
Miss Betty Blaucrt, Miss Thclma Headley and Miss Elizabeth
Marsh.
Informal Dinner Party
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McGinn
of Gatun had Mr. and Mrs. Ar-
thur Corbett and family as their
dinner guests Tuesday evening.
Mrs. Corbett. Ruth and Jimmy,
are salting Friday to make their
home in Otter Creek. Maine. Mr.
Corbett is retiring from service
with the Panama Canal after
twenty-three years of service. He
will join his family in the early
fall.
Rebekah Club Invited
to Atend Exhibit
The Schol for the Blind, In Pa-
nama City, is having an exhibit
of its work in the Masonic Tem-
ple, No. 1. on 13th St. W. In Pan-
ama City on Tuesday, September
11.
The members of the Rebekah
Club have been extended an In-
vitation to visit the exhibit. The
club has been assisting the
school financially for some time.
Any other Atlantic Side resi-
dents will also be welcome and a
cordial invitation is extended
the general public to attend.
IN HOLLYWOOD
Mrs. Foster Complimented
with Dessert Bridge Parly-
Mrs. W. E. Shands. of the Coco
Solo Naval Station, was hostess
for a dessert bridge party given
Tuesday at the Hotel Washington
to honor Mrs. Earl Foster of Nor-
folk..Va., who is visiting her
daughter and son-in-law. Lt.
and Mis. Roy Nielson of Co-
co Solo.
The fciiesls included the mem-
bers of Mrs. Sands bridge club.
They were: Mrs. Henrv Thorn-
ton, Mrs. Jack Schwartz, Mrs.
George Ellis. Mrs. Vance Schwe-
itzer and -Mrs. MA. Loy.Jr., and
Mrs. Nielsen.
A guest prize was presented
the honoree and the prizes for
trie game went to Mrs. Henry
Thornton and Mrs. Jack
Schwartz.
Announcement
Mr. and Mrs. Lowell Richard-
ion announce the birth of a
daughter on August 20 In Mexico
City. The baby has been named
Mary Patricia.
Mr. Richardson was stationed
in Colon as vice-consul, prior to
going to Mexico.
Visiting the Richardsons at the
me was Miss Edith Colson. of
Madison. Wisconsin, who Is also
%eIl-known on the Atlantic Side
as she was a guest pi the family
when they lived at the consulate.
Mrs. Baas Returns to Isthmus
Mrs. M. J. J. Baas with Ann
Marie Doreen. Christina and Pe-
ter arrived on the "Wilhems-
tadt," Sunday, from a visit with
Mr. Baas' relatives in Holland.
Thev visited Mrs. Baas' family
on Staten Island before going to
Europe.
Mr. Baas with Mat, Jr.. will ar-
rive from New York by the United
Fruit Line on the 11th.
were in charge of the refresh-
ments.
Mrs. H. G. Ferri was also pre-
sent.
Dance at
Cristobal High Schol
A "Get-Together" dance will be
held In the gymnasium of the
Cristobal High School Friday
evening from 7:30 to 10:00 p.m.
Alumni, friends and parents are
invited to attend.
LI. and Mrs. Lindgren
Leaving for Virginia
Lt. and Mrs. F. M. Lindgren
and children, Dorothy. Yvonne
and Louis, are sailing Saturday
for the States after residing, for
the past five years on the Isth-
mus. Lt. Lindgren Is now at Fort
Gullck. but has been stationed at
Fort Davis. Fort Sherman and
Balboa Heights. He Is being as-
signed for duty at Fort Belvolr,
Va.
Membership Committee Meeting
The Membership Committee or
the Inter-American Woman's
Club will meet Friday at 9:30 a.m.
at the club building, to make
plans for the annual tea to be
NCO Wives Club Has Meeting
The regular monthly meeting
of the NCO Wives Club was held
Tuesday evening in the club
room.
Mrs. Eugene Smith, a buyer of
ladles clothing, from New York
Rave a talk and questionnaire on
what the residents of the Canal
Zone desired in the way of wom-
en's wear. She was representing
the Post Exchange.
Four new members were Intro-
duced. Thev were: Mrs. Virgil
Lucky, Mrs. David Walfort. Mrs.
P. A. Voigt and Mrs. William
Hutchins.
Mrs. George Carlson won the
white elephant.
Each member brought a box
of rice as their donation to the
St. Vincent de Paul orphanage.
Refreshments were served by
the hostesses. Mrs. Harry Col-
bert. Mrs. Jese Friee, and Mrs.
David Fogle.
The other members presept
were: Mrs. Ruth Mossman. Mrs.
Sybil Hawkins, Mrs. Robert
Moore. Mrs. Lowell Parker, Mrs.
Margaret Bell, Mrs. Russel Mann,
Mrs. Ernest Beck, Mrs. Jose Me-
lendez. Mrs. Duane Mundkow-
sky, Mrs. John Cousins. Mrs.
Myrtle Godwin, Mrs. Beatrice
Whyte. Mrs. J, L. Lastlnger,
Mrs. Arthur Crandal and Mrs.
C. S. Harvey.
NO JINX TO HER
NASHVILLE. 111. (UP.)
Black Friday is a lucky day .(or
Mrs. Iada Anderson. Mrs. Ander-
son was born on Friday. July 13,
1851. and celebrated her 100th
birthday this July, when the 13th
also fell On a Friday.
HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Ex-
clusively Yours: Inside on Ga-
briel Pascal's plan to. film the
life story of Mahatma Gandhi is
that all financing will come from
the Ford Foundation, with Hen-
ry Ford III making the announ-
cement. Charles Boyer has al-
ready been contacted to play
Nehru.
oOo
The word for all the hullabaloo
about the Joan Craw ford-Russell
Nype romance rhymes with the
lad's name: tripe.
oOo
Jack Buetel's kildares have In-
formed him that his right ear
drum was destroyed by the gun
blast accident that occurred dur-
ing filming of "Rose of Ominar-
on." His hearing is definitely
Impaired.
OOOr-
John Barrymore, Jr.. who would
rather not talk about his recent
walk-out during rehearsals of a
summer stock production of "The
Hasty Heart." Is no longer living
with Aunt Ethel. He's with his
mother, Dolores Costello, at a
ranch south of San Diego.
oOo
There's hope that a second
operation to reconstruct her hip
socket will enable Marjorie Ram-
beau to walk again and .resume
her place as one of the screen's
Rreat character actresses. Mar-
jorie has had to limit herself to
roles in which she could emote
from chairs since the auto ac-
cident that crippled her several
years ago.
oOo
After Mrs. Gary Cooper tele-
phoned from England a dozen
times. Lady Lawford, Peter's
mother, finally sent her a cable
giving her the exact date of his
arrival In London. Evena movie
king's mother has to get her
sleep.
Movietown citizens who are
betting that the Barbara Pay-
ton-Tom Neal marriage never
takes place will lose their shirts.
The wedding date has been fixed
for September and the ceremony
will be a quiet one.
oOo
Reason for the recent presence
in Rome of Ingrld Bergman's O.
S. lawyer was to draw up papers
insuring that all percentages due
Ingrld from her forthcoming
"Europe, in 1951" will go into her
bank account and not Roberto
Rossellinl's.
oOo
Overheard at the Villa. Nova:
"Now that she has wot her.final
divorce decree, all she asks Is
that people give her a chance to
get back to sub-normal."
oOo
Artie Shaw's first novel. "The
Trouble With Cinderella"could
he mean Ava or Lana?is due on
the bookstalls in October.
oOo
Margaret Whiting's big click
at the Last Frontier Hotel in Las
Vegas brought her a Cocoanut
Grove offer, and a whole series
of supper club dates. She'll make
the grand tour before signing a
big TV deal.
oOo
Neither the Ladds nor the
Crosbys are happy about the
printed reports that Gary Cros-
by is pitching romantic woo at
Carol Ladd.
oOo
Warners has already shelled
Junior Auxiliary Honors
Departing President
The Junior Auxiliary of Elbert
8. Wald. Unit 2. American Le-
gion, arranged a farewell party
to honor Ruth Corbett. who sails
tomorrow with her mother to re-
side in Maine.
Miss Corbett tendered her re-
signation as president of the or-
ganization and preshided at the
election of her successor. Miss j
Lucv Alexaitls was elected to the
position and Judv Griffon was
appointed chaplain.
-Mrs. William Crump, Past Ju-
nior Chairman, presented the
honoree a Guatemalan purse as
a;alft from the croup.
.The Junior Chairman. Mrs. Is-
abel Aguirre. with Mrs. Celia
Bush and Mrs. Hollis Griffon
TROPICAL
TODAY!------TODAY!
Shows:
1:3*. 3:*t. 5:15, 7:0a, l:5
POII THE MMT TIM! IN
ITS IOO YIAR HISTORY
THI CAMERA GO IS
THEWAUS0F
LSOM
_STEVE"* DAVIC
COCHRAN BRIANS
wup rey to CORSM ooagnffihot
M.MMM* CRANE WILBUR BRYAN For

IT 1KB RADIO PICTURES l*C.
out $100,000 on story treatments
for a modern version of "The
Jazz Singer" and the property
Is still miles away from the
shooting mark.
oOo
Now that she's the mother of
seven children, humorist Robert
Q. Lewis suggests calling her
"MA'reen O'Sullivan."
oOo
It's not generally known, but
Frank Fay, who didn't get to
play "Harvey" on the screen, has
a small percentage of the movie
version that starred Jimmy Stew-
art.
oOo
It may be true that Mario Lan-
za and MGM are lovey-dovey a-
gam, but wait until some of the
studio high brass pick up a fan
magazine a few months from
now. The story will quote Lanza
as saying that some of the un-
favorable press comments, about
him were inspired by MGM to
chasten him.
oOo
Note from Alan Wilson: "Just
saw Alfred Hltchock's tennis
background thriller, 'Strangers
on a Train.' It should have been
called. 'Murder, Anyone?'"
oOo
It will be Keenan Wynn ln-the
role of the loud-mouth salesman
and show-off In "Phone C
From a Stranger."... Warner
Bros, have reactivated "The
Story of Will Rogers" after a lull
in preparation. New te/tative
starting date is Sept. 15, with
Will Rogers. Jr. leading the pack
for the title role.

BALBOA


STARTS SATURDAY!
,BOOK THAT BLEW THE LID OFF SORORITY
LIFE IS NOW ON THE SCREEN! /
DIABLO NTS,
SPOOK SHOW!
FRIDAY 10:30 P. fA.
Boris Karloff in
TRE-MUM'MY"
n
[Panama K^anal (clubhouses
Showing Tonight
WANT TO HAV FUN... GO TO THE MOVIES!
BALBOA Be,, DAVIS Barry SUUJVAN
*&lLr "PAYMENT ON DEMAND"
0:15 ajSJ Friday "SHORT GRASS"_________
DIABLO HTS.
6:i;. 7:58
Ooiuld WOODS Trudy MARSHALL
"BARBARY PIRATE"
___________Friday 'SIERRA"
COCOLI
:1 a .
PEDRO MIGUEL
1:00
Audit MURPHY Wanda HENDR1X
"SIERRA"
Friday "SOWS OF NEW MEXICO
(MUri
'BORN YESTERDAY"
GAMBOA
' r- m
David BRIAN John AGAR
"BREAKTHROUGH"
Saturday "SIERRA"
GATUN
Afjf
(Friday)
GOODBYE, MY FANCY'
MARGARITA ^"^ hayward o u bowman
.:- "HOUSE BY THE RIVER"
Friday ROGUES OF SHERWOOD fOBF-ST"
CRISTOBAL
Alr-Condltloned
i:IS A 8:10
Erro) FLYNN a Dean STOCKWELL
"KIM"
Friday "KATIE DID IT"
BELLA VISTA Th8 Wonder Plctur O
Dct*-M *** All Tlmel In Technlcolorl
'SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARWS"
LUX and CECILIA THEATRES
JOURDAN PAGET CHANDLERS
CENTRAL-
Shawa: 1;M, 2M, 4:53,0 a.m.
GREGORY PECK
BARBARA PAYTON. In
"ONLY the VALIANT'
The atorv of ilx who fouiht
_____like six hundred:______
ENCANTO THEATRE
___ Air-Conditioned
AT~9:00 P.M. WAHOOl
S113.W in Prises!
Alio May Zetterling. In
"GIRL IN THE PAINTING"
MacDonald Caray Marta
Toren. In
"MYSTERY SUBMARINE"
TIVOLI THEATRE
SPANISH DOUBLE I
Cantlnflai. In
"EL MAGO"
Emilia Gulii, In
"PERVERTIDA"
TROPICAL
Action and Suapensel
STEVE COCHRANE
DAVID BRIAN, in
"INSIDE THE WALLS
OF FOLSOM PRISON"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
bank indirr'i
$20 Cash for the Public
AT 6:00 AND 0:00 P.M.
- Alao:
Robert Rockwell. In
"TRIAL WITHOUT JURY"
B1U Elliott. In
"SAVAGE HORDE"
VICTORIA THEATRE
MacDonald Caray, In
"STREETS OF LAREDO"
Betty Mutton Fred Altai
- In .
"LET'S DANCE"
TODAY!
ERUPTING With PRIMITIVE
EMOTIONS & HIGH
ADVENTURE!
LUX THEATRE
Air-conditioned
AND
CECILIA Theatre
SIMULTANEOUS RELEASE I j
Jt is all I trill ever'
know of love, and beauty...
and rare adventure".
\\\
i ***;
Ol
--JORDAN- PAGET -CHANDLER
muir siiut mm samo un m maw un
i.nensnP-etiMrt Until PtlSsCat 0/~\
DELMER DAVES HARMON JONES &
rh**,
CENTRAL
WEEK END RELEASE!
TAIMU Wittt. LNU HULEASE! *AI\IU
I0DAY Shows TODAY
iwa*Mi j.j- 2.4g> 453i 6;5g> 9.03 i warn
GREGORY PECK
as Captain lance, who gave fort Invincible
I
only
BARBAJA PAYTON WARE
GORDON DOUGLAS
.WILLIAM CAGNEt^.
Scroon Play by Edmund H. North |
and Harry Brow*


'
.



THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER *. mi
THE MANAMA AMEKICAN AN INDEPENDENT UAUT NEWSPAPER
Pacific J^>C
PAGE PIV1
ociet
f

fr/iU Jjllti'a Caflioiin
80, 194 &- JJmfku ^f. Panama 3-0943
UNITED STATES AMBASSADOR AND MRS. WILEY HONORED
WITH DINNER BY ADMIRAL AND MRS. ALBERT BLEDSOE
Commandant of the 15th Naval District. Rear Admiral
Albert M, Bledsoe and Mr*. Bledsoe were host to a small
group of (rienda at a dinner, honoring United State* Ambas-
sador to Panama and Mrs. John Cooper Wiley.
The dinner was held on Tuesday evening at the Admiral's
quarters on the Naval District Reservation.
The Julio Hrurtemattes
Honored at Two Dinners
Mr. and Mrs Julia Heurte-
matte who are visiting here, wer
guests' of honor at two dinner
parties. Mr. Heurtematte, who
is connected with the World
Bank, was one o the principal
Panamanian delegates to Inter-
American Economic and Social
Conference.
On Teicay evening a dhmer
was given in their honor by the
Panama's Minister of Social Se-
curity, the Honorable Juan de A.
O alindo and Mrs. .Galindo at
their residence tn Golf Heights.
They were honored at dinner,
given by Mr. and Mrs. Max
Heurtematte on Monday night at
the Heurtematte residence In
Golf Heights.
New York, was presented with a
linen table cloth given as a go-
ing-away-present by her friends.
Present,at the luncheon were
Mrs. Emma Barlow. Mrs. Helen
Barrett, Mrs. Rea Belcourt, Mrs.
Marge Brown, Mrs. Hannah Ca-
rey, Mrs. Maybelle Clemmons,
Mrs. Mary Connard. Mrs. Gra-
ham, Mrs. Nae Kellsher, Mrs.
Nell King. Mrs. Pat Night. Mrs.
Dora Krldle, Mrs. Guy Lord,
Mrs. Dora McKenna. Mrs. Vera
McKenna. Mrs: Rosetta Mlllett,
Mrs. Moomaw, Mrs. Agnes O'-
Donnell, Mrs. Dorothy Payne,
Mrs. Royalls. Mrs. Julia Rivet,
Mrs. Emllie Shedeker, Mrs. Lois
Steffgenand.Mrs. Kay Trimble.
Miss Joanne Flynn is
Feted at Cocktail Party
Mr. and Mrs. Peter G. Plynn
of Balboa entertained at a cock-
tail party Monday evening in
honor of their daughter, Miss
Joanne Flynn. who arrived by
plane Sunday evening from St.
Louis, Missouri, where she has
been attending college.
Miss Flynn. who received the
Canal Eone College Club Schol-
arship two years ago. received
her Bachelor of Science Degres
from St. Louis University this
year.
Bon Voyage Luncheon
for Mrs. Fredette
Friends of Mrs. Catherine Fre-
delte gathered for a bon voyage
luncheon In her honor at the
Hotel Tlvoli yesterday at noon.
Mrs. Fredette. who is leaving
with her husband. Mr. Joseph
Fredette. on September the 14th
to make their home in Brooklyn,
Shower and Tea
for Mrs. Stroop
A baby shower and tea was
given on Sunday In the after-
noon by Mrs. Aloerl Edward Ro-
binson and her daughter. Miss
Coobl Ann Robinson at their re-
sidence in Gamboa, honoring
Mrs. j.me Stroop and her Infant
daughter. Melody.
Included were Mrs. Pat Morri-
son. Mrs. John Snodgrass, Mrs.
Harry Stlnney, Mrs. Eric Lind-
berg, Mrs. Walter Brossard, Mrs.
Jesse Crawford. Mrs. Ethel Pit-
man, Mrs. Richard Duncan. Mrs.
Helen Rau. Miss Karen Stroop
and Sh&yne and Candace Stroop.
Esperanza de Perez. Mrs. Ursula
de Ventura, Mrs. Isabel de Ko-
dat. Mrs. Carmen de Espinosa,
Mrs. Hortensia B. de Barrera.
Mrs. Sofia Sotomayor, Mrs. Ruth
R. Townsend. Mrs. Clara Wal-
ters, Mrs. Rita de Duran. Mrs.
Rosarlo de She!Ion, Mrs. Fanny
A. Haton and Mrs. Jeannette
McKibbon.
Raymond Bourne Trio
to Keynote Elks Dance
The Raymond Bourne Trio of
the American Club, formerly of
Miami, will give a performance
that will be the highlight of the
evening at the anniversary dance
given by the Benevolent and Pro-
tective Order of the Elks of Pa-
nama Canal Zone Lodge No. 1414.
. The dance will take place Sat-
urday evening at the Lodge Club
In Balboa. Dinner will be served
from 6:00 n.m. onwards and cock-
tall start 7:30 p.m.
, This dance Is open to Elks and
their guests. Reservations for
dinner mus! be telephoned to the
club before Friday,
V.F.W. Auxlli-ryto '
Give Bingo Party
The Ladles Auxiliary to Veter-
ans of Foreign Wars Post 3822 Is
sponsorlne a blno party this
evening, at the Post Home on Cu-
rundu Ro'd. Ca.*h urizes will be
given and play will begin at 7:30
p.m.
This party Is open to the pub-
lic.
Mississippi Democrats Admit Selling
Post Office Jobs; Couple Sentenced
JACKSON, Miss., Sept. 6. wife, two of 12 persons charged with conspiracy
to sell Federal jobs while members of a pro-Truman
State Democratic Committee, pleaded guilty yes-
terday and were sentenced t prison.
The two-year sentence imposed upon Mrs. C.
V. Murphy of Winona was suspended But her
husband was ordered to serve eight months by
U. S. District Judge Allen Cox. Additionally, Mrs.
Murphy was fined $250.
ISTHMIAN DATA
Births
PHILLIPS, Mr. and Mrs. R. A.
of Paraso, a daughter, Aug. 30
at Gorgas Hospital.
ROBERTS, Mr. and Mrs. Earl
of Silver City, a daughter. Aug.
30 at Colon Hospital.
' ATKINSON, Mr. and Mrs. Al-
vin of Camp Coiner, a son, Aug.
30 at Colon Hospital.
CARMICHAEL, Mr. add Mrs.
Edgar of Colon, a son. Aug. 30 at
Colon Hospital.
WHITE, Mr. and Mrs. M.
Balboa, a daughter. Aug. 31
Gorgas Hospital.
Miss Dorothy Hicks
Returns to .College
' Miss Dorothy Anne Hicks, who
has been spending the summer
vacation with her parent's. Mr.
and Mrs. Robert H. Hicks, left
the Isthmus by p.A.A. plane on
Monday. Miss Hicks will resume
her studies as a sophomore at Bo j
Jones University In Greenville,
South Carolina.
Leaving on Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Aber-
nathy and their son, Charles C,
plan to leave on Saturday morn-
ing; by plane for a thirty day va-
cation to be spent visiting rela-
tives in Henderson. Texas, and
attending a hardware show in
New York. Mr. Abernathy. who
Is connected with A.A.I.O. on
Albrook Air Force Base, lives with
his family in Curundu.
RUTH MILLETT Says
Return from Costa Rica
Mrs. Joseph W. Cfcey of Bal-
boa with her mother. Mrs. P.
Ansell and her children. Jean
ahd Richard, returned Monday
of I after six week's vacation In San
at i Jose, Costa Rica.
BOWERS. Jr. Mr. and Mrs. J. Fella Maduro Saib
Friday for New Yf
E. of Balboa, a daughter, Aug.
3,1 at Gorgas Hospital.
DOMNGUEZ, Mr. and Mrs.
Alcldes of Paltllla. a son. Aug. 31
at Gorgas Hospital.
s JOHNSON, Mr and Mrs. O. L.
of Panama, a son, Sept; 1 at Gor-
gas Hospital.
JOHNS014, Mr. and Mrs. of
8an Francisco, a daughter, Sept.
1 at Gorgas Hospital.
GALLARDO. Mr. and Mrs. To-
mf s of Panama, a daughter. Sept.
1 at Gorgas Hospital.
DETAMORE. Mr. and Mrs.
Jerry, of Balboa, a daughter,
Sent. 1 at Gorgas Hospital.
EVANS. Mr...and Mrs. Janies J.
of New Cristobal, a daughter,
6-t. 1 at Colon Hospital.
DUNCAN. Mr. and Mrs. Amos
of Gamboa, a daughter, Sept. 2
at Gorgas Hospital. .
ALLEN, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
of Curundu. a daughter. Sept. 2
at Gorgas Hospital.
BEMBENEK, Mr. and Mrs. T.
J. of Curundu, a daughter, Sept.
2 at Gorgas Hospital. '
HORTER. Mr. and Mrs. Milton
or Diablo, a son, Sept. 2 at Gor-
gas Hospital.
ASYN. Mr. and Mrs Robert of
New Cristobal, a son, Sept. I at
Colon Hospital.
REID. Mr. and Mrs. Alfonso,
of Paraso, a son, Sept. 3 at Gor-
gas Hospital.
Mr. Felix B. Maduro, promin-
ent Panama businessman, is
sailing on the S.S. Anco-.i Friday
for an extended business and
pleasure trip in New York.
Cooking Class Luncheon
Hel dat Mrs. Smith's Home
Members of the cooking class
of the Inter-American Women's
Club gathered for a luncheon at
the home of Mrs. Angle Smith on
Albrook Air Force ase at noon
yesterday, with Mrs. Smith and
Mrs. Marguerite Brown acting
as hostesses.
Attending the luncheon were
Mrs. H. C. Fish. Mrs. W. H.
Bach. Mrs. Rosa de Hernandez.
Mrs. William J. Bright, Jr.. Mrs.
Ruth E. Doan. Mrs. Caroline
Haman, Mrs. Peggy Falk, Mrs.
Panchla de Ponce Roas, Mrs.
Motorists Warned
Of Fee Crabbing
ROCKFORD.
"Warning, fee
town. '
Tenn. (UP>
grabbing next
' Deaths
BRAMMER, Cleveland, 69, of
Panama. Aug. 30 in Gorgas Hos-
pital.
ARROYO, Manuel, 35. of Colon,
Aug. 30 at Colon Hospital.
ELLIS. Joseph N.. 74, of Gatun,
Sept. 3 at Colon Hospital.
McEWEN, Rose. 71, of Curun-
du, Sept. 3 at Gorgas Hospital.
Signs like that were posted to
the north and south of Rockwood
by some prankster. They remain
now ax warnings to motorists.
City police left the signs, hop-
ing they would scare some speed-
ers Into slowing down.
Mayor Lloyd G. McCluen said
he wished "the signs were Jive
times as big if they would slow
down traffic." The signs are 12
inches- by 10 Inches.
"No man ever leaves a wife he
enjoys being with. But many
have divorced superb cooks,
fashion plates, wise managers,
and devoted mothers," Louise
Bruner points out in a recent I
magazine article.
That first sentence Is one wives |
should memorize and take to
heart.
But how can you be sure your
husband enjoys being with you?
He does if you can answer "Yes"
.o the following:
Do you find something to
laugh about together every day?
You can. you know. If you look
for the amusln? side of little ev-
ery day Incidents and share your
laughter with your hasband.
Do you make your husband feel
adequate to all of his responsi-
bilities? You can do that by ap-
preciating what he does for you,
instead of being unhappy because
some other woman .has more
than you do, and letting him
know that you believe In his a-
bility and his own special talents.
DO YOU TAKE IT EASY*
Do you have a relaxed, easy
attitude, so that small annoyan-
ces, sudden changes of plans,
and emergencies, don't upset you?
Do you honestly'try'toisee1*
things from your husband's point
of view? Men and women have
very different Ideas on many
things, and even though a wom-
an may not think as her hus-
band does it Is Important that she
realize that he has as much right
to his ideas as she has to hers.
And she must remember that
hers aren't necessarily always
right.
. Do you know how to play? A
hardworking man needs to relax
completely now and then and for
a little whl!.? forget his responsi-
bilities. But many wives never
really share such carefree Inter-
ludes, because they are always
serious, always practical, always
worrying about details.
Are you happy? if you are, your
husband will enjoy being with
you. If you aren't, you cant ex-
pect anyone to find you good
company.
$0tm&
Ten other defendants in the
iob-selling scandal, which be-
came an issue in the recent pri-
mary to elect a Governor, peti-
tioned the court for dismissal of
the charges. They contended
that the Fedefal law making It
an offense to receive contribu-
tions for Influence or recommen-
dations in securing Federal jobs
is Illegal.
Judge Cox said he would not
fule on the motions u.itU next
Jan. 1, at which time the ar-
raignment proceedings would
continue- Trials would follow in
event the motions were denied.
The Murphys and the other
defendants, including top leadrs
of the pro-Truman faction In this
State which has Just elected a
States' Rights Governor, were all
members of the State Democratic
Committee.
Thiscommlttee was recognised
by the National Democratic Par-
ty as the dispenser of patronage
after the "regular" committee
Joined the States' Rights holt of
1948..
Charges that the pro-Truman
group had resorted to outright
sale, of jobs were first made In
Congress by members of the pro-
States' Rights delegation a Sen-
ate Committee investigation fol-
lowed.
The evidence was strong
enough for a Grand Jury, to re-
turn indictments against the 12.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
wh loo.ooo r-Moi* mm
Presents
After Its investigations here,
lacy; April, the Senate Commit-
tee reported evidence that the
Murphys "between Nov. 15, 1850.
and Feb. 2, 1961, received from
six individuals and deposited in
their bank account a total of at
least, $2,500.M
Witnesses told the committee
that they paid'the money to get
post office Jobs.
The other defendants were:
Clarence Hood. Meridian, for-
mer National Democratic Com-
mltteeman for Mississippi, Indict-
ed for conspiracy; Frank Mize.
Forest, chairman of the State
(pro-Truman) Democratic Com-
mittee, conspiracy; Curtis Rog-
ers, Sylvarena. committee secre-
tary-treasurer, conspiracy, sell-
ing of Jobs and perjury; B. C.
Beasley, Pelahatchle. former
committee secretary, conspiracy
and selling of Jobs; Forrest
Jackson, attorney for the com-
mittee, conspiracy, selling of Jobs
and perjury; Miss Lveme Yel-
verton, Jackson, conspiracy; J.
H. Wilkinson. Jackson, conspira-
cy, selling of jobs and perjury;
Roy Brashler, Brookhaven, cons-
piracy, selling of Jobs and perju-
ry; Henry Debrow. Jackson, cons-
piracy and perjury; and Dewey
McLeod of Mt. Olive, selling of
Jobs.
After the scandal broke, the
Democratic Party relieved Hood
as Mississippi chairman but It
Todav. Thursday, Sept. S i
M.
30Let's Dance
OO^Music Without Words
15 Negro Spirituals
30What's Your Favorite
00Panamusica Story Time
15Evening Salon
00Make Believe Ballroom
(VOA)
30Sports Review
45Jam Session
00world News (VOA)
15Cross Country, U. S. A.
(VOA)
45Jam Session (VOA)
00Meet Eleanor Roosevelt
(VOA)
:30Commentator's Dig e st
(VOA)
;45Sports Tune of Dav and
News(VOA)
00HOTEL EL PANAMA
15Musical Interlude
30Take It From Here (BBC)
00The Owl's Nest
00Sign Of,f
9:15Stand By For Adventure
9:30As I See It
10:00News and Off the Record
11:00News and Off the Record
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00^-News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45American Favorites
2:00Songs of France (RDF
2:15It's Time to Dance
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3:00All Star Concert Hall -
3:15The Little Show
3: Si)Collector's Corner
4:00Music Without Words
4:15David Rose 8how
4:30What's Your Favorite
6:00Lean Back and Listen'
6:15Request Salon
7:00Mayor of Casterbridge
(BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Musical Notebook (VOA)
8:45Salute to Brasil
9:00The Jazz Club (VOA)
9:30Commentator's Digest
(VOA)
9:45Sports and News (VOA)
10:00Cavalcade of America
(VOA)
10:30Time for Music (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
1:00 a.m. -Sign Off
Explanation of Symbols
VOA-Voice of America
BBCBritish Brotdciitlni
Corp.
RDFRadiodifusin Francalsi
RUGGED INDIVIDUAL
RICHMOND, Va. (UP)' When
the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
conducted a poll to determine the
best of its latest additions to the
Art gallery, one patron appar-
ently was not impressed by th
paintings. He cast his ballot for a
newly-Installed water fountain.
PANAMA'S NlWESTaMFWSTkEzim
ffltolinioui Club
Platter Fans. Are You "Hep" To Our

RECORD CLUB
..-.* .., ... j ..
%T 1 ^
Fot as little a$ J |00 or 00 Weekly
Vou can be the proud owner of the latest "hits'.. or what-
ever type of music you enjoy most'.
Ca. Cyrnos Cyrnos Gift Shop
No. 1 J. F. de la Ossa
(Tlvoli Crossing)
No. 16 Tlvoli Ave.
(Across from Aneon Piayshed)
Tomorrow, Friday, Sept. 7
A.M.
6:00Sign On and Alarm Clock
7:30Request Salon
8:15News (VOA)
8:30Morning Varieties
8:45Music Makers
9:00News
has not appointed a successor
Mrs. John Clark of Dekalb, na-
tional committeewoman of the
pro-Truman faction, still holds
the position. She has not been
brought into the scandal.
The elected States' Rights
committee has handled party
ouslness on a State level through-
out the Democratic split.
In the Aug. 7 primary and In
tfte runoff primary Aug. 28 op-
ponents of runner-up candidate
for Governor Paul B. Johnson,
Jr., called him a friend of mem-
bers of the pro-Truman group.
Ex-Gov. Hugh White beat
Johnson in the runoff.
ONLY FOUR DAYS MORE!!
TO HEAR
CHARLIE BOURNE
One of America's Great Pianists
Playing in both the BAMBOO ROOM and
THE ZEBRA LOUNGE
Together with those Singing Stars
DON AND LOYAL RAYMOND
SPECIAL WEEK-END PROGRAM
Two complete hows nightly at 10 p.m. and 1 a.m.
REMEMBER !!
YOU CAN PLAY THE
HORSES HERE
IN COMFORT
EVERY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
HLWDOWNE
trtnag
JLoveli
y
TRY BIRO EYE QUICK-FROZEN
CONCENTRATED ORANGE JUICE I
READY IN'45 SECONDS-JUST
ADD BACK COLD WATER AND
STIR OR SHAKE HARD I BEST
JUICE YOU EVER TASTED I
A VERY
PRECIOUS PERFUME
Uf\H Lerchandise
.
Xarge .assortment... for the home... collector's Items!

FOR IVIIT OCCASION
SHEAFFEfCS
""^ #
Givo Sheoffori writing qgipmtnt for
wofl-romaniborad gift. Unmiililml for
boouty, quality, long-looting Mts-
V faction. CSoOM now from cur
completo telactlon of try lot and
color in ovary price ranga.
G^IIT
oMlT
OK
COTY
Dtalribuu.i v..... l.RNOtt, S.A.
T.h.: 1-17! t-liS
Tryumnm
4 it's a dohciou bevarago
V it contains no stimulant
V it batos you enjoy reotful lMp
V K a preparad riant in K. ~,_
On Sale PANAMA:
Casa Zaldo Joyera Porras Librera Preciado
Novedades Morrison La Oficina Moderna '
Snchei y Herrera Servicio Lewis.
COLON:
John Sorany
Representativas: CA. ATLAS, S. A.
Novelties
Mantillas
Pure Silk Scarfs
Qtraw ^Articles
a Dolls
a Shopping Bags
o Hat Boxes
a Wastepaper Baskets
and many other haidom
articles you'll delight in owning!
(Hand 'Sags
Alligator o Antelope
m
m
ainttags
Oil a Water Color
orcetatn
a Ornaments for th Horn
o Dollsdressed in Polleras
JL cat her (oods
,ooas
Bags o Billfolds
Telephone Directory Covers

x
PANAMA
COLON
MOTTA'S
Thaakt to wonder working M 3. toaar't Mob mi
oly Mop* growth of aoor-cnauag kaetoria bat
keep down Jutmrr growth. Yaa actaaRy ob*W
protertioa with regular, rtclinire at* of now M.n!
Now at roar eoraiccic cannier.'



PAGE SIX

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAIIf NEWSPPEB

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER llil
Wvpfp
pa ***&% *5er J*f&lj*
Leave your od with one of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
H. 4 TWnH An
KiOSKO DE LESSEPS
ruin 4*
ruui
MORRISONS
tort*) *f JuU At
rh.lie 2-S441
BOTICA CARLT0N
lMH M*ln4* An.
rhoi>- VH Coln
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
No. H W*l I2lb SttMt
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
He. SI "K" IrMl-Paaam*
He. 12.1 Cralral Avc.-C*l*a.
39
r
Minimum for
12 words
3f each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE:25 cycle 1-4 H. P. mo-
tor for washing machine. Phone 3-
1512. house 30 New Cristobal.
FOR SALE:3 Pc. Rattan set. small
tables. 3-way lamp, other house-
hold goods. Coll after 5 o'clock.
0788-A. Williamson Place. Bil-
bo*.
.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED:Retired employe olone.
wishes to rent room in fomily
quarters. Btlboa, Anccn or Diablo.
Tel. 2-3746. Bilboa or 3-1505
Margante, ofter 4 p. m.
FOR SATE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:1949 Cadillac convert-
puncture proof tubes, ndio, heater,
defroster. Twin spotlights rear win-
dow. :oare set General W/W tires.
S2.995.00. Call Coco Solo 380 or
write Bo>. 282, Coco Solo.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
C H I V I 0 11 T
NEW YORK. ST, LOUIS,
OR NEW ORLEANS
Smoot-Paredes
Panama 2-0600
FOR SALE:Windsor Kue, 1950.
4-door. De Luxe Chevrolet, white-
wall tires, low mileage. 0766-D,
Williamson Place. Balboa, between
4 p. m. and 6 p. m. daily.
FOR SALE:1947 Buick Super Se-
donette. See Cdr. Carpenter at
Joint Weather Unit Albrook. Phone
office 2237. home 7108.

FOR SALE32 ft Philippine moho- ;
gany cabin cruiser, powered by M-7
Chrysler Marine motor. Sleeps 6. j
gos cooking, running water. Two
6 ft. mechanicol fish boxes, one
4 ft. in galley. Fully equipped, out-'
riggers, cooking and eating uten-
Wit. Soilfish and Marhn tackle. I
Plenty spore parts. Leaving Satur- ,
day on vacation. Price for every-
thing $2.400. Consider car in
trade. Telephone 83-6257.
FOR SALE: 1939 Oldsmobile 2-
door sedan, body and tires good
condition anj mechanically. Duty
paid. S200.00. Phone Cristobal 3-
1571.
FOR SALE: Hcovily built motor
sailer "Crusoe," 32' x 8 1-2' x
3 1-2', fir, pine, mahogany; 'four
bunks, large cockp.t, emergency
tiller, new sail:, refrigeration;
quipped fo. outriggers and fish-
ing chair; licenced for ten. Six
cylinder gray marine, 73 H. P.,
fresh wateri cooled. Inspection in-
vited. J. V. McGimsey. Panama
Conol Yacht Club. Phone 3-1983
i Cristobal'.
FOR SALE:1942 4-Door Ford Se-
dan. Good motor, good tires, good
transportation. Phone 83-22^0.
FOR SALE: 1942. Buick~SeoW
Balboa Bowling Center from 3 p.
m. to I 1 p. m. Ask for Diaz.
IMMECIATE DELIVERY
CHEVROLET
NEW YORK. ST. LOUIS.
OR NEW ORLEANS.
Smoot-Paredes
Panama 2-0600
"ONS
We have a few CHOICE BARGAINS
left in USED CARS. Come in ana-
tee them befar* you buy.
NASH AGENCY Tiyoll Craning
Panama.
~
Z
I
1
4.
u
0
=
n
I
n
c
II
-
5
=

903 more 903 more 903 more

n g u r e s
that speak
for themselves
-
* Last month THE PANAMA AMERICAN carried 3 24 8" classified ads as comparad to 2345 in all other daily papers in- Panam combined
903 more 903 more 903 more
|
3
o
1

I
w
S
o
3
MISCELLANEOUS
Oe yeu have a drinking problem?
Writ* Alcoholici Aaaaymaaa,
Sax 2031 Aaeaa. C. Z.
Lessons: Cooching in Arithmetic and;
plion'cs sympathetic instruction for,
I primary Kindergarten' ond pre- '
r-.si ages at Individual School on
....fiador Rd EVIboa, neor pipe
[construction. Coll Hoffman, Pedro
fUguel 553.
^Position Offered
4TED:Beauty e*>arater. >*-
.lnc*d, Washington Hotel I Calen I.
Phone Cristobal 3-2116.
FOR SALE:.1950 Chevrolet Sedan
excellent condition, seat covers,
radio, other accessories. 83-6254,
2042-A, Curundu.
FOR SALE: 1941 Plymouth con-
vertible with radio. Good condi-
tion, $250. Pedro Miguel Barber
Shop. House 181-D.
FOR SALE: 1938 Oldsmobile in
good conditio.i with good tires.
Reasonable with extra parts. Call
2-1334.
Any commission acceptable domes-
tic, overseas. inter planetary.
Write Gaylord Multy. Box 734 An-
cn, Conal Zone.
SUMMER SPECIAL Cold Wove. $7.50.
Why have a home permanent?
..with inadequate facilities, no
certain finished look, and no guar-
antee when you can have o
professional one complete for only
$7.50! It will last longer. ond
look better! These can be hod
Monday thru Thursday. Make your
appointment early! Tel. 2-2959.
Balboo Beauty Shop. Open 9:00
o. m. to 6:00 p. m. Balboa Club-
house, upstairs.
RESORTS
Phillip*. Oceonside cottages, Santa
Clara. Box 435. Balboo. Phone!
Panama 3-1877, Cristobol 3-1673.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
IT YOU THINK PRICE8
Are High In Panam
GET A LOAD OF THIS
advertisement we received la
foreign trade journal:
CHLORDANE
CONCENTRATE
NOW W ONI OUNClf BOTTLsS.
This remarkable Chlordan* Coneen-
ira mixed with a full quart of
K52 nuk very efiecbvT 1%
Insect ipray. Retailing at (lag th2
?" ou" bottles are now ataUabK
Vi*.1' on,v 00 PS DO
PAY/,LL SHIPPING CTAfOta
(Dame of Company deleted to^T"
OUR KFTAIL PRICE )
for a SU ounce bottle'
That Makes ONE GALLON
85c.
(sorry, we don't pay shipping
charges)
GEO. F. N0VEY, INC.
n Central Ave Tel. 1-gug
Williams Sonto Claro Beach Cottoges.
Two bedrooms, Frigidoir*s, Rock-
gas ranges. Bolbou 2-3050.
I ECOSOC Proposes
[ Funds For L.A.
Economic Group
GENEVA. Switzerland, Sept. 6
- (USISi The United Nations
Economic and Social Council re-
. commends to the U. N. General
? Assembly that funds be granted
to the economic commission for
Latin America to carry out "ful-
ly" the 1951-52 work program of
the ECLA
The Council acted Monday* in
adopting this resolution by a
vote of 10 to zero, with eight ab-
stentions:
"The Economic and Social
Council, considering that the
work of the commission estab-
lished at its fourth session is of
primary importance for the eco-
nomic development of Latin
America;
"Taking into account that the
conomic commission for Latin
America is the most recent re-
gional economic comm'/ Ion and I
ghotild be given the same oppor-
tunities for development of Us
work as other regional commis-
sions:
'Recommends that the neces-
sary funds should be made avail-
able to Implement fully the 1951-
2 work program of the commis-
sion included in its annual re-
pont."
In the course of discussion all
?Jclegates who spoke expressed
general approval of the work of
aba* Latin American commission.
The speakers represented Cana-
da.: Chile. Chioa, France. India.
Mexico, Pakistan, Per. The
Philippines. Sweden tris United
Kingdom, the United States and
Uruguay.
The Economic commission for
Latin America alone with simi-
lar commissions for Europe and
Asia and the Far East, are U.N.
a-roupg which operate under the
UN. Economic and8ocial Coun-
cil
FOR SALE:Oldsmobile 1942 Hy-
dromatic. Good body, engine, and
?res, $350.00. Tel. 2-1962.
House No. 613-D, Cocqli.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
CHIVROLIT
NEW YORK, ST. LOUIS
OR NEW ORLEANS.
Smoot-Paredes
Panama 2-0600
FOR SALE
Real KsI.up
FOR SALE OR RENT: Farm in
Costo Rico obout 5 hectares, lo-
cated 8 miles from the capital at
4,200 feet above sea level. Fine.
, healthy climate, regular road,
plenty of water. Excellent for grow-
ing high priced flowers for internal
trade or export, corn, vegetables,
potatoes, sugor cane and for
dairying For detailed information:
Arturo Schlager, apartado 1479.
Son Jose, Costa Rica.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
PHOTOGRAPHERS opportunity to
take photos of native hut under
construction beside EL HALCN
Photo Shop at entrance to Hotel El
Ponom.
Grotnlich'i Santa Claro beach-
cottages. Electric Ice boxes, gat
stoves, moderate rates. Phone 6-
541 or 4-567
HOTEL PAN-AMIRICANO in El Vo-
ile. Special room rates for Septem-
ber. $35 per month, $20 for 2
weeks. Meals a la carte. Telephone
Panama 2-1112 for reservation.
FOR RENT
Houses
Hlf synchronized
lightmeters arrived
INTERNATIONAL
JEWELRY INC.
,_ &****! Central IS*
'Joining latent. Hotel)
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Immediate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
. 22 E 29th St
FOR RENT:House, completely fur
nished. stove, refrigerator. 3 bed-1
rooms, gorage. Telephone 3-3143'
Panama.
FOR RENT
Apartments
FOR SALE: 19 species aquarium
fishes, plants, supplies, turtles, 11
Via Espaa opposite Juon Franco
Stobles. hours 4-8 p. m Phone
3-4132.
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
modern furnished-unfurnished aport
ment. Contact office No. 8061 10th
St. New Cristobol. Phone 1386. Co-
Ion.
Japs Purge Red Party;
Ban Political Activity
TOKYO, Sept. 6 (UP)The
Japaneae Oovernment todav
purged the Japanese Commun-
ist Party for the second time
In 15 months. It banned from
future political activltv 19
members of the provisional
Central Committee who took
over the party leadership af-
ter 41 Reds were similarly ban-
ned last year
Holy Ghost Orchid,
Photographs, Shown
Al Canal Library
The Panama Canal Library
is presenting an exhibit featur-
ing a Holy Ghost orchid plant
lent .to'the library for exhibi-
tion by Harold L. Gore, presi-
dent of the Canal Zone orchid
society.
The plant, which has two
blooms and six buds. Is shown
in a glass exhibit* case to the
right of the library's lighted
exhibit case, to the right as
one enters the Civil Affairs
building.
Also included in the exhibi-
tion are an enlarged photo-
graph of the orchid, made by
Harold Griffin, vice president
of the Orchid Society, the cer-
tificate issued the Canal Zone
Orchid Society by the Ameri-
can Orchid Society, and booke.
pamphlets and magazines on
orchids from the collection of
the Panama Canal library.
*a>
The Holy Ghost orchid, or
Espritu Santo. U the national
flower of Panama. All persons
who wish to see the orchid are
urged to visit the exhibition
as soon as possible since Mr.
Gore la eager for the orchid to
be seen at its best, and it Is
uncertain how long the blooms
will remain fresh In the case.
The library is planning to leave
the orohld books and photo-
graphs on display for about one
week
FOR SALE:6 cu. ft; Deep Freeze.
like new. $175.00. Child's Sliding
Board, $15.00. 86-2186.
FOR SALE: Cocker Spaniel Pups,
registered. May be seen ot Qtrs.
27-.. Quarry Heights. Telephone
_82-2216.
MOTHERS, protect bby's feet the
best safest woy you con JUMPING-
JACK Shoes are recommended by
specialists. Sold exclusively at
BABYLANDIA. No. 40. 44th St.,
Bella Visto. Tel: 3-1259.
FOR SALE: J- Slightly used fishing
tackle, less than one half price.'
Telephone 83-6257.
FOR RENT: Modem furnished
smoll family. Best residential site
aportmenf. ideal for couple or
in Panama, Paitilta Airport Road,
No. 121. Priced to suit your pock-
FOR RENT:Apartment 33 East 39
Street, 3 bedrooms with two 'baths,
diningroom. maid' quarters with
both, garage, etc. $125.00. Phone
Panama 3-3467
FOR RENTNicely furnished" apart-
ment, screened. Tiled. Porch,
Paajor-Diningroom, Kitchen, Bed-
room. $55.00. Apply 112 Vio Be-
lsono Porros. Neor Roosevelt
Theotre.
ALADDIN
KEROSENE Mantle lamp
60 Candle Power ot Modern White
Light. Burn* 80 Hour* On 1 gal. of
Kerosene. Uea* 4% AIB Only i%
KEROSENE. Absolutely Safe It
cannot Explode Require* no gener-
ator or pump No Smoke or Odor.
So Simp!* Child Can Operate It
$9.95 Lowest Price
ever Offered la Panama.
All Part* Ardanle.
On Sale la All HAROWARX and
rURNITURE Store*
Distributor:
WONG CHANO, S. A.
Colon Mh St. A Balboa 4v
Tel MS
Pauai SJ Central Ave.
Tel. 2-2*87
American Legion
Officials Visit
Military Chiefs
New officers of the Canal
Zone Department of the Amer-
ican Legion and American
Legion Auxiliary called on Brig.
Gen. Emll C. Kiel, Commanding
General, Caribbean Air Com-
mand, recently at 'Albrook Air
Force Base to "express their
desire to cooperate with the
Air Force In any mission In
which the American Legion can
render service." In the word
of Major Leon J. Carrlgton,
Commander of the Canal Zone
Department of the Legion.
General Kiel reciprocated
with a promise to cooperate to
the fultest extent with the
American Legion.
Also visiting the general were
Mrs. Patsy Ryan, Department
President of the Legion Au-
xiliary, and John J. Kennedy,
Aide to the Legion Department
Commander.
Earlier In the morning, the
party visited Lt. Gen. William
H. H. Morris, Jr.. Commanding
General, Caribbean Command,
at Quarry Heights.
(U. S. Army Photo)
C0NVA1R GETS
AIR FORCE
(Continued from Page 1)
pile. This again is vastly more of
a headache for aircraft than for
ship designers.
The Air Force said that Con-
valr and QE will "work closely"
together on the project. This ap-
peared to confirm previous be-
liefs that the plane can be built
only by "working from both ends
at once."
In other words, Convalr will
concentrate on building a plane
big enough to hold the atomic
engine which GE is designing.
Oaf. in turn, must' build an en-
gine powerful enough to get Con-
vair's enormous airplane off the
ground.
There seems no room for doubt
that the plane will have to be
considerably larger than the
B-30. which has an englne-and-
fuel weight limit of about 150,000
pounds. It probably will even ex-
ceed the size of Howard Hughes'
"Hercules," the 218 foot long
wooden flying boat which has
flown Just one mile since it was
built during the war.
The engine-und-fuel weight-
limit of a plane the size of the
Hercules would be about 300,000
pounds, or 100 tons.
Despite these intricate prob-
lems, the Atomic Energy Com-
mission said only last month that
"progess" is being made In solv-
ing them, and that the "feasibil-
ity" of the plane has been defin-
itely established.
Air Force Secretary Thomas.K.
Finletter also said recently that
there no longer Is any question
that the plane can be produced.
Partlv because they cannot
really know vet, and partly be-
cause lt would be top-secret If
they did. scientists close to the
project are extremely dose-
mouthed about the probable
speed and range of the plane.
They are confident, however,
that the speed will be well in the
supersonic range, and the range
will make present flight dis-
tances of five and 10 thousand
miles sound like short hops.
FOR SALE: Large Fox and Police'
FOR RENT Lovely furnished oport-
ment. Two bedroom, livingroom,
porches, garden, garage, servant'!
quortcrs. All comfort. Well situat-
ed. Telephonj 3-4655.
Bulldog. Bes. offer toke
House 915-K. Lo f\ca.
him,
FOR SALE: Assorted length used
flexible rubber hose. 1 1-2 2"
2 1-2". Best offer. The Texos Co.
Panamol Inc.
FOR SALE:_Records of.33 1/3 RPM
of 100 different brands. Classical
and popular. AGENCIAS DIAZ,
37th St. Phone 3-1029.
FOR RENT: Comfortable modern
apartment, 2 bed-rooms, maid's
room. 2 boths ond garage. 51 St.
No. 7, upstoirs, El Avilo. Tele-
phone 3-1581 or 3-0542.
FOR RENT
Mi -el la neon*
This New Amazing
Cou^h Mixture Comes
From Blizzardly
Cold Canada
Comrjounoeo from rore Conodiar
Pine Bolsem, Menthol. Glycerine, Irish
Most and other splendid ingredients
Buckley's Conodiol Mixture is differ-
ent more affective faster in
action Get o bottle todoy take
a teaspoontul. let it lie on your tongue
a moment then swallow slowly
feel its powerful effective action
ipreod through throot. heoo no
bronehioi. tubas. Coughing sposrr
:easet for right owov It storts tc
FOR RENT.Office or store spoce
19 x 20 feet, beside FOTO EL
HALCN ot entrance to Hotel El
Pbnami. Owner on premises. Tel.
3-1179.
CZ Teachers Union
Planning Welcome
For New Instructors
The American Federation
Teachers Union, Local 837, Is
sponsoring a "Welcome and Get
acquainted Party" for the new
teachers, to be held at the4
Hotel El Panama on Friday
night September 28 at 7 p. m.
A buffet supper and refresh-
ments will be served and In
addition there will be music
"Crossman"
RIFLES
22 Cal.
C02 and pumping action
PISTOLS
#06LfiG
m stn ot May Plaza
- '- ..jj... wwvy iToni re M.MUH Hide WliJ DC mU3JL
loosen up thick choking ohiegm one and dancing. Also, bridge tables
open up doggee bronchial tubes / w"l be available for those so
Now you'll know why over 30 mil I interested.
''on bottle ->< Bucl'ev's hove been'
oir in cola wintry Conodo ., Entertainment will be furn-
_ Your own druggist ho* this r*ot i lshed by a troop from Panama
"onoriir< discovery I who will perform native dances
^___ I in costume.
Bomb Blasts Hole
In Paris Bank;
Cops Seek Saboteurs
PARIS. Sept. 6 (UP)A new
bomb explosion In a mid town
bank here today rocked the
tree-lined Grand Boulevard
area of the city.
Police are hunting gangs of
bomb and sabotage terrorists
who are attacking tanks and
railroads.
Today's blast tore a huge
hole In the side of the bank,
which Is In the opera district.
Only a few hours earlier pol-
ice announced they had found
definite attempts at sabotage
on the Basle-Calais express"
route.
Mrs. Luisa Bruce Dies;
Burial Held This P. M.
Mrs. Luisa Bruce died yester-
day at her residence at La Ca-
rrasquilla following a long illness.
She was buried this afternoon
at the Pueblo Nuevo Cemetery.
Mrs. Bruce e survived by
eight children and 14 grandchil-
dren.
Pfc. Ruoff Goes
To Offurr AFB
Pfc Jaek M. Ruoff. U8AF, son
of Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Ruoff of
Cristobal, Canal Zone has been
transferred from Kessler Air
Force Base, Mtos.. to Offutt Air
Force Base. Nebraska, where he
la a control tower operator.
Ruoff previously attended the
University of Oklahoma where
he was majoring In business ad-
ministration. He enlisted in
January of 1951 and was sent
to Lackland Field. Texas, where
he received his basic training.
After completing Basic train-
ing, Ruoff attended control to-
wer school at Kessler AFB.
Miss., where he graduated and
was assigned to Offutt AFB,
Nebraska.
Bomb Goes Off In TV
Shop Near Havana U.
HAVANA. Sept. 6 (UP)A
powerful bomb exploded in the
doorway of a television shop
near Havana University today
durin*/ a student demonstra-
tion against planned increases
in cltv transport fares. Dam-
age was light. There were no
casualties.
Huk Supporters Call
For Election Boycott
MANILA. Sept. 6 (UP)Com-
munist leaflets being distribut-
ed secretly here call for a boy-
cott of the Philippine national
elections In November, and
support for the Huks in their
struggle to overthrow "the
United States Imperialists and
their puppets."
NATO Treaty Heads
To Meet In Ottawa
OTTAWA. Sept. S (UP)The
seventh full-scale meeting of
the North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization wUl get under way
here Sept. 14 in Canada's Par-
liament buildings.
BUT RUSSIA INVENTBD IT
BOSTON (U.P.) There are
more telephones In five New
England states that there are
In all of Russia, according Ho
the New England Telephone &
Telegraph Co. The five states,
exclusive of Connecticut, have
more than 2.500,000 telephones
while Russia has 2.000,000
MARVIN J. WARD, age 24. of Terre Haute. Indiana, today
was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the United States
nSir.f w" h* S ce,rem,ony & 'he otiices of Lieutenant
bean Command Morrls* Jr' Commander In Chief, Carlb-
a Te1!foU.,52ant's. Kar5, re engraved with Wards initials,
?ir*t mr ?rnnT1f?i1noby1va nl.rThn m?' GeorKe 8- Patton- fame" wartime
commander, who offtlmes presented engraved Insignia to of-
ficers of his organization upon receiving promotions.
nrSl nlSLi Swgeant 1st Class aslgned to the Head-
quarters Detachment at Quarry Heights, was awarded a dl-
2SinCmu,M,0m the enll8ted r*nk* due to outstanding
service. He will serve as mess officer at Quarry Heights
Ward originally came to the Canal Zone in May 1946 and
served at the Commander In Chiefs quarters under Lieute-
nant General Willis D.'Crittenberger, as non-commissioned
officer In charge.
In June 1948 he was detailed for dutv at the mat. nf
oESSUL&fSS?1 ??e 1 a SuDPlv Technician mthe
Quartermaster Corps. Later, he was assigned to the Adjut-
ant General's School at Fort Lee. Virginia!^
Following graduation, Ward returned to Quarry HelKhta
where he again assumed charge of the Commander In Chief's
quarters In this position he directed the house staff and
arranged offlolal functions which are often scheduled there.
(Official US Armed Forces Photo)
THE CANAL ZONE DELEGATION of the Veterans of Foreign
Wars presenting the Seoritas Priacilla and Clarita Navarro
?' Fla^% t0 Commander-in-chief Charles K. C. Rails of
uie y.r.w. at the 5ntd Annual Encampment held in New
York recently. Commander Rails expressed his appreciation
vL %u I' .P"rt.aken bT the p**n*an colony of New
JiJ. Cy durln *h* convention. From left to right are
Clarita Navarro, Priscllla Navarro, Commander-in-Chief Rails,
Dept. Chief of Staff SFC Walter E. Rahte, Headquarters UA ,
jriiinf "rVi*?* *nal DeP*rtment Commander E.
J. Egllnton and Staff Sgt. Raymond N. Barrett, 57M N tc S
SQN. Albrook AFB.
REGISTRATION DAT at the Canal Zone kindergartens, ele-
mentary, Junior and senior high schools Wednesday was no
occasion for Joy to young Patricia Lawrence, who Is going to
enter kindergarten at Balboa this year.
One of the many Canal Zone youngsters who started the
new school year Wednesday, this rather reluctant young
scholar Is shown with her mother. Mrs. Glair G, Lawrence,
filling out the necessary forms to launch the youngster eat
her school career.
At. the left Is Mrs. J. D. Lord of Balboa, also recisterlgg]
her son, George, for kindergarten at Balboa
Police Weigh Murder,
Suicide In Adamic Death
RIEGELSVILLE, N. J.,, Sept.
6 (UP)State Police today were
checking fingerprints on a rifle
and an axe handle and studying
repdrts of threats against writer
Louis Adaml: in an effort to de-
termine whether he died by his
own hand or was murdered.
The Hunterdon County pro-
secutor said' today the most
promising clue to the" Yugoslav-
born writer's death appeared to
be fingerprinU found on an axe
handle.,
Be said the axe had been used
to pry open containers of kero-
sene with which the Adamic
house and barn had been soak-
ed before the fire
Neo-Nazi Weekly
Makes Bow; Hits
At Western Allies
FRANKFURT. Sept. (UP)-
West German newstands today
displayed the first copies of a
fully-fledged weekly newspaper
"Deutsche Opposition." publish-
ed in Hamburg by the growing
neo-Nazi Socialist Reich Party.
It Is already busy blasting a>
way at the three Western allied
occupation powers, the present
Oerman coalition government at
Bonn, the Socialist opposition
party, the trade unions, and Just
about everyone else except thg
seven recently executed Nax
war criminals, who are referree
to as "comrades."


K.
R6DAY. SEPTEMBER I. 19S1
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QUESTIONS ON THE DEE CASE
Mail Bog Editor
Dear Sir:
I sincerely hope that someone will lye me the right answers
to inv questions.
What happened to the white slip of paper found in the Mina
Dee's case? concrete evidence of Mrs. Dee's honesty. A gov-
ernment witness picked it up and gave a receipt for it. Why
was it that the government could not produce It in court?
Why is it that the trial was held In the Canal Zone when
the court has not the power to subpoena witnesses from Pana-
ma?
How is it. that a Judge on the Canal Zone can forbid an
American citizen to go into the Republic of- Panama?
Curieus.
Young Farmers
Get Together
In Two Groups
BY PETER BOSON
REPLY TO QUESTIONS ON THE DEE CASE
The questions asked In the second paragraph of your letter
relate to court evidence and its evaluation in a specific case
tried recently in the U. 8. District Court for the Canal Zone.
As such, we publish them without comment, since The Panama
American makes no general attempt to reply to every question
raised in Mall Box Letters.
Your second and third paragraphs, however, pose questions
ot a general nature relating to the authority and rights of the
Judieiary of the United States. We understand from conversa-
tions with you following receipt of your letter, that you are
seeking information on these points, not merely asking rhetoric-
al questions?
For this reason, and because others have asked similar ques-
tions verbally, we have sought to determine the answers through
through consultation with members of the Canal Zone bar. We
havo done so because we believe such action Is in the public In-
terest of citizens of both the Republic of Panama and the Unit-
ed States, and of residents of the dual Jurisdictions on the Isth-
mus. We believe it is to the disadvantage of both that misun-
derstandings on these points should exist.
As to the question "Why is it that the trial was held in the
Canal Zone... a representative of the US District Attorney's
office Informs us that'the charge was brought there because it
was the defendant's duty to account fully and promptly for US
government funds at the Finance Office of The Panama Rail-
road Company, at Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, a specific loca-
tion within US jurisdiction. When evidence indicating this had
not been done was presented to the District Attorney's Office,
prosecution was started in the Canal Zone, within the Jurisdic-
tion, in which the failure to account fully and promptly for US
government funds allegedly occurred. At least one other legal
tetjhnlcallty In the case, it Is understood, might also have brought
the case under US Jurisdiction. But the basis on which the
case was prosecuted was that the failure to account fullv and
promptly occurred at Balboa Heights.
It was pertinent that defense counsel did not challenge the
Jurisdiction of the US cqurt to act. nor has any member of the
Canal Zone bar with whom we have talked questioned its au-
thority in this case.
On the second half of your Inquiry "... when the court has
not the'power to subpoena witnesses from Panama?" we learn:
(1) The US has no such right, and (B) It did not subpoena
witnesses from Panama.
Witnesses from Panama were asked to appear, and did ap-
pear voluntarily. It Is a common practice throughout the world
for residents of one Jurisdiction to testify voluntarily in the
courts of another. The situation would have been exactly the
same had the witnesses come from, say, Costa Rica or Colom-
bia. Down the years It has not been uncommon for US citi-
zens or other residents of the Canal Zone to testify In Panama
courts voluntarily when asked to do so.
Your laif. question was "How is it that a Judge on the Canal
Zone can fflbld an American citizen to go into the Republic of
Panama?" The sentence meted out to Mrs. Dee, after the jury
brought in a verdict of guilty, was two years in the penitentiary
at hard labor-. However, the sentence was suspended on the
condition that she comply with certain provisions. One of these
wa she pay a fine and another was that she leave the Isthmus
US statutes provide in laymen's language that when a
Judge ameliorates a sentence (in this case a penitentiary term)
he Is given almost unlimited discretion as to the conditions he
imposes on the convicted person, within certain time limits spe-
cified by law. The person sentenced in this case was not for-
bidden to go into Panama but was given a choice of refraining
from doing so.-and complying with certain other"conditions, if
she preferred them to serving her sentence. The defendant
chose to accept, and 'agreed to comply with the conditions on
which her sentence was ameliorated from a penitentiary term
Managinc Editor. .
WHO'S FOOLING WHO?
' i,- Panama, R. p.
Editor, "Mall Box"
"The Panama American"
Present.
Dear Sir:
There appeared in he Mall Box column a letter signed by
one R. Nugent, in which he desperately tried to vindicate Mr
George Washington Westerman "meaningless things," he has
sponsored, allegedly, as a tribute to the West Indian Workers of
the Panama Canal.
As a proud Panamanian myself and having participated in
the struggle to obtain the benefits listed by Westerman as given
through Newcomer's sympathy is... untrue.
It's my solemn opinion, that it will be reasonably difficult
for Mr. R. Nugent, to prove to the contrary the facts as stated
by "Proud Panamanian."
You stated that "you have not agreed with George Washing-
ton Westerman on many things,"... for that you have complete
authority, even constitutional rigths, since his "meaningless
things." that also have you" so much upset, might affect you
directly, but to insinuate disagreement with the late FDR pol-
icies, using your very words, is "nonsensical and smacking of
personal frustration, since you have neither voice nor vote in
avoiding their promulgation.
**r. Editor, again your paper has proven that you can fool
all of the time, you can fool some of the people all'of the time
but you can not fool all of the people all of the time
.v. f Mr.}ncoln were here he would nave told Mr. Westerman
the same thing. ,
"El LMer."
^

S
Try the small but mighty want
ad
If the wonder selling aid
Cats results so fait, to cheaply
When you want to sail or trade!
Vm'U arree F.A. Clisaifieds are
SUPER, too, for buying, %t\iim%,
renting, trading, hiring, or what-
ever your need it!
WASHINGTON(NBA) Two
government agencies ate now
running clubs for farm young-
sters.
One is the well-known 4-H
club movement, run by the Ex-
tension Service of the Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
The other is FFAthe Future
Farmers of America, whose of-
ficers are now meeting in Wash-
ington. It is run by the Agricul-
tural Education Service of the
Office of Education, Federal Sec-
urity Agency.
While the Washington exec-
utive heads of the two organi-
sations insist they are not riv-
als, there is r. certain duplica-
tion of effort. Sen. George D.
Aiken of Vermont has a bill be-
fore Congress to take Future
Farmers and the agricultural
vocational education program
out of Federal Security Agency
and pot it in Department of
Agriculture, where it would
seesB to belong.
Congress has so many pressing
problems on its hands, however,
that the Aiken bUl has small
chance of consideration this
year.
Federal government employes
who manage the FFA program
say they don't care what agency
or department they operate from,
Just so they're permitted to keep
on with their work.
FA Is he younger, smaller and
more exclusive of the two organ-
izations. It now has 340,000 mem-
bers in 7900 local chapters.
They are in every state except
Rhode Island, but the biggest
memberships are in the southern
states, from Texas with 32,000 to
North Carolina with 30,000.
Membership of Future Farmers
Is limited. to boys who are full-
time high school students who
are taking courses in public agri-
cultural vocational schools.
The 4-H club movement is
much broader and bigger.
It takes In some two million
farm youngsters, both boys and
girls, betweeh the ages of 10 and
There are 98,000 4-H club locals
In every county in every state.
They have 185,000 local volunteer
leaders and 730 assistant county
agents who work on 4-H and emu
organization full time.
A farm- boy can belong to
both 4-H and FFA at the same
time. As a matter of fact, says
Gertrude Warren, organisation
secretary for 4-H work in the
Department of Agriculture,
many farm boys work on 4-H
projects before they get into
Futura Farmers and they re-
torn to 4-H work after they get
out of vocational high school.
What the Federal government
contributes to these two farm
youth organizations is Impossible
to determine.
The figures are burled in the
books of the larger Department
of Agriculture Extension Service
and the Federal Security Agen-
cy's Agricultural Education Serv-
ice.
Last year the Extension Serv-
ice got $31 million and Education
Service got $30 million. But only
a small fraction of this went to
the young folks' organizations.
Agricultural Extension Service
and Agricultural Education Serv-
ice grants are made to the states
on a matching basis.
The states In turn parcel out
the money to counties and local
communities for -all manner of
activities. So every dollar gets
multiplied two or three times be-|
fore it is spent.
A. W. Tenney, national execu-
tive secretary of the Future
Farmers, with offices in the Fed-
eral Security Agency, says the
members pay dues and pay most
of their own expenses. Their big
mOment is an annual convention,
at which the "Star Farmer of
America" Is named from among
the membership.
Plans for this year's conven-
tion to be held in Kansas City
in October, were made at the
meeting of officers in Washing-
ton this week.
Four-H has an annual en-
campment in Washington In
June, bringing two prize-winning
boys and girls from eaeh state.
Future Farmers was organized
in 1928. It was originally admin-
istered by a Federal board of vo-
cational education, made up of
the Secretaries of Agriculture,
Interior and Commerce, plus a
few civilians.
The board was abolished ten
years later and the administra-
tion shifted to the Office of Ed-
ucation in the Department of In-
terior.
Under President Roosevelt, the
Office of Education was shifted
to the Federal Security Agency.
And If the Aiken .bill goes
through, administration will go
to the Department of Agricul-
ture.
Charmed
Laws Of Proberbility
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK. I would like to believe that
Senator Estes Kefauver is serious about his Code
of Conduct for investigations, which might at
least provide a little aid and comfort to the
target of Congressional attack.
We have not yet decided that a committee
probe is not a trial, or that Just because a Con-
gressman says it makes It so.
"The unfortunate thing." Kefauver says, "is
that charges made on the Senate floor, some-
times without proper foundation in fact, and
charges made before committee hearings, some-
times likewise devoid of foundation, have the
tendency to convict in the minds of the pub-
lic those persons against whom the charges
have been made."
Kefauver is right enough, since he pioneered
the field In the Infliction of guilt by associa-
tion in the now-famous crime commission hear-
ings of last year.
It was true that he was dealing mainly
Slth busted flushes whose redolent reputations
luldn't have been sullied, but the odd inno-
cent could have been wrecked for all the world
to see.
Kefauver's code now mentions that committee
hearings supply equal access to radio, television,
newspapers, newsreels. and magazines.
I still think that there's going to be some
strife on the television angle, even though the
Senator specifies that camera lights are not to
unduly distract or frighten the witness and in-
terfere with Ms presentation of defense.
The point has not been made to stick, so far.
but I do not think that a man can legally be
made to appear as an upaid actor for commer-
cial television if he is accused of no crime and
is not a defendant, but merely a witness.
There are very few people with sufficient
stage presence not to appear guilty under the
impact of expert cross-examination.
When this is compounded by the trappings of
television and the knowledge that a few million
souls are hanging on your every stammer, even
a man with nothing to hide would appear to be
a furtive fugitive from truth.
And the possibilities of smear are limitless,
since there is no recourse by libel, and refusal
to cooperate is punishable bv imprisonment.
I have never been too high on the Con-
gressional Investigation as a strong weapon of
democracy, since nothing much save noise
usually comes out of them, and outrageous
charges are often cynically thrown1 merely in
hope of hitting a mark.
The guy on the stand, formally accused of
nothing, can merely duck and hope that too
much of the muck won't stick.
Kefauver hopes to remedy this by a provision
that anyone to be probed will be forewarned of
the charges, and that any legislator who in-
tends to name an individual or an organization
in a derogatory manner first notify his target
of the charges.
This is ostensibly to allow the witness to pre-
sent a sworn statement and to retain a counsel
who could cross-question the probers and to file
a rebuttal.
Matter Of Fact
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
THEY'RE SMEARING IKE NOW
^miiy WASWHOTOHI
MERRY-GO-ROUND
.
iy PtW PIAISON
am

J
Four-Hwhich, incidentally,
stands for Head, Heart, Hands
and Healthgot Its start no-
body knows exactly when, but
before 19M. The idea grew up
In Obla. Illinois and Iowa about
the same time.
Dr. Seaman Kapp, former pres-
ident of Iowa 8tate College, who
was brought to Washington at
the turn of the century to head
the fight against the boll weevil,
got the idea" of carrying on the
crusade through farm youth or-
ganisations.
Today the idea has been spread
to Europe by the Marshall Plan.
In Japan It's the 4-K club and in
Cuba it's the 5-C club. For com-
peting with Communist youth
organizations, there's nothing
like It
WASHINGTON.The best proof of the terror
inspired among certain groups or politicians by
the mere name of Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower,
is the simple fact that a flood of poison pen
literature about the General is already pouring
out. >
Occasionally It is useful to know the way the
political sewers are ilowing, and in this case u
is particularly instructive.
A fair sample of the stuff being circulated is
a pamphlet called the "Williams Intelligence
Survey,' published in Santa Ana, Cal., by a
character who bills nimself as "news analyst,
lecturer, former counter-intelligence oificer." .
Williams strikes his two key-notes in his first
paragraphs, describing Elsenhower as a "carous-
er with Zhukov and other high Soviet crimi-
nals," and "the man most wanted by the Zion-
ists to head the government."
From this start, the reader is plunged into a
strange anti-semltlc nightmare dominated by
the figure of Eisennower nimself, the "Zionist
candidate," the "red caterer," the ex-President
of Columbia University.
("As you know," Williams remarks confiden-
tially to his readers, "Columbia is in New York
City, and virtually a ghetto institution, an in-
cubator of proselytes and international Jewish
revolutionaries."
According to Williams. Elsenhower is guilty of
innumerable misdeeds, ranging from plotting to
become a military dictator, to Insinuating a
left-wing Polish professor into the Columbia
faculty.
"Is Elsenhower Jewish?" Williams at last asks
himself. He answers with a qualified negative.
But he adds sterjilv that we "dare not forgive
the arch-criminals and morons of our own race,
merely because they are led by the nose or
bribed or driven."
Williams' pamphlet is a fair sample of the
cruder style of this special literature.
But perhaps there is even more significance
in the style that wears a thin cloak ot normal-
ity (indicated by avoidance of outspoken anti-
Semitism), which is best represented by the
1951 "report" of a public group known as the
Partisan Republicans of California.
This curious manifesto lists Eisenhower. Gov.
Earl Warren of California, and former Gov.
Harold Stassen as the "three principal prospects
which the Communists and New Dealers are try-
ing to Impose on the Republican ticket."
It names Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt and the
Communist oartv as leading Elsenhower backers
for the Republican nomination.
It rehearses several of the Williams' charges
the Polish professor, hob-nobbing with Zhu-
kov. etc. It accuses Elsenhower of complicity
In a "Soviet" plot to send American troops to
Europe, which certainly puts Soviet foreign pol-
icy in an unfamiliar light and it reaches its low
in the statement:
"Only Odd knows how many hundreds of
thousands of men, women and children were
tortured and murdered by the Soviet criminals
because of < Elsenhower's i actions. The blood of
these innocent victims justified Elsenhower's de-
coration by the Soviets."
The reason why it Is now prudent to have this
look into the sewers is. very bluntly, that the
sewers are threatening to well up into our pub-
lic life.
Neither Williams nor the Partisan Republicans
have any real importance in and of themselves.
Yet they are symptoms of something very Im-
portant Indeed. We do not yet hear open anti-
Semitism on the floor of the United States Sen-
ate.
Yet the attack on Anna Rosenberg early this
winter stank of concealed anti-Semitism.
Gen. Eisenhower is not yet the victim of pub-
lic attacks like those sketched above. Yet Sen.
Joseph W. McCarthy's recent denunciation of
Oen. George C. Marshall was an experiment in
the same art form.
Worse still, the disgusting nonsense contained
In these poison pen pamphlets of which more
might be quoted ia actually beginning to be
accepted as sound political currency by out-
wardly respectable politicians.
When the Partisan Republicans accuse Eisen-
hower of "never opposing the treacherous pol-
icy of Harry Hopkins. Alger Hiss. Dean Acheson
and Reds whose records show thev served the
Interests of 8talin," they speak the language of
twenty Senators.
In the past fortnight, these reporters have
several times been solemnly told about Williams'
Polish professor canard, as a sinister Incident
dug up by Senate Republicans of the Taft
group, which would surelv block Elsenhower's
nomination. Probably these Senators are faith-
ful readers of Williams.
The truth is that too many of the more con-
servative politicians of both parties, but par-
ticularly of the Republican party, are beginning
to suffer from a milder form of the same vici-
ous disease that shows itself in this poison pen
literature.
Among the Republicans, the acknowledged
leaden of these men is Sen. Robert A. Taft, ot
Ohio, who is of course utterly free of the di-
sease himself.
Yet thus far Taft has accepted the support
of the Infected (both Williams and the Partisan
Republicans are strong Taftites. by the way*;
and in the case of Sen. McCarthy, he has even
seemed to encouraged the infection for political
reasons.
No one has attacked Franklin Delano Roose-
velt's delay In repudiating Communist support
more bitterly than 8en. Taft.
And the Senator now owes it to his own high
character and great talents indeed he owes
it to the country to repudiate and rebuke all
manifestations of this spreading and menacing
disease, both underground and in the Senate,'in
the sharpest and moot emphatic manner.
(Copyright, 1M1, New York Herald Tribune. Is)
Dan A. Kimball says: Five Morel brothers serve with the
navy; Money is not wasted by Armed Services; Navy
/ played active part in Korea.
(While Drew Pearson is on s brief vacation, the Wash-
ington Merry-Go-Round is being written by several dis-
tinguished guest columnists, today's being by Honorable
Dsn A. Kimball, Secretary of the Navy).
WASHINGTON. Few people know that once again five bro*
thersare on active duty at the same time with the Navy.
These five brothers have not had the publicity that "the Sul-
livan brothers" had during the war when they served together
aboard the old U.S.S. Juneau.
But, from my point of view, the Morel brothers are pretty
important in their own way, because they come from mv homo
state of California.
Here's the story on the Morel brothers pf Downey. California:
Joe, the oldest, is 35. and he is teleman 3rd class, serving aboard
the U.6.8. Harley
class, is at the Naval air test center, Point Mogu, California; Vic-
tor, 23, seaman, and William, 21, fireman apprentice, are serving
-ogether aboard the U.S.S. Hanson: the youngest of the five, Alex-
ander, 18, seaman apprentice, Is based at the Navl training center
at San Diego, California.
This is a pretty good record for one family. I think. It should
show us what an appeal the Navy has for the young man of today.
We have a great many other "brother teams" in the navy,
a no in one case, we have a set of identicl twins, seaman Ray and
Roy Lowe, who are at the U.S. naval base in Charleston. B.C.
Both these twins are now on their second hicth in the Navy.
Theli wives, incidentally, are sisters.
I have the greatest admiration for all our boys in the Navy.
From the newest recruit to the highest brass, they're all de-
voted to the welfare of the Navy and the nation.
And that goes for the girls in the service, too. All have done
a wonderful job.
Their morale is very high, and we are providing them with
the finest ships, aircraft, and equipment that American ingenuity
can devise and that our budget will allow.
Sometimes I read in the papers or in news letters that a great
deal of procurement money is being wasted by the Armed Service.
I don't know where these writers get their information, but
that is not the picture as I see it.
I can't, speax for any other service, but so far as the Navy Is
concerned, we are doing everything possible to get a dollar's worth
ol defense for every dollar we spend. That's not merely a slogan;
it's a dally practice.
If at anytime anyone has information which indicates that
the Navy is treating procurement matters loosely, I want to hear
about it, and I guarantee that each case will be investigated fully.
I think there is entirely too much loose talk about procurement
bungling.
The Navy has been dping a great job in Korea for the 14
months that we have been engaged, as part of the United Nations,
in putting down the aggression of the Northern Communists.
I think the fighting men of the other services in Korea would
echo the statement that General Omar N. Bradley, chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, makes on page 254 of his book, "A Sol-
dier's Story."
On that page, General Bradley notes that the first message
he received from V corps on D-day in the Normandy area was
Thank God tor the United States Navy!"
Our battleships, our carriers, our anti-submarine vessels, and
our Marines have had a great share in the success which U.N.
ground and our Air Forces have achieved In stemming the tide
of aggression in Korea.
They have made continuing attacks on snemy supply lines,
while tin- planes from our aircraft carriers have dealt blows In
dive-bombing and strafing.
One of our major feats, which deserves to be more generally
known, was the torpedoing of the Hwachon flood gates by Sky-
raider from the U.a.S. Princeton.
This was the first aerial torpedo attack since World War II
and it did much to tnwart the preparations of the Communists
for a powerful thrust southward.
Tney had closed the gates of this dam to lower the level ot
river waters to facilitate the movements of their trucks and sup-
plies across river beds.
When we reopened the flood gates with torpedoes, we created
a problem for them which stoppea them cold for awhile.
Incidentally, it was the new XJSB. Juneau, the name-successor
to the ship aboard which "the Sullivans" were lost during World
War II, that made first contract with the Communist enemy in
Korea by shelling troops and vehicles below the 38th parallel on
29 June 1950.
In the 12 months that fellowed that initial shelling, Navy
ships fired a total of 262.000 rounds of projectiles.
The U.S.8. Missouri made a record run to tne area to add its
weight to the assault.
The carrier U.S.S. Boxer broke all records to get aircraft to
the scene.
When we pulled the Missouri out the New Jersey, a. sister
chip, filled in.
The Coral Sea, the Bonne Honime Richard, and other carriers,
have been substituted to give crews and air groups alternate action
exprtanos and rest. There has been no let up.
During that first year, our amphibious forces landed 151,6000
personnel, 29,000 vehicles, and 141.tons of cargo, or nearly one ton
per person landed.
At the same time, the Navy accounted for the safe removal
of 282,500 civilian and military personnel, 18,600 vehicles, and 410,-
000 tons of cargo.
This was entirely apart from the sea-lifting of more than
14,500,000 measurement tons of cargo. 1.200.000 passengers, and
50,000,000 barrels of petroleum products, to an-1 within the Pacific
area by the Military Sea Transportation service, which is under
the jurisdiction of the Navy.
To do this job, we had to call in a good many of our reserves,
both Navy and Marines Corps, on short notice and personally I'm
very proud of the way they responded.
Some of those ships are manned by upward of 50 per cent
by eserves. many of them veterans of World War II. We plan to
rotate or release them as circumstances aflow. These fellows de-
serve a lot of credit.
As for the Marines, regular and reserve, they have written,
another epic in blood and mud and ice, with every heroic incident
in the valorous tradition of the corps.
This is a pretty good record and we are very proud of it.
But, the Navy has not been the only service in Korea. The
Army and the Air Force have borne their respective burdens and
they have done a fine job. too.
We have been fighting there as an ail-American team and
that is what we propose to continue to do.
i
END OF A HAMMY PERFORMANCE -When S3 bogs broke
loose at a .laughter house in Philadelphia, it took 10 policemea
and a hott of packing-plant workers an hour to round thorn up.
Hora, the last of the renegade porkers ia hauled back to too
as a cop in background mops his weary brow.
-



PAGE FIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPFH
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 151
Indians Regain First Place As Red Sox Whip Yanks
------PENNANT PILOTS.... .No. 3
Unit System Is Merely Using
Right Man At Right Time, And
Making Use Of Bench-Stengel
,__ _..
NCS
American League
Third of six dispatches by man-
agers of leading major league
clubs written fo: NEa Service
Bv CASEY STENGEL
" A plaxer who can do better
than the one playing has no
business on the bench.
The answer 10 t.ie so-called
platoon svstem is as simple as
that.
Not the leasi advantage o
the unit svstem Is tha: It keeps
those In the dugout on iheii
tres.
Some riehi-hand batters are
pothered bv the sitiearm pitches
of some -hand pitchers.
Borne left-hand hitters are le.ss
formidable asam<' southpaws.
80 vou switch 10 meet the oc-
casion.
The Yankees employ Oil Mc-
Doutjtald at second oase when a
riant-hanaer opposes us. at
third when we lace a left-
hander. That cets third base-
man Bobbv Browns hiuhlv-ef-
fective left-hand poke in the
batting order against right-
handerv Jerry Coleman's risht-
hand "oat and skillful second
basing in the lineup against
left-handers.
To stack the New York bat-
tine order with left-hand bat-
ters aaainsi right-hand pi ch-
ine this season I used first
baseman Joe Collins in riaht
field with Johnnv Mi/e at fist.
frequentlv moving Collins in for
defensive purposes late in the
Koine.
The .'eht-hand bat tine Hank
Bauer is our man in fight field
against left-handers, end we i
brought the switch-hitting
youne Mickey Mantle back from
Kansas City.
1
TEAMS Won Lost Pet.
Cleveland.. 85 50 .630
New York 82 M .626
Boston 78 .-.1 .605
Chicago. 72 Kl .541
Detroit 1.1 11 .45
Philadelphia 56 78 .422
Washington 5.1 77 .418
St. Louis I" M .310
G.B.
1
4
12
23
284
29'
42
Todays dames
Boston at New York (2).
Chicago at St. Louis (Twi-Nite)
Washington at Philadcrp'a (N).
Only Games Scheduled.
Yesterday's Results
FIRST GAME (Twilight)
Washingt'n 000 000 0011 5 0
Philadelpa 102 000 lOx4 9 1
Marrero (11-8. Haynes and
Guerra; Zoldak <5-9> andTipton.
SECOND GAME (Night)
Washington.......... 7
Philadelphia.......... 9
NIGHT GAME
Boston.............. 4
New York............ 2
j FACTOROn his way to racking- up 100 strikeouts for the fifth successive year, Ralph
its the sign, cocks his arm and follows through. Branca stars in relief for the Dodgers as
FANNING
Branca geU> ...c mu ma in ana ioiiow mrouKn. orunca stars jn reuei lor the Dodgers ;
well as finishing more than half the games he starts. Despite early-season injuries that sidelined
him for three weeks, he narrowly miss-ed a no-hitter in the ninth against the Pirates Ditched a
two and a three-hitter. (NEAJ
NIGHT GAME
Detroit.............. 2
Cleveland............ 5
Casey Stengel
out. the batter hit a line single
to right. Johnny Kcs.;.\ on
third, waited to see if the ball
nould be caught, it wasn't, but
it was fielded peifectly, and
Pesky d -layed nls break for the
plate so long that he was ac-
tuary lorced there bv Mapes'
extraordinary, one-hop throw.
I used to substitute Bill John-
son for Dr. Brown at third be-
cause he was a little surer in
the Held, had a bit better arm
NIGHT GAME
CHICAGO at ST. LOUIS
i Postponed, Inclement Weather)
National League
TEAMS
Brooklyn
New York
St. Louis
Boston .
Philadelphia 65
i Cincinnati 57
1 Chicago. 56
and no superior as a tagRer. Pittsburgh
Late in a key game with Cleve-
Remembe'r that this rleht and i land at the Stadium last sea-
left-hand hit tine business does- son. I put Mapes in ntlvt field
n't go all the wav down the: and Johnson on third
line. All pitchine looks alike to, Lou Boudreau opened the Iii-
Mize. for example. I've used dlans' half of the inning bv
right-hand batting pinch-hit- doubling, and Bobbv Avila ran
ters against right-handers and for him.
left-hand hitting pinch-hitters i The next batter hi a tower-
ing flv deep into right field.
and Avila taReed up for the
Won Lost Pet.
8> 47 .644
54
63
(i
69
78
XI
M
M
.600
.512
.496
.485
.125
.421
.418
Today's Games
St. Louis at Chicago.
New York at Boston (N).
Philadelphia at Brooklyn.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
G.B.
5'i
17' _
19! i
21
29
29
30
(N).
Young Chilean Baseball Enthusiasts
Will Visit Boston As City's Guests
IQUIQUE. Chile. Sept. 6 (Spe-
cial)Two local boys, represen-
tatives of the Iquique baseball
team, will soon be enjoying a free
trip to the United States as a re-
sult of a kind gesture made ear-
lier this year by a Bostonln who
visited here.
Invited by the City of Boston,
the two baseball players left Ari-
que on an extended business
trip. He discovered that tha
boys of the town had a tre-
mendous enthusiasm for base-
ball, but was disturbed because
they had little or no equipment
with which to play the game
that is considered the national
sport of the United States.
Kiely Outpitches Raschi;
Tribe Easily Beats Tigers
By United Press
NEW YORK, Sept. 6 Rookie lefty Leo Kiely as-
tounded everyone in sight by pitching the Red Sox to a
4-2 victory over the Yankees lost night at the Yanket
Stadium. It was especially appalling to the Yankees be-
cause he bested ace righthander Vic Raschi and because
he knocked them out of first place.
Kiely pitched a strong seven-
hitter and had a shutout until
the Yankees tagged him for two
runs In the eighth inning. He was
well supported by 'an eleven-hit
5-2, from the Philadelphia Phil-
lies.
The Cincinnati Reds took over
sixth p!ace and pushed the Pitts-
burgh Pirates back Into last placa
Boston attack that Included a with a 6-3 victory while the Chi
homer and single by Ted Williams ( cago Cubs won. S-2, In eleven ln-
and'two hits apiece by Bobby Do-
err, Billy Goodman,. Charley
Maxwell and Buddy Rosar.
The Cleveland Indians moved
back into first place a full game
ahead of the Yankees and four
games ahead of the Red Sox
with a 5-2 victory over the De-
troit Tigers.
Homers by Al Rosen and Luke
Easter accounted for four runs
and Early Wynn needed no more
backing to record his 17th vic-
tory. Cleveland has now won 16
games in 17 starts against De-
troit this year.
Elsewhere In the American
League the Philadelphia Athlet-
ics topped the Washington Sen-
ators, 4-1 and 9-7, to displace
stopped ringing with people of-; them' In sixth place'as first Sam
rering to contribute equipment'
the people of Boston had gone
.mo action.
aeainst southpaws. It is the tyoe
of hitter and pitcher that de-
termines the move.
Maneuvering players has paid
the Y?nkees rich dividends.
There was that afternoon two
vears ago at Yankee Stadium,
when I put Cliff Mapes in right
lield aeainst the Red Sox be-
cause of his superior out field-
ing ond throwing.
With the bases full and one
Yesterday's Results
FIRST GAME (11 Innings)
Louis 000 002 000 002 10
sprint to third after the catch. | Chicago 000 000 200 013 7
, St,
Mapes threw the Mexican kid
out on the fly.
The platoon system is mere-
ly plaving the right man in
the right place at the right
rime.
NEXT:
Giants.
Leo Durocner of the
1
0
Brecheen (9-4> and Sarni; Kel-
ly (6-2) and Often, Burgess.
Mr. Gilmour wrote to Bill Cun- I terminals, and civlc-mlnded Bos-
ca yesterday on Panagra en route ningham, popular sports writer | tonians volunteered to collect
to Cartagena, where they will land columnist for the Boston | crate and deliver the packages to
board the Grace Liner Santa Ro-1 Herald, asking if it would be pos- the pier where the Grace Line
sa for New York and Boston. The, sible for some used but honest-ship Santa Olivia was soon
boys, Rogelio Gonzles and Jorge to-goodness equipment to be col- scheduled to depart for Iquique.
Flores, will be declared official; lected and sent down to the boys
guests of the city. in Iquique;. Cunningham reprint-
It began in 15 when Harold ed the letter in his column. The
Gilmour of Boston was in Iqui- next day his telephone never
Zoldak then reliever Bob Hooper
scored Impressive triumphs. Fer-
ris Fain made six hits to boost
. his American League leading
Every conceivable piece of batting average to .341.
equipment for a baseball team
started to come in. Containers
were set up in railroad and bus
nlngs over the St. Louis Cardi-
nals then dropped a 6-5 darknesg
curtailed eight Inning second
game.
The Red triumph was achieved
despite homers by Ralph Klner
and Clyde McCullough as Her-
man Wehmeler scored his fourCh
win.
The Cubs snapped a seven-
game St. Louis winning streak as
Ed Burgess singled In the win-
ning run In the opener but in
the second game homers by Stan
Muslal and Harry Lowrey even-
tually provided the winning mar-
gin.
Jones, the spot pitching cholea
for Manager Leo Durocner. won
his fifth game In the opener
while Maglie became the first
pitcher in the National League to
win 19 games when he held the
Braves to six hits as Alvln Darle
made four safe hits and Monte
JOE
by
WILLIAMS
The climax of the drive came
when Boston's two major league
teams gave the order to clean out
their storage rooms of bats, balls,
gloves and even uniforms.
Irvin hit a four-bagger in tha
NATIONAL LEAGUE Giant second game win.
The New York Giants picked In the opener Dark drove home
up a half game in their pursuit, two runs while Walker Cooper
of the Brooklyn Dodgers by hit a two-run homer for Boston,
drubbing the Braves in Boston. Gil Hodges hit a bases loaded
3-2, behind Sheldon Jones and home run in the fifth Inning as
9-1. with Sal Maglie on the hill.
The Dodgers bad their lead
reduced to five and one-half
games even though they won.
the Dodgers won without diffi-
culty from the Phils. Ralph
Branca pitched his 13th victory
while scattering nine hits.
The death of 20-year-old middleweight George Flores as,
rrnvn lua i re.sn" oi inJuri*s suffered in Madison Square Garden ring last i
??i? ninin n w"k- C"U ior mott th*n ""* investigation and the con-!
chicho8 Sol }u2 ti ,38 2 s*s?ses s-fi sassM*which such *
By sailing day, contributions
"from the citizens of Boston to
the young baseball players of
Iquique" amounting to more
than twelve hundred pounds
were loaded aboard the Santa
Olivia. When the ship arrived
in Iquique on January 2, a large
delegation including Gilmour
and his baseball fans were on
hand to receive them.
Staley (16-13' and Rice; Hat-
ten (3-4i, Klippstein, Rush and
Burgess.
Stanky Sparks, But All Hands
Contribute To Giants' Drive
Bv II \i:i:v GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK Sept. 6 I NEA 'In i home-run range, swatted four in
their pluckv charge from behind i a week three of them game-win-
down the backstretch. mister, the ners Whitey Lockman whose I
Giants well illustrate dwhat hitting played a major role won
Branch Rickey meant by balance, a game with a tour-master. Mon-
The protractd winning streak te Irvin accounted lor another
was launched when Eddie Stanky the same way.
are customarily dismissed around here.
Bill Cunningham wrote in his
column, "It helps steady a man's
faith In what's good and right to
come back from a place where
faces are set, voices bitter and
returned to second base, but no
individual has been nearly as hot ]
as the club.
Irvin crowded the 100 mark in
runs batted in with no more than
14 home runs. Only Ralph Kiner
was ahead or close to the Negro
outfielder, and the Pirate was
headed for another home-run
championship with 36.
Robin Roberts and the Phillies
had shut out the Giants, and
with the Dodgers.running away
and about to hide, the Harlem
outfit was only a game and a
half out of third place. The Jints
looked, and no doubt felt, smaller
than Bill Veeck's midget, when
Stanky replaced Dave Williams.
who had been fetched up from
Minneapolis to play second base.
Willie Mays gave the side a lift,
and Bobby Thomson after four
years finally was talked into
victories were won by one run,! hanging his stance when switch-
the mark of the good club. There e(i from center field to third base,
was no big inning, but the New, where hp is adequate.
York Nationals scored when they i
had to. Tied or oehlnd late in the But it was not until the pesky
going, you feit they would pull it! stanky commenced to get on base
out. again that the Giants were off
Leo Durocher didn't get too and running,
many complete games from the
Was this unfortunate youngster the victim of official neglig-
ence? Or something even more deplorable? The details leading
up to the fatal match with Roger Donoghue, another youngster,
firct avitn (Ttvi are curious. For some reason it was not announced until two .
New York (wi MO orH 6 i weeks, afler lt nad been made- Whv was tw*? The- "s"1 proce-I the news unrtlievedly grim to
Boston 000 200 000-2 6 0 {h m?0mce the Pa'rinB 0 bOXers lmmedlatelv or Pub" ,ln.d nt J.ua* Pla'n good folks,
Jones (5-10, and Westrum; Tula match was signed the night of. or the day following
a match in which Flores had been stopped by Donoghue in
a White Plains arena. It was signed by one Billy Brown, who has
charge of filling the supporting, or preliminary programs, for the
Garden. This was the second consecutive time Flores had been
i stopped in two weeks. The other time was at Fort Hamilton In
| two brief rounds.
Obviously Flores did not belong in the Garden, even in a pre-
liminary. I am told that Al Weill, the Garden matchmaker, who
confines his gifts largely to the windups, was opposed lo the
match. Whether his opposition took aggressive form I do not
know. But when Flores' physical fitness was certified by medical
examiners Weill had an out, whether he was looking for one
or not.
These medical examiners constitute an advisory board and
work with the boxing commission. The board Is composed of com-
petent physicians. They function in a well-equipped, state-sup-
plied modern clinic. Flores evidently met all required tests, in-
cluding the encephalograph, a machine designed to record the
extent of damages to the brain.
Spahn (18-12i and Cooper.
SECOND GAME (Night)
New York............ 9
Boston.............. 1
NIGHT GAME
Cincinnati............ 6
Pittsburgh............ 3
NIGHT GAME
Philadelphia.......... 2
Brooklyn............ 5
Sports Briefs
with friendly hearts, have done a
generous thing from which they
can't possibly profit personally,
and for which they may never
even be personally thanked.1;
Accompanying the two boya on
their trip will be Gilmour him-
self, who is now living in Iquique.
They will overnight In Lima, be-
fore taking another Panagra
fight on to Guayaquil. Quito, Ca-
ll and continue to Cartagena.
Whitey Lockman Eddie Stanky
More than half of the Giants'
BY UNITED PRESS
FOREST HILLS, NY., Sept. 6
Freckle-faced Maureen Connolly
won the women's singles crown
in the National Tennis Cham-
pionship at orest Hills, New
York. The 16-year-old Miss Con-
nolly became tne youngest U. S.
FINE WAY TO RUN A RAILROAD
Dr. Vincent Nardiello, who represents the commission at ring-
side, is not a member oi this board. Dr. Nardiello is not only a re-
putable physician but a knowing man in prize fight matters
history by defeating Shirley Fry
of Akron 6-3, 1-6. 6-4, yesterday.
The sturdy blonde from San
Diego, California, betters the
record held by Helen Wills Moody
who won in 1923 at the age of 17.
Miss Connolly will be 17 on the
17th of this month.
pitchers, but the pitching re-
mained steadystarting and re-
lieving. Jim Hearn started pitch-
ing as ho did the second half of
last season. Sal Maglie should
have hit the 20 mark and Larry
jansen remained the other big
pitcher. Called In from Ottawa,
Al Corwin launched a winning
skein. Bubba Jones and Koslo be-
came the "'one-' relief pitchers,
George Spencer the "short."
IRVIN BATS IN RUNS
WITH FFW HOMERS
Wes Westrum relocated the
Here is what to do
after
OVER-INDULGENCE
loo much good food and drink?
Try Alku-S.ltzer and m* how much
ottar you feel Alka-Saltiar aootha*
Baadacha. nautralizaa aioaaa gastric
aridity, "n you right again"!
K<-p a tupply of Alka-
Saltiar handy tlwmyt.
3 Alka Seltzer
THOMSON SWITCHED FROM
DIMAGGIO TO MUSIAL
Someone told Thomson that he
resembled Joe DiMaggio thus an
unnatural wide straddle and no
stride, which left him stiff and
with his arms tight. His distance
was confined 'o his arms. The
braw Scotsman now has his feet
a bit closer together, and he
crouches over somewhat on the
lines of a right-hand batting
Stanley Musia!. although not as
pronounced. The result is that
he is loose and has rhythm and
power.
If Bobby Thomson turns out to
be a reasonable facsimile of eith-
Women's Singles Champion In : having once been a fighter himself. I am told that Dr. Nardiello
openly questioned Flores' fitness from practiced observation, ask-
ed to see the commission's "book" on the lighter, received no co-
operation.
My efforts to contact Dr. Nardiello yesterday met with no
success. Previously, seeking similar information, the commission
office (none of the three commissioners was present) referred
me to the medical board. The young lady who answered said
there was' no one In authority on hand and explained she was
not permitted to release medical findings, I would have to get In
NEW YORK The draw has: touch with Dr. Charles Muzzlcato, who apparently Is the board's
been completed for the National spokesman. Two phone calls failed to find Dr. Muzzlcato in bis
Amateur Golf Championship office; a request that he call back brought no response.
which is set to get under way Up to the time of Flores' death no comment had been heard
next Monday at Bethlehem, from Eddie Eagan, chairman of the boking commission, who
Pennsylvania. Defending Cham- seems to be on vacation. Eagan, who is salaried, virtually runs
plon Sam Ursetta of Rochester, I the commission. His associates, Dr. C. B. Powell and Leo Swears,
New York, meets Eugene Zus- are not conspicuously active. Swears is sefdom seen at the rlng-
pann of Goodland. Kansas in an side. Powell Infrequently. Eagan used to box as an amateur.
opening round match of tbe six- Powell and Swears have no boxing background whatever. All
day match play tournament, if three are political appointees.
Urzetta retains his title, he'll be | We had two ring fatalities around here last year, Laverne
the first to repeat since Lawson i Roach and Sonny Boy West. It became the practice then, on re-
Little did it in 1934 and '35. j commendation of the medical board, to bar any fighter who had
! been knocked out for 30 days. As soon as the shocked clamor died
down this sensible precaution was abandoned.
PAMPTON LAKES. New Jersey
Former Middleweight Cham-
pion Ray Robinsontraining at
Pompton Lakes for his return go
with Britain's Randy Turpin
will have only a light workout to-
day. Robinson, who lost his 160-
pound title to Turpin in London,
already is trimmed down to four
pounds under the limit.
LOS ANGELES Center field-
er Jim Rivera of Seattle has been
named the Most Valuable Play-
er in the Pacific Coast League.
Rivera received 14 of the 23 votes
er Joe DiMaggio or Stan Muslal,! cast. Tbe fleet fly chaser leads
there's no telling how far the the league with a .352 batting
Giants will go.
And they already have the
Dodgers, 13'2 lengths on top only
a few days ago looking at the
scoreboard.
GAELIC GAME
New York'NEAiNew York,
defending champion, will meet
County Meath of Eire for the
Irish National Football League
title Sept 30. at the Polo
Grounds.
average. He's the property of the
Chicago White Sox and may re-
port after the Coast League play-
offs end.
INDIANAPOLISWalter Can-
diera Duke of Lullwater won the
$35.000 Horseman's Stake at In-
dianapolis In straight heats yes-
terday at the Indiana State Fair.
The race is the richest event for
the two-year-old rotters In he
country. The win Is the 14th in 15
starts this year for Duke of Lull-
water.
LET'S GET THE ANSWERS. NOW
There are a number of questions the men who run prize
fighting in the Big Town should be asked and an immediate
Investigation by Gov. Tom Dewey, who appointed the. commission-
ers, is in order. Here are some of the questions:
(1) Why was Flores' appearance In the Garden kept secret
until two toys.before the fight?
(2i Is it true that matchmaker Weill was opposed to Flores
fighting in, the Garden?
(31 Did Dr. Nardiello indicate professional concern and was
the Information he sought in the commission office denied him?
(4i Why was the 30-day ban on knocked-out fighters dis-
continued?
There Is still another matter which invites the Governor's
Inquiry. Dr. Frank Ferlalno, forceful and outspoken, who original-
ly headed the medical board, walked out In evident dissatisfac-
tion. Is lt true, as Is reported, he was hampered and harassed
by outside agencies with selfish motives?,
The time has come for a showdown and If need be a house
cleaning, and it should be thorough and all-inclusive. It Is not
enough to say that In the prize ring death Is an occupational
hazard. If that's all It adds up to it Isn't worth the candle and
the sooner abolished the better. But If we are to continue the
grisly sport every effort should be made to see that lt Is honestly.
Intelligently and vigilantly supervised. There Is reason to believe
that up to now. under the Eagan administration, lt hasn't been.
All right, Governor, It's your move. A young man with wife
and chUd has been killed and the circumstances strongly suggest
that negligence.,Ignorance and favoritism, possibly not entirely
separated from politics, led to his death. What are you going to
do about it?
Army Boxing Season Opens
f
Tomorrow At Clayton Gym
The 45th Reconnaissance Bat-
talion will take the lid off the
Army boxing season Friday night
Edgar; Featherweights, Raymond
Vachon vs. Clayton Parrlsh.
Lightweights, Noel Parkerson
in the Fort Clayton Gym when lt vs. David Santiago; Lightweights,
meets the 65th AAA Group with I Edwin Hall vs. Richard Barn-
a crowded program of 14 bouts.
The events will get under way
at 7:30 when Paul Eller. 118, of
the 45th meets Angel Coln, also
118. of the 764th AAA Bn, In a
three round-Bantamwelght bout.
Last, but far from least, of the
bouts will have James Veronee
of the 45th slugging lt out with
Robert Ortega of the 764th in a
Welterweight tangle.
The program, with 45th fight-
ers listed firs', is as follows: Ban-
tamweights. Paul Eller vs. Angel
Coln; Bantamweights, Fayette
Cowan vs. Aloert Sanchez: light-
weights, Theodore Leone vs. Ish-
mel Soto; Featherweights, Car-
man Bean vs. Rodriguez-Rodri-
guez; Flyweights, Edellmlro Ji-
mnez vs. Robert Smith; Light-
weights, Ivan Rhodes vs. Robert
hart; .MWdbwelghts, Stlnson
Hall vs. Louis Brado; FlWeights,
Nick Vargas vs. John Rlvas;
Lightheavyweights, Donald Ta-
tro vs. E^tient Tte; Llght-
Weights, Jim Reyna vs. Jesus
Caldern, Welterweights, James
veronee vs. Robert Ortega.
.Trliners for the 45th are Wil-
liam Larsen end Sfc Frank Ceci.
and for the 5th Group, Sfc Ted
Rounis. Sfc Bob Blevinj and Cpi
Willie Palou.
TATUM'S TONS
.COLLEGE PARK Md. . -Maryland has 97 candidates
tor the football squad coached
by Jim Tatum.



THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1951
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE NTNB
Ruffing Unlocked Gardas Mips To Make Mexican Big Winner For Indians
Convention To Determine
Wrestling Champ Is Likely
To Be Best Show Of Year
By NED BROWN
: EA SpecMI Correspondent
NEW YORK, ~pt. 6 (NEA)
What promise." to be the greatest
wrestling show of the season is
scheduled for Tulsa, Okla., Sept.
7, 8 and 9. when the National
Wrestling Alliance holds Its third
annual convention In that oth-
erwise peaceful city.
Toe principal piece of business
will have to do with "universal
recognition o f
lo n e and the
same grappler
is heavyweight
champion of the
world. This In-
novation prom-
ises to develop
into about as
juicy a rhubarb
as even the most
rabid wrestling
addict could
wish.
8am Muchnira
George Simpson, Kansas City,
Mo. Muchnick, Toots Mondt of
New York and Haft are the main
supporters of Thest' titular
claim. Lou came by the crown
through "lineal descent," accord-
ing to Muchnick. president of the
Alliance. He traced various In-
cumbents of the mat throne from
the time of Fanner Burns, down
through the reigns of Hacken-
schmldt, Frank uotch, the Zbys-
zkos, Ed Stranger Lewis and Lon-
dos to Orvllle Brown.
"Lou was matched to wrestle
Orvllle Brown for the title in
1948," explains Sam.
"Brown was NWA champion at
the time. But before the contest
Brown was severely injured in
an automobile accident and had
to retire. This, of course, left the
field clear for Lou."
It was Just as simple as that.
Ex-Yankee Ace
Taught Bear
To Go Through
By DICK CARMODY
NEA Staff Correspondent
CLEVELAND Sept. 6 (NEA)
Marriage and the eagle-eye of
Red Ruffing, former Yankee
mound great, made big Mike
Oarcia one of the most feared
pitchers In the American League.
The powerful Cleveland right-
hander Is currently on the way to
his best season in a three-year
major-league career. He has
hurled more than 200 innings, is
almost a sure thing to win 20.
His earned run average'is one
of the lowest.
I
now moguls of
the game have
bern converging on Tulsa, each
with a candidate of his own for
the title. The Alliance Itself,
which mushroomed from a mem-
bership of six into a group of
about 30 of the more affluent
and influential promoters, rec-
ognizes Lou Thesz, the St. Louis
Flash, as kingpin of the mat
game. But this recognition Is by
no means unanimouseven with
th* Individual members.
Thesz admittedly is a legiti-
mate wrestler; he eschews clown-
In; and sticks pretty close to or-
thodox holds, but still manages
to make his performance Inter-
esting, even thrilling when he
has a good opponent. Lou is pow-
erful, well proportioned, and is
goodlooking in a he-man way.
champion through
lt>;eal descent
The Alliance was organized in
Waterloo, la.. In July, 1948, the
charter members being 8am
Muchnick of St. Louis; Pinky
George, Des Molnes; Harry Light,
Detroit; Tony Stecher, Minnea-
polis; Al Haft. Columbus, O., and
For some time LIVELY FRACAS IN
THE OFFTNG
There are those among the
newcomers, however, who favor i
Don Eagle, a colorful scion of the
Mohawk tribe, for the champion-
ship, whilst such as Gorgeous
George, Baron Leone, Mighty At-
las and a host of others have
their backers.
Right here It might be explain-
ed that these backers are fana-
tical in their allegiance. Their
mat heroes are not merely great,
they're stupendous.
When one considers that a
majority of these Alliance mem-
bers are former wrestlers of re-
nown, it becomes apparent that
a lively fracas is almost certain
to ensue before a titleholder is
elected.
Indeed, with members like
Toots Mondt, Rudy Dusek, Cow-
boy Luttrall, Tony Stecher, Paul
Bowser, Ed Don George, Al Kara-
sick and other erstwhile mat
stars getting into the rassle-
dazzle and tossing one another
around, it wouldn't be at all sur-
prising If the new champion
should emrege from among the
moguls themselves.
Stranger things than that are
happening nightly in TV-rass-
ling!
BHS Places 6 Lads Among
First 100 In National
Five Star Competition
BIG BEAR__When Mike Garcia stretches, winds up and flres the batter gets either a biasing fast ban
or a deceptive curve. Improved control give the Indians' Mexican a low earned run average ana
promises to win him 2 games. (NEA)
Bad Ruffing
Lincoln-Mauricio Meet
Tonight; Albrook Wins;
Lee Leads Scoring Race
LEAGUE STANDINGS
TEAMS-* Won Lost Pet.
Lincoln Life .. .. 7 .777
Albrook........7 I ,70
Mauricio........1 g ,m
TONIGHTS GAME (7:30)
Lincoln Life vs. Mauricio.
The Albrook Flyers retained
their chances for winning the
second half of the Pacific Bas-
ketball League as they defeated
the hapless Mauricio squad Tues-
day night by a one-sided score of
94 to 72.
Albrook trails Lincoln Life by a
single game and If the Life In-
surance boys defeat Mauricio to-
night, then Albrook will have to
win Sunday night to create a tie
for the second half. Should Mau-
ricio win Thursday night and Al-
brook win Sunday night, the Fly-
era will be champions of the
le??ue by virtue of winning both
haives.
Tuesdays game began with Al-
brook Jumping Into a quick lead
and at one point in the second
quarter had a 14-polnt margin,
but the Mauricio team, sparked
by Ed Capalbo, came roaring back
and had tied the game at 42-all
wnsn the first half ended.
"rlth the third quarter only
n- -tos old. the Flyers had run
u;o, a .twelve-point margin and
the tired Mauricio squad was no
match for the Albrook team from
then on and the Flyers won han-
dily by 22 point*. Karl Parsell
scored 27 points to pace the win-
ners, followed by 8al Sclafani
with 17 points and for Mauricio,
Caoalbo with 25 points and Ml-
n-; with 15 were high scorers.
~:on Lee of Albrook virtually
c.nched the Braniff Airways
Trophy for high scoring as he
counted fifteen points, which
against Bob Olbson's 10 points
gives Lee a 31-polnt edge, with
each player having one more
game to play.
Ballots for voting on the
league's Most Valuable Player
will be passed out at the games
tonight and Sunday night and
( KEEN STUFF/ NO MOR6 l
> SQUEAKS IN MY BIKE
each fan is urged to cast his vote
for his choice of most valuable
player. Winner will receive a
beautiful trophy donated bv
Braniff Airways.
The box score of Tuesday's
games:
Albrook FG
Lee..........
Chatham...... 2
Parsell........ n
Sclafani........ g
Ingram........ 3
Coycault .. .. .. 4
Bean.......... \
Eraser........ 1
Danlelson...... 0
Muto......... 3
Bonta......,. o
Ulshaffer...... 1
DeWltt........ 0
Totals.........38
Mauricio fO
Gibson, N....... 4
Hllzinger....... 0
Gibson, B....... 4
Olhoeft........ 0
Presho........ 0
Capalbo........11
Mlnot......., 4
Mills.......... a
Cotton........ 1
Totals.........28 20 72
. .Score By Quarters
Albrook 20 42 73 04
Mauricio 13 42 53 72
Referees: Chance and Tlese.
Timer: Baldwin. 8corer: LeBrun
FT TP
3 15
0 4
5 27
S 17
4 10
0 8
0 2
0 2
0 0
1 7
0 0
0 2
0 0
_
18 94
FT TP
4 12
1 1
2 10
0 0
1 1
3 25
8 14
3 7
0 2
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He is not far behind the lead-
ers In the strike-out department.
"Good old home cooking, plus
plenty of rest have helped an aw-
ful lot in getting me back In
shape, after my poor year in
1950," says Mike.
Both of these items Mike at-
tributes to his pretty young wife,
Gerda, whom he married last
winter. "Living In a hotel Is all
right," he continues, "but it can't
compare to home life.
"You try much harder when
you know someone else is de-
pending on you "
Garcia has been one of the best
control pitchers In the league,
and he gives the sharp-eyed Ruf-
fing, now an Indian coach, credit
for spotting a fault in his deliv-
ery which sometimes caused him
to be wild.
"Before Ruffing took me aside
and straightened me out, I was
locking my hips when I threw
the ball," he explains.
"I wasn't" following through
naturally. It took a lot of prac-
tice and hard work, but I finally
overcame the fault. The result
was a big improvement in my
control."
Fundamentally a fast ball ar-
tist, Mike has developed a good
curve to supplement his basic
pitch. He credits his improved
curve ball to Coach Mel Harder,
who worked long and hard with
him.
Mike broke in with the Indians
in 1949, winning 14 and losing five
his freshman year. He had a bril-
liant 2.35 earned run average.
Everyone expected great things
of him In 1950.
But luck ran out on him and
he finished the '50 campaign
with an unimpressive 11-11 mark.
When asked if he thought the
sophomore Jinx caused his com-
paratively poor showing, Garcia
laughs and shakes his head.
"No, I don't think so," he says.
"I reported to spring training
camp overweight last year, but a
few weeks of running in that Ar-
izona sun would have got me in
shape. But personal matters
caused me to make three trips
home during spring training.
"When I got going, at last, I
won five straight. But in a game
with the A's, I pulled a muscle in
my shoulder. That really set me
down. It was raining off and on
that day and every time I'd
throw. I'd slide in the mud,
stretching the shoulder muscle.
"The funny part about It, we
won that gamo 20-2, but it cost
me any chance I had of a good
season. By the time I got back
into action, I was so badly out of
shape I was just wishing the sea-
son would end and was waiting
for next season to get here."
Mike, called Big Bear because
of his appearance and strength,
was born and rrew up on a farm
hard by Vlsalla, Calif.
It's hard to picture it now, but
at one time the 200-pounder had
aspirations to be a jockey. That
was when Garcia was in the
eltthth grade.
Fortunately lor the Indians,
an uncooperative nag put an end
to Mike's riding ambitions when
he threw the Mexican-American
hurler over c. fence during a race.
The mishap required 14 stitch-
es In Mike Garcia's elbow and
that was enough to cure him.
Panam Flash McSweeen Prepares
For Another Big Track Season
The following is an excerpt
from Morry Be&chloss' sports col-
umn "Besch's Bull-pen which
appears In "The Daily Illini"
about Panama's brilliant track
star Cirilo McSween.
Happened to be passing by
Chalmers street, now In the
process of renovation, and
spotted a familiar figure hard
at work on the construction
project. Cirilo McSween, ap-
parently bitten by the bug
which has driven many Illini
athletes to seek hard labor as
a conditioning measure, pres-
ented a strange contrast to the
dapper, well-dressed Panama-
nian flash, well-known to all
Illini fans.
Despite the deafening staccato
of a pneumatic drill, we were able
to attract his attention. Realizing
it was time for a break anyway,
Cirilo sat down with us to chew
the fat for awhile.
"Are you figuring on Improv-
ing last year's times?" we asked.
McSween was sure that he'd be
able to break last spring's 47.7
outdoor mark but, strangely, was
not so confident about his crack-
ing 48.8 indoors.
Admittedly a strong finisher,
McSween realizes the many
curves on the indoor track slow
his time as he stays behind the
pole. man.
Therefore, his last-second
sprints, in which he attempts to
overcome the leaders, does not
permit him to Improve his time
greatly. The outdoor event gives
him a better chance to run his
own race. "Somehow, though I
never find myself following the
careful plan I set up before the
race," Cirilo admitted.
Asked about his Olympic
hopes, the friendly track star
was frankly pessimistic. "Now
that Lloyd LaBeach has turn-
ed professional; my country
(Panam) may not send a
team. He was the greatest run-
ner we ever had."
We learned that LaBeach, who
was a sensational sprinter for
Wisconsin in 1945 and '46. had
found pro running more lucra-
tive In Australia. McSween ex-
plained that professional track
is similar to horse racing In the
land down under. They bet on
the entries, who have to come out
and strut for tne crowd Just the
way you see at horse races." La-
Beach wrote him that he had
made a nice pile during the past
year.
Turning to the subject of his
old friend, former Illini Herb
McKenley, McSween said he had
not heard from the Jamaican
since he started his European
tour several weeks ago. "But
George Roden promised to bring
me a pair of custom-made shoes
from England," added Cirilo.
Roden, another Jamaican, now
enrolled at Morgan State college,
holds the world's record for the
400-meter dash and Is NCAA
quarter-mile champ." Knowing
that Herb and Roden are only
the two best-known of many top
Jamaican quarter-mllers, we ask-
ed Mc8ween what Jamaica had
to produce such speedsters.
McSween attributed it to their
complete devotion to training
and peculiar physical makeupa
long lean body, with short torso,
and long spring-like legs. Mc-
Kenley is 6.2 while Roden tops
6.4.
"Good team coming up next
year?" Illinois' top quarter-miler
thought so. "You know, Henry
Cryer will be back." Slated as No.
1 half-miler. Cryer dropped out
of school before the season's
opener. He is now going to sum-
mer school and intends to enroll
again here next fall.
For the second straight year
the Balboa High School track
athletes placed well in the Na-
tional 5-Star competition spon-
sored by John T. Core of Rich-
mond, Virginia.
In competition with high
schools from all sections of/the
United States, ihe Bulldog tfcln-
clads placed six boys in the top
100. In the 1950 competition they
landed a total of nine in the first
100.
Top man for the BHS squad
was Horacio "Pete" Fbrega, who
placed 21st. Fbrega had a point
total of 354 points, while the win-
ning boy had the excellent total
of 434 out of a possible 500.
Next in line for the Bulldogs
was Ted NorrU, 39th, with 336
points, Jim Brady, 45th, 331
points, Rudy Ostrea, 73rd 318
points, Fred Raybourne, 79th, 318
points, and Jerry Halman, 94th,
312 points.
Competition is held In five
events, the 100 yard dash, the
half mile, shot put broad Jump,
and high Jump. For the effort
each boy achieves In each event
.he Is given so many points,, the
total of which results in his final
score.
The various schools conduct the
Fight Dope
GROSSINGER, New York Sept.
6 (DP)The training of Middle-
weight Champion Randy Turpin
at Grossinger, has turned Into a
family project.
The Champ's elder brother
'Middleweight Dick Turpinays
he may step Into the ring with
Randy today or Friday. Randy
has been sharpening np against
another brotherJackiewho is
a featherweight.
"If I do spar with him. Randy
will have a hard job of catching
me," says Dick. "He's a hard hit-
ting lad, he is."
In yesterday's workout, Turpin
caught Bobby Danes with a left
hook to the jaw and the light
heavyweight hit the canvas for a
nine-count.
5-Star competition at their own
tracks, and then send the results
to Mr. Corf In Virginia, and he in
turn compiles the final resulta
and sends them to each compet-
ing school.
Twenty schools placed boys in
the top 100, with Jackson High
School of Tennessee taking top
honors with 20 places and 993
points. This point total was ar-
rived at by awarding 100 points
to the first place boy, 99 to the
second, etc., down the line.
Battle Creek, Michigan, Carls-
bad and Albuquerque, N. M., John
Adams. South Bend, Indiana, and
Summit, N. J.. finished in that
order ahead of Balboa. This gives
the BHS lads seventh place, with
a team total of six places and 195
points. In the 1950 competition
BHS placed third with nin
places and 470 points.
N.C.A.A. Releases
Schedule Of Grid
Games To Be TV'd
NEW YORK. Sept. 6 (UP) '
The National Collegiate Athletic
Association has released the
schedule of 19 football games to
be telecast tnls fall. The Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania which
balked at the set-up was left
off the list.
The National Broadca s t i n c
Company's 52-station network
was chosen to transmit the 19
games. However, all 19 won't be
seen by any one city. Some will
be telecast only regionally, some
nationally and each city will be
blacked out twice, with all cities
blacked out Sept. 22nd, when no
games will be televised.
Games cannot be televised
from the West Coast to the East...
only from East to West. That'
because the two-way cable won't
be operating until Dcember first.
SULKI SLEUTH
NEW YORK (NEA 1 Har-
ness horse driver George Marker
was a Philadelphia detective for
30 years.
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Frogs' Knees Tops
On TCU '51 Menu
FORT WORTH. Tex., 8ept. 6
(NEA)It's no secret that Tex-
as Christian football hopes are
riding on the results of four
knee operations.
Oil Bartosh sent word from
San Francisco, where he is
training with the Naval Re-
serve, that his leg Is well. Doc-
tor removed a broken cartilage
from the back's knee. Fullback
Keith Flowers appears to have
recovered from a second oper-
ation on his right knee. Mai
Fowler, who was lost In the
first three minutes last season,
is running hard and cutting on
his repaired knee. Halfback
Bobby Harding seems to be
coming along, although he was-
n't operated on until after
spring training.
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The League's Best
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Rirhie Ashburn. Phillies .. -J
Jackie Kobinswn. Dodger* .MS
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(SPORTS PAGES 8 & 9
AN INDEPEND
fDAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is saf'* Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY- SIXTH YEAR
PANAMA. R. P.. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER IBM
FIVE CENTS
Hussions Go Down To Bitter
Defeat In Conference Opener
Moscow Says
US Tactics
'Steamroller'
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 6 (UP) Russia suffered
rwc overwhelming defeats in the first business session of
the Japanese Peace Conference. Delegates adopted a
rei gh set of rules to limit debate and refused immediate
consideration of a Soviet demand to invite Communist
China to the parley.
The first Russian defeat came yesterday when the
conference voted 45 to 3 against consideration of a So-
viet demand for immediate adoption of its proposal to
incite Red China. Only Poland and Czechoslovakia voted
with Russia. Indonesia, still on the fence with regard to
the treaty, abstained.
After drawn out Communist-inspired debate and par-
liamentary shadow boxing, the peace conference finally
got around to a vote on adoption of a tough set of proce-
dural rules which would limit each delegation to a state-
ment of one hour. This time the vote went 48 to 3 with only
the three Iron Curtain countries voting against it.
sssa. "H 'HiBr i aw s. a?J srs
nent chairman of tht confer- m consider iuch a
enre. He received 43 vote*. Two problem as the Japan-
votes went to Australian Am- | ar Tr.atv
MOSCOW. Sept. 6 'UP MoS-
:ow newspapers today published
i bitter attack on United States
steamroller tactics at the Jap-
anese peace t'-eaty conference at
3an Francisco
A Tass dispatch from the con-
ference said United States tac-,
tics there were causing serious sparring with the Communist t work lt u lmpos.
disagreements between the Unit- '
?d States and some of the other
-.-ountries attending the confer-
ence.
The dispa'ch asserted said the
Jnlied Slates was imposing res-
-.rlctive rules of procedure on
he conference by means of a
votinR machine."
"DesDite th? State Department's
fforts to turn the conference
..nto a hollow formality serious
disagree merits have already
ropped up between the States
Department, and those countries
which usually obey American or-
ders."
Taw repcrted the United
3tates was putting economic
pressure on India to compel that
country to si';n the treaty.
Opposition Boycott
.Forces Standstill
in Iran-Oil Dispute
TEHERAN. Sept. 6 (UP) Pre-
3iier Mohcmed Mossadegh's
>)ans to submit an ultimatum to
Britain to settle the oil dispute
jet ween the two countries on
ran's terms were cut short to-
lay when opposition deputies
joycotted the meeting of parlia-
nent called to consider the
. cheme.
Government supporters wait-
ed for hours before deciding that
; quorum 66 of the 100 dipu-
ties was not going to show up
;n parliament.
Mossadegh was upset by this
aoycott. but planned to press the
Majlis (Parliament! for a vote
>t confidence to add to the over-
whelming one he got from the
Senate yesterday.
Teheran's main bazaar was
dosed today as shopkeepers and
overnment supporters rallied to
he Majlis building to cheer the
>overnment and shout "Death
o traitors" at the few opposition
deputies who showed up.
Some opposition deputies are
lettered to have boycotted the
neeting because they were afraid
to run the gantlet of Government
jupporters outside the Majlis.
Armed police and troops stood
juarri There were no incidents.
bassador Percy Spender. 2 to
Pakistan Foreign Minister
Chandrl Mohammad Zafrulla
Khan, and four nations ab-
stained in the secret ballottlng.
Spender then has elected
vice chairman with 31 votes.
Seven nations voted for Khan,
two for French Foreign Minis-
ter Robert Schumann, four ab-
stained and the remainder
scattered their votes.
The vote on the "gag" rules
climaxed a hectic morning of
bickering debate in which the
Communists tried to open the
conference to unlimited dis-
cussion and talk the treaty to
death.
From the moment Acheson
opened the meeting nine min-
utes late at 10:09 a. m.. PDT.
the Reds sought to derail the
Anglo-American program for
the conference.
After Soviet Chief Delegate
Andrei Gromyko's proposal to
consider Immediately an In-
vitation to Red China was re-
jected, the Communist bloc
made eight separate attempts
to delay the conference for
change or further study of the
prooosed rules.
All were defeated by wide
margins.
Gromvko also left the way
ese Peace Treaty."
3. The Soviet Union "does
not impose our point of view
on anyone; we do not want
anyone to impose their views
on us." ......
4. Everyone has the '.'indis-
putable and undeniable" right
to present any proposals at the
conference.
Acheson. as temporary chair-
man, ran the meeting with an
iron hand and Gromvko and
his Polish and Czech satellites
repeatedly rose to dispute his
rulings and delay procedure of
the conference along predeter-
mined lines.
Acheson repeated the remin-
der President Truman gave the
delegates when he opened the
conference. He said they were
here only to make statements
on and sign the treaty draft
on terms of the Anglo-Ameri-
can sponsored text released
Aug. 15 after 11 months nego-
tiation with "most of the other
allied nations."
The treaty probably Is the
most lenient ever given a de-
feated nation. Although it strips
Japan of her Pacific and Asia-
tic empire, it demands no re-
parations and leaves the way
open for her to rearm.
"While serving as your tem-
porary presiding officer, I shall
conduct proceedings in such a.
way as to realize the purpose
for which the conference was
calledfor the conclusion and
signature of the treaty of peace
with Japan on the terms of the
text before us," Acheson said.
He then declared adoption of
the rules of procedure the first
order of business. Gromvko im-
mediately sought to gain the
floor, waving his arm twice ahd
finally rising, but Acheson re-
cognized New Zealand Delegate
Sir Carl Berendsen. who moved
adoption of the rules.
Gromyko again sought the
floor but Acheson recognized
Cuban Delegate Oscar Gans,
who seconded Berendsen's mo-
tion.
Seaman Wills Estate
To US, Guatemala
Health Services
PHILADELPHIA. Sept. 6 (UP)
The people of Guatemala re-
ceived a gift of S500 here today
In appreciation of their kind-
^Z^'H-^J^Z Iifi? seaman^'^ "list
as Illegal and unacceptable to
omfaJt0hoSeA8tere 'S &-S ^HSS!- i^SS
TSASti other, re- of S^^ to ^PitaK orphan-
& SMrsa
tion by the American-British "P11**-
dru.t 2S5E H?i0h^m Macfarland left $12.000 to the
J1 e,w ^.,lh7uh o^r.^ L'nl** St* Publlc Health Ser-
possible to establish peace in
~the United States
Reds Hall Tons Of
German Parcel Post
Shipments to West
BERLIN, Sept. e (UP) Alli-
ed officials disclosed today that
the Soviets have virtually halt-
ed German parcel post shipments
by train from Berlin to the West.
Officials said that for the last
few months Soviet officials have
orderde mail cars detached from
interzonal trains when their
trains arrive at the border be-
tween the Soviet zone of Ger-
many and the British zone.
The mall -an have then been
returned to Berlin.
As a result 000 tons of parcel
post is now backlogged in Berlin.
This Is regarded as another In
the series of Russian-sponsored
East German mores to blockade
the Western sectors of Berlin.
Last week a heavy tax was
placed on all German vehicles
using the highway between Ber-
lin and the West.
The tax has virtually stopped
traffic on this roadway.
the Far East without the gov- I "* S # 9&-
ernment of the Chinese Peo-
ple's Republic" and said China
"has not at all" participated in
the present treaty planning.
Gromyko seemed determin-
ed to drag the conference ot
beyond Saturday when i-
natore of the treaty was
schemled. He said last mtbt
he expected the eoaferestcc
to last "at lease a month ~
Gromyko made these points:
ciation to
Government."
Brylcreem
KEEPS TOUR HAT*
. aoft, lustros

Cfc Irvjteo mi Mr
Mm* > Albrook-Bound C-54
Sits At Coco Solo
An Air Tore C-54 that devel-
i oped engine trouble this morning
about 125 miles out o Albrook
was escorted in for a safe land-
ing at 12.10 today at Coco Solo
The MATS plane, oo its regu-
lar run irosa B.-ookley Air r o; i -
Bast in Mobile. AJ.. to the Canal
Zone, had seven passengers
six/* a The pilot radioed Air
1 Porce Traffic Control at S 42 that
' be was having oaotor trouble, and
ieit an escort would be a precau-
tionary measure.
First Air Rescue Squadron lm-
i mediately dispatched an SB-17 ,
{ wit. a dropgable life boat As-
, other SB-17 that had been out on
a routine flight was diverted and i
, neaded for the troubled plane.
Both SB-17S and the C-54 land-
ed aalejy at 13:1*.
Martial Law Over
As Bangkok Calms
BANGKOK Sept <
Martial lav wa# lifted here by
royaJ dacree this morning
It vac imposed following the
aoortlv* June 29 coup staged
by the navy
Abdullah's Son, 42,
Returns To Jordan;
Takes Oath As King
AMMAN. Sept. 4 (UP) Emir
Talar. 42. son of assassinated
King Abdullah, took oath here as
the new King of Jordan today
less than an hoar after he arriv-
ed in the country by plane from
Switzerland.
He was In Switzerland under-
going treatment for mental dis-
orders when Abdullah was
mated,
Gromyko finally gained the
floor and demanded that Red
China be invited to the con-
ference. Acheson ruled him out
of. order, but Czech Delegate
Dr. Oertruda Sekanlnova sec-
onded Gromyko's motion and
asked that the conference dis-
cuss that question first.
For nearly an hour pro-
ceedings were delayed while
the Reds sought to block
adoption of the procedural
rales. At one point, after
Acheson hsd announced he
would permit one five-min-
ute talk from each side on
the question. Polish Delegate
Stefan Wierblowskl refuted
tm leave the platform when
his time was up.
Boyish-Looking British De-
legate Kenneth Younger, who
had been recognized, finally
shouldered him from the plat-
form and the Pole left waving
his arms.
After the conference repected.
45 to 3. Gromyko's appeal from
Acheson's ruling that his pro-
posal for Immediately conside-
ration of an Invitation to Red
China was out of order. Wier-
blowskl recommended appoint-
ment of a seven-member com-
mittee to consider rules of pro-
cedure and report- back today.
This proposal as well as
Czech and Soviet amendments
to the proposed rules were de-
feated by votes ranging from
25 to 7 to 48 to 3-
"When tHe-morning session
recessed, Gromyko strode brisk-
ly from the hall. He refused to
sav whether he would offer a
substitute treaty draft.
"What do you think of the
procedure here today?" report-
ers asked.
"It Is bad, very bad." he
snapped.
Cl Sliahtly Hurt
After Running Car
Off CZ Highway
An Army soldier was treated
for scalp lacerations after a
car he had been driving was
completely demolished last
night on Thatcher Highway
near Mile Post No. 5.
When Opl. Alan C. OlUesple
lost control of the 1948 Chevro-
let lt left the road and travel-
led about 197 feet before
crashing Into a tree.
GUlespie. a member of "B"
Company. 33rd Infantry was
treated at the Ft Kobbe dis-
pensary. The vehicle is owned
by cpJ. Floyd M. Roberts of
Hq and Hq. Co.. 33rd Infantry.
Further Investigation of tht
accident is being conducted.
Fast Action
Averts Fire
On Carrier

Mix a flame-spewing, mllllon-
candlepower flare among a
batch of Navy planes loaded
with high-octane gasoline on a
carrier deck and you have the
Ingredients for a first-class dis-
aster. These dramatic photos
show how Just such an emer-
gency arose on the deck of the
USS Bon Homme Richard, oper-
ating In Korean waters, and
how it was met. At right, smoke
pours around a Douglas Sky-
raider fighter plane after t,he
high-powered flare was acci-
dentally dropped from another
plane during takeoff. Below, as
smoke blots out one craft and
blankets others, Aviation Boat-
swain's Mate James L. Seig, of
Compton, Calif., (whlte-shirt-
ed figure Indicated by arrow)
runs with the flaming flare to
throw lt over the carrier's side.
KLM Fuel Dental
Equipment To Jamaica
At the request of the West
Indies Committee In London.
KLM. Royal Dutch Airlines
will transport free of charge,
a quantity of dental eauipment
to Jamaica as the hospitals
there are Id urgent need of this
material. The equipment will
be sent from London via Cura-
cao to /amalea.
w kMMk ... SmV n
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u
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said that Oov-
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Cribbing Cadets Members Of
Organized Ring, Says Irving
NEW YORK, Sept. 6 (UP)
Maj. Gen. F. A. Irving, super-
intendent of United States Mil-
itary Academy, said today the
Cadets Involved in cribbing at
West Point were members of
an "organized cheating ring"
which began operating in 1949.
Irving made the charge In
a letter to Brig. Gen. Chaun-
cryr. Fenton. retired, president
of the Academy Association of
Graduates. It was made public
by Col. William H. Kyle, pres-
ident or the West Point so-
ciety of New York and a vice
president of the Bankers Trust
Co.. and Col. George De Graff,
secretary of the association.
The letter, mailed to 12.000
West Point graduates today,
said that all the cheating was
done by members of the foot-
ball team, their room mates
and close associates.
"These men apparently came
to think of themselves as a
group apart, and developed a
set of values different from
those of the remainder of the
corps of cadets." Irving said.
He said that the cribbing has
resulted in 75 men being separ-
ated 'from the academv. It ap-
peals, he said, that the total
will be approximately 90.
The situation was revealed by
two cadets who reported separ-
ately to their cadet company
honor representative that the
Honor Code was being violated.
Irving said.
"This current situation was
not reported Immediately bo-
pro-CoBununist I
Govammeat of. j

Red Magazine Says
US Message To
Soviets Deceiving
MOSCOW. Sept. e (UP) -
Recent messaKes to the people of
Russia from the I r Ited States
Congress and from President
Truman were deliberately cal-
culated to deceive the Soviet
people and the whole world, ac-
cording to the current issue of
the Moscow magazine Mew
Times.
The magazine said the "crude
falsehood'' of the Congression-
al message was shown by a sub-
sequent statement by Sen. Brian
McMahon, D. Conn., advocating
the use or atom bombs on So-
viet tndustrlsl -enters If the
Russian* attacked Western Eu-
rope.__________
Brozil Seeking
I folin Capitol
ROME Sept f Vies Tsetdent /oeo Cafa Ficho
saM hare today that Brasil
wanted ssore Italian eapital.
He said arrangements eouM
a Made (or more Italian ami-
ratloato JraaU. -
cause lt started as an organ-
ized effort by a small group
determined to live outside the
code," the letter said. "It spread
as a conspiracy. Failure to re-
port this cheating has not been
a primary reason for discharge
of this group. Practically all
these men nave admitted to
active participation in cheat-
ing."
The two cadets who report-
ed the cheating in April said
they had been invited to join
the "ring," Irving said. The
cadet Honor Committee in-
vestigated the charges in
May, and the latter was then
turned over to a board of of-
ficers, he said.
Union distributed Irving's
leaer to the 12,000 West Point
graduates.
Irving described the opera-
tion oi the "ring" as follows:
"This has been an organized
cheamiK ring, lt has not been
a number oi Isolated groups or
Individuals, because of the na-
ture oi tne evidence, no one
knows for certain when the
activities of the ring began or
in what numbers the ring be-
gan. It was certainly confined
to a very small group as late
as the Fall of 1949. it spread
in the Spring of '90 and mush-
roomed to approximately 90
cadets from the examination
period of December '50 to March
'SI, due primarily to spread
among football players, their
roommates and close associates.
"Men were added to the ring
In two general ways. First,
athletes low In studies had the
system explained to them by
their upp;r class teammates.
Second, one cadet might either
ask another cadet for legitim-
ate help or receive unsolicited
aid.
"In either circumstance the
man receiving the advfee would
find the next day that he had
been given the main problem
that appeared on his examina-
tion. The cadet giving the aid
had used information given to
him by members of the ring
from the other regiment who
had already taken the exami-
nation.
"When this happened con-
sistently a cadet might become
suspicious and ask about the
matter. He would then be told
that he was now in the ring,
perhaps given the names of
many personal friends (some-
times two, sometimes 12), using
this system, and In general
placed under great pressure to
stay In the ring.
"Many cadets In the ring
seemed to have a double
standard of values and acted
as If they were especially
exempted from the Honor
Code."
gs
GtOCOA

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