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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/00964
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:00964
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text

^0!l!!m
AN INDEPENDENT ^/I
DAILY NEWSPAPER
fan am American
"Let the people know the truth end the country is mfe** Abraham Lincoln,
SedgramsYO.
CANADIAN
WHISKY
Jetarte*
xei
list TEAS
PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY, DECEMBER Z7, 1955
FTVE CENTS
SUPERVISING DIGGING OPERATIONS today at Old Panam, where the arch for a mysterf-
our underground door Is going on, was Dr. Alejandro Mndez Perelra, curator of the Panam
Museum. It Is hoped that a tunnel which may lead to the large Iron door will be found after
the digging gets underway. It is Mndez Perelra's belief that with four men working constant-
ly. It may take one week to clear the underground passageway.
Search Begun
At Cave Site In
Old Panama
What some archaeologists
think may turn out to be either
an old Jail, a. mysterious tunnel
to' the sea, or possibly a treasure
deposit was being excavated to-
day by four diggers in the Old
According to Dr. Alejandro
Mndez Perelra, curator fair the
Panama Museum, excavation ac-
tivities may last about a weak.
He was reluctant today to ex-
press his opinion as to where-)
the tunnel may lead, or what Its
significance might be, but said
he would wait and watch the
proceedings eagerly.
There was speculation that
diggers may uncover a large
Iron door bolted shut with three
cross-bars and a padlock Inside
the tunnel, but today they had
managed to clear only a small
portion of the passageway.
So far only a human skull
and a piece of bone have been
uncovered, and a atone arch,
but no indication of a door.
The entrance is on the land
side of the highway.
A large crowd of curious na-
tives had gathered around the
site but were being barred by
National Guardsmen from en-
tering the area where the men
were digging. > ,
One spectator was dubious a-
bout the possible existence of a
tunnel there, because, he point-
ed out, the heavy machinery
which had been used to build
the new stretch of highway
NewCrestH'rtsYubaCity

'Black Christmas
Takes 790 Lives
CHICAGO, Dec. 27 (UP) The
"Black Christmas" weekenend of
U55 set an all-time, all-holiday
record for traffic datas, a steadi-
ly mounting death count showed
today.
The three-day Christmas week-
end became he deadliest heli-
WHAT MAY TURN OUT TO RE a diggers' dream was being
discussed today by a few experts In the field who lust hap-
pened to be "paslng through." They are (left to right) John
Wise, a New York collector of pre-Colombian artefacts: Cleve-
land Morgan, president of the Montreal Museum of Pine Arts;
Carl Curtis old-timer on the Zone who lives in Gamboa, and
Panama Councilman Felix Luclanl. The two Stateside -visitors
were at the Panama Museum when they learned of discovery.
They accompanied Dr. Alejandro Mndez Perelra, curator of the
museum.
there would have surely caused
any tunnel to collapse.
Two expert archaelegists were
on the scene purely by accident
today. They are Cleveland Mor-
gan, president of the Montreal
Museum of Fine Arts, and John
Wise, a New Yorker who special-
izes In collectlne pre-Colombian
artefacts. Both came here from
Peru two days ago, and were
visiting the Panama Museum
this morning. Dr. Mndez Per-
elra accompanied them to the
site.
They were both anxious to
learn of any developments but
would not advance any the-
THE CANAL ZONE'S CHRISTMAS SPIRIT of goodwill and com-
munity fun carried through last night as the Zone's most mobile
sleigh made its final run. Last to hear the honking* of Billy
HolToweU's Christmas serenade were the passengers aboard the
New Zealand-bound Southern Cross, who had spent their Christ-
mas day at sea, far from home. The sleigh went dockslde at
Balboa, and the passengers lining the ship's rail cheered the
evidence that Santa Claus' reindeers are not confined by oceans
Lancashire couple Ralph and Mrs. Cooper, heading for a new
life in Pukekohe. NZ, rode the sleigh on a serenade run to
Curundu, got a red-nosed reindeer for a souvenir. Earlier hi
the day the sleigh's doughty crew, headed by Bob Turner of
the Maintenance Division and hard-blowing Randy Colclasure,
of the Hallowell Philharmonic, had been the Service Center
Division's guests at Wait Disney's movie, The Vanishing Prairie.
Other points to which coachman Turner drove his Chevrolet
reindeer were through Balboa, neon and Los Rlos, to Balboa
Heighl and Morgan's Gardens, and a special serenade for the
patients in Gorgas.
ories adding they would "wait
and see."
The mysterious underground
door first came to the attention
of Luciano Vergara who works
for the Ameglio Farm to Pana-
ma, about five years ago. He
apparently had been taking a
midnight stroll along the road
connecting Old Panama with
San Francisco when he chanced
upon the hole, and following
the tunrtel. claims he came up-
on a bolted door.
He apparently covered the
hole and kept his secret until
this year when he discussed It
with Dloscorldes Vergara, his
foreman, but no relation. Both
men got their employer, Pedro
Amegllo's backing for the search.
Ameglio then visited Minister
of Finance Alfredo Alemn on
Dec. 15 and found out that the
law provides for discoverers of
burled treasure to* spilt 50-50
with the owner of the land on
which the discovery is made.
The Old Panama lands belong
to the government.
A councilman, Felix Luclanl,
who was present to the office
at the time decided to Join the
expedition. They started dlggine;
about 1 a.m. yesterday and will
continue operations until they
clear the passageway.
Another I run Man
Arrested By Reds
BERLIN, Dec. 27 (UP) The
U S. Army announced today that
an American soldier was arrested
by Communist police yesterday
after a minor traffic accident in
East Berlin. He still Is missing.
The soldier was Master Sergeant
Mike Kliman. of Brooklyn, New
York.
The Americans today asked the
Soviets for return of the soldier.
He last was seen at about 22
hours yesterday when East Ber-
lin police took him to East BerlinH
Police Headquarters.
The arrest raised the question
of whether East German Commu-
nists wl exercise their "sover-
eignty" by trying the soldier.
They threatened to try Ameri-
cans last week after a U. S.
Army court martial acquitted two
Americans of Communist charges
they attaeked an East Berlin act-
or.
Retired PC Pilot
Gordon F. Kariger
Dies In Norfolk
Capt. Gordon P. Kariger, re-
Ured Panama Canal pilot, died
apparently of a heart attack last
Friday morning In Norfolk, Vs.,
where he and bis family have
made their home since his re
tirement In 1952. He was 45
years old.
Capt. Kariger was a member
of a well-known Canai Zone
family. Born in New Orleans, he
came to the Isthmus with his
family In 1915 when he was no-
ly five years old. His father was
also a Panama canal pilot.
Capt. Kariger grew up in the
Canal Zone and attended Zone
schools. He was first employed
during a school vacation at the
Panama Canal Press in 1927. He
was employed on the perma-
nent Canal force In 193S as a
signalman la the Marine Bu-
reau.
e was
tug
m rnr
mate two yea .
to towboat master tn
was transferred to the .
force in 1944 and was employ
In that capacity until his retire-
ment because of physical disa-
bility in Mav 1951
After returning to the State,
he was employed as a towboat
master In the Port of Norfolk
and wa son duty aboard c tog
when he was stricken and died.
He Is survived by his wife,
Pearl, and a son, Gordon, Jr., of
Norfolk; a daughter, Mrs. Gwen-
dolyn 8tegmler and a grandson,
of Washington, D.C.; two sisters,
Mrs. Paul Berndt. of South
Bend, Ind., and Mrs. Marian
Llpscomb, of Long Beach, Cal.;
and three brothers, Lee, an em-
ploye In the Locks Division:
Carl, of Gronton, Conn., and
Bernard, of Long Beach.
Funeral services for Capt.
Kariger were held Monday In
Norfolk. A floral tribute waa
sent by the Panama Canal pi-
lots Association.
day m the nation's history when
the United Press count passed
the Ssl death tell, ef IvSTt four-
day Christmas weekend.
The United Press tally from i
p.m. Friday until midnight test
night showed a-total of 592 traf
fie fatalities.
There were 09 deaths in fires,
four in plane era east, and 125 in
miscellaneous accidents for a holi-
day death total of 790.
Ned H. Dearborn, National safe-
ty Council president, when inform-
ed of the united Press count st
tributad the unexpected rise in
deaths to increased traffic and
unfavorable driving weather.
Thousands of Americans took ad
vantage of the Monday holiday to
drive long distances for Christmas
visits. The extra day was reflected
in the tolL
sj
Last year Christmas fell on Sa-
turday and the toll was 380. The
year before it was 532. -
The all-time holiday high was
set in 1952, when the United Press
counted 591 deaths. Christmas was
on Thursday that year and the
count started st 8 p.m. the day
before and ended 102 hours later,
at midnight Sunday.
Texas ted all states in number
of deaths with 41. Illinois, with 37,
was second and Michigan was
third with 38.
Those tolls wore far out of
proportion te vehicle registra-
ilehM
Pennsylvania and New York
both have more automobiles than
titber ef the leaders but New York
had only M fatalities and Penqsyl-
registrations taaMf*"* .'***
had SO traffic dsWasW^Concrivably
severe flooding in teat state re-
(Coatlaued on Page > CeL 5)
Christmas Mass
Held At Palo Seco
Christmas mass was conduct-
ed for the patients at ths Palo
Seco Leprosarium' at 2 o'clock
Christmas morning in the Palo
Seco chapel by the Rev. John B.
Ruthledge, of St. Mary's Mission
In Balboa. .
The services were attended by
Col. Charles O. Bruce; Canal
Zone Health Director, Dr. Eara
Hurwita, superintendent of Pa-
lo Seco and Mrs. Hurwlts ana u
number of sisters from St. Ma-
rx's Mission in Balboa.
The services were held follow-
ing the annual Christmas party
in the main recreation hall dur-
ing which the patients exchang-
ed ff'fts and sang Christmas
carols.
(NBA Telephoto)
RESCUE Mrs. George Mar-
karian and her two-j
top i
copter lifts them from the roof
of their flooded home In rain-
drenched Guernevllle, Calif.
The helicopter returned to res-
cue Oeorge Markarian and his
son, Dennis (lower arrow).
Waters Rush
Second Time
Through Levee
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 27 (UP) A new crest sent
the Feather River pouring today through a 600-foot gap
in the levee along Yuba City, flooding the deserted town
for the second time in less than a week.
The muddy waters began rising at the rate of three
inches an hour during the night. Finally they overflowed
the gap at Gumrree, broken during last Saturday's flood
when 10,000 persons fled for their lives.
The waters filled half of the stricken town before they
began to recede. In the southeast section, they rose to
nearly three feet. Flood officials expected them to go no
higher.
Actually, there waa-little fur-
ther harm the flood waters
could do.
Where they were deepest was
already an area of destruction,
with some houses crumbled into
pieces and debris piled against
trees and crooked street signs.
One house, for example, was
perched at a crazy angle on a
railroad track and another sat
uarely In the middle of the
It also kept the city's residents
from returning to salvage what
they could from the ooze that
covered what once waa their
homes.
Plood workers watched help-
lessly earlier while the angry
crest churning towards the bro-
ken levee that once guardad
flood-ravaged Yuba city.
Armed guards had patrolled
the
through the ruined hon,
the debris for those who
to escape last Saturday's wall of
water.
There may be as many as 100
victims, officials said.
Canal Zone Holidays Quiet;
Only Action Seen In Court
Death took a Christmas holiday
over the week-end as the Canal
Zone recorded an uneventfult hree
days.
Police today said nobody was
kilted, none injured, and that no
natural deaths were reported to
them over the long week-end.
The holiday was not marred by
any automobile accidents. People
either stayed at bone to celt
brateor drove carefully.
These were a few eases of e-
versalriled gents who this morn-
ing faced the Balboa Magistrate
ea charges of hrtexteattea.
Because in the majority' of ess-
es the defendanata, considerably
sobered by their experiences, had
spent Christmas in the Balboa jail,
Judge John E. Doming chose to
be lenient.
He Imposed a $10 fine on Hen-
ry W. Francisco, a 24-year-old ci-
tizen of British Honduras who to-
cay claimed all he was doing
when apprehended by police at the
Limits, was "telephoning a
friend.'* The time was 2:20 a.m.
on Christmas Dsy.
'If yea had resisted arrest,
the penalty wetdd have have
been store severe," the Judge
teto the stefeedant*
Michael A. Springer, who was
celebrating' Christmas a bit early,
was literally picked up from the
sidewalk on La Boca Road by an
arresting officer. The Panama-
nian defendant was lying partly on
the sidewalk and partly in the
gutter, the policeman said. The
Judge fined him $5
A Panamanian who was wash-
ing and drying his clothes ea
rocks near the entrance to the
rock-crushing areas opposite the
Gaviln Road section was brought
into court on a charge of vagran-
cy. The Judge ressiasirt imposi-
tion of sentence on the 26-year-
old defendant, Juan de Dios Oban-
do who claimed he was returning
to Campana, his home in the In-
terior. He ss id he had been look-
ing for employment with the Pa-
nama National Guard or in the
Canal Zone, but having failed to
secure work, was gomg back.
He was placed on one year proba-
tion. f
Two men who argued that they
were just waiting to get permis-
sion tc borrow their cousin's car
in La Boca were both found
elty of loitering after they en-
ed pleas of not guilty.
Ernesto O. WbJttiaghaw, ig,
who postee said flag his wallet
and personal papers at the desk
sergeant hi the Balboa Police
Station after he waa placed na-
der arrest, wM sentenced te five
day, bi Jail.
His companion. Perclval P.
Clarke, 22, was fined $10.
Tre men were charged Jointly
after they were found asleep in a
car parked alongisde quarters
0790 on La Boca Road at 5:40 yes-
terday morning. They claimed
they were waiting to get the key
to the car from their cousin, a
resident in the building.
Two Panamanians, Emilio Ba-
rra and Honororio Pimental, were
charged with burglary in having
ualiwfullp tried to enter a resi-
dence in Chtvs Chiva trail with
intent to commit larceny on the
evening of Dec. 24. Ball of $100
was set for each defendant, and
the case was continued until to-
morrow morning.
The theft of $5 cents worth of
groceries from the Tivoli Commi-
ssary proved expensive to Ber-
nardo vergara, 28-year-old Pana-
manian, who was fined $15 for the
petit larceny.
(NBA Telephoto)
RIVER ON THE RAMPAGE Aerial view of Eureka, Calif.,
shows part of the Klamath River Bridge under water as the
ralnfed river swirls past. Oov. Goodwin Knight has declared' a
state of emergency In Northern California where eight persons
axe repoted to have been swept out to sa by flood waters.
^i*te aiwfy" engineer's _
?arysvllle, across; the river from
uba city, reportad' to atley
Pierson, state director of Civil
Defense, that the new crest "will
no doubt cover most of the ter-
ritory that was covered in the
last breakthrough."
"The depth of the water has
not been determined," bat no
doubt it will be adequate to un-
do any good that the people
might be doing in cleaning up
now," the engineers office re-
ported. ,
Repair crews had tolled
throughout the night in an at-
tempt to repair the yawning
gap In the 33-foot levee.
The Yuba City situation ap-
peared to be the most serious In
the Par West, where storms end
floods have taken a toll of S3
lives and caused at least $100,-
000,000 damage to the states c-f
California, Oregon and Nevada.
The latest tragedy reported la
the wake of the floods took
place tn south western Oregon.
Five members of a farm fam-
ily were buried in a landslide
that covered their home. The
dead were Mr. and Mrs. Marlon
Neal, and three ohllrtren, Tom-
my, 18, Mary, 16, and Becky, 30
months.
The weatherman had soma
cheering news, for a change. He
predicted onlv scattered show-
ers ovar northern and central
California in the wake of yester.
day's heavy rains that caused
rivera to rise ominously again.
In addition, he forecast colder
weather and snow in the moun-
tains. This would halt the dan-
gerous runoff of melting snow
and ice that has also caused
'streams to swell.
(NBA Telephotoi
CALIFORNIA TOWN UNDER WATER Aerial view shows Standard Oil Co. storage facUtttsB
Inundated at Guernevllle. calif. The town of G uernevllle sent a "desperate" call for help
the swollen Russian River sent Its waters swirling into the town Itself for the first tima
1940.


riot two
THE PANAMA AMERICAS AM OT>KPEM>BT DAIL* NEWSPAPER
TtTMDAT, trECEMBE* 21, 1IH
THE PANAMA AMFRICAN
mnnt- nd publiihco ar th rMAM AMKMir.AN
ftUNMC er NIUON Mumnni M Itl
HAOMOCIO ARIAS. IDflO
Wl H HUT P O BOX '4. *. N O P.
tlLCPHONI 2 0740 LINB>
OKI AODOU. PAN IMIRICAN. FAN*
OPPICI. It 171 ClNlHAl AVINUI MTWlt 12tH AN* 1ST*
Foaaiaw HlPMMNTATIVt. JOSHUA . POWlRt. INC. ,
sab MAuisoN a. nw voa. rr N. V.
, lOA I
fl MONTH. IN -""T*~ '-7
fON MONTH* IN ADVANCt i J
.fON ONI VIA*. IN ADVANCt 10.00
HO
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too
inn u tow roKUM thi mapim wm coiumh .
Iba Ma.l Sea K M aoea (mum lor readers The '" A*;1?,
getters * reca.- ar.l.tully oad ... toadied mi " eanMoetial
4m'i apaaar
t>t
I rao rctfrilMi a Ittttr dan'l ba liapatUal it II
ay Lai far. ara peMkked ia tha order racervad.
7 bvran ara aaMNaaa^ "* .-. .....
Plawa If la ktra Iba latter Hmitai la oat oaf* raooth.
Merrill* letter wrlreee h held in itrktart eeoHdaeee.
This ocweeeper oomioos ae reaee.* lar rtetemerrfi m eel-lew
j""*s in letter* Iran reader.
THE MAIL BOX
SAN ANTONIBUOLE
Dec. 20, 1055
Rr:
The holiday rush is on and with In the highest death tol
on record. From midnight Friday to midnight Sunday, a total
t 44 died In highway accidents, with another 20 burning co
*Most of the country U covered by a blanket of snow and it
loota like white Christma, out It only extends a short way
^The Sir Force U overrun with accidents all overthe country.
IB tne past 24 hours Florida was hardest hit. They are riot
SroShwuntlng the damage and loss of life In fogbound Flor-
ida; and we had a little wreck, too. A collision *> miles south
*"?*%!& ree in history is on d all *
~ 5K SiaVS a^J^^ up lot
of new icbi. The first sets will be obsolete in a month and you
can trade in for a better and more expensive set, then call the
repair man every few days. Looser up your POdntbMk, there
Is nothing chap about them. About a donan in this block:Mfi
one through those troubles and we see the repair truck out thto
way every day in the week, and sometimes on Sunday at double
prices. Its cheaper to go to the movies and you see much^more
Captain Johanes wants me to give him a winning number 13
In the Panama lottery and he will take me on a trip to Boquete.
Pod Balentlne at Waterville, Maine, gives me more news on Bo-
mete than anyone else. Gets it from Pedro Moreno. Rains have
ruined the coffee crop and the trees are loaded with navel or-
anges. Mo roads. No market. Wright
tabor News
And
Comment

n
And in the Center Ring .
*\V
v.
ANSWERING THE CALL TO DUTY-A polar besr cub moves
in for a meal at the Milwaukee. Wis., zoo. But the feeder is a
dog, not the mother bear. Because zoo official feared the cub
Would die or be killed by its inexperienced mother, a dog that
I had just had pupi was called on for wet nurse duty.
DEFENSE LINE-UPDefense lawyers meet In Denver, Colo.,
with District Judge Edward J. Keating, seated, to discuss the ease
of John Gilbert Graham, who is charged with murder in the
dynamiting of an airliner on which his mother and 43 others died.
The defense team, appointed by Judge Keating, consists of, left
Ho right. Paul L. Weadtck, Charles S. Vigil and John J. Gibbons.
By VICTOR RUSEL
There is sworn testimony in Sen
atonal files charging that leaders
of the United Electrical Workers
Union (UE) were in the ssme
Communist apparatus which photo-
graphed and mapped such stra-
tegic defense sectors as the great-
er Pittsburgh area its airport,
steel mills, bridges, and nearby
military installations.
These films were turned over to
the Communist underground--the
same network which summoned
into Washington a group of Pitts
burgh Communists, secording to
this testimony. The group flew in
to the Capital in a specially char-
tered planeand spent hours dis
Sussing the seizing of buildings
i Washington when the revolution
eame. It's all there in the files.
This same apparatus had special
goon squads to provoke riots at
major plants. It also collected in
formation on Jobs, skills, produc
tion quotas and distribution of
equipment made in our vital ra-
dar. Jet, bomber, atomic motor
and electronic war plants.
This is Just a speck among "tons
of material" in the hands of the
''Infiltrated Organisation Unit" of
the Subversive Organizations Sec
tion of the Internal Security Di
vision of the U.S. Department of
Justice.
Before the government can pre-
sent a single sheet of these docu-
ments to the Subversive Activities
Control Board, there are many
legal maneuvers the UE canand
wulmake. So it won't be until
May or possibly even next fall
before the Justice Dept. can really
move to disqualify the UE as a
union which can bargain for its
100,000 members in the very heart
of our electronic complexities.
If the government proves its
case, the pro-Communist leaders
of this union cannot function as
labor men. Then 20 per cent of
the union membership 10,000
at least can petition the Nation-
al Labor Relations Board to per-
mit them to reorganize the union.
If they choose non-Communist
leaders, the union will be in busi-
ness again and none of the wooes,
contracts, pension and welfare
fund benefits, vacation or seniority
rights will be lost.
But the government may never
get its chance to show s document
to the Subversive Activities Con-
trol Board, which has the power
to disqualify the UE. Since the
first hearings won't take place for
six months, perhaps a year, the
UE's Sovieteering leaders may
make use of a gimmick which will
permit them to retain control of
this mighty strategic union.
The law under which the Justice
has Just moved against the
that any union in the
_ m prsSftia- to be non*
_iun*t. TherVsre it cannot he
punished, ven under it* oM lead-
ers. So, this union, which under
its present leadership has been
charged by many a Senatorial
hearing witness with being one of
the most important instruments of
the Communist machine In this
country, is trying to get Into the
AFL-CIO anyway it can
At the moment, the UE is con-
sidering a proposal made person-
ally to its high command on the
morning of Nov. 30 by James
Carey. It should be noted, that
Mr. Carey la act only president
of the International Union of Elec-
trical Worker (IUE) but is also
one of the eight men who govern
the new AFL-CIO. And he is Sec-
retary-Treasurer of the mighty im-
portant Industrial Union Depart-
ment of the AFL-CIO.
Mr. Carey, accompanied by IUE
vice-president Harry Block and his
assistant, Lee Finnegan, went up
to the old VanderbUt mansion on
New York's 51st Street, at the in
vitation of the United Electrical
Workers' executive board. Other
AFL-CIO leaders were asked but
rejected the Md. rt _
There Carey and bis colleagues
discussed three issues: Joint sc-
tion in the marathon Westinghouse
strike. A no-raiding agreement be-
tween the two unions. And unifi-
cation of the two unions.
Carey said later that he asked
the UE high command to end
their locals into his AFL-CIO
union. They talked for over two
hours. There was no decision How
ever, should ^e notorious UE-
now under attack by the govern-
ment decide to move its people
into Jim Carey's union, the old
left wing machinery of each local
would remain Intact Once mside
the AIVCIO. the old UE crowd
would bo Immune from govern-
circuited Just as it was about to
slash one of the mato power lines
of the pro-Communist apparatus
dug deep into this country.
CARELESS SMOKINO
BOSTON -(Uf) Cje
smoking accounts for one third of
all home fires.- a survey by the
Institute for Safer Living revealed
There are approximately 1.000
horn? firoT dJlyto the United
SUtee.
New Job For Santa
By PETER EDSON
Ode Washington
Merry-Go-Round
t DRbTW "ARSON
WASHINGTON (NBA)
They've done killed Santa Claus
for this Christmas, insofar as the
U.S. government's foreign aid pro-
gram is concerned. But they've
given the old boy a new, full-time,
year-round Job.
This is the import of the
extended, surplus food distribution
program just announced by Secre-
tary of Agriculture Ezra Taft
Benson in a holiday surprise.
For the two previous Christ-
mases, there were big U.S.
government giveaways of food
parcels sbroad.
This kad been President Euan
bower's own idea.
The President's purpose was to
overcome the criUeiein that too
much of the American foreign aid
went to people at the top who
didn't need it. What he tried to do
was make a generous gesture of
Christmss good will from th
Americsn people to the pee* and
needy In free, non-Communist
countries.
Four million food parcels were
distributed in 20 countries at a cost
of 11 million dollars to "Operation
Reindeer," Christmas 1SS3. In
"Operation Poinsettia" last Christ
mas, parcels went to 40 countries
at a cost of 30 million.
The decision to discontinue this
program was made quietly last
o
the
its and
Co-operation Administration de-
cided that Christmss giving was
too expensive and that it cut down
on higher priority, year-round for-
eign aid programs.
There was official announce-
ment of this action. But the word
got around. And private U.S. for-
eign relief agencies that had
co-operated on distribution of the
Christmas parcels last year started
a quiet campaign.
Through their Advisory Com-
mittee on Voluntary Foreign Aid,
they asked Department of Agricul-
ture to enlarge its program.
Under authority granted by
Congress, surplus butter, dry milk,
cheese snd cottonseed oil supplies
are now given to welfare agencies
in this country and abroad.
The trouble was, according to
relief workers, thst these supplies
alone didn't fill the need. What
people wanted more was basic
flour, corn meal, rice and dried
beans.
But there was a catch in the
law. Government agencies were
authorised to "reprocess" these
foods for charitable use. But the
law didn't specify that bulk sur-
pluses could be "processed."
The distinction was that 250-
pound drums of dry milk powder
International meaning ground into flourfor the
various relief agencies.
It is still going to take an act
of Congress to straighten out this
matter before the new Benson pro-
gram eaa be made fully effective.
In the meantime, the first red-
tape roadblocks have been re-
moved. Dry beans and rice
surpluses, to 100-pound hags, can
be distributed to relief agencies at
September while President Eisen- could be "reprocessed" into small
hower was to Denver. Officials of cans for family use. But wheat and
the State sad Agriculture Depart-1 corn couldn't be "processed"
home and abroad.
And wheat and eorn, un-
processed, can be shipped to bulk
to countries like India, where the
grain is cracked by hand and
boiled for food.
The 17 private American relief
iiencles who hsve taken over the
Job ef distributing U.S. surpluses
WASIONGTON-r-The public has
the general idea that hammer and
tongs let fly at eoagreastonal hear
togs. Senators are supposed to look
sternly at witnesses, badger them
into testifying, threaten them with
contempt if they flinch.
This was true at many of the
McCarthy hearings, bat ether
congressional probes are frequent-
ly featured by human interludes.
Ne moment to the life of Harlew
Curtice, ttM.leO-paid head of Gen-
eral Motors, probably was more
embarrassing than when Senztor
O'Maboney (D., Wyo.) forced him
to sit and listen to the testimony of
critical General Motors dealers.
However, this did not prevent Cur-
tice and O'Mahoaey from holding
a pleasant aside en pheasants.
It began when Curtice asked
Sen. Francis Case, South Dakota
Republican:
"1 should like to ask you about
your crop of pheasants. I used to
enjoy hunting to your state. What
has caused the pheassnt erop to
reaeh such a low level?"
0'Mahonoy-"They have mi-
grated to Wyoming."
Curtice"These were still thou-
sands of millions of them to the old
days. You mean they have some
there in Wyoming!"
Case"I have not even heard of
an open season. Do you have an
open season to Wyoming?"
O'Mshoney "We protect i
wild life."
Case"Our pheasant hunting
this past fall was by fsr the best
to several years."
Curtice"From a very low lev-
el."
Case"You could get your bag
limit this year to an hour and a
half."
Curtice"If you were a good
shotI do not claim to be one
you could get the bag limit, which
was higher then, to much shorter
time."
Case"We had some very se-
vere winters-hunting got low."
Curtice"Could you net control
the winter? Can you not speak to
the Senator here? Maybe you can
get him to help control the winters
up there."
O'Mshoney"Well, my first Job,
I think, is to control the automo-
bile manufacturers and the deal-
ers so thst they can sit down to a
very friendly atmosphere such
as has been exemplified this morn-
tog."
\ BOOTLEGGED AUTOS
Digging deeper than pheassnts,
Senator O'Mshoney bss dug up
some secret General Motors min
utes that give a fascinating insight
into the world's biggest corpora
tion.
The minutes tell whst hsppened
to a top Buick-Pontiac-Cbevrolet
dealer who was cut off for talkinK
^fiaffAsiaffM4t
ice Committee, American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee,
American National Red Cross,
Assemblies of God for Foreign
Service, Catholic Relief Services,
CARE (Co-operative for American
Remittances to Everywhere),
ChurWI World Services. Foster
Parents' Plan for War Children,
Internattoaal Resne Committee.
Iran Foundation, Lutheran World
Relief, Mennonites Central Com-
mittee, Unitarian Service Com-
mittee, United Lithuanian Relief
Foundation, United Nations Chil-
dren's Fund and the Tolstoy
Foundation.
Stealing Is Stealing
'. By BOB RUARK
0

DJAKARTA, Indonesia AH I'll freely offer 75if you've brought
THE AX FALLS
Exactly 20 days later, Anderson
received simultaneous letters front
the Buick, Pontiac. and Chev-
rolet divisions, notifying him that
his franchise would be cut off. In
other words, he would be put out
of business after 21 years of out-
standing service to General Mo-
tors.
Anderson pleaded with the GM
representatives. He even appealed
to Postmaster General Arthur
Summerfield, acknowledged spoks-
msn for General Motors inside
the Eisenhower Administration. It
later turned out that Summerfield
did nothing for him, except report
to Curtice.
Finally, the Lake Orion dealer
was granted an audience to Sep-
tember with Curtice himself.
The GM boss waved a copy of the
National Automobile Dealers As-
sociation containing an account of'
Anderson's speech. Angrily, he
read excerpts from the speech.
When he came to the reference to
"factory bootleggers," ^Curttee
snorted: "Why, ycVre a Red. Dd
you want me to continue, reading?
"Not for my benefit,*' snapped
Anderson. r
At this point, Andersen's sals
manager spoke up to defend Mm.
Referring to Anderson,he told Cur-
tice: "If you drain out all his
blood.you'U find that it's JK
cent GM snd one per cent Mood.
Unimpressed, the GM.pro re-
marked that Anderson|s Oxford
speech had been written by
NADA's director, retired Rear
Admiral Fred Bell.
"Bell did not write the talk,"
retorted Anderson.
"Well, you authorizod'their print-
in it, didn't you?" shouted Cur-
tice, waving his copy of the NADA
""I didn't know anything about it
appearing in the magazine,' de-
nied Andersen.
"Are you going to sue toon?" do-
msnded Curttoe.
"No, I'm not going to sue them;
ner am I going to sue anyone. AR
I want to do is sell sutomobiles
snd make a profit," replied the
disfranchised dealer.
to do with.

*Tfivp
see of Indonesia during our brief
f rating spell here Is the decks,
have been to Indonesia, and I
have e definite dislike for being
artested every hour on the hour.
Sten guns make me nervous. Es-
peetolly when everybody's got one
except me.
It is possible to go ashore for
a few hours, to see the pretty
ladies without clothes on the upper
half, and to get run over by the
American automobiles. But Indo-
nesia is still having its growing
Sisins as a democracy, and a white
ace might Just as well be Dutch
as North Carolinian. No, thank
you very much, as the British
say.
There Is the thing of money, as
well as passports. For instance,
although nearly every country in
the world allows it* transient visit-
ors to take a short look-seeand
drop a few bucks for gewgaws
and gimcrscksthe Indonesians
seemingly are averse to company.
You need a visa, and you need
medical certificates, and, on the
money, you have to accept what-
ever Indonesian currency you need
in form of voucher. If you don't
spend it all, you cant get your
original stake back. And there ato t
that many bad batiks that I want
to buy.
The official rate of exchange, as
quoted by the ship'' purser, is
55 rupiahs to the pound sterling
But you only get 20 out he dock,
when you present your nest little
voucher. But your taxi driver will
a buck or a pound or so ashore
illegally.
This broad disparityincurreney
is one of the reasons you don't go
sshore. I catch cold easily, espe-
cislly to drafts, snd have a de-
cided dislike about being stripped
naked by strangers wearing ma-
chine guns.
I kid you not. On a former trip,
several Australians I know were
stripped. On this one, my friend,
the mild Australian, was stepped
and searched three times by gun-
toters, and the last one suggested
that it might be a good idea if the
Aussie sold him his camera
making the point with a Sten gun.
The Aussie, name of Peter, Is
mild, and he did turneth away
wrath pretty good, and got home
with his earners and his body,
intact.
The blackmail among the men
who wear Chicago typewriters is
highly organized. There wss one
poor soul selling wooden snakes,
from dock to deck, payment is
cigarettes. He acquired two packs
of lung-candy for his snake, and
immediately tucked the smokes, un
der his armpits. Along came a
character with a noise-maker,
nudged the snake vendor, and
shucked the cigarettes out from
under his armpits without bother-
ing to raise the gun. He didn't
evea ask the man if he was loaded,
but assumed that the Sten gun
spoke for itself.
I am not knocking new demoe
racy, but Indonesia is still a coun
try where the chief of the kam
pong tells the illiterates y/hat tick-
et to punch, if they can remember
the initials of the party. They vote
by picture, by sing. It is either
hammer-and-sickle, or star-end
crescent, or one of the other three
parties. Right now the hsmmer-
and-siekle is not doing so well,
which makes the voting signs for
the Commies more prominent to
Djakarta.
In times past I have seen the
same symptoms ef bye-bye to the
white colonist to Africa and India,
and I suppose' It Is nstural to
throw everybody out everybody
who is s symbol of horrid col-
onization, everybody who built the.
buildings and made the streets
and stabilized the economy. But
I have alwaya noticed that the
wholesale negation of the colonist
is accompanied by Sten guns,
rigged elections, and a general
poney of black-market currency
and beggar-your-astghbor, as wit-
ness the hijack Job on the two
packs of butts and the semi-stick-
up on the camera.
Maybe somebody to the Indo-
nesian foreign service might take
note of the fact that every ship
which docks in Djakarta departs
with a few hundred new enemies
to a beautiful land, and a basic-
ally nice people. It's not really
necessary unless you are to the
permanent Tommy-gun business
for ao real reason, and stealing is
still stealing, even when computed
to rupiahs.
tice
Lee Anderson had been a GM
dealer to Lake Orion, Mich., for
21 years*o hot a salesman that
to lMl he won first place over
15,000 other dealers in thy netipn.
But he made one mistake. He spoke
bis mind last June to the Oxford,
Mich., Rofy Chrt- ... u ^
"The old song, I can get K for
you wholesale. Is heard throughout
the land and it is driving any
legitimate automobile dealers to
red ink and distraction." Ander-
son complained to the Rotarians.
This situation is particularly acute
in the trading area ef automobile
manufscturing towns, where about
1.000 automobile dealers toce ex-
tinction under the impossible han-
dicap of direct faetory competition
T new ear discounts of 1500 to
*Then Anderson bluntly suggested
to the Rotary members that'You
atop and think before you buy a
car from a friendly factory boot-
''W course," be added. "You can-
not be blamed if you can get
a brand new car at beJow-dealer
cost. Actually my barber to Lake
Orion haa had 25 offers of new
1055 models at prices below my
invoice."
- - ------------------------------------
P. A. CLASSIFIEDS
ly prncttoe time la up! Will you let me down now?'.'
merfield going
went to him for help."
NO MORE SPEECHES
Anderson explsined thst he had
received a phone call from Sum-
merfield, requesting a copy of a
book Anderson had written.
GM's Executive Vice President,
Willis m Hufstader, sitting along-
aide Curtice, then put a question
to Anderson bluntly:
"Whst assurance does Genersi
Motors hsve thst no more speeches
wUl be made? How ean we be sure
thst wht yeu bave^said doeant
come from deep wTthin?
"I promise from the hesrt that
I will make you no more trouble
Anderson pledged.
Curtice abruptly arose *;
nounced: "Let's end on that note.
Three days later, Anders<, was
notified that his appeal had failed,
that ho was no longer a General
Motors dealer-for exercismg his
died with McCarthyites. One
Vice President, Harry Anderson,
has openly embraced Senator Mc-
Carthy's politics. Another Vic*
President, Stove Dubrule, has play-
ed footsie with McCarthy's follow-
ers. Truth is that dealer Anderson
has never belonged to an organi-
zstion any more Red than Gen-
eral Motors Itself.
WOMEN GIT BREAK
HARTFORD. Conn. (UP> -
Women policy-holders sre permit-
ted to clip three years off their
sge by the Phoenix Mutual Life
Insurance Co., It's making m<
allowance to establishing rates be*
cause women have greater life ex-
pectancy than men. .
r i i' 'i
Young Actor
Answer to. rVeViOUtt Puzzle
ESSH
IdiSililL
ACROSS
a mine
3 Solitary
4 Priority
(prefix)
3 Epic
I r em lain.
appellation
7 Wickeder
SCoasume
Solar disk
10 Greek letter
11 Harvest
20 Fish eggs
Robertson
f He performs
on the-----
waves
1J Idolize
13 Uncle Tern's
friend .
14 Pedal digit
15 Ocean vessel
10 Louse egg
17 Japanese
outcast
T 1MIJHI
li.ltaV ll.\ lltil I
SSBSOC-H'JfcJ I ll"!'..V laBBBBMBBI
MUII
111! Ill i Klllk.
V\Z. lull j I -I*
BBBaaaaa urJUU Ul I" i ,
auu\ ili i-- i
Uuiciui'i:]. ssli.-ir*
lg Summer (Fr.) 21 Burlesques
1* Verbal 22 Enigmas
21 Fillip
,22 River (Sp.)
23 Age
SO Contri vanee
20 Allotment
32 Eager
22 Preposition
34 Humus
35 He designed
the U.S. flag
38 Pared
32 Dairy product
41 High note in
Guide's scale
42 Legal point
42 Greek wsr god
4 Implement
4 by Pasala
Fltssaaurico
1 Small child
Obscured
53 British coins
55 Individual
MHsfll
57 German city
MMetal fastener
M Writing
0 He is a young |
but------actor
IuTainipi iQTHTHTI minina
iiiviirai ig||*ioii i4\\*f
21 Cry of 40Ass.stsnt
bacchanals 42 Upon . f
27 Base 44 Hindu queen
20 Arrow poison 45 British
20 Elevator sutessaan
inventor 47 Presage
21 Protuberance a Handle
27Meesureef 40 Frosted
24 Egyptian sun cloth 50 Abjure
god 31 In one's gift S3 Dibble
25 Moist M Blood money 54 Compass point


' '
TTF.SDAT. nr.rEMBFR 17. MM
TrT* PANAMA AMERICAN AN DfDCPKNDKNT DAILY NKWSPAPai
PAGI
7%e Mafote fht&tt
Y MRS. MURIEL LAWRENCE
Hn-M. 1. writes, "Since the
birth of our third child aix years
ago, ray husband and I h a v e
coniidered separation s e y e r a 1
tines. Each time, we decided a-
jainst it for the children's sake.
But our marriage is giving nobo-
dy much happiness. My husband
blames me for everything that
Sims wrong with the children. If
ley are fresh, disobey, fail in
achool-or are ever late getting
homeit's sure to be my fault..."
Te separate from a marriage
partner, we don't have to put
physical. spsce between us. In-
stead, we can just put. irresponsi-
bility between us. Like Mr. R..
we can throw all the responsibili-
ty for children's training on our
partnerand "divorce" ourselves
from him without sny convention-
al bother with lawyers, judges
and legal decrees. And by hiding
this reality from ourselves, main-
tain the noble fiction that we're
holding our marrige together
"for the children's sake."
What dishonesty! It doesn't
work. Like murder, our resent-
ment will out; end forced to main-
tain the physical closeness of
marriage, it simply devises other
kinds of division.
Such bidden splits between par-
ents often sre more destructive
than the open kind. Writes psy-
chiatrist Louise Despert in her
book Children of Divorce, "'.'lu-
dren suffer more where divorce
is emotional, but not openly ex-
pressed. The child of emotional
divorce cannot ask to have hit
confusions clarified and his fears
explained away. He does not know
| what he fears snd has no words
for what he does not understand
The unidentified situation between
his parents is far more threaten-
ing to a child than a realists st-
ustion, however painful, which is
squarely faced together with his
parents."
I hope thst this quotation an-
swers the R.'s delusion that chil-
dren's happineaa requires resent-
ing parents to live together.
If they give it up, their mar-
riage could improve. For they
might be able to locate their real
reasons for staying together. They
might discover, as many married
people have before them, that
what holds them together is
stronger than what shoves them
apart.
They might discover that each
has dieaded loneliness without the
other; that each has felt the same
desolation at the prospect of divi-
sion.
They mght find that back of
all those decisions to remain to-
gether has not been noble and
self-sacrificial devotion to their
children at allbut their own de-
sire for ultimate understanding
and content together.
Wouldn't that be nice to find
out?
But these two people can't ex-
pect to realize how their own
needs of each other have held
them together if they keep de-
claring that their children hold
them together. If false pride and
dishonesty force them to go on
disclaiming their own investments
in this msniage, they will have
to continue to resent it aa a bur-
den instead of appreciting what
it offers them.
Cily Block Ripped
By $1,000,00 Fire
LOWELL. Masa.. Del. J7 (UP)-
Flames, led by exploding csns of
___ 0 i___ ipsint, roared through a city block
!in downtown Lowell today, caus-
WASHINGTON, Dec. 27 (UP) Ivoli. Italy, found six pieces of|jng damage estimated at more
The National Geographic .society I Stone Ase ca ved to be than si.aoo.ooo.
South Polar Expedition Listed
As Most Far-Reaching Of 1955
society I Stone Age csrving believed to be than $1,800,000.
today liated a massive Internslion- among the oldest art objects ever
al aasault on the South Polar found In Roman lands,
region ss the most drmatic and: K gravel pit in fheboygan, Mich.
fa -reaching exploration of 1945. produced reindeer fossils thought
It said the exploration of the to have belonged to animals inhab-
ago.
"earth's coldest snd emptiest
'.land" is expected to yield many
rrysteries in such fields as weath-
er, minerals, cosmic rsys, glacial
and geographical ala. The lnten- Tools and other implements be-
sive study will last more thanilieved to have been used by four
three years. hitherto unknown civilizations
The society cited as another were found on the Firth River
major-scientific sdvance this year banks in the Yukon territory.
iting the- northern pert of Michi-
gan's lower peninsula 11,000 yeara
Two patrolmen discovered t h e
blase raging inside the four-story
Medical Arts Building and ave
the first alarm. Firefighters from
11 communities joined forces in
JfACOfT ON MIPSJl^
y OSWALD JACORY
Written for NRA Service
battling the flamea for about six
hours.
A tZ-yesr-old Briton has used s
season ticket out of London on
British Railways for 74 yesrs.
peek after K-S fell to an Italian
team in ISM, was climbed in late
Map by a British team under Dr.
Charlen Evans.
NIGHTY CIRL-Probably the
I best nightgowned gal in TV ia
VVsneesa Brown, who's starring
Ktbe "My Favorite Husband"
ow. Her part calls for either
[opening or closing the show
Svith a bedroom scene, so CBS
la spending *s much money on
per nighties and negligees aa on
per daytime clothes.
Noval Plane Crash
In Azores Kills 2
ANGRA DO HEROSMO, Azo
res, Dec. 17 (UP) A U. 8. Ns-
vy plane crashed and exploded
Sunday night on Terceiro. Island
in the tores, killing two of the
four persons aboard
Pirtugueae officials said here to-
day two men aboard the plane
were pulled from the wreckage
before the explosion.
They were taken to a U. S. Air
Force hospitsl st the joint Portu-
guese Aimerican air base near
here.
Authorities asid the plane was
bound from Bermuds to North
Africa on a routine flight, as part
of a' squadron transferring from
Permuds to Port Lysutey, French
Morocco.
New Soviet Envoy
Approved By Egipt
NEW SOVIET INSIDE
CAIRO, Dec. K.(UP) The E-
yptian government announced to-
an it has approved Russia's ap-
pointment of a new ambassador to
succeed Dsnlel Solod, who put
through the desl for Communist
arms to Egypt.
Officials, ssidt he new ambasss-
dor is Kiaaeleae Dimitrievitch,
presently chief of the protocol de-
psrtment the Soviet Foreign Min-
istry. ,
It was reported Solod waa in
line for a promotion
THE BLAZING TALENTS OF TWO GREAT

STARS IN

"TO CATCH A THIEr
Release at the "CENTRAL" next Sunday 1st
AHred Hitchcock, the grant master of the suspense tale,
has a reputation for discovering new atara, hut he alae
makes spectacular use of the tried-and-true. His newest
and greatest thriller for Paramount, "TO CATCH A THIEF,"
has as its superb principals, Cary Grant and Grace Kelly,
both of whom have now made three memorable films for
him.
Grant starred In the outstanding hits, "Suspicion" and
"Notorious," and Miss Kelly in "Dial M for Murder" and
"Rear Window." Each of these was a movie milestone, but
Alfred Hitchcock's favorite stars and the Vista Vision and
Technicolor esmeras have made "To Catch A Thief" an
entertainment adventure to top them all. Advt.
Cause of the fire was uncerlsln
but officials sttributed to con-
teniera of paint In the Shenn-
Williams Co. store, one of many
s yrir umu m uiv " i.i.ii bjsiness estsbliihments in the
the msking of s msp resching 00! In another Csnsdisn 'n,"r.lbsock.
million light "yesrs into space.government geologists used two
Now seven pesrs in the msking,,helicopters'in collecting ,00 *
the msp will be completed next,pounds of specimens,
yesr and will cover three quarters,
of the hesvens. John Iibf, snd Amencsn, set off
The map is composed of hun- with porters to find Noah's Ark
dreds of photogrsphs made by the which, by Biblical accoung, land-
48-inch Schmidt telescope camera ed oo Mount Ararat in present-
st the Pajomsr observstory in day Turkey.
California. The society ssid It re-| Ksnchenjungs, loftiest unsealed
veals millions of'new stars, galax-
ies and systems of gslaxies.
The society ssid the Antasctic
exploration during the 1957-58 In-
ternational Geophysical Year will
beckon scores of scientists from
the United States, Australia, New
Zealand, Britain. Russia, C h i 1 e
Argentina, Norway, France,
Spain, Belgium, Japan, South A
frica and other countries.
The Americsn team is hesled
by Resr Adm. Richard E. Byrd,
now en route to the Antsrctic.
.Preliminsry scientific crews from
Argentina and Britian already re
settled In the vast wasteland
The U. S. contingent, entitled
"Operation Deepfree^e, will es-
tsblish st lesst four bases ont he
continent,-one at the South Pole.
Antarctica covers million squsre
miles, about half of whiih never |
has been seen by man.
To give some idea of the alie
of the project, the societp said the;
United Ststes will furnish 30 tons,
of equipment and supplies for each
member of the expedition. During
World War II seven tons of equip-
ment and aupplies were needed
for each American soldier a-
b'oad.
The society listed as other me-
jor explorstory achievements in
JM5: ,
Excavators in a cave near Ti-
Prepare for HOLIDAY ft CARNIVAL FUN
LEARN A PICK Your Favorita Dances.
BALLROOM DANCE PARADE.
LATIN DANCES
CHA-CHA-CHA MAMBO MERNGUK V**ACYlA
RUMBA PASODOBLE SAMBA TANGO...
AMERICAN DANCES
ROCK'N ROLL SLUKFOOT JITTERBUG- WALTZ
FOXTROT ONR8TEP CHARLESTON -/JABODY
POLKA LA VARBOUVIANNA VIENNESE WALTZ...

NATIVE DANCES
TAMBORITO CUMBIA PUNTO PASJLLO.'-
PARTY DANCES
CHA-CHA-CHO-CHO CABOOSE RASPA-BUNNY
HOP HOKBY POKEY PAUL JONES...



CLASSES FOR
PRE-TEENS TKBNAGER8 COUPLES CLASS PRIVATE
LESSONS, BY APPOINTMENT ONLY.
CALL: BALBOA -4SSS or PANAMA MSSS
HARNETT ft DUNN



I
i

FELIX
Invites you to come to his Branch
Store from 4 to 6 p.m. and hear
famous Lucho Muoz through
courtesy of Cia. Alfaro, playing
your favorite Music on his Ham-
mond Spinet Organ.
NOITB (D)
AAKQ1'
4
? SI
K1SSS
EAST
si
W AQJ7J
? KJU
A 10SS
K 10 2
AQ10S
? J74
SOUTH
*JJ
Ml
? SO
? AQ8I
North-South vui
a* Sew! West
Pass 1 NT Pass
Doubt* Pass Pass
Pass
Opening lead- Q
>*
-
Bidding throughout the country
nas improved tremendously since
moat experienced playera have
adopted a point count to guide
, I"'. H?w'ver. i till impor-
tant toi look at your distribution
m addition to counting your points.
Ita something like wstching your
weight you need to know how
much you ve got. but you siso con-
sider where you've got it.
In today's hand, North saw that
he had only 12 points in high cards.
He opened the bidding, properly
enough, but got discouraged when
hi partner m s d e the weak
r.e,P0Bie one no-trump. North
decided to psss since game was
slmost surely out of the question.
The pass wss s poor idea even
tnough North s count wss not
eDOU.*h for I me. North had all
of his high cards and most of his
distribution in the black auits. Both
red suits were wide open. The hand
would almost surely play a few
tricks better at at suit then st
no-trump. Hence North should have
bid instead o fpsssing, despite his
low point count.
North got a second chsnee to
correct the contract when East
doubled. By this time, however,
North had made up his mind. He
stood by the poor contract and i
suffered s minor disaster.
West opened the queen of hearts,,
snd the defenders proceeded to
tske the first nine tricks in besrts
snd diamonds. South wss down
three, for s loss of 800 points.
If North had bid two spades,
he would have played the hand;
there, making this contract with!
an overtrick. Even if North had,
bid two clubs, he probably would
have become declarer at two or!
three spades or two or three clubs.
Nine tricks were there for the tak-
-, | part score and going down at one I
no-trump would have bee* pretty
cloae to 1000 points.
APPROPRIATE
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (UP)
Blodgett Memorial Hospitals
new waiting room for expectant
fathera has been nsmed "Heir-
port."
0
-----------------------------------------
This Week's Winners:
.
Otilda de Orillac
Ricardo Borbon
Fred Hirschman

Noemi McFarlen
Lemuel Risinger
Judith Batista
e Kurt Meyer t
* Paulina Downs /"
' e Sara da Pa reda* !
e William Rota J f
Jots Castillo
e Ricturte Guam '
Maximo de Leon Samuel Carmichaol f
Major Shade
Roberto F. Smith
S. Cibbs
Lt. Col. Crowell
Dr. C. Rusovimot
A. B. Rigby
Judith Batista
Alcides Monroe
Rudolf Baker
e Jote de Gracia j'
e Wilfred Lynch fa
' D. de Borissoff 7
e A. Stefanov f
a Jose Gomez a"
e Wilfred Greens '
e Joaqun Beleo \
Sandra Nelson 7
e E. V. Romigh /
And They Won For FREE!
All Slips Ending In ,
7 Win...Check YOURS!
.T
Beautiful Colorful
Rhinestone Seis
For the 31st
$4.50
w
Cuff Links and Tie Clips-------$4.50
_g *** faV.^sa, ~at
Hi
18-47 (137) Central Avt.
BRANCH STORE No. 6 Tivoli Avenue
Aeross from Aneon Post Office
JUSTICE IS BLIND...
loverbloomS
BUTTER
*"*W5i*

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tr all outdtmh
i -
at
[NEW ZBAiASJD
ARMOUR


STUDEBAKER

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First Showing
'Se Oustanding Car
Of The Year
President Classic Sedan
TROPICAL MOTORS,
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Modern Styling!
Powerful!
S. A.
TELS. 2-2086 -2-3172 PANAMA
Even With Eyes Closed
You Are Bound To Win
In Our
FREE WEEKLY RAFFLE!
.

THIS WEEK'S WINNERS ARE
e D. Lavalle
e Eduardo Lowe
Sr. Alvarado
e Aquilina Saavedra
Joee Oiler

e Dorothy Knox
e George W. Biiss
M. Benavent
William E. Hebel
Earl Harrison
Ana de Jimenei
e Aida E. de Larrinaga
Elena de Paris
e Joaquin Borrel
e George S. Hanlen

1NitipPitt? IMhui fkiiiihtn
JO**9 *M*mm DARIC M K T I f T -T 1.1-tlBi
(kalian (HiaJquarttrt. t|* home of Ycrtikal Blinds and rtwat/L^
"OUR FURNITURE GRACES THE LOVELIEST HOMES"

\


-
pagr rocm
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NIWtPAPCT
TTJRSDAT, DBCEMBRR ST, 1MB

THE MARQUEE
BY DICK KLEINER
: lff4M#*tl7>t ++#*+*,i
?Thi chapter of Arthur Godfrey's
own story, serialized in a nation-
al magazine, which dealt with his
flying of Julius aRosa and other
ftiends is "untrue," according to
one of the people involved.
.Saya this ex-Godfreyite: "He's
staking up fairy stories. Perhaps
hat he's written is -what he wish-
es HAD happened only it
sit"
*A FEW PAST FACTS: NBC-TV
i some spectacular plans. One is
' a TV showing of the Broadway
flop, "Ankles Aweigh," with Mar-
tha Raye and the retiring Betty
Mutton taking over the" parts Betty
and Jane Keen played . Eunice
Bay son, who stars on many of
ABC-TV's made-in-Encland stories
A "The Vise," haa been tapped
bj Hollywood . Lucille Ball
will have her baby all over again
and the date is Feb. 4. The
3runs of "I Love Lucy," now
Hod "The Lucy Show." will pre-
sent the sequence of Lucy's baby,
starting Dec. 31 ... A french
actress now making some prelim-
Qary noise in TV circles is Den-
Me Dorin. She's an expert fencer
and once was the girl's champion
bicyclist of France.
On her lait appearance with Ed
Sullivan, Marten Merlewe had a
epecial sweet In the audience. It
was an English newspapermen,
Cecil Stanaway, who was the first
reporter to interview her. This was
beck in '41, when Marion was a
chorine In o London revue, "Sauce
Tortero." In his story, Stonowoy
said thorp was another good-look-
ing gal in the chorus o kid
named Audrey Hepburn.
Let this be a lesson to wives
pays to stay near your hus-
bands.
LIGHTLY AlRED
BAY NOBLE ("Edgar Bergen
Hour," CBS-Radio): There are lots
of fish in the sea, but men in
say family have always married
women. Tradition, you know.
The very lovely TV actress,
one Rowlands, generally com-
mands starring parta on TV dra-
matic shows. But she took a bit
part in an hour-long drama, "Ex-
pendable House," a few weeks
back because the star was her
husband, John Cassavetes, and
She'd therefore have a chance to
be with him constantly for the
Rowlands Dentse Dorin
NBC-TV is receiving gentle com-
Elainta from mothers who .watch
of them write that they'd like the
program better if there was more
Spock, less of the "panel" of moth
era on the show with him.
His friends say, however, he's
resisting efforts to put him on
camera more they say he has
a "bug" on the subject, doesn't
wsnt to hog the spotlight, fears
he'd appear too pompous if he
was alone in the picture too. much.
SIDE GLANCES
By Cobrath
People who've seen Bdgar Bar
gen's upeowibn qud show, "Do
You Trust Your Wife?" soy that
Bergen, Charlie McCarthy and
Mortimer Snord ere all food, l
there'll ho onofher performer
who'll steal the spotlight. Ifs Bd-
gor's roroly-usod third dummy, a
garrulous gel named Effie Klinger.
Embarrassing moment for MC
Jack Bailey of "Queen for a Day,"
which, incidentally, goes network
on Jan. 3. He asked a contestant
what she'd most like to have. And
she said, "Enough money for fare
to New York so 1 can get on 'The
$44,000 Question.' "

"Yes, I bundled myself up a little oxtraI want 'em to
" realize at the office that I've had a bad coidJ"
AND THB FIRATSB
P* GROBGE TUNDE
BUST rr/lUBE .YIN*
ALL ftOBNNfr NOW.THAT]
HONE CALL WILL. JUST
KRECK1.ES and bus
10 days or so
One
rehearsed.
:e wh
a.Broad-
lonEUe was
!*W op-
__-nsen in the
idway whow, "Middle
And you guessed
it Gema got the part.
Some wooho hock, Ed Murrew's
"Peree* to Person" featured
Charlton Heston end Bert Beeh-
rsch, an export on men's clothing.
Heston end Bachrach had never
mo. Last week, Bachrach was eat-
big dinner In o rottowron and roe-
anlzod o voice, directly behind
M, OS Heston's. Me introduced
himself end the two hod e pleasant
toreen to person teak.
_ MARINES LL
Gen Randolph MeCall Pate has
beer/ named 21st commandant
of the U.S. Marine Corps, effec-
tive Jan. 1. He will replace
Gen. Lemuel C. Sboppard. Jr,
who is retiring. General Pate,
57,' has been in military service
for 37 years, and is now assist-
ant commandant of tho- serpa.
He commanded the 1st Marine
Division in Korea during tho
last three months of fighting
there.

ALLEY (I4jr
Agreed
...rwVn think rrs
WflHT HDR Tri* MS
OP A SKXy TBtT
fiETTmr IT IN TH* s\
NECK AH. Tr
B.
NOGR.I.-
D\OU \ WW WED BETTER
EVER HEW? ] ASSEMBLE THE
OPSUCH / W40LECA*5fV
GfiiL?
Love and Affection?
ST BDGAR MARTIN
l RBLA*3tcr,
WsE-P|tfW rJBPLATBS IT6.a*
QjtCKV/, AW fluPB geu** TH6 SUFXC ASAIN.
. ..
' . 'X

u&iybvdy. toada, taAAf*(A.
IBB STORY OP MARTHA WAY Nl
Rohher!
By ftTLSON SCRUGGS
ATTkATIle*BNT i
ABBOSNTrta* /
SNATCHM MDOWB
MAITTHA WfcYNE'S,
PURSB. /
'/ u !
I
; I
i
\y*T YfWK*. a* sew
TJO vBJOAK XT MR*
Hocrwt. waex./Bto.,
MOO WWtt V#WE.
VVOOA^OSmtOBO^C
r*KYv\\\b.
VtjBT
MOV>
RWPtt*>
V.
WDtVt
CAPTAIN RAtf
Friank'e Arrives
LRSLIE TVRNRk,
PKISCTJJLA'S POP
C#DT^rSAtlOB JrlfCi
Bj AL TdRMECB
SJBftJB^fta
\OU SHOULD NEVtfT
TALK TILL YOU KNOW
WHAT YOU WANT
BUT HOW WILL
. I KroOW WHAT
? TO SAY
TILL I HEAR
WHAT I'M -
TALKING
ABOUT
?
BUGS RUNNY
BgDoal
UkaTbatt
#5
aa/^O*
...I WOULDN'T want
A*rTaf*rrrtt)vOTix)PW.l can
I KNOW fOiCt & MAM/ATTEND TO THAT
* PRETTY BlOCl
TW* lA Sw3wS^S4*ML mPOtX
AT CERRAlvAsArVl SU.LMC
TfN mwrtv.
fwMAVSTOal
IT0T0JJMO
THEHACobVPA
>. 40TA
USM41KX.
Vlt PUNT
Safe?
BY JAT BEAYIUN
yKAH, a Mcnomen pkxwup
\A WOMAN S4-1HB PB5CRT
Hl, IMMCV*/ AMV- ^ THkf> AM3RNOJ&. THE SSL
TMSMB MEW ON FLrJTAHAP "tAkRIsI HSR CA ANO
iNSATV HJMWUlOmKj HRCP HM
X
AUTHOtlT POOS* THB 71
CA OOAMtBAWOM "S
TMRV'VR PUT UP BLOCK' "
ACS5 ON SVRBV RO OUT Of THB SOTE-. I THtsllC
ystma s***. punt.
" |!'IH
MAJOOI ojnOPt il. I Of B>At
an ft win
VeRITABLE SRAg-fJAwON*
EVER KNOWS uAJAT'LL POP
OUT/^HAk-KAPF/ SUPPOSE
WkXLlM OP WHAT THOUGHTS
Oa ABC rVARBORlMfi
IKAT MR. MORRIS5BV
.WAS UMA8LE
TO RAD ?
ac
I'LL 60 tOV OH PETTS-R,
AtATOe.' I'LL SINE you
A r>RT H TMe PLAY IF
you'll pack your
> with ms por a littl
Rids on th>
^choo-choo.1
ARCYJe^
LEAVlrt?


TUE8DAT, DECEMBER ti, 1M>
THE FAMAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
\J5ocial and yJth
erwie
Bq* 5031, -J*
'neon
'er
By Staffers
Box 134, PuKamm


MISS VIRGINIA DARE SELBT
UIAT-ENTREKIN ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
Mr. Juan BeywudJnVlbr of Balboa, Canal Bone, has an-
aaaeneed the ngagen*r* nd approaching marriage of his
dolg^r, TOg^ lSuVlW of Gnarport. hfieippi, to the
Reverend Roderick Lenta Entrekln, aw of Mr. and Mr*. Wil-
liam Tbamea Entrekio ef Meridian, Mississippi.
Mis* Selby graduated from the
Balboa High School with the Class
erf "SI. and received" her Bachelor
of Science is Elementary Educa-
tion degree from the Mississippi
Southern College in 1955. She is
presently employed by the Oulf-
port City School in Mississippi.
The Reverend Entrekin is a
Erfduate of the Meridian High
hool and received his Bache
lor of Alts in Sociology degree
from MHlsap* College in Jackson.
Mississippi in* 1950. He attended
the.School of Theology at Emory
University and received his Bach
lor of -Divinity degree in IMS.
He il <>* serving as the Minister
of the Anttdch Methodist Church
in .Laurel, Mississippi. .
The marriage will be solemmz-
d on Jan. *, at 00 p.m. in n*
Parkway Heights Methodist
Charca); Hatesburg, Mjssissippr
The Riveted* Aubrey B. Smith
will oJBc'-
Mr."Sflby, father of the bride-
elect, plans to lesve the Isthmus
by plane on Friday, to attend the
wedding.
Captain CltHerd Payne
Marks Mth Birthday
WMh Alt "At Hems"
A number ef riosds called at the
BeHa Vista residence of Cant, and
Mrs. Clifford Psyns last week
when the couple were "at home"
on the occasion ef Cspt. Payne's
oth birthday.
. A partaer ia the skipping agen-
cy of Payne A Wardlaw, and also
of Andrews k Company, Cap.
Payne retired from active duty
this fall.
group of friends yesterday morn-
ing at a post-Christmas breakfast.
Birthday Dinner '
Mr. and Mrs. J. Edward Healy,
jr., entertained with a home din-
ner at their Golf Heights resi-
dence on. Christmas Eve,
*ie affair was.a joint dMory-.
snee of Mr. Hesly's birthday and
tke Christmas season.
Mrs. Suiter VIsWop
The Hendrseos
The British Ambassador te Pa-
nama and Mrs. Ian Henderson are
entertaining as their heuse-guest
their cousin, Mrs. Nancy Vernon
Butler of London.
Midshipman Durar
Heme far Christmas
Midshipman Paul Dura*, Jr.,
whTisattondtag the U.S. Naval
Academy at Annapolis. Mr., u
home for the Chnstmas holidays
S M.rMrH5ghu."r-
Scribner in" Bella ViaU was the
SSTof a CtdP.rl
gift exchange on Friday tvcamg
Ambassador Betorns
'S AmksKor of Cjta Bk.
to Panama, Mr. Carlos de la Es
prills, has returned from San Jo-
seafter visit there with rela-
tives. _____ .
Guillarme Andreves
*Vr* STSrs. Guillermo Andre
e QoB IW*U were hosta on
ty at the now home m El Can-
grejo. t. ,'
Small Dinner .
At Spanish imbessy
ThTApibssMdor of Spain end
asBsffv-SiH
for a group of tmate friends.
N# 42876
Firat Prixo
PAGE
*
Takes pleasure in announcing the winners
of his CHRISTMAS RAFFLE
$1,500.00 in Merchandise
MARTA YELASCO
El Cangrejo
J
Miss Herbert Visrtinp
Her Parents Hare
Miss' Katherine Herbert ia
spending the holidays with her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Her-
bert of Diablo Heights.
Junior at Southwestern IxHiisia-
na Institute, she wss recently ini
tistod into Sigma Delta, Pi, a na-
tional honorary Spanish fraternity.
Mrs. Francisca Aria
InsortaiM At Lwnahoen
Mrs. JBaancisco Anas, mother of
Presidon^Ricardo Arias, enter-
tained on Christmas day with a
luncheon for members of the fam-
ily and intimate friends The af-
fair was given at her home, "La
Loma."
The Reher Leats .
Entertain At
Holiday Breakfast
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Laatz
of the Gaviln Area entertained a
I. Mary's falmel
EuihtGrade. at St M?,"";
ion School in Balboa are spoo
Jtog dance at St. Mary. Bail
S3ght to raise fund, for the St.
,Mr? School Building **
Admission Is 50 cents **'
t. may be purchase at to.door.
The dance start* at 7:M p.m.
Sieyers-Auatin
^snTilrs. Robort C. Sievers
of Margarita have announced tne
engagement of their daughter. E-
5* Kathryo, to Mr. Donald D
Austin of Stamford, Texas.
Mr. Austin is employed with the
Canal Zone Police Dppartmemi.
Hiss Sievers Is a student at the
Canal Zone Junio College.
Interpretive Raadle*
Postponed fhliTWeelc
The final session of the Inter
pretive Reading seriis of the
USO-Jewish Welfare Board Armed
Forces Service Center has boon
postponed because ef the holiday
season.
This group was to have met to-

NEW YEAR'S EVE
COMES ONLY
' ONCE A YEAR!...
MAKE A BIG NIGHT
OF IT AT EL PANAMA
Our celebrated New Year's Eve Party
ii the meet exciting way to teind up the Old
and ring in the New!
COmiNU(WS MUSIC POR DANCING TIL DAWN
CLARENCE MARTIN'S ORCHESTRA
WALTER FREDERICK'S RAINBOW ORCHESTRA
FAVORS FUN CALORE IH THE LOVELY MOONLIT PATIO from I r.m.
Spodoi Dinner /pr those desiring if 15. por porson
LIQUOR AVAILABLE BY THE BOTTLE

t
T'j
Bntreaea .- per persea. Ticket* ea sal* at front Bask
Cafi Max, S-ieeO, to reserve year table, (trias tleket numbers.
(Refular dwinor from 7 p.m. In tho Boll Vitta Room
with RAY COX' Orchestra for dancing)
(NO 4:30 CLUB
en
Now Years Evo
LAST CHANCE TO SPENO A WEEKEND at EL PANAMA for only $15
Coil flosorvotioaa uaangai for derails.
Ia Southern Pennsylvania they
grow and can nearly l-S of our
national supply of mushrooms. We
went through that beautiful rolling
country and talked-good eating
with several amiable growers and
canners. Here ia what we learned
about mushroom sauces for broiled
toft.
Mushrosen Steak tabee
One ounce can sliced mush-
rooms, S tablespoons flour,, 3 caps
liquid, made from mushroom liquid
and water, V4 teaspoon salt, pepper
to taste.
Drain mushrooms, saving liquid.
Add mushrooms to steak drippings
in saucepan or sikllet and brown.
nflour, atir until browned. Stir
ushroom liquid, adding water
to make 2 cups liquid. Add season
ings. Simmer, stirring until smooth
Podr over steak to platfer.
$200.00 in MerchBMdite
Mrs. Dorothy Burke
Port Kobbe. C. Z.
$100.00 in Merchandiar
Delmiro de Coparropa
No. St, 5th Street. ~
N'iStfOO
Second Prize
N 05584
Thir Prix
The 81 approximations will be announced later
One-quarter cup butter, 1 small
cloye garlic, minced floe, 2 4-ouace
cans sliced mushrooms, drained.
Melt butter and continue to cook
until borwa. Add garlic and mush-
rooms. Continue to boat until mush-
rooms are hot Serve ever steak.
i
Mvshreeen CWM Savce
One -ounce can Boston mush-
rooms, 2 tablespoons butter, 3
tablespoons' flour, tt teaspoon salt,
'/ teaspoon pepper, l cup milk,
liquid drained from mushrooms, U
cup chili ssuce.
Saute drained mushrooms in
butter and then romavothnmiad
set aside. Blend flour, salt and
pepper into batter. Add, slowly,
milk snd mushroom liquid. Whoa
smooth and boiling, add chili sauce
and aautood mushroom.. Serve hot
on steak or meat loaf.
1
morrow, but. wil bill meat later
gt a time to be announced through
the newspapers.
I Panama Plane
New Veer Celebration
Op New Year's Dav, the regu-
lar Sunday brunch will be served
at the Hotel Bl Panama. Eric the
Great (magician) will again per-
form for the assembled lonehers
Music lor dancing will be furnich
ed by Papito Baker's orchestra.
A gals party will be held on New
Year's Eve in the Patio of Hotel
El Panarna. Two alternatin or
ebestras will supply the rausix for
dancing. These are Clarence Mar
tin's orchestra and Walter Frede
rick's Rainbow orchestra. A spe
cial dinner will be served, for
those who wish to order. New
Year's favors will be passed out
to Sje celok^ljprs. Adnjlsoxv| is
lie regular dinner" will be serv-
ed at the Bella Vista Room on
New Year's Eve. /
Bay Cos and bis orchestra will
play music for dancing.
NOT INOUCH TiACHBRS
VsWMILLION, 8. D. (Ur) -
Dr. M. W. DetaeH, dean of the
school of education at the Univer
sity of South Dakota, said the
placement bureau seceived notices
of l.aga position* for secondary
school teachers and SR for ele-
mentary teachers between Sept. 1,
ISM and Sept. 1, ls5S.,The univer-
sity was able to supply only 126
candidates.
MEETINGS
dal aeS OttmriM," * *MtnO
ImMem Club Officers
Meet On Thursday
A meeting of all incoming offi-
cers of the Balboa Emblem Club
will be held at the home of Mrs
Min Dot, 527C Morrison Street,
Diablo Heights on Thursday, at
pT:fO p.m.
Any members who would^ard
te attend the asootiag are Bah in
vited.
BALBOA SERVICE
CENTER
BEAUTY SHOP
SPECIAL
COLD WAVE
$750
Monday Thrn Thnrsday
For appointment
Balboa 2-225
For U.S. personnel
and their families only.
-^
R
H
O
D
A
\
THE MOST BEAUTIFUL
DRESSES- f
ir NIGHT DRESSES
ir COCKTAIL DRESSES
ir FINE COTTON DRESSES
* EMBROIDERED DRESSES
ir SHOES, by DeLi.e. Julos'
Schoen, Palixzio, ate.
ir LINGERIE, by Van Rtshe,
Silvarte,
if HANDBAGS, by Elite, etc.
ir BRASSIERES,
by Ex^rto Form
ir COSMETICS, by Charles of
the Ritz
it COSTUME JEWELRY,
by Pandora
ir SWEATERS, (Italian)
by In Happiness
if GIRDLES, by Matsrna-Line.
Swisstex
and many other articles all of the finest and
moat known n the United States
WE HAVE A STORE SPECIALLY FOR ZONIANS
IN FRONT OF THE ANCON POST OFFICE
TEL. PANAMA 2-3121
I
I
I
a*
I
1
!
I
I
I
f
f
l
I
I
j
in m\ i|* wi
a meal in itself!
*
*

C-tsss. Carrots, w-
toe. rut, Com. l
S C*lery, Sweet r^fi
^l. Turnips, S^"
Pe^ers, ad Parsler _#j

^*
*> * ww**;
to
Uti/
Just
jht
ire,
m//j
SCUP
.....
Tempting, garden-froah
vegetable* . HT HXAsmr
BBB* ITOCK... with juat the
' right amount of seasoning.
lorveCampbelrs Vegetable
Soup soon ... serve it often.
*c
r SWICTION* ,
^BtcanMwgNfi*^
J^M0^i>iBMf,^
**"< Mm bal tmor ** **
m u t Mt.aw.
CAMPBELLS VEGETABLE SOUP
CondBnW tor Gnat* Value Look for the Red-and-Whito Label
.
P. A. CLASSIFIEDS



rAGE BIZ
fANAMA AMERICAN AN INDBHMMBfrDAILY NaTWBI,
TCEBDAT, DECEMBEK 17, IN
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
inexpensive Want Ads Bring Quick fesnts\f
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
librera preciado
t Strei Na. II
Agencias Internal, do Publicaciones
N* t Latter rum
CASA ZALDO
Cenlaal Ave. U
LOURDES PHARMACY
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
Jto. M *V Urnl
MORRISON
LEWIS SERVICE
See. Thren We. 4
FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS
14 Cenltll Annt
FARMACIA LUX
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANCE
J. fan 4 m Oma At*. Me. 41
F0TC>DOMY
warn Ar eaemana Am !.
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS
M Street Ne. St
FARMACIA EL BATURRO
"8AS-
FARMACIA
Via
IU
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FOR
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PROFESSIONAL
CANAL ZONE POLTCUmC
DENTAL MEDICAL
.DA iGwnutn University) MJ>
tlv.U (4th el Jell) Aye, to. ***
U Aneen Scfcaol riaysrmwa)
TeL X-2ll --
RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
, /IJH WDCE
Phone Panama 1-055!
TRANSPORT!* BAXTtR. S.A,
Peckers Shippers Mervnr.
ene. a-2451 a-15 Um *ldmt * ,
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Rial! & Jumping de*ae djHv
1 5 m. Phone 1-0279
or t noeniatmanr.____
FOR SALE
Household
FOX SAL: Mevtaa wiik.ne
machina, autematla pump; aa
wafar heater, vary economical.
Beth rfemi a I moat new. Panama
3-6212.
FOR SALE
Automobile
FOR SAL!:1952 Mar* Miner
4-a-aar anden, khwk. Calt Dara,
affiea 3-0994. mMM 1-49.
FOR SAL!:1 living
liatiai of I cauca, 2 cKaira, I
(aal.toel, 1 caffaa labia, I set af
nat tablet. 2 lampi, I flaor
lamp, I telephone Mana". I roam
dividar. Call 17-6111, 109-A,
Fart Clayton.
FOR SALE
Real Estate
FOR SAL!:Tb. Mm f amity's
baautiful boma at Carra Campa-
na. Ready lor occupancy. Fully
furnished: alcctric plant, Ecoao-
*ai refriearator. tova and v/atar
haatar. laauire: Pbona 3-0361
r 3-04J7.
FOR SALE: 1952 Fard V-l
black tardar, rada, haatar. 19,-
500 milaa, perfect
Panama 3-6212.
FOR SAL!:1955 HMesen Cal-
itarnian hardtop, twe-tee. Sala
owing ta Inrapaan trip. Pnoao
2-0913. 3-2547 after 1:30 n.m.
LESSONS
Give yeair Pra-taan ar t He in at a
Ballreem Dance Cewrse for Xmai.
16- >/i hear laaaam V a FRE
Dane. Bnek ONLY $10.00. Raa-
tration will ba bald Jan. 7tk
at 10:00 a.m. Balbea "Y." Call
albaa 2-4239 er Panama 3-
1660. HARNITT O DUNN.
Egypt. Saudi Arabia, Syria Put
Armed Forces Under 1 Commander
BURIED Funeral servleee
are held recently In I
far Panama
ill Grler IU
Ape. If, In eo
two B-47 jet
Ml Air force
ITa. The foinm'BaJbsM High
School gradante Is survived by
bfc widow and three children,
fab brother Robert, who lives
ta Diablo and a sister In Cali-
" forn'a.
CAIRO, Dec. 27 (UP) Egypt,
Saudi Arabi and Siria, chief A-
rab opponents of the Baghdad de-
fense alliance, put theu\ armed
forces under one commander yes-
terday.
The three Arab league powres
suffered a rebuff, however, in their
efforts (o line Jordan up with them
ynd keep Jordan's 20,000-man Arab
legion out of the Baghdad Pact.
Semi-official sources said Jordan
will not answer their offers of fi-
r ancial aid replacing British help
until after aext spring's elections.
B.t the caretaker Jordan govern-
ment agreed not to join the Bagh-
dad Pact in the meantime.
The government of Saudi Arabia
announced in Cairo that Egyptian
Maj. Gen. Abdel Hakim Amer be-
comes head of joint Egyptian-Sau
Arabian armed forces under a new
mutual defense pact. Amer, who
doubles as Egypt s minister of war,
already serves as commander-in
yptun-Sptjanarped
Was A Bundle
Back Then
$3
-Way
*ADISQN, Wis. (UP) Ever
woader when you're in a grocery
how much $3 bought back in the
Gay Nineties?
Don Jones, city building inspec-
tor, found out the other'day wl he discovered a slip'of paper blow-
ing" around outside the city hall.
The paper, which probably blew
out of some city office, was signed
by Charles Hinrichs, superintend-
ent-of poor, and was dated March
80, IBM. .
It authorized a person to buy $3
worth of groceries a ndcharge it to
the Dane County Poor Fund.
Penciled on the back of the blank
was this list of items bought with
the $3:
Fifty-pound sack of flour, $1.40;
main 'oppon
.ghd.tj'Pact which
links Iraiu Iraq, Turkey, Pakistan
and Britain into a "northern tier"
;'lince along Russia's southern
flank.
To keep Jordan from joining the
Baghdad Pact, the three nations
formally announced today they are
ready to provide Jordan wit h fi-
nancial aid that would replace the
grants now received from Britain.
The Syrian radio said King Hus-
sein of Jordan has agreed to a
meeting1 of the heads of five Arab
slates to discuss methods of "ex-
tricating Jordan from the elutb.es
of foreign imperialism."
A radio Damascus broadcast,
monitored in London, said solution
of tie present Jordanian crisis
would be the "first step to the solu-
tion of the Palestine problem."
It 8a id Hussein, whose govern-
ment is partially supported by
British money, would meet with
the chiefs of Egypt. Syria, Leba-
non and Saudi Arabia.
Britain has been negotiating, to
bring Jordan into the Baghdad Pa-
et in return for an increase in the
$22,400,000 she now contributes to
the support of the desert nation.
sugar, 50 cents; coffee. 25 cents': The British-Jordan talks set off
ViBound tea, 18 cents; bacon, 38 "Vf"1 V0{* m Jord*n 1,st ***
' .a nihlnh rlaimorl rnnxa Than An lma*
cents; soap, 10 cents- -1 pound
crackers, 8 cents; candy, S cents;
tobacco, 8 cents.
LEGAL NOTICE
UNITED STATES OT AattBICA
Canal Zone
Untie Slat. District Court Par Tha
Diatrict ( Tka Canal Zone
Balboa Dfvtalon
ta tha Blatter of tka Adoption ot John
Thoma Marshall, and Barbara Sean
Marshal), minora under the as of 14
yean. No. 4JH Civil. Citation. Petition
for Adaption.
Ta: John A Marshall
You are hereby required to appear be
fore the United State* Diatrict Court
for the District of tb Canal Zona. Di-
vistan of Balboa, at the Courtroom there-
of, in Anron. Canal Zone on the 17th
day of February ISSS. at t o clock hi
the forenoon of that day. then and
there ta show cause. If any you have,
why O. O Benson should not procaod
with the hearing of his petition for tha
adobtlen of tha above named minora.
Wltneas the Honorable Guthrle P.
Crow Judge. I United State Diatrict
Court for the Diatrict of the Canal Zona,
this 14th day of December 1*SS.
C. T atcCeaariek, Jr.
Clerk of Court
Seal)
By Late r. Mantean
Deputy Clerk.
Ta: John A Marshall
The foregoing eltaUon la severed upnn i
yeu by publication pursuant to the or-
der of the Honorable Guthrle T Crowe. :
Judge, United State District Court fo-
the Diatrict of the Canal Zone, dated
the 14th day of December ltSS. and en-T
tared and filed in thla action m the of.
flee of the Clerk of the United State
District Court. Division of albo, ef the
teth day o' December ISM.
C. T MrCermlrk, Jr.
Clerk of Court
B.t Late X. _
Deputy Clark.
which claimed more than 40 lives.
The Egypt-Syria-Saudi Arabia of-
fer to match the current British
aid was first reported last week
Informed sources todsy said the
three countries are planning a
fourpower "summit" conference
with Jordan to try to reach three
main goals. They are:\
1. To supplant the- grant Jordan
now receives from Britain with
funds from Egypt, Syria and Saudi
Arabia.
2. To discuss means of prevent
ing Jordan and other Mideast na-
tions from entering the Baghdad
Pact.
3. To arrange closer alliance of
Arab states.
Syria wants to include Lebanon
in the talks, sources said. Lebanon
now is neutral on the Bagh dad
Pact question.
Tension Is Kept High
By Algerian Fighting
ALGIEBS, Algeria, Dec. 27 -
(UPJ Tue new clashes In
France's "little war*' with nation-
alist rebels kept tension high to-
day in Algeria.
Accoccfagjto official reports, a
i letdert offlaw' *** o|abeUTJomped a French
~Army reconnaissance group in the
Jemmapes region during the past
24 hours and one rebel aeid in the
short sharp fight. One French sol-
di .* was seriously wounded.
Bebis tossed a home-made gre-
nade into the Cafe alarquet at
Corneille killing a Frenchman,
Gerard Clavieres, and seriously
wounding five-other persons.
The deaths were added to a
Christmas Day death toll of 24. Up
to midnight, the five-day Algeria
death toll stood at 158.
In Morocco, Premier Si Bekkai
finally completed his cabinet by
naming Jewish Dr. Chanim Ben
Zaquen as minister for postal serv-
ices. Bekkai bid originally agreed
thei-e would be one prominent Jew
in his cabinet.
Helmet Camera
Devised By Pilot
ST. LOUIS e(UP) "It's using
your head that counts.'' according
to jet test pilot, Gerald Huelsbeek,
who has invented a helmet-
mounted camera be can operate
with a twist of the head.
Huelsbeek, who flew 54 combat
missions in Korea,- said he never
did like the Ida* of taking his
hands off the controls to make
movies of other Jets in flight.
So the 27-year-old former Navy
pilot took a modified gun camera,
weighing less than a pound, and
attached it to the side of his flight
helmet. The sight projects on wire
in front of his right eye. To com-
pensate for the weight, he oboked
MISCELLANEOUS
ALCOMOLrCJ ANONYMOUS
MX 2011, ANCN. C.2.
OX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
FOR RENT
Apartment
WNhaaaa AeerytKal Anew Raperta
anclar* Cat-atHv
L. C. WILLIAMS, C.P.A.
Tal 2-1945 Asede. 414 Pan.
FOR SALE
Mirf*llaneouB
POR SALI:Srawatt-Warner ra-
die and racers' player. r*hee
Panaaas 2-4*44.
LAST DAYS! lisiMaHeaefl
a* an otea: Bras, skirts, alts, jaw-
T IMf wTW, Btyt+Pt K8>Ckrt>fM.
Make your errors. 115 Central
Avenna, Vila nava.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motora
COR SALI:Beat. 12* Thama,-
aen atrasara1 with 9.8-n. Jena-
M mater J200. 427 Lei Rlnt,
Kan. 2-4434.
Act Of War Charos
Laid To Red China
After Xmas Attack
SEOUL, Korea, Dae. T (UPV-
The Republic of Korea today ac-
cused s fleet of Chinese Commu-
nist gunboats of a "deliberate act
of war" in attacking a Korean pa-
trol boat Christmas morning off
the southwest Korean coast
Four Korean coast guardsmen
were captured, the government
said. It urged the United States
and other allies "to join with us in
immediate measures of defense
and counterattack."
In an official announcement they
charged the SV hour gunbattle In-
side the 0-mile "Rhee" line ef
Korean fishing waters was "only
the beginning'1 of a plot by Com-
munist China. North Korea and
Japan to "penetrate" free Korea
and destroy it as a bastion of the
fieeMory, defenses."
TrWlTOK government said the
battle started when a coast guard
cotter discovered 14 Communist
Chinese fishing boats inside the
line established by ROK President
Syngman Rhee to protect South
Korean fishermen
Japan has quarreled bitterly with
the ROK government over the 60-
mile limit, which forbids use of
the waters by foreign fishermen.
The government said the cutter
captured one of the fishing boats
and put four men aboard to take
it to sort. A fleet of six Chinese
armed hosts steamed into view
and opened fire. The captured fish-
ing boat was retaken, and the four
Korean coast guardsmen were
made prisoners.
The coast guard cutter returned
the Chinese fire end wss not dam-
aged, the government said.
"It is no exaggeration." the of
ficial announcement said, "to say
that the very survival of Korea
and free Asia are at stake."
A spokesman for the U.S. Tsr
East command in Tokyo said no
special orders hsve been issued as
a result of the incident.
Neither the U.S. Nsvy nor the
Air Force, which patrol off Krea,
reported seeing the early morning
battle.
ATTINTrOM C.U JMStM
aaaeera hiralehia aaaHmiiari, I,
2 sanan, bet, e*M aiiit,
nana Panaena S-4941.
RESORTS
POR NT:2-Venranas aaert-
ment. hat water. Rkarne Alisa
Street. Cama* Alafre, laamre
37th Street No. 4-23.
FOR MNT:_ SataN aawtansat,
airier and aeereem. Another
warn fwe hasriama, nartar-din-
ini ream, aN service, ratfrajer-
ater. hat water, saaaN aarch.
Bath apartments mdnasadanr.
CaM henea 27 43rd St. rton
3-47.
MR BINT: Mnnem aaart-
mant I and 2 bedrea. Parque
Ufevra, am the sasha. Saltante
far .I. families. Cad Bmanettt
Fata Stnwie er 2-1282.
POR RlNT.CamrnrtaMa apart-
het water. Perejil, Second Street
Na. II. Phane 3.2494.
POR INT:Secand
5 aWraams, Irvinf.
tar. Plana Francia
SIOO.mnarHily. Far
anana 3-3195.
iwiy sicsiii.
,hltch-
het vt-
2. Rent
BaWwin's rnrakhee' aaartmants
at Santa Clara Beach. Telenfcane
Prakack. Sate. 1224.
FOR RENT
Mirtrrllaneonn
Cramlich', .. cllr, m^*
Ceriafe. Madera canvanianeas,
aewarata ratas. Phane Osamme
4-441.
nnnch at Santa Clara. Talas liana
1T72.
FOSTIR'S COTTAGES. One mna
Balkna 1844.
PHILLIPS OeaaeeM. .
Santo CUra. Baa 415. Bamae.
fneaw Panama 8-1877. Crietn-
hel 8-1478.
FOR RENT
Kooma
FOR RINT: BnantrfaUy lar-
nmhed rnnm, k Relia Vteta. Maaicn Ave. 49,
near 43rd Street Fwnew 3-0553.
FOR RINT: Soneteen meats,
ateid. Jnate Arasamana Avo-
Hta Na. 37-11.
Street Na. 4-23.
Inn-ire 37th
FOR RENT
Honaeo
*
FOR RINTr-
!!,-*.,
den, earth Vie
Keys t 18tn Street
Fmncteaa
edmam chalet,
Na. SI.
Na. 8, Sea
FOR RINT: Baaatirnl new
chalet In Ua Annateac Thma
badeaema, two batbraJaaa. hv-
ma-aiHte, mam. kitchen, onrab
nd tarafe Phana 8-3904.
FOR RINT; Cama* Ate,:
Nicely fejrnteknd ream with deli-
cie meals. Private bath. Phone
3-1789.
WANTED
Apartment*
WANTIO: By America enn-
Ple, airy fnrntebad aaartmant ae
hause for One month start!
Jannaty 15. CaM Pbnee 2-2444
darrnf office bears.
Position Offered
WAraTt, -. Bi
and talsvtelan. Mnlnrat. Otetri-
bntnr. Jnw Franctecn do b Oaaa
Ave. No. 38 bBn Row),
serer 8 am. any week. ate.
WANTID^Sncmtarr,
Most be feed Snotteh atann, nine
bamrs. Apm*f w*m rnR anttaa
tax SIR.
WANTED
Misccllaneona
WANTSO.Cana1 bnma for nanv
ynar-eld anseH kiaak tef, In W
enrtent bnaltb. wtek R mweni*.
ttaed rial ilia for ebi
rima* Pa-am. 3-0128.
Black Christmas
(Conttneed from Pare 1)
s trie ted some motoring end possi-
bly saved lives.,'
The flood disaster has claimed
at least 40 lives in California and
Nevada since it began-late last
week. New rains that poured down
on the spongy deita area of the
San Joaqun and Stanislaus rivers
brought warnings of further flood-
For thousands the extra Monday
holiday was spent salvaging furni-
ture and clothing from the rav-
ages of the flood as they returned
to their homes after spending
Christmas at placea of refuge.
rttarnoM mingled with the
leys ef Christmas in ether nemes.
At Fort Wayne. Ind... the bodies
of two boys missing from their
homes were found electrocuted In
a junk yard. lTaay apparently
touched a hot guide wire as they
climbed a fence.
Doctors at 'Milwaukee fought for
the Ufe Of 13-year old Duncan
Himes, shot while delivering news-
papers Christmas Day by attorney
John Burggraf. 29. Burggraf told
police he mistook the boy for an
intruder.
Near Garyland, Mich., an early
morning fire took the liyes of Mrs.
Gladys Soper, 36, and all five of
her children. A widow and three
of her five sons died Christmas
Day in a fire at Clearwater, B.C.
Two Marines, Sgt. Robert A.
Burlison Jr., Bridgeport, Conn.,
and Pfc. Antonio Longo, New York
City, were killed Christmas Day at
Camp Jejeune, vN. C, when a
baxooka, shell believed to be a dud
exploded. .
OOOD DIM DIIP
CORNISH, N. H. (UP)
Schoolboy Kugene Demers saw two
bocks- in a brook. Their antlers
were hopelessly locked. One buck
had drowned. The other buck toe
victor in the fight, faced a similar
fate. The boy and Conservation
Officer Jesse Scott roped the sur-
viving deer and freed him.
Egypt Reinforces Troops
Around Bloody Gaza Strip
Maa year elans new for
TMI PUPPfT SHOW"
Theater TVMrndev
December 29
2 P.M. 5 P.M.
P.M.
RELEASE
IT'S BIG!... IT'S BUXOM!... IT'S BEAUTIFUL!...
"GENTLEMEN MARRY BRUNETTES"
TODAY at the "CENTRAL"
Bo anaeh mink was aaed In filming scenes for "GaWTLE-
MKN MABRY BRINETTES,'* shot In Technicolor Cinema-
Scone on kacation In Parla, London and Monte Carlo, that
the famous couturier, Dior, had to shot down his for de-
partment for one day while Jeanne Craln, Jane Rnsaell and
other dolls did a "for-dlgger" scene. Ate* en-etarred to
GENTLEMEN MARRY BRUNETTES.' throagb United Art-
ists release, are Alan Young, Body Valle and Scott Brady.
antwt.
fcl I IMlll ImmmSmmmmmmmnl
Cyprus Official is
Found Assassinated
NICOSIA, Cyprue. Dee. tt <\SP)
A Cypriot government official
was shot dead outside his home
in s vlllsge near here today In an
apoarent renewal of terrorism
Poliee found Costas Nleolaou, a,
government beiltff. dead from bul-
let wounds at Kythrla. Nleolaou.
who escaped assassins' bullets last
month, waa believed the victim of
a terrorist attack- The under-
ground EOKA organisation has
singled out Cvoriot* worklne or
cooperating with British Colonial
authorities.
The first Ulegsl communist lest
lets in Cyprus since the party waa
outlawed, meanwhile, were eirea-
lated m Limaasol today. They
celled for "United action to pro-
cure toe party's reetirotion and
obtain self-determination rights
for the Cyrpus people."_________

lead weights to the other aide of
the helmet. ._
Now an he has to,do to wake
50-foot movies with the electricri.v
operated camera is to turn ws
bead toward the *ub**ct_.j,i1.
There have been no 'fl1*
about the pictures." the McI*mneJ!
Aircraft Corp. pilot said.
IDCATIOMAL HBADACHI
GRINNELL. Is. - W. Klaosner. coUeej marshal,
asked inalfeKnity prwddenU attend-
ing toe inaugural of Dr. Howard
Bowen as president of Grinnett
College to stand. Then he turned to
Dr. Bowen and Introduced the
group as men "to whom yon can
turn sor adrice. eenWMttion and
aspirin tableta."
JERUSALEM, Israel. Dec. 27
(UP) Authoritative Israeli
sources said today that Egypt has
reinforced its troops in and around
the bloody Gaza strip.
The informants said that the
equivalent of one division pos-
sibly 10,000 men are now en-
trenched in the area, scene of
continued border skkirmishes.
"There was no such force there
six months ego," the sources.
The official Iarseli army spokes-
man accused Egyptisns of two
border violations in the past two
days. Maj. Dan Gov. said Egyp-
tian soldiers yesterday fired on an
Israeli patrol near- Kussufim, 'a
settlement en the junction of the
vital Nege* desert water pipeline.
Sunday, according to Gov, infil-
trators attacked the settlement of
Mir Yitzhak. Gov said the Israelis
suffered no casualties in either of
the incidents. ,
The ma jor Arab opponents to the
anti-Communist Baghdad Defense
Alliance put their armies under a
single commander but suffered s
rebuff in their efforts to woo Jor-
dsn into their pact, according to
Arab reports yesterday.
A Cairo announcement said
Maj. Gen. Abdel Hakim Amer
took over command of the joint
Egyptian-Syrian Saudia Arabian
armed forces. The three nations
re the main opponents to the
Baghdad Pact which links, Iran,
Iraq, Turkey, Pakistan and Britain
into a "northern tier" alliance a-
k>ng the southern flank of the So-
viet Union.
In a move to keep Jordan's
crack 20,000-man Arab legion out
of the Baghdad Pact, the three
Arab powers yesterday formally
announced they are prepared to
provide Jordan with the financial
aid that would replace the grants
now received from Britain.
Reports from Damascus, Syria,
Suong semi-official sources, said
tat Jordan will not answer too
proposals until after next spring's
elections. At the ssme time, how-
ever, the caretaker Jordan govern-
ment agreed not to join the Bagh-
dad Pact in the meantime.
U. S. Ships, Planes
Aid Dramatic Rescue
Of 37 Jap Fishermen
TOKYO, Dee. 87'(UP) TJ. 8.
snips and planes worked in moun
famous sees and gam winds to-
day with the Japanese Coss.t
Guard and saved 37 Japanese sea-
men from three stricken vessels
off the east coast of Hokkaido Is-
land.
Another S. Japanese fishermen
were missing from seven vessels
caught by a savage winter storm.
The U.S. Destroyer Oibourn,
working in 40-foot waves, rescued
three men from the Dai Nin Shin-
ya, Maru but another 21 crew
members were feared lost
At Hacbinobe in northern Japan
a navy seaplane and an air force
helicopter aided Japanese Coast
Guardsmen to save 22 men of the
32 aboard the grounded freighter
Handa Maru. The other ten crew-
men were feared drowned.
A Japanese patrol boat rescued
12 crewmen from another fishing
vessel missing since Monday.
The storms did hesvy damage
on the northernmost island of Hok-
kaido and one person wss report-
ed killed and two missing. Some
77 houses were destroyed in Hok-
ksido snd 82 homes flooded.
Israeli, Egyptian
Patrol Trade Fire
JERUSALEM, Dec. 87 (UP,
An Israeli patrol exchanged auto-
matic fire with Egyptians near
the tense Gaza Strip today. No
report of casualties were reported
in the brief exchange.
Major Dan Got, Israeli military
spokesman, said intermittent auto-
matic fire bursts surprised inhabi-
tant of the Jewish settlement of
Ein Hasheloshs near the Gasa
Strip.
An Israeli patrol returned too
fire, be said.
Ein Hasheloshs is less than five
miles from the Egyptisn town of
Khan Yunis inside the Gasa Strip
which was attacked by Israeli ar-
mored columns last Sept. 3.
Gov. said that today's Gasa a-
rea attack followed a Syrian "pin-
pricking" barrage of automatic
fire on the Jewish settlement of
Ein Gev on the East shores of
Lake Tiberias (Sea of Galilee).
. No casualties resulted from the
"Intensive'* Syrian attack and
Jewish forces didn't bother to re-
turn the fire, Gov said.
Prof Sees 1956
As Banner Year
ANN ARBOR, Mich. (TJ)
The American economy next year
will achieve a 8400,600,000,000 gross
national product for the first tone,
according to a University of Mich-
igan instructor of business admin-
istration
Prof. Paul W. McCracken said,
however, that the booming output
of the auto industry will drop by
"about 10 per cent' in IBM from.
this year's record high of about
7,500,000 cars.
He predicted the general level
of business activity will be higher
next year than in 1855. in contrast
to toe auto industry. Although the
forward momentum of toe boom
has slowed down as full employ- .
ment hss been achieved, "the mi-
nus elements in the picture s r o
not yet strong enough to cause a
reversal," he added.
"The year 1956. being what tt is
in politics, will more than likely
produce a tax reduction with a
corresponding increase in tske-
home pay," be said. "The pressure
of demand against capacity will
be the single most important 'boll-
ish' factor in toe capital goods
Industries.''

1st PRIZE
i
i
L
DECEMBER 25
2nd prize ydpftiZE
Presea, your iicket* before Friday
.(606.00 (Accaimlated)
- Your tickets are valid for a whole year Keep them carefully
TOTAL... $1,500.00
2.$540.00 (Accumulated) 3.$360.00 (Accumulated)
J


TUESDAT, DECEMBER ti, 1S55
THE PANAMA AMERICAN All INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE SBVITI

CAPITOLIO
BANK! I:M .m.
EVERT MINUTE
COUNTS
Also:
THE RETURN OP
THE BADMEN
TIV OLI
ttc ------------------- **.
Double In Spanish!
ESCUELA DE
MSICA
Also:
EDUCANDO A PAPA
CENTRAL Theatre
75c.
SENSATIONAL RELEASE!
The Year Musical Hit I
- 46c.
Jane Russell Jeanne Craln, In
GENTLEMEN MARRY
BRUNETTES
In Cinemascope and Technicolor!
LUX THEATRE
,---------------------------:-------- Me.
A GREAT PICTURE!
MEL PERRER MIRSOLAVA
_ln-
BRAVE BULLS
DRIVE-IN Theatre
He. --------------------------------- Me.
ONE DAY RELEASE!
Zaeharv SCOTT Carol MATHEWS
-In-
TREASURE OF RUBY HILL
CECILIA THEATRE
Me.
GREAT DOUBLE!
MAUREEN O'HARA, in
LADY GODIVA
FAITH DOMERGUE, in
THIS ISLAND EARTH
Both in TECHNICOLOR!
RIO
35c. ----------------
Double in
Cinemascope!
A STAR IS BORN
- Also: .
THE COMMAND
VICTO*! A
*-----------^
DANGEROUS
MILLIONS
UPHOLDING FOUR
- Also:..
Another Picture!
VTOMIC PICKLE BARREL-A physicist takes the radiation
ount from New York University's sub-critical nuclear reactor
two tone of uranium rods in a pickle barrel. The sub-critieal
reactorso called because it cannot sustain a full chain reaction
Is used in N.Y.U.'s nuclear engineering education program. Ex-
periments are made by hoisting a neutron source among the
uranium rods. Water, not vinegar, as some gagster suggests, is
used to shield the experiment It is the first nuclear Installation
in New York City.
HOLLY
MOVIES
by I rsklne Johnson
HOLLYWOOD ->- (NEA) Be- calls her wardrobe woman, hair
dresser and make-up man "the
wrecking crew:"
Eleanor Powell, once billed by
Hollywood as "the world's great-
est tap dancer," is denying the
comeback rumors once again.
It was "Born to Dance" and
other big musical films for Elea-
nor as,an HGM star in the '80s,
but now she's happier, she says,
as the Mrs. Glenn Ford, Bible
teacher, who conducts a Sunday
afternoon religious show on a -TV
station.
"No neon lights, top billing or
public acclaim can compare with
ths love of children," says still
glamorous Eleanor. "Now my en-
hind the Screen: Hollywood's pol-
ishing up its big-time talent gun-
sights for another world-wide sa-
ari labeled "Operation Star
lunt It's the result of a king-
size headache the problem of
easting films.
In the. big economy wave a
couple of years' ago the major
tamos cleared their contract lists
en the theory that "we can hire
atara by the picture as we need
them."
The theory sounded feed but it
didn't work.
When Hollywood killed its star
ystcm it killed most of its stars.
Today, fewer than 10 names
mean anything at the box office.
And most of these stars, like
Frank Sinatra; Marion Brando,
John Wayne, Jimmy Stewart and
Audrey Hepburn are nosethumbmg
the major studios by forming their
own independent companies, or
dnnuiHHg such a big percentage
of the profits that the majors can't
afford them.
So, once again, the big studios
re planning a return to the star
system with a talent hunt to find
and create new stars. At the same
time the current box-office champs
are being warned about the pit-
falls of self-production.
But there's a worry for the ma-
jor studios, too.
With only big movie spectaculars
clicking at the box office, is it
possible to develop new stars?
It's a SM.000,000 Hollywood ques-
tion so important that Don
Hartman, production head of Par-
amount studio, is on record as
saying:
"Unless the motion picture In-
dustry finds new faeos, and seen.
It to o##ftMHj.
Rod Steiger wfll test for the
role of "Joseph" ka Columbia's
big Biblical epic . Lauren
Bacall, never one to use a mun-
dane expression when she can
tribe anything explosively,
tire life is centered around chil-
dren and I adoro thorn/'
THE WITNET: A drunk stag
gered away from a bar exclaim-
ing: "Good night, Marilyn Monroe,
wherever 1 am." . Jack Benny
said he went to Hollywood's ex-
pensive L'Escoffier restaurant for
dinner and his bill was $58. "And
when I fainted," reports Jack,
"the charged me another $3 for
the glass of water they threw in
my face."
THIS 1$ HOLLYWOOD, Mrs.
JONES: When Director William
Wyler isn't around, Hollywood's
executive set refers to him as
"Wee Willie." The reason, maybe,
that a strong man in a carnival
scene for his latest movie, "The
Friendly Persuasion," is billed as
"Wee Willie."
Gina Lollobrigida, about the
male sex:
"All men are the same. They
all think the same and want the
same rhino. Language makes no
difference where men are con-
cerned.
Suicide Plleup Kills
Father Of 6; Mother
Also Tries Suicide
BORDEDONV1LLE, La., Dec.
27 (UP) A plantation farmer kis-
sed his six children goodbye Christ-
mas eve, then drove off and minut-
es later smashed his car "at M
miles an hoar" into an oak tree
in a suicide pileup, the Avoyelles
i-arish sheriff said today.
The death hiked the violent death
toll for Louisiana to nine for the
Ion holiday weekend.
Sheriff T. J. Jeansonne said the
evidence confirmed the fact the
atner, Elvis Dsigretont, 41, com-
mitted suicide by smashing the
the family car into a thicx oak
Lee on the outskirts of the town.
Jeansonne said the victim "was
going 95 tor 100 miles an hour when
ue int.''
Neighbors said Daigretont, a
farmer on the rlexmere Plantation
here, had threatened to shoot blm-
seif earlier in the week over do-
mstic troubles and also spoke of
crashing to his death in his car.
His wife, Pule, 39, swallowed
half a bottle of clorox earlier Sa-
turday in an apparent suicide at-
tempt. She was rusnedd to the hos-
pital at nearby Marksville, her
stomacn pumped out and returned
to her home before her husband
left on his death ride.
Neighbors said Daigretent kissed
each of his six chilaren goodbye
Christmas eve and hinted broadly
at his wild death plan.
Emergency Landing
Made By Airplane;
40 Passengers Sale
BRYCE CANYON, Utah, Dec. 17
(UP)An American Airlines plane
ei route from Los Angeles to New
York with 40 passengers made an
unschedules landing at the Bryce
Canyon emergency field today
when an engine caugth fire.
The plane landed nt 1 a.m. af-
etr pilot C. W. Evans radioed Los
Angeles that wsrrinf-ligMe show-
ed he had a fire in the No. 4 en-
gine. Evans feathered the propel-
ler on that engine and made the
landing without incident.
A fire department from, a near
by town put out the fire before
the passengers had a chanca to
g-t off the plane.
The plane, flight No. 4, left Loa
Angeles at 9 p.m. and was schedul-
ed to arrive in New York at 7:15
it'was a Bryce Canyon in 1947
that a DC crashed in flames kill-
ing 54 persons in the first accident
involvin0 that type plane. The
DC caught fire in flight and was
attempting to land when it crash-
e i 100 yards short of the runway.
Commerce Secretary Paints
Prefty Picture For 1956
WASHINGTON, Dec. 27 (UP)
ci.unerce secretary am c i a i r
Weeks predicted yesterday the
soaring American economy will
rise to new heignu during the first
half of 1955, paceu Dy too oeueeui-
er steej, auiu ana construction in-
dustries.
He also foresaw a "little" up
turn in tne term economy, a "good
cnance" for a balanced budget and
no' "craan- potentialities in we
current stock marxet situation.
Weeas aucxea any prediction of
a tax cut in 1S56, btu said it it
comes ue "empuasu" snoulu be
"on relief to the consumer."
The secretary maoe ms rosy fore-
cast ox an even bigger boom in
196s in a radio wit. view on toe
MBS program ".Reporters Bound-
up.'
He backed it up by releasing a
tompi euensive siu vey o majo* in-
dustries snowing that nearly all
segments expeci to continue at or
above current high levels at least
through next June. Highiignts 01
of tne survey snowed:
Autos: Uuipui expected to hit 4V4
million, a boost trom the 4,227,000
produced in tne tirst half oi 1955.
Truck production, which saw its
produced in toe iirst naif ot 1945.
Truck production, which saw its
best year in history in 1965, slated
to show a "sizeable increase" in
tne January-June period. To sur-
vey did not indicate whether it took
into account the ford Motor Co.
statement last week hat its 1956
r.vwuiuua acnedules had been re-
duced.
ConstructioB: Estimated 1956
spending on all new construction 44
billion uoUars a 5 per cent boost
from 1955 s record. This despite
an anticipated drop Of lOO.OOu in
new home construction.
Iron and steel: Current record-
breaking production expected to
continue tnrough next june, mak-
ing the first half of 1956 one of the
highest "if not the highest" in his-
tory.
"Weeks, in the radio interview,
said the auto industry's big output
in 1983 wss "very influential^ in
bolstering the economy. He called
the industrp a "great barometer"
economic health along with other
heavy industries and construction.
Be said he watches cenetrnc-
'very closely" and "I like-
tke way I read" its prospective
Weeks said that while farmers
"haven't shared to the degree that
people generally have" in the cur-
rent business boom, "I think the
turn is going to be op a little rath-
er than the other way."
He did not elaborate. The Agri-
culture Department's latest eco-
nomic analysis forecast a some-
what lower income for farmers in
1956 compared with this year, when
their prices and income were fall-
tag.
Weeks did not go deeply into the
subject of the budget or taxes, ex-
cept to say he thinks there is a
"good chance of balancing the
budget this year.'* This presum-
ably referred to the .current fiscal
year ending next June 30.
While declining to say directly if
he favors a tax cut next year, he
aaid it. was "almost aciomatlc"
that the lower the tax bill "the bet-
ter off the people will be because
then heir effors are awards creat-
ing wealth."
He said that of the 1954 tax cut,
about 66 per cent went to consum-
era and the rest to indusry. In any
new eut, he added, ''I would per-
sonally rather see the emphasis
placed ... on the relief to the con-
sumer.''
He declined to comment on the
possible effect on the stock market
of any announcement by President
Eisenhower that he would not run
again. "I am hist doing a little
praying in that direction and bey-
ond that 111 say nothing at the
present time," he commented.
LITTLE LIT
Potitlcol thunder Is seldom oc- }
comnonied by enlightening.
DOLEFUL DOVEA mourn-
ing dove that has a right to
moarn Is this one being held'
for the photographer at Silver
Springs, Fla. The bird was,
mysteriously wounded and
I grounded by a short twig, im-
! bedded In Its neck. The wound
fhad healed around the twig so
the dove has to go through life
with a chip on its shoulder.
sfeiBAw*;^*Hi
19
COLLECTORS' STAMP
This new AtBtrtae. sta*0-nn
ors stamp collectors. It .shows
a young philatelist examining
his album. Violet-brown, It
was designed by Josef Segner.
A small surcharge will Subsidize
work of Austrian philatelists.

Roaring Fifties note: One of the
swank $50-a-day rooms in a Las
Vegas hotel will soon feature mink
bedspreads.
showing at your service center
Theaters tonight i
BALBOA 6 5 810 I diablo hts. s:u *
.7.. ~-.!~L:*J^ I Ka'hry GRAYSON
-SO THIS IS LOVE"
- Color -
Wt4 "S Agaimt The Bam"
GAMBOA 1:M
"MAN FROM LARAM1E"
J%y W4. Tank On The Bwh"
MMnK5!&K~ "-...-S^JSS^.Jt'SSJ Tnsale On The Beach"
S I Thandajr "OS
Wod. Twurl 1 The South ft.-ific"
MARGARITA 6:15 8:5|
latkar WILLIAMS
vu jomcsoN
"DUCHES OP IDAHO"
- Ootari
^SKXAIJ)
INF'
PARASO 6:15 7:44]
-BATTLE TAXI"
Thanday "GUtALDINr'
CRISTOBAL 6:15 7:56
air-CiaaWlMi
Herbara RAMWTCK
O Sobart ST AM
"ESCAPE TO BURMA"
I we*, -jumara
II
LA BOCA
"LIVING
DABUNG"
DESERT"
ANTA CRUZ 6:16 7:50
"RAGE AT DAWN" |
1CAMP BIERD 6:15 7:56
"HER TWELVE MEN"
LONG ILLNESSThought to
be rapidly recovering from
bronchial pneumonia that
struck him OcL 7, West Ger-
man Chancellor Konrad Aden-
auer had a setback that is caus-
ing concern throughout the
western world.
If you want Bourbon at its best call for
"GREEN RIVER/ Americas smoothest
whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS
-



-
rORKLORB BOLIVIA PROM
'THE PUPPET SHOW
Balboa Theatre Theraday
Beceaaboc 2
SHOWS! S
_ljiu.-&m^t sun.
Each bottle he* a
ticket for the Car-
ta Vieja Raffle. Big
Cash Prizes week-
ly
RECIPE: (For ten peopl*)
eggs'
I 'A cup* suffer
I V4 pints cream
t pint RON CARTA VIEJA
Seat yolks end whites of sag*
separately. Add one cup of
sugar to the yelks and beat
wail. Add Vs cup of suffer
to the itiffty beaten white.
Mix together. Stir In wolf-
whipped cream. Then stir
In RON CARTA VICIA
thoroughly and place antint
mixtura in punch bowl.
Sprinkle with nutmeg and
placa In refrigerator to chill.
Serve In punch cup*.
CARTA VIEJA
sthifbodif. fsiadu QloAAipsdbu
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED BE ROYAL CHARTER 1646
Royal Mail Lines Ltd,
FA8T -FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
TWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OF SOUTH AMERICA
TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR. PERU AND CHILE
S.S. TOTOPAXir ....... ........................Dee.
M.V. "SANTANDER-..............................Isas, i
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA
STRAITS OP MACALLAN, MONTEVIDEO. RIO DE
JANEIRO, LAS PALMAS, LISBON, VIGO, CORUAA
AND LA PALLICE.
M.V. "REINA DEL PACTPIOO" (1SJH Tons) ......Jan. 11
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
M.V. "8AMANCO" ..;..............................Dee. SI
M.V. -SALAVERRr'..............................Jan.
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD./HLLD AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
8J. "LOCH GARTH" ........................ .....Dee. U
SJ "ABBEDYH"..................................Jan. 12
TO UK/CONTINENT
S.S. "DIEMERDTK" .............-...'...............Dee.
All Sailings Subject te Chante WKbent Notice
rACIPIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO.. Cristobal Tel.: 1654/5
(PANAMAAe. Pert #85, Tel. I-1U7/S
PORD CO INC. 1BALBOATars. BMf. Tel. t-lSffS
r
* *>>>>> >?> >!>*>>> 1 > >
GRACE LINE
26 modern "Santa" abr* anltlng the
Americas with fast and fresjeent
service.
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM NEW YORK
TO WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA
8.S. "SANTA BABEARA Dae Cristobal, C. Z., Dee. 21
S.S. "SANTA ISABEL".......Due Cristobal, C. E, Jan. 4
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK
SJ. 'SANTA LUISA"........Sails Cristobal. C. Z., Dec. U
S.S. "SANTA INES".........Sails Cristobal. C. Z., Dec. 36
FROM U. S PACIFIC ft WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA
TO BALBOA AND CRISTOBAL. C. Z.
S.S. "SANTA IE".............Dne Balboa, C. X., Jan. 14
8.S. 'SANTA ANITA"..........Dne Balboa, C. Z, Jan. M
FROM CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C. Z. TO THE
WEST COAST CENTRAL AMERICA ft U. S. PACIFIC
S.S. "SANTA CBUE" .......nab Cristobal, C. Z, Dec. 2
Balboa Only
PANAMA AGENCIES CO
.CRISTOBAL: SlSl 2135 PANAMA: 2-0556 6557
BALBOA: 1561-215
< < ( ( ( H ( ( < I IHIlfCl < < 5_S \ .'. > < .V 5 *
Adults 66c. Children 25c. I
PANAMAS LAR4MST SCU.IN8 RUM
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
New Orleans Service
Great While Fleet
S.S. "MORAZAN" ...
S.S. "MARNA".......
SJ. "SDCAOLA" .....
S.8. -AGGERSBORG"
SJ. "TAsJCE".......
A Stenaaat ..........
S.S. "MARNA" ....
,,.J...
8.8. 'TAQUE"
S.S. "MORAZAN"
Arrive*
Cristobal
Jan. 1
Jaa. 1
S
14
IS
.Jan. 22
Jan. Ml
.Pen. S
Fab. 12
Aba Handling Rsfrtgefatei aed CBIEed Cargo____
New York Service Arrive
1 Cristobal
SJ. "JUNIOR" ...........
8 J "HEREDIA" .........
SJ "PARISMINA" ......
SJ "ERA BERLANGA" ...
SJ "LkMON"...........
SJ. "ESPARTA" ....
....
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Jan. 36
Pen, 4
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Weekly bar. of twelve passenger ships to New
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"___________ni Seattle.________________
Special roaao trip lares from CristoM to New
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Te New York......................S240.O0
To Loe Angales and San Francisco .... $270.00
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TELEPHONES:
CHJSJTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2004


PAGE EIGHT
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN fNTJEPENUPNT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27, II
Well Rested Carta Vieja Club Tackle Sodamen


Jim Davie To Make Debut
For Spur Cola Against
Yankee's Cookie Stempel


By J. J. HARRISON JR.
A well rested Carta Vieja club, which has not
played a game since Dec. 18 when it dropped a dou-
bleheader to the Spur tola Sodamen, is scheduled to
engage the league leaders tonight at 7:30 at the
Olympic Stadium.
first, Grenald filed deep to
right. *
Moore, who had been round-
ing second on what had seemed
a sure base-hit had to hustle
back to first to avoid being duu-
bled.
Manlto Bernard took Bobby
Prescott's throw from right field
and appeared to make the tac
on the sliding Moore but umpire
Named as starting pitchers
are the Yankees' CooKle Stem-
pel <-i> and Jerry Davie (00),
both righthanders.
Davie Is at 22-yearr-old na-
tive of Garden City, Mich, who
fead a 13-8 record with Augus-
ta, Clan A Sally League, last
summer. He finished the so-
son with Buffalo, Chus AAA
International League, where
he did not figure in a dec sien.
Originally imported by the willie Hinds motioned safe.
Chesterfield Smokers, Davis iin-l _h -!,... hi..,,..___a
%tvgf&"tSSeSFmffi*!** rgument Smoker roster by Wally Bur
nette, and the Sodamen
him up late last week.
Yesterday afternoon at the
Olympic Stadium Reinaldo
Grenald* two-run homer in
the second inning gave the
Sadasaen a 2 to 0 lead, and
prov ded the margin of victo-
ry for the Sodamen's I to
whitewash of the Smokers. The American Legion Pacific
Jim Tugerson scattered four Twilight League team has heen|
hits In picking up his fourth,holding workouts with a mpa-
wln against no losses. He went city rost>r of 24 plavers gett'ng Chesterfield
". ft.* tin* unilil- ... _ iL tasa ______ A llCt in e>a
of
but
ly Bur-'---------------------------'!
signed American Legion
.....Ball Club Ho'dlng
Workouts At Balboa
__
Ocean Star Easy Upset Winner
In $5,000 Christmas Classic

Tentative Pacific Twilight
League Schedule For 1956
-___0 j___ -
Monday. January 2 Lucky! 3. Games on Mondays thru
Strike vs Junior College; Balboa:Friday are night arms starting
High *e American Legion. at 7:15.
Wednesdy, January 4 Bal- J. Double header on January
boa High vs Lucky Strike. 2nd. will start at l:uu pm.
Thursday, January 6 Jun-{ 4. Single games on Sunday
ior College vs American Legion..will start at 2:00 p.m.
Sunday, January 8 Amerl- S. All games will be.7 innings,
can Legion vs Lucky Strike. A Qames marked I8L are in-
Tuesday, January 10 Amer- terscholaatic leagues and will be
lean Legion vs Balboa High.
Wednesday, January 11-Juh-
ior College vs Lucky Strike.
under the Jurisdiction and con-
trol of this league. The results
-. 1-ui.v on uve of these, games, however, will be
Sunday, January 15 Lucky 1 reflected in the respective teams'
Strike vs American Legion. Iwon-Lost percentage of
Tuesday. January 17 Junior 'Twilight League.
STILL MOWING Cleveland's
Don Mossi, who cuts down Amer-
ican League batters, adjusts s
power lawn mover on the grounds
of a Daly City, Calif., sanitar-
ium where.he is working in the
off-season.
Grenald's Grenade
the route for the first time and |n shape for the 1956
registered the secon'l shutout of WhVh opens Jan. 3.
the season. Temmate Vibertl Mansrer Red Yielding has Roberts, lb ......3
reason Austin, ss
IPrescott, rf
An
4
4
H Po
Clarke blanked the Smokers 12 been pnttlnc his rb arres Stewart, cf...... 4
to 0 on Dec. 4. jthi-ough "attln* and field** Schell, If ........4
Humberto Robinson suffered drilU whU setting their sirhtv Parrls, 3b ....... 4
his third loss as compared to!nn the >956 chamnlonah'n. The Queen, c ........ 3
one triumph. He was followed to f.eglonalrr* were runnenuw to Bernard, 2b ..... 2
the mound by Burnetts who the rhsmnlon Lucky Strikers lRob,nson- P ..... 1
took over in the seventh after las* en son lB- Osorio ........ 1
RobtyuSad been Wttd.tQtM The twenty four mon a* Bumette, p .....0
pinch hitter. Bumette gave up|Wblrh has been practicing t
two hits in blanking the wln-!the Peino Stadium eonits of
ners the rest of the way. |#he following nevera: Howard'
Orenalds roundtrlpper came. iw mura, Moh'Pile. Frnnk .hh.
after Clarence Moore singled to Cherle Aimed!. "Ill peehette.
lead off the frame and stole sec-1 Roy Conrad. Bill Lnwrmce, 8pur Cola
ond. The 3rd and last run cross- marie* Mrr.bd. Jar* s-me. , '
ed the plate In the 3rd on John Joe rulbreath, cirlev Hln enn' c ....... 1 3
ei" i Charles, 3b-lb ... 5 0 1
College vs Balboa High (I8L).
Thursday, January 1 Luc-
ky Strike vs Balboa High.
Monday, January 23 Amer-
ican Legion vs Junior College.
Friday. January 27 Balboa
High-.vs junior College-(ISL).
End of Ptrst Half
30 0 4 27 12
E. Osorio filed out for Robin-
son in 7th.
Glenn's single. Robinson's balk, Km'tte Norton.
Herman Charles'Infield out and Bud MeCaJl Joe warren. v>|-
Heccor Lopez' sacrifice fly >to Ham J. O'Connor. Jerk Cueela.iT}10.?'..^
A short rhubarb developed
ta the top of the eighth when
with one out feed MSere on
Have Row I. ,
Warren. Wl- :%** 2b:*>
nam j. inonnor, Jack Cuecla, T, 0I"'vh^o.;.
Charle Bennett, Al Dougherty, "i .wa,t*
Hugh Hale, Warner Bass, Jim
.Rotte. Cesar Ortlt and Andy
anches.
Moore, as
Grenald, If ....
Kellman, c ....
p. OeWio, rf .;-.-
Tugerson. Ph...
2b
n
0
n
1
1
0
0
0
Sunday. January 29 Amer-
ican l-eglon vs Lucky Strike
Thursday, Febraury 2 .Luc-
ky Strike vs Junior College.
Sunday, February 5 Lucky
ii?e vs An,erlcan Legion.
r^lS ay' |,e,brury ^ Junior
College vs Balboa High (I8L).
0 JPSW- Feruarv 8 Bal-
Sl Mb'rfi1 v Amalean Legio*
b0!H15h vs Lucky 8trike.
Tuesday. February 14 jn-
lorcollege v, American Legfi,
hnTh^f,2ay' February 16 B.l-
H.1fh vs Junior College
ConS?*?' Frebr,u,rv > Junior
college vs Lucky strike
Tuesday. February 21 Amer
lean Legion v. Balboa Highu
Thursday. February 23 -
American Legion vs Junio? Col
wilL1"** JTebrury 24 Lucky
Strike vs Balboa High. "
End of Second Half
NOTE:
B
?
4
n
1
;|B^8tSd,mue ,cheduled
0
0
for
Spur Cola
Cheater.
33 3 9 27 isj
021000 0003 9 l!
000 000 0000 4 O
SUMMARY F '': Grenald,
2, .Lopes. Earned Ri.. : Spur Co-
la 3. Errors: Spur Cola l, ip
Osorio). Two base hits: Charles,
Lopez, Parrls, Glenn. Home
Grenald. Doublepiays:
Bahama Punches Ouf
Onesided Victory
Over Paolo Melij
Weltemelght Yama Bahama
Brittahhew!fnTd Blm,nl "
lath iWMt Ind,e"' "O" hla
Ith victory hut night on
HoberU. Austin, Robinson; Aus-' shutout 10-round decision over
SL?"SS: Roberts; Lope.'?"?1? Me,1 of Montrea before
Moore Thorne. stolen baae " j? their television fight it
Moore. Sacrifice hit: Lopez. Hit st- Nicholas Arena. *
if^riV J*oblnson 'Kellman 2,1 mama's rapid-fire bursts to
4T,',StrU,Clto0ul by: Roblnson ffi""1 head won in such l0P
4, Tugerson 2, Bumette l. Bases *** iaahfOn that not one of
2?n^0,*?5inonl.Tug9r- , ring officials ga?e
7. Last named team Is Home
Team. .
S. Team Manners are:
American Legion Yielding.
Lucky strike Larry Jones-
Phone 273-5251.
Balboa High Paul Karat -
Phone 2-1704.
Junior college- Stewart
Brown phone 2-278
9. Pre-game practice schedule
Hdme Team finish batting
45 minutes prior to game time.
Take infield 15 minutes prior to
game time for 10 minutes.
Visiting Team take field 45
minutes prior to game time. Be
off diamond 15 minutes before
game time.
Ground Rules. Baseball,
Balboa Stadia*
1. One base on any overthrow
tnat goes.into foul territory,
base must be made.
3. As many bases u you can
get on any overthrow that stays
in fair territory.
3. On a pitched or thrown ball
at home plate all you can get
unless the ball get. hung Up
22".h^,, TV" ,n ""Payable
lo ed De btLtt' '* al'
4. Over the fence on the
bounce, two bases allowed
. ' Any batted ball is m play
that stays ln the playing area
!%
Vale-Miami To Gel
Orange Bowl Caga
Tourney Underway
The Stud La Enea a claasy
three-year-old brown colt Ocean
Star Sunday raced to an easy
eight length victory in the fea-
tured $5,000 added Christmas
Classic for native horses over
one mile at the Juan Franeo
race track.
Hugo de la Pen ha's star re-
turned a Juicy SIC.4S to wrn
despite three previous wins in
whleh he ehalked up excellent
times. In his last start before
the classic. Ocean Star made
much better time than Rlejul
which weat off the edds-en
matuelt chelee Sunday.
With this triumph, the son of
Kbano-Valamaid finally lived up
to his promise of greatness. The
grandson of former Juan Franco
track champion Brujo (sire of
Valsmald) had a brilliant cam-
paign In 1954 as a two-year-old
ne but this year he slumped badly
land only recently showed a re-
turn to winning form.
Sunday it was no contest. O-
cean Star broke on top, staved
off the early challenges of Ele-
nita, Don Brigido and Tlngat
tften drew away when given his
ned to open a long lead which
ne Increased in the home-
8trlfch1 * r,*ch the finish line
fully eight lengths ahead of Ri-
qui.
The latter got off to a good
start but met interference and
was shlow to recover. He finish-
ed strongly to be next best but
was evidently no match for
ocean star Sunday. Tlngat,
which turned in a remarkably
good performance, rushed up
llulnt " ^tretch after
getting off laat to move within
Knf Jjntth oi the flying leader
he finished third, fslterlng at
the finish. Elenita. another big
surprise, was a forward facto?
all the way and held on well to
mi? ifl^* T** ot a Purse.
th> V J* tat*'r nather
three lengths ahead ef pjenl-
fwirth $250. Be la Penha plck-
MUr SSL BttS^to5
AftiL,i'?ed of the ke of
Atoatross] teeslan Oodntess m
Pocrates. QM*ogTSffj
rio over seven furlongs deanite
t0 'freight of S SouSdl
iutnhd.y*m top0,t ha *"1 err,
TANDIHG
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
\
Tesms Won Lost
Spar Cola............... 9 1
Chesterfield............. 4
Carta Vieja............. 1
5
8
Pet.
.900
.444
.til
YESTERDAY'S RESULT (Olympic Stadium)
Spur Cola 3, Chesterfield 0
TONIGHTS GAME (Olympic Stadium)
Carta Vieja (Stempel 0-1) va. Spur Cola (DtVie f>0)
Game Time: 7:30
CLASSIC LEAGUE
Team Standings
Hotel El Panama .......34
Restauradnte Skychef .. 28
Seymour Agency........23
Austin Nash .......... 22
Caribs..........
Seymour Agency .. ..
17 Yankee. .. ..*.. ..
23 DehJinger's Agency ..
33 81eepers
21
19
ia
la
16
is
201
21
3!
2*
34 Seymuor Agency halted thJ
----- Termites' chances to increase!
Resa u r a n t e Skychef lost their league lead by posting a
ground to Hotel El Panama ln two to one win. Bill Jacober and
the Classic Leagkue when they,Thelma Camby *howed the way
could only win three points from: ior Seymour Agency while I
Austin-Nash while Hotel El Pan- Gunn and Billy Coffey were
ama white-washed 8eymour A- high for the Termites,
gency.
Ted Melanson and Bud Balcer
scored over 00 to be high for
Restaurante Skychef and Bill
Jacober led Austln-Nash.
Stephens
Thomas .
Almeda .
Jacober .
Best .
178
182z 177
193 167
171 168
155 177
Glelchman
Zeletes .
Welch .
Meianspn
Balcer .
on 5, Burnette 2. Left on base:
Spur Cola 10. Chesterfield 5
i8u.r.ec?rd: Robinson 3
runs, 7 htis In 7 Innings Balk-
f;rb'"son; Winning pitcher.- Tu'-
gerson tu>t. Losln pltchw.
Robinson d-J Um.pirT^
faslern All-Slars
Defeat West 21-10
'n (brisiian Bowl
defe.ted the West, 21-10. in '^
f rst annual Senior Christian Foot-
biU Bow' game in this g e
Srfh^^ mUChemph"'8"
cnurih atlendance ,i on football
ability The two squads were
lectod from big and .mall cobe-
ej located east and west of the
Mississippi River.
Halfback Fred Smallwmv!
BSWgf^-^uthe na'SeT112
/unble by Qusrterback John Lyle
of Hardin Simmons in the fetf
oud minute, of play. This pi
U^e ball on the West 27. Fou
Plays later SmaUwood took a
P-tchout 13 yesrds to core
?..r5,e.H,leyJ<> MkkU Tennes:
see State made the first of hi
three conversions.
lege made the first psy^ff imr.
cep.ion in the first period. A few
EftE 1,ter. "rterback George
Hemng of Missi.sipp| Southern
made a scoring pass to Bill Wheel-
end y UCU* convert*d ta
Indiana fullback John Bartkie-
wicz grabbed the second Intercep-
tion for East on the West 18 just
after the second period got under-
way and scored.
West picked up a touchdown on
a four-yeard pass from Lyle to
J,m,"* of Texas Western late
m the first period after East al-
ready had scored twice. Jim Rush-
er f.f Kansas State added a 10-'
S221 f'eW iMl ,or We" a the
third period.
H.llback C. L. Sheperd of1
North Texas State led the West
ground gaining with M yards in
4 carries. Joe Pagliei of Clem-
son sort Bartkiewici each had 25
yarns for East in five and sis
csrries, respectively.
gg--f'roundL"3W?h.
hadI wn.no "'"-ewnt ghter
aheetIS \il^dS 0n *ch *co"
\. fir* ?' ^ 'gbtln* ln W
hrr!,,-!,^ Ifk main ""It.
huC u0n.d round nd gashed
his left brow in the fourth. At
he finish, Melis, formerly of
Italy but now resident ot
Montreal, was floundering and
nearly went down when his
taetbeS.bUCWedbya^ht
Bahama, favored at J-l 1-
w*VE? J" WM flhtg as a
rMuehiei4rled iso% pound-
MIAMI BEACH, Dec. 27
rTm. h,*,-:oring quintet
utaw.11?. a**^n*t "-Prtalng
aSlit5fm tonlht M > rst
f1"1 Orange Bowl basketball
tournament gets undeiway.
fiif" Co2?ll ?ruce H' on
"ht P Vlnf o P h o m ores
J?**' veIy Iood ehanee to
hi0Tr t*1'' " which
n i .nly * Powerful Holy
-it? nE.,ta if* Jvored tlonm
with Columbia to go into the
ment "* e,ht^* tourrS!
Starting the tournament at
?w~Pm WS be a COnfMt be
tween New York University, 4-2
for the season. tnd Tulane, 4-3.
Sw Y"IeM,aml * will fol-
Columbla. which has a 3-1
record after Colgate nosed the
ni^0^,67-*8' O" *inst
2E2? ,Cl,r"'.-5- m the tlrst
RT*.. wl5 fUrnoon double-
rM"i ^""ay. The remain-
ing first-round contest will pit
Pterlda State University g-4 *-
gainst powerful West Virginia
917 911 867 2695
Restaurante Skychef
170
173
158
180
191
180
199
177
238
223
133
156
168
221
190
Braniff Airways "flew" away,
from the Caribs and into second
place .via the shut out route. To*
Zones' "grand old man of Bowl-
ing" Harry Klumpp, led his!
team to victory by scoring a 288 i
game and 613 series. Ted AlbriU
M7 ton was high man for the Ca-
S35 ribs.
The Sleepers won two games
from Dehlinger's Agency and
created a tie for the cellar. Wil-
soa Dillon and Al Minor bowled
highest for the Sleepers while
..?*" ,nder,on *n 433 did likewise for Dnhllnger's
528 i Agency.
503LEd__Low*nde ! ?*aep with
549
550
514
Saturday's dividends:
Bob Hope amazes with talents won in vaudeville tro
THE SEVEN LITTLE FOYS"
OPENS RELEASE NEXT THURSDAY AT THE
"LUX" THEATRE
J-Oonsaga $620, 3.60.
3Granero $4.80
SECOND RACE
1-Newbrighton $33.80, fo.80, 41
2-Encachada $6.80, 5.
3Salustlo $8.40.
P^jMe: UNJI.
t _ Tm"l> RACE
1Don Pastor $6.60, 3, 2.20.
a-Liborla $3. 360.
a $3.20.
One-Two: $l4j
FOURTH RACE
cSSSSStSfff> * "
3-nAvispa $2J0.
QwtaJela: $4$.4t.
PBTTH RACR
1 Sedur $17.60, 5.20, 2.80.
-*5i foot $S.2tt, 2.20.
3Falrlyable_$2.20
SIXTH RACK
\~S2 8pot . ':*>.
2-Don Denl $4, 2.80.
3Discoveyr $5
SEVENTH RACE
?ZS 82J,UW ** **
3King $3.80
. ^_ .EIGHTH RACR
9V-?r . I 2.80
1|| *-Arranquin $460. .40.
3Pregonero $11.40.
Qelnlela: glf.
NINTH RACE
l-lfflMyiH. *M 2.40.
2-Valley Star $8.20, 8.
3Merry Mason $280
IRNTH RACE
1-Brie $5. 320.
!Poltmon $3.40.
872 1017 888 2757
iJ?fl 51 p*"'na scored their
lowest total of the year and still
managed to win /our point*
from Seymour Agency, Jot Pager
was high man-for Hdel Rl rnn.
*" while Harry Colbert scored
rugnest for Seymour Agency.
89l2fi2?.Tt,eo cor*d the"" high-
- est ttries ao far to beat the Yan-
kees two to one. Earl Bast also
KtUSLT * *blfh ior
Markakia
Larrabee
Konrad .
Kutach .
Colbert .
Seymour Agency
169
, 175
. 155
. 156
.202
169
146
190
169
172
158
163
177
185
187
522
510
571
Wilber
Peger .
Lowande
Bowen .
Coffey .
320.
_ . JP7. * 0 2583
Hotel El Panama
- . 138 10 198
300 194 199
. 179 177 161
188 180 190
160 139 156
486
593
517
558
505
5 900 904 2669
Indlvidnai Averages
2*.............g;
Balcer"..............2S
S,bert............ ion
f
3.40
uod nope s luie uramal* periermanre in -t'HE 8a,VEN
LITTLE POTS.*' hailed by critic and aadieaees everywhere,
shoald eeme as ae aurprtse te these who knew Ma early
background. In the glare of his fabulous position at the top
of the entertainment world, the leen years are easily for-
gotten, but those year* laid the selle feandatton which
made his many-faceted portrayal of a great vaadevtlle asar
in "THE SEVEN LITTLE POTS" pessfhle.
In the delightful VlstaVheen, Technicolor film. Hepe
stags, dances, engages in a kino of humar aew fee bias,
his first biographical role plays a straight drama-
.. part with deep understanding aad eeaetien. He tseats
honestly by all these talent. Advt.
in
singa,
I and In
tic par
I honestl
_____
Sunday's Dividends
PIRST RACR
2~eReWSP$?r2Sa0' ' "
Cadrlno $2.20.
, _. SECOND RACR
1Tom Collins $97,33 jn 7
2Chic's Ned $Ts I
-Copar $5.40^.
Oyaje: SIM
1 . "MtD RACE
it?.l?h7.rroIT* W-M-
zCachlta $3.20. 8.40.
3Don Manuel $8.20
Oaw-Twe: $ig.
t.m I01* ACE
1Lady Edna $4.40, 3 2
J-Rablblanco $6.40 2$i
l-Wlnsaba $M
9Mb: fir
.__. PIPTBRACR
1-After Me $4JO, 2.8O.
3Kiosco $9.40.
SIXTH RACE
2Oallsto $3.20. 4.
fIguasO $5.20.
SEVENTH RACE
Persiflage $760. 6.80. .
3-Devonahlre Club f24.80, 7J0.
1Alminar $9.40.
PaaMc. $52.40.
EIGHTH RACR
|1Yosiklto $1120,5.
Kutach
Poger ....
McQarvey
Hermann
Glelchman
Jacober ..
Zeletes ...
Bates ....
Almeda ..
....,
"'...'.
190
189
186
184
183
183
182
181
181
PACITOD COSMOPOLITAN
' MTXED LEAGUE
Team Standings
Termites .... M
Braniff Airways V. V. . g
iy.--. -1.......
3Petite $2.60.
Qwialeb: $12M.
1 . NINTH RACR
l-Oceaq Star $16.40, 5.20, 3.40.
2-Rtaul $2.80. 140.
>-Tingt $4.80.
Oae-Tw.: $51.46.
TENTH RACR
1Mossadeq $6.20, 340.
2Albatross $2.60.
George Welsh Leads
South To Victory
In Shrine Game
H Little George Welsh of Navy gat
on. a dasaling display of his tal-
ent as the nation's champion
passer for 42,179 fans in tho Or-
ne Bowl last night to lead the
South team to a 20 to 7 victory
l' the .North in the annual
Shrine College All-Star football
game.
The KS pound ejwerteraaek
* rf...*#*rto***|y a* er
food little man with passes Is
r^U v*B "*** ,er
!^*..g m*n- threw over
the beads ef a behemoth
"Ok*." line be on. t.-eh-
dewa aad eat ep two ethers,
ne ef which he scored him-
of his passes was All-America
Ron Beagle of Navy and Harold
Burnine of Missouri, who top-
ped the country ln pass cstching
this season. "
The five-foot-10 pass-master
completed 12 of 20 tfirSw ioK
! J*1S of 1M vrd to be
named the "outstanding player*
of this eighth annual'classic.
Two^of hb passes were inter.
" *nd 15 seconds old when
Welsh dropped toss Into Be^
51. rma tar Jyard touch-
18 .Tn p,ay South CarolinaTjoe
f"" ^overed a fdmbltT by
Sf.b^Jl08t.0LWe?t Virginia o
th* North 31 toseT'Up"th';'pb7
The Smith's final
in
scorln g
the third
JOB*
march of 80 yards
period showed the fans
how good the little man
Coaldale. Pa., really was. Webh
nti Beagle twice, then halfback
Jack Loach of Miami and Bur-
nine to cover 68 yards.
Established 1893
Highland
Queen
SCOTCH WHISKY
ueen
MACDONALO 4 MUIR LIMITSO, DwdHf, Lwtk.


MX, DECEMBER . 1W
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AM tWDEFKNPEWt DA1LT HtWSPAPBJ
PAGE Nlrtt
frowns Rouf Rams To Refo/n Pro Football Cha
ark Feared tied
lever Throw Again
y HARRY GRAYSON
._ ORD, Pis. (A>-or-
, Stooeham U delighted after
first time at bat at tin spons-
a golf touraament
by Statifrd, brought Stesve-
! adjacent hotel property!
terida reama o nationi
i followed the aame
ayeri with the keea iaterest of
golf fas, but the one the own-
VSn Now York ****-
ctaaest was UMagfh*;
ao who went Into the final
I with a clear ahot at the to
botmakera like Sameul
Snend, Mike Se aeh a k,
. Ed Oliver, Dow Ftaater-
., skip Alexander, ** Balding
Marty PurgpL
llNSTIAD, YOM1HAM gat kis
manager, Bill Riga, kept
yuooi trim and high-
.amateur out of Lake
fl. HU name: Alyi
here waa cause for alarm about
s' precious throwing arm,
the leas of their captain, one
big player of thaigame of
^all/easlly could wipe out
aatever chance the Gtente have
getting back on the right track
*L be recalled that the Poto
uoders" sad sack season of
?wa written off a total toes
gBorUtop Dark a*****0
i that wrapped up his am-
for the year as early as
, Ted Busaewski broke
ffk'Vthlrd rib tagging *"*"
foolishly attempted to smecs:
rt bailout of Klua ham-like band
aker and hitter Dark until Sept.
The worat was yet to coma-la
tog size package. On the sec-
day after getting back to the
ck of things, Dark was off bal-
when be hit the bag in try-
to boat out a bit in Phitodelr
a. He tumbled over on his right
dor.
ta give the shoulder a complete
rest.
Fortunately, an operation was
not necessary, but the disconnec-
tion had to heal. Dark know where
too division was, could feel it with
his fingers. He went to work at
kks off-season Job selling a ehe-
mically-treated mud used in dril-
Graham Sfars
Performance
In Farewell
Lakers Out At Sea In Try
To Keep Franchise Afloat
toe fas
THE DOCTORS' REPORT read
^separation" and Dark returned
i his Louisiana home with orders
.. was not until Nov. 8 that the
doctors permktted any exercise
having to do with the shoulder.
Dark then hung a blanket on a
wire in his backyard and tossed
baseballs at it from a distance of
SO and 89 feat
"I haven't thrown hard yet,"
he saya, "and before the golf tour-
nament I had to throw 3t balls be-
fore the shoulder loosened up. It
was tight, but then waa no pain.
DARK. WHO IS toe Baseball
Players' goaf champion, did not
have a club hi his hands until a
week before the Mayfair Ian
Open.
After a practice round with Sam
gnead and another in the proama-
teur, there waa still cause for ap-
prehension about Dark's ability to
throw a baseball wall. Dark him-
self waa deeply concerned.
The golf awing putts on the
boulder and Dark's was sore and
"But, as the doctors sad, the
golf swing was prociaaly what toe
Shoulder Beaded," says the au -
round athlete from Louisiana
State
"The soreness disappeared aft-
er the first round of the Open. It
as aa loose as ever throughout
the last three rounds.
"MOW I CAN "PLAT all the golf
I can eram in and, when the Ume
comea, prepare aa I always have
for the start of soring training. It
wUl be three months before I have
to throw hard and by then I am
now sure the shoulder will be aa
gtfor."*Stoneha. left Florid,
for Arixona highly pleased that he
invited Dark to compete in toe
VpthSto^; fir* m. that
player.
COS ANGELES, Dai. 27(UP)
Otto Graham went back into
retirement today alter a bri<-
llant farewell appearance m
which he ran and passed tne
Cleveland Browns to a 38-14 rout
over the Lot Angeles Rams for
their third National Football
League championnlp.
It waa a fttlsf climax to
fabulous career. Graham ena-
e4 1 years of service with the
Brownsthe team which re-
eerded the most successful
decade 9a pro football history
with 1 Straight division pen*
nants. Cleveland also has won
seven league titles In two cir-
cuits since eoach Paul Brown
took ever It years ago.
Brown termed Oraham *'tn|
ntest quarterback ever* thi-
ng yesterday's victory be,
fore a record crowd that paid a
record groas gate to witness the
world title piayoft in Memorial
Coliseum.
Oraham retired from pro
football after a similar cham-
pionship game show last year.
However, he returned this year
at the personal request of eoach
Brown. Oraham said he does not
Intend to play again. Brown al-
so added that he does not ex-
pect Otto to help him again.
Oraham scored two touch-
downsone with i 15-yard roll-
out and the othar on a one-loot
plungeand passed to two
touchdownshurling 60 yards
to Dante Lavelll and 39 to Ray
Renfro.
e ah grabbed yardage
whan needed, both en the
granad and through the air.
The Browns based their vic-
tory on a dafenso that picked
off seven opposition passesone
short of the 15-year-old record
for Interceptions In a champion-
ship game. Three of the inter-
ceptions produced touchdowns:
Cleveland scored In every pe-
riod, picking up a field goal in
the first, two touchdowns in the
second, two in the third and
one in the fourth.
y JIMMY RRI9LIN
YEW YOBS (NEA)
Mikkelsea, ttie plowboy
i talking about what has becemel settle for less.** he was saying.
one of the strangest stories in The M Mikkelsenwss referring
vam anorte to, of course, the troubles which
isadl "Maybe we won too much right (have crept upon the Minneapolis
HOU WME
0
a
by -TlTufcWAY*
Mtokelsoa,.tne plowboy sisad "Msvbe wejon ooo - a
Minneapolis Laker veteran, was'from the start" and people, won t
JQE
by
WILLIAMS
.it upon
franchise in the
ball Association.
_Js is the once-proud midwest-
era stronghold which had as much
to to with the league's present
success as anything else which
has happened in its 10-year histo-
ry. It wss Minneapolis, with its
overpowering George Miksn.
which made professional
ball big league.
basket
But new. In ha seventh year of
operation, the Minneapolis situa-
tion is shaky. The Lakers wound
up losing money Isst year and
this time around, slthough the
season is young, the result must
be the same. Tha crowd Just
aren't coming out.
"We won five out of the first
six championships we tried for,
Mikkelsen points out. "At first,
people were excited. But now, we
have to battle against apathy.
The front office has to hustle over-
time to keep people interested.
Maybe it's too much success, I,
don't know.
"Merchants always wire throw-
ing a night for somebody or giv-'
ing sway prises for the highest
scorer and things like that. Heck,
a guy could get himself a new
overcoat or a TV set or a washing
machine with a good night.
"But the gifts weron t as ira-
portsnt as the enthusiasm be;
End them. Now. it's all gone.
EAST-WEST impresario BUI
Coffman is rJiappy because Ed-
die ErdelsU, a San Francisco boy
yet, took Navy stars Ron Beagle
and George Welsh south To Mia-
mi's Shrine game ... after Beagle
had told a New York writer he ex-
pected to go to the Coast contest...
One ef the veteran Brown line
stars will be axed after this sea-
ten because hit off-field didees
get ewt o hand ... he was slug-
ted with a beer bottle in a tav-
ern.
Octave Blake's passion for
harness racing is more than senti-
mental. The Grand Circuit prexy
once met a crucial payroll for
us vast industrial firm by cashing
in bonds secured from the sale of
a colt given him by his father a
trotting tyro, too. ... Blake, who
mixes golf and horses at Prince-
ton quarterback and a naval flier
of World War I vintage... and, of
course, reared the '54 Ham ble too
aa winner, Newport Dream. ..
The Syracuse Nationals, last
season's pre basketball champs,
are going abroad next April un-
der Stare Department auspices to
flesh their stuff in such places as
Iceland and Rome.
When Ssn Francisco's basket-
ball team is piling up the points,
All-America BUI Russell has a
tendency to-loaf ... not because
he's lszy, but because he doesn t
want the gap to become too big.
or .coach Phil Woolpert will yank
hint . his traditional post-game
greeUng to Phil: "What you trying
to doVCoach, give me callouses?'
c^Woyf efe'and' $KSZ^&fe G..U-
ST(ll) tie' Knickerbocker, battle for a rebound during
National Basketball Association conteat at Maduon Square Garden
I Aseoei

Who's Lighiweighi Champ?
SmithQnly OneWhoKnowjl
MwSEi MttHa ^ThTthlrd- es White ta MM to
L& K! BVM aalrtrtraaaemabiy be ar.aed that Friend's l&
Ano^ta^ateuTable factor ta eomparaUve batting power If
one league has more power at the plate than *he other, It foUows
tat tha pitcher' burden will be lighter or heavier, depending
on which league he works in.
CONFUSION ENTERS V
ha testifies there 1 greater virulence in the National. Of
the 2?tchrV^ankedVlMtanlnp pitched to nnimum> require-
nVtT aVangH ranged tronHLsTto 5J8. j the American *
ateo qauUfied and the spread was LOT to 4.4a._____
L* tk>M m> be Mthinc conclusive about these ligares,
ehbeT Wteto? to atoTSa.paratrve. If the pKehl.g to the
AsMrtoasfwas ef a higher order aad who can prove that It
^V-Thto would togtoall, account tot the tower run prodae-
hi HMaaesttonably a valid instranaent ta appratotag
dtehtog efcfUa whsa^erftaed to .no league, tat toses sn-ch
if Ite Interpretive cogency when asked to euver toa m.eh tor-
rtU,IttenUon waa called to the possible dlsintofratlon of Cleve-
land oitchins In thto space a few issues back. ERA offers cor-
iSattob^romT3.e4.Vnd AL leader In V. Garcia slipped to
2 aqdlWh place, and Lemon from 111 to 1.88 and only five
complete games. o o .
BYRNE AND TURLEY
The normal expectation to that a pitcher who moved from
a* aeventh-nlace club to a pennant winner will show immense
topTOwmer^Tbto waan't altogether true of Turley. acquired
by the Yankees toTa spectacular "-player deal last winter.
Tarley sUmsnad kJs BsrUaoore J.45 EEA ta J.aS, struck rat
lit won 17 and tost 13 and bettered hto control somewhat, tat
K osa hardly he said he was a rearing ball of fire. Be waa sap-
.,fl to make the Yankees a shoe-to. Instead, It waa the vet-.
Control was the secret of Byme's dramatic comeback. It
would help Turley if he could uncover one like It. In '64 he
fanned I8S and walked 181. Last season he narrowed the ratio.
Evan so, with 171 he was till the wildest pitcher In the league.
Here are two lines, marking a span of even seasons, that
succtntly describa Byrne's ucceaaful struggle to locate the plate:
Year W-L Innings SO BB Ranked ERA
ISO 1-7 IN lfS 17 ISth 3.72
IMS 1S-S 1.4 7 14 th 3.U
Ta '* (too IB and 11) Byrne led tha league In walks. In-
deed, In '51 he walked more than twtoa aa many aa he struck out.
Last season there were eight other pitchers who made more ex-
travagant use of the pass. >
"It took me 1 years to learn how tojHtoh," he says.
Turley'a stUl got seven to make It. He started In '48.
By JIMMY BM!UN -
NEW YORK (NEA) The
main event at Madison Square
Garden had ended and two four-
round fighters were knocking each
other. around in the ''crowd chas-
er," as this final bout of the night
to called. ,.
About the only one in the now-
emptying arena who seemed to
have an interest la it waa aguy
at ringside. He wore a brown
suit and thin mustache and he
hunched over moved bU.body
with the sunches and called to
one 0f the fighters in the ring.
Ha must be a relative." a
Doctator on his way out mused.
,PSabably just,, aaoth; gu
who likes fights," a spmrtewriter
answered. '^Anhough he looks a
little familiar."
As they left Wallace (Bud)
Smith, the lightweight champion
of the world, was clapping his
hands and still calling to the pre-
liminary boy.
This is an example of the born
too-late bad luck which, has hit
the slim, hard-punching Smith
He is a champion of the world
today, but only the hardiest fight
fan could begin to tell you who
be is. Even 10 years ago, the
lightweight championship was as
solid a holding as the best utility
tfhclr
But in 1B5S, Smith Is a (ham
lea with little more than loose
change to his pocket, a future
which is, st bast, uncertain and
a name which only people who
read record books know much
gbe"* _a*
When Smith outpunched Jim
my Csrter six weeks ago at Cin-
cinnati, he received the biggest
purse of hto csreer about fat.ooo.
That's the kind ef money a Beau
Jack would have Beared at 10
years sgo. For Smith, however, it
might be aa much as he'll ever
get
Smith ssys. But where are they
going to coma from'
Until things straighten out.
Smith dutifully walks into the
Passyunk Gymnasium in Phila-
delphia at two o'clock each after-
noon and starts training. He seems
to be the only guy interested in
the whole affair.
GOOSE REPLACES DEER
ALLEGAN, Mich. -(UP) Den-
ver Anderson and Douglas Parker
were returning home after an un-
successful dsy of deer hunting
when they spotted a wUd Canadian
goose walking down the street at
Allegan's main intersection. They
caught the goose bare-handed and
dined on it later.
The Minneapolis story- h n* *
new one in basketball. Since they
started playing this game for
money, many cities of sue have
been good for. st best, seven
ye*For some resson," Joe Lap-
ehick of the Knickerbockers re-
calls "s town would burn use1;
out sfter that period. It happened
in a lot of places -Indianapolis,
Sheboygan, Buffalo, Oshkosk
They'd go great for about seven
years and then nobody would
show up for games and you d have
"Of course, the trouble In those
days was that the talent never
changed. You had fellows like
Pete Barry, Johnny Beckman and
myself playing right into middle
age years. Why, I left the Celtics
when I wss 36. But the only rea-
son I stopped was because I got
tne St. John's University ach-
ing job. Otherwise, I'd be praying
now. .
"Today, we have a major league
presentation, with the top college
talent, from coast to coast, com-
ing up each season. But maybe
you'll still come on s town which
will burn out on you. So you keep
going until you hit on a set-up
of citiesnot /amsll ones, either
which can eairy the game aU the
way."
. Russell hasn't fouled out
Kme since his sophomore season,
ock hardwood. .
Publicist Peto Reselle, back
from an inspection o* Olympic
facilities In Melbourne, says IW-
Infl quarters Down Under will
be no problem . staying in pri-
vate homes bests any hotel ac-
commodations. .
The pro football Giants still
send a contract annually to Ed
Kalafat ef the Lakers followed
by the personal contact of a line
coach every time the Minneapolis
basketeers hit New York ... inside
story on the state of the Laker
franchise is that the players them-
selves say the town is burned out
aa a basketball spot. .
Attendance in the NaMenel Bas-
ketball Association Is ust 17 per
cent over teat year ... and so's
the calaber of ley, thonks to the
most remarkable crop of rookies
m the erne. . .
Don't gauge the progress of All-
Americas Tom Gola aad Dick Rk-
as.
Oeteve Blake
kette in the pro cage ranks by.
their low scoring totals ... M-pfua <
as coUegians, they've been confin-
ing themselves mostly to plsymak-
ing for the other gunners oa their
squads ... it's a loss-up between
Gola and Rochester's Mguriee
Stokes for NBA rookie of the yesr.
Rah Ceusy rovoaline his basket-
ball philosophy to Sister Martin
In e pest-aame huddle: "De-
fense? I don't oven knew how
to spell the word:" . .
The solicitous alumnus was
psssing the time of day with the
college coach: "How're things at
home?" . "Cap't kick." ... "The
wife in good health?" ... '"Bout
usual." ... "And that boy of yours,
he's really growing up, isn't he?'
... "Can't say. I'D have to check
the films first." ...
Between' yeuVme, ? h o r o' e
mere than met newsprint In the
recent story that had eH's so.
del circles buestof. ...
?5
rodo y Encanto .25
WAHOO! SllS.ee
Janet Leigh, in
"FEARLESS FAGAN"
Clark Gable, In
"MUTINY on the BOUNTY"
"' "
Today IDIAL .20 10
Gregory Peck, in
"SNOWS of KILIMANJARO
". ^aaargd-jB^aom. Ist-
"SUPBRnMWTrt EXILE*
This is whet has been running
through the thinking of profes-
sionsl basketball people. The word
is that Minneapolis is close to be-
ing through. The town thst put
pro bssketball ever in a big way
may be out of the picture before
longto be replaced by the- need-
ed Chicago or Detroit.
*
Opas Niabthr frees
8:00 tm.
ROULETTE
21 (BLACKJACK)
CRAP TABLE
PURER
CHUCK-A-LUCK
SLOT MACHINES
BAR SERVICE
Ir-ron 4

tional Boxing Club says. "There
has been mention of a champion
ship match with DuhoA Lot of
Italy and somebody talked about
a eon-title fight with Art Aragn
oa the West Coast. But nothing
has been done."
Graziano and Ferrante say
they'll appeal. Smith aays, "I'll
back to my original manager,,
MarsUlo."
Ha to caught, you see, between
daae of public apathy far aay-
thing less than a red-hot cham-
pionship match and a load of
managerial troubles which have
him stymied.
It all revolves sround Carmine
Graiiano and Tony Ferrante.
They bought Smith's contract m
May and a month later had him
in the ring with Carter at Boston
where Smith won the title.
Since then, Pennsylvania has
revoked their lfcaasee far een-
sorting with people not consid-
ered among our finer eititeas.
"We cannot do business with
Smith because of this situation."
Harry Markson of tha Interns-
OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA. REPUBLIC OS PANAMA
Complete Prizc-uinnin* Numbers in the Ordioary Drawinr No. 1920, Sunday, December }S, 1955
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided hi two series "A" 4c "B" of 22 pieces each
First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize
4287 $ 44,000.00
6270 $ n.200.00
0558 $ 6,600 oo
Vic
MarsUlo, the Newark. N.J. fun-
nyman, doesn't know about it.
"I had the guy for five and a
half years and I got only one fight
In Madison Square Garden," Jie
ssys. "I had to put him in with
fighters I'd never okay ordinarily
but be had to eat. So I sold him
for $3,500. I acted as aa adviser
for the second Carter fight. But
that's all. If I get Smith back with
no strings attached, maybe I'll
take him."
So, bare is a champion who. it
seems, has, nobody creating a de-
mand for him. It's tha kind of a
strange thing that can happen on
ly in today's brand of boxing
"I'm a champ now. They got
to give sae the right fights"
sun
fztr
am
sur
ess.
SSST
7*7
sen
PrlM
IM.SS
usase
isxas
iss.ss
in.se
in.se
m.os
inssi
. in.se'
N.
1ST
1187
IOT
1SS7
14ST
1SS7
1SS7
IJS7
1ST
1SS7
132 M
iss.es
ijee.ee
in.es
in.se
in.se
in.es
U2.se
in.ee
inss
No rrtzaa. s 12.SS zjes.se

35. 22S1
23S7 in.ee
I4S7 132.0
I2SST uses
Izsst in.se
II7S7 utas
2SS7 mse
Ixssr in.es
sen
J2S7
SSS7
MST
S7
PriiM
S
in.es
in.ee
2,m.ee
inss
inss
in.e
m.se
m.ee
in.ee
in.ee
No
asi
1ST
4287
an
OS7
SSI
4SST
TS7
SSI
Prlxae

in.es
iss.es
ii.eee.ee
inss
in.ee
ins
uj.ee
ins.
U2.M.
iss.se'
N
sen
sin
S
S4S7
SI
sen
S7S7
S
me
inss
use.es
in.
ISZSS
ins
ins
in.es
isi.ee
ins
No
1S7
SZST
ess?
4S7
ssn
sen
TS7
SSS7
an
rrtiM
s
in.
inss
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usas
nj.es
me
ins
in.e
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i

a Prlu* Ma ftiM Mo frtae
7SSTt 7 in in: sen sin mse ins VS. sen is-* toas*
72S7 1SS7 *B8 ton usass ISMS uoes issse
7S7 ins S4S7 ins ear us.es
jsn 1SSSS SSS7 isa.es seer sas.es
: Ten inss sen 1110 sen in.ee
I'lSl in.es am lasse nn use
178*7 ins ssn ist.es sat m.w
'7SS7 IJ1W see in.e seer tttss
Approximstioos Derived From First Prize
427S
ns
ess
sat
42S1
s
44SSS
an
2*3
S
.es
tas test I sss
a
a
a
ess
2S1
tK
t
sse
tees
4t.M
esss
AppTtiiinuiioos Derived From Second Prize
ens
tales
Ml
II
110.00
in
a.
on
usa
iie.ee
m
nee
lie ee
mi
s
nee
iie.es
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n net
mi
ii.
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ns
s
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3,
ue.ee
1ISS
m
ns
ii e
Ii.
s
ne.ee
SM
ITT
ite.ee
ne.e
Ml
em
s
sss.se
',153
Approximation? Derived From ITiird Prize
o*Ajybodif fistadL
' THE PEDRO MIGUEL BOAT CLUB
NOTICE NOTICE NOTICE
There will be an important businsss meeting at the
Pedro Miguel Boat Club, December 27th at "(8)
eight p.m. All sales repreaanUtivag that have ac-
counts with this club and all members ara urged
toattand
ZSH

uts
its..
SM IttM SMS
132 00
SMI
esat
MM
ssee
MSS
MS*
S
mse
TSH
S
1MJ
S
atase
St
Prlsewlnnlng Numbers of Sunday's Lottery Drawing were old at: First. Second and Third in Panama
Tha Nine Honored whale tickets ending ta 7 and net inrlnded In the above Isst win Perty-Faar Dollars S44.M
The whole ticket has 44 pieces which comprises the two aeries
each
"A" and "B"
Signed by: ALBBRTO AXEMAN, Governor of the Province ot Panama Cad. 47-HISS
The RepresentaUve Of The rreasurv RICARDO A MELENDaW
WrrNBBBBS
Carlos O. Batn. Cod. No 43-1S437
Juan B. Nieto, Cd. 1S-1323
ALBBRTO 3 BAR8ALLO
Notary Public. Panama
PABLO A PINBL.
Secretary


Welsh Leads South To Shrine
(NEA Telephoto)
PRESENT FBOM 1KB At the annual Christmas party ^for
White House sUff members and newsmen who cover the Chter
Executive. President Elsenhower gave each o them a copy of
the above landscape which he painted. The painting, a winter
scene of a mountain stream in the Colorado Rockies, was started
a week before the President suffered his heart attack and com-
' pleted while he was recuperating In Fltsslmons Hospital.
* *
Ike To Spend Quiet Week

On State Of Union Message
WASHINGTON Dec. 27 (UP)I The President's Christmas holi-
President Eisenhower today began day ended in the afternoon when
si quiet week of pondering that he
will tell Congress next month a-
bout the problems of the U n i t e d
States and the world.
Mr. Ils.nh.wer will deliver his
annual Stata a the Unlan mat-
sale shertly after Congress can-
vana next tueeday.
Ha planned to devote the rest of
the week to sorting 1 *is office
on the., message. As slant White
House press secretarf Mti r r a y
Snyder said no official callers are
scheduled.
Snyder aid the president has
Siven no further indication whether
e will go South this winter as his
doctors recommended. The doctors
suggested the trip to aid the Presi-
dent's recovery from Ms heart at-
tack
Mr. Eisenhower told the Key
West, Fla., Chamber of Commerce
last week he doubts he could get
away from Washington this winter,
hutt if he could he "should go no
further south than Georgia.
The President interrupted h 1 s
long holiday weekend early yester-
day morning to meet at his office
with secretary of state John Foster
Dulles for sbout an hour.
Dulles told reporters afterwards
hat he and the President discussed
four or five matters." He said
"nothing special" was on the a
genda. 6
Snyder told reporters as Dulles
went into the President's oval of-
fice that the legal holiday "was
the kind of a day the President and
secretary of state cad talk togeth-
er for an hour and probably get
twice as much done" as on a reg-
alar work day.
Snyder made the statement af-
ter a photographer c r a k e d,
"Doesn't the President know it's
a haitday?"
AN INDEPENDENT

YHfe
DAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama Metican
"Let the people know the truth and the country is mfe" Abraham Uncoln.
list TEAK
PANAMA. R. P., TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1835
FIVE CENT
Russian 'Peace Budget' Cuts
Defense Money By One-Tenth
MOSCOW, Dec. 27 (UP) The
Soviet of the Union, one of the
houses of parliament, met today
In the Kremlin to continue its
discussion of the budget.
The Soviet of Nationalities, the
second chamber, was scheduled to
meet on the same topic later.
Both chambers were expected to
wind up their discussions on the
budget tomorrow and adopt it un-
animously with negligible modifi-
cations.
Psrliament will then proceed to
the next item on the agendarati-
fication of decrees enacted by the
Presidium of the Supreme Soviet
since August
The word "moderation" was cir-
culating through the corps of
western observers here as they
critically exsmined the first day
of the special session of the Su-
preme Soviet. For the first time
in years, a speaker at the meet-
ing of the Supreme Soviet (parlia-
ment) did not attack the west.
There was no mention of "ag-
gressive designs against the So-
viet." In fact, there was little
mention of the west st alL
his son/ Maj. John Elsenhower,
and his three grandchildren return-
ed to Ft. Belvoir, Va., after spend-
ing an old-fashioned Christmas at
the White House.
It was a gay and typical
American Christmas celebra-
tion far the lisenhewers. It in-
cluded church, the usuel ehti,
carel sbtgmf, picture taking, end
traditional bhj family Christmas
dinner, with turkey and all the
But the highlight of the celebra
tion was the grandchildren on
whom President Eisenhower dotes.
Together with their father, Maj.
Eisenhower,, three of themDavid,
7, Barbara Anne, 6, and Susan
nearly four spent their Christmas
at the White House.
Their mother, Mrs. Barbara
Eisenhower, was at nearby Walter
Reed Army General Hospital where
she gave birth to little Mary Jean
last Wednesday. But she was able
to get away from the hospital for
a few hoars for the family dinner.
The children dominated Presi-
dent Eisenhower's Christmas day.
He played Santa for them, without
benefit of costume, and bea m e d
proudly as they rendered "0 Come,
All Ye Faithfull" In a special car-
oling for newsmen.
At the height of the celebra-
tion, the President herded the en-
tire family into the magnificent
East Room to pose for their first
family portrait m the White House.
Little David, wearing a grey suit
with long pants and a bright red
bow tie, summed up the family's
Christmas as he walked into the
room. As he put it to newsmen:
Boy, did I have a time today."
Papal Address Soon
To Give Church View
On 'Painless' Birth
VATICAN CITY, Dec. 27 (UP)
Pope PiUS XII will tell doctors
from all over the world next
month the churchs* views on pal
ess "natural" childbirth, Vatican
sources said today.
The sources said the important
papal address, to be given Jan.
8 to a mass audience of obstetri-
cians, will deal with the moral
implications of painless childbirth
methods.
The Rome Institute of Genetics
sent out invitations to medical as-
sociatlons sll over the world to
send delegations of obstetricians
to the Pontiffs audience.
In previous addresses to medic-
al men, the Pope has given the
church stand on such subjects as
birth control and psychiatry, and
he has discussed the possible
harmful effects of tobacco and
some drugs.
Pius XJI has delivered more
speeches on scientific matters
than any of Ms 20 predecessors,
as part o the "apostolate of the
word."
In his annual Christmas mes
sage Saturday, the pontiff .dis-
cussed atomic energy and warned
that the testing and use of nu-
clear bombs must be stopped if
man is to avoid a world catas
trophe. A _^_^
Instead, there was a ""peace
budget" for 1M that cot do
fes spending by one-tenth and
promised a better deal for the
Russian consuaser.
The budget, in the form of an
appropriations bill, was presented
to the opening of the special ses-
sion yesterday by Finance Minis-
ter Arseni E. Zveres.
It switches emphasis to housing,
consumer goods and industry.
The meeting itself is expected
to end tomorrow. ,
By then, the delegates will hsve
heard a report on the recent tour
of India, Burma and Afghanistan
by Premier Nikolai Bulganin and
Communist Party Secretsry Niki-
ta Khrushchev.
The appropriations bill caned for
defense budget of 102* billion
rubles compared with last year s
112 billion rubles. The cut in ef-
fect wipes out the 12 per cent in-
cresse in military spending in-
cluded in the current budget.
Arms account for 18.0 per cent of
the new budget compared with
19.9 per cent In the 1955 budg
et
There Is no official rate of ex-
change for the ruble. The going
diplomatic rate makes one ruble
equivalent to 25 cents American.
Zverev's speech accompanying
the budget was one of the most
moderate made before the law-
makers in 20 years.
He said emphasis would be on
housing, consumer goods and in-
dustry.
following up criticism of hous-
ing the government said it would
Increase living space 18 per cent.
Zverev promised a higher rate
of consumer goods production, al-
though it will not be the "sharp
upsurge" promised in former Pre-
mier Georgi Malenkov's speech in
1953. After Malenkov resigned lsst
February. Accent against wss
placed on heavy industry.
This lsst received top priority
in the new budget again. But cut
ture, education and social servic-
es ajso came in for increased al-
locations, i
Zverev also said the Soviet U-
nlon will train 70,000 technicians
during 1956. This is sn increase
of 12,000 over 1955 when Russia
turned out more sic enlists and en-
gineers than any other nation.
At the slsrt of the day'a mee-
ing, the legislature adopted a
four-point agenda: .
1. The budget for 1956 and re-
ports in fulfillment of the 19 54
budget.
2. Confirmation of interim de-
crees issued bp the Presldum of
Parliament the interim body
since the last session.
3. Reports of the exchange of
delegations between the Supreme
Soviet snd other parliaments.
4. A report on toe Asian tour of
Premier Nikolai Bulganin and
Communist Party leader Nikita
Krushchev.
The meeting is expected to last
three days.
The morning session today end-
ed with a statement by the lead-
er of a visiting delegation from
the Iranian parliament. His pres-
ence as a guest sepaker was con-
sidered significant because Iran
has hist joined the anti-Commu-
nist Baghdad Pact.
Read story, on page
Chinese, Algerian Rights
To UN Questioned By Faurel
PARIS, Dec. 27 (UP) Pre-
mier Edgar Faure dropped a new
campaign topic into the bands of
French voters today and got
a thunderous cheer for his efforts.
He questioned whether it was
'realistic'' that Nationalist China
should remain seated on the U-
nited Nations Security Council.
And he stirred up the Algerian
T
Paris Police Nab
Man Who Planted
Bomb In Basilica
PARIS, Dec. 27 (UP) Paris
breathed easier today after police
arrested a 45-year-old baker and
charged Mm with trying to Wow Tha"t left
up the famed Basilica of the Sa-
cre Coeur with a crude time-
bomb.
Police esught up with the bak-
er, Daniel Havas, as he was pre-
paring to make a few more bombs
they formally charged him Mon-
day night with "attempted de-
struction of a, public building by
sn explosive substance."
The cryptic messages Havas
sprinkled around Paris signed
"Daniel, born Saint Maur, Count
of Paris" or "the son of S a n t a
Claus," put police oa his trail
put his bomb in the crypt of the
beautiful white Basilica of the
Sacred Heart atop Mont Martre
Hill on Christmas Eve. It was
found 50 minutes before the
Christmas Day noon mass.
They said when they caught up
with Havas in his lodging house
room at 75 Rue Doudeauville.he
readily confessed he was the man
they were hunting.
question by saying "the time
the colonies has passed." He al
admitted that Algeria could
completely integrate with Fra.
He spoke to 4,000 people in
Paris Salle Wagram, which of
is used for boxing matches
all-night balls. The 4,000 in
and 2,000 outside, cheered hi
at nearly every word.
' A spectacular debate was in
cards for tonight when Pier
Mendes-Frances has Comma
Party leader Jacques Duelos
his chief heckler at Paris' Is
sitkm Park.
Mendes has challenged Fo
Minister Antoin* Pinay, forml
Premier Georges Bidsult and
elos to cross verbal swords
him tonight.
Pinay refused and on Mol
Bidault asked to be excused
to pressing prior engageme
That left It between Vendes
Duelos both sharp-tongned or
ore. .
Opposition Leader
Faltering In Laos
More Funds Frozen In Buenos Aires;
New Peronista Revolt Is Overthrown
VIENTAINE, Laos, Dec. 27
(UP)" Opposition leader
Souvannavong took a back sei
in Laos' national elections tods
with more results coming in
lowing Christmas Day voting.
Here in Vintame, Foreign ML,
ister Phoui Sanaikone was leal
ing the poll. He is the leader
the Independent Party,
Premier Katai S a t o 111 h ws
leading in the south province
Champassak. He heads the 1
greaslVe Party.
Souvannavong had led the earl
polls. Final results sre expecte
on Thursday.
Education Minister Nhouy Al
hay protested Monday night thi
some polling stations closed to
early. He told newsmen he
self had been unable to vote.
Local Tours To Be
Resumed To Darien,
San Bias Islands
The colon Chamber of Com-
merce and the Panama Tourist
Bureau have announced resump-
tion of .their local tours in the
Republic of Panama.
These Include tours to San
Bias islands and the Darien re-
gion, both one-day plane and
boat trips, and one-day trips to
David, El Volcan and Boquete.
Several thousand America
tourists have taken advantage
of these low-cost group tours In-
to the. interior of Panama in
recent years. .'
Since these excursion* are
made only in the dry season,
prospective patrons are urged to
phone Colon Chamber of Com-
merce or Panama Tourist Bu-
reau to make reservations.
COPA will furnish the air
transportation flying a 30-paa-
senger DC-plane.
These trips have been planned
by the tour director of the
Chamber of Commerce, who can
be reached at Balboa 4394 for
additional information. Local
travel agents may be called for
reservations on scheduled tours.
BUENOS AIRES, Dec. 27 (UP) from
Funds of 360 individuals and 97
companies, were frozen today and
will remain so until they prove
French Revue Queen,
Owner Of $3,000,000
Legs, Critically HI
PARES, Dec. 17 (UP) -Misthv
guett of the lovely legs lsp critl-
caBv ill here today and thousands
of Parisians gathered around
newspaper stands to read reoorts
of her condition and revive mem-
ories of her golden days.
The 82-year old Mistinguett.
queen of the French vsrietv stage
anee the Guy Nineties, suffered s
Stroke Christmas eve while spend-
ing the holidays with her broth-
er. Her son. Dr. Leopoldo LI m s
Silva said she suffered s cerebral
congestion,
Mistinguett st 82 still claims the
"most beautiful legs in the world.''
They were once insured for $3,000,-
000 and they made her the star of
French music halls where she was
known not only for her legs but
for her champagne smile.
She was a star in her own right
at the age of 30 and she could
still perform agile feats of sere-,
batic dancing 30 years later. The
lsst tune she showed her famous
legs in a revue was in London in
1M7 and with customary success.
One of the usual ingredients of
her revues wss the dazxling sight
of Mistinguett descending s mas
sive staircase between rows of
shapely aads. Even with that
kind of eosenetition all eyes stay
ed on MiatiatTuett's sags.
Vinson Seeks Government Insurance
For GI Dependents' Medical Care
WASHINGTON Dec 27 (UP) ordered his committee staff to get es or mental and nervous dlsord-
Rep. Carl Vinson (D-Gs.). yester- together with Pentagon officials to ers.
. _1____,-_L-i - iu^.k Aiit a imwmm whr#hv till
work out a program whereby GI
dependents woiud' be assured of
medical care and the burden on | emergencies
military physicians eaesd.
The Defense Department later
submitted a proposal whereby a
inson, chairman of the House GI could tas ot medical insur-
d Service. Committee, t. a -m^d ^reimbursed
dap called for congressional ap-
proval of a government- support-
ed Insurance plan to help provide
medical care lor dependents of
servicemen.
Dental care would be limited to
reporter his committee hopes to
present the plan to-the House at
the forthcoming session of Con-
gress.
Under press law. dependents of
servicemen receive free govern-
ment medical csre if military
medical faculties are available.
But Maj. Gen. George E. Arm-
strong, Army surgeon general, has
complained the job of caring for
dependents has become so burden-
some it is interfering with the
regular military suties of service
physicians.
Uoon hearing Armstrong's com-
plaint hi the last session, Vinson
Food Poisoned Cake
for medical care received by
dependents in civilian hospitals.
The plan also would provide re-
imbursement for GI's who do not
laKe the insurance plan but whose
dependents get care in civilian
hospitals.
The GI would have to pay 30
per cent, of the first $100 of the
bill, plus IS per cent of the re-
mainder of in-patient care and 30
per cent of the remainder of out-
patient care.
The Defense Department esti-
mated that out of the 2.200,000 GI
dependen, about SOO.OOO would be
covered by the insurance plan.
It was estimated that under the
isuraace program the government
would pay about 73 million dollars
Hospitalize? Dozen tiKjtir** ctr' *
For civilian care for dependents
BRINDISI, Italy, Dec. 27 (UP) i not under the insurance plan, the
estimated pearly cost to the g o v
estimated yearly cost to the gov-
their profits were legal under the
regime of ousted Dictator Juan
D. Peron.
Two of the firms involved are
Industrias Kaiser Argesrtins, a
$0,000,000 affiliate of the Henry
J. Kaiser Enterprises in the Unit-
ed SUtes, and the Williams Chem-
ical Co.
A total of 172 firms now are un-
der investigation for possible illi-
cit profits from 1843 until the
downfall of Peron in the revolu-
tion last Sept. 20.
The list of individuals whose
funds have been attached Includes
figures in the world of sports, the
theater and virtually all collabo-
rators of the Peron regime.
Among them are Juan Manuel
Fanglo, world champion auto rac
er whose interests extend into the
business field, internationally
known tennis star Teran de Weiss,
actress Fanny Navarro and Aus-
trian industrialist Frits Mandi.
AJI former deputies snd former
governors of the Peron administra-
tion who were not on the original
list of 239 individuals whose as-
sets were frozen Dec. 9 were in-
cluded in the latest list.
The provincial government at
San Luis announced today it
crushed a Peronista revolt on
Christmas eve and arrested "a
number of persons."
The plot involved non commis-
sioned officers, motorized anti-air-
craft troops, several federal police
officers and civilians loyal to oust-
ed dictator Juan D. Peron, the
government said.
It said a series of r s i d s 'on
Christmas eve broke up the plot.
One soldier was killed and two
rebels wounded in a skirmish at
the home of a former Peronist
deputy in Villa Mercedes, the gov-
ernment said.
The plot wss discovered Fridsy
morning when an officer noticed
conscripts in the anti aircraft
force had risen early on
noncoms to take shooting Rebels holed up in the home of
practice. No such practice was the Estrada brothers, one of
scheduled for the day. The offi
cer notified bis regimental com-
mander and second srmp head-
quarters was advised.
The army moved in, and 20 non-
coms were arrested. Their state-
ments implicated others including
police officers and civilians, au-
thorities ssld.
TV- federal interventor commis-
sioner questioned the prisoners
and they were sent 400 miles to
Buenos Aires from San Luis, s ci-
ty of sbout 2,000 population in
west central Argentina. It is the
Sits of a big Argentine Air Force
base. ,.
The interventor said "security
measures" were imposed on the
night of Dee. 23-24, and the ar-
rests were msde to head off "dis-
orders. '
Similar incidents have occurred
this month in the cities of Mendo-
zs, La Pista and Cordoba, where
the revolution that ousted Peron
last Sept. 20 got its impetus. '
A military and police detail
closed in on the latest plot early
Ciristmss eve, raiding several
places at Villa Mercedes.
whom had been a Peronist deputy
in congress, opened fire.
The government forces returned
the fire, officials said. One draf-
tee was silled, two other persons
were wounded in the house, in-
cluding one of the Estrada broth
ers. Twelve persons were arrested
after the rebels hoisted a white
flag.
Red Radio Lauds
Pope's Xmas Talk
LONDON,'Dee. 27 (UP) Mos-
cow radio said last night t h a
Pope Pius XII's views on disarm
ament in his Christmas massage
"command attention.''
The broadcast, made in Italian
and monitored here, said that in
many countries public opinion
"heard with satisfaction" that
part of the speech "in which the
Pontiff expressed himself in favor
of prohibiting nuclear weapons, in
favor of the termination of atomic
testa, and for the setting up of ar
mament supervision."
Inspection Of Private CZ
Vehicles Begins January 3
Inspection of privstely-owned ve-
hicles in the Canal Zone, required
by the new traffic regulations, will
begin at the Motor Transportation
garages at Ancos and Cristobal,
Jan. 3, it was announced st Bal-
boa Heights.
The Army Navy, and Air Foree
are making arrangements for the
inspection snd certification of ve-
hicles owned by their personnel.
No csrs qualifying for base pass-
es nor those licensed in Panama
orderswill be inspected by the Motor
About s dozen persons who ste
bad Christmas cakes still were ai-
der treatment for food poisoning pitis to an estimated 1
in a hospital today. a year.
More than SO persons altogeth Medical care would be limited
er ste the cakes Sunday night. A- to diagnosis scute medical a a
bout 40 adults snd children were surgical conditions, contagious di-
given first aid treatment at the aeases, immunization and matera-
hoapittl and sent home. The oth- al and infant care.
era were reported not in serious It would not include house calls,
condition. I hospitaliza tion lor chronic disess-
MIGs Cause Alert1
On Chinese Island
TAIPEI, Dec, 27 (UP) CM
munist M1G jet fighters a[
ed Matsu Island. Nationalist
na's Northern Island outpost, si
caused an air alert Monday.
The Official Central News
gency warned that the Reds maj
attack Matsu earlier than expec
ed. in view of recent intensive
tion of Red military activity
round the off-shore Island.
It was the third time in three!
dsys that Red forces had appear|
ed in these waters, according
Central News.
BALBOA TIDES
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21
HICH LOW
2:19 a.aa. :57 M
2:57 p.m. fill ad
f
-----------------------------------------1------------
Uvula D^ii
^f (NEA Telephoto)
WATSIDE INN BAT AGED BY FIRE A than tie of Ice covers the charred remains of the
Wayside Inn at Sudbury, Mass., after it was ravaged by a $200,000 fire. Firemen, working in
10-below-zero weather, had to chop through IS Inches of brook ice to get water to fight the
blase. The 268-year-old inn was Immortalised la Longfellow', Tales of a Wayside Inn."
Transportation Division.
The motor vehicles will be in-
spected for: Tne proper operation
of brakes; lightsincluding turn
indicators wmch ara required on
all cars manufactured later than
Jan. l, IBM, and oa certain vat-
eles from which hand signals ara
not easily visible; steering macna-
nlsm; wheel alignment; horn or
otoer Warning tie vices; windshield
wipers; exhaust pipes and muf-
flers; rear view mirrors; wind-
shield and door glass; and tires.
The inspection st tne Motor
Transportation Division garages
wm continue througn t eh. . in
spec tion hours ere: Noon through
p.m. Mondays through Fridays
and 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays,
during tne inspection period oi a
little over eight weeks.
A fee of su cents, payable at the
inspection point, will be charged
tor each vehicle inspected st the
Motor Transportation Division ga-
rages.
When the car has paased Inspec-
tion, a circular sticker will be af-
fixed to the lower corner of the
windshield ana the car's registra-
tion certificate will be stamped
"inspected." These suckers and
base passes are the only ones
wmch may be fixed to the lour-
inch square at either aide of the
lower portion Of toe windsnield.
Car owners, whose vehicles do
net pass inspection will be requir-
ed to have the detective mecha-
nism or quipment repaired at any
garage of their choice; the vehi-
cles will then be inspected again.
In general, the re-inspection will
be done without charge. Cars
which fail to pass inspection and
where the delects are not reme-
diad satisfactorily will not be per-
mitted to operate on Canal Zone
highways after Marc* 1.
nspection of commercial vehi-
cles licensed to operate in the
Canal Zone has been required for
several years, but the inspection
of privstely-owned motor vehicles
has not been done before.
TODAY! 75c. 40c.
3:M 5:M T.H t:H p.m.
It' a joyous
screenful of muaic,
pectacleand
hnppinees!
The
Glass
Slipper
^^Spect^^UrNc^.
^\cotom ^\
nasawM-urs!
IMHON
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as as anensaf <*
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