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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/01223
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:01223
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
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Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
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TWENTK-SIXTH YKAR
PANAMA, R. P.. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER I, 1951
PTYB CENTS
US Troops Capture Hills
Overlooking Key Red Base
(NA Telephoto)
DEATH BOAT Rescue workers examine the fl shine boat Pelican after It wag towed In awash.
Nine bodies were pulled from under the deck* of the vessel, which overturned in a riptide,
off Montauk Point. Long Island. Only 19 of the 56 persons aboard the 45-foot craft survived
the accident. Many of the 37 victims are .still missing. A probe is under way.
Increase In
Auto Prices
Imminent
Another Hurricane Is Located
As Storm In Caribbean Eases
f,?iJFWf S SUCCESSOR The new British jet flghter. the
SK' X&r i^P). flies in formation with* fifituoesd
will thVS Ck"0*** bT VRo"-<>y< *9njet ine.
(will be the first of the new wept-back win* fighters to o into
quantity production for the Royal Air Fore*.
'Battle For Moon Joined
As Chemists Eyes Go Pop
LONDON. Sept. 5 (UP) The
Battle for the Moon opened here
today.
Scientists from ll western na-
tions, including some of the
world's leading military rocket
designers, assembled last night
to. form an international lnter-
Slanetary rocket society and pool
[formation that delegates be-
lieve may prevent the Russians
,from "capturing" the Moon.
Arthur C. Clarke, chairman of
the British Interplanetary Socie-
ty, said western scientists know
the Russians are concentrating
n the development of space
rockets and may easily be furT
ther advanced than the West.
He said the Russians, working
with the help of captured Ger-
man scientists, may be the first
to land a space ship on the Moon
or launch a "space station" to
float above the earth's atmos-
phere, giving the Soviets tremen-
dous strategic advantages.
Some of the Germans held by
the Soviets are known to have
knowledge of Hitler's designs for
Just such a space platform.
The United States has admit-
ted working along the same lines.
Delegates will Inaugurate the
International Astr o n o m i c a 1
Foundation dedicated to the In-
terchange of information on the
possibility of launching space
travel "In our time."
Attending the conference are
delegates from the U. S., Britain.
Argentina, Germany, France, It-
aly, Spain. Denmark, Norway
Austria and Sweden
Among them are some of the
Germans who designed the
dreaded V-2 rockets which blast-
ed Britain in the latter days of
World War II.
In New York .meanwhile, a sci-
entist said that man in the. next
23 years may solve virtually all of
the mysteries of the processes of
life, and thereby "alleviating
m"y of our remaining physical
The prediction came from Dr.
M. Howell Furman, chairman of
the department of chemistry at
Princeton University, in making
the presidential address at the
opening of the American Chem-
ical Society's diamond jubilee
meeting. .
The ACS's meeting this year is
the largest It ever has held, main-
ly because hundreds of chemists
from many foreign lands are
here to participate with the Am-
ericans in an International con-
clave.
Opening the big scientific
meeting, Dr. Furman said that
there is "reasonable hope" that
an important part of animal
food requirements may be syn-
thesized in "rather compact pho-
tosynthetlc factories."
He recalled the new develop-
ments in the use of radioactive
substances as tracers to study
photosynthesis, the process used
by plants to convert sunlight In-
to carbon dioxide.
Furman also predicted that
man would be able to use atomic
energy for power purposes, and
that achievement should come
within the next 25 years.
He saw a "world In the future"
where scientists would produce
new "wonder drugs," fibers, plas-
tics, coatings and a "host of
products that will be useful to
agriculture, industry and human
health."
WASHINGTON. Sept. 5 (UP)
Price Chief Michael V. Di-
Salle plans to issue an order
within the next week author-
izing a general Increase in au-
tomobile prices, it was dis-
closed today,
Price control officials refused
to say how big an Increase will
be permitted. But it was un-
derstood it will not include all
cost increases auto makers have
incurred since the Korean War
began.
Information said the price
agency Is trying to complete
the order for DlSalle's signa-
ture before be leaves tods:
on a speaking trip to Jackson-
ville, Fla., and Dallas. Other-
wise he is due' to sign It on
his return here Monday.
Officials indicated the in-
craases will vary for different
* of automobiles. Several
'major auto makers already,
have applied tor increases un-
der the revised controls law
now in force.
General Motors Corp., has
asked Informally for permis-
sion to raise prices by 8 to
10 per cent on all OM cars-
Cadillac, Bulck, Oldsmobile,
Pontiac and Chevrolet.
Ford and Chrysler, the other
members of the auto industry's
big three, also have applied
for hikes banging up to 10 per
cent- TEHERAN. Sept. 5 (UP)
The "r"Bnhort" o^,^m.t Iranian Premier Mohamed Mos-
to the new'"controls Ed i sadegn today "ed plans
ed thatTricremgsVust ft' to SUbmlt an 'turn to Brh
MIAMI, Sept. 5 (UP)The sixth
tropical storm of the year was
located today 1,400 miles due west
of Dakar, Africa, as the Carib-
bean storm that once threatened
Jamaica petered out. However,
the weather bureau said an un-
identified ship radioed sufficient
information to indicate that the
new blow was possibly of hurri-
cane intensity and was centered
some 3.2CO miles from the North
American continent.
The earlier hurricane that had
churned the Caribbean with 100
mph winds degenerated into
squalls at 40 mph or less. The
weather bureau found that the
hurricane had broken into rainy
squalls over a vast low pressure
rea which crept slowly towards
the Gulf of Mexico. They warned
that the random turbulence still
had the Ingredients needed to
form a raging hurricane once
more.
"Hurricane Dog" as the weath-
er bureau identified It, had veer-
ed westward before it broke up,
sparing Jamaica a retural of the
whirling fury which killed 154
persons three weeks 'ago, and
damaged $50,000,000 worth of
property.
Watery gales of 50 to 00 miles
per hour ranged about 200 miles
northward and knocked out
roads and communications
around Kingston where the pre-
vious storm had hit hardest, but
the hurricane winds bypassed the
battered city. Thousands of res-
idents who' were hungry an
homeless since the Aug. 17 catas-
trophe emerged from govern-
ment shelters thankful for what
many called "miraculous deliver-
ance" from a second destruction.
Their Governor, Sir Hugh Foot,
warned them this morning to ex-
pect the worst from anticipated
100 mile an hour winds pointed
dead at Kingston, the capital.
The southern shore of the fruit
and tourist-laden island hadn't
yet dug out from the debris of
the 125-mile on hour fury of
Aug. 17.
' High tides and drenching gales
with winds of 60 miles an hour
isolated Kingston, according to
a telephone report from United
Press correspondent Kenneth
Miller on vacation from Wash-
ington.
T e 1 e p h one communications
with the Island were cut off for
nearly five hours. Making the
last call before the lines went
out. Miller said he was unable to
get into Kingston from Tower
Isle because of flooded roads.
Calling back at 2:45 p.m.. Mil-
ler reported that Kingston still
was cut off as 60 mile an hour
squalls continued to pound the
south shore.
Korean Peace
Talks Slated
For Hong Kong
8TH ARMY HQ., Korea, Sept. 5 (UP) United State*
Marines and soldiers today fought fot- and captured four
hills.overlooking Kumsong, key Communist base on tlrt
central Korean front.
United States artillery immediately began pumping
shells into the Red troop and supply center, and covering
the long valleys down which the Reds must move in their
expected counteroffensive.
Allied artillery and bombers blasted the Communists
(UP?KIVeKore1nyarSlce ahe.ad f ** 9r0Und tr00PS in the hUrS f % morni"9
talks may be shifted to Hong! darkness today.
When the fight for the peaks was over the Reds had
lost 2,600 men, two thirds of their front line troops in the
sector.
"The government is keeping all
precautions in effect until to-
night," he said. "But these de-
voutly religious islanders call it a
miraculous deliverance."
He said the gales had knocked
down many communications
lines, but no casualties were re-
ported by late afternoon.
In Kingston, thousand of res-
idents left homeless and hungry
by last month's hurricane were
crowded into shelters that with-
stood that blow and into II new
centers opened by the govern-
ment.
Iran Preparing Final
Ultimatum To Britain
West Germany
Loses Long Fight
For Seized Assets
BONN, Sept. 5 (UP) W-.st
Germany today lost her lct.fi
light to regain an estimated
*2,000,000,000 in former German
assets earmarked by the West-
en allies for reparations.
Allied officials proclaimed a
new law making final the ssi-
uie of the property.
low lor all "reasohalie" ln-
creases in costs since the Ko-
rean War started. The auto
makers' requests were based
on this amendment.
Informed quarters did not
say why the ordef will not al-
low all the increases authoriz-
ed by the amendment, which
President Truman has asked
Congress to repeal, on grounds
it Is inflationary.
The auto industry raised Us
prices by 10 per cent but the
government cancelled the hike
pending a review of industry
costs. Last Spring DiSalle au-
thorised a 3 i/i per cent In-
crease for the Industry.
61 Gels 6 Months
In Panam Trial;
Case Is Appealed i
An Ameriean soldier who was
sentenced by the Fifth Circuit
Court of Panama to six months
in Jan" for involuntary man-
slaughter Is on "duty status" in
Fort Amador today pending ac-
tion on the appeal of his law-
yer.
James L. Irving, 81, from Hq.
taln to accept Iran's terms for
an oil settlement, or to see all
British oil experts expelled from
Iran.
Mossadegh made his an-
nouncement in the Senate,
which backed the plan 26-0.
The Iranian cabinet is ex-
pected to start tonight on
drafting a letter to Britain,
containing the ultimatum.
The ultimatum would give
Britain two weeks in which to
accept Iran's three-point pro-
posals as originally submitted
to Br
tain did not accept the Iranian
ultimatum.
Mossadegh's three points are:
1) British experts should sign
individual contracts with the
Iranian National Oil Company;
2) Iran would
Kong to escape the taint of neu-
trality violation charges which
pushed them near collapse, dis-
patches from the allied camp be-
low Kaesong said today.
Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway's
truce team was in conference
with him here. They were be-
lieved to be preparing a new
note to the Communists which
may propose a new site for the
negotiations.
Allied offi.ials still were offi-
cially hopeful that the talks
would be resumed. And the Pel-
ping Radio said last night that
"the road to peace in the Far
East is still open."
Reports from the camp below
Kaesong and speculation among
the best sources here suggested
that Ridgway's message to Kim
11 8ung and Peng Teh-Huai
might suggest:
1. That the conference be
moved to Hong Kong as an
indisputably neutral site.
2. That the negotiators might
use a "tent City" set up in the
middle of No Man's Land be-
tween the opposing armies.
S. That the Job of keeping
Kaesong neutral be delegated
to iotat Hilary police petrels.
Instead of the Communist se-
curity forces.
A responsible source at the
advance camp told UrlKed Press
Correspondent Frank Bartholo-
mew that Hong Kong had been
discussed as a possible site for
the armistice conference.
An alternate suggestion was
trie construction of a tent city in
an open field In No Man's Land.
It would operate on the basis of
everybody leaving at the end of
each session so no occasion would
exist for further allegations of
neutrality violation.
Bartholomew said no informa-
tion was available at the camp
as to whether any tentative act-
ion had followed discussion of
the possible sites.
Ridgway's note was expected
any time within the next two
United Nations planes con-
tinued to roam over above
North Korean roads, seeking the
Red supply columns still head-
ing to the front despite the
loss of more than 4,000 vehicles
Truman All
But Admits
Hell Run
term,Tf^omp^nsaationn,for S' gfe 9iggSU&B2 &&
Anglo-Iranian Oil Clmpany; l,ea-d of the ttce.tenm. t
3) Iran would sell oil to Bri-
tain only for British consump-
tion.
to Britain's Lord Privy
Richard Stokes, when he was in
Teheran negotiating.
Britain would be offered the
opportunity of making counter,
proposals favorable to Iran.
Mossadegh said the residence
In London Britain Is expected
to reject this ultimatum.
Officials there reaffirmed
Britain's decision to maintain
a skeleton staff of about 350
experts in the great refinery
Seal, at Abadan to protect hutalla-
be moved in if
permits of the British oil ex-" and sell oil from Abadan wlth-
perts would be cancelled If Bit-
15 Cents Lost
Last Tooth Cone;
But Villian Jailed
tions there.
Troops will
necessary.
A British 'Foreign Office
spokesman said Britain consi-
ders Iran is not entitled to offer
out British approval
"The oil is the property of
the Anglo-Iranian Oil Com-
pany, and the Iranian Govern-
ment therefore has no right to
sell it."
Iran has offered to sell oil
accident in which a 18-year-old
Panamanian, Ladislao Araos Ar-
ela of La Chorrera was killed
instantly.
On Sept. 25 of last year Irving
was driving in Arraljan with
the young Panamanian boy and
handed him the wheel of the
Cheesecake And Roses This Way
r ti!T2h*MT,.LC,T1' NJ- Sp*t 5 fiP^T-S?i- siria from all parts of the nation get their
SZutte! .cl*JL* tltU ' Mm* A6""- They don the
S-aardwalk with brlrb - -red flosU to enhance, the
Special Troops, was tried for an Zone employe, dropped several
coins from his pocket at the
Pacific Clubhouse rest room
yesterday morning. He accused
a bystander, Modesto de Leon
of having recovered the money
The defendant. De Leon
punched Brathwaite when he
threatened to call the ponce
. to settle the matter. The blow
car. Arcia, who had never driv- to the Jaw knocked out the
en before, took over and was sole surviving tooth that Brath-
J to Communist Poland and Cze-
choslovakia, as well as
in, i i ^countries.
The loss of a last tooth, and ~---------------------- -
15 cents resulted in a 39 year
old Panamanian being senten-
ced to 30 days in Jail in this
morning's session of the Balboa
Magistrate's Court.
It all started when Georgr
Brathwaite, 62, an ex-Canal
night postponed his return to the
advance camp.
Admiralty Trial
Ends; Briefs
Will Be filed
Trial of the S4fl,000 admiralty
suit against the Luckenbach
Steamship Company was termin-
ated yesterday afternoon in the
U.S. District Court at Ancon.
Donald J. McNevin, attorney
for libelants Ann Maden and Ra-
fael Guzman, and Ramirez and
DeCastro. the Luc k e n b a c h
Steamship Company's counsel,
will now submit memoranda and
will await the Judge's decision.
The claim developed after the
Florence of the Luckenbach Line
collided with the small coastwise
ship Lilly on Sept. 21. 1090, in-
flicting heavy damages to the
other wooden boat and killing cattle
that were on 1-oard.
SAN FRANCISCO, 8ept. 5 (UP)
President Truman headed In-
to the Middle West today after
surprising West Coast Democrats
with a preview of his platform
for 152.
Fresh from a rousing party
meeting at which he came with-
in inches of saying he was rendy
to run again, the President de-
parted by plane for his home
town of independence, Missouri.
Democratic Party followers
from 11 Western states seem to
regard him as a candidate now.
In booming campaign invec-
tive after his 19 style, Mr. Tru-
man set a political fire at a
noonday gathering of 300 Paci-
fic Coast Democrats.
He poured political gasoline on
the Republican Party, applied a
torch and stood back to admire
the blaze
When the smoke cleared and
the ear-splitting applause died
away there was visible a Demo-
cratic blueprint for 1952, Tru-
man-style.
The President's simple themes:
1) "Support the Democratic
slate and you will be working for
the people of the United States,
you will be working for world
peace."
2) "Reactionaries and isola-
tionists, plus economic fossils,
who oppose the administrations
foreign and domestic policies are
flirting wltn national suicide,
flirting with the end of civil-
ization."
The crowd yelled like fight
fans looking lor a knockout.
to Allied air strikes in the pas
10 days.
Kumsong is the mountain ey-
rie to which the Reds shifted
their central front headquarters
when they were driven from
the Iron Triangle last spring.
Yesterday the army force at-
tacking it was identified as
the United States 7th Division,
with Ethiopian infantry at-
tached.
Meanwhile in Tokyo it is be-
lieved the complete draft of tho
latest note United Nations Su-
preme Commander General
Matthew Rldgway Intends to
send his Communist opposite
numbers is under study in
Washington.
It is expected to be sent to
the Communists today or to-
morrow.
It is reported Ridgway will:
1) Try to get the ceasefire
talks restarted by suggesting
they be switched to a new arte-
where violations of neutrality,
would be unlikely; .
2) Invite the Reds to resuma
the ceasefire talks without fur-
ther bickering over alleged
neutrality breaches, or end thern
for good and fight it out on
the battlefield.
4 Die In 12th
Crash Of Alaskan
Planes In Month
ANCHORAGE, Alaska. Sept.
5. (UP). A twin-engined
Cessna plane crashed and burn-
ed in a thickly populated resi-
dential section killing four per-
sons today.
The crash raised the toll of
dead or missing to 92 persons
In 12 Alaskan airplane crashes
during the past month.
Gamboa Bus Drivers
Clash; 1 Arrested,
Other In Hospital
A heated argument over bus
schedules landed one driver in
Oorgas Hospital yesterday with
a deep laceration on the fore-
head.
Another was booked on a
charge of "assault with a dead-
ly weapon."
Two Gamboa bus drivers. Au-
gustus Mantique. 62,' and Alon-
so Romaln, 29 were parked in
front of the Santa Crux Club-
house in Gamboa.
When Mantique demanded
that Romaln drive off first. Ro-
maln refused. Mantique relatlat-
ed by starting to deflate the
tires of Romair.'s bus.
Romaln then grabbed a length
of pipe which he used for a jack
handle and struck Mantiene on
the forehead over the left eye,
inflicting a deep wound.
After the injured man was
given emergency treatment by
the Gamboa dispensary doctor,
he was taken to Gorgas where
he was admitted for observa-
tion and possible head Injury.
He is not on the seriously ID
list.
Romaln was arrested. There
will be a preliminary hearing
Monday.
Jury Suggests
Imagined 'Non
Bouncing Teacher
Virgin Hi-School
Who
Club
killed In a crackup.
Although the scldier did not
appear yesterday, his written
statement, read in court, reveal-
ed that he was very tired when
walte had.
De Leon pleaded" not guilty
to the battery charge, and re-
ceived the 30 day sentence.
he let Arda drive and he be- Sinele-Seatpr Kills
lleved that the youth had driv- ,. ^ r IU8
Each '-
Jadge, i
starts today.
loot I-e fer the first signs ef favor in a
Txe a-.ua: Ju:..es f Jadgtag the contest
en before.
Two other American soldiers,
pr.sse.ngen in the ear at that
time, William P. Harr s. 21. and
C.st.Cy Earl Coroney. 24. have
Lem exonerated of any guilt.
Ir - was reoreiented In
Court by Pedro Moreno Conea,
Pilot, Home-Owner
DEL MONTE, California, Sect
(UP). A single-seater air
Elane crashed into a house near
ere setting both the house and
plsne afire.
Police found two bodies, be-
lieved to be he pilot and anlvsn! in ni'
occupant of the bouse. me report
| MEMPHIS. Tenn.. Sept. 5.
'(UP) The Smelby County
Grand Jurv today recommend-
ed the firing of Mrs. Maurlne
D. Haysllp. the eighth grade
teacher who reported a "non-
virgins'' sex club among coeds
at a Memphis High School.
| The jury had Investigated
charges of "organized immoral-
ity" mentioned by Mrs. Hay-
slip, the wife of a minister.
"Our extensive investigation
reveals no scintilla of evidence
Of the existence of a 'non-
virgins' club," the Grand Jury
reported.
The Grand Jury report said
"non-virgin" sex club as an
unfounded rumor."
"We cannot escape the
conclusion that Treadwell
High School has been vici-
ously maligned by the un-
founded charges."
"The several incidents do not
indicate organized immoralltiy
and they have no connection
with the school, its activities its students, a community and
or organizations." the report a city."
said. "Thev constitute problems Mrs. Havsllp had charged that
for parental control and are he was ordered transferred to
not within the province of another school because she
school discipline. tried to expose a 'non-virgins"
"We have carefully consider- sex club at Treadwell High.
. ed all the charg-s made in the The mother of three children.
Its investigation "revealed in- statements of Mrs. Hayslip and the oldest, a soldier in Jeoan.
cldents of immoralitv among heard her in full. It is our Mrs Haysllp said that she got
individual students." Adding opinion that her continued em- her IniormaMon from "some of
'We do not consider them un- ployment in the city schools the girls" at the school. Mrs.
or in m'-v-r." rou'd be Innrtv'-ub'r nd a Hav!ln and other wi'npiws.
"The report concluded that at the grand jury hearing,
the "non-virgins'' club..."is a The grand Jury said that the
non-existent, imaginary organ- morals of Treadwell High School
ization, which through common were above average and recom-
gosslp, regrettable rumor, care- mended that Mrs. Hayslip be
less reiteration of hearsay, and dismissed.
without fact or foundation, be- "We, the Shelby County Grand
came a monstrous fantasy of Jury, as requested by the Mem-
sexual orgy which threatened phis Board of Education, have
the reputation of a school and investigated the charge that
organized immorality existed In
Treadwell High School." the
report said.
"Individuals with informa-
tion were' repeatedly urged to
appear and be heard. Our ex-
tensive Investigation reveals
very substantial and creditabls
evidence that no such club as
a "NonVirgin's Club exists or
ever existed."
Mrs. Haysllp vas not avatt-
desenbed the dteser.ice lo kitfl community," mcluduig students, had testified able for comment.
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THE PANAMA AMEBICAN AN INDEPENDENT OAILY NEWSPAPF*
Cargo and freight-Ships and Planes-Arrivals and Departures
Shipping & AirLine News
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great White Fleet
Arrives
New Orleans Service _______Cristbal
SI 5.32P ..................................Sept. 10
S.S. Chlriqui ...................................Sept. 16
S.S. Mayari ....................................Sept. 17
S.S. Manaqni ..................................Sept. 29
._________frUadltng UafrUarated Chilled and Central dram
Arrives
Crist6b.il

New York Freight Service
S.8. Cape Arinof ..............................Sept. 5
S.S. Cape Cumberland ..................... Sent 9
S.S. Cape Cod .................................Sept. i8
S.S. Cape Ann .................................Sept. 23
S.S. Cape Avinof ..............................Sept. 30
Waakl} *Uun*a MIMtwk, Lo Anecio. San rancian, tram.
O callona I Sailing to New Orlen, and Mohllt
H* Waaaaar In thin crvlrr arc Mmltao In twelve oMtni.nl
Tequeni rreiahi Malln (mm i ri.mhai m Waal t'oait Central men
Three Professors Returning
To United States Alter
Working in Engr. Div.
Three professors who have
spent the summer working in the
Civil Engineering Branch of the
Engineering Division will leave
the Isthmus this week to return
to the United 8tates.
Howard M. Glifft, head of the
Cristobal to l\ew Orleans via
Tela, Honduras
Arrives
Cristbal
55 !r!,,,i...................................Sent
S.S. Chlriqui......(Passenger Service Only)......Oct. 2
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2884 COLON U
Sanitary engineering department
at Cornell University, will leave
Friday on the S.S. Ancon.
Taylor D. Lewis, associate pro-
fessor of civil engineering at
CorneJl, will leave by plane to-
morrow, accompanied by hi swife
and two sons.
Melvln N. Rotsch. architecture
professor in the School of Engi-
neering at Texas Agricultural and
Mechanical College, will leave
Saturday by air with his wife
and son.
TERrrr _,
1 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1ML
" NANA PEEL ON LAST STEP
SWEDISH TRANSATLANTIC LINE
Accepting Passengers For
LOS ANGELES
via
AMAPALA, LA UNION and LA LIBERTAD
by
SAILING SEPTEMBER 7th
C. B. r EN ION.* Cw., INC.
Tel. Cristbal 1781' Balboa 1065
_
\
GRACE LINE
Advance Passenger List
For S.S. Ancon
The S.S. Ancon will leave the
Isthmus Friday with 152 passen-
gers, including several local col-
lege students returning to school
in the United States.
Among the passengers on this
sailing will be Dr. Julian Hunt
medical officer at the La Boca
District Medical Clinic; John H
McNamara, Assistant Chief of
the Postal, Customs and Immi-
gration Division; and Dr. Arthur
N. Sprlngall. Assistant to the Su-
perintendent of Gorgas Hospital.
.Gustavo Abeles, Mrs. June L
Tnderson and daughter, Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur G. Baggott, Miss
Janet L. Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. Ar-
ba E. Beck, and Major and Mrs.
Arthur E. Buckley and son.
Miss Jean Capwell, Miss Doro-
thy Capwell, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
t. Carey and daughter, Miss Pa-
mela Carpenter. Bruce Carpen-
ter, Miss Pauline Carroll, Mr and
Mrs. William J. Carson and son
Mrs. Belisario Castro. Lt. and
Mrs. Raymond C. Charlton and
son. Ronald C. Chlsholm. Vernon
L Clontz, Miss Barbara Comber
Mr and Mrs. Joel L. Cook. Mrs.
Arthur Corbett and two children
and Mrs. Jane D. Cox and daugh-
John E. Davis. Miss Dorothy M
L.edeau\, Mr. and Mrs. Roberto
de la Guardia and three children
JACOBY ON BRIDGE
Wayne Detamore, Miss Shirley E.
Edwards. Richard C. Elton, Mr.
and Mrs. Sumner E. Ewlng, and
Ralph W. Fels, Mr. and Mrs. Mer-
wln A. French.
Howard M. Grlfft, James B.
Giider, Mr. and Mrs. William K.
Greene and son, Jay E. Hall, Mrs.
Helen -Hancock and daughter,
Miss Rosamond Hartshorn, Her-
man J. Henriquez and two daugh-
ters, Mrs. Vida Henriquez and
son, Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. Hen-
ry, Richard C. Herman Dr. and
Mrs. Julian H. Hunt.
Miss Gloria K. Ives, Mrs. Hilda
J. Jones, Albert J. Joyce and two
sons, Cpl. Louis Juliano, Mrs.
Bonita Kadoch and son, Mrs, Hel-
en W. Kalar, Daniel P. Kiley, Mr.
and Mrs. Benjamin F. Kuller, Jr.
Mario Lachman, Sgt. Joseph B.
Lockman and wife, Richard 8.
Lombard. Miss Dolores J. Lowry,
Flix Maduro, Mrs. Louly Malea
and four children, Miss Cather-
ine R. Manush. George A. Martin,
John H. McNamara, Earl W. Mel-
rose, John L. Miller and wife, Dr.
and Mrs. Wm. E. Murry and
daughter .
Miss Ann K. Newhard. Mrs.
Louisce C. Nolan, Mrs. Teresa M
O'Donnell, Waiter C. Olhoeft,
William F. Ossenfort, Jr., Mr. and
Mrs. Harry W, Peterson, Mrs. Lil-
lian M. Peterson, Major Donald
A. Price, Mrs. Ruth W. Redmond
and daughter, James C. Reld,
Robert f. Roche, Mr. and Mrs.
Robert E. Rogers. Miss Virginia
A. Ryter, and Miss Margaret L.
Ryter.
Miss Jean Saarlnen, Robert
Saarlnen, Mr. and Mrs. George
H. Sanford, David Sarko, Mrs.
Marcella Scanland, Miss Barbara
A. Schnake, Miss Carol B. Ser-
geant, Mrs. Louise N. Soyster and
daughter, Dr. and Mrs. Arthur N.
Sprlngall, Mr. and Mrs. John F\
Stopa, Mr. and Mrs. Everett O
Swinson. .
George J. Waidron, Morris
Waxman, Miss Frances L. Weed-
en, Miss Barbara Ann Wells, Mr.
and Mrs. J. Horace Wei traer, Miss
Jean Ann White, Miss Dorothy
Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Howard M
Woods, and Mrs. Edith Gerrans.
'nitt TtWft TM AUCIUti J DOMMJ POfcMT
) WaWTlONi, MADAM -dTUAT TWS DKAtOH
PL. wow CO* LIU ]LADY UV-TN*,
V* HI* KBPORT TO/ AM MIWULU6
- .ygjifj-----------\ AMiHtr-nrnjApr
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TV PKAoON LADY TO ACCOMFUtH TH/...'
A
>*0
K *% AND HI FRIEND
A Quick Trip
BI MTiMMtL BLOS8EB
Ano jowing our noon friends
tdoav will be none other than
uro smith star athlete from
shadyside /
c^wn-g*"*
AM.EV OOP
Oneor Both
.____It
BY ?. T. HAMITN
BOOTS AND HER HI IHMEJ!
That's That
BY EDGAR MARTI!
BJ OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
FROM NEW YORK TO WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA
S.8. "SANTA CECILIA" ...........Due Cristobal, Sept. 12th
FROM WEST COAST SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK
8.8. "8ANTA ISABEL1' ... ,.....Sails Cristbal, Sept. 10th
FROM U.S. PACIFIC & WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA TO BALBOA & CRISTOBAL
ill flS^JgHP".............ue ialboa- SePl 9th
8.8. SANTA ADELA ...............Due Balboa, Sept. 14th
FROM CRISTOBAL TO WEST COAST CENTRAL
AMERICA TO U.S. PACIFIC
M.8. "GUNNER'S KNOT".........Sals Cristbal. Sept. 9th
'Balboa Only.
PAiXAMA A#-*'fc'^W. '*-"
Cristbal 1144 2135 Panam 2-155B 0557 Balboa ISO 2159
NORTH U
? 741
/Q10I4
? ill
4>A42
WEST BAIT
AK10S3 *>
VAI a/S2
? Q104 ? JB852
WM M0785I
SOOTH (D)
AQJ0I
VKJ973
? A7
? KQ
N-SvuL
SMtk WaM North East
1* Pan 1N.T. Past
It Past IV Pa**
Pasa
Opening lead* A
U** ......iiiiiiiilllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllirinirTrirtTjj
RENT
Happy landlords and
tenants get together
through oar want-ads
every issue. Tom to
the ant-ads. Check
them oow t
Every month . every week . every day
THE PANAMA AMERICAN carries MORE WANT ADS
(han all other daily papers in Panama combined I
The bidding of the opponents
sometimes tells you to open a
trump. For example, dummy may
deny one suit bid by his partner
and raise another suit with en-
thusiasm. That sort of bidding
usually Indicates ability to ruff
Ue denied suit, In which case
he defenders may have to lead
trumps at every opportunity in
order to get their tricks.
In today's hand the bidding
sounded Just like that to West
As turned out, however, he
sho-.ld have trusted his eyes as
well as his ears.
. When West opened the ace of
.learn, a very reasonable open-
ing lead because of dummy's bid-
'nf ne had the chance to see
tnat dummy was not short in
spaces Staring West in the face
were three small spades
In spite of this West failed to
char.se his plan. He continued
with a second trump, whereup-
on Declarer, as bridge Jargon so
eleg.-ntly puts it, wrapped four
hear s around West's neck.
So th won the second round of
trumps in his hand, cashed his
clubt and the ace of diamonds,!
and crossed to the king of dla-
monds to discard a spade on the'
ace of clubs. He completed the:
stripping process by rufflne
dummy's last diamond.
Now he could lead a trump to
dummy and return a spade
When East played low. South put
up the queen and West found
himself in the soup. He had to'
win and had to return spades
No matler what he did. he could
win only two spade ticks, and
South was bound to make his
contract.
Wast should have set the con- j
tract before South could win a1
trick. South had bid spades, and
West could see eight spades in his
own hand and the dummy. Ob-
viously. East was short and could
ruff the third round.
Wast should have laid down
the ace and king of spades as
soon as he saw the dummy. Then
a spade ruff would have set the
contract.
BT OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Service
One question seems to plague
more of my readers than any
other. "What should I do," hun-
dred* of them have aaked me,
"when new and strange rules
are sprung on me right in the
middle of the game?"
That's easy. Just be your nat-
ural courteous self. If you're at
a friend's house, and your friend
wants you to play billiards with
a baseball bat instead of a cue,
you humor him. Do the same
thing if he wants to play Canas-
ta in some peculiar way.
In your Own home, you should
\ announce at the beginning of the
same that you are following
such-and-such rules. Naturally.
I suggest you follow the offlciar
rules; and I recommend that you
haul out a rule book and put lt
where lt can be consulted In case
of a difference of opinion.
However, if you want to follow
ome different rulesgo ahead
-nd do so. Thla is a free coun-
ry, and the Constitution gives
every citizen the right to make
up his own Canasta rules. You
owe It to your guests, however,
to mention your new rules before
the game begins.
C>We were playing Canasta
'nd the score became so hceles
that we conceded the game to!
our oDponents. They wanted us
to finish the hand out because
they wanted to see how hl"h a
score they could roll up. When
we refused, they became quite
annoyed. Who was right?
AThis is another question for
n specialist on etiquette rather
than a games expert. When a
stake is involved you naturally
have to finish a game in order
to find ont what the score Is.
Likewise In a tournament you
would have to finish the game.
In a sociable game with no stake,
however, it should be possible to
concede a game without having
to finish it out.
When the opponents feel a dif-
ferent way about it. the question
becomes one of politeness: Which
side should yield?
There might be many different
reasons for foUowing the wishes
of your opponents in a matter of
this sort. They might be older, or
very distinguished, or perhaps
one of them is your husband's
boss. All good reasons, no doubt,
but none of them have anything
i to do with th* rales of card
i games.
As far as the card ruling is
concerned, I would give a cons-
titutional ruling. It is "cruel and
unusual punishment" to make
players finish out a hopeless
?ameso I would rule that It is
innecessary for them to do so.
CAPTAIN EAST
Keys of Mystery
BT LESLIE TURNER
BWZE5, OME ON EMMSTTIS RIWG DOCS CoHK. IT TO N**lA*TNrr.
FIT VSMJCEVS DOOR! WHY Vj WOUMrT NEED IT MJY
WOULD HE HAVE REV* TO $OtWS MORE j
PUVCE* l THE BROTHERS AD *
BEEN E6TRMJSED SO LONG*
rf! POaVULB.^VOU UEAM VWJCEY
AND THAT MI6MT \ SAVE W Ml? KIT
PIMM TJWONe. HE HAD TO DRIVE
fT's A CMS KIY. /DOW*) V> C*TCH T
CIRCU$ TKNNJJE
?EEDEDIT!
AND EKMETT HAS
no CAR
NOTIFEMMETTOfplff
HIM DOWN MJD UER
HID THE CMC NED HAVE
HAD LOTS MORE TIME
WDEIT.SC
OH,MR.
TU8IS! IPf
~ SOMIH
>AcVGkis UTI66
MMrKVOUU
fjunuya
VIC FLINT
Fight to the Finish
BT MICHAEL OIHALLEX
WV/*ouc
HIM A.9AISI/
eutu An
STLL CLUK.HC
n snjpv*
I HAND r
I'UK BOAKOINU HOUSE
with
auioB amru uirr orm ?
KNOW WHUT, MISTAW BUS' ?
LOOK LAK MISTAH MA30R
GOT HISSELF MISPLACED
IN DEM WOODS ALONG WITH
^/VIlSTAH TWkSGS/ HOWvbl)
LS?ECkON HE klM S4T
LOST, 8EIMX 6ICH A
\BIS-<5AME ROSTER
AW ALL-ROUND i
.JUN6LE WIZARD?.
By J B vVILLi...-
I THINK HIS WOODS
SAVW HAS RU6TCD
AROUND THE ED&eS*.
JASON.' IF THERE WAS ,
AN OWLS CLUB CHAPTER ]
OUT HERe, WE'D KNOW
WHERE TO LOOK-'THE i
only bis same hc6 ',
Seen aroond lately j
is deuces wild/.
Don't Neglect Slipping
FALSE TEETH
' Do fahw t*th drop, allp or webtala
whan you talk. at. lauati ar metta?
Don't ba annoyed and embarranad by
ueh handicapa rASTUCTH. an alhallaa
i non-acid I powdar to aarlnkla on your
plataa. kaapa falaa taafh mora firmly
and addad comfort. No
patty tarta or fael
today at any drug
"-^
ifort. No guiamy. (oaay.
faaling. Gat rASTKTK
lrug atora.
\&
iSfiETTWa
FULL of
' LOSTPBOPLE"
SSS^SeW!lB9B9eaS*afo!


..
'"KnVESDAT, SEPTEMBER V 1951
HE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
Scientists Unfurl Discovery:
We 're All Worked By Springs
Truman Can Slap Taff-Hartley
Injunction On Copper Strike
NEW YORK, Sept. 5 (UP) The structure of several
proteins fias been determined, two scientists reported to-
day. The development may mean that science will be
able to produce synthetic bone, muscle, red blood cells,
heir ond wool.
The significant scientific achievement was reported
by professors Linus Pauling, chairman of the division of
chemistry and chemical engineering, California Institute
of Technology, and Robert t. Corey, professor of chemistry
at Cal Tech.
They told the diamond jubilee of the American Che-
mical Society that atoms which make up hair, wool, muscle,
finger nails and several other fibrous proteins are arranged
in the form of a spiral, or helix.
The protein molecules, according to the scientists,
are similar to springs.
Furthermore, the scientists by
using laboratory techniques, have
determined the diameter o the
prlng-shaped molecules with an
accuracy of a billionth of an Inch.
The measurement was done by
X-ray diffraction data and mole-
cule models.
Verifications of the structure
are now appearing In progress In
Cal Tech laboratories and from
Dr. M. F. Perutz of the Cavendish
laboratory, Cambridge, England.
Scientists for many years have
been attempting to determine
;he structure of proteins, which
\re known as the building blocks
of the human body. They are
considered among the most Im-
portant of all substances found
in plants and animals.
While the research at Cal Tech
was an adventure Into pure sci-
ence, the end result may haye far
reaching significance In medical
science.
One of the proteins whose
structure has been determined Is
collagen, which makes up tend-
ons and also Is present in skin
and bone.
Thus, arthritis and other dis-
eases that are being treated with
cortisone and ACTH are some-
times referred to as collagen dis-
eases.
ACTH is now obtained from the
pituitary glands of swine, and
scientists believe that it might
never be synthesized because It
may be protein material.
However, the work of the Cal
Tech scientists may bring the
synthesis of ACTH years sooner.
The next goal of the scientists
will be to make artificially pro-
tein substances.
That might lead, the scientists
say,to realsynthetlc protein food
substances such as steaks and
chops.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 5 (UP)
A presidential fact-finding board
reported yesterday that the cop-
per strike is damaging defense
production, thus clearing the way
for President Truman to halt It
with an 80-day Taft-Hartley law
Injunction.
The board's findings, submit-
ted formally to the White House,
were transmitted to the Presi-
dent In San Francisco.
He Is now free to seek a strike-
stopping court order which would
send the strikers back on the job.
Mr. Truman Is expected to ask
TV IN A TEEPEE 01' debbll TV has invaded the peaceful
antiquity of the American Indian. Sioux Indian Chief Red Cloud
has gone and had a TV set installed In his teepeeen a studio lot
in Hollywood where he is playing a featured rola in a movie. The
chief says he's plenty sold on television but, "It would make my
-M- n ancestors turn over in their graves." ) \
Hemisphere Said To Need Close Links
Between Biggest Countries: Brazil, US
I
RIO DE JANEIRO, Sept. 5 (UP) The United States
I and Brazil, as the two largest and most populous countries in
', the Americas, must form a solid block for die defense and well
- being of the entire hemisphere, a high' government official said
here today.
Finance Minister Horacio Lafer, who leaves for Washing-
ton today, on a two-week official visit, said a dose union of the
two countries "should be the point of departure for a new in-
terpretation of the Monroe T^rine that wrfTmake the Amet-
icas the guardian of the political principles demanded by free
num."
Lafter expressed hope that his
Washington visit will contribute
to a complete understanding be-
tween the United States and
Brazil and thereby to the wel-
fare of the whole Western hemi-
sphere .
He described his journey as a
"general good neighborhood
trip." It will be his first visit to
the States.
"We are undergoing intense
and extremely rapid progress in
Brazil.
"But. -without a strong United
States there will be no survival
of the world's political civiliza-
tion. A prosperous Brazil will
contribute to both," Latter said.
"We are marching toward a
population of over -100,000,000
In the near future, so that Bra-
all's political and social struc-
ture Is of vital Interest to all
American countries. We under-
stand our responsibilities in
continental policies and desire
to be aided in carrying them
out."
The 51-year-old official, known
as a "businessman's .business-
man," said he is not going to
ask the United States for any-
thing specific but that he
hopes In a general way to "re-
move the fog clouding the gen-
eral picture both as regards
Brazil's thinking and that in
the United States."
Officially, his trip Is to attend
the council meetings of the In-
ternational Bank and the Inter-
national Monetary Pund.
He said the government is
sending the Finance Minister in-
stead" of the usual delegates to
Unidentified Bandit
Pulls $4,800 Cash
Snatch In Tampa
TAMPA, Sept. 5 (UP) An
unarmed bandit snatched three
money bags containing $7,418
from a cafeteria cashier on the
streets here yesterday but drop-
ped one bag containing $2,600 In
his haste to flee.
He escaped In a confederate's
ear with $4,818 In cash, although
he was chased for several blocks
by a police patrol car.
The patrol lost him in the
crowded traffic on the city elec-
tion day here.
Miss Gladys Loverin, 41. the
cafeteria cashier, told officers a
man hopped from the car and
grabbed the bags as she was
walking to the tank. She said
he made no effort to plek up the
bag he dropped.
8everal spectators saw the In-
cident but none said. he knew
the bandit The car in which he
fled was a 1950 blue Pontiac se-
dan with a stolen license plate.
"show the Importance It gives to
those Institutions."
He said he was prepared to
supply Information on all basic
questions regarding Brazil, such
as its strategic minerals and oth-
er defense materials, as well as
It transportation and agricultur-
al production problems.
"We have not been able fully
to overcome the Inflation
brought on by the last war and
Its great expenditures," he ex-
plained. L
Soil Conservation
Work HHs Pay Dirt
In Prizegiving Today
, SPARTANBURG, S C, Sept. 5
(UP) Secretary of Agriculture
Charles Brannan is expected to
laud the soil conservation meas-
ures practiced to four South Ca-
rolina and two North Carolina
counties this afternoon when
$20,000 in prizes- will be given
away here.
Brannan will be the principal
speaker at the Piedmont soil con-
servation contest presentlon cer-
emonies at Piedmont lntersate
fairgrounds.
The awards range from $750
in cash to a cement mixer, to 35
turkey dinners at a Spartanburg
restaurant.
The contest is sponsored by the
soil conservation district super-
visors of Spartanburg, Laurens,
Cherokee and Union Counties In
South Carolina, and Polk and
Rutherford Counties in North
Carolina.
Chairman of the Spartanburg
soil conservation district, J. A.
Brldwellsaid 22 communities and
400 farmers, future farmers of
America, and 4-H Club members
will share In the prizes which
have been donated by 214 busi-
nessmen, merchants and others
interested In soil conservation.
Some 1,476 farmers in 97 com-
munity groups took part In the
ocntest.
Brldwell said the contest was
initiated to make everyone real-
ize "he has a stake in the land."
Its Easy To Stump
Experts on: ''Who
Was J. Colbath?"
PARMINGTON. N. H. Sept.
(UP.) You can stump most
of the experts by asking them
"Who was Jeremiah Jones Col-
bath?" ,
You can get quite an argu-
ment, too, if you tell them he
was vice president of the Un-
ited States under President Ul-
ysses S. Grant.
The books show that the vice
president was Henry Wilson.
who served from 1873-75. But
Wilson was born Colbath, chang-
ing his name to Wilson on
reaching manhood.
6 Engines Involved
In South Carolina
Freight Train Smash
DORCHESTER, S. C, Sept. 5
(UP) Pour trainmen were In-
jured here early today when two
Southern Railway freight trains
rammed head-on derailing 28 box
cars and burning five diesel en-
gines. ,
A railroad spokesman and De-
puty Sheriff T. A. Warner said
the trains crashed head-on and
burst into flames.
The spokesman said six diesel
engines were involved In the
crash.
Three were pulling about 100
cars toward Columbia and the
other three were pulling only a
caboose toward Charleston.
Warner said the impact of the
crash derailed a number of cars
and piled .them onto the tracks.
Traille was blocked for a time.
Railroad officials axe investi-
gating the cause of the crash.
I. L. MADURO Jr.
100 Central Avenue
For Sale
first quality
STEEL
in the following sizes ...
i" 162.00
r
ton
14- /66oo
ton
Tels. 2-2854 2-2844
8UPERSONIC MUFFSA
ground crewman at London
airport wears thick- padded
earmuffs to protect his ear
drums from the supersonic
whine of Jet engines ip" the
"Comet" airliner in back-
ground. Need for such protec-
tion is changing "styles" at air-
ports around the world.
Horse And Buggy Days
Make Trucker Sigh
PHILADELPHIA, Sept..
(UP.) Marcus Roggenburger,
who has completed 35 years of
accident-free driving for a
downtown department store.
looks back fondly to- the days
of the horse-drawn wagon.
He uses a one and a half ton
truck now. but there was a day
when he had a snappy i horse-
drawn buggy with a gold stripe
down both sides and yellow
wheels. He liked the buggy
much better.
"Horses had brains and they
always knew when to atop,"
Roggenburger said. "Most driv-
ers now don't have brains and
they never know when to stop.''
Large New Assortment of Styles!
From ..45
LA MODA AMERICANA
112 Central Avepue Panam
Attorney General J. Howard Mc-
Grath to seek the injunction
either here or at Denver, and Salt
Lake City, main union headquar-
ters of the strikers.
The White House did not know
when the request will be made.
But it could come at almost any
time.
The fact-finding board, head-
ed by Ralph T. Seward,, found |
the week-old strike in the copper
and related metals industry Is
"causing or aggravating critical
shortages of materials vital to
the defense program, to defense-
supporting industries and to the
essentials of the civilian econ-
omy.''
While the board was not called
on to make specific recommen-
dations, it found that settlement
of the Kennecott Copper Co.
strike probably will restore only
about 30 per cent of the domes-
tic copper output.
Our
SUPER COLOSSAL
SALE
CONTINUES
DON'T MISS ITI
ZIGZAG
108 Centra! Avenue
Open from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and during noon hour
from Germany
/-Porcelain L^of-fee and ZJea ^eti
lovely pastel colors
$ 18.50

^tflar dinner L^otfte J/i
elevar polka-dot design
$8.75
f-^orcelain ZJaole f-^laauea for *J4ot Jinei

PANAMA -----. COLON /tfOTTS
'
TNE^WSMN CREAM
Skin demand dally corra
>- Me.n. Skin Cream
;S"*athai important double-
duty. For daily car-, per-
___ '*. make-up baae protect,
^eaaBBBBBB against rouchnea, rhac.
* eoftenw, ion. Qtly medicated
J-el.. ow-emlte. Fe* dailTctelil
GORHAM
TOWLE
Heirloom
Stieff
Norwegian
Sterling
(MR PMTLKH
PANAMA
(0L0N JEWELRY(0
. f r o n 1 of } op
roi
r
all for
Eno's
It settles the stomach!
First thing in the morning take 1i glass of ENO'S -Fruit Salt".
ENO'S settles the itomach. It i freshening and cleansing to dry,
unpleasant mouth and tongue. It will relieve lick headache, ENO S
k good for the liver, too, and it keep the tyitem regular. So take
your Fruit Salt" regularly. Make ENO"S your pleasant, sparking.
ntfwfag drink 1
Eno's
4 Fruit Salt'
SPECIALLY RECOMMENDED
le, IIIIGULi* ACTION.
SICK HEaDACHS. UVXalSHNISS.
StUOUSNISS, HIATBU.N, etc
ThWHftm'mi-Fn^Sli-mtr^iMUnlmii
T

EVERY 5 MINUTES
-
.



.

Think of it! Every 5 minute*, a powerful
Braniff-Liner take* to the air... somewhere ia the America*. Every
minute of the day, hundreds of air travelers in North and South America
are enjoying the finest in Braniff comfort and luxury. Such a record
of accomplishment can only come from years of experience in fast,
safe passenger service. That's why Braniff-with 22 years of flight
s
experience-is recognized today as one of the world's great airlines
serving the hearts of both Americas. Next time you travel, fly
Braniff-El Conquistador for deluxe service at no extra fare-or
El Intercontinental for comfortable air coach service at savings up to W%.
Ask for ratea, flight information and reservations at
your travel agent or Braniff ticket office.
-
,
.
Hotel El Panam
Via Espaa, 111
Telephone Panam 3 4726
In Coln, Telephone X79
,'/


** ( r-Ff
HE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
m
P 'egroes Claim Cotton Crop
Blocking Their Education
ALEXANDRIA, La.. Sept. 5 (UP).Forlv Negroes, who didn't
luce <-?r nica of the opening of their schools being postponed 10
Iney cc.-ld pick cotton, picketed the offices of the parish school
boa << ml the newspaper. Town Talk, here today.
her carried homemade signs, saying: "What color Is cot-
..,!' j ' races C!'1 Dick cotton." "We need an education."
.V aiulria is reverting to slavery." "Education before cotton."
wry don't you pick cotton?"
except for two unidentified women, who said they were the
no ;c-s of school-age children, all of the pickets appeared to
be of high school age.
If.' HOLLYWOOD
BY ERSKINE JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1951
Ti:j said they picketed the
Ec!ic;il bor.rd offices in the court-
ho.. c. because School Superin-
tendent M. S. Ai!:en announced
la.t reek ihat the opening of
Negro schools would be delayed
so students could pick cotton and
heln relieve a pir!:c rs' shortage.
They paraded in front of the
cqu;\house for a few minutes
Rapides Parish has one of the
biggest cotton crops in its histo-
ry-
Fields are white with cotton,
there is a .shortage of pickers,
and farmers will lose millions of
dollars if a hurricane or heavy
ain.s strike the area.
John Boogherts, a cotton buy-
er, ran a newspaper advertise-
with their rlgas. men marched mem last week, saying lie would
eiglv blocks to ihc newspaper
and paraded there there lor a-
boul 15 minutes. The group then
broke up.
Thry said they picketed the
newspaper for printing Aikr.i's
announcement. Aiken did not
comment on the demonstration.
Rut when he announced the
delay In the opening of Negro
schools, he said there was a rea-
son in addition to the need for
cotton pickers: Additions to two
big; Negro schools have not been
completed.
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Where 100.000 People MM
Presents
oifer prizes to Negro cotton pick-
ers. He said he would offer a $1
prize and urged farmers and oth-
er buyers to contribute the prize
money.
White schools opened on sched-
ule today.
A poll of planters showed that
the delay in opening Negro
schools did not bring out addi-
tional pickers.
One planter, who didn't want
to be identified, said he didn't
see any point in delaying the
opening of Negro schools in Alex-
andria merely in the hopes o
getting cotton pickers, although
good pickers can make up to $10
a day.
"City Negroes don't pick cot-
ton," he said. "I would rather
have a cotton picking machine
than a whole bunch of Negroes."
HOLLYWOOD (NEA) The
hO-bum around Hollywood is
about to change into a raucous
"Whee" now that Stanley Kram-
er has signed Katy Jurado, one of
Mexico's fiery stars, for a key
role In 'High Noon."
Katy is a combination of such
fire-breathers as the late Lupe
Velei, Dannielle Darrieux and
Pola Negri, according to HI direc-
tor Budd Boetticher. who guided
her through her scenes with
Robert Stack and Gilbert Roland
in "The Bullfighter and the
Lady."
Here's one of the Jurado sto-
ries told by Budd:
She flew up from Acapulco dur-
ing production of the Republic
picture to take part in a mam-
moth benefit performance in
Mexico City.
Because of faulty plane con-
nections, Katy showed up at the
theater shortly before midnight
a time when the audience was
growing restless and noisy.
A soprano had already left the
stage in tears when Katy faced
the boisterous crowd. As she be-
?.n sonf' ct-" and jeers
rilled the air.
Katy glared at the audience
and walked off.
A few seconds later she was
bac.;, pointing a deadly-looking
revolver at the loudest hecklers
"Ladles and gentlemen," boiled
Katy. "I have volunteered to en-
tertain for this great cause. I
receive not one penny for this.
"In my hand I have a revolver
And the first joker who makes
one sound will get it between the
eyes."

All the hotel yarns don't con-
cern Blng Crosby.
Jack Gilford tells about one
vain, pompous movie king check-
ing in at a New York hotel. A
group of women gathered to peer
at him and the actor kept turn-
ing his profile to his admirers as
he signed the register.
"Make certain," he said, "that
I have a room with a beautifi
view."
"Yes, 'sir." answered the sar-
donic clerk. 'We'll instruct the
bellboy to hang up a full-length
mirror."
German Republic
Signs Torquay
Protocol To GAIT
Today. Wednesday, Sept. 5
3:30Collector's Corner
4:00 Music Without Words
4; J5French n the Air (RDF)
4; 30What's Yaur Favorite
6:00Lean Back and Listen
6:15 Evening Salon
7:00The Lady on the Screen
(BBC)
7:30Sports Review
7:45 Here Comes Louis Jordan
8:00News and Commentary by
Raymond Swing (VOA)
8:15Twenty Questions (VOA)
8:45Science Digest (VOA)
9; 00The Jo Stafford Show
i VOA i
9:15Radio Forum (VOAi
9:30Commentator's
iVOA)
9:45Sports and News iVOAl
J0:00The BBC Playhouse (BBC)
11;00The Owl's Nest
MidnightSign Off.
Ballroom
SPORTS
Tomorrow, Thursday, Sept. 6
A.M.
6:00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15-NEWS (VOA)
8:30Crazy Quilt
8:45Jerry Sears Presents
9:00NEWS
9:15SACRED HEART PRO-
GRAM
9:30As I See It
10.00NEWS
10:05Off the Record
11:00NEWS
11:05Off the Record (Contd.)
11:30Meet the Band
NoonNEWS
P.M.
12:05 Luncheon Music
12:30 Popular Music
1:00NEWS
1:15 Personality Parade
1:45EXCURSIONS IN SCI-
ENCK
2:00Call for Les Paul
2:15Date for Dancing
2:30Afternoon Melodies
2(45Battle of the Bands
8;00American Debut
15The Little Show
I] 30Let's Dance
400Music Without Words
4 15Negro Spirituals
. 4;30What's Your Favorite
i:0f>- PANAMUSICA STORY-
TIME
6; 15Evening Salon
7:00Make Believe
(VOA)
7:30BLUE RIBBON
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00World News (VOA)
:i5Cross Country, U. S. A.
(VOA)
45Jam Session (VOA)
S40Meet Eleanor Roosevelt
(VOA)
$0Commentator's
(VOA)
9 M5Sports Tune of Day and
News (VOA)
10 JOHOTEL EL PANAMA
10jl5Musical Interlude
10:0Take It From Here (BBC)
11.-00The Owls Nest
12:00Sign Off.
TROPICAL
' TOMORROW! ~
ipftTM HRST TUMI IN
ITS IOO VIAR HISTORY
TMI CAMIHR QOIi
"MfiOETHEWALUOF
MLSOM
mm STEVE
COCHRAN
Acheson Praises
Treaty As VOA*
Broadcasts to Japan
NEW YORK, Sept. 5 (USI8)
U. S. Secretary of State Ache-
son believes the "progressive"
treaty with Japan to be signed
at San Francisco this week is
"a demonstration of the es-
scntial unity of the free world
in taking collective action for
peace."
Acheson's words were con-
tained in a statement broadcast
to Japan Monday In the first
of a new series of Voice of
America programs to Japan in
"'Bestjboth Japanese and English.
The treaty. Acheson added,
"is at the some time a demon-
stration of the confidence of
the free world in the future of
Japan and the desire and'abil-
ity of the Japanese people to
make a genuine contribution to
peace, security and progress."
He said: 'This readiness on
the part of the fre world
to make peace with Japan is
the true test of its friendship
for Japan."
The Secretary expressed the
hope that the new VOA broad-
casts to Japan wUl contribute
to the furthering of the un-
derstanding and friendship be-
tween the two peoples.
"This peace of reconciliation
J" fn eloquent demonstration"
of these feelings, he concluded.
Other statements on the first
broadcast to Japan were made
by Vice President Alben W.
Barkley. Ambassador John Fos-
ter Dulles. President Truman's
special representative on Jap-
anese treaty matters, and Sen-
ator Richard M. Nixon. Re-
publ can of the state of Cali-
fornia.
UNITED NATIONS, N Y
Sept. 5 (USIS)-The German'
Federal Republic Is the 31st
nation to become a party to
"General Agreement on
Tariffs and Trade (CATT).
The Republic became a con-
centrating party to GATT Sat-
urday when Dr. Heinz Krekeler,
charge d'affaires of the Ger-
man Federal Republic in the
United States, signed the Tor-
quay Protocol to GATT at U. N.
headquarters. As i result of the
signing, the Torquay tariff
schedule relating to the trade
of the German Federal Repub-
lic will come into efefct on)
October 1.
The German Federal Republic
was also the first "Of six govern-
ments recently granted the
right to become parties to
GATT to sign the agrment,
rne others are Austria, Per,
the Philippines Republic. Tur-
key and the Republic of Korea.
To complete requirements for
accession each of these five na-
tions must sign the protocol
by October- 21, 1951,
If all of the five eligible coun-
tries sign the protocol, the
agreement will cover a group of
countries whose trade accounts
for about four-fifths of the
world's total.
"In its ultimate effect. Ger-
many's participation In the
Torquay arrangements will
prove to be of mutual benefit
jo all participating nations,"
Krekeler said on signing the
protocol.
He declared that his county's
adherence to the protocol will
"greatly facilitate exports of
German goods and imports of
foreign goods into Germany
and thereby stimulate German
commercial activities."
In acceding to GATT the
German Republic will make
tariff reductions on specified
products and will acept the
obligation to conduct its for-
eign trade in accordance with
general provisions of GATT
covering non discrimination,
internal taxation and other
matters.
Over at RKO. Jane Russell, Vic
Mature and Hoagy Carmlchael
are being photographed against
the background of a lavish gam-
bling den in "The Las Vegas
Story."
This is the picture that kept
Jane from co-starring with Ga-
ble in "Lone Star." The playback
machine blares out a number in
which the line, "But my resist-
ance is low," is repeated over and
over.
Heavy-lidded Vic and tortured-
mouth Jane go into a long em-
brace. Director Robert Stevenson
barks "Cut." but Vic Isn't ready
to immobilize his lips. He holds
the scorching buss another sec-
ond, then slowly droops to the
floor. v.
You'll never see this scene in
your neighborhood theater. It
would blow out every fuse in
town!
*' .
Shelley Winters was sprinting
down the hallways at Ol when
an old friend stopped her.
"Why haven't I seen you late-
ly?" he asked. "Have you been
busy?"
"Busy!" gasped Shelley. "Hon-
ey, I've been .so busy I've even
had to rush my crying spells."

Don Taylor's two year old
daughter, Avery, is a pronoun-
twister, unable to comprehend
the difference between "me" and
The ether day Don took the
half-pint aside and tried to set
her straight. The same evening
Don heard noises on the stairs
and called out:
"Who's there?"
"It's my," answered Avery.
fJJT?r5: BUT DEADLY-Banned from the market in New York
and Cleveland is this peanut-sized pistol, made in Janan ? -1?
for about $1.95. The inch-long weapon oto a l/M-mch pee"
It h ES2. 0r" 1,enetrt W* Pages of heavybr!d SSer
Mve Mow Zi,toi" rt*n ln ,he hind 0f CtevetandTo" S
g* Bt'ow V?e P'5'01 r miniature bullets. Burn marks atriht
sharp hole left as it passed through the eighth sheet.
To Train ROK
Officers In US
WASHINGTON, Sept. 5 (USIS)
A program to train officers of
the army of the Republic of Ko-
rea will soon be started at army
bases in the United States.
The Defense Department con-
firmed press reports of an an-
nouncement to that effect by
9WW Jrnes A. Van Fleet,
Eighth Army Commander ln Ko-
rea.
A Department spokesman said
an advance party of 22 RKO of-
ficers who will act as interpret-
ers is now en route to this coun-'
try. The main contingent of 250
will leave Korea by ship later this
month.
The ROK officers will be train-'
McNamara Will Take
California Vacation
John H. McNamara, Assistant
Chief of the Postal. Customs and
Immigration Division, will leave
Friday on the S.S. Ancon for a
vacation in the United States. He
plans to visit for about a month
ln California.
Panama Canal Clulhouses
"^ Showing Tonight *f
WANNA RELAX... GO TO THE MOVHSIII
BALBOA
ed ln two groups, 150 to receive
infantry instruction at Fort Ben-
nlng, Georgia, the others to study
artillery methods at Fort Sill, |
Okla., the Department spokesman
said.
Alr-C'nndllionrd
_:15 >:
"PAYMENT ON DEMAND"
DIABLO HTS.
: A S:S
_Ajao_Shpwlng Thursday!
The U.S. naUonal debt as of
June 30, 1951, was about $260,-
000,000,000. All the government-
owned and private gold stocks in
the world was estimated to be
worth only $52,000,000,000.
COCO LI
:ll s:M
"DIAMOND HORSESHOE"
Thursday BARBABY riBATE '
""jfeTSSP? Tru*r MARSH ALL
"BARBARY PIRATE"
Thursday "SIEBBA
PEDRO MIGUEL ATI7,n^A?.1Si.?.vry L*w2?
1*. "AT WAR WITH THE ARMY
QMu^jj&u
STARTING
TOMORROW
MELODY!... MAGIC!...
Digest
Ks a story relayed from the
Belgian Congo, where Humphrey
Bogart and Kathertne Hepburn
worked in "The African Queen."
Director John Huston had Just
ordered his special effects men to
set fire to a village that had tak-
en weeks to construct. Suddenly
the natives began to chant
"Kichwa Tupe, Kichwa Tupe,
Kichwa Tupe."
"What does that mean?" Hus-
ton asked the company transla-
tor nervously.
"Natives say white men got big
emP.ty heads;' came the answer.
The movie director paused to
look at Bogey wearing a black
beard, Katie in her slacks, and
the flames shooting into the sky.
"You know," he said, "I think
those natives are right."
.
Daphne Du Maurier. who asked
$2o0.000 for the film rights to her
forthcoming novel, "My Cousin
Rachel," plus-percentages and a
seven-year lease arrangement, Is
now coming down in her de-
mands. And one Hollywood stu-
dio is nibbling.
Scientific Wax Figure
Museum \

Only one price 35C
GAMBOA
Friday "BQEW YESTERDAY"
,.g**;gJBMrT Colttn QBAY
"LUCKY NICK CAIN"
Thursday 'BREAKTHROUGH1'
(Friday)
MARGARITA
m-.u site
CRISTOBAL
Alr-CondtUoned
I* s:30
"GOODBYE, MY FANCY"
Thuntd.y "HOUSE BY THE RIVES"
Errol FLYNN Dean STOCKWEU,
"KIM'
Alio Showinr Thursday
TODAY LADIES DAY
NO MINORS ADMITTED
No. 16 Peni Avenue (Next door to IRIS Theatre)
CENTRAL
TOMORROW!
TOMORROW
ERUPTING With PRIMITIVE
EMOTIONS & HIGH
ADVENTURE 1
LUX THEATRE
Air-l ondltloned
AND------------
TODAY
PANAMA CITY
THEATRES
Present
BELLA VISTA LATIN DAY!
Stfyrt: 3.*S 5: T M> dm.
Argentine'! Greatest Comedian
LUIS 8ANDRINI
In gensetfonel comedy!
'LA CULPA LA TUVO EL OTRO"
With MlltZINI^r.lrlrU CASTFJ.
LUX THEATRE
CECILIA Theatre
SIMULTANEOUS RELEASE!
CENTRAL
"oAVrV
r n\ni)is\ns
Snowwhite
m. c*atY ted consu -ooaonrrHim
mm t a CRANE WILBUR WmtQt
if VFN riWAr.r*
/ is all I will ever
know of love, and beauty...
and rare vufyentore.V.
Laugh-Crazy
Story
of that
Boy-Crazy
Age I
Margaret
O'BRIEN
l~Z,
***
n 1
M
i k'%-
AUea Martin, Jr. Jiammy Hant
. in .
HER FIRST ROMANCE
She Jutt liked every boy ln
town... Every onel
MELVYN DOUGLAS
MAUREEN O'HARA
-in-
A
W0MANS
SECRET"
:s-
CeCILIA THIATRt
Meet the bride who wouldn't stay for breakfast I
Larry PARKS Barbara HALE. In
"EMERGENCY WEDDING"
A]f.: H* eouldnt keep out of trouble I
*Jekey ROONEY Tarry MOOSE. In
"HE'S A COCKKYED WONDER"
TROPICAL THEATRE
"ONLY THE
VALIANT
mui-mmtmimmms.
JOURDAN.....PAGET""CHANDLER
""* IrUOI Slttl MM sow it m rWB Ul UVJ
MMMtMMW III I hi -v
DtlMH DAVIS HASMON JONtS /ft
h*m
LOUIS
THE OIVE-rOB-GLORY-STORY. OF THE
SUBMARINE "THUNDEB"
John WAYNE Patricia NfcAL, in
"OPERATION PACIFIC"
ENCANTO THEATRE
Air CeneitleiMd
Johnny Sheffield Sue
England, ln
"HIDDEN CITY"
Also: Don McGulre
Tracy Roberts, In
"SIDESHOW"
TIVOLI THEATRE
BANK DAY! flOe.M
Free at 6 and 9 p.m.
John Oarfield, in
"BREAKING POINT"
Virginia Mayo, in
"PLAXY MARTIN"
CAPITOLIO THEATRE
A GREAT DOUBLE!
Sabu Joan Paige, ln
"MANEATER of Kl'MAON"
- Also: -
Abbott and Costello, in
"NAUGHTY NINETTES"
VICTORIA THEATRE
Chapters 6 and 7 of
"THE SEA HAWK"
-Also: -
"THE PHANTOM"
'FEIIDIN' RHYTHM"
fc


i-
.
WEDNESDAY. SEPTFMBER 5, 151
i.
THJB PANAMA AMERICAN *N INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE Pwwm
l^acific ^>ocie
l
i

y/ti sue cj.
IHU*
&, m GaLa JJotfiu 0*1 Parama 3-0943
AMERICAN SOCIETY TO GIVE BUFFET NEXTWJK
BONORING UNITED STATES AMBASSADOR AND WIFE
Entertaining in hoBor o Unite* States Amblador to
Panam and Mrs. John C. Wiley, the American Society of
the Republie of Panama will tender a buffet supper on Sat-
"^ginning ai 7*1 p.m. In the evening, the buffet will
be held In the Balboa Room of Hotel El Panama.

Despedida Champagne Party
Honors Haitian Minister
A Peruvian silver platter was
presented recently to Minister of
Haiti to Panama Pierre Hudl-
court by members of the diplo-
matic corps accredited to Pana-
ma. Dean of the diplomatic corps
and Pruvlan Ambassadpr Emilio
Ortiz de Zevallos made the pre^
sentatlon at a despedida cham-
pagne party.
Attended' by members of the
diplomatic corps i.nd their wives,
the farewell party was given by
Peruvian Ambassador to Pana-
ma and Mrs. Ortiz de Zevallo3 at
the Embassy residence on La
Crest.
Cornell Alumni Fete
Visiting Professors
The guests of licuor at a din-
ner given last evening- by the
Alumni of Cornell University in
Hotel Ei Panama were Professor
T. D. Lewis and H. M. Grifft.
who are here from Cornell on a
special mission. Mr. Juan B.
McKay was in charge of arrange-
ments.
Among those attending were
Mr. Menalco Solis. Mr. Rogelio
Icaza, Mr, Juan J. Amado, Mr.
J. B. McKay, Mr. JiraB. Dsayer,
Mr. Prank Molther and Mr. T.
Lindo.
The Herbert Judsons Honored
at Lawn Party-Boffet Supper
In honor of Mr. and Mrj. Her-
bert R. Judson. who are retiring
soon from the Canal, neighbors
on their block gave a buffet sup-
per on Monday evening. The
supuer was held on the lawn of
Captain and Mrs. Abbott's resi-
dence in Diablo Heights.
Those particlcatlng were Cap-
tain and Mrs. Howard R. John-
son and their son, Mr. and Mrs.
Richard L. Dehllnge and their
son. Captain and Mrs. Allan S.
Wallace and their son. Mr. nnd
Mm. J. Charles De Young, Mr.
and Mrs. Louis C. Maurer, Mr.
and Mrs. H. D. Halverson. Mr.
and Mrs. Francis WUFeeney. Dr.
and Mrs. William H. Grant. Can-
tain and Mrs. Elmer G. Abbott
and their son. Captain and Mrs.
F. J. Harrington and thei-sou,
and Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Hoff-
meyer.
Farewell Dinner Honoring
Mr. and Mrs. De La Guardia
Mr. and Mrs. Enrique de la
Guardia entertained with dinner
a* their residence last evening in
honor of Mr. de la Guardia' sis-
ter and brot.ier-m-!aw, Mr. and
Mrs. Roberto de la Guardia, who
are leaving soon for New York.
Invitations Issued to
Medinfir-Skidmore Wedding
Invitations have been sent out
for the marriage of Miss Edith
Lee Skldmore. grand-daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Jemes Milton
Turner. Jr.. of Tampa, Florida, to
Robert Edward Medlnger. son of
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Medingerof
Balboa Heights.
The wedding will take place on
Thursday. Sep-einber the 13th. at
5:00 p.m. at 2628 Watrous Aye-
nue in Tampa, Florida.
Barbara and Edward Schnake
Return to Colle-e in U.S.
Miss Barbara Schrfake and.her
I -rother, Mr. Edward Schnake.
: on and daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
I Bdward W. Schnake of Pedro
; Miguel, will return soon to the
! United State to continue their
i educations. Miss Schnake. who is
a senior In the School of Educa-
liion of the University of Mls-
| ourl, will sail on September the
;7th.
Mr. Schnake who graduated
1 from the Caaal Zone Junior Col-
lege and the University of Mis-
souri, is a firrt year student in
the School or Medicine of the
University o" Bt'If^lo in New
York. He will sail on September
the 14th.
its regular business meeting to-
morrow at 7:30 p.m. at the Pedro
Miguel Masonir Temple. Impor-
tant items will be brought up at
..ils meeting.
Woman's Club Bridge Group
Meets Tomorrow at Noon
The weekly bridge group of the
Balboa Woman's Club will meet
on Thursday at 12:30 pro. in the
Jewish Welfare Board Center.
Legion Auxiliary Notice
Sunday being Gold Star Mo-
ther's Day, the American Legion
Auxiliary asks all members to
attend church services in com-
memoration of the Gold Star
Mothers that day.
Tournament Penef: Dance
at Golf Club Saturday
The Panama Golf Club is giv-
ing a dance on Saturday night
to raise funds for the Open Golf
Championship Tournament. All
sorts of games will be played for
prizes. No admission fee Is being
charged.
Bridge Tournament
The Ancon Balboa Duplicate
Bridge Association held its
weeklv tournament in the card
room of the Hotel Tivo'.i on Mon-
day evening. They played a
'.eam-of-four tournament.
Winners were: First team Mr.
-nd Mrs. W. No'-ris and ?''. 'd
Mrs'. H. G. Robinson pld, -
ond team, Mr. snd Mr W.
Kennedy. Mr.. John E. Divls
and Dr. Stewart.
Ramadan Grot'o
to Meet Ton;- ht
Tjie jT,-,--- % Gro'to will hold
Statistics Confirm US War
Costs Disclosed By MilUr
WASHINGTON, Sept. 5 (USISt
The ''realties* of the sacrifices
me.de by the United States dur-
ing and since World War Two. to
which U.S. Assistant Secretary
of 8tat<> Edward G. Miller. Jr.J
referred during his Panama City
address are made more explicit
in a memorandum recently com-
piled by the U.S. Library of
Congress. At the special meeting
of the Inter-American Economic
and Social Council on Panama
this week. Miller mentioned the
war-imposed strains on the U.8.
economy in connection with the
question of assuring the future
purchasing power of Latin Ame-
rica's monetary reserves.
Miller said the realities of the
situation include the fact that
the United States came out of
World War Two with a national
debt of more than 250,000 million
dollars, and with large continu-
ing financial responsibil i t i e a
caused by the war and the cur-
rent emergency is requiring very
considerable financial and econ-
omic sacrifices on the part of the
American people, as well as the
sacrifices of life."
The Library of Congress state-
ment of the cost of World War
Two, which was prepared for an
address to the Senate last week
by Senator Brlen McMahon,
makes these points: The overall
money cost to the United States
of World War Two will eventusl-
) be $1 '00,000,000.000. ($1.4 tril-
lion) or 13 times the cost of
jAu War One.
RUTH MILLETT Seys
This is for the many women
who write in about personal pro-
blems that are making them
miserable and say. "I have wor-
ried and worried about it."
Don't give yourself any credit
for worrying. Women often do.
to the extent of feeling that ji'st
because they have been wor-
rying themselves sick the prob-
lem should straighten out foi
them.
But worrying doesn't solve any
problem. And nobodv deserves
any credit Just for sitting around
and worrying.
If vou have a problem that Is
making you miserable, stop hug-
ging your misery to you. Sit
down and look at the problem as
clearly and honestly as you can
as though it were a friend's
problem Instead of your own.
Decide what choices you have
in meeting it. Examine each of
those carefully with one idea in
mind, to try and determine what
kind of a result you'll get.
Pick the solution that seems
o of'er the most hope of better-
' the situation and make up
- our mhd that you'll carry it
out without any backward glanc-
es.
DONT EXPECT MIRACLES
Don't expect any sudden mlr-
?c!eno matter what your pro-
blem Is. Instead, work slowly but
surely toward the thing you are
hoping to accomplish.
If you pet discouraged along
'he way. remind yourself that
vou have chosen the way that
seemed to offer the most hope
and for that reason you must not
turn bark.
The women who make no
headway in solving their per-
sonal and family problems are
the ones who do nothing but
worry about them. And judging
from my mall a lot of women feel
thev have done all they can a-
bout a situation if they have lost
enough sleep about it.
The direct military, cost to the
United States of the mobiliza-
tion of 12 million men and the
supply of war material to her al-
lies, according to defense secre-
tary George Marshall, was* ap- ,
orordmately $350.000 million be-,
tween 1939 and 1946.
The Korean conflict has be- j
come the fourth most bloody and
expensive In U.S. history, tlie
memorandum states, quoting an
editorial in the Washington Post.
The United States total of kill-
ed and missing in battles of
World War Two was 295,000 while
more than 13,000 US. soldiers
have thus far been killed in Ko-
rea.
Salem Sisters Give
Yearly Concert
In Colon Tomorrow
The Salem Sisters Missionary
Band tomorrow night will give
another of the their yearlv
cultural presentations In the
church at Third Street and
Central Avenue in Colon.
The entertainment will In-
clude a concert and drama. It
will get under way at 7 o'clock.
The Sisters hare grouped
several "of the organization's
leading artists and guests from
other denominations for this
event.
Lovers of cultural entertain-
ment are Invited to attend.
Don't risk your charm
with old-fashioned
ineffective deodorants.
v.
ONIY NIW ODO-IO-NO CHAM
01 VIS YOU ALJ. THIS I ADVANTAOISi
I Scop* perspiration quick-
ly aad safely.
x Bewnhee odoar irneandy.
i Gira full proucaofl fot.
mm to ikrtt days.
4 Nevar IcrfcaMS normal
eWly.
AUUtomt l ttate
Absolutely Wf! to
all taboo.
New, esxloaVe formal.
Never dra ep, aeree
gets gritty or cakes la the
ar at ordinary deodos*
aaa often do.
LODO R0-H0 Cream
thtj deodorant without a efotibf
SUMMER SPECIAL
Wli.> Have a Home
Permanent?
.... with Inadequate facilities,
no certain finished look, and
no guarantee when you can
have a professional one com-
plete for only $7 50! // vil'
last longer, and look better I
These can be had
MONDAY thru THURSDAY
Make your lAfA
Appointment L'LlJtl
Early! #*#
BALBOA
BEAUTY SHOP
Mrs. Bates Wleman. Mgr
Opta t.-ee a.m to ( M p.m.
Ralbo* Clabhoue, apatain.
NEW ZALAW PRODUCT
^tiantic 3e
ciet
9
Bo, 195, ymttm OtLpLon* (?*tu
378I
REPRESENTATIVES of the American Red Cross (Caribbean
Command), and of the Caribbean Command witness loading
at Tocumen of urgent medical supplies aboard a Pan Amer-
ican World Airways Clipper consigned to the Mexican Na-
tional Red Cross at Mexico City. The supplies are being sent
in response to a call for aid from the Mexican Capital, which
will in turn be distributed In the Tampico area. Many vie-
tims are still suffering from the recent hurricane that swept
that city.
The U.S. Army Caribbean and the 15th Naval District
made these supplies available. Pan American World Airways
contributed by flying the medicines to Mexico City without
charge.
Overseeing the loading are Lt. Col. Donald D. Wilson, of
the Logistic Staff, Caribbean Command, and Howard R. Ross.
Red Cross Director from Quarry Heights.
*
tELIX

SPECIAL
SALE
for TOTS and GIRLS
DRESSES
PLAY SLITS
SWIM SUITS
LINGERIE
POLO SHIRTS
BOY'S SPECIAL
POLO SHIRTS
3 For 1.00

POLL PARROT fre-Tetted SHOES
for BOYS nd GIRLS
Scientijically Protect Their Tender feet!

MAIN STORE
FELIX B. MADURO, SA.
21 Central Avenue Tel. 2-0238
Store Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and from 2 to p.m.
Bigger Food Value
with
QUAKER OATS
I.eaefeeJ QeeaerOeh-
your whole family gets at
tu cetf key food essen-
tials needed for GOOD
HEALTH. No other
whole grain cereal offer*
more nourishment then
Quaker Oauthat's why
it'* called Nature's Won-
der Food. Eat it daily!
MORI FOR YOUR MONEY WITH QUAKER OATS
INIROY.......to.-.......rH4hi
STMNOTH.....................phatyaf)
STAMINA..............I*t *" TVssssh (Vites* i.)
INJOYMINT....
Boil 2 capa of water. Add sale. Wnn boiling. aaM
1 cap of Quaker Oau. Cook il aurrmj, for 2',t
minutes. That's all t
NEW TEACHERS WELCOMED WITH SUPPER PARTT
Members of the faculty of the Cristobal High School who
had remained on the Isthmus during the summer months
arranged a "Get-Together" dinner in the cafeteria of the
High School Monday evening to welcome the new members
of the faculty, and famlllea who returned from vacation.
i ne dinner was arranged by Mr. and Mrs. Paul Beck, Mr.
and Mrs. Noel E. Gibson, Mr. and Mrs. Luke Pahimbo, Lieu-
tenant and Mrs. John M. Nolan, Sergeant and Mrs. Louis
Viggiano, Mr. and Mrs. Gearhard Lust, and Mr. and Mrs. C.
F. Anderson of Balboa.
The new teachers who were in-
troduced at this time were: Mr.
and Mrs. Bruce Davey and son,
Mr. and Mrs. Reynold Vann
and three daughters, Mr. and
Mrs. Bernard ETOSt and two
sons. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E.
Crimmel and daughter. Miss Ve-
va Sasse and Miss Olive Schweit-
zer.
'Others present were: Mr. and
Mrs. O. E. Jorstad and son Jon.
and Major and Mrs. Wayne
Bar:, of Balboa.
Farewell Dinner for
Commander and Mrs. White
Commander and Mrs. W. D.
King entertained with a dinner
party at their Coco Solo quarters
Monday evening to honor Com-
rianr'er and Mrs. T. G. White
who leave in the near future for
Washington. D.C.
The hostess used a humorous
theme for the evening. Her cen-
terpiece was a nautical carica-
ture. She depicted Commander
King with his crashed plane on
a tropical isle, all In miniature,
with palms and. appropriate
greenery. Sailing to him was a
replica of his sailboat towing a
bottle of liquor, for fuel and cig-
arettes for food.
As the honoree had recently I
been the recipient of the Navy's)
E for efficiency m his Squadron.
the hostess presented him with
ci'stird ni dcorp'-d Wth a
large confection dry E, and en-
t i.ca v.tii mciingue. Inscribed
with bon voyage wishes.
Those enjoying the Kings' hos-
oltalltv were: Captain and Mrs.
L. L. Koepke. Commander and
Mrs. W. W. Bemls. Lt. Com-
mander and Mrs. T. L. Apnle-
oulst, Lt. Commander and Mrs.
A. P. Anderson and Lt. Com-
mander and Mrs. H. E. Schmidt.
fleers Club. Mrs. James Pumpel-
ly presided at the buffet table.
which was centered with carna-
tions and assorted tropical flow-
ers.
The friends who called during
the afternoon included: Mrs. By-
ron King. Mrs. Hollls Prelss. Mrs.
Victor Silva, Mrs. Gerardo San-
chez. Mrs. Jose Nieves. Mrs.
John Hipson. Mrs. Roy Willcer-
son. Mrs. John Sofka. Mrs. Ra-
mon Vale, Mrs. Francisco Mn-
dez, Mrs. Antosen. Mrs. William
Wallace, Mrs. Archie Davidson.
Mrs. Jose Torres. Mrs. Ricardo
Vazquez. Mrs. William Llnd-
strom, Mrs. John Prehle and Mrs.
Orvllle Shaw.
f
Colon Hospital. The baby ha
been named. Jacqueline Rose.
Mr. Evans is employed with
the Transportation Division at
Coco Solo. Mrs. Evans is ths
former Miss Rose Mizrachl o
Colon.
Mr. and Mrs. La Crois
Return from Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. Milton M. La-
Croix returned Monday from A
vacation spent in Chicago and
other cities of the central states.
Mr. apd Mrs. Munre
Move to Ancon
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Munro,
of Gatun. moved today from Ga-
tun to Chegres Street In Ancon.
Mr. Munro Is employed by the
Electrical Division and has been
transferred to the Pacific Side of
the Isthmus.
St. Mary's Alumnae
Association Meeting
St. Mary's Alumnae Associa-
tion will meet this evening at
7:30 at the Parish Hall at 4th
and G Streets.
Mrs. Harris Wins Painting
Mrs. Howard Haris of Gatun,
held the winning ticket. No. 166,
for the seascape painted by Mrs.
Flovd McDermltt. The painting
was donated by the artist and
was raffled by the Ladies' Auxil-
iary of thre Gatun Union Church
to raise funds for their organi-
zation.
Cocktail Party for Officers
of Armed Forces
The Reserve Officers Associa-
tion Is entertaining Friday even-
ing with a cocktail partv and
buffet refreshments at the Co-
co Solo Officers Club from 6:00
to 8:00 n.rn.
AH reserve and active officers
of the Armed Forces are Invited
to attend with their ladies and
guests.
Reservations may be made by
calling Mr- John Olancy, Cristo-
bal 2139. or Mr. Walter Hunni-
cutt-Colon 800.
Returned from the Interior
Mr. and Mrs. George Engelke
and Mr. and Mrs. Herbert En-
gelke returned Monday from a
visit to Gorgona.
Mrs. J. J.-Jackson and her
voung guests Candv and Taffy
Koepke and Donna Jean King
have returned from a visit to
Santa Clara.
"Chocolatada" Given as Bon
Voyage for Mrs. I.inderen
Mrs. Frank Lindstrom. whose
'usband Is completing a tour of
duty at Fort Gullck, was honor-
< "wN'h a "chocolatada" which
was arranged as a bon voyage
,v by Mrs. Victor Mrquez
and Mrs. Antonio Quesada.
The party was given Tuesday
afternoon at the Fort Gulick O-
Recent Arrivals in Gatun
Miss Stella Gallo and her mo-
ther, arrived last week and are
occupying quarters No. 39-J m
Gatun. Miss Gallo Is one of the
new teachers assigned to the Ga-
tun Elementary School. Miss
Gallo comes to the Isthmus from
Modesto. California.
tax
Imported
Canned Hams
PER
DREWS
KRAKVS&
4T.4LAJSTA BRAND
art offered by
TACAROPULOS
COMMISSARY
Phone 1000 Coln
HOME DELIVERY
Miss Mildred Houy. arrived by
plane Friday from Frederlcks-
burg, Texas, and Is occupying
quarters in Building 41, In Ga-
tun. Miss Houy Is also assigned
to the Gatun Elementary School.
Mrs. Vestal Morris returned
by plane yesterdav from a vaca-
tion in the States. She spent
part of the summer attending
school In North Carolina. Dr.
Morris will return to the Isth-
mus at a later date.
Birth Announcement
Mr. and Mrs. James J. Evans
of Colon, announce the birth of
a daughter on September 1st at
Catun Auxiliary Meeting
The Women's Auxiliary of the
Gatun Union Church will meet
Thursdav at the Church at 1:30
p.m. for refreshments. Tha
meeting will start at 2:30 p.m..
Mrs. 8am Mauldin, vice-presi-
dent will preside in the absence
of the president. Mrs. William
Badders Mrs. W. C. Smith and
he>- "committee are in charge of
refreshments.
Rainbow Aemnlv Fntrrtains
The members of Cristobal As-
sembly. No. 2. Order of the Rain-
bow for Girls gave a party at the-
Gatun Masonic Temple for mem-
bers and their truests and the De-
Molay boys and their guests. Ait
evening of informal games and
danclmr wps followed by a slum-
ber party for the girls.
The arrangements were made
by Miss Jeannette Marquard,
Worthv Advisor and Mrs. B.
Donald Humphrey. Mother AcW
visor of the Asembly. Mrs. Viev*
tor May and Mrs. William Ha-'-
darit.s assisted Mrs. Humphrey
in chaperoning the slumber par-
ty.
Miss Jacquie Boyle and Donna
Humphrey were gnests of Was
club with Messrs Carlton Croft,
Ralph Malcolm. John Albright,
John Hatgl. John Fahnestoek,
Georee Bennett. Don McLaueh-
lin. Dan Nellis. James Nellls,
James Scheibeler. Dickie Cun-
ningham. John Frank. Tom Gib-
son. Gilbert Ferro, Bob Bailey,
Bobbv alter. Buddy Thomas,
PaulWhltlock. Robert R. Scott;
Joe Carter and Marvin Rodger'.'
The other adults who attended
were: Mrs. J. M. Fahnestoek,
Mrs. Howard Munro. Mrs. Fred
Wllloughby, Mrs. Fred A. New-
hard. Mrs. Raloh Malcolm and
Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Albright.
The girls present with Mis
Marquard were: Misses Ardls
Willoughbv. Martha Graham. Pat
Howard. Nancy Kariger. Ltmeve
Dough. Dorothy Rowley. Carol
George. Marie Fraser. Mildred
Marquard, Henrietta Ferrl, Joyca
Cookson. Edwins Walsh. Lois
Sche'.degg; Maydele Gardner. Di-
ane Schetdegg. Mary Sherry. Ro-
berta Williams. Kathryn Daniel,
Pat Rndre, Nellie Holgerson, Joan
and Paula Holgerson, Judy Mal-
colm. Louise Edmonson. Carien
Taher. Pamela Hawthorne. Diane
McLaren. Arlene Vandergrift,
Svlvla Mann and Ruth Corbett.
,.. yew diMevereaf the new. ja>
proved Modest! Mide especially to
give you comfort m action.
So luxury-toft(hit 8 out of 10
women in a recent test reported ae
chafing with Modus.
So assuringly ufewith it trlfk
shield for extra long-lasting pro-
tection.
Such freedomsach comfort-
that you'll never again be satisfied
with any other bread.
SO'Ht, fAI
MODESS
M^MtmJjeolmwn

Your gift of an Elgin American dresser set will
bring glamour with utility into her daily life.
Exquisite design engraving and enduring jewel-like
finish for beauty's sake. Nylon brisdes. hand-cut comb
and heavy beveled glass mirror for duty's sake. This
year, surprise her with tbis perfect gift
e
TAHITI
T 1 i t W t t I f T 0 I
I. .-L



PAGE SIX

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN nCDEPENPENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
aw
_:. WEDNESDAT SEPTEMBER 5. 1M
**ssjfje6 2* *vick
Ltovs your od with on of our Agents or our Offices
LEWIS SERVICE
N. 1 Th*H At*
KlUSftO l)R l.ESSEPK
f*fe
Paaaai
MORRISON'S
N*. 4 Paaitk of Jr Av
Faene !-M4i
B(t IK A CARLTON
IMS* Mfleaatf At*.
Pi*- *Celea
SALON DE BELLEZA AMERICANO
n*. st mm i:th street
IMF PANAMA AMERICAN
Ma. I? H" Stre*t_r-aaam
Ne. 12.17 Cotral At*.Calta.
SO
-.'
p

Minimum for
12 words
3* each additional
word.
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FO RSALE: Three Rattan orm
chairs, 0835 Amador Rood, ocross
(rom YMCA
FOR SALE:$65.00 7 Pc. mohogory
dmingrcm set. $45.00 couch, cush-
ions, cover, plywood bock. $55.00.
Sirr.mons double bed. innerspring
mattress, choirs Phone Curundu
5159.
FOR SALE: 9 cu ft porcelom
Westmohcuse ice box. Box in ex-
cellent condition, needs new unit,
?rice $25.00. Phone 2-2494.
hous* 122 Ridge Rood. Balboa
Height.
FOR SALE:25 cycle 1-4 H P. mo-
tor for washing mochine. Phcne 3-
1512. house 30 New Cristobal.
FOR SALE:1949 Codilloc convert-
puncture proof tubes, ridio. heater,
defroster. Twin spotlights rear win-
dow, ^oare set General W/VV tire.
$2.995.00. Cell Coco Solo 380 or
write Box 282. Coco Solo.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
IUICK
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Paredes
Panam 2-0600
4.
e
s
903 more 903 more 903 more
FOR SALE: 1948 Chevrolet 5 pos-
senger coupe. Cor in perfect
shope. To be seen at Torpoon
Club, fcotun, C. Z.
FOR SALE: Mattress, single bed.
Small desk. 2 Easy choirs. Dresser,
mahogany. House 0440-F. Ancon.
telephone 2-2311. Balboa
FOR SALE:Mercury Sedan 1941.
Engine, overhiuled. new battery. 2
ivory Venetian blinds, 40 inches
wide. Phone 2-2496 offer 5 p. m.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:Windsor Blue. 1950,
4-dcor. De Luxe Chevrolet, white-
wall tires, low mileage. 0766-D.
Williomson Piece, Balboa, between
4 p, m. and 6 p. m. doily.
WANTEC:Boxes, Doeermon pins-
cher or German Police dog, less i
than 6 months ofe. Cell Panama I
3-3589.
FOR SALE:1947 Bukk Super Se-
donette. See Cdr. Carpenter of
Joint Weather Unit Albrook. Phone
off^e 2237. home 7108.
WANTED:Retired employe olorre,
Wishes to rent room in family
quarters, Balboa. Anccn or Diablo,
Tel. 2-3746. Belboa or 3-1505
Marflarilr, offer 4 p. m.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
IUICK
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Paredes
Ponomi 2-0600
FOR SALE:1941 Nosh 2-door se-
den. Good rubber and seat covers.
Engine fair. $150.00 cash. Cris-
tobol 3-1742.
FOR SALE:2 strong "Diesel" work
boats. For cargo, shrimp trawlers.
Tel. 2-2252, Dr. Morles.
FOR SALE: Philippine mahogany
cabin cruiser, powered by M-7
Chrysler Marine motor. Sleeps 6.
gas cooking, running water. Two
6 ft. mechanical fish boxes, one
4 ft. in galley. Fully equipped, out-
riggers, cooking and eoting uten-
sils. Soilfish and Merlin tackle.
Plenty spore parts. Leoving Satur-
day on vocation. Price for evry-
. thing $2,400. Consider cor In
trade. Telephone 83-6257.
FOR SALE.1949 De Luxe Tudor
Chevrolet. Excellent condition $1,-
350.00. Con arrange financing.
Cnstobo! 3-1319.
4.
u
C
=
I
4.
t-
S
I
I
4.
C
B
M
f
1
gU
res
that speak
for themselves
Last month THE PANAMA
AMERICAN carried 3 24 8
classified ads as compared
to 2345 in all other daily
papers in Panam com-
bined !
903 more 903 more
903 more
8

E
O
1
n
1
3
o
1
(f
S
W
3
o
*J
9
*
5
o
3
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
IF YOU THINK PRICES
Are High in Panam
GET A LOAD OF THIS
dvertljement we received In
e foreifn trade Journal:
CHLORDANE
CONCENTRATE
NOW IN ONr OUNCE BOTTLES.
SUSS ""' "/now .ilUbS
wYpIvV! Ty M0 " noi*
(name of Company deleted in pit"
OUR HETAIL PRICE
for a 5'. ounce bottle
That Makes ONE GALLON
85c
(sorry, we don't pay shipping
charge)
GE0.F. NOVEY, INC.
teatral Ave, _
MISCELLANEOUS
Oe r*e * aWaktag piahitrnt
Write Alc.halic. A .any mew
Soi 2031 Aacea. C. Z.
Any commission qcieptoble domea-
tic, overseas. inter planetary.
Wnle Goylord Mulfy. Box 734 An-
con. Conal Zone,
LESSONS
WE teach oil types of Ballroom
dancing. Professionol instructors.
Balboa "Y". Hornatt Dunn.
FOR SALE: 1939 Oldsmobile 2-1
door sedan, body ond tires good
condition and mechanically. Duty
paid. $200.00. Phone Cnstobol 3-
1571.
FOR SALE:1942 4-Door Ford Se-
don. Good motor, good tires, good PHOTOGRAPHERS opportunity to
tionsportotion. Phone 83-2210. ,olie Photos of notive hut under
---------------------------------------------------------1 construction beside EL HALCN
FOR SALE: 1942 Buick Sedan. | Photo Shop at entrence to Hotel El
Balboa Bowling Center from 3 p. Ponomi.
m. to 11. p. m. Ask for Dioz.
RESORTS
Tiny cottoge, almost new. Two, three
people. Countrystyle cpmforts. Pri- I
vacy. Near village. Wonderful '
climate. Fritz Marti, El Volcan,
Chiriqui. Panama.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
Williams Sonto Clora Beach Cottoges.
Two bedrooms. Fngidoires, Rock-'
gas ronges. Balboa 2-3050.
Gromllch's Sent Cloro beoch-
cortoges. Electric Ice boxes, gas
stoves, moderte retes. Phone 6-
541 or 4-567.
FOR SALEBaby buggy, old 5 H. P.
SALE:1940 Ford Sedan with; Johnson outboard, swop 25 cycle
48 Engine ond radio. $250.00.
Coll Mc 273-2264 before 1530 or
house 332 Gamboa, after 1630.
Lessons: Coaching In Arithmetic ond
phonics sympathetic instruction for
primory Kindergarten and pre-
eheel oges of Individual School on
Amador Rd Pt Iboa. near pipe, WILL TRADE
construction. Call Hoffman, Pedro
Miguel 553.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
IUICK
NEW YORK OR DETROIT
Smooth Paredes
Ponomi 2-0600
Apex washing machine for 60
cycle or motor. 1949 Ford 6 tudor.
Call 15th Naval District 2239.
Final 'Caribbean'
Contest Vote Count
Slated Friday Night
The semifinal tote count In the
Caribbean Contest, which was
held last Fridav night, Aue 31
St the Panama Capital Hall re-
mitted as follows:
1942 Chevrolet:
pick-up in good operoting condi- j
tion for Willys Jeep in equal con- I
dition. 817-B Empire St. 2-3679.'
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SALE:New electric portable
sewing mochine. $75.00; lorge
carved toble, $50.00; carved Chi-
nese floorlamp, $50.00; Chinese
rug. $400.00; IC yards hond-em-
broidered draperies, $10.00; word-
robe, $25.00; bench embroidered
cover. $10.00; electric saw; elec-
tric pointsproy. Phone 2-1310
Balboa.
FOR SALE: 19 species aquarium
fishes, plants, supplies, turtles, 11
Via Espaa opposite Juon Fronco
Stables, hours 4-8 p. m. Phone
3-4132.
FOSTER: Cottoges for rent by
day, week or month between Santa
Clora ond Rio Hato. Tel. 2-3142
_ or tee core toker.
HOTEL PAN-AMIRICAO in El Va-
lle. Special room rates for Septem-
ber. $35 per month. $20 for 2
weeks. Meals o la corte. Telephone
Panama 2-1 112 for reservation.'
Tel. 3-eiM
LUX
VENETIAN
BLINDS
Imuedlate
Delivery.
Tel. 3-1713
22 E. 29th St
j | PC Personnel Man
Back After Hiring
Electrical Help
George F. Welsh, Chief 6 the
Employment end Utilisation Di-
vision of the Personnel Bureau,
has returned to the Isthmus af-
ter about three months in the
East Coast area of the United
States recruiting- electrical work-
era for the Canal organization.
As a result of the recruiting
drive, about 50 wlremen were em*
ployed tor the Loca* and Electri-
cal Divisions. About 26 of the
new employes have already ar-
rived on the Isthmus and the re-
mainder are expected to arrive
within the next few weeks.
William Black. Electrical Su-
pervisor at Pacific Lock, worked
with Welsh on the first part of
the recruiting drive and Is now
on vacation leave in the United
States before returning to the
Isthmus.
The recruiting; team left June
11. Welsh returned Monday on
the S.S. Ancon.
In addition to the wlremen
employed as a result of the drive,
contacts were made with state
employment offices, civic of fl-
etis and other organisations and
individuals through whom it is
believed a continuing potential
labor supply may be opened to
the Canal organisation.
The cities visited Included
Richmond. Roanolce. Winston-
Salera. Raleigh, Columbia, Ma-
con. Atlanta, Wheeling. Steuben
Wile and Washington, D.C.
Capital
Beauty Is
'Miss DC
"Mi
Washington
of 1951,"
30-year-old
June Beverly
Klein, left
embraces the
runner-up,
Diana c.
Wallace, 19,
after finals In
the capital
beautv contest
at Washington
theater.
Miss Klein will
compete in the
"Miss America"
contest at
Atlantic City,
N. J.
Amended 1948 US Sugar Act
Will Benefit Latin America
PhiHifi. Oceonside cottages, Sonto
Claro. Box 435. Balboe Phone
Panama 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673.
.3 a n a la c
ana
IN8TANT
Fat-Fret
Powdered
Milk
FOR RENT
Houses
Dorothy Clifton)
Virginia Williams i
Jamaica
T430.
Antigua.
T170.
JETlnl<1*d' '**'"ley McDonald'
WOO.
*arbaao*. 'Sylvia Richards i
4770.
^Grenada. 'Cecilia Douglas)
POR SALE OR RENT: Farm in
Costo Rico about 5 hectares, lo-
cated 8 miles from the capital at
4,200 feet above seo level. Fine,
healthy climate, regular rood,
plenty of water. Excellent for grow-
ing high priced flowers for internal
trade or export, corn, vegetables,
potatoes, sugor cone and for
doiry.ng. For detailed information: FOR SALE:Brond new Singer sew-
FOR SALE:One Radio Tester and
one Tube Checker. Reasonable.
Call ot No. 52 Mariono Arose-
meno, R. P.
FOR SALE:6 cu. ft. Deep Freeze".
like new. $175.00. Child's Sliding
Board. $15.00. 86-2186.
Arturo Schlcger. apartado
San Jose. Costa Rico.
1479,
ng foot mochine. Best offer $135
Central Celidonia. 0 Street. House
207. room 2.
FOR RENT:House, completely fur-
nished, stove, refrigerator, 3 bed-
rooms, gorage. Telephone 3-3143
Ponomi.
FOR RENT:Completely furnished
house m La Crests. Three bedrooms
two baths, maid's quorttrs, bar.
swimming pool, hot water, etc
$350.00. If interested call Pan-
ama 3-4630 between 12 and 2
P. M.
St, Lucia M10.
St. Vincent 'Dllma Evans i
two.
The final voting in the contest
will take place this Friday night.
Sept. 7. commencing at 7:30 at
the Panama Capital hall, when
there will be two counts, the first
ftt 1:15 p.m. and the second t
1:45 p.m.
All Interested should try to
reach the hall at 7:30. at this
final count, maybe expected ma-
ny changes and surprises. As
the voting now stands there Is a
note Of uncertalntv as to who
will eventuallv be declared the
winner on Friday night.
kTa
Start
iv Nitht
jfww first aid rlasse? that are
FOR SALE: Cocker Spooiel Pups,
reg.stered. May be seen at Qtrs.
27-A. Quarry Heights. Telephone
82-2216.
Barber Shop Ouartel
Sinaers Meet Tonight
In Balboa Brewery
Residents of Panama and the
Canal Zone who have bent for
"close harmony." either as
singers or listeners, are Inform-
ed that a chapter of the So-
ciety for the Preservation and
Encouragement o Barber Shop
Quartet Singing in America, in-
corporated, is planned for this
comunlty.
This remarkable organization
acale. It now has more than
800 chapters scattered through-
out the United States and
Canada.
'Birthed," "invented." or
of singers and would-be singers
operates on an international
what-have-you. In 1938 bv a torium ktV".""" ",.cuo'-
Tulsa Oklahoma attorney VB *?*80*,"**
Owen C. Cash, the Societv has ~1~--. Pre*ented from
grown by leaps and bounds.
FOR RENT
______Apartments
ALHAMIRA APARTMENTS
Modern furnished-unfurnished apart
ment. Contoct office No. 8061. 10th
St. New Cristobal. Phone 1386. Co.
Ion.
(fortified with Vitamin D)
WHEN PROPERLY DILUTED
CONTAINS:
Froleln.............. jsj?.
^t0* ............. 51.91V
Pel................. 1.9%
Calcium ............ 1.2%
Phosphorus ......... 1.02%
Sodium Oxide........7%
Potassium Oxide ___ 175%
Niacin .. .. 4.2 mt. per Jb.
Thiamine .. 1.8 ta%. per lb.
Ribofiavin.. 9.2 ma;, per lb.
Cloriee ....... 3 per ,t.
Vitamin D 4f units per t.
On Salt la r.c. Ce. Ceaamlauriee.
Ceasefire Signed
In Toy World; Kids
Like New Designs
By GAT PAULET
NEW YORK (UP)They've
decided on A cease-fire in the
toy world.
The experts say children have
tired of playing at war and
now are more Interested In
space ships and Bopalong Cas-
sidy than with tanks and sol-
diers and submarines.
That is why, said the Toy
Guidance Council, that parents
will see fewer war toys on the
Christmas market. Those being
sold will be Inexpensive ones.
The council, an advisory
group working with manu-
facturers, said children arc-
interested merer than ever
before- in 'leys of tomorrow."
Television is why. the council
said. A spokesman explained
that the youngsters see scien-
tific fantasy on the screen and
then demand such playthings as
atomic rockets, stratophones
and gelger counters.
The council's anuual exhibit
here even had Willie Ley, *
rocket scientist, on hand to
demonstrate some of the scien-
tific toys.
The atomic rocket cheats a
little on its name. It never
leaves the ground but it's shap-
ed like a rocket ship and gives
off realistic sparks as it rolls
along the floor on hidden
wheels.
& dltrlouon of the "defi-
JLP-.JbVt Act Of"1948," which
President Truman signed Into
lew, makes some changes in the
amounts of sugar that can be
imported Into the United States,
government trade experts point-
ed out today.
These changes, however, will
PSjLev Inttf-effect until Jan. 1,
1953. Meanwhile, present sugar
quotas remain In effect.
The changes were made, the
trade experts said, to give cer-
tain areas a chance to partici-
pate more fully in the sales of
sugar to the United States. These
areas are the Dominican Repub-
lic. El Salvador, Haiti, Mexico,
Nicaragua and Per. They are
known as full-duty areas and
pay 67.75 cents for each 100
pounds of sugar imported Into
the United States.
Requirements for joining, ac-
^2re1s,d8e0Bt^oUnder,Pay lD cordln* **** Sta.
e clauaa a in th. Vl"' Saturdy Evening Post
mese classes are in the con- story, are rigid
tjnuatlon of the general cam-
paign to train all Canal Zone
residents in firs: aid work
William Oorden, well-known
comunlty worker and certified
flrst aid Instructor, will head
the tralnine course
Persons registered in Cha-
tres Irrt week nuu:
l .<: > *e -on
f!AV 3 'a1),*- '^\h*,d :s,,n;.t',.-edh> aol,,R*
*A. ffuiri'
sBhag're.VhooL3' h"d iB "K
marres school. 4 , Nontx Avenue> Panamil CUy;
ac. end
Only eligible are those males,
free, adult, congenial, of good
reputj. who can sing and
thore who can't, but want to
lerrn. or are satisfied Just to
listen.
Anyone who can live up to
these stem Qualifications and
a liitt. .ed In doini'. something
about it mav attend the Dre-
l.:r.' 'cry oreanlzetlon meeting
ht t 7:30 in the Beer
Maria Del Rey
Sings To Patients
At Army Hospital
Patients of the U.S. Annv
Hospital at Fort Clayton had
a brightened holiday Monday
when vocalist Maria del Rey
JSho'subeen a1 El Panama Hotel
for the past three weeks, ap-
S. 7Uha.her gUltar "d
presented a 45 minute program
"ESS nnd Amer"*n HE
Respectfully silent when she
"* Introduced as a stateside
radio and television star with
an mpreaslve record of per-
sonal appearances in smart
supper clubs from New York
to San Francisco, the audience
it0 n ,w?med UP when she
pegan strolling around the audi-
torium aski -
which she
memory.
~S5?MltUy effectlv were her
renditions of Spanish songs.
bathrobes and containing a
wheel chairs, had a large num-
ber of Puerto Rlcan troops who
were grealty pleased when she
changed from Enp'ish to
8panlsh and delivered Island
Following her program rNhe
auditorium. Miss Del Rey asit-
St**HL ?Lthe *ard8' sere-
nading bedridden patients who
were ur.able to attend the per-
formance. Nurses, doctors and
a croun of the men who had
withnessed the audltr- m show
followed in her wake as shi
progressed through the wards.'
FOR RENT: Modern furnished,
smoll fomily. Best residential site
aportment. ideal for couple or
in Ponoma. Poitlllo Airport Roed.
No. 121. Priced to suit your Dock-
et
FOR RENT: Two apartment on
Justo Arosemeno Avenue No. 73-
A one furnished. Tel. 3-0294 or
2-2341. Ponomi,
FOR RENT:Furnished aportment.
two bedroom, livinflroom, kitchen
ond bath, big balcony, elevotor,
105 dollars. Tel. 3-1648.
FOR RENTAportment 33 East 39
Street. 3 bedrooms with two bothi.
diningroom, maid's quarters with
both, goroge. etc. $125.00. Phone
Ponoma 3-3467.
FOR RENTNicely furnished oport-
ment. screened. Tiled. Porch.
Parlor-Diningroom. Kitchen, Bed- .
room. $55.00. Apply 112 Via r>- Si'd /e"ni,eA enters
Irsorio Porros. Near Roosevelt
Diana Cbiari's New
Poinl-4 Handicrall
In Penwomen Snow
Recent examples of ceramics
and weaving by the prominent
Panamanian artist, Diana Chla-
n. will be exhibited at a tea to be
given in honor of women artists
".?, Jrlter8 oi p*n*m* and the
canal Zone by the Canal Zone
Branch of the National League
?if m T1 an Pen Women at their
Little OaMery in the Hotel Tivo-
u from 4 to 8 p.m. Saturday.
_The artist, who Is Mrs. Victor
2E15, ,n prlme 1,fe- ^turned
recently from the United States
where she had ben studying at
Nnhnand,<8cho01 of Crafti in
North Carolina on a grant from
Aff ,Inrt,ltute of mter-American
Pnin '- connectln with the
Point Four program
tJSfi ,K!",tlcle" of handicraft to
be exhibited were executed dur-
ing her studies there.
Diana, whos beautiful bateas
are admired throughout Panama
rhVrFJl*"*1 ZoDe- was ^ ln
i/niire. She was educated at Pa-
2S2*'i Norn,al School and also
Improved from last year is
the atomic energy laboratory,
which includes a working
gelger counter and a Wilson
cloud chamber for detecting
radiation. >
The council said the wild west
Influence Is going strong again
this year. There's a mechaniz-
ed posse shooting gallery with
moving targets, a rodeo game,
holsters, and a galloping hobby
horse.
Several new type dolls will be
on the Christmas market. One
collection Is dressed in au-
thentically-styled historical cos-
tumes, with appropriate hairdos.
Another doll comes with a
transparent hatbox containing
her attachable chignon.
Dolls are capable of many
things. Some say both "mama"
and "papa." One cries and
blows bubbles and still another
has an adjustable face which
can be made to cry, smile or
aleep.
Cuba,- the only non-fuU-duty
nation, pays 50 cents. The na-
tions which will most surely gain
by the amendments are the Do-
minican Republic. Haiti, Mexico
and Per, officials said if u.8
sugar requirements will, by 1953
have advanced materially, Nicar-
agua may join this list, they
added.
It Is estimated that U.S. pop-
ulation Is Increasing by two per
cent per year, adding about 150,-
000 short tons annually to do-
mestic consumption. In 1951 re-
quirements are estimated at ,-
250,000 short tons. In total con-
sumption as well as on the per
capita basis (over 100 pounds
per person) the United States,
which is also the second largest
producer of sugar, leads the
world.
El Salvador would show a de-
cline from 6.750 to 4.416 and Ni-
caragua, a slight loss, from 8.380
to 8,353. Officials pointed out.
however, that these two losses
may be made up by increasing
U.S. demands for sugar and by
the distribution among Latin
American countries of the so-
called sugar deficit other a-
reas falling to supply their full
quota. (Por example, If the Phil-
ippines or Puerto Rico fall to
supply their full quotas.)
Cuba's deliveries would decline
from 2,959.200 (M) tons to 2,711.-
000 tons, but, as already noted. .
actually this may turn out to be launched
clt" in which cuba shares prom-
inently.
ECOSOC Concerned
Over Restrictions
On Newspaper Men
GENEVA, Sept. S (USIS)
^ United Nations Economa
and Social Council Is on record
as overwhelmingly expressing
extreme concern over govern-
mental actions designed to ex-
clude, restrict or punish newa
correspondents solely for per-
forming their proper duties.
The resolution was approved by
the Council Saturday. The vote
was 14 to 3, with Pakistan ab-
staining. The opposing votes
came from the Soviet bloc the
Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia and
Poland.
The clear intent of ECOSOC. as
previously stated in social com-
mittee debate, was to cover such
cases as that of American news
correspondent William N. Oatis,
Oatis was given a ten-year pris-
on sentence by the Csech Com-
munist regime on grounds that
his routine news gathering cons-
tituted espionage.
The resolution "urges strongly
that personal restraints be re-
moved and sentences Imposing
arbitrary punishments be revok-
ed and appeals to governments
to do all within their power to
safeguard the right of corres-
pondents freely and faithfully to
gather and transmit news."
During a brief plenary discus-
sion, U.S. Deputy Representa-
tive Walter Kotschnig expressed
hope that as one result of the
ECOSOC action "the Czechoslo-
vak government will see fit to
free sn Innocent man who faith-
fully and loyally pursued his
calling."
Blast furnaces, using Iron ore
at steadily increasing rates, will
have a new feeder next year. The
laregst ore carrier evr built for
srvice on th Orat Lakes will bt
Flower Show At La Boca,
Wins Plaudits Of Crowd
In
Theatre.
FOR RENT
Mirellnrnif
FOR RENT:Office or store space
19 x 20 feet, beside FOTO EL
HALCN ot entrones to Hotel 1
Ponomi. Owner on premises. Tel.
3-1179.
Mexico and New Mexico under
QUALITY
TROPIDURA
itKVlCt
rants from Panama's Govern-
ment.
She was one of the first to en-
courage the revival of the native
crafts m Panama and Is noted
ror her use of ancient Indian
?!?/". 8nel10w w<*k with the
institute of Inter-American Af-
fairs on their project to raise the
standard of living and health ln
the Interior.
.u01*"' l? "gtal member of
tfee Cavaaj Zone Branch of the
Na.lonal League of American
Pen Women. Examples of her
,,l*:,d "f'l hav been shown In
i he Little Gallery, but this will be
ne first comprehensive exhlbl-
jon^of her work to be shown
Armed Forces Courses
Registration To End
On Friday Evening
Registration for off-duty
United States Armed Forces
Institute courses will be open
through Friday, at the Clayton
Education Center, according to
the 95th AAA Group Educa-
tion Officer.
Offered to soldiers and their
dependents are: English and
mathematics both eighth grade
and high school; physical
science; radio servicing; begin-
ners English for Spanish speak-
ing people.
These classes, offered to help
soldiers raise their educational
lvels, are scheduled to begin
monday.
was out-
Dr. Spring*!] Plans
To Attend Hospital
Conventions in US
Dr. Arthur H. Sprlngall. As-
sistant to the Superintendent
2L ar|as Hospital, will leave
Friday, accompanied by Mrs.
Sprlngall, to attend two con-
ventions ln St. Louis.
They will sail on the S. S
Ancon,
Dr. Sprlngall will attend the
conventions of the American
College of Hospital AdmlnU-
trators and the American Hos-
pital Association ln St. Louis
from September IB to JO. They
will re'urn to the Isthmus Oc-
tober il.
The Urgest Flower Show ever the pink cammellla
staged on the Isthmus was pre- standing.
sented to the public at the Pad- Four Classes were entered,
fie Clubhouse by the La Boca Class I. cut flowers; Class II Fruit
Flower Arrangement Class under and vegetables; Class III, dried
the direction of Mrs. Pat Mor- and exotic and Class IV, Horti-
an and ln cooperation with St7 cultural. Ten volunteers entered
eter'a Church of La Boca and arrangements for "Special Oiat
Rev. Lemuel B. Shirley. Four sions."
thousand visitors attended the Amy Howell was the star ex-
show. The Class served refresh- hlbltor. She won first prise ln
ments from 3 to 4 p.m. to the Class I. second prise In Class II
mmebers and special guests ln- and Honorable Mention ln Class
eluding: Mrs. F. K Newcomer, TH.
Bishop and Mrs. R. Heber Good- The arrangement of hellconia
en. His Britannic Majesty's Sec- entered by Lucille Monlouir won
retary to Panama and Mrs. Jas- second prize,
per M. Leadbltter, Admiral and The winning arrangement In
Mrs. M. C. Bledsoe and the Class II was entered by Ethelyn
Judges. Mrs. Hortensia Alfaro Ingleton. It was an arrangement
de Alemn, widely known for her on a dried palm apath.
artistic flower arrangements, The Coral and dried leaves
Mrs Jean Karch. Supervisor of creation in Class III entered by
Art for the Canal Zone Schools. Georgiana A. Parchment carried
Mrs. Irene Pauldlng, painter and off first prise,
critic and Gaspar Pacheco, de- The Judges worked long to ar-
slgner and architect. rive at fair conclusions for over
400 entries. The enthusiasm, im-
A short impressive presenta- agination and- originality that
i Ion ceremony followed the re- was so obvious m the treatments
freshments at which time Myrtle made it difficult but excitingly
Green sang a solo accompanied stimulating,
by Elisa Davis. Lurlene Johnson The following reeeived awards,
in behalf of the Class presented The prizes were given by Mrs
Mrs. Morgan with a fitted pic- Morgan and R. K. Morris. Class
nlc case and read a letter ex- I: First Amy Howell; Second,
pressing their sincere gratitude Luollle Monlouls; Third, Dorothy
for the Inspiration and Joy they Williams and Honorable Mention,
had received during the eight Amy Lambert. Class II: First.
lessons. Mrs. Louise Morris and Ethelyn Ingleton; Second. Amy
Mrs. Ruth Mead were given gifts Howell; Third. lona Marshall,
ln appreciation for their assist- Honorable Mention, Mabel Belah-
ance. Rev. Shirley was given a fonte. Class III: First. Georgiana
letter as a token of thanks for A. / Parchment; Second, Rose
making the course possible. Robinson: Third. Myrtle Green
The guest exhibitors added a and Honorable Mention. Amy
highlight to the show. Captain HowelL Class IV: First. Mildred
Clifford Payne's white caladlum Johnson; Second. -Beryl Irving:
and pepper plant ln full bloom Honorable Mention, Lucille
Interested many visitors and Monlouls. Honorable Mention,
phoatographers Mr Ray Nel- "Special Occasions": "Christ-
son's exhibit drew much Interest mas." Dorothy Hay wood; "Brid-
wlth his Calla Lilly Begonia. An- al," Beryl Williams, Hallowe'en,"

M
. Ifel Wing, several fare cacti and, Hannah Moore^



***nm
^Tj-
wr
iNESDAT. SEPTEMBER 5, 1*51
",'Vi""~*
TTB PANAMA AMERICAN AN tNDEPF.NDENT DAItT NEWSFApE
PAGE SEVElf
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
WND K0 Ulimo *V TMB MMM MICAN ewe**. INC
rooxruo av nilkn ounIVIli in iaaa
NAMMDW ASIA, lonon
. H STMin P. O. BOX 194, MANAMA. I. 0 P.
TtLFHON* PAMAMA NO. T40 li'llNHI
caui .o**iaa. MhAMimeAw. mun*
C*LON 0HCI. 12 17 ClNTIIAL AVU HTWetN ItTM ANO lTH STMlrra
roAHAN awtltlNTATIVSa. JOSHUA POWERS. INC.
34B Madison Av.. NlW YC*K. '7> N. 4T.
LOCAL T ha ii.
____________ IT 8.SO
1.OO
_____ ia no t4 on
I MONTH. IN AOVAN-
' il MONTH IN AOVANOC
O- %N> v*R IN DVANCL-
MATTER OF FACT
By Joseph and Stewart Alsop
THE CLANGOROUS ABYSS
WASHINGTON.Anxiety about the future In Korea is bring-
ing on a bad attack of nerves In the government
Aa recently reported in this space, the American policy mak-
ers have little hope of a Korean ceasefire until after the Ban
Francisco conference on the Japanese peace treaty.
But the question now being asked Is whether, even after San
Francisco, a ceasefire can be arranged.
We shall not buv a Korean truce by abandoning the project
for a Japanese treaty. We shall not yield to the new Soviet
black-mall. /
Will the masters of the Kremlin then order the ceasefire
talks to be renewed in earnest, or will they order a renewal of
the war*
The most careful Inquiries reveal a wide but depressing, range
of official and expert opinion on this crucial point. (
To begin at the dark end of the spectrum. Gen. Mat-
thew B. Rldgway has lately sent the opinion from Tokyo
that the whole ceasefire project was probably a blind
from the start, and that we must now be prepared for
an eventual full scale renewal of the Korean flfhting.
A middle group here merely states that the odds against a
final ceasefire aer heavy, and are Increasing.
And the comparative optimists call It "still an even bet.
Since this Is the present range of official and expert opinion.
It Is certalnlv time to think about what will happen if the tragi-
comedy of Kaesong suddenly merges Into a new Communist of-
fensive which may. Indeed, happen tomorrow.
On the one hand, the long lull of the ceasefire talks has
benefitted the enemy far more than most people realize.
Quantities of new heavy equipment, including considerable
artillery And about 600 tanks, have been brought into the war
zone. > ..
The depleted Chinese and North Korean units have been
filled up. so that the enemv is now estimated to have about
500,000 men in Korea, with 400,000 In striking positions between
the 39th parallel and the front.
The buildup of air strength, which' had reached 1,000 planes
In Manchuria two months ago. has continued slowly.
Above all, every kind of supply dump has been piled up.
Therefore. Instead of being able to sustain an attack for only
a' few days, the Chinese and North K-oreana are now considered
able to continue on the offensive for a much longer period.
It is even calculated that every aided day of lull, in
which the enemy's supply dumps are not depleted by
heavy fighting, adds another day to the period daring
which an offensive effort can be maintained in the fa-
tare.
Thus the enemy in Korea is much stronger now. than he was.
<':i the other hand, so are we.
-ur forces, dug in at Chorwon and Kumwha, occupy Incom-
parably the best defensive position they have ever held in Korea.
They have had time to strengthen their hold on the Iron
Triangle by every device of the military art, so that they can be
sure of taking a fearful toll of the attacking enemy.
Por the first time, they have their full complement of wea-
pons and equipment of all kinds.
And for the Urst time, the aevlslons and regiments are more
than up to strength, with substantial reserves of manpower.
Balancing the enemy's gains of strength against our gains,
the authorities here now share the* same sober confidence In our
forces' power to hurl back a Communist offensive that has al-
ready been expressed by Oen. Rldgway and Gen. Van Fleet.
There Is only one point of Immediate concern.
Since the I'. N. armies in Korea have had no real
., aaaaaning experience with hostile air, sever* temporary
etbacki mav ensue If the enemy brings his fall air
strength uta the battle.
This single point of immediate concern in > turn symbolizes
the very deep and anxious concern that is universally fait about
the long range results of a serious renewal of the Korean fight-
ing.
For if the enemy air enters the battle, the question of re-
taliatory air attacks on the enemy bases In Manchuria, will be
inescapably raised at once.
And even if tfte ngmlng follows the old pattern, the let-
down and deception of the false ceasefire negotiation will still
give rise to the strongest pressures to widen the war.
In short, if it begins again all-out, the Korean war
can hardly go on forever as a limited war. It mast
someday burst It* precarious bounds, and become a much
larger and more terrible conflagration.
These grim truths are of course the best arguments for op-
timism about an eventual ceasefire agreement. If the enemy
both understands these truths and does not want a wider War.
he too must desire a final ceasefire in Korea.
But these same truths also indicate the peril of the present
moment.
We are travelling a narrow ledge, skirting a clangorous
abyss, and we had better realice that this is our situation, In
order to avoid mis-steps.
(Copyright, 1951, New York Herald Tribune Inc.)
Labor Newt
Am
('omment.
THIS IS TOUg rOKUM TMi StAPggS OWN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
fbe Mall Boa on pen to Hi reatan at r. Paaaata Amariae*
terra- ata ixtM retare** taa art haaaHaa ia ** ****a*tl*l
amanar.
I rax ...tn.Mf. Mtw d**l be 1-aatwM II 4mm1 .*. rb*
Mil toy. Larrart or* aaalnJie* la tat aiac. received.
PImm era t* kem eh* lateara Hmn* t. ** **a. **_
leaatrtv al Utt.i -ritan hale la rtnetaar sMtMaaM.
Tfclt aawiaa**' aaaa-aa m >aaas*llar, lot sNtoaoata at aia>a<
raptsssod la letrera treat raatfan
LADIES, BE GOOD!
., Diablo Heights, C.Z.
Mail Box Editor
Dear Sir:
I have been Incensed at the mean and malicious remarks of
"Lady Oodiva" and "Lady With Nothing to Wear." .
I suppose the Commissary has broad shoulders and can take
a little rimming, but it surely disturbs mv spirit of fair play and
justice to see stones hurled at the supervisor by someone hiding
behind the wall of anonymity.
I have always found that If you have a grievance. It is best
to go to the source of the trouble. The Commissary managers
have always treated me with courtesy and have given refunds
when necessary.
Perhaps it takes courage on the part of some to do that and
they would rather nourish a grievance and watch it grow and
I have been on the Isthmus for 11 vears and surely think
the Commissaries have improved about 5 percent and in that
time I have had many dealings with the supervisor and have
always found her kind, helpful and courteous. As for being
watchful wouldn't you too if you were entrusted with thou-
sands of dollars worth of merchandise and found that buttons
were being cut from expensive suits and dresses were literally
"walking away"?
The supervisor might be permitted to say:
"Madam, your slip is showing." but she can hardly add:
My dear, you look Just divine In your two dresses "
When I was a little girl I "helped myself" to a larga bou-
quet of red tuUps from the yard of a woman all the kids called
"the mean old witch." My mother marched me and the flowers
back to the woman and told me she usually took flowers to the
hospital each day.
Well, the woman not only gave me the bouquet, but offered
to give flowers for any school function and asked me If she
could name a new hybrid tulip for me.
_ rom tn?n on J brought children* to gaze at the garden of
the kind and generous woman of Insight.
I often think that If my mother had not been alert I too
would have gone through Ufe hunting for something mean to
warn*-. DernaM m* wnole outlook on life might have beer
For Justice.
By Victor Riesel
WASHINGTON At one dra-
matic moment here in the high
tension efforts to ease the cop-
per paralysis, a top Defense
Dept. official harassed by se-
cret reports that a two or three-
week strike would actually pre-
vent us from protecting our-
selves In the event a world war
suddenly broke outwas forced
to walk over, shake hands and
fraternize with a strike lead-
er who three times has been
accused of membership In the
underground Communist "mo-
ther" cell from which the party
infiltrated key government
agencies in the past 20 years.
That Incident, more than
anything else this past hectic
week, reflected the utter welrd-
ness of our national efforts' to
defend ourselves.
Somewhere missing was a
realistic policy for handling pro-
Communist unions which have
th?lr base in the most strategic
bottleneck industries.
And because the govern-
ment chose'to bargain with,
instead of cracking down
immediately on, this left-
wing Mine, Mill and Smelter
Workers Union, I can re-
port that the sentiment
here, among the non-poli-
ticaliud union chiefs, is to
use similarly tough tactics
with the government when-
ever they want anything.
In the words of one national
labor chief, who Is here for an
an' unusually closely guarded
CIO Vice President session:
"We^ get a run aTound for
a month for being reasonable.
The pro-Commie crowd actually
begins preventing us from mak-
ing certain weapons, even after
a four-day copper strike, and
the government's dealing with
them fast. What do we have to
be, charter Communists?"
The strike bralntruster. whose
hand the Dept. of Defense offi-
cial shook, la a mustached. crew
cut. lean fellow, who. in Soviet
tunic, would look like Holly-
wood's version of a'commissar.
He is Nat Witt, a fanatical,
brilliant pro-Sovieteer, whose
intimate friend, Lee Pressman,
placed him in the Communist
Party cell.(during testimony be-
fore the house un-American Ac-
tivities Committee).
This one man. Nat Witt, na-
tional attorney for the copper
strikers, is. according to an ex-
colleague of his' (an ex-Com-
munlst Party member who
worked with him in CIO), a
.former New York- cab driver
who became the pro-Commies'
most competent strategist.
"Witt is one of the real powers
in that circle. He's the man who
did the proselytyzing of such
powerful men as Lee Pressman,"
I was told here this week by
the ex-Communlst from Inside
CIO.-
"Now he's here, as general
counsel of the Mine, Mill and
Smelter Union, and the govern-
ment deals, with him. Small
wonder the COmmles have con-
tempt for us."
And this man Witt, who, to
my personal knowledge, profan-
ed this land of ours and its
way of Ufe in the restaurant of
Atlantic City s Hotel Chelaa dur-
ing the ISM CIO Convention,
actually placed President Tru-
man in this position:
According: to high sour-
ces in the Defense Dept., the
President was faced with
either watching all wdr pro-
duction and most civilian
production grind to a stop
in less than two weeks
or so deplete our highly se-
cret copper stockpile that
we would actually not be
able to swing into all our
weapons' production- for
months even if war was de-
clared by the Soviets.
How does this happen? Here
Is unpublished Defense Dept.
data: There is on order right
now for delivery to the Signal
Corps, as swlftl;' as possible, 90,
000 miles of copper wiring for
battlefield communication.
And then there's steel and
cobalt which depends on the
sulphuric acid that duns off In
the refining of copper. That acid
Is In desparately short supply.
Yet we need it to "pickle"
(temper) wartime steel. We need
that acid to harden cobalt.
We need cobalt for electronic
equipment, radar and radio,
and we need It In alloys for
heat resisting metals which
means jet engines.
We heed the acid to make
aviation gasoline the produc-
tion of which, I can report. Is
being curtailed even at this mo-
ment.
When the strike began, there
was only a few days supply of
sulphuric acid. The President:
was told that a week's copper
strike would actually mean cut-]
backs In our shipment of arms.
We need 50 pounds of copper
in an ordinary car or jeep, and
400 pounds In a big convoy
truck.
Yet, here In Washington, we're
forced to watch this union be-
hind the scenes for Its real ob-
jective - absolute control of the
copper Industry through nation-
wide bargaining. This means
that only the Mine. Mill and
Smelter Workers would talk for
copper workers. It means that
within a few years, th* few
other AFL and CIO unions in
the field would be driven out,
leaving that Ufa and death In-
dustry In the hands of men such
is Nat Witt
-
Spiritless Youth-Rally
/ / fOK .*

Nothing On The Bawl
By BOB RUARK

NEW YORK. It Is very" possible that Harry
Truman's fabulous "bluntness," which is more,
often jst plain rudeness, will earn him some
fresh friends as a result of his lU-mannered re-
ception of the Czech ambassador, Vladimir Pro-
chazka. M
"Old Harrv sure got him-told," they'll say.
"Good old Harry. When he bawls 'em out they
stay bawled."
I am not very impressed with a President who
hits an occasional gutter-level of bad taste to
wrangle personally with Inferiors.
If we are officially angry with the Czechs for
their treatment of the jailed newspaperman.
Bill Oatls, and we have been ignored In our
formal diplomatic demands for his release, then
there are all sort* of nice little official penalties
we can Impose.
We can sever diplomatic relations entirely,
which would grieve iiobotfv hereiverv hard, and
I daresav that the Czechs wouldn't start a war
with us until Mother Russia says so.
Or we could just sort of break off all trade
relations, which would hurt the laving Czechs
painfully in the pocket. This almost any na-
tion, even a slave satellite, understands!
But we solve Uttle when Intemperate Harry
decides to clean out the barroom with a mouth-
ful of abusa that more befits a mule skinner
than the head of a state.
It certainly scares nobody, and lowers the
stature of Harry's office, which is a high office.
Harry's bawlings-out. are never consistent'
enough to be effective.
He has not bawled out a great many of the
cute cronies who do peculiar business with gov-
ernment funds, and the last time I looked he
had not bawled Bill O'Dwyer ^oose from the job
of Ambassador to Mexico.
It seems to me we ought to formulate some
dignified and effective way for dealing with the
people who stomp our toes- that is. If we are
so conscious of other people's rights that we
mount a full-scale war to avenge the downtrod
Koreans.
Up to now we have come off sadly when the
Red Yugoslavs shoot down out fliers or when
the Hungarians put the snatch on Robert Vo-
geler and we have to bribe him out of the jail-
house.
The issue on Impoundment of our nationals
Is clear.
Either the guy Is working for our spy shop
and takes his medicine like a man. or he Is not
working for the Intelligence boys and hence de-
serves all protection ahort of war.
If he Is an agent, he Is spying on purpose
and must be sacrificed because he know* the
terms of his job In calculated risk.
But If he is just an innocent victim of total-
itarian pressure, bribery and ransom doesn't
work for very long, and ranting at a paid di-
plomat won't solve it.
When you have sent terse demands to a na-
tion, and they are ignored, calling Its striped-
pants salesman a bum Is of very little effect.
The bum has been called a bum before, and by
his masters. '
As I recall, when the Chinese had Angus
Ward sewed up tight in Mukden, the State De-
partment, for which Ward worked, didn't to
anything concrete about springing him Until
the 8crtppa-Howard newspaper organization
raised so much ruckus that Ward became an
international Incident and tbev had to set him
free.
All this seems an odd way to run a railroad,
if you are as big and powerful and rich a na-
tion as they keep saying we are.
You don't cuss or plead or take It sitting if
they persist in shooting your fliers and jailing
your nationals and kidnapping your consuls.
You answer the toughness with toughness %nd
In a way the boys can understand.
We had that miserable little Gubichev cold
In collusion with Judv Copln, the boby-sox spy
dame, and we let him loose and sent him home
plumb free.
I expect If we had shot him there would be
lesa inclination abroad to push our people
around.
I do not suggest that I know the answer to
the problem of protecting our nationals abroad,
but I do know one thing: Blustering at tame
Ambassadors ain't It. It Is too much like holler-
ing into a barrel.
New Penalties
By Peter Edson
WASHINGTON(NEA)Making it tougher
for racketeers to engage in Illegitimate business
Is a primary aim of the revised legal code which
the Senate Crime Committee Is proposing to
Congress.
Being practical, court room lawyers, Senators
Kefauver. O'Conor and their associates realize
that as dope peddling and bootlegging are made
more difficult, the crook* will start looking for
ways to beat the rap.
Criminals have good lawyers, too. So as one
highwav of illegal trade is closed, criminal law-
yers will advise their client* of legal alleys
where they can operate with safety.
The trucking Industry, for Instance. Is begin-
ning to attract the musclers-ln.
Looking ahead, the lawmakers are trying to
put legal roadblock* on as many of these cri-
minal byways as they can.
Senate crime Investigators found evidence of
a few cases of racketeering already In the
trucking business.
Joe Adonis and his pals were found to be In-
terested In concerns with contracts for hauling
new ears from Detroit and Edgewater. N. J..
plants. Intimidation of competitors by black-
jacks ha* been Involved.
To meet this threat, the Senate Crime Com-
mittee advocates revision of national transpor-
tation policy law.
Under present law. there Is no provision for
revocation of an Interstate Commerce Commis-
sion licence. The onlv standards are public
convenience and necessity.
It is now proposed to add a requirement of
good moral character for all licensees.
Exposure of the horrible conditions in the sale
of drugs to minors resulted In introduction of
37 anti-narcotics bills in' the House.
Senate Crime Committee has picked one of
these bills which ha* already passed the House,
and wUl push it for passage by the Senate.
This bill would Increase sentences for convict-
ed dope peddlers. First offense would get two
to five years, second offense five to ten years,
subsequent convictions ten to 20 years. '
For sales to minora, the penalty would be 20
years to Ufe Imprisonment.
But judges and lawyers who oppose statutory
minimum sentence* are fighting these measures.
A small but Important change Is proposed for
the Federal appeals act It would grant Federal
prosecutors the right, now denied, to appeal
court orders for suppression of evidence.
Getting suppression of evidence orders is com-
mon practice In defending narcotics charges.
Tightening of liquor sale and transportation
laws Is strongly recommended by the Crime
Committee.
Under present law, every wholesaler and ma-
nufacturer must get a Federal permit. But once
granted, permits run Indefinitely.
The new Idea Is to grant permits for two
vears only. Renewals would be denied law vio-
lators.
One bill that may raise a storm of protest
would provide penalties for violation of the
Webb-Kenyon act of 1913. This law makes it a
crime to ship Uquor Into any state which bails
its importation from outside the state.
Today Kansas and Oklahoma have such laws,
but since 1036 there have been no penalties for
violation. .
A still more stringent liquor traffic reform In-
troduced In the House would make It a crime
to transport liquor Into any area that has been
voted dry under local option laws.
Amendment* to the Immigration laws are also
recommended by the Crime Committee. At the
present time, there are no enforclble penalties
for conceaUng or smuggling aliens into the
U. 8. One new bill would close these loopholes.
Change In the perjury law to facilitate convic-
tion in criminal cases is an important recom-
mendation of the Crime Committee.
Today, If a witness makes two contradictory
statements, the government must prove which
statement is false.
This would now be amended so as to make
contradictory statements In themselves perjury,
without th* necessity of proof on which is right.
Another technical change proposed would
make it possible for Congressional sergeanu-at-
arms to enlist the aid of any law enforcement
officer in serving Congressional subpoenas.
This reform Is out forward aa a result of the
Crime Committee's own difficulty in apprehend-
ing some 14 witnesses.
As soon as the Senate passed a special reso-
lution, authorizing the FBI to assist, the 14
flocked In.
FlnaUy. creation of a permanent Federal
Crime Commission Is proposed.
<*mu WASHINGTON
MERRY-GO-ROUND
y DRIW PEARSON

MillarrJ Coldwell says: Cracker-box strategists fumble
Civil Defense; America must face a new concept* of
war; We have no time for fantasy.
i While Drew Pearson is on a brief vacation, the Wash-
ington Merry iu Round i% being written by several distin-
guished guest columnist*, today's being by Millard ( aldwell,
Federal Civil Defense Administrator.)

WASHINGTONWhile time is running out, the cracker-boa
strategist* fumble Civil Defense.
Some of them know that air power at its best can stop
only 30 out of 100 attacking enemy bombers. Yet they insist that
more air power is the sole answer to protecting the home front.
Others blow hot and cold.
One day they think the situation is so hopeless that ClvU
Defense could do no good.
The next day, the world situation looks brighter, so Civil
Defense is not needed.
Still others insist that retaliation Is the answer. What we
can do to the enemv blinds them to what the enemy can do
to us.
They forget the trigger for our retaliation will be a mass
atomic attack on our own cities.
Then, another group, the ostrich thinkers. Insist that no
nation would dare attack this country, because nobody ever has,
and besides we're too strong.
Some, bored with crisis after crisis, wake up now and
then, say "It can't happen here," and doze off again.
The timid pin their hope on Russian backwardness and
say "That atomic explosion In Russia wasn't really the bomb."
WhUe the pseudo-strategists grope In a smog of truth;
half-truth and fantasy, time Is running out. We stand In
danger of war.
Too many seem unable to grasp the fact that we can lose
a war.
Their stock answers are: "If It takes production, we'll out-
produce the enemy. If it takes atomic bombs, we'll build bigger
and better atomic bombs. If they hit us. we'll hit 'em harder.
These prevalent American belief are ingrained, basic but,
unfortunately, stop short of an adequate answer to the sharp
question sired bv reality.
They were incomplete bv three thingsRed imperialism, the
global bomber and the atomic bomb.
This trio has forced on Americans a whole new concept qf
war.
Today or any day. America itself can become a battleground.
Civilians are the first targets in this new kind of war.
If the enemy first smashes the home front, the mlUtary may
have little left to fight for and less to fight with.
The Kremlin knows that our American home front must
be knocked out quickly, if it is to be knocked out at all.
For this reason, the first attack must be a grand slam using
all the modern terror weapons.
Those who doubt the likelihood of war on the home front
should heed what Representative Clarence Cannon. Chairman of
the House Appropriations Committee, had to say on the floor
April 9. He said:
"If war comeswhich God forbidIt will be fought in this
country as well as abroad."
'General Vanderberg (speaking for the Air Force) said: "In
spite of aH our radar fences, our walls of shipping, our net-
works of communication and our clouds of interceptor planes,
70 per cent of the enemv planes carrying atomic bombs would
get through. We might as well face that fact.
"very center of production, every center of wealth and po-
pulation and civilization would be devastated.
"We have only to look at the cities In Germany to see how
the cities of America would look within one week after war
started."
W. Stuart Symington, while chairman of NSRB. said: "Who
can be a bigger fool than the fool who continues to fool him-
self, especially when his own existence Is at stake."
Those who will read the record must see where the 30 year
pattern of Russian imperialism leads.
The retallatlonlsts have, an empty answer. To devastate Rus-
sian cities would not restore our own.
Unrealistic thinking has sapped our strength and robbed u*
of precious time.
No American city Is prepared to cope with an enemy attack.
We must use our time wisely and well. There is no time for
fatalism or fantaay.
(Copyright. 1851. By The BeU Syndicate. Inc>.
Bornean Monkey
Answer to Previous Purcie
HORIZONTAL
1 Depicted
animal, the
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It is------
10 Product of
boas
12 Perchad
13 Fortification
15 Scatter, as hayu Shout*
17 Near 11 Glut*
SHidaoua
monster
4 Has existed
Fraud
Europaap.
rabbit
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Brother of
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11 Foe
1 Behold!
20 Group of
players
23 Ignoramus
25 Anglo-Saxon
slave
26 Gaelic
27 Bustle
21 Doubly
(prefix)
29 Tone E
(music)
30 Vipers .
33 Prostr*t*
35 Ripped
38 Lubricants
37 He lived W5
years (Bib.)
38 Preposition
38 Sacrificial
block
44 Jumbled type
45 Permit
47 Thin veil net
48 Body of water
41 Eel-shaped
amphibian
61 Oriental
guitar
S3 It toa------
monkey
' VKTICAL
1 Touch lightly
I Railroad (ab.)
14 Down
16 Drivel
21 This------is
from Borneo
22 Earns
21 Dispute
24 Prayer
31 Decorous
M Genus of
moths
3d Simpleton
34 Reins for
driving
38 Solar diak
40 Breathing
organ
41 Symbol for
thallium
42 Too
43 Portuguese
money of
account
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SO Universal
language
32 Symbol for
tellurium
Try the email but mighty want
ad
it's the wonder ailing aid
Gets results so fast, so cheaply
When you want to soil or trade!
You'll agree P.A. Classifieds arc
SUPER, too, for tnyin., seUin*.
renting, trading. Wring or what-
ever yoor neeel is!



IK
_t.. -
PAGE fight
f>
9
THE PANAMA AMEKICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAFEP.
WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 5, Ml
White Sox Edge Out Indians 3-1 In Eleven Innings
PENNANT PILOTS. ...No. 2
.
Manager Ignoring Percentage Plays
Hunches And Bad Baseball-Dressen
Percentai* baseball i* basic-
ally simple to explain: i; is
merely a matter of knowing pout
personnel a-id something about
the other players in the league
A manager who tenores per-
centage is playing hunches and
the percentage is aealnst him
Much has been said for man-
agers who toss percentage into
the ash can and attempt un-
orthodox nicks. If a stunt works
the manager is a genius. If it
flopslook out!
I never plav a hunch.
Hunches cruc'fy you.
You have to know retain
things about the other side, o
course, but It is e'PWr*IIv more
. lnjDortant to know every cap-
ability and fault of your own
men.
Too many managers mend too
much time worrving about how
to cope with the opposition's
maneuvers. Hence, thev arc con-
stantly on the defensive, even
When their players are at bat or
ore the bases
On the base, for eyvnole. it
Is only common sense lo .".void
the straight steals unless vou
have a ma-i on base who really
knows how to steal.
The best tlmi to emplov the
r htt-ancl-fun is with one on' and
. > man on first. You can be dou-
" bled. up. sure, but maybe vou
.tan eel the runner in scoring
positionperhaps ehace him nil
" jjie way tit the platewith a
WCU-placed hit
Here again, the basic question
Is: Have I got the right mm at
the olote for the hit-and-run?
;'. That's plavin" percentage.
.. Deep in this same vein. I don't
like to nlav niv infield in fl"ringiand when they can do the best
.the early Innings, except to cut lob today or tonight,
.qff a possible run at the plate. | There has hern a lot of talk
Pullinc the infielders in turns a about overshifiine against cer-
.200 hitter into a potential .400 tain hitters. Critics of it point
Clouter. ou that it is dangerous to leave
Sometimes. I would rather c,ive i-i field unprotected. Advocates of
Westinghouse, Caribe Win
H hile Powells Drop To 3rd
By CHARLES DRESSEN
Dodgers' Manager
PILLS STRINGS Here is
Caricaturist George Scarbo's
pitch on Chuck Dressen. (NEAf
up a run for the outif I think
we cau get it back later.
The Dodgers, like most modern
clubs, play for the big inning
whenever possible. But when the
opposing pitcher is really tough,
we plav lor that one run early.
The psychology is to ob;ai:i a
lead a.s Quickly as possible. The
other side, then, requires two
runs to beat you.
Managing well is simply hand-
ling men. playing them where
the so-called Boudreau shift con-
lend it is the best way to cut
down the potential of a strong
pull hitter. Personally, I'm all
for It.
Take Ralph Kiner. for exam-
ple. The big Pirate is positively
brutal to left field. There are two
things against which there is no
defensea home run and a base
on balls. If Kiner, whom we
kni is going to put the ball
deeply into left. hlts,lt out of the I
park. 100 men in 'the outfield
aren't going to stop him.
But if Kiner doesn't hit a home
run. the percentage Is In our
favor if we have an extra man
in left field.
Should he fool us and slap one
to right, the percentages is with
us again.
I'd certainly rather have Ralph
Kiner on first base than have t
him hit a home runand it Is .
extremely doubtful that even he'
could find the right field stands
or fence. |
oOo
NEXT: Casey Stengel of the
Yankees.
Frank Sedgman
Wins National
Tennis Singles
BY OSCAR FRALEY
United Press Sports Writer
FOREST HILLS, N.Y.. Sept. 5
Hitting every shot in the books, in their effort to climb back to
slugging Frank Sedgman of Aus- h- tne Indians are sending
tralia became the first foreigner Early "Ous" Wynna 16-game
in 15 years to win the U.S. Ama- .m.eragains-, the less expe-
Yankees, Tribe Virtually
Tied For Junior Loop Lead
By United Press
NEW YORK, Sept 5 The Yankees today show only
a four percentage point advantage over the second place
Indians who handed them the American League lead last
night by dropping an eleven inning 3-1 decision to the
White Sox.
TITLED FAMILYJohn B. Jessup, Jr.. added the Wilmington.
Del.. Country Club championship, his first tournament victory, to
the family's collection of tennis crowns. His mothpr, the former
Marion Zinderstein, was one of the world's foremost players. Mrs.
Jessup held the national doubles title from 1918 through '22. with
Efcanor Goss and Helen Wills, was mixed doubles champion in '19
with Vincent Richards. She was a member of two Wightmsn
Cup teams. (NEA)
by
JOE WILLIAMS
teur Tennis Championship yes-
terday when he walloped Vic
Selxas of Philadelphia. 6-4, 6-1,
6-1 In the since 192H '
Taking to the famed center
court at Forest Hills shortly aft-
er 16-year-old Maureen Connol-
ly of San Diego, Calif., became
the youngest women's finalist In
the 70-year history of the tour-
nament by upsetting top-seeded
Doris Hart of Coral Gables, Fla.,
6-4, 6-4, Sedgman was a model of
precision and power as he storm-
ed to the men's championship.
The handsome, 23-year-old
Australlapystar of the victorious
Davis Cup forces from down un-
der, crushed the PhUadelphlan in
50 minutes. It was the worst final
round defeat since Big Bill Tild-
en allowed Wally Johnston only
five games exactly 30 years ago,
and made Sedgman the first for-
eign winner of the U. S. crown
.-'nee England's Fred Perry won
;n 1936.
-- ' TEAM STANDINGS
Refresqu. Caribe 6 2
Westing-house 6 2
Powells S 3
D-903rd 3 5
Coco Solo 2 6
Junior Vanity 2 6
No games are scheduled
Wednesday. September 5.
Friday. Sept. !;
Junior Varsity vs. Powells
Westinghouse vs. Caribe
Thursdays game between Ihe
903rd and Caribe should prove to
be a contest well worth seeing as '
It may
REFRESQt'ERIA CARIBE
750
750
625 Hall
375 Welch
Doubles Tournament
Semifinals Set For
Saturday, Sunday
The semifinal matches of the
Spaiding Cup Doubles Tennis
Tournament are scheduled to be
played Saturday afternoon and
Sunday morning at the Panam
Olympic Tennis, Court.
Saturday at 4 p.m. the Webb
Hearn-Capt. Hampton duo is
slated to meet George Motta and
it Claude Luke.
Sunday, at 8:30 a.m.. it will be
Bill Hele-Julio Pinilla against H.
Willis-Angel Delvalle.
The winners of the a+ovemen-1 The Yankees have been making excellent use of this glm- I Ken McGregor, HebieFlam and
tioned teams will meet at a later mick in recent years. They have Just picked up Johnny Sain of Wimbledon King Dick Savltt.
date in the finals of the tourney.: the Boston Braves, a right-handed pitcher, with impressive ere- But the 28-year-old former
The semifinal matches were set dentials. Last year they added Johnny Hopp by the same process Army pilot didn't have it yester-
back to the week end because it | and the year before Johnny Mize. It is possible they could have day in the face of one of the most
Miss Connolly, whose devastat-
i; power from the baselines put
r into today's finals against
hirley Fry of Akron, O., and in
position at 16 to become the
youngest women's titleholder In
i history, had raised American
u date after whica no big-league player can be hopes that Selxas might win. For,
sold or traded. But in this, as in most things, there is a gimmick, as an underdog all the way
It Is known as waivers. Meaning that if all clubs in one league through the tournament, he had
indicate disinterest in a player it it permissible to sell or trade i become the giant killer of the
nim_to the other league at any time. I affair by flattening such stars as
rienced Marlin Stuart of Detroit
tonight but Boston will have o
beat the Yankees before Cleve-
land can reclaim the lead.
Saul Rogovin helped sink the
Indians with an eight-hit effort
that topped Bob Lemon and
brought dismay to the large
crowd of partisan ClevJanders.
Until the eleventh inning the
game's only runs were ac-
counted for iiv Luke Easter's
22nd homer in the fourth in-
ning and by Eddie Robinson's
rightfield blast in the sixth.
Nellie Fox Inaugurated the ele-
venth with a line double to the
left field corner and whizzed to
third while Al Zarilla grounded
out. Cleveland purposely passed
Robinson In the hope of execut-
ing a double play but the plan
backfired and two more White
Sox safeties pushed Fox and
Robinson home.
This was the only scheduled
major league game.
Today the pennant chases re-
sume with a heavy schedule of
games, most of them .at night
American League fans probab-
ly will focus their attention on a
Dodgers now six game sout in
front. Sheldon Jones (4-10) and
Sal Maglle (18-5) will toss for
the second place Giants. Warren
Spahn (17-11) and Jim Wilton
(6-4) will be throwing for the
Braves. ?
In that Chicago doubleheader.
the Cardinals will use Cliff
Chambers ,(11-11) and Gerry
Staley (15-13>. The Cubs will
pitch Bob Kelly (5-2) and Cal
McLish (3-9). In single night
games, Philadelphia la at Brook-
lyn and Cincinnati at Pittsburgh.
The Phils will call on Ken John-
son (5-4), and he'll be facing
Ralph Branca (12-6) of the
Dodgers.
Cincinnati will call on Herm
Wehmeier (3-9) against Bob
Friend (6-9) at Pittsburgh.
Turpin's Sparmale
Predicts K.O. Win
For Stronger Randy
BY UNITED PRESS
Former Middleweight Cham-
pion Ray Robinson is looking be-
uruclal three-game series which yond his Sept. 12 return bout with
is the desire of the National Ten- j won the 1949 flag without Mlze. Likewise, the 1950 pennant with- merciless assaults ever seen at< combe (10-9) against J. M. Mc- hard this time," predicts Hobbs,
nis Board of Panam to stimu-
late interest in tennis and only
on week ends is it possible for the
majority of fans to witness the
matches.
out Hopp. but the fact remains both made substantial contribu-
tions in tight races.
for
250 Hooper
250 Moore
Gibson
Highly
Moser
Pescod
Swearlngen
TOTALS
o
4
I
1
7
3
I
2
ft
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
0
1
fls
5
4
1
4
2
2
1
0
2
Total
0
8
13
3
IS
6
I
8
5
Sain is likely to be of considerable help, too. In fact, I be-
lieve his presence on the staff, as starter or reliefer, or both,
Yesterdayi afternoon Hele and virtually guarantees Casey Stengel his third straight champlon-
Pimlla whipped the Omphroy ship. Sains 5-13 record with Boston Is deceptive. A pitcher cannot
brothersCasper, Jr. and Earl win without runs. The Braves got him precious few. There was
fi-2, 6-2 to advance to the semi- a stretch of three games, for example, when they averaged only
final round. one run back of him. And two weeks ago he held the Dodgers to
one earned run in seven innings in a futile try.
The aristocratic pitcher from NewportNewport, Ark., that is
Raffensberger Still
Sad Over One-Hitler
Forest Hills. Sedgman's attack
was powerful and without letup
and drew storms of applause
from 11,000 sunbaked spectators.
Sports Briefs
BY UNITED PRESS
matches the third-place Boston
Red Sox against the Yankees at
New York. Boston is just four
games behind the Yanks and the
clubs still have nine games with
each other.
Yankee Manager Casey Sten-
gel says this is a big series and
he'll use his three top pitchers,
Vic Raschi, Allie Revnolds and
Ed Lopat. Raschi (17-8) is set
to start tonight. For the Red
Sox, it probably will be Leo
Kiely (4-3).
Chicago will pitch Ken Hol-
the new 160-pound king, Randy
Turpin of England.
Robinson says he will be glad to
okay a third, or rubber match, If
he regains the title on the 13th.
"I have no alibis for my loss to
Randy in July," says Sugar Ray.
"If I beat him this time I'll be
glad to go back to London and
fight him again."
Robinson Is confident, but Zach
Hobbs, a sparmate of Turpin,
thinks Ray is In for another sur-
prise.
"Robinson Is going to get hit so
Donald (3-5) in another jiight
game at St. Louis. And Connie
Marrero (11-7) of Washington
will try to take Sam Zoldalf and
the A's at Philadelphia under the
lights.
The National League schedule
shows six games, including a twi-
nlght doubleheader at Boston
and two day games at Chicago.
Leo Durocher's Giants will be
in Boston, hoping to pick up
"I sure wouldn't want to be him.
I trained with Robinson a Tew
years ago, and he's good. But this
Turpin hits harder. He'll knock
Robinson- out and might send
him to the hospital."
Turpin says he feels stronger
now that he is getting more food
at his Ferndale, New York, camp.
"You know we're limited to
three-fourths of one pound of
meat for a person in the British
CHICAGO. Sep. 5 The title
wil be 33 Sept". 2^Naturay,"he"snTVhe pUcheV'he'was when Mler.? t,ne Vfar! m*Y ** add; -OIe ground on "the" Brooklyn IsTes/'sys Turpin.
he first came up in 1942 and, after the war"made a practice of -ed * the laurels already earned'
30 5 21
65
BY UNITED PRESS
Southpaw Ken Raffensberger
of the Cincinnati Reds still Is a
little unhappy over the infield
single that robbed him of a no-
hitter Sunday.
Raffensberger pitched his
winning 20 or more a season, four times in the last five seasons.
I to be exact. But don't get the notion he's a faded, weary-armed,
veteran riding on his press clippings.
HERE'S HOW THEY WORK
by King Ranch's Curandero, win-
ner of, the richest mile race in
history. Curandero won the
$100,C0 added Washington Han-
dicap at Chicago, and picked up
$113,950 for King Ranch.
be an upset since 903rd
has been coming in strong at the In tne second game of the eve-
flnlsh of late. Problv the hardest iln" the hard driving and
foueht game of the week will be passinc Westinghouse qul
Fridays came between Caribe dumped the Powells powerhouse j toVtbMDaw'ltae.TiafiensSerg-1 J^tflmW^^S^^riJSSS^i^
ho are tledi?3-47. Although Westinghouse er says that third-inning no-hit' 8 m "* Cardlnak last
DETROIT The favored 'Miss
Pepsi won the Silver Cup Power-
eve- fourth onp-hlttpr in Ih mitnre fit' ** '"" "' aa.ni a aiaiuie uui ui Ule league, ine
fast I wl en Ed MlksL o the Chicaeo WsM,? on.ly *1000S and "S& an* club' evcn the Poorest.
toted: cubs belt out a drlbblar dow 2PS be wilUng toil?i lnat ior h,m Particularly the Giants for
wu.se the. thKfh. it. n?ILZ-Jl wn.om, suc.h economies have a special fascination. That's how they
and Westinghouse who
for first place in the second half.
Both teams will be out to elim-
inate each other as contenders
for the traveling trophy donated
- by the Universal Sports Co. of
New York. The public is Invited
to all of these games at the Mar-
garita Gym No admission is
charged.
In last Friday's opener. Caribe
defeated Coco Solo 65-34. Bob
Gibson led in the scoring with 15
Sjints for Refrecq. Caribe while
osfeld led the Navy marksmen
with 12 points.
The box Scores:
NAVY. COCO SOLO
Orochowski
Blair
Bryant
Belviy
Sos f eld
ellerud
Cantrell
TOTALS
fi
0
1
2
3

0
1
ft
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
fls
4
II
2
3
3
(I
n
last four meb via the foul route
during the early part of the
fourth quarter, thev were ahead
throughout all of the came with
the lead varying between two
and eleven points. Chambers
Doured 17 points through the
hoop for Westinshouse while N.
Gibson and Mannint each scor-
ed 12 points for Powells.
The Box Sroes:
So much for Sain and the pennant implications his arm car-
ries today. . What the public cant understand Is how It is,.
possible to get a man of Saln's stature out of the league. The [ boat ,Rfe,e on. .'/* R, ,*/
completely outclassing the field.
The boat.'owned by Walter and
thev Roy Doas'fti was the only craft in
the field of nine to finish all five
, 12-mile beats in the gruelling
But the Braves had no Intention of letting Sain go for the j ** Th veteran driver Chuck Cleveland
Theres no doubt it would have waiver price. Due to uncommon fan ennui they are losing scads Thompson piloted the winner. | ?ton
rolled outside the baseline." says of money this year. If they dealt with a National League club it I ---------- chica*-
Bobby Adams. | had to be on the waiver basis, $10.000, no more. Their only I WEST POINT. New YorkThe
-Inning no-hlt
spoiler should have rolled foul.
season.
American League
TEAMS
New York.
Won Lost Pet. G. B.
. 82 48 .631
84
77
71
HI
WESTINGHOUSE
going to roll out. But Bobby
couldn't get out of the way with-
out touching the ball and he tried
for the play."
In Raffensberger's previous
Philadelphia 51
St. Louis 40
Detroit
noi, Payd,,th,rd'.,!!vas"a11 ?et to chance to get npovtat moneyTas't'chr'wmon^-aver's, then I U. mltay"Academy*hs sign- I JX*,hJ"J" "
teldthe ball and then saw it was peddle him to the highest bidder In the American. ; ed a new basketball coach., He's
Persuading the seven other clubs in the National to agree E'mer Ripley who has coached at
no doubt took some diplomatic doings. Very likely It amounted to John Carroll University ln Cleve-
a friendly conspiracy. No club ln the National could gain any- |land the last two years.
thing by holding up thCkdeal. so why not go along with a brother I
- c.ub owner in'distress?T*t him make some money. Sain in the' RlPtey takes over from John
?,ilf" Uiitii u ?.g s,of B,r^ok" American, could hurt no club in the National. That he undoubt- Mauer who had moved to tlje-
edly would help many was academic, since he couldn't be had, i University of Florida. Before go-
59
51
61
71
75
78
89
.627
.602
.538
.462
.414
.409
.310
4
12
22
28
29
41 h
Total
1
3
5
10
12
2
30 5 21
IS
Gelling Up Nights
If iOJ ufler from (iet^if L"p
Nifht. Backaihr, I.f* Pain. Lou
f \i|our, Ktrwm^nens or weak -
n9s y ou should hip > our l'r-,M.ii#
Gland ImmidlatHv with ROGENA.
Tills wonder medicine makes
jrou feel younger, stronger snd -
~SP without interruption, (el
JEN from your che mitt today,
faction s"uaranlu
-
Chambers
Ibnez
Celis
C. Magdaleno
L. Tom
P. Magdaleno
Rios
salos
Lam
TOTALS
Bailey
Anderson
Manning
Wilson
Allpaier
N. Gibson
C. Simons
Brvant
Smith
Marty Marion of St. Louis ruined
Total another that same year and Nip-
py Jones of St. Louis turned the
triefc in 1949.
WEISS OUTSMARTS RIVALS
Why is it that it is always the Yankees who get these fellows?
The answer seems to be that the Yankee front office is more
and knowing. George Weiss usually seems to be a step
ing to John Carroll, the new
West Point court boss coached at
Georgetown, Yale, Columbia and
Notre Dame.
Rlpley will Inherit predomin-
ately sophomore squad at West
Point.
Take soothing
B/smof
and feelgood again!
nno-BisMOL is cesru. I, spread,
a Modnng. protective costing on ir-
Matad itonuch snd intestinal wtlU.
1. H,ip, ,w *u (to,, .
1 '''* "'" l"mniion md
* ''* <*,. ,nd ,, lk, emtci
*po.moi, fo, ^ntlt m ut JE
A Norw.cti 'ro*vr>
anyway.
That's how these operations usually work. There's nothing
illegal about them, though they are transparently tricky and do
demand a form of studied co-operation that is not ln keeping
with the best interests of the game. Any process which permits
club owners to Jettison a star player is a reflection on the league
and a manifestation of contempt for the fans.
DETROITCincinnati has got
off to a fast start in the Ameri-
can Legion baseball finals by
over-powering a team from White
Plains, New York. 6-1.
Righthander Howard Whitson
.. pitched five-hit ball to give Cin-
ahead of his competitors. There were two reasons, for example, cinnati the win. He struck out
whyjie bought Mize from the Giants ln '49. five and didn't walk a man.
Whitson lost his shutout in the
tecond inning when catcher
Grover singled, took second on
an error and scored when short-
stop John Perkins doubled to
right field.
Cincinnati pounded loser
George Raimo for 11 hits and
scored four runs in the first In-
ning. An error, catcher Basa Nix-
on's triple and singles by Roy
Nixon and Harold Sweet featur-
ed that four-run rally.
One was he believed Mlze's bat ln pinch-hit roles might de-
cide a few close games. Another was to keep him from the Red
Sox. should the Boston front office happen to entertain similar
notions. Mize got ln only 13 games but his six hits for 10 bases
helped and In the World Series it was Mize's two-out single with
bases loaded in the ninth in the third game that paVed the way
to a Yankee come-from-behind victory. That hit alone made
whatever the Yankees paid for him a profitable Investment.
I note now that Hank Greenberg, who G.M.'s the Cleveland
front office, is cry-babying the Sain transfer. One thing the In-
dians don't need is pitching, though it Is probably true that no
club ever had too much. But It might have been worth $50 000 to
the Tribe's pennant prospects Just to keep Sain from the Yan-
kees. As noted, that's the way the wise Mr. Weiss plays it.
And couldn't the Red Sox have used Sain? You would have
to think so. But here again the spirit of brotherly love may have
been functioning. Certainly Tom Yawkey would go as high as
the Yankees. But the Red Sox are direct competition for fan
patronage and as such the last club the Braves could afford to
make more attractive at^the gate. And Mr..Yawkey la under-
standing.
Faltering Philip!
PhUip's Ufe Is filled with .raises.
Well-worn steps and rags be smms.
Repairs would leave his home like new.
P. A. Classifieds, lost the right Ism!
o preveof linen ftirmnf
yellowso keep it white aa
now, you OMd to use our?
sunk .
Today's Games
Boston at New York (N).
Detroit at Cleveland (N).
Chicago at St. Louis .
Washington at Philaderp'a (N>.
Yesterday's Results
NIGHT GAME
Chicago............ S
Cleveland............ 1
National League
TEAMS
Brooklyn .
New York.
St. Louis .
Boston .
Philadelphia 65
Cincinnati 58
Pittsburgh 56
Chicago. . 55
Won Lost Pet.
14 47 .641
54
62
64
68
77
77
76
7S
65
65
.594
12
.594
.480
.421
.421
.420
OB.
~6
17
18
26
29
2
36
Today's Games
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (N).
St. Louis at Chicago (2).
New York at Boston (Twi-Nite)
Philadelphia at Brooklyn (N).
Yesterday's Results
OPEN DATE.
guards, HIND SHIN BOOTS-J-aUur
up by impenden, protect guards on rear legs of trotters
gainst blows from opposite feet, prevent cuts by the front shoes.
KNEE BOOTSLined
held i
ILL iOOTSUsoilly made ELtOW- BOOTS Shpskin-
of rubber, they fit over the front lined pads are worn high on front
hoofs to prevent cuts on the ten- legs to gusrd horse's elbows from
tfsr quarttr, or noel, by hind legs- being hurt by own hoots.
LIO SHOWStandsrd biU of equipment protect the limbs of'
trotters ana psrori. There sre others designed by tram* end'
Silvers constantly seeking to Ineresse protection sgsinst injury and.
improve speed. (NEA) ~~ "'
'I
m
rrrz


WEDNESDAY. gSSJKT^t , !*r1
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
PAGE N1N
United States Davis Cup Officials Name Six^Man Tennis Team
-0
Vic Seixas Heads Squad;
Larsen, Flam Not Chosen
FOREST HILLS, New York, Sept. 5.
(U.P.) Davis Cup tennis officials have
named a six-man squad which puts th#accent
on youth.
It's headed by Vic Seixas of Philadelphia
and the Wimbledon champion, Dick Savitt of
Orange, New Jersey.
Other members of the squad which will
attempt to get the famed tennis trophy back
from Australia this December are Hamilton
Richardson of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Tony
Trahert of Cincinnati, Budge Patty of #s An-
geles and Bill Talbert of New York.
Talbert, a veteran double player, is the
only one on the team ever to play in a challenge
round.
The selections committee ignored Art
Larsen of San Leandro, California, the U. S.
champ last year, and Herbie Flam of Los An-
geles who was beaten in the quarter finals of
this year's tournament.
33rd Infantry Gets Ready
For Army Boxing Tourney
BOXERS WORKOUT Rigorous workouts fill the afternoon
ior members of the 33rd Infantry's Boxing Squad. Here Fer-
rers Hernandez holds the heavy bag. left, while Horace Duke
punches. At right Arthur Collins holds for Lorerreo Baca.
(Official US. Army Photograph by Cpl. Ultsch)
PORT KOBBE, CZ.. Hangar
three at For KObbe has taken on
the atmosphere of a big time
boxing camp.
The men of the 33rd Infantry's
boxing team, twenty-five strong,
are training here dally. Each
morning these hard punching
gladiators report for road word
from a five o-clock until eight.
They perform their regular Army
duties until noon and then re-
port for an afternoon of rug-
ged work.
The first thing is a warm up
period of callsthentlcs, followed
by work on the heavy bags, speed
bags, medicine ball and other
conditioning exercises. Each af-
ternoon they spar. During the
first week they sparred only one
four minute round, but now in
the third week of training they
must complet a full three
rounds.
Lt. Joseph McCrane. head
coach. Is ably assisted by four
men with considerable boxing
experience. They are; Sgt. James
M. Parks. Sgt. Lorenzo Baca,
Pvt. Donald Tatro. and Pvt.
Frank McLaughlin. Of these all
but Sgt. Parks will fight with the
team.
Only the best of the origlonal
quad of ele thy men remain.
Forming the nucleus of this
fear's team are eleven men who
nave worn the blue and white of
the 33rd befor. Thse men are do-
ing their best to train the new-
comers in the fine art as well
as get Into shape themselves.
Carrying 4he colors in the
lightweight division Is Don Ta-
tro. Don fought hi 1MB and won
the Armv crown in this area. He
was unable to fight last year be-
cause of other duty.
Itt the middle weight class the
competition Is keen, with three
men back from last year. Ar-
thur .Collins, who lost In the
eliminations to last vear's mid-
dle chamo, and William Marlon,
who also lost in the eliminations,
will 'try to go all the day this
time. Among the newcomers are
Charles Joyner, Charles Sad-
ow*M. and Robert Howdon.
P"jt, Baca, welter weight chamo
Of the year before last. Is back
this vear, and is In fine shape.
He did not fight vear beciuse of
a broken wrist. Horace Duke. en-
Runner-up for the past two
years, Hilario Chappa, and Earn-
est Wright another man with
past experience will fight It out
to represent the outfit In the
bantam weight class.
The men's confidence Is strong,
and every one Is working hard
to make the Infantry the team
to beat.
Herbie Thomas
Wins 500 Mile
Stock Car Race
DARLINGTON, 8. C, 8ept. 6
(UP>Herb Thomas of Oliva,
North Carolina has won the "500-
Mlle" Strictly Stock Car Race at
Darlington .South Carolina over
a field of 81 starters Monday.
Thomasto a 1951 Hudson-
made only three pit-stops in pac-
ing the field In a Wal of six
hours, 30 minutes, and five sec-
onds. The Tarheel speedster also
led at the half-way mark.
In second place came Jesse
James Taylor of Macon, Georgia,
also in a 1951 Hudson as some
20,000 racing fa.is braved a blaz-
ing sun in near hundred-degree
temperatures. The Georgian won
$2.800 as hi stake.
Buddy Shuman of Charlotte,
North Carolina captured third-
place and a $1500 cash prise with
a 1951, six-cylinder Ford.
Hershell McOrlff of Portland.
Oregon, drove his 1951 Oldamo-
clle 88 in for fourth place and a
cash take of $1200.
Another 1951 Oldsmeblle 88
driven by Harold Kite of East
Point, Georgiacame In fifth to
win $900.
A second Georgian from Hape-
vllleFonty ; lockdriving the
same mak r, won seventh-
place and l
1 fireball is of Day tona
Bc-cn, Pic;. ..cred in behind
other boy with past experience, ^ffSoO^ to puU ,n c*h
win 9lo try to make the grade. pra* or W00'
nf^'tt^r.o!lUin; tnl'i^thi Anothr Floridlan-Blll Snow-
lllhtwaw *r^am.rt W ien f 8t" Augustine, piloted his
ngntweignt crown. Albert was 1 etoht-"v'inrt#r Wnrri in h-
runner-up last year. Wlli^m 'foVior *, e'lghth-place
Horn, who fought for th- 33rd *
belre, snd the new "*\ \J-
Ttlr'-i pnd John **"""'-M r
o;if th Jlihtwel-^-- -
Local Rate Little
League All-Stars
To Meet RP Stars
Sunday, at 4 p.m.. at the Santa
Rita Park in Panam City, the
Pacific Local Rate Little League
All-Stars wUl hook up with the
Panam City Liga Infantil Ali-
stan In the first game of a five-
game series for the Isthmian tl-
Ail games will be played at
Santa Rita Park which is situat-
ed near Teatro Ancn, at the in-
tersection of C and 17th Streets,
in Panam City. Admission prices
will be 10 cents and 5 cents.
The Local Rate All-Stars corn-
rise the following: H. Warren,
. Grant, A. Jones, M. Grant, J.
Allen, Karl Sinclair, Walter St.
Louis, Cecil Griffith. E. Wilson,
W. Barnaby, R. .Hmenez, A. Titus,
L. Blades, H. Holder, E. Mollnar,
G. Moreno, C. Oarnett, P. Wel-
lington, R. Pate, Ivan Lord, Earl
Best, Carlos Caddie R. Innlss, R.
Brown and C. Layne. Erline Con-
liffe and Cleveland Small will be
the managers.
B
Fight Dope
BE UNITED PRESS
.NEW YORK, Sept. 5 (UP)
Middleweight Champion Randy
Turpin won't admit as much. But
observers at the British champ's
training camp in upstate New
York say that he's settled on a
definite battle plan for his Sept
12 meeting with Sugar Ray Rob-
inson in New York.
The word is that the 23-year-
old Turpin will concentrate all
his fire power on the Harlem
challenger's slender waistline.
The overall strategy, according
to ring experts who've watched
Turpin workodt. is to tire Rob-
inson with body punching, then
shift to the head for a knockout
punch.
Yesterday Turpin demonstrat-
ed he has the punching power to
hurt the 31-year-old Robinson
when, he staggered two sparring
partners. The English champ
went eight fast rounds and look-
ed impressive.
Today, he tapered off by con-
fining his work to five miles of
running.
At the Robinson camp in
Pompton Lakes, New Jersey,
there's mixed oplniom about Ray's
form. w
The experts agree that his
weight Is good. Ray scaled 156' 2
after sparring five rounds yes-
terday. And the ex-champ has
been bouncing punches off his
classy sparring partners.
However, several observers
pointed out that Robinson also
has been taking- some punches
which is unusual for him, espe-
cially during training. Terry
Moore of Baltimore, the eighth-
ranking middleweight, was one
sparring partner who was a lit-
tle rough with Sugar Ray. Moore
drove Robinson to the ropes with
one left, then caught him with
another left a round later*
Campanella Has Bone Chips In
Elbow; Frick Fines 3 Dodgers
BUOY BOUND___Willa Worthington McGuire retained the wo-
men* national water-skiing, championship at Lake Placid, N.Y.
The Cypress Gardens. Fla., star, shown rounding the buoy ujtne
ilalom. won that event and the trick riding and) jumping. (nea>
Colon Boxing Commission
Approves Elimination Bout
2 pot
'"l McLM"h'r.
All -" Fe-then-r'
to I" 'd sh-oe *~* '
goel 1 of trp'i'-'
m They are Elmundo Tor -
a^-- Tererra Hernandez, a south-
paw.
/
Ninth end ten'h places went
of
t.
un..ng a 1951 Gla-
v8.
/. t.-.S i-1 of there-e.46C
1 starters were left running 4 to 3.
If Light-Heavyweight Champ
Joey. Maxim wants to pick up
$25,000 he has the chance. The
managers of contender Harold
Johnson of Philadelphia has of-
fered the Cleveland champ that
big a guarantee for a November
title bout In Philadelphia.
Johnson to rated as one of the
three top contendera for the title.
Little Rock Clinches
So. Asso. Pennant
BY UNITED PRESS
The Little Rock Travelers have
cinched their first Southern As-
sociation pennant since 1942.
The amazing Pebbles from
Arkansas put a lock on the loop.
lead Monday night as they spilt
a twin bill with the Nashville
Vols.
The Travs who finished In
the cellar last seasonpulled
completely out of reach with a
nine and one-half game margin.
Pete Mallory nearly ruined the
Labor Day doubleheader for more
than 7,000 Little Rock fans as he
blanked the pace-setters, 2-0,
with a two-hitter in the opener.
However, Al Yayllan rescued
the day as he topped the visitors.
6 to 4, In the afterpiece for his
15th vietory of the year.
Hal Simpson and Jim Cronln
bar-Iced up the jurve-balling lefty
with homers while Jack Harsh-
man poled out his 46th circuit
clout of the season for the losers.
Birmingham moved back Into
second place by splitting a twin
bill with New Orleans while Mo-
bile dropped a pair to Atlanta.
The Barons clipped New Or-
leans. 3 to 1. In the opener at the
crescent City...but the Pels
bounced back, 8 to Z,
Atlanta's John Maldovan and
E.n Liddle teamed up at Mobile
to keep Mobile from scoring In
18 Innings.
Maldovan took off with a
"irec-hitter that caught the
errs, 2-0, in the seven-inning
:.:. game. Lldd.e came on to
the hill hot in the second
as he blanked the Bears
* 'o 0 with a five-hitter
i Memphis and Chat-
.-.'td a pair with the
.ng the opener, 8 to 1,
Lookout* the nightcap.
The Colon Boxing Commission
yesterday approved the Leonel
Peralta vs. Wilfredo Brewster
ten-round 135-pound bout as the
first elimination contest to clear
up the recently vacated light-
weight championship.
The Peralta-Brewster match Is
scheduled for Sept. 23 at the Co-
lon Arena.
Two six-rounders and a four-
round preliminary will round out
the program which will be pro-
moted by Cades Delvalle.
The semifinal will bring toge-
ther the revamped Sylvester Wal-
lace and Carlos Watson at a
weight limit of 133 pounds.
The other alx-rounder will be
a special between up-and-com-
ing Leslie Thompson and Black
Bill at 126 pounds.
A four-round preliminary be-
tween Hankin Barrows II and Pe-
dro Tesis completes the card.
Meanwhile, word from the Gold
Coast indicates that Chocolate II
is enjoying bis best form in a
long time. Chocolate's usual speed
Is present but his timing to ex-
cellent and he is hitting harder
than ever, hence, Colonltes are
expecting a big upset Sunday
night when "Choco" tackles Louis
Thompson at the Panam Gym.
Thompson, however, has also
been impressive and expect* to
continue his unbeaten winning
streak. A victory for Thompson
will place him among the top
contenders in the forthcoming
lightweight championship elimi-
nation .
In the semifinal match, Leonel
Peraltawho only this week
signed to meet Wilfredo Brewster
on Sept. 23most win to remain
in consideration as a contender.
NEW YORK, Sept. 5 (UP)
The Dodgers may be grumbling a
little today, even though they
lead the league by six gamea.
X-rays show that two pieces
of bone are floating around in
catcher Roy Campanella's left el-
bow. And Roy is the boy who has
hit 31 homers, batted in 96 runs
and Is hitting 327.
Roy says the elbow hurts but
not enough to keep him out of
the lineup. He plans to get the
bone chips removed after the
season ends.
Practically the whole Dodger
team is steaming over three
fines ordered by League Presi-
dent Ford Frick. Frick nicked
Manager Charley Dressen, $100,
pitcher Don Newcombe $75, and
second baseman Jackie Robin-
' son $25 for an ineident in Sat-
urday's game with the Giant*.
Robinson and Newcombe were
tossed out of the game by umpire
Al Barllck who says they were
too rough with their bench Jock-
eying. When that happened,
Dressen ordered his entire bench
to the shower room, explaining
that he was trying to protect the
Dodgers from the umpires. Frick
evidently didn't like that slur on
his umpires., .hence Dressens
lighter pocketbook.
There's one consoling note for
Charley and his Dodgers.
Brooklyn Is so far out in front
that fans are beginning to play
the magic number game. And
the magic number for Dodger
Eennant hopes to 17. Any com-
Ination of 17 Brooklyn wins or
Giant losses means the National
League flag will fly In Flat bush
The Giants have 21 games to play
and Brooklyn 27.
FIREBIRD BLAMED
EAU CLAIRE, Wls. (UJ.)
Willard Moses said a fire that
caused several thousand dollars
damage on his farm started In
the rafters of a barn where birds
were nesting. He theorized that
"a sparrow picked up a lighted
cigarette and carried It to the
rafters."
Labor Day Sports Attendance
Increases Except In Baseball
BY UNITED PRESS
A survey of Labor Day attend-
ance figures, a traditional guide-
post for the sports promoter, held
good news for Just about every
sport except baseball.
Major league attendance drop-
ped off roughly 37,000 from the
holiday throngs of last year.
American League fans were re-
sponsible for that boxoffice
slump. Last year 152,000 of them
went out to the ball parks. This
year the number was only 104,000.
In tennis, the National Cham-
pionships at Forest Hills, New
York played to the biggest crowd
In a decade. Fifteen thousand
tennis fans jammed the famed
West Side Club, and thousands
more had to oe turned away at
the gate.
Horse racing was another pros-
perous sport Monday.
A United Press survey of 17
tracks show that 2l,oo"o more
fans went out to bet on the bang-
tails this year than last The
total number who rooted winners
home was 326,000. And they had
Dan's Dilemma !
Dan's pockets had no sliver
lining.
For some money he was pining!
Then a P. A Want Ad ha
sighted.
Got a Job.. now he's delighted!
the gum bands off their pocket
books, too, betting almost $18,-
000,000. That's about tw* and
one-half million more than went
through the mutuel machines
last Labor Day.
The man who polices thorough-
bred racingSpencer J. Drayton
thinks his organization may be
responsible for the bigger crowds
and mutuel play.
Drayton. president of the Thor-
oughbred Racing Protective Bu-
reau, says the public has more
faith In the sport now.
"Doping, once the nefarious
business than almost ruined
horse racing," says Drayton, "to
almost extinct today."
According to the ex-FBI agent,
the stimulation of horses Is not
a major problem anymore. Dray-
ton says there have been only
three cases of stimulation during
the first six months at tracks
where his T.R.A. agents are on
the lookout
Auditing Scores
Close Victory At
Aqueduct Park
NEW YORK, Sept. 5 (UP)
Form players who check count-
less figures before risking a
deuce would have been wise to
play a hunch yesterday. It was
William Swing's Auditing. The
brown colt made a game recov-
ery In the stretch to win the fea-
tured Blue Point Purse at Aque-
duct Park in a photo finish with
Gold Heel. _
The son of Count Fleet sprinted
to a three-length lead coming
around the final turn, only to
fade and fall back to third. The
favored Combat Boots, followed
by Gold Heel took over. Then,
midway down that stretch. Aud-
iting came to life again and nip-
ped Gold Heel at the wire. Com-
bat Boots ran third.
The time over a fast track was
1:44 2-5. Auditing paid $8.20, $4.40
and $2.90 across the board.


Diamond Notes
BY UNITED PRESS
:. J
Ohio Governor Frank Lausche,
a strong candidate for the base-
ball commlsslonershlp, told news-
men in Columbus, Ohio, that the
appointment might not "be
available" to him. That was in
answer to one newsman who ask-
ed Lausche If he would take the
job if it were offered.
The Ohio Governor didn't ex-
pand on what he meant by "not
available" but Lausche did say
he's received many letters urging
him to stay on as Governor of
Ohio.
Lausche refused to comment on
reports that he talked in New
York last week with baseball club
owners. The owners will meet In
Chicago on Sept. 20 to consider a
man for the job.
There's nothing like a winner
to keep everyone happy...and
Charlie Grimm, manager of the
Milwaukee Brewers-, is no excep-
tion .
Grimm, who led Milwaukee to
an American Association pennant
this year, has signed for another
year with the Brewers. And the
salary Is reported to be more
than $15.000. Grimm says he will
not return to the majors as ru-
mored In baseball circles.
"I signed now to end those ru-
mors," says Cnarlle "I plan to
finish out my baseball career
here. Everyone has been wonder-
ful to me."
i
i
Classified Ads in August alone
903 more than all other
Panama daily papers combined
prove that


LITTLE i ADVERTISERS
too, know where
to get fast action,
sure sales
BIG RESULTS!

1
t
58.1%



For the first 8 months of this year j
THE PANAMA AMERICAN carried 61.7%
of the total classified ads placed
in Panama newspapers I



THREE DODGERS FINED BY N.L. PREXY
Hoy Campanella
Has Bad Elbow
Yanks, Red Sox
Open Big Series
The League's Best
(Includes Yesterday's
Games)
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Ferris Fain. Athletics......331
George Hell. Tigers.......329
Orestes Mioso, White Sox.. .324
Gil Coan. Senators.........321
Ted Williams. Red Sox.....319
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Stan Alusial, Cardinals.....388
Richie Ashburn. Phillies .. .341
Jackie Robinson. Dodgers.. .333
Roy Campanella. Dodgers .327
Johnny Wyrostek. Reds.....323
(SPORTS PAGES: 8 & 9)
'
AN INDEPENDEN^
jBfe
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.

TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR
PANAMA, R. P.. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1951
FIVE CENTS
Gromyko Ready For the Fight,
Says Talks May Last Month
A
Nationwide
TV Show Cost
$40,000,000
SAN FRANCISCO. Sept. 5
Pi Thf East Coast of the
tnlted States met the West
Coast for 30 history-making mi-
nutes last night while an estim-
ated 40,000.000 persons watched
President Tinman on the first
nationwide live television pro-
gram
It cost the television industry
$40.000,000 one dollar for every
viewer to televise the Presi-
dent's face to the largest crowd,
In history.
He was opening the Japanese
\ peace treaty conference in San
\rancisco's War Memorial Opera
.House.
The coast to coast television
was made possible by a mlcro-
\vave relay system set up by the
American Telephone and Tele-
graph Company.
East Zone Germans
Threaten Blockade
Tax on lifelines'
BERLIN. Sept. 5 iUPi The
Soviet-controlled East German
8tate threatened today to in-
crease the new blockade tax on
the lifelines connecting Berlin
and the West.
The Communist East German
regime Is reported as believed
Bow to be considering taxing
canal traffic from West Ger-
many to Berlin.
This would supplement the
toll they clamped on highway
Vehicles running between Ber-
lin and the West.
The barge tax would be In
retaliation against the West
Berlin City Government's sug-
gestion that the Western pow-
ers retaliate against the road
tax by taxing Soviet zone barges
on West Berlin waterways.
SAN FRANCISCO. Sept. 5
i UP i Chief Russian delegate
to the Japanese peace confer-
ence here said today that he
was ready for a fight.
He predicted that the con-
ference, which the Western
powers hope to wind up in four
days, may last a month.
Gromyko's prediction came
as delegates from 51 nations
gathered today to debate the
tough procedural rules with
which the United States hopes
to limit the debate on the
treaty, so as to get it signed
Saturday.
Gromyko's plan to upset the
United States' scheme was dis-
closed in conversation last night
with Britain's Minister of State.
Kenneth Younger.
Gromyko spoke to Younger at
a reception after the formal
opening ceremony last night in
which President Truman warn-
ed the conference that its sole
Job was to sign the treaty.
Later Philippines Delegate
Brigadier General Carlos P.
Romulo jovially asked Gromy-
ko: "When are you going to
start the big fight?"
Gromyko replied: "If by 'fight'
you mean my right to speak
and criticize then I am ready
for the fight."
Truman's Speech
Truman warned Russia to
keep hands off the Japanese
treaty or be branded an ad-
vocate of more war.
Speaking at the start of the
51-natlon conference called to
approve the treaty, the Chief
EJecutlve reiterated the willing-
ness of this country to explroe
all problems threatening the
Pacific peace with Russia or
any other nation.
But. he added, this was not
the time nor place for such a
broadened international dis-
cussion.
"Our specific task here Is to
conclude the treaty of peace
with Japan," he said. "That
will be a great step toward
general peace in the Pacific."
The President then cited the
need of other steps to clear the
constant threat of war from the
Catholic Bishop
Reported Missing
In Red China
HONG KONG. Sept. 5 (UP)
Catholic quarters said today
that Monsignor Lawrence Bian-
chj. Bishop-elect of Hong Kong
la missing in Red China, and
his fate is unknown.
. He was placed under house
arrest with other priests in
Waichow. South China several
weeks ago On Aug. 26. Com-
munist soldiers took him from
hit house, and he has not been
heard from since.
UN Reinstates Two
Victims of Charges
Called Groundless
UNITED NATIONS. Sept. 5
(UPl The United Nations was
ordered by its Supreme Court to-
day to reinstate two employes
whose appeals implied they had
been victims of groundless Com-
munism charges.
Three other firings, two of
them involving officers of the
United Nations Employes' Asso-
ciation, were upheld.
The United Nations adminis-
trative tribunal, headed by Mara
Jam Sabeh of Nawanagar. decid-
ed that Trygve Lie's reasons for
the firings were "adequte." but
that "due process was lacking"
because the accused "was at no
lime in a position to plead di-
rectly to the statement of cause
of his termination."
(NEA Telephoto)
PEACE MISSION President Harry Truman waves from the
door of his plane as he prepares to leave Washington for the
Japanese Peace Treaty Conference in San Francisco. Tru-
man warned Russia not to throw any monkey wrenches Into
the treaty machinery.
Pacific area, particularly the
restoration of peace and secur-
ity in Korea. But, he continued,
these "other steps" would have
to follow the Japanese treaty.
The Chief Executive, obvious-
ly not wanting -to precipitate
more of a diplomatic crisis than
now exists here, was unusually
circumspect In dealing with the
Russians who are expected to
opposse apprvoal of the treaty
In its present form. But there
was no doubt in the minds of
the diplomats that the Soviet
Union was the target of the
President's remarks.
"With Japan returned to Its
place in the family of nations,
and with the people of Korea
secure, free and united, It
should be possible to find ways
to settle other problems in the
Pacific which now threaten the
peace," he said.
"The United States had made
clear on many occasions its
desire to explore with other
governments at the proper
lime and In the proper forum
how this might be accomplish-
ed."
He s%id there were "many
well established ways" for this
exploration of peace In the
Pacific "if there is a genuine
French Regime
In New Crisis
PARIS, Sept. 5 (UP) Pre-
mier Rene Pleven struggled to-
day to keep his loosely knit
coalition together as a debate
over whether public funds
should go to church schools
threatened to topple his new
government.
Radical socialist members of
his cabinet are opposed to the
bill proposed by Catholic Po-
pular Republicans (also in the
Cabinet calling for more di-
rect aid to church schools than
the National Assembly voteH.
desire for peace in all quar-
ters."
"But," he added, "these are
not matters which can be dealt
with in our present conference.
We-have come here to take a
single stepbut a step of ut-
most importance.
"The treaty now 'before us
offers more than talk of peace;
it offers action for peace. This
conference will show, therefore,
who seeks to make peace, and
who seeks to prevent it; who
wishes to put an end to war.
and who wishes to continue it."
Thus did Mr. Truman draw
a polite dividing line through
the conference hall and by In-
direction, put the pro-aggres-
sor label on any nation that
stands with Russia In seeking
to upset the treaty .
"We believe," he said, "this
treaty will have the support
of all those nation that
honestly desire to reduce the
tensions which now grip the
world."
While the President anticipat-
ed the re-entrance of Japan to
the community of nations, he
pointed out that restoration of
sovereignty to the Japanese
people "does not mean that the
slate has been wiped clean."
He said the memories of
Pearl Harbor and Bataan were
not easily erased, and that
Japan would not find the world
"entirely friendly and trust-
ing."
Mr. Truman added, however,
that this was the time for re-
conciliation looking toward the
future, not the past.
"There can be no progress
unless the Japanese people and
their neighbors In the Pacific
are made secure against the
threat of aggression." he said.
The President sought, to
quiet anv-fears about the pro-
jected, limited rearmament of
Japan, saying in effect that any
Japanese defense force would
always be in conjunction with
forces of other nations in the
area.
After recognizing, as the
treaty does, that Japan must
possess the right of self-de-
fense, the President said that
the Japanese contribution to
the Pacific defense force would
not constitute an offensive
threat.
Although the President point-
ed out that Japan must pav
reparations to the nations it
damaged in World War n. he
said "the treaty we are gather-
ed here to sign has not been
drawn in a spirit of revenge."
He said the Japanese treaty,
and recent mutual defense pacts
with the Philippines, Australia
and "New eZaland were "initial
steps toward the consolida-
tion of peace In the Pacific."
He acknowledged certain dif-
ferences of opinion among na-
tions signatory to the Japanese
agreement, but expressed the
belief that most of them had
been reconciled.
3-Yr-0ld In Gorgas
After Had Dog's
Bile In Colombia
A three-year-old Australian
boy. bitten Sunday afternoon In
Buenaventura. Colombia, was in
Gorgas Hospital today for treat-
ment of rabies.
The boy was brought to Gor-
gas board the Grace Liner San-
ta Margarita. He. was admitted
Monday and was reported in
good condition today.
The lad is Kenneth Smith. Jr.
whose, father Is an employe of
the Grace Line company In Co-
lombia.
He was bit by the dog while
out walking with his grand-
mother, Mrs. Dorothy Adklns.
Mrs. Adklns. who had been
told the dog was mad, hurried-
ly notified the parents of the
child and rushed him to the ship
that was leaving for Panama
within 30 minutes.
Mrs. Adklns Is now staying at
the Tlvoll Hotel.
HE MISSED THIRD A hatless, breathless Willie Mays crosses home plate In "the lerond"^-
nlng of the Giants-Phillies Labor Day opener, apparently the owner of an Inside the -nark
home run. But umpire Babe Pinelll ruled him out because he failed to touch, third bui
Phllly pitcher Robin Roberts, who tossed a neat six-hit. 6-3 win, is at left, and Giant catcher
Wes Westrum. the next batter, Is looking toward third, possibly hoDlng Willie's error of
omission would pass unnoticed. "r OI
Luscious ex-Amvet Official
Free as Death Cuts Triangle
NASHVILLE, Tenn.. Sept. 5
(UP) Death speeded the pro-
cesses of the courts today und
left stately, blonde Florence Re-
delsheimer who once was ac-
cused of having two husbands
with none.
Wealthy Jonas Redelsheimer,
58-year-old retired oil and real
estate man, died of a heart at-
tack after breakfast at the hotel
where he lived alone. His 40-
year-old wife, a former Vice
Commander of the American Ve-
terans, had been estranged from
him for several months.
A week ago, she filed suit to
divorce him and sever the last
tie of the marital triangle that
made her a publicized figure last
winter.
At that time, Florida contrac-
tor James Benn accused her of
entering Into a bigamous marri-
age with him while still married
to Redelsheimer, whom' she wed
14 years ago. Benn claimed pa-
ternity of Mrs. Redelsheimer's
daughter, Patricia, now 14
months old.
Mrs. Redelsheimer, who had
spent her Winters In Florida
while her husband attended to
his holdings in Nashville, replied
tearfully to the charge that Benn
had "hypnotized" her Into an
illegal marriage.
A Florida divorce court an-
nulled the marriage and Benn
dropped his bigamy charges. But
another episode of the triangle
came in Nashville last May when
Benn flew there from New York
in company with Mrs. Redel-
sheimer and by officers with
a lunacy warrant which she had
sworn out against him. She said
Benn had threatened to harm
her and the baby, Patricia.
Benn satlfied Davidson Coun-
ty officers as to his sanity and
left town, asserting that Flor-
ence had "betrayed" him Into
flying to Nashville by saying she
wanted to see him.
5"*?.1 pcM-KO Patrolman Pete Fena of HWsborough. Calif, itaffiraSftMS
ghffiSu to Stag! ^ con&eS1-"11 * ofttr^woula
Prince Proclaimed
King of Jordan;
Wife Seeks Divorce
AMMAN. Jordan, 8ept. 5
(UP)Crown Prince Emir Ta-
lal was named the King of
Jordan today when the cabinet's
decision approving his ascen-
sion to the throne was un-
animously carried by parlia-
ment.
The prince will officially be
proclaimed king on his arrival
here tomorrow from a Swiss
clinic where he had been un-
dergoing treatment for nervous
disorders. Last week the doc-
tors had pronounced him cured.
Meanwhile diplomatic sources
in Jerusalem said the Crown
Princess of Jordan has started
legal proceedings to gain a
divorce from her husband.
Emir Talal. the newly proclaim-
ed King of Jordan.
Italian Premier in US;
Seeks Treaty Revisin
ROME, Sept. 5. (UP). Pre-
mier Aid de Oasperl left tor
the United States to seek a
revision of the Italian peace
treaty, and press for the retara
of Trieste to Italy. _..'
Evacuation Begun
As Kansas River
Ads Up Again
TOPEKA, Sept. 5 (UP) The
Kansas River ripped out a rai.-
road bridge here today.
Some 9,000 people were
evacuated from North Topeka as
the river threatened to repeat
its flood performance of last
July.
But the river levelled off as
heavy rains predicted failed to
materialize- .*2
Army Engineers called for ad-
ditional equipment as t a a J
worked furiously to plug the
dikes protecting North Topeka.
All t'ne dikes holding back the
river were shattered In Ju'/a
disastrous flood.
SNS U Baudoin'
Docks With Troops
For Sherman, Davis
J The U8NS "Lt. Raymond O.
Beaudoin" arrived in Balboa yes-
terday with units of the 370th
Engineer Amphibious Suooort
Reclment aboard. She transited
the Canal northbound.
As the "Beafldoln" passed Ml-
raflores locks; cooks and other
mess personnel left the ship and
continued by motor ton to be"'n
preparation of the evening meals.
The units will be nermanentlv
stationed at Fort Sherman and
Fort Davis. ln the Atlantic Sec-
tor.
Commandlne officer of the
370th is col. Robert P. Alexan-
der He was transferred from
Washington. DC. last July 18. to
command of the 70th. Durlnc.
U) conflict with Japan. Col.
Alexander served with amphi-
bious groups ln the Pacific area,
after which he was attached to
the Engineer's central staff.
FBI Probes Titoist
Writer's Gun Death
In New Jersey
RIEGELSVILLE. New Jersey,
Sept. 5 (UP).FBI agents today
investigated the possibility that
left wing novelist Louis Adamic
may have been killed by Com-
munists for Joining Yugoslav
Marshal Tito's anti-Soviet camp.
The FBI was called Into the
case after Mrs. Ethel Sharp,
Adamlc's secretary, told the po-
lice that four Communists had
threatened the writer last year
because he was working on a
book supporting Tito's stand.
The final chapters of the 500,-
000 word book, "Eagle and
Rock," were found beside Ada-
mlc's body early yesterday
morning in his burning home.
Adamic had been shot once
in the head by a .22 caliber
buUet.
Assistant Hunterdon County
coroner John B. Fuhrman found
Adamic died from "a supposed-
ly self-lnfncted wound."
Adamic did not leave a suicide
note.
Security Program
Legislation Goes
To Senate Group
WASHINGTON. Sept. S (USIS)
A cc\ ference committee of the
U.S. Senate and House of Re-
presentatives Is expected to meet
soon to Iron out differences-be-
tween the two foreign aid bills
adopted by the two houses of
Congress.
The Senate over the weekend
approved a Mutual Security Pro-
gram bill which would authorize
$7,286,250,000 ln military and
economic assistance to free na-
tions for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1952. Previously, the
House of Representatives had
approved a similar bill which
would authorize a $7,498,750,000
program.
President Truman had request-
ed $8.500 million for the program
embracing all U.S. foreign aid
efforts.
The Senate Foreign Relations
and Armed Services Committees
had recommended an authoriza-
tion Of $7,535,570,000.
After the conference commit-
tee of the two houses of Congress
agrees on an authorization, the
Congress still must vote on an
appropriation to finance the pro-
gram Republican Senator Scho-
eppel of Kansas said a multi-bil-
lion-dollar tax Increase for the
nation must get through Con-
gress before the foregoing assis-
tance funds are voted.
In the meantime. U.S. aid to
free nations is continuing as the
result of interim legislation ap-
proved earlier by Congress.
Meanwhile Redelsheimer had
fallen into poor health. A series
pf heart attacks forced him to
leave his richly furnished estate
on a part of the old Andrew
Jackson Hermitage property and
enter VanderbUt Hospital.
Florence and the baby moved
to the ultra-fashionable Stone's
Throw apartment*, another Re-
delsheimer enterprise, and Re-
delsheimer, when he left the
hospital, went to lrVe at the Al-
len Hotel.
This morning a maid found
him sprawled dead across hla
bed.
Mrs. Redelsheimer was ln se-
clusion at her apartment.
Only US Hales Must
Register Tomorrow
In Canal Zone
Selective Service registration
in the Canal Zone extends only
to male citizens of the United
States, according to an expla-
nation Issued today by A. C.
Medinger State Director, ln
answer to numerous inquiries
received by the Canal Zone lo-
cal boards.
The Presidential Proclamation
of August 16, 1951, provides for
registration of U. 8. citizens
only, and accordingly aliens
will not be registered for Selec-
tive Service under the terms of
the Proclamation.
The Canal Zone local board
offices located at the Panama
Railroad Station, Balboa, and
the Administration Building,
Cristobal, will register U. S. citi-
zens ln the age groups 18 thru
25 tomorrow. Those who reach-
their 18th birthday after that
date, i.e., persons born after
Sept. 6. 1933. shall be register-
ed on the day they attain the
18th anniversary of the day
of their birth, or within 5 days
thereafter.
Another point clarified by
the State Director refers to tho
exemption from the require-
ment of registration ln the Ca-
nal Zone granted to members
of the Regular Army, Navy, Air
Force, Marine Corps, the Coast
Guard, the Coast and Geode-
tic Survey, and the Publlo
Health Service. This exemption.
It was explained, refers only to
commissioned officers, warrant!
officers, pay clerks, enlisted
men, and aviation cadets of
those organizations.
X