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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/00963
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:00963
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Sunday supplement
        Page Supplement 1
        Page Supplement 2
        Page Supplement 3
        Page Supplement 4
        Page Supplement 5
        Page Supplement 6
        Page Supplement 7
        Page Supplement 8
        Page Supplement 9
        Page Supplement 10
        Page Supplement 11
        Page Supplement 12
        Page Supplement 13
        Page Supplement 14
        Page Supplement 15
        Page Supplement 16
Full Text

to RIO
THE MARVELOUS
CARIOCA CAPITAL!
BRANIFF
INTIRNATIONAL AIRWAY
L YeSUNDAY
Jtmeman
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.
Seagram's V.O. 1
CANADIAN WHISKY

m^
TEN CENTS
PANAMA, R. P., SUNDAY, DECEMBER .1MB
Wants Ban On H-Weapon Tests
Feather River
Slashes Levee
At Yuba City
o
MARYSVILLE, Calif., Dec. 24 (UP)- Tha Feather
River smashed through the levee at nearby Yuba City early
today forcini the evacuation of .ome 10.000 residents,
plus thousands of Marysville citizens who had taken
refuge there because of threats in their own area.
To the south, Stockton and Modesto ordered partial
evacuation as the rising Tuolumme River neared the over-
flow mark of 605 feet at Tuolumme dam.
But Christmas Eve brought a
glimmer of hope for some 25,000
homeless people. There w*a a
let-up in the week-long series oi
violent storms which ravaged
sections of California, Oregon
and Nevada. v*-
At least 15 persons were known
to have died and property dam-
age was estimated at nearly
$10,000,000 In floodir e as
itretching along a 500-mlles belt
Gifts Roll In To
Family Evicted
By Preacher
ST. PETERSBURG, Pla., Dec.
24 (UP) O"1 stacked up by
the hundreds today for a family
of eight who were evicted from
their small rented house three
days before Christmas by a
community preacher.
The preacher, the Rev. Ray
Hanselman, appeared at the
house In nearby pinellas Park
with a court order, a deputy
sheriff and two Negro trusties
late Thursday and moved all
the belongings of Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Chyle and their six small
children Into the front yard.
Chyle, a Junk yard man who
was away at the time, id he
had fallen $40 behind in his
$10 a week rent on the house
and had asked Hanselman for
an extension. The father aid
he had used most of his money
recently to buying sappl'et for
small house he is building.
Late yesterday Hanselman
aid the back rent was only part
of the reason he evicted the
Chyles. The family, he said,
"permitted their children to run
wild, piled junk all over the
place and permitted acts of de-
struction against the property.
"I feel very sorry for the chil-
dren," Hanselman added. "I be-
lieve they should be taken to a
home where they should be able
to get proper uphrlngine The
home was next to his church.
Chyle, expressing the fami-
ly'* surprised tratlfnde for the
gifts, emphasized that "I em
able to work and provide for
mi family. We don't hare
much but we manage to make
at."
By this afternoon. $500 In
cash, hundreds of dollars worth
of food and clothin* had been
collected, pinellas Park Police
Chief Ellis Devoe headed a
group of citizens who said they
were going to give the family a
"Christmas tree with plenty of |
presents."
Edward Rlccio. president of a
loci building company, prom-
ised a four-room house rent-free
"for as long as you need It." It
was one of four offers of free
housing.
from south-central California
to central Oregon and including
the Reno area of Nevada.
At the time of the surprise
break in the Yuba City levees,
nearly 2000 .volunteers were
fighting to keep Marysville from
being swallowed up by the tor
The Tuba CKy flood relieved
the pressure at Marysville,
where the river dropped 25
feet to a matter of a few
hours. .
Scores of helicopters, amphib-
ious ducks and volunteer boats
moved throughout. Yuba Citf
picking up water-soaked strag-
glers of the sudden evacuation.
Although the water varied
in depth from two to It feet,
it was believed that property
damage would be much less
than if the break had occur-
red in the Marysville levees.
Marysville is located in a
hollow which would have filled
up in a matter of minutes while
Yuba City is surrounded by
mostly flat agricultural land
which would allow the water to
spread.
One of the last reports out oi
Yuba City said there were some
signs of panic as residents
crowded In their cars and push-
ed their way Into lines of traf-
fic heading for higher ground
some 50 miles away at Woodland
and Colusa.
The Red, Cross reported at
woodland that the first of the
evacuees arrived early today. It
reported there was no panic in
that area, although the evacua-
tion cars were moving bumper-
to-bumper.
Weatherman Aims
To Keep Females On
Hurricane Blacklist
Christmas Message Calls
For Effective Disarmament
VATICAN CITY, Dec. 24 (UP).Pope Pius XII warned
today against the danger of further nuclear explosions am
called for a ban on the test and use of atomic and hydrogen
weapons.
The Pope emphasized, however, that the ban on tests
must be accompanied by simultaneous world agreement
on an effective $y$tem of in$pection, control and disarma-
ment.
In his annual Christmas message broadcast to the
world, the 79-year-old Pontiff warned that the fate of "the
whole human race" is at stake.
He cited detailed scientific reasons for halting nu-
clear explosions and painted a grim picture of the horror
which awaits man unless he brings the atom under con-
trol.
"Only the inconsolable weep*
ing o/ humanity which in det-
olation will gaze upon the ca-
tastrophe brought on by It
won foUy."
Sitting on a golden throne in
the consistorial hall of the a-
postollc palace of the Vatican,
the Pope spoke for <45 minutes
clearly and firmly..
He appeared in excellent
health for a man of his years,
in striking contrast to last
Christmas when he was so weak
he could nob deliver his annual
message.
r hrwtmas MAGIC The magic of a little boy's Christmas is shown in Marc Boles' eyes,
ITS *SiJ Santa's* knee for the first time. Marc, who lives to Balboa, was too thrilled to
place a large oTder but like many Canal Zone children, he found this morning that hte whisk-
ered friend had not forgotten hhn_______________________________(fnoto by jean nancy;
Skipper Of 'Pirate Ship Back In Balboa
Fighting Mad After Ecuadorean 'Escort'
Without mentioning it by
name, he supported President
Elsenhower's proposal for mu-
tual aerial Inspection and the
plan to set up listening posts
and similar controls around the
glober
These were the words of the
Pope on his 80th Christmas.
spoken to Id purple-clad cardi-
nals and other high officials in
the Vatican and broadcast in 20
languages around the world.
with the world's hope shat-
tered by the second Oeneva
conference, the Pope warned:
"This Is the spectacle offered
to the terrified gaze as a result
of such use of nuclear weapons
In war:
"Entire cities, even the larg-
est and the richest In art and
industry, wiped out. a pall of
death over the pulverized.ruins,
covering countless victims with
limbs burnt, twisted and scat-
tered, while others groan in
their death agony.
"Meanwhile the spectre of the
radioactive cloud hinders the
survivors from giving any,, helo,
and inexorably advances to
snuff out anv remaining life.
"There will be no, song of
victory," the Pope said.
Elsewhere In hh address, th
Pope:
1. Called for "preventive pa*i-
ficatlon" that Is, Urgent at-
tempt* to settle peaceably quar-
rels which might blossom into
wars.
2. Warned that opposition to
communism cannot be based On-
ly on antivcommunism. It Is tha
duty of men of liberty to set
right ttoelr own part of tha
world.
J. Urged the nations of Eu-
rope to help colonial peoples
solve their problems lest theee
peoples "might be drawn B
blind nationalism to plunge
hM n tw*rv
chtvm and M*ery.'
4. I
The wiry skipper of what
Ecuadoreans called a "pirate
ship" returned to Balboa- har-
bor today fighting mad.
His ship, the tuna clipper Ka-
tie Lou, lost four days of fish-
ing time, he claims because an
Ecuadorean destroyer seized the
vessel and "escorted" it to Gua-
yaquil where it was kept unde/
armed guard for four days.
Ecuador is one of three coun-
The Pope said that further
nuclear explosions "would gen-
erate conditions very dangerous
for any 11 vine being."
But he said In his 5000-word
address that a ban on tests a-
lone would merelv lead to new
suspicion amon< the great pow-
ers and accusation of "insincer-
ity in a matter basic to the fate
of t>>e human race."
He emvhasized that the re-
nunciation of tests must be
accomnanied by the renuncia-
tion of the use of the weapons
and a general systern of dis-
armament based on workable
controls and inspection.
EDITORIAL FOOD
PROVIDENCE. R. I. (UP1-
Defendants who sopear before Dis-
trict Judge Luiei DePasquale in
connection with highway accident*
are handed a copy of a newspaper
editorial on the subject. The iudge
bad 10.000 copies of the Providence
Journal-Bulletin editorial printed at
his own expense because be thinks
it is "food fee thought."
WASHINGTON, Dec. 4 (UP)
The weather bureau plans to of-
fer a new list of feminine names
for hurricanes of 1956.
The list is a secret until re-
leased officially. But one thing
is certain It will not in-
clude any of the names used to
designate this year's hurricanes.
Alice la out. So are ,Brenda,
Connie, Diane. Edith. Flora,
Gladys, Hilda, lone, Janet. Katie
and the rest of the 195 list.
Also out are names that have
a geographical connotation like
Georgia and Caroline or a time
connation like Eve or Dawn.
These names could confuse a
person trying to chart a hur-
ricane by radio.
The new list is certain to
arouse again the chronic ire of
persons. Including some mem-
bers of Congress, who oppose the
Idea or giving feminine names
to hurricanes.
Some complain that the names
indicate a flippant attitude on
the part of the weather bureau
to storms that cause a con-
siderable amount of death and
damage.
Othe r" lust don't like the Idea
of having their own name, or
their wife's, associated with hur-
ricanes.
It started In the Pacific dur-
ing World War n. Short names,
easy to pronounce and Identify,
were selected because they are
least likely to be garbled In ra-
dio transmission.
But why feminine names?
Well, someone figured that men
fighting a war were more likely
to hear a girl's name on the
radio rather than a boy's. At
least, that was the theory.
The new list comes out next
i week.
tries claiming jurisdiction over
ships within the three-mile ter-
ritorial limit.
Skipper Capt. Joseph Nunez
charges, "They are the pirates
not me." He says he was about
18 miles off their coast when
the Katie Lou was picked up by
the destroyer.
"We're not getting freedom
of the seas," he said today.
They are trying to claim the
whole ocean.' As long as oar
government tolerates thai
type of acton, they'll keep
Vorgy And Bess Cast Sing
s
Carols Over Russian Radio
pulling us in."
Nunez says that he immedi-
ately made a protest to the
U.S. State Department in Ecua-
dor, and that the consul gener-
al was making all the necessary
arrangements for toe protest to
be setn to Washington.
"Oar law says anytbJng o*t-
sMe the three' mile limit, and
that's what fm going to stick
to." f
When the vessel was taken
into custody it had picked up
only six tons of tuna, since be-
ing released however, it man-
aged to fill their quota of 300
ton which will now be unloaded
at Ponce, Puerto Rico.
The 121-ft. long tuna clipper
is Jointly owned by five flsher-
imen out of San Diego. Calif.,
and carries a 13-man crew plus
an engineer. Harry Justice, and
his assistant Don Moffatt, all
Americans.
Future- plans Include a return
trip to Ecuador where the skip-
per claims he will go right on
LENINGRAD. Dec. 24-UP)
The American cmopany of "Por-
gy and Bess" today sang Christ-
mas carols over a Soviet radio.
It was the first time since the
1917 revolution that such songs
have been broadcast In the So-
viet Union.
The Americans were forget-
ting the sub-sero cold this
Christmas Eve In the warmth of
their reception in the Soviet's
second largest city.
Leningrad has gone wild over
the members of the first Ameri-
can troupe to ever visit the So-
viet Union. And the Americans'
almost unanimously agree that
this is the most enthusiastic re-
ception they have enjoyed In
their years of globetrotting.
The Americans, even before
they have presented the George
Gershwin production, are a "sol-
Id hit." Russians look on in de-
light and admiration as they
Jitterbug in the restaurant of
the Astoria, the plushest hotel
In Leningrad.
"They all look like Paul Robe-
son," is an often-heard com-
ment.
Throughout the day, mobs of
Russians followed the actors a-
_ 'third part;
Russia and the Communist bloc
would profit from the enmi-
ties of Europeans and non-Eu-
ropeans.
5. Rejected the theory that
progress can be based only on
material well-being and that se-
curity rests only on mounting
"social production."
6. Said some persons in the
West shared the erroneous be-
lief thgt material progress la
sufficient basis for man's secur-
ity. This, he said, could beguile
some In the West into the dream
world of a false co-existence.
Arthur Godfrey:
Gives $100,000
To AF Society
WASHINGTON. Dec. 24 (UP)
TV star Arthur Godfrey -has
sent a $100.000 Christmas check
to the Air Force Aid Society to
help Air Force families in need,
scoiety officials said yesteasVay.
The check represented J
frey's proceeds from a serS
Saturday Evening Post
about his life.
The scoclety Is a semi
organization which pro
nancial help to airmen
families and widows.
long the snow-blanketed Nevsky j|.Bj-AaaaA0 ||i Boulevard, and besieged them CniSII11dS rfCSC!!!
outside of the Czarlst winter,
manding autographs. _, -
"It's phenomenal," said Rob- ourselves for Christmas? A
ert Breen, the producer.
"It's fantastic," added Ana-
tole Heller, manager.
day off tomorrow. So see
you Tuesday.
BALBOA TIDES
SUNDAY. DICEMIf.lt 25
SKIPPER of the "Pirate Ship" Katie Lou, Capt. Joseph Nunez
i left) and his chief engineer Harry Justice (leaning on rail
look over the peaceful Balboa harbor after having had a run-in
with Ecuadorean officials. Panamanian cook Bertiand Josephs
said ha was glad to be back home.
fishing
coastal
- s"0 right on
outside the three-mile
- limit recognized by in-
ternational law.
"Next time they'll nave to
stop me with a cannon," ha
ays.
HIGH
1:5 a.a*.
LOW
5:54 a.*.
fill p.*.
MONDAY. DICtMIIR 2*
HIGH
0:22 ...
1:04 p.m.
LOW
4:59 .
720 ps.
CHRISTMAS IN HOSPITALIts not much fun tospend^
mas in hospital, but unexpected gifts, like this pecaaga
the Doctor's Wive Club, break the monotony of the long
Ivan Klasovsky, who broke his arm when he fell out of *
beams as ha unwraps his surprise.
(Phete kg Jeaa


dq2
ACW TWO
TIE StTNDAT AMEBICA
' SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1155
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WAUL: Watbtwide Btatdntiia Srwaa


CHRISTMAS OR NOT, YOU CLXDTS, we must press
on with the fearless Journalism lurk. The old dodge about
watchdog of the public interest, and other ill-defined
phrases.
Well, I found myself*%uLking among the suds at Ro-
lando's Hideaway yesterday, reluctant to
1) .Command to a wary Santa Claus the one-whel-
ed open Hudson shay loosely controlled by Red the Rick-
shaw wallah; and
2) Make public utterance on my'discovery of an
iniquitous, imperialistic conspiracy between the. united
States and Russia.
Most unspeakable thing about item 3 is the way they
foist it off when the Christmas-happy world is off its
guard.
No better day than today for me to unmask this plot
against half the peoples of the world. And the'most im-
portant half, at that. Half at you, as they say in the his-
torical novels.
I refer to the US-Russian conspiracy to kidnap Santa
Claus. As parties to.the conspiracy I fearlessly name (let
them sue if they dare) Scandinavians, Germans, English-
men and. even, Canadians.
This infamous aggregation, in defiance of the Sher-
man anti-trust laws, have schemed and designed to pinion
Santa Claus to the North Pole. /
Their dastardly design, in the face of the fearless
journalism herein wrought, will avail them nothing. I am
about to launch a campaign to liberate Santa Claus. You
may quote me.
The plain facts of the matter are, Santa Claus no
more goes for that North Pole stuff than you or I go for
frostbite. Madison avenue promotion men may do their
best, the Post Office can accept letters for Santa Claus.
c/o North Pole.
None of this is going to curb my revelation of the fact
that Santa Claus's own idea of Christmas is a sunny South
Pacific beach, with the breakers streaming in, and the
long summer nights with the wondrous sunsets over Ka-
piti Island, as seen from Paraparaumu. Want me to spell
that again?
Furthermore, Santa Claus, before he was pressed into
this Vorkuta complex in which certain northern hemi-
speher regimes aforemehtioned have chained him, had
nothing to do with that Eskimo rigout they've issued him
with. v
The genial gent infinitely prefers Bermuda shorts and
a sports shirt. Also sandals, instead of those Russian-issue
jackboots.
And that ridiculous sleeping cap. Only genuine thing
about it is the tassel. This is derived from the corks Santa
used to dangle on strings from the brim of his broad-
brimmed Australian bush hat, to keep the flies off his
face.
The beard is genuine enough. The outback midsum-
mer sunshine always did make Santa's chin raw for shav-
ing.
In brief (or briefs), Santa Claus has long realized
what Congressmen are beginning so spectacularly to wake
up to. That is, that winter is something to avoid.
All Congressmen do is pile aboard Panama Line ships
for inspection tours of the Panama Canal. Santa, on the
other hand, since earliest times knew that midsummer
was the time for Christmas, and accordingly established
his base at the South Pole. Canal Zone Postal Officials
please note.
Exactly when the infamous kidnap job was pulled,
imprisoning the poor fellow at the North Pole, I do not
know.
I can say, however, that the deed stirred much dis-
cussion in Australia concerning the possibility of invoking
the Lindbergh Law. This discussion is broken for only
about five minutes annually, on the first Tuesday in
November, when undivided attention is given to the run-
ning of the Melbourne Cup.
There are other misconceptions concerning Christ-
mas which it would be well to dispel at this point.
This business of the fir tree. Santa's been stuck with
it lately, because that's all that will grow on the tundra
to which the dastardly powers aforesaid have exiled him.
Actually, till his capture by northern forces, he was
alternating annually between waratah and pohutukawa
for Christmas trees. This fir tree is strictly POW camp
improvisation. It is a shame that today's kids should be
allowed to grow up unaware of this discreditable situa-
tion.
There was suspicion for a time that much of the
blame lay with the Christmas Card lobbies in the guilty
countries. They were so .deeply committed to snowflakes
that it would have cost them millions to switch to suntan
lotion as a Christmas theme.
Never underestimate the ruthless power of vested in-'
terests.
It heartens me considerably, let it be said, that here
on the Isthmus the perfidious plot against the bewhisker-
ed benefactor is beginning to be realized.
Today is the sort of weather Santa really goes for,
and the sight of Zonians honoring him in tropic rig does
much to console him ir! his deep freeze durance. I have
received this information very recently, through highly
confidential channels. S*. >'
And there art other signs. For instance, last week
CTiristaias week, that is when they^oisted the flag at
the American Embassy upside down ontr is a Southern (or upside down)-hemisphere seasoivand
someone there at the Embassy knows it.- \
Well, by the time you read this Santa will have beer*
through here. He long ago got into Ovt^ habit c* travel-
ling early. X
Ai you know, the drear.northern hemisphere winter
nights are long and. tedious, and even if he makes his
rounds round about coffee break time, it is still before
down. '
But Santa became an early operator when he knew
he had to get the job done in time to get early in Line at
the ticket office for the big Otristmas Day game at the
Sydney Cricket Ground.
Big and all though the ground is, if you don't get in
the queue early Christmas day, there's no hope of getting
a decent possie from which to see fast bowler Ray Lind-
wall send the best of England's batsmen scurrying back to
the pavilion like they're trying to get out of the rain.
PERCY'S PEERLESS PORTENT for this week will in-
deed be a Christmas present for you all. The normal kick-
back is naturally expected.
But this festive day is the 124th since the new RP-US
treaty became effective. That is, 124 days since Zonians
began wondering whether they would be celebrating
Christmas with cheaper, low-duty liquor.
Total amount of, such liquor being consumed by the
average Zonian over this season: 0.
Which makes
1240
as infallible a formula as you could possible hope for.
Merry, full-duty Christmas.
.
r.


m*m
'.' ----'



gDNDAT. DECEMBER 5, 155
THE SUNDAY AMERICA
FAGE
Spectaculars Spark Yule Fantasy
Farm Teenagers Put
Nix On Social Booze
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa.-(UP)
Pennsylvania's farm teen-agers
frown on social drinking and ad-
vocate regular church attendance.
A survey conducted by rural
sociologists at Pennsylvania State
University also showed the young-
sters approve dancing, smoking
and loafing. __ .
A poll of some 2,800 boys and
girls, sophomores in rural Penn- _
sylvania high schools, showed more suncrior 8trength ,n(| ase.
than three-quarters of the group But afler y^^^g themselves to
disapproved of drinking alcoholic!, pulp w ^ aiender, lra0othskin
beverages. |ned am! well-dressed, many teen-
* t. tJagers find t"*1 tne youn* men
Some 60 per cent felt going JOy^ are ^ng to attract arrive
church was necessary in order to; for the date un^empt, uncombed,
be a good community eader. but, Ushed >nd dirty under the
slightly more than half could' ^! fingernail.
nothing wrong with working on the " typicI, nx?onie ^ . dress to attract him because I like
Wkv u Jems 2w. use Santa Claus, Don't Abuse Hi*
_ mm____*_a--------1* -* U.Im AMa
Hot as Ihat as She 7
THE truth finally dawns on
teen agers, however their taste
may be conditioned by their fe-
male friends, that the whole point
of beauty is to make women at-
tractive to men.
It is one of our weapons, just as
men are designed with generally
Sabbath.
Card playing was okayed by 45
him, he ought to do the same. He
must not like me or have any
pe cent oTthe youngsters, and 55 ~0^^
per cent gave their approval to "peci
"loafing up town." Smoking was
approved by 54 per cent. Dancing
This ain't necessarily so. It
also isn't necessarily true that be-
fi" *' -, Q- _. . aiso isn i necessarily uuc >-
won the support * *r ce,cause he looks that way that he
A majority of the, highscjiopi ^ jgnirant of gw?d m,nners
times.
Then wrap the rest of the
string every which way around
the balloon. Make it as lacy or
as tighf as you like. Don't wor-
ry about plaster splatters. Hang balloons of different shapes.
ITkese (labes which awns* colorful tree rnaaaents are made
. B4m*ly fram baleos round which is wrapped plaster of Paris -
Hitad atrinr. The balloon Is popped when the strins hardens and
pro, a kesnesaade Chriatmaa mobile.
By KAY SHERWOOD three, four or five jrards; you
NBA Staff Writer can piece another length onto
this If It's too short or trim
How would you like to spark down, if it's too long. Soak string
your Christmas household dec In plaster, wrap one end around
rations with glamorous crea, the balloon, knot a couple of
tlons you can make at the last
minuteand enjoy doing It?
Spectaculars like globes of gold-
en filigree dangling from the
celling can house your loveliest
ornaments, colored balls, or cast
Interesting shadows on the wall.
Or there's a giant fireside "can-
dle" richly ornamented with
garlands of fruit, nuts and
greens.
If you think I'm kidding, meet
the expert who will show you
bow. His name Is Slgmund Pur-
wln of Chicago, and he's the art
director and v.p. of a noted mer-
chandising display firm (W.L.
Ptensgaard). He applies the
same inventive talent to devis-
ing home decorations with his
family that he does to the store
window displays you see.
The golden globes are so easy
to make that, yes, even an older
child can make them and the!
littlest members of the family
will get quite a bang out of
them.
Basic materials include bal-
loons, string, plaster of Paris,
water and gold paint a push-
button spray can.
Procedure goes like this: Blow
up the balloon. Mix plaster of
Paris with water In old bowl or
can to a creamy consistency.
Cut off a length of string
,d nota l a plastic core, the sprayed It gold. Wbe- eMaaw.
re around, she'll extlawb* Aaaaav
colors as well as gold, silver,
copper, if you want to vary the
effects.
I should add that you'll want
to protect the wall, while spray-
ing, with newspapers taped up
In back of the globes.
Variations on the theme can
be introduced by using string or
yarn or flat tying ribbon of dif-
ferent widths, by scattering
flitter on the wet paint, by using
up to dry (I tie the wrapped bal
loon to an indoor clothesline).
When thoroughly dry, hand
the younger child a pin and let
him pop the balloon. Draw out
the rubbery remains. Then spray
gold paint over the globe for
color.
Purwln Suggests the spray
paint because you get a Profes-
sional finish In seconds. Spray
paints axe widely available in
Mrs. Maria Morris
Dies At Age 74
Horatio Alger Way
Said Still Possible
Once finished, the shell is
quite sturdy. You can slide or-
naments through the holes and
hook to the top. For special ef-
fects, you can trim part of the
globe away with sharp scissors.
As the core of his fireside can-
dle, purwln uses a cylinder of
white porous plastic 'Styro-
foam), but our small town store
had this material only In flat
sheets and blocks, so I jwitcherl
to a birch log which works Just
about as well. I nailed this to a
level wood base to reduce the
danger of tipping.
You'll need staples to hold the
garlands In place. Long-needled
pine sprigs, cranberry chains
and Christmas beads can b
wrapped around and stapled to
the core. Then, as suits the fan-
cy and the larder, wire on or-
anges and a bunch of granes,
leaves and tiny
Purwln says the fresh fruit
lasted through the holidays.
When you've tacked, stapled or
wired on the trimmings, spray
lightly withhold or copper paint.
To lei some of the natural col-
ors show through, spray at an
angle.
Purwln uses a shallow glass
dish containing a squatty can-
dle on top of his creation, which
can be' lighted to heighten the
candle-like effect. Because of
the presence of very young chil-
dren In our house, I will settle
for a simulated wick of twitsed
pipe cleaners.
sophomores approved divorce in
cases where the couple could no
longer remain happily married.
Makeup for girls won the ap-
proval of 63 per cent of the group
But, surprisingly, only 56 per cent
of the teen-agers thought students
should be allowed to spend their
own money as they see tit.
Plastic Bag Said
Wrap Of Future
CHICAGO (UP)- James P.
Berand, sales manager of the Visk-
ing Corporation's plastic division
at Terre Haute, Ind., told the Na-
tional Paper Trades Association
convention here that bags of poly-
ethylene film may become the uni-
versal wrapping in stores.
He put the merits of plastic gro-
cery bags this way
"The housewife could carry
home her groceries in a bag that
By John J. Kane, University ( Notre Dame
SANTA CLAUS can be a real
danger. True, he is a symbol
of the Joy and happiness of the
holiday season. But we can
become "fixed-' at the Santa
Claus level and never get to
the higher meaning of Christ-
mas: the birth Of Christ.
No child can entirely appre-
ciate what the Nativity means.
So we tie up the Joys of Christ-
mas with or-
dinary pleas-
a n t events
such as giv-
ing presents
and the like.
The young
child first
learns that
Christmas Is a Joyous season.
He understands the real reason
why when he moves from Santa
Claus to tha mystery of Bethle-
hem.
BUT THE CHILD, and grown-
ups too, can forget to associate
Santa Claus and the Joys of
Christmas with the birth of
if you do like him enough to go. our saviourthe real cause of
out with him, you might take
the trouble to find opt what i on
his mind relative to his appear-
You could try it this way: "Alice
always looks so fresh and pretty.
Isn't it nice?'' His response mav
not be at all what you expect. He
may still be looking.for a g irl
friend who wants to tinker with
machinery! '
You may find that the dresses
that way because he doesn't want
to be a sissy. Yer. may find that
he feels the pressure from youf-
to be dressed-up and is trying to
say: "If you like me, you like me
as I am. Once I prove this, 111
dress up all you like."
Christmas Joy. Instead the ten-
dency la to disassociate Christ
from Christmas.
In some communities vary
year, objections are raised to
-Nativity playa in public schools.
The symbol of Christmas, the
Infant Jesus, la obscured by
scotty dogs and blizzards that
would terrify viewers If they
were not on cards. "Oh, Come
All Ye Faithful'' gives way to
"I Saw Mama Kissing Santa,
Claus."
NOW SANTA CLAUS, mlstle
toe. holly, even scotty dogs aid
inane songs, have their place in
Christmas. If they would stay |a
it. They should add to, not su-
plant the theme of Chrlstmapt
the birth of Christ.
Protesting against Santa Clats
won't bring Christ to Christmas.
But through Santa Claus we can
get to the real meaning of tie
holiday. My own child told re
how to do It.
ONE CHRISTMAS EVE 4
were putting the manger undfr
the tree. My little girl waf
helping," talking to the state*
of Mary and.the Infant JesiJL
Suddenly she blurted out, "DaJv
dy. did the Infant Jesus had
up a stocking and did He gt|
toys?"
At first this seemed like blai*
phemy, linking Santa Claus wlwj
the Infant. Now I regard it 44
almost genius. I told her thai
without Christ, the Infant Jesus,
there would have been no Chrlsjs
mas, and without Chrlstma4
there would be no Santa Claite
It wasn't a very good explana^
tlcn. but my little girl's la|t
words as she fell asleep were,
"Jesus. He came first didn't HJ>i
Daddy?"
OF COURSE it isn't always L%
easy as this and we don't ofteH
get our children's help in such
matters. But we do have a.
challenge: to take the eustonte
that surround Christmas kt>
America and make them add tk
not detract from, the Nativity.
Jesus, does come first; all othftT
Christmas observances should
take us to Him.
t MM FnMta Santa* *** Si )
not only would withstand the ride'around the home
home from the supermarket but
could be re-used many times as a
refrigerator bag, a sweater bag, a
garbage can liner, a general stor-,
age bag, a traveling bag, a bathing |
suit bag, and for one of a number
of varied uses polyethylene has
DSuufbodi^ fisuadbu ClaMifodL
Proleslanf Yulefide
Service In Israel
CHICAGO - The execu
tives of a major oil company be-
lieve the future of the Horatio
Alger story is secure.
A survey conducted by Standard staple on fall
Torch, the employe magazine of bunches of glass balls
Standard OU, shows that 21 per
cent of the company's executives
in the midwest12 out of 58did
not go to college.
Of the 46 men who -did go to
college, 37 helped pay their way by
working.
The executives generally advise.
fegM^o work todr way if necessary. LCfllCrCO ACOMld
But several caution prospective w *tmMm
students not to tie themselves down jerttc fm hip Pm..
ZZ^JStortSFpUSZ t-nT YUuKideMceleKion7 K
Mrs. Maria E. Morris Par, j"vto* ^mpus^viSes.KeSleC 'h /k^vH
manan mother of the vice Pres-( yMost0? the comany officials ZChrZlte d ** CA
-ident of Local 07, OCEOC-CIO, ^^ y,^ college degrees are,0" t-nrutmas eve.
died yesterday at porgas Hospi- ..door.0peilers" but that a young tj,., ipe,ker at (hj, KTVKe -m
tal after a brief Illness. She was;mtn c 8UCceed without college ^ canon H. R. A. Kones minister
74 years old. 'even though it "may take a little ^ the Angelican Church of St
In addition to her labor ieaaer lonfier- _, .Andrews which stands in Israel
aon, Alfred. Mrs. Morris is sur- Dr. William J. McCill, general opposite Mt. Zion and the walls of
vWed by her eldest son. John, of manager of industrial and public, Jerusalem's walled "old city" in
Blok Agencies In Balboa, Hugh, relations, who worked part-tlmi Jordan. The service, held in the
(in Jamaica), Mrs. Emilia Valere during college, said: ^...'T-' auditorium, will be conducted
and Mrs. Prudencia Henlln. "Not everyone needs to or shell d By its director, J. Leslie Putnam
Owing to the Christmas holl- go to college. But if anyone really of Milwaukee, Wls.
days, funeral arrangements will| wants to and uses some ingenuity, -n^ (,& before the white
not be made until Tuesday. Bur- it is just as easy today to pay an stone building erected in 1933 wUl
tal win probably take place on | or part of your expenses as it was ^ be festooned with decorations flut-
Wednesday.
25 years ago.
Humphrey Bogart and Gene Tierney
Star In "LEFT HAND OF GOD" Due
On Saturday At The Bella Vista
tering down from the 100-foot tow-
er. Floodlights will illuminate the
area ar night, making the tower
visible for miles around.
Each of the city's Protestant
ministers will take a leading part
in Ule service. The Baptist pastor,
Dr. Robert Lindsay of Norman,
Okla., will lead the choral singing.
The Rev. J. W. Foster of the
Assembly of God Church, a British
denomination, will read from the
Scriptures, together with the Rev.
M. G. Griebenow, Minnesota pastor
of the American Church sponsored
by the Christian and Missionary
Alliance. There will be eight Scrip-
ture readings alternating with carol
singing.
New Highways
Tree' Caracas
From Mountains
CARACAS (UP) New super-
highways are "liberating" this
beautiful capital of Venezuela from
the towering, majestic mountains
that surround it.
The new roads are part of boom-
ing Venezuela's public works
program, in which $331,000,000 was
spent for new projects in the past
year. Besides highways and
bridges, these projects ranged
from slaughterhouses and augar
mills to vast low-income apartment
developments designed to eliminate
slums.
Outstanding among roads com-
pleted in 1955 is a $5,000,000 four-
lane highway through the
mountains that separate Caracas
from a flourishing Industrial and
farm region to the west.
Formerly, commerce between
the capital and the cities ol
Maracay, Valencia and Barquisi-
raeto was hampered by a winding,
two-lane road that caused both
delays and accidents.
Also completed under this year's
roads program is the Autopista del
Este, an extension of the
$80,000,000 superhighway that
sweeps from La Guaira, Vene-
zuela's chief port, to Caracas. This
extension cuts through the con-
gested eastern part of Caracas and
speeds up travel from the Carib-
bean coast to all parts of the city.
These two routes, along with a
third being completed across the
mountains that wall in Caracas to
the south, have freed most of the
city from the isolation sought by
its founders some 400 years ago.
But the oil-rich history of Vene-
zuela in the last two decades
changed all that. The cultural and
political capital of the country also
has become a teeming industrial
city with more than a million
inhabitants and aggravating tratiic
and housing problema. With space
getting scarce, not only homes, but
office buildings are sprouting up
on the slopes of mountains to east
and west of the city
One of the moat impressive new
completed
commercial structures
In addition to Scripture readings thi r u ,be j^ Building,
in English passages from the Ho.y ^ b ^ Creole PciI0lcum
Writ win be read in Hebrew and aw|I.,tonft standard Oil of
i -a it, ..v. Inside the Y building are three; ,,. blge(ll oil producer.
Christmas treesone in the spa- ^-^ vear a new low-income
riera lobby, snot her in the! t t witn ^.i oi lMM
e apartments, and 52 four-stoty
buildings of eight apartments oach
The world over, more and more truck operators cut costs per mile and increase profits by
choosing ROAD LUG for tough highway hauls and rough off-the-road operations.
Ibis year,
. structures willi
dining room. Trie trees have been
decorated by the YMCA's perms-
nent residents.
were completed for the housing of
11,800 persons living in nearby
slums. Altogether, $4U,OOU,000 was
The Protestant churches have no 0Q low.rent housing in the
organized pilgrimage to Bethlehem ~, u,. government report
said.
Todays movlegogtag taste for the daring and1 thei dif-
ferent in screen entertainment Is decidedly tIs led by the
Bella Vista Theatre's new Cinemascope attraction, ite.
LEFT HAND OF GOD," which will be released next SatUr-
iy Rarely has there been a more offbeat and more Intrigu-
ing story, told with power and brilliance by a wonderful
cit headed by Humphrey Bogart. Oene Tierney ana IJ
Cobb. Mark this one down as a dramatice highlight of the
nan' (^ftJU"lr1
'LEFT HAND OF GOD" Is a story of faith and lore In
solle of all troubles and is laid in the exotic atmosphere of
Se-Crainiunlat China with its war lords fighting a cor-
rupted .fiovrrnmen'. *~d firistlan m'iions standing for the
<>y ind price o the human race-. Advt.
as does the Roman Catholic Church
for Christmas. A number of Protes-j
tanta go aa individuals. I *' i a I
Each of the Protestant churches SCIGilCe MOS IN6W
will conduct its own service on "
Christmas morning.
On Christmas Day, the YMCA Is
conducting a party for several
hundred children, with gifts dis-
tributed by a properly attired
Santa Claus.
Gimmick For Smog
OLD HUNTER
MANTN. Mich. (UP) Har-
LOS ANGELES (UP) -* A
balloon-borne, "diamond-studded"
device is science's lstest gimmick
to study smog.
The'device, known as a meteor-
ograph. University of California
meteorologist.
The heart of the instrument, car-
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EAR
MORE TONS, THE WORLD OVER, ARE HAULED ON GOODYEAR TIRES THAN ON ANY OTHER MAKE
T.H.-TMI OOTI- TIM-* >! COMPANY. AKROM l. OHIO, U
AUTO SERVICIO,
vey Reals, 94. is believed to have ried aloft by balloons is a tin
been the oldest sportsman to bag'railway car drawa by a doe.
a deer during Michigan's 1955 aea- mechanism st an inch-an-hour
son Beala killed a four-point 150- pace. A smoked glass plate is car-
pound buck in nearby Kalksska ried by the car to plot data against
County He said it was the 113th1 time. Three mechanisms in the
deer he has killed since he first instrument register temperature.
*AiZ?-*.**n *.%3SF wSST?'ISId l& E,u,na de Avenida Ancn y Odie "H" No. S Telfonos: 2-2204-2-2205
number of deer that could be takes), etches the responses.
s

A.
i



#out
THE SI NDAY AMERICAN
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25, INI
%at -rJl yin oLlfe
he Jrn Uke ^Arm-ea ^/orcei
Tor MM la lh Arar* Service' reto th aed *
la Waenteston frem Mr. Alice sV Leopold, Ml head e/
Department Women's stotreaa. aad Mrs. Oliver
owtbcr. Mr. Crowther U pMt chairman of MM Defense Ad-
CeaunlHoe a Women la the Services.
--------------
BY ALICIA HART
1H1NOTON (NEA) -Now
telling all about a wom-
vlde a ready-made social life,"
according to the commanding
officer of one of the military
,- training centers for women who
[e In the Armed Service of|i quoted in the pamphlet
#S "The biggest attrition factor
From marriage, to getting up! with all of us i m*rriag*," states
in' the morning, to intelligence] attractive Col. Phillis D. Gray,
work to lingerie it's in a new i head of Women in the Air Force
ovframent pamphlet hot oil the (WATS). ____
"unveiling took place at COGNITION OF the mar-
Pentadoo the other d a y iUl "attrition factor" is one rea-
t a flurry of female brass, son the services feel they need to
Mts and chit-chat. keep attracting better women. To
las a swan affair. Nobody do this, they're putting heavy em-
1 a 'bottle of champagne phasis on career opportunities
Jthe first, edition, but all which the booklet describes.
IIs were in good spirits.
Higura the newly launched These include administration
blet is a cinch to help boost and personnel, machine account-
jliber of worn**}, who mayMng, finance, supply, communica-
Ftbe service. *% tions, medical and denUl special
'ties and air operations support,
J4er floema Soll
There are also technical fields
and individual specialities open
to women.
IT'S THE REAL purpose
handbook, and Defense
a need for quallfi
uca. On* of these is intelligence,
ireers for Women in the but H takes certain qualification.
Armed Force" is the name theyl "Can a woman keep a se-
as v* the aippy booklet jointly cret?" aak the handbook. "Is she
written by the Defense and La- exceptionally acute in observa-
or Departments- Uon and analysis? Then the may
'it' preaantad in a vent at- fit into the auper special area of
tractive way," ay Mrs. Alice K. every service intelligence. She
Leopold who heads the Labor wh DOt become a Mata Hari.
Deaartment' Women'a Bureau.! hot perhaps can be assigned
"Very attractive," coocurs Mr, to a contenntelligence office."
Oliver Crowthcr. chairman forj Another section answers aome
the last year of the Defense Ad- of the most common questions of
vlsory Committee on Women in giris who are thinking of joining-
up. For instance, it points out
that:
^TbRmmlttee of civilian
women prominent in business,
provisional and civic affairs
recommended two years ago that
the handbook be prepared.
IN A BBZY, MININE
tyl* the booklet gives gal the
low-down on militaryMa. And
the ale pitch is terrific.
It even makes rising at six. in
th* .morning ound like fun. De-
crinina the training schedule 01
rSnSt, for example, it lays:
IKdit the chatter of a group of
heaRhy, lively girls, th* recruit
washes up and dresses in a
freshly laundered (by her) unl-
jjreakfast isn't Uto of
fruit juice and a cup of black cof-
fee. Recruits stoke up on fruit
juice, cereal, bacon and eggs,
caite and probably milk.
feir-a/Mmnn the'services "I
"Women in the Services, like
other working women, buy and
wear the prettiest clothes they
can afford In off duty hour*.
Lingerie is not a military 'issue,'
but is purchased by the women
themselves according to their
individual tastes,"
NEW VEGETABLE?
MERIDIAN. Miss. (UP) -
Frank Thomas grow and eats
a vegetable that resembles both
a squash and sweet potato. He
calls the vegetable a squash sweet
potato. It grow* on a vine and
weighs between four and five
pounds whan matured. The veg
etable, Thomas- said, tastes like
an Irish potato and can be cooked
Vaddition, the'services "pro-for a main course or dessert.
Suit and Jacket* Team Up
'In TexturediTweed Knit
.Steed Wary O'Ceaaar. From her bed she aread*
httt-tM everywhere.

Y ALICIA HART
PHILADELPHIA - long-term i resident of Sing Sing
prison foils over on his cot and
re-read^ the only letter that has
come tjb him in six weeks.
"I.00 net ask for warlds bey-
end nor wings that I may fly.
I only ask that I may sec a tiny
piece of sky."
' In Brooklyn, N. Y., a new irl
validconfined but not accus-
tomed to her sickroomimpa-
tiently rips open the sole en-
velope in the morning malT She
is advised:
American Poetry League. Mis
O'Connor has built up that or-
ganization's membership to 900,
four times its 1903 sice.
Clothes from current Califonia collections are aimed at winter
vacation wear, are equally goad for next summer. Coordinated
separates (left) feature tone-on-tone look. Short sleeve erlpn
cardigan Is lined la print matched to the sleeveless Mouse. Skirt
to straight and narrow; all three cam* In pastels and are wash-
able. Swim suit (center) is in brilliant cotton print, ha matching
mushroom-pleated skirt. Skirt It machine-wshable, press-free
aad has pleats that are guaranteed to stay la. Suit goes In to wash-
ing machine, toe. Long torso T-shirt that will not shrink, sag or
stretch is worn with slim pants in cotton sateen. All design
are by Stephanie Roret of San Francisco.By Galle Dagas,
NEA Women's Editar.
-----
ermanen
1
V:
..Manny (Oirthday, oDear f-^i
feautu (Joon *J/j I \t

,
f
ow
Zthu Aear \Jd
Color ^fascinates Baby. If you
don't believe it, observe his vary-
ing riactlons to egg, spinach and
carrot pastina. One mother used
this to advantage when she
mixed the favorite red mashed
ia. _.. Plums' m with the not-so-faxe-rlte
useless regretting "* ; applesauce,
re been; Regretting Is en- vv ^ ____
"Ifs
that have
,yo f,V w,l,ow,n ,n\ lA,.tii Baby is neralb quite "happy
Both letters carry the same sig- wJth AMh or crlcker, un-
less he's already tasted the heady
nature. The name is clear en
ough: Mary O'Connor. The "O" of
the last name has a face care*
fully drawn in it. The features are
Irish and the smile is wide. One
eye winks knowingly.
It is an accurate sketch of the
signer. Maty O'Connorconfined
to the Philadelphia Home for In-
curables since 1937has tried to
spread cheer throughout the
"shut-in" world.
Her publication, "One Tiny
Candle, is mailed,-to veterans'
hospitals, prisons and the homes
of incurable invalids. The ingre-
dients: poetry, short stories and
camouflaged philosophy.'
let-
She writes from 25 to 100
tcrs a day. She corresponds
ularly with'small children,
ernors and her penitentiary clien
tele.
delights of cookies.. Spme Babies
like the large substantial round-
ness of sweet cookies, but are
just as content with a round rusk
biscuit.
No why is it that: On* Baby
likes his stringed pull toys, but
liked strings just as well. Th*
longer, the better, is his feelings
and he walks about the house
pulling an entire ball of twine
behind him.
It'll be a wearing lime, after
Baby is encouraged by his father
to throw the rubber ball. Until
Baby is able o understand, you
reo I m*y g through a period where
I'f.ihe wants ti thr*w almost any-
SS-'tHtos-
The reason for all this activiry?
Try this if Baby's no3e runs,
but be Isn't old enough to blow
Slngle-llne thought* and ^ri.^f^yJ^J^^;
poems dot the pages of her *r-jlb*" ""if .* we'nt b "k \0
page publication for .hut ins. when they let him go baile to
rst ifu /.^m. #mm a fhinesp bottles rather than cups, iney
The tiUe comes from a anese i d anod nim ^
I a letter. If she has any Incurable "
malady, It is optimism. She tells
her readers that in reality they
are lucky.
ighteen year* age.
HlJ ,.h,, . th* permanent wave has unques 1192J. By then, it had already advanced from the original version
Uonably reme a long way. The las with the delicate air aad that put a bend in the hairline t a mane that was about three
we stralgat, straight hair (left) underwent her marvelous con- feet long. The verv latest in salan permanente right! i don
version center, when the permanent wave was It years old, In I with plncurl and produce a leak that la natural.
BY BtTSY WADE,
NBA Staff Writer
IT wa fifty year ago this sea-
son that a young German hair-
dresser, working in London at his
trade, (and making artificial eye-
lashes), produced the first per-
manent waving machine.
This process, which has come
to mean curly hair that will last
through rain and shampoo for
women born with the poker-
stratght variety, was an instan-
taneous horror.
Beauticians recoiled In alarm
at the prospect of something that
would put them out of the busi-
ness of giving marcel waves. This
process, which ranks in the mod-
ern femsle mind with Mrs. Wises
of the Caffage Patch and the
bustle, was done with a hot iron.
The curl vanished at the first!
hint of fog, moisture or dew.
Charles Nessler was not dis-
couraged. He poured hia eyelash
profits Into the permanent wave
gadget until he was able to pro-
duce a machine that wa accept-
ed by the trade and by the women
of Europe. ,
At that time, Nesaler recom-
mended trimming five-feet-long
manes to* a modest three feet for
application of the wave at the
hairline
such that the timid had to fol-
low.
When operators first worked
this device, a permanent took 18
hours. It was cut to four as the
beautifiana became more skillful.
When bobbed hair cam* in, the
permanent wave was assured of
permanent success.
Once things got going. Nestle
wasn't the only man In the busi-
ness. The LeMur Company
worked out a method that used
steam rather than dry heat. In
1928, the two companies merged
to form the Nestle LeMur Corn-
No lunch in Baby's lap is a big
advantage to mother, when her
Maryltoddler is Just learning to feed
O'SSmoTsaw' that everyone from; himself A new apron slips over
bartenders to stamp collectors the tray or table and ties to the
have official days or w e e k s | legs^ It's made of waterproof
named in their honor. She resent- printed fabric and washed v wn
ed the omission of a special day!ease,
for poet. She spoke loud and long
on the subject.
profits: between "ay- auu nw mumku, ~ ,," . iir ti
we re!Connor is now contacting several!comes m nursery aolors This has
an Interna-an advantage in that it can .
pany, aa outfit that's more In thelhis fake-eyelash
business than ever theie day. 70 and 80 million "women
The pre-heat machine came in,turned from straight-haired Cin-foreign countries for
1931; the cold wave m 1942. derellas to curly-haired princesses |tional Poetry Day.
Th* final result of Nessler and by professional salons in 1954. National President of the
,------,-------.------------------------.---------------~-----------_-----------------_J---------------
For those who still prefer th*
Baby bathtub to the bathinette,
Her words were heard. Forty- one now comes in that W".sh*
six sUtes now observe Poetry j plane. It holds 20 quartsand
Day. Still not satisfied. Mis Or- oval in the traditional st>le.
Seasonal tJJrei- I4p
ALL the amusing, attractive ac-
cessories and clothes in the de-
partment stores for holiday wear
make some mature women feel
just a touch of cuvv. Perhaps
their waists arc too large to bear
the conspicuousness of a glitt.ry
belt. Perhaps they feel a g c I'd
dress is
ful for
rings may not do at ail
used for a laundry tub who
Baby's too big.________;
-------_-----__,-----------------
Jjilk 'low alcalina oLimetiaht ^fn rCesorl ^raih
ions,
C*at or
W~t
Sheath Or Wide,
It's All Of Silk
BY GAILE DCGAS
NEW YORK (NEA)-Lustrous
silks Sparkle in resort collections,
this year, foretelling the appear-
ance of more silks for spring.
Variety is nearly endless. Thin,
crisp silks, soft silks, silk tweeds,
wide-ribbed ottoman, pure sildk
faille for both suits and coats.
Silkbroadcloth and silk taffeta
a little well, too youth-ly,,^ ,ight weij[nt and >, ^^
* printed and plain. Silk chiffon and
silk organdie, thin and crisp.
rRnltied tweed >im uit with Matching Jacket appear* in reaert
rollo lions for near on winter vacations. Suit is in mixture of
ie cotton, nylon, testes and wool while jacket is in acetate,
eallon aad nvtoa. Both design are fresa Jautxea.By GAIL!
JUtiAS, NBA Women's Editor.
hairdressers made enough money
to pay income tax.
Nestle settled on 46th Street
and opened a salon. His machine
then looked like something out of
the Grand Guignol. It had three
dozen heating devices around
which the hair was wound and
k literally hung the custom-
r from the ceiling
Wise American women were
For those who teei somewhat, These silks are cut into shirt
deprived of the fun of the season waUt breases, mita, coots, after
In 1915. Neesler arrived in New .because of any of ttese reason* !fivt Md evening dresses, blouse
York with his machine and a new here are a few nominations ioriand jimpie sheaths.
name N*stle. The besuty bus!-'strictly holiday em that mint*
noes ws In such a tate that do well for grown womtn: They are used for coat and jack-
year that only three American A red houaeeost Get one hat et i^unga and skirts.
sweeps the floOr. even J you usual- "
ly wear the short Kind. Have the w bow here two examples
festive fun of coming re breakfast,from the resort coUlection of:
in it even if only once a year Molbe Parma. Lsteday dress m
A sari-sheer silk scarf with gold Persian block print *k surah
threads. This is an iaexpenme | deft has squsre neckline that's
item, but as crisp, and ?ay as new; cut high in front and deeper at
snow Wer it with your suit or back ,_._,
coat, or just from a pocket rf Full skirt is belled over its own
you've a mind petticoat.
A white tailored blouse with,
quick to reject such an affair But holly embroMery. This you may! This "" ,u*e,..be,*f
pretty soon, like so msny mass do yourself or you can buy it. silk and brown-toned silk iurii
acceptances, the brave began to|There u nothing overyoung about,print (right) in dress and straight-
have their hair curled fa this! such an itemTbut it is definitely lined coat Coat u lined In
r and the results were seasons!. at the drees.
print




immmm
mmm
SUNDAY. DECEMBER 25, 1955
'Ml '"I 'i".."
THE SUNDAY AMERICA
PAGE FITS
&m 5031 t ^Ai
Social and \JlherwiM
a, Staff.,* & m>p^*
* byfill, fsculty member of the lo-
* cal college, is official sponsor of
Delta Psi Omega.
Christmas Brunch
. At Hotel El Panama
1 The regular Sunday brunch win
I be served it noon today in the
' Balboa Room of Hotel El Panama.
Brunch will available until 3:00 p.
m. Music for dancing will be fur-
nished by Lucho Azcarraga and
his orchestra. Eric the Great
(magician) will provide the floor
show.
Dinner will be served in the
evening at the Bella Vista Room
Sunplving the music for dancing
will be Clarence Martin and his
orchestra.
Package Revolution
Just Getting Started
CHICAGO (UP) The impact
of packaging on the variety and
merchandising of food bas given
the American people food that is
better and cheaper, and its effects
are due to spread.
Carl W. Shaver, director of aalea
for a New Jersey firm, told a re-
cent annual meeting of the National
Association of Food Chains that
these benefits to consumers were
about to be extended also to the
field of perishable foods,
. "Meat, produce and dairy prod-
ucts, which together account for 50
per cent of our total business, are
in for deckled changes which wul
shift store-level processing and
packaging to a centrally-located
operation, to the factory or the
packing plant," Shaver said.
He said that "the food chaina
have not yet reached the midpoint
in the packaging revolution.
AtARMINC ESSAY
METHUEN, Mass. -HTTP)- Be-
cause she sounded a false fire
1 alarm, a 10-year-old sohooleirl was
ordered by the fire chief to write
"j essav entitled "The Hazards o
False Alarms." .
MISS MARY BETHINA HATCHETT
MB, mm m W J HATCHETT OF BALBOA REVEAL
SuGwreiFs'mtrotaL to Walter Ellsworth trout
Mr and Mrs. W. J. Htcnett of Balboa announce the en-
ulSi** their daughter. Mary Bethlna, to Mr Walter
E%w3 Trea^-m ef Mr. and Mr.. L. B. Trout of Balbea.
Misa Hatchett is a graduate of
Balboa High School/ with the
class of U54. and is now a sopho-
more attending the Canal Zone
Junior College. ^
Mr. Trout is a garduate of Bai-.
boa High School, with the class ofj
1#' and of the Canal Zone Jun-
ior College, class of 5-
No date ha been set for the
wedding.
Christmas. Watsair
Party At El Cangrejo
Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred 0. Purdy
of El Cangrejo gave a Christmas
Wassail party at their home, Fri-
day night. Their guests enjoyed
the special preparation of cider
and spices, which'is the tradition-
al drink for a wassail, and which
many of them tasted for the first
time.
WWiel^Meitaenhalr i Dr- And Mr. W. T. Bailey
WetfdMf " Misseurl Give Ceckt.il Party
Before an altar background of Dr. and Mrs. William T. Bailey
mink and white gladiolas, f e r n entertained a group of friends a
Mtois and cathedral tapers, Mis!a cocktail parly Friday night at
Veon Nichols daughter of Lt. Col- their home on Hernck Heights,
nel and Mr. Jame B. Ntehol.
Tort Clayton became the bride oi
First Lt. James A. Mendenhall,
VSMC in an evening ceremony on
Dec W. at First Christian Church,
Versailles. Missouri.
Mr. And Mr. Kuhrt
intertain With
Family Dinner _
Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. Kuhrt
^IUwwtro i the son of of Margarita entertained last night
II? and MrTOphw Mendenhall with a family dinner party,
f Ottervilk, Mo
The .Rv.'J. L. Freeman officiat-
ed at the double ring ceremony.
The bride, given in nwrriage
by her father, wore a snow white
dreas of Imported Chantuly lace
JnTnylon tuUe over glistening
bridaf satia. The smooth fitting
lace bodice wa styled with a
swe^rt neckline, outlined vvUh
eluding for Christmas Eve Miss
Joyce Gardner of Balboa, whose
engagement to Watter H. Kuhrt,
Jr., was announced yesterday, and
Mrs. and Mrs. Harry W. Gardner
of Balboa, and other relatives.
New Members ef.Dramatis
Fraternity Henered At
Army Navy Club pinner
line, outlined wun Ann Livingston and Jerry Fox,
JS2m dee lace and spinkledlthe newest members of Delta Psi
wnfiridetclnt Wiins The long Omega, national honorary drama-
with rweceni sequma . *__... were honored at
lace sleeves tapered to tradition
al Saints over the hands. The floor
lenKn^skirt of gossamer tulle
featured a lace peplum from the
waistline and repeated the lace in
banded inserts. Her double finger
tip-'veil of pure silk illusion float-
?Tfrom a tiny half hat of pleat-
ed tulle outlined with sequins and
featuring side clip, in flo*"
design of tiny seed pearl. She
carried an orchid) on-a white bnd-
* The matron of honor Mrs. Glenn
C. Brusjkhorst. Kansas City wore
a Wue nylon tulle ballerina length
dress with a pink carnation cor.
**4he bride attended the Canal
^ne Junior College, and Kansas
ite College, Manhattan Kansas.
The bridegroom attended Den
ver Unh/rrity and-the University
ef Nebraska. ., ..
The couple will reside at the
Mariae Corp Air- Station. Cherry
Point, N. C where be U now
tic fraternity, were honored at
the annual Christmas Dinner giv-
en at the Army-Navy Club, at Fort
Amador on Thursday.
Miss Beth Hatchett, cast direct-
or for 1955-56. was in charge of
the social affair, to which alumni
member of recent years were in-
vited, along with all active mem-
bers now in college. Subert Tur
?
New Bull Story
CHICAGO"- (UP) -, Some bulls
around the country reigning to
edeouater a shocking situation
There's a device^out now that s
detfgaed to sfttrain fighting bulU
a Vailed the "Hot Shot Bull
e device fits over the animal's
. something like a bridle. But-
w connected wfft a battery are
imbedded' in it so that when the
bun'dashes into another bullor
an obt-matcbed fanner electri-
cal shocks will persuade him to
chaste hi P,sns'
CHRISTMAS FUN
at EL PANAMA
Sunday Brunch Dance
r--
BALBOA SERVICE
CENTER
BC4CTr SHOP
SPECIAL
COLD WAVE
*7.50
Mop day Thru Thorsday
Far ne'mmfnt
i i ? vm
' i > oei
r.i il r frm : Ideal for the entire family 1
Delicious menu,
complimentary cocktail
music by AZCARRAOAB
TRIO, and entertainment
by ERIC the GREAT,
balloon man!
all for M.25
CLARENCE MARTIN'S
ORCHESTRA
playing in the cool comfort
of the alr-condltionea
Bells Vista Room for
dining and danclns
tonight and every night.
"enjoy yourself
its cheaper than you think'."
at
l?<
nma
Kcf.rfc) H> m

MARRIED. IN MISSOURl-Mra. Jame A. Mendenhall .who
wV. fitmeVly Mb Veen Nlcholj, Is shown en *''~$ J*
Mr. Mendenhall i the daughter of Lt. Col. and Mr?;*mA*
B. Nichols of Fort Clayton. She was married to Lt Jame A.
Mendenhall USMC. Dec. It, in Versailles. Missouri.
California Ag
Students Help
Keep Pests Out
BERKELEY, Cali. (UP) -r-
As the toy-like water taxi and the
large commercial liner meet in
San Francisco Bay, an eager group
on the smaller craft's foredeck
prepares to board the ship.
Rope ladders are cast and young
men with a purpose swarm up
the ship's side.
But this is no bloodthirsty pirate
crew ready for plunder. It's a
gang of agriculture and entomology
majors from the University of
California aiding California's
department of agriculture in a
necessary job. The wave-riding
students help regular examiners
inspect vessels returning from
Pacific voyages for harmful hitch-
hikers crop damaging insects.
Passengers, notified beforehand
of the youths' assault, open their
luggage for scrutiny and stand
watching as all staterooms, sou-
venier potted plants, food lockers
and crew's quarters are given the
once over. If all is well, each suit-
case has glued onto it the official
department inspection seal.
Then the student return to their*
campus to await further assign-
ments.
But this doesn't mean a vacation
for the more than 200 full-time
California Bureau of Plant Quar-
antine check men stationed at air-
ports and harbors to guard against
the invasion of foreignbred insects.
Last year, these watcher judged
more than 4,000,000 vehicles and
10,000.000 persons for such dostruc-
Uve mites as the Mediterranean
and Oriental fruit flies, mango!
weevils and bean pod borers. They
intercepted 794 infested lot of fruit;
fly host material, thus defeating
the 2,000 odd species of leaf-eaters
from aU over the world that might
wage economic war with Californ-
ia growers.
But for all the bugs halted, a few
manage tp sneak in. These ac-
count for a $200,000,000 yearly loss
to farmers within the state. When
compared with such a huge
amount, the $10,000,000 worth of
expense attached to the quaran-
tine service since it was started
in 1921 seems small.
AWAY IN A MANGER 8ixth Graders of Anc on School gather around the giant-sized nac*--,
miento they made during art classes. The" chll dren shown in tine, picture designed and exeQJU
ed the figures by themselves.


Western Michigan
Having Oil Boom
HESPERIA. Mich. (IP) -
Western Michigan is having its big-
gest oil boom in 15 year.
.So far. oil bas been struck in
five wells in the Huber area about
five mijes north of here. A petro-
leum industry trade magazine said
the new field "appear to be the
most important oil strike in western
Michigan since 19a."
The first well to come in is pro-
ducing 200 barris a day while the
others are producing 100 barrels a
d'y- _*___________
ANGRY DRIVER
HAMDEN, Conn. (UP) Af-
ter an gO-mile-an-hour chase, police
arrested motorist Robert J. Hstch
who explained he was driving fast
because he was "mad" -#15 min-
utes earlier he had been charged
with speeding.
Cxcerpt Jiwtt -A Christmas Card ^
"This is a time when great things viust again be dared jn
Jolti'.*President Eisenhower, Etanston, Illinois, 9S4. >
If those now living become truly devoted to the fairigj-
dream that mankind has yet known the ovtrcomlng-jp;.
human Injustice ours could be remembered as one of.j^H
great ages in history.
We dnic not make small plena thase havt no power
move men's hearts. The Ideal of a truly tree society has pene-
trated before, and It cao.fcerietrate again.
Our hope lies In the knowledge that each of us, In suiie.
of bur feebleness, ca become a channel o universal com-,,
passion.
All of us, no matter where we live, have unlimited spirit
ual resvurces on which to draw; we have the power of trt
and truth can make men free; we have coiiviction that
-God of all the world is calling us to a great response; we h
the capacity to work for the kind of world in. which we
lleve.
The history of our time doe not depend on unchani
able. Impersonal forces, but upon the nature of the drei
which possesses us. ohr dedication to lt, and the courage with :h
which we pursue lt, together.
CHRISTMAS COOBJES-Mr-J. A rjcardjftml.|** '
the Doctors' Wires' Clab, and Mr. G. E. Johnson bring t nrurt-
wu^olde. baked by member, of the club to the patient, at
Gorgas Heapltal. The Doctor'. Wire abo decorated tree* far
the wards, and supplied toys and booaa for the peditrica
ward, as part of their Christmas project.
FUNERARIA NACIONAL
"THE PALACE OF UNDERTAKING SERVICE"
The moat morJern equipment
Wtat 16th Straot No. 13A20 Phona 2-1473
Superior L^adillac
Wa can proudly ay ay that wa nava no compatitora
boca usa our service is superior!
OUR MOTT8
PROMPTNESS:
Promptness
Careful Attention
Honesty
Because we five rapid service,
precise and efficient and at any
hours-
Because we have the Bast in our
TAKEN CARE OF: Une. Cadillac Hearse, and
American Materials.
Here we do not try" to fool any-
HONESTY: one. our prices are just and at
the level of every pocket.
WE ARE YOUR FRIENDS AND SERVERS, and
because of that wa ask your attention, and co--
operation ao we may attend to you at
you doserve.
^_____TViS T^sn TOC.MA
* ** iiiiwim -^ is Days Only,
wa\ f
of the following items:
v d^^^^^H ft*-
. ^UaiAl Price NOW
OajHw ..,!aV
DEVOE Wonder-f ones - rubber base paint ~
BEST OF THE BEST,.................. 6.35 5.40
DERAYCO Enamels........... ........ ?r s s 5-50
VELVFTONE Casein Paste.................. 325 2.85
EMPIRE Flatlux......................... 5.00 3.90
Synthetic Thinner....................... 1-75 1./5
Powder Casein.....................Pound 0.20 0.17
Turpentine....................... Gallon 0.60 0.45
And many others
We've juat racaivad the marvellous SUNFLEX Cold Bond Caaain paata, the revolutiort in markat paint. Wf
have alao the famous paints used at apecified in the modern houaea at Corozal and Balboa, Canal Zone.
Remember: ATTENTION, QUALITY, ECONOMY, GUARANTEED PRODUCTS and complata ttoek irv
paints only at
PINTURAS ISTMEAS, S. A.
with etoret in the Stadium Area and Branch in Va Etpaa 2183, Rio Abajo
PHONE 2-3444 *0X " 108



x


FAGE SIX
TIE 81INDAT AMERICAN
SUNDAY, DECEMBEft 25, 1959
-_
"

YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
Bring
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luUll A**. 4*
LOURDES PHARMACY
m U CanaaaBllIa
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k. **"
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insto Aroiraaeaa Are. mu tt tL
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si street n*. u
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canal torn POliTDLDHC
DENTAL MEDICAL
Oi C a r ibrcca Dr. aV A vll Ji.
PERSONALS
HARNITT & DUNN wMmi their
many fricndi ft ttueaars A Mar-
ry Xmai & Happy Oaacinf for
l6.____________
FOR SALE
Boat & Motora
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SALE: 19S0 Cae)4Mac-a2
4-aeor, 7000 mile since avar-
haul; naw tiraaleas whieawallt;
hronie ail fitfar; vaee-jet; Wy-
rjramark with passrna aear.
$1450. '$450 awai.
57.
RETIREMENt. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
, JIM RIDGE
Phone NOUB -0S3
FOR SALERoa 16 fee, out-
kearal 3/8 Marina, plywood.
$200. CiH Aabotr. Panama 2-
1033 or 2-1036, evenir., 3-
4383.
FOR SALE:'53 Old. Sun
4-door. hydramatic. power eteer-
ing, brake*, electronic aya, raar
peaktr, $1850. Call Fart Kobbe
2298:
ha* in hiattfoom
on of'2*2 beer cfl, each
of 4 4Rfcrr,btf.sd.-Spt>es, of
COUfSP.
TRANSPORTES 1AXTM. S A.
Packers Shippers Maers
haae. 2-2451 2-2562
Laam Riera* at
PANAMA RH3ING SCHOOL
RUs** Jampina clajaaadalfc
3 la 5 p.m. Phone 3-0279
ar by oopalntmair. .
IARNETT & DUNN
DM DANCK STUDIO
<* CHASM4CHOOL. SUITE 111
Malta* 2-42 ar Panama S-lfM
El Panam Hotel
Navy Studies
:h And Roll
Seasickness
lifeflKei
VV YOBK -iVPh~
engineers stage life-1
|n storms only-a stone's throw,
the nation's capital to help
trays of building better and
economical ships and, in the[
is, they're uncovering ways;
Safeguarding against seasick-1
by decreasing the pitch *nd
fore millions of dollars are In-
vtjs&d in building the real thing,
vy ships-to-be are put through
gtueling tests m the giant. 186-
fTe, David Taylor Model Basin at
fraderock, Md., center of U. R
rernment research in nava'!
bhjtecture and the largest
ratory of its kind-in the world
ere, into indoor channels 20
!S0 foot wide and more thanj
, a mile long, innovations In,
sign, structure and powcrinc
rtested with wood olr, wax
Problems in navigating and
jHl\* fhe nehavior of object:
Jling through the water, the way
und travels underaeas. the^e*
Its of explosions on a J*1PJ
ucture. development oi.Iiimct:
er television, and dozens of
ker related ubjecU are under
M* speeds up to 60 knots per
Hir, ship models towed
ugh the water by eleetacully
ferated carriage madeof teel
ping width travel on' rail
rekinmR alongside. ?"? J;
afuments are earned either OffAe
carriage or the ship model.
Wave* simulating, ocean, con-
dauons that could batter shipstaj
pieces are controlled1 by engine***;
while every stress and strain, pitch
Troll of the model is- crdf
Marn tbe carriage and operators
(wave machines coordinate the
aeration by short-wave radio,
teelways, raagaime of Amen-
cam iron and Steel Institute^ re-
pMrts that an estimated 00,
Si be saved in fuel and roschlnery,
X in the lite of a ship if it
ftciency can be increased by one
Mr cent in the laboratory stage..
* major project at the Basin u
Kiaing ways fox minimizing the
eta and roll of ships at sea to
wear and tear and get
more accurate firing,
abarkingand less sea-
^*We the Navy has made
attacked it at the Basin by,
i m huU shapes and by new
of navigation which
i tod roD.
PICK OF THE DAIRY INDUSTRY-Ruth Marie Peterson, the
Ame'iican, Dair^ P/uicesa, ahres-one o three glasses of milk with
Agriculture Senetary Ezra Taf't Benson in hia Washington office.
The 20Ty**t-o!d AuVttn. Minn, girl won her title at the Inter-
national Dairy bow in Chicago. She will attend the International
Trade Fair m Bogota. Columbia, acting as an ambassador of good,
ill from the US dairy industry,^____________________-
luce
de-
'GREAT*HEAHT.WAItMING COMEDY."
Hollywood Reporter.
THE SEVEN LITTLE FOY*
Release at the "LUX" Theatre, Thursday 29
pest Accessory*.
,ont-Catcher
IARBINGTON. R.I. TP) -
ink B. wTttemare \atm that
new car bad most of the mod-
gadfiets But he didn t know
It on of the accessories wa
"pheasant catcher." ,
L- wa' driving to work us
aing wtara pheasant crashed
hi *pipdshieli
d at -market
the Mr* plucked The
waa Mnptof dinner
M-T IOIWMLIC
I Qat New Brtum roo-
and Loan Asstw,jpj
about slippery side-
year The comparr
- |. y atas* below the
iewalk to melt
MISCELLANEOUS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
OX 2031. ANCN. C.Z.
ox 1211. cmsTOiau.cz.
TOP. SAll: 1954 F.ra V-l
-fardar. Original owner. 17
taaflii *V, 9000 mila. $1400.
Can be Huacea. Phon. Balkoa
rciiicnca -1527; aHlca 2-
2541.
CONGBATTJLATING THE WINNERGen. Carlos P. Romulo
of the Philippines shakes hands with Ambassador Leo Mates
(righti of Yugoslavia In the UN General Assembly in New
York after .Yugoslavia woo the contested Security Council
seat. The long deadlock over the seat was broken when del-
egates voted 43-11 to give it to Yugoslavia.
^^
1 ^>%1 tafc*!!^ ^
Jrll ^** ^ ^^ ^^^^^bI \
aFfltafak' bbbbbbbI
HA I fh0^ n
^bbbbbbbI M
t A B^Bb S L^ bP*^^
HM a
kfl^uMMtaM aaiaaB -r
P*y ill
BaaaBaSBBBGal
RESORTS
PHIUIPI Ocaaaiiaa Cartaaai.
Santo Clara, lax 435, laBJaa.
Phaaa Panaraa 3-1877. Criara-
aal 3-1673
Distribution Of Data
On Other's Homeland
Agreed By US, Reds
WASHINGTON. Dec. 4 .
The United State and Russia
have agreed to let each other
resume distribution of monthly
information magazine In the
other's homeland, the State De-
partment has arinounced.
Under the agreement, reached
through a series of diplomatic
notes, this country will sell In.
the Soviet Union each month
50,000 copies of a Russlan-lnn-
guage magazine on American life
and custom.
Russia, in turn, will be per-:
mltted to resume publication of1
its monthly English-language
Soviet information Bulletin here.:
The United States suspended
publication of Its slick magazine,
Amerita, in Jnly 1952 because of
stringent restrictions the Com-
munists placed on its distribu-
tion In Ruslsa. In retaliation, It
ordered Russia to halt distribu-
tion of the Soviet bulletin in this
country.
The State Department said It
asked Russia Sept. 9 for permis-
sion .-.to resume distribution of
Amerfka. The CommtTnixts
agreed" tos the proposal last Fri-
day.
The U.S. note said publication
by this country "of m Russian-
language magazine for distribu-
tion within tht Soviet Union
would constitute a concrete step
furthering a fuller Interchange
of Information and Ideas" as
proposed at the Geneva confer-
ence last summer.
It said Amerika will be "an
illustrated Russian-la n g u a g e
magazine, which would btuM
tural and non-polRlcal in ME-*
acter, devoted to an objective
presentation of various aspects
of American Ufa."
Russia said that It will not re.
quire a preliminary review of tbe
magazine, the State Department
said.
Russia did not say when it
plans to resume publication of
the bulletin, but indicated It will
do so shortly.
Graailich'i Santa Clara ieaer.
Cartaaai. Madera convenience,
moderat rater. hoa Qetatoa
-441.
ShtaaaMt't rntatrtjaal Hattaae an
beach al Santa Clara. TalaaJieaa
Thamaiaft. lalaaa 1772,
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. Om tila
Nat Catlaa. Law rates.
tarkaa IfM. ,
FOR RENT
Apartment*
WANTED
Apartments
ATTENTION G. f.l Jaar aaiM
nadara ram.ahea aaartmaat*. I.
2 bedroomi. hat, cald w a t a r.
Ffcaae Faaaaaa 3-4941.
FOR RENT:2-bedroom apart-
ment, bat watar. Ricarda Ariai
Street. Campo Alafre. Inaurre
37lh Street Na. 4-23.
FOR RINT: Cox 2-bedroam
apartment. Na. 15-B Sth Street,
Saw Francisca da la Caleta.
WANTIO: Vacaran aaart.r.
lor couple withawt children or
aaH, Martina January I. Rafar-
encat turniahed. Balboa 2-3171.
Geographic Briefs
WASHINGTON The first men
to fly around the world nonstop
did it in ten minutes. Richard E.
Byrd and Floyd, Bennett on May
8, 1926, flew to the North Pole
; and circled it, crossing all the
meridians of longitude in one full
turn, the National Geographic. So-
ciety lays.
Position Offered
WANT: Radia tacaaaUiea
eipariencad in com man cat ana
and feleyiiian. Motorola Distri-
buter, Jar Francisca eta la Oasa
Ave. Na. 31 i Automobile Raw)
after 3 a.m. any waafc day.
WANTED:Secretary, Ulinaual.
Mutt be flood Enjlrtli rterta, area
houri Apply witb rH datarla
and abata. Box IIS. Anean.
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous
FOR RENT: Saacio.i lcala,
ground. Jurto Aratanaaaa Ate-
nu No 37-11. Inquire 37tb
Street Na. 4-22. .
The Canary Islands were nam-
ed for their many large dog (Lat-
in cams). The canary bird took
its name from this archipelago,
now part of Spain.
(NEA Telephotol
OFFERING SOME COMFORT James Ct. Apel, whose daugh-
ter, Mrs. Mary Calhourt, and her three young children were
killed by Mrs. Calhoun's estranged husband, Buford Calhoun.
In Dallas, Tex,, comforts a was wounded by Calhoun. Police captured Calhoun in a drug-
store after shooting him. He later died of his wounds.
Tlie rollicking thetoBchly delightful "THE SEVEN LIT-
TE BOYS." which won the "arents Magarine Medal A-
ward as- an outatiusdiag family pictarr, will pen soe>a at
the LVX Theatre, with Bob Hope starred aa Eddie Far*.
The U>rv of the most fabolou family act la aadevilie.
the film is a wonderful blend of mude, high haaaar. drama
and RoucbiQl rotnancr Hope's dramatic aerfarraanLe. bju
beet hatled fir etlea>
Secretly-Accused
Ex-POW Cleared,
Awarded Back Pay
WA8HINOTON, Dec. 24
The Foreign Claims Settle-
ment Commission has cleared a
former soldier of anonymous
charges of collaborating with his j
Communist Chinese captors In
Korea and has awarded him $2,-
125 for his 28 months in a pris-
oner of war camp.
The office of Rep. Harold D.
Cooley said the commission
cleared Daniel Lewis Wheeless,
29, of Rocky Mount, N.C.
No decision has been an-
nounced In the case of Pferry Mc-
Donald Walker, 29, Mount Olive,
N.C, Wheeless' prison camp
friend who faced similar charges.
The two veterans demanded and
got one of the first public hear-
ings In such a case.
Federal law provide a $2.50
per day payment to prisoners of
tbe Korean War but denies It to
any who collaborated with or
knowingly aided the enemy.
Wheeless and Walker applied
for their payment last winter.
The commission informed them
that It had information that
they aided the Communist pro-
paganda program by making re-
cordings, voluntarily attended i
tudy group meetings, were,
friendly with the Chinese and!
were singled oat by their captors
for favorable treatment.
Walker, through their attor-
ney. Col. Hubert Klwood May of |
Nashville, N.C, denied the!
charges and demanded the.right:
to face their accusers publicly
and get specific facts about their
alleged misdeeds.
They won a pubUc-hoaitos; be-
fore Commissioner Whitney Qil-
liland at which-they were the
only witnesses. Commission re-
gulations do not allow claim-
ants to see confidential Defense
Department records concerning;
them-
DE-CAPPED
GOSHEN, bid. Holderman aad two of hi buddies
are sound sleeper. They pent the
night in Holderman' car near the
business district, and when they
woke up the next morning all four
of tbe car's hub caps were miss-
ing.
WILL RUN FOR RE-ELECTION With his wife, Lucy, be-
side him, Sen. Walter George announces at a news conference
in Vienna, da., that he will seek re-nomination to the U.S.'
Senate In the Georgia Democratic primary election next year.
George. 77, has been m the Senate since 2922.
-------------r----------------------------------------------------------------r*--------------------------------1---------------------------------------------
1 i
V^SaaaaaaaanV L^miV^
at at wNaaii anP

aaaant 1 4 *



1
TURNCOAT RETURNS FROM BED CHINA American turncoat
Richard Tenneson lefti, who refused repatriation after the
a Into Hong Kong from Red China after
living behind the Bamboo Curtain.
Is British Police Superintendent Al Gordon.
The misnamed American hem-
lock, unlike the Old World tree
whose juices killed Socrates, is
poisonous to neighter man nor
best.
milesthe National
Society say.
Geographic
Having hurdled the sound' bar-
rier, airplane designer now face
a thermal barrier. Even in Uta
thin atmosphere of 30,000 feet, ah*
resistance would heat plane tur-
faces to 300 degree F. at twice
the ipeed of sound.
. The earth's orbit is such that the American Indians, are classified
sun is three million miles closer by scientists as a Mongol people
in January than in July. If the I descended from ancient nomad of
sun' rays did not strike the Nor-!eastern Asia, the National Gao-
(hern Hemisphere more obliquely
then, winter would be warmer
than summer.
The kangaroo family has more
than members. Some are called by
other nameswallaroo, wallaby,
euro, and pademelon. They range
from the foot-long musky-rat kan-
garro to 7-foot red and great
grays. _____
Mount Singgalang In central
Sumatra gets 320 days of rain a
year with a mean relative humidi-
ty, of 93 percent.
Cape Good Hope, despite popu-
lar belief, is not the southernmost
tip of Africa. That distinction, goes
to Cape Agulhas to the southeast,
which is 33 mile nearer the South
In 1956 Mar and Earth will
swing almost as close together a
they ever comeabout 35 mill'on
graphic Society ay m it* ajaw
book on Indians of the AOMticas.
The highest point in Ohio is I,*
550-foot Campbell Hill, near Balla-
fontainei
French canalboat ordinarily eaf
ry metal arms to swing pasieng
er on and off. A housewife maj
be swung ashore, shop the mail
street and rejoin the leisurely
barge at the other end of town
MORE POWIR
FRANKFORT, lad. (UP) -
The Power boys' are going to b
mighty powerful in Frankfort com
Jan. 1. Kenneth Power was electei
mayor. Brother Sam is count;
prosecutor. Bfother Ray. a fin
department veteran, is expected fs
be named fire chief.
\
Betty Balance in a scene
from "THE PUPPET SHOW"
Balboa Theater Thursday, Dec. 29
at
2 p.M. 5 P.M. 8 P.M.
Adults 6 i:* :0 *:i5 :W S:55 pja.
HIGH Adventure RELEASE!

MEN KNEW HIS FURY BUT NOT HiS FACE!
WOMEN KNEW HIS UPS. BUT NOT HIS NAME;
He hid his secret behind a
mask of revenge-and d<
fh? might of a despot na
GENE BARRY ?DAN O'HERUHY


"' -
SUNDAY. DECEMBER 25, lt55
THE SUNDAY AMERICA*
PAGE 8EVEW
CAPITOLIO
j5c. -------------- 80c.
NOT AS A
STRANGER
- Also: -
CANYON
CROSSROADS
T IVOll
'tac.-----------------**
Double In Spanish I
ESCUELA DE
MSICA
. Also: -
EDUCANDO A PAPA

CENTRAL Theatre
Kr ___________________.--------------- *C
75c.
Sensational release i
The Year Musical Hit!
Jane Russell Jeanne Crain, in
GENTLEMEN MARRY
BRUNETTES
In Cinemascope and Technicolor I
LUX THEATRE
75e----------:- '-----------* c*
GREAT RELEASE!
Tony CURTIS Colleen MILLER
in
THE PURPLE MASK
Cinemascope and Color
DRIVE-IN Theatre
WEEKEND DOUBLE!
ROBERT MITCHUM, in
THE NIGHT of THE HUNTER
FARLEY GRANFER, la
THE NAKED STREET
CECILIA THEATRE
Mc
GREAT DOUBLE!
MAUREEN O'HARA. In
LADY GODIVA
FAITH DOMERGl'E. In
THIS ISLAND EARTH
Both In TECHNICOLOR!
3c.
R I
J5c. ----------------- tie.
Double In
Cinemascope!
A STAR IS BORN
- Also: -
THE COMMAND
V /C TO*
15c. ------------
HIGH SOCIETY
- Also: i
MR. BOOTS
'ANTA Proposes Plan To Bring
40 Weeks Theater To US Cities
NEW YORK A plan for bring-i support a 40-week, season of low-
ling Uve, professional theatre to priced, professionally produced
I cities throughout the United States theatre each year
for 40 weeks every year has been! To do this, ANTA.first proposes
proposed by the American Nato-i to c.eate four year-round talent
nal Theatre and Academy (ANTA).lpools to replace the annual gravi
The proposal, called "the 40 .Ution of theatre people of New
.Theatre Circuit Plan" because the|York,
prospectus lists 40 cities as the1 New York would be one
required basic nucelus, is reveal
THE THRILLING FIGHT FOR SURVIVAL
Typed
Art Cartoon
cd in detail in the December issue
,of Theatre Arts magazine. The|
plan has received the enthusiastic
support of Helen Hayes, Maurice,
Evans, Ralph Bellamy, president |
of Acors' Equity Association, Rog-|
er L. Stevens, a leading Broadway ,
producer and president of the Newjduce ten Ply\m,ult"eus, v- c'
Dramatists Committee. CorneliaacOrding to ANTA,s proposal. The
Otis SkJiner, playwright Marc resultant 40 productions would
' each play on* week in each
four talent center
Theatre Circuit. The ethers weoM
be Chicago, where the nucleus of
a talent pooi already exists; eith-
er San Francisco or Los Angeles;
and a southwestern city, possibly
Dallas, Fort Worth or Houston.
Each talent center would pro-
tilm again by producer Waft Disney to hla newest .true-life adventure. "The Vanishing prairie;" which enn-
oihno. fheaw Tha some of the naturalwonrjers which are shqwn'ln technicolor: Rapidly disappearing from the grassland seen
for the 40 tinues today at ^f*o* Th*' "" athVAme rican Prairie, the" prongrn can be found nowhere else. Graceful, agile, fleet of foot, he can outrun tjio
is *he P?|hom ^. (J. J1^/^ r}^ .center, dlie-toJErl a brace of defenseless prairie dogs/ The Plains Indians carefully modeled their '
fastest horse... 8wooping downonM. >rey t^newuer i.^ w)h ^ M^f, of wlnter, Uie /or the arum ab "becomes a rim struggle for existence. The con-
layaa1 S..... Utliar Bifn. h, "i9mtt,
ficW." rhrMfhNt h I.,, w , p^^.
:" it * "" "" Ogih "Ne
city
. Connelly, president of the National
I Institute of Arts and Letters, onthe circuit.
Myre. MeCmldi wU Broadway producer Richard Al- The 40 plays produced esch year
* drich, Basil Rathbone, Raymond would be balanced between co-
Massey, and other leaders In themedy and drama, classics and
American theatre. Broadway.hits and new crlpU.
40 Weeks in 49 Cities Swire envisions a time when the
; The Plan is based on the pre- * rbeatoe Circuit might get the
,mise that there -re 40 cities in the|cream.t the output of new play.
lUnited States which can and will wrlgbts.
Lack Of Writers Main Problem Now
Of TV And Theatre, Evans Claims
New Playwrights
"The arrived playwright is go-
ing to offer his new plays to Broad-
! way first, of course," Willard Swire
admits. "But we're particularly
interested in developing new play-
' wrights. The reason I think thai
____0 ___ most new playwrights will turn to
| us is-that they know they'll have
NEW YORK Television and thing as a social code. Propriety'their plays on the boards for 4
J in this T-shirt age, can scarcely weeks while on Broadway you can
be said to exist. Those small nice-!Pen Thursday and close on Satur-
tles of behavior which provided so dy- And if a play is a hit on our
much dramatic meat for the likes circuit,. I see nothing that would
6f 'Maugham ar no longer of in-'stop It from going into New York
terest in the theatre. In the cur-i under the usual Broadway auspi-
rent world of Tennessee Willis mj ces/
and Arthur Miller, it's felt that ._. w .
passion can exist only in the back, Theatres Waitinff
alleys of Louisiana.or in a neigh- The theatres needed
the theatre are currently, faced
with a common basic problem, ac-
cording to actor-producer Maurice
Evans.
The problem: a lack of writers.
"There are dramatists galore
who are grinding out ,a. steady
stream of words for. stage and
Ty," Evans admit "but the dra-
matist who has something to sayborhood of ash cans. Passions
and the ability lb say it effective-;must be in the raw. Civilized pas-
ly has either disappeared or gone sion seems to be-oufrmoded
into hiding.''
40
Theatre Circuit are. In many
cases, waiting almost ready .made,
according to Swire. Throughout
Evansrecsdlga play "in which he the ountry, he points out, there
'appeared several vears ago Ter-|are legitimate theatres, opera
Evans, who is currently re- ence Rattigan's "The Browning |houses and movie nouesa wnicn
presented as a" producer both on Version.'' which, as he points out.!were, originally built for stags
tht stage ("The Teahouse of thejwas about civilised people and aisnws wich are either standing
August MoonVand-No Trmes for|highly civilized passiona manlempty oi operating on the close
Sergeants"! Jion television (thetorn between dedication to theedge of solvency with movies
monthly 'HaBinjrk Hall of Fame"|classics and a carnal and volup- They could form the nucleus of the
series on NBO), to impressed.withuous wife, theatres to be used, he saya^Tne
the fact that out -play wrights seem! -'Apparently this appealed tc I hind o. theatres he has in mind,
to.be drying up at a time when the public and to some of the!he reports, are the Brown Tbe-
our novelists have continued to critics as a trivial situation '" atre in Lousville, Ky., and the
bloom. Evans admits. "I found myself Court Square Theatre In Spring
baffled by thus reaction, tor I field, Mass., both onetrm elegm
Resorts to Adsptatioas thought It was the basis for leaf mate theatres.
pathos and drama. ANT/ is an organization incor
"Like any theatrical producer. I "im not suggesting that we goporated by an Act of Congress ui
have been looking for new plays back to trivialities but I do get 1935 and granted a Congressional|
that would rouse me sufficiently slck of watching nothing'but efe-"; charter "to extend the Hying the-l
to want to produce them,'' Evans ;mental passion in the thcatr-. This atre beyond its present limitations!
says "But I havent found them.,^ of ^ting presumes an un-'by bringing the best in the tbeatri
Instead I have resorted to dra-ihealthv kind of sophistication. It. to erery state in the union It, i"
matlc adaptations of novels Tea-, smackf of decadence, and I feel the only orgsnization In the fieli
house' frora-Vern Sneider's novel >igure u,at t.s not n keeping witn.jof the creative arts which operate
and 'Sergeants' from Mac Hym-1 tne tastes of most- people." es under a Congressional charter.|
an's very successful book.'
Disney PutLFiaht For Survival On Filnr

rK^ncVs' olhraortog'fhythms o al'l prairie bl rdlife... With the
slant search fo? food leads W herd of elk (right) across the snow-cove
grassland toward higher grou ndon the- Snow Flatn.
Leisure Time
May Spell Danger
UNIVERSITY PARK. Pa. (UPl
Leisure time can be a liability
unless It's' spent constructively on
hobbies and c>her recreational out-
lets, according to Fred M. Coombs,
professor of physical education fit
Pentt, State.. ,
Faltering Philip:
i
"
Ml'SlCAL TRIO...Eddie Albert and his'wife Margo strike a
harmonious chord with their young on Stevle. The Alberts have
recently appeared on their own television show.
For the, first time in history, the
average worker in America now
has more leisure time than work- -
ing time, he said, adding:
"And this can lead to a de-
generation' such' as has befallen
nations of the past which have
achieved great amounts of leisure
time for their people:"
He recommended that persons
with time on their hands interest
themselves in hobbies, preferably
i those calling for participation. He
I particularly recommended family
| hobbies and leisure time activities
'because "the family that plays
together, stays together."
Where Were You
SCOTTSVILLE, Mich. -(UP>-
Robert Howe figured something
must have happened when he ar-
rived home from deer hunting and
! found the house empty. And a few |
, things had happened, too.
His wife. Audrey, was in the]
hospital with a new baby daugh-l
' ter, and his father, Harry, 62, waaf
! in the hospital recovering from a-
! heart attack and broken hip. which
he cuff erad during the excitement
of the arrival of the baby.
'hiHp's fe lo MJleo 'with truisee
Weil-worn ateta, and rut he sea
palr wbaM latt Ms bemr tike new.
; A OaaaUVthv ban the Hrht clue!
J1AI. DRIVE-IN
THE BEST DOUBLE OF THE MONTH!
Showing Gt yaWt SswioL CsmisL JhueAA. Joday,!
iDiablo Hts. 2:30. 6:16, 8:2|
Jame* H'EWART
mas; j-ro&i LARAMir*
Cinemascope Colon
Man. "OMEO AND JVLIIT"
to p 1 a y-
Bvana, we
transitional
What has happened
Wright: According to
are going through a
period in tht theatre.
"The p>ya that I was brought
up on were relatively easy for a
dramatist to write." he says.!
"Spmorset Maugham, for instance -
wrote a whole succession of them. |
They wert nohrly alliiaaed on the I _
breaking of social barriers and"
the resultant scandal was the ba
sis for play
Passion in Back Alleys
NowSlWl there is no -
---------^--------------;-------
GAMROA
Clark GABLE
SliMii HA Y WARD
SOLDIER OF FORTUNE'
Cinemascope Color:
1-M GATUN
Tua*. "MAN fr|H LABAMIF.'' la*. 'TMALE on l BEACH'
2:3 :
jack WEBB
"DRAGNET"
Coloi I
-RISTOBAL "YOUNG AT HEART"
:':M Dorli DAY e Erank SINATRA
Ala. ak*wtas#SUN. MON.
TODAY
& Tomorrow!
75c. 4flc
I
Chi
!
I
QUICK QUOTES
JAYNE'^IANSFELD. the film
star no)T8|ipearing on.'Broadway
an Will Success Spoil Rock Hunt-
er:": "I prefer men between the
agita, of .and 50. I love candle-
light, music, artistic things, squir-
rels an* rabbit*, my Great Dane,
my fireplace and my pink Jaguar
...Whenever I get depressed, I
read my press notices and look at
my pictures."
MARLON BRANDO, revealing
that he.plans to be back on Broad-
way in a Tennessee Williams play
next FaH: "I've hurt jnyaerf stay-
ing in the moviea too long- IV
shpped ss an actor becsuse the,
movies don't Jivttan actor the self'
diaciplina he neeajs to keep sharp ,
DEBORAH KBRR oo the plight *?
of the foreign actress in the Unit-
od StatM: against you m America tf you're
from Rn^ad._Thoy automatical-
ly endow ybQ wRS a tiara And if
you're French! You're a ma-
dame or s courtesan."
CENTRAL
1:15 8:51 4:52 :5S t:H p.m.
BIGGEST RELEASE!
Greritlenii
"GUTHMEN
Mamiinlcrrtr
WAI'K MMMstCHAW",
'SSiUfUitUiLfT
NAVf YOU MET IMS JOBfS' !
ELSA MARTTNELLY. JO -year
old Italian movie kctres.-' "1 don't
waot to start at the bottom and
work my way mv I want to star
(be topand sa> there."
Mai^BiiffLgttjeS
|CnsrEavCAScopE cokx-V'Ifecbnicolor
aMtaWtMsBmsyllMrtOOStlJCHWSIU. BncMteaCHMOSail
Towering Above All Others...
.a motion picture
that will not be
'ily matched
jrforgotten!
Robert Mitchom
Shelley Winters
tailaattai
LILLIAN GlSHi!*^aalwiimi
CHARLESLGHTON
Icnaajii, It INKS KB Imm a. a*
MMfSnaS riMaal MU tsteoii
- smm m uan mvn
JVIOHT
OFTHK
fiunti:r
** -m
PLUS:
IT HAPPENED ON
THE NAKED
STREET:
SOMEWERE
IN THE MAZE OF
BROOKLYN'S
JUNGLE'
FAKLEY ANTHONY ANNE
GRrW QlaMi BMUOFT


W*
ni
f AGE EIGHT .
THE gPNPAT AMERICA*
SUNDAY, DECEMBER tS, IfH
T
$5
Juan Franco Graded Entries
r.r.
Jacks? Wt
COMMENT
ODDS
*. --> -FfaAfB as- **'"5
1Cadrlno
*- Realo
8M. Slipper
4Los Morros
Good Joy
8New Look
7Carries
8Dixie
A. Gonialee 87x-Chance with |ood sUrt
V. CMtUlo 115 -Last trip not bad
C Glraldo 110 -WiU be contender
M Hurley 113 Some pep in mornings
B Baeza lOOx -Has shown nothing
m! Ycaza 113 -Reportedly ready
A Ycaza HO -Must improve more
J Cadogan 110 -Touted this week
8-1
2-1
2-1
5-1
15-1
4-1
5-1
2-1
8Gallsto
7-achiax
7*
.j . i- iMMrtad iVt ft, fur $175.00 -
Wta ,mHCONDIlACIOTHI!>OUiLI
Pool Cleses 1:1S
2 Paques
-4 Alaba:
1Copar
M
-jrda
hies Ned
ftAtom O
88. Windsor
7Pru Fru
. 8Fanglo
-8Coronellno
,J0-A. Fulmar
V. CaatUfy
A. Gonzlez
E. Campbell
L. Glraldo
J. Cadogan
O. Chanls
B. ARuirre
R. Gamero
J. Gongora
A. Mena
113 -Shuffled back last
105xCould score at price
115x Jockey handicaps
122 Despite highweight
108 Would pay off here
106 Longshot chance
113 Distance handicaps
113 Usually close up
116 Has beaten better
110 No. 1 contender
B. Agulrre 118 -Form indicates
Aliaz 115x-Dangerous despite rider
im.ort.^ 7 Pas. e $450.00 feel Closes
^WCONO RACIOf THI DOU8LI
8-2
8-1
4:05
18ally Spruce A. Ycaza
2-Alminar .*7gb
3-Persiflage L. Glraldo
4D. Club A. Creidldio
5Dlxlprlncess J- Gongora
6FonUlnebleu B. Agulrre
7Tony F. Alvarez
8Pinino R- 9.am.e
B_Pontn -?,uz
10-Y. Prince V. Castillo
110 Needed last
113 -Chances appear good
115 -Sharp factor here
99x Must show more
108 -Might not make it
113 -Beaten favorite
112 Last was dubious
105 Would surprise
100 Raced evenly
113 Seeks third straight
3-1
4-1
3-1
30-1
15-1
8-1
2-1
80-1
8-1
4-1
Riqui Mutuels Choice;
Coral, Black Gold Rate
Dangerous Contenders
Ten of the best native thoroughbreds in train
8-1
10-1
8-1
3-2
20-1
15-1
3-1
4-1
5-1
2-1
Srh R.c. "A-ft"
1Nacho
2Julie
3Metto
4Yosikito
5 (Petite
6 (DOn Grau
Ird Rasa "Nen-Wtaseers"-
ft a*. Puros $250.00 Pool Closes 1:45
ONI TWO

30-1
2-1
4-1
10-1
8-1
8-1
EVEN
Nativos 7 Pf.'o'- * Poo sees 4,40
QUINIILA
J. Jtmnez lOTx-Good recent racy
B. Baexa Wx -Lightweight may help
M Ycaza 108 -Strong contender
E Pita G. 114x-Bert early foot
H Ruiz 113 -This may be spot
J. Phillips 107 -Ratea good chance too
8-1
5-1
2-1
8-1
8-2
3-2
9th Use. "OirWaus CUsiU1
1 Mils Pone $5000.00
ONI -TWO
P..I Cl. 5:15
4* Race V
Natives tH M " *'M Po#l CtoMi *'M
QUINIILA
IS. Velluda
2Rabiblanco
1Lady Edna
4Wlnsaba
6Regia
-Radical
7(Filn
8(Don Jaime
A. Valdivia 113 -Could get.up here
f. cadogan 115 -Prefers this rider
B Agulrre 113 -Improving steadily
G. Ramos 96x -Upset possibility
R Rapia I06xDangerous in mud
K FtorS 113 -Runs well when rested
J. Phillips 105 -Could get up here
J. Avila 117 -Running to best form
5-1
3-1
3-2
10-1
5-1
3-1
3-1
3-1
5th Race 'I"
1Escorial
SIJaquimazo
8Lexden
4Kiosco
IAfter Me
B. Afuirre 115 -Should beat these M
M Ycaza 110 -Good chance now W
V CartUlo 115 -WiU fight it out 3-
E Pita D. lOflx-Could score at price M
H. Ruiz 108 -Showing improvement 8-1
A. Ycaza 118
B. Agulrre 118
L. Glraldo 126
R. Gamero 102
H.Ruiz 10'
M. Ycaza 118
K. Flores 126
A. Valdivia 126
J. Gongora 115
F. Alvarez 126
Back in best form
Must ignore last
Improvement due
Apparently outclassed
Would pay off here
Ran well in return
Good past performances
Nothing recently
Could surprise here
Should handle this
l-Oclkn Star
2Corn
3Portal
4EleniU
5Don Brigido
6Don Goyo
7Black Ggld
8O. Wonder
9Tingat
10-Rlqul
10th *. "8" le^H- 7 N* P.- $750.00 M CUm.
tifiar ffs hlssass.
4-1
2-1
8-1
$0-1
15-1
4-1
4-1
20-1
10-1
EVEN
inw will dispute the $5000 added purse in the one
mile Christmas Classic this afternoon at the Juan
Franco race track.
An added attraction for fans
will be the usual drawings for
Xmas prises held in the various
sections of the track's premises.
Riqui is sure to EC an odds on
mutuels choice to chalk up his
second Christmas Classic triumph
in three tries. Riqui beat out the
favored Golden Tap in 1953 in a
thriller but failed miserably last
year when he did not even finish
in the money. The ill-fated Golden
Tap won the event her second-
to become the present all time
leading native money winner.
Riqui along with Portal, Black
Gold and Golden Wonder, will
have to tote 126 pounds In this
weight for age event because
5:40
4-1
8-2
31
3-1
8-1
8-1
8-1
"O" Inserted 8 W N-' $00.00 Pool Closes 8:15
PIR5T RACIi OF THI DOUBU
1 nnd Real F. Alare 110 This looks like it
.twa sSlrdo Y Castillo 110 -Apparently overrated"
tjio. M. Ycaxa.112 -Could go here
2t?a VL Florea 113 -Distance too short
V98H? -f oBSrm 110 -Not against these
The Uniform
Doesn't Bring
Big Money
NEW YORK .-(NBA) John-,
ny Podres was talking about the
money a baseball player can
make.
"I'm hot now," he was saying.
"I really learned how to pitch in
the World Series. I know I can do
it now. And with that business be-
hind me, I'll put on that uniform
next year and make myself some
big money." ;
"You forget," a guy said, "that
you can have a uniform on next
season and only get $65 a month
for it." He was referring to Pod
res' draft board troubles, which
have not been resolved.
they are four years old o r over.
Three year-olds Coral, Ocean
Star and Don Goyo get in with
118 while two-year-olds Don Brtgi
do and Tingat have been assigned
the feather of 105. Elenite, anoth-
er two-year-old, gets a three -
pound sllowsnce for being a fiUy.
She will carry only 102 pounds.
Coral, BUck Gold, Don Goyo
and Ocean Star are rated the ones
most likely to upset the favorite.
Both Coral and Black Gold were
disappointments in their last
starts but are sure to improve con
siderably with the big purse and
silver trophy as incentives.
Portal is another which usually
does well when there is added
money to be picked up. Golden
Wonder, Tingat, Don Brigido and
Elenita are the rank ouUiders in
the race.
The secondary attraction could
turn out to be much more thrilling
than the classic. Top weighted
Mossadeq, at 126, will attempt to
defeat the likes of Barge Royal,
Quematodos and the Albatross
Amoro entry in a seven furlong
sprint for Class B imports.
Juan Franco Tips
By LUIS
1El Regalo
2Fra Fru
3Paparrorra
4Lady Edna
SJaquimazo
Gllate
7Persiflage
8Metto
R'qui
18Mossadeq
ROMER
Cadrlno
Chic'a Ned
Don Manuel
Don Jaime (e)
Escorial
Onda Real
Ponton
Nacho
Don Goyo
Hipocrates
DBMfbodii- HaaiL..0amt^dh.
v
i u 1)9
CLASSIC


We artel our frUnth
at thi nappy time
and wish them well,
new and always
CHRISTMAS PRIZES FOR HOLDER OF
LUCKY ENTRANCE TICKETS
CLUBHOUSE PRIZE...........75.00
Second................. 50.00
Third..................25.00
GRANDSTAND ...............$70.00
Second................. 30.00
Third.................. 20.00
HELD POOL.................$50.00
Second................ 20.00
Third.................. 10.00
9th RACE For Native Horses 1 M,LE
Purse: $5,000.00 Added Pool Closes: 5:15 p.m. [
' ONE-TWO
1- OCEAN STAR .........A. Ycaza ...........~. 1
2-CORAL....................B. Aguirre............ U*
3-PORTAL...... ........L Glraldo 126
4-ELENITA. ............... R. Gamero ............102
5- DON BRIGIDO........... H.Ruiz...-.......... W5
6- DON GOYO.............. M. Ycaza............U*
17-BLACK GOLD............ K. Flores ............. 12*
8 GOLDEN WONDER........A. Valdivia ... 1
9 TINGAT.......... .......J. Gongora ........... 105
10 RIQUI............./.....F. Alvarez 126



ww<
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25, IMS
THE SUNDAY AMERICAN
PAGE NINB
Pro Title Story Isn't New-Stop Old Otto Graham And Win
y JIMMY SRISLIN
NEW YORK (NEA) If
an old thing for Otto Graham,
this business of playing in a'game
for the championship of profes
sional football. Automatic Otto, as
the remarkable Cleveland Browns
quarterback is called, has been
the big item in the last five Na-
tional Football League champion-
ship games.
If you rush Otto, get his
throwing a touch off its usual
feathery, straight to the tar
get style, you have a solid
chance to beat the Browns.
The situation is unchanged this
season, as the Los Angeles Rams
and the Browns meet for the
| league championship, Dec. 26,
Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles.
Otto is 34 now, and it's "positive-
ly" his last season. But he's still
the man to beat.
This is the sixth time the
Browns have been in the big one.
And it is the third time they've
faced the Rams. In 1930, Lou
Groza's loe was. the difference in
Cleveland's 30-28 victory. The next
season, the Rams turned back
Cleveland, 24-17.
IN "PASSING, PLEASE NOTE
/
PRACTICE RUr*--Chiharu Igaya, Japanese OL
works out at St. Anton Am Arlberg, Austria as he preps for the
winter Olympics. Igaya won the lien's National Alpine title
flier this yes* while a student at Dartmouth College.
by
JOE WILLIAMS
Apparently the distinction between a fighter who manages
a successful comeback und one who regains his championship,
has not been defined with adequate note from one of the customers indicates:
* "There waa nothing unprecedented about Sugar Ray Rob-
inson winning back the middleweight title from Bobo Olson.
Take a look at the record book and you will find that Stanley
Ketchel did the same thing in a fight with Billy Papke aa long
ago as 1008."
It was hardly the same. To begin with Robinson never lost
the title. He retired undefeated to enter the light heavyweight
division. Then, losing to Joey Maxim, he retired altogether.
At least this was his intention. But after some 30 months,
during which his cash holdings dwindled to piggy-bank pro-
portions, he returned to the ring, had six tune-up figlrfs, then
knocked out the current champion.
To come back, a fighter obviously must first go away,-and
after having gone he must heed the compulsion to return. By
this rule o; thumb definition, Robinson was an authentic come-
back, and since all others in similar circumstances failed, it
wan unprecedented.
There is nothing about Robinson's accomplishment that Is
analagous to Ketchel and Papke. Ketchel lost his title In Septem-
ber and regained It in November of the same year, fighting
regularly before, Ms well as afterward.
In Keichel's day, even regaining a title was considered
epochal and was appropriately rhapsodized in boxing literature.
Now its commonplace. Until recently Jimmy Carter, for exam-
ple, made a mischievous practice of winning and losing the
lightweight title every other Friday night, or so it seemed.
OOODBY, OLD PAL
To describe Robinson's feat as unprecedented, historically
accurate as It may be, is to take Imprudent liberties with lan-
guage values, especially In view of the soft touch he faced, yet
sports page readers owe with a profound debt of gratitude.
"They never come back" was the oldest and most labored
cliche in the trade. Thanks to Robinson, it can now be filed away
and forgotten along with lightning never strikes twice, {"-
never win Derbies and money never makes for happiness-,
it seems iiKely the phrase gained its original currency
following Jim Jeffries' abortive effort to redeem the white race.
The Ohio boilermaker, who had retired undefeated, came back
after six yean and was messily battered by Jack Johnson. More
than one lead story from the Reno press box that July after-
noon probably started out: "They never come back."
for all anyone knows, Johnson might have beaten Jeffries
the best day he ever saw, but what Inexorably doomed the come-
backer were the corrosive effects, mental as well as physical, of
his long Idleness. Among other things, he had Irretrievably lost
his zest for fighting.
When a comebacker answers the bell, desperation has re-
placed ambition. The sheriff is Just around the comer and money
must be raised.
7T NEVER RETURNS
Heavyweights fight more often now than in other days. If
the tltleholder defended once a year he was regarded as *
fighting champion. It was three years before Jess Willard put
his title on'the line Roughly, he faced the same problem as
Jeffries. He was a ring rusty 38, and Dempsey, 24, tore him apart
Demptey, like Robinson, and Jeffries before him, was sure
he was through with the ring forever when he announced his
retirement. Financial colic later compelled him to change his
mind. I was with him when he resumed training.
'The hardest thing." he explained, "is to get the feel of
fighting again. I'm in good shape, I'm punching all right, I can
still make all the moves, but somehow something is lacking."
Desire. Deep down, he no longer had It. He wasn't fighting
because he wanted to, but because he had to.
Sine then, the Browns have
tangled with the Detroit Lions
three times, losing two in a row
until they, broke out with a 56-10
runaway* last season.
It appears, then, that there is
nothing really new to say about
the Browns and the Rams in a
playoff game. Tthat is, until you
get to a fellow by the name of Sid
Gillman.
This is GiUman's first year as
'a professional football coach, and
'he made it a good one with, Los
Angeles. Brought up a f t e r a
couple of big years at Cincinnati,
Gillman applied a thorough and
painstaking touch to the busi-
ness of running 33 huge and mo-
bile buys who play football for
a living.
His efforts resulted in a con-
sistent performance by the Rams.
They never lost two in a row
and always came back strong
after a loss. On Oct. 30, for ex
ample, they were beaten by the
Chicago Bears, 31-20. The next
week, the Rams defeated San
Francisco and were back in stride.
It was that way from the start.
IMsSitaHjBm'
...OF COURSE, THAT1* NO
4L0UCH OP VETBQAN
PA&B8 7MT A4AH HAVB IN .
NORM mBROCKUNj
==
mm
"Hitchcock Touch" Sparks Now VisiaVislbn Thriller
TO CATCH A THIEF
Next great attraction at the "Central" Theatre,
January 1st
H 9t plenty of mileage out of
Ronnie Waller, the rookie half-
back from Maryland. Then there
is Norm Van Brocklin, the sixth
best passer in the league and
the best punter. Tommy Fesrs,
the sure-handed veteran end, was
fifth in receiving. And T a n k
Younger came along hard at the
end.
There is a touch of newness,
too, to the Browns' style. Paul
Brown's club used to give you
an overdose of Graham's tosses.
As an offshoot of the passing
game, big Marion Motley would
go up the middle on a trap play.
But Otto's automatic tosses and
Lou Groza's field goal kicking
were the main weapons.
But this season Brown has
gone to the ground. He turned
Curly Morrison, the ex Ohio
Staterl from a fullback to a half-
back. And Morrison, who was
25th in rushing a year ago, picked
up 824 yards this season to rank
third. Ed Modzelewski, obtained
from Pittsburgh ia t y p -
cal Brown trade, busted through
for 619 yards from the fullback
spot. Even Graham began to car-
ry the ball more often, legging it
69 timas
If a winner had to be pick-
ed, you'd have to go with Graham
and the Browns Otto's most
valuable asset is his absolute re-
fusal to fluster under fire.
You get an idea of this when
you note that the Browns failed
to place a, single pass receiver
among the league's top ".Un-
der Paul Brown's pass P"**-
five receivers move dowtuTeld-
Its up to Otto to pick the right
one. He has no teady^f.vonte
He takes his time add gets the
Twuon.1 television audience
nlus an expected 100,000 n-the-
a. fans wUl see the game. U
figures to mean close to *3,ow
^rthStod^rmoney,
Jy'tfpy .^tch better than
for keeps.
Chesterfield And Spur Cola
To Resume Feud Tomorrow
A NEW SIGN OF AFFECTION
FOR DOCS
By JOB STETSON
Dot Editor
Recently I was asked how to
break a dog of taking hold of her
mistress' hand and bearing down
hard enough to be quite painful
Since I have bad several dots
who do this, it may be that this
is a problem of some interest.
First, let me give assurance!
that this behavior is a sign of af-l
fection. I remember one owner I
who left his dog with me.
He made a point of say ins.:
"When she takes hold of your
hand you are okay. She only does
this with people in whom she ha-
absolute confidence."
The time came when it became,
her habit to take hold of my hand
and later, when she had returned
to her home and I had occasion
to visit her now and then, she
would show that she bad not for-
gotten by that same sign of affec-
tion.
If this behavior is painful or
embarrassing it can be modified,
but should not be done at the ex-
pense of the dog's confidence. To
eliminate it by objecting or pun-
ishing would be a rebuff. It would
be as serious as reprimanding n
child who greeted you by taking
your hand with his jelly-covered
hand.
. There' must be a substitute.
Some show of affection which you
can make on your part so that
the dog's method will not be nec-
essary to establish the mutual af-
fection and confidence. I
One method which may work Is
to teach the dog to sit on com-
mand. You can then give the com-
mand whenever you greet the
dog's head and speaking affec-
tionately to him. Whenever the old
habit comes through, repeat the
command. Follow it with the pal-
ting You have now established a
method of contact. Those are sub-
stitutes which the dog can learn
to expect instead. Never part or
speak sweetly when he attempts
to take hold. Always speak plea-
santly and encourage when he
sits and-or behaves himself.
If it is a big dog, the "down''
command may be more logical
than the "sit."
(Distributed by NEA Service)
By J. J. HARRISON JR.
The Panama Pro League swings back rilo ac-
tion tomorrow afternoon after a three^day repite,
with a single game between the league leading Spur
Cola Sodamen and the second place Chesterfield
Smokers scheduled for the Olympic Stadium at 3
o'clock.
r j
Probable pitchers
Cola's Jim Tugerson
Don Elston
handers.
(0-0),
are spur
. <3-0> and
both right-
last summer will be making his
first start,4u*e.
'
Suspense-'master Alfred Hitchcock's greatest film, "TO
CATCH A THIEF," will be the next attraction at the CEN-
TRAL Theatre. Cast in the starring roles of a notorious
jewel thief and a thrill-hunting heiress are Car Grant and
Grace Kelly. The tripping tale of danger and inLriuie was
filmed In VMtaVlskMi and Technicolor amid tbe glittering
splendour of the fabulous French Riviera. Advt.
A HANGER Ohio Sutes
Frank Howard give you an
idea of what bright can do in a
basketball game a* he tries for a
rebound" They don't only
touch the rim todaythey hold
onto it, as he-'i doing here
Two-of Tugerson's wins have
been at the expense of the Car-
ta Vieja Yankees. In each in-
stance he was the starting
pitcher1, but failed to get by the
seventh Inning.
The lean, muscular hurier
from Dallas, Class AA Texas
League, has not gone the route
In any of his appearances.
He picked up his third win*, In
relief, against the Smokers Dec.
20 in the much-discussed game
in which Smoker second base-
man Manlto Bernard made a
costly ninth-inning error that
contributed greatly to the Soda-
men's 7 to 4 victory, and their
eighth consecutive triumph.
Th* Smokers got their revenge
two nights later when they
crushed the Sodamen in a 12 to
5 rout.
Elston, who had a 17-6 record
with Los Angeles, Open Classi-
fication Pacific Coast League
The 26-year-old, sidearmer
pitched three and one-third In-
nings against the Sodamen In
Spur Cola's oniyjoslng eitort
this season. His performance
had the fans all agog.
He struck out six, walked
one, gave up one hit and one
Tun and kept the Sodamen
baffled with his low outside
deliveries and chgngeups.
Elston became the prooerty of
the World Champion lVooklyn
Dodgers several weeks ago Irt a
trade that sent former Dodger
pitcher Russ Meyer to the Chi-
cago Cubs.
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
Spur Cola............ 8
Chesterfield.......... 4
Carta Vieja.......... 1
Won Lost
1
4
8
Pet.
.889
.500
.111
GB
3'/z
7
LAST NIGHT'S RESULT: Open Date
TONIGHT'S GAME: Open Date
TOMORROW AFTERNOON'S GAME
Spur Cola (Tugerson 3-0)' vs. Chesterfield
(Elston 0-0)
Game Time: 3 o'clock
-AND STILL CHAMPION4
5r
Nashua Gets
Royal Welcome
From Miamians
MIAMI, Dec. 24(UP)The
king of the sport of kings re-
ceived a royal welcome todas,
and except for a hearty sneez*
during his official reception,
bore through the ceremonies
with regal decorum. '").*
Nashua, the golden boy of flu
racing world, arrived "home"-to
the scene of his richest race a-
mld a crowd of some 600 of his
admirers turfmen, city offi-
cials, sports writers and specta-
tors.
It was the end of a Kentucky.
to-Plorida trip In a private Pull-
man car for the "Horse of th*
Year." Nashua arrived for the
[Winter season. Including a crack
I at the SlOO.OOO-added Widener
Handicap Feb. 18 and the $50,-
000.McLennan Handicap purs
Feb. 4.
Wins in the Widener and M-
Lennan Handicap would bring
him more than a horse's hair
over the world's greatest money-
winning thoroughbred, Calumet
Farm's Citation.
Citation has piled up earnings
of $1.085,760; Nashua now claims
a bankroll of $045.415.
The big colt, accompanied
from Paris. Ky., by a throng of
sports writers. Dhotoerapher
and his proom Al Robertson, was
presented the key to the city
of HI'leah, carved from a tlant
carrot.
Onlv ft slight sneeze bv th
Hn Interrupted the presenta-
tion.
"That's his way of accent inj
your ereeting," chimed Nashuat
1 groom.
Op hand to greet th* noup
onrchased for a record $i.2*i>
000 by a svndlcate headed of
Tfslle Combs. II. of LexinctoiJ,
Ky., were veteran trainer Sum-
py Jim Fltzslmmons, M*>v.*
Henry Mil'ander nri official!
from th track and the Cham-
ber of commerce.

>$****
Open Nifhlly frSM
1:00 ..
ROULETTE
21 (BLACKJACK)
CRAP TABLE
POKER
CHUCK-A-LUCK
SLOT MACHINES
BAR SERVICE
4lr-C*n4ltlMMd *
^RELLA VISTA
%M1
PRICES:
75c. 40c.
TODAY
SHOWS:
1:3, 3:15, 5:00,
7:00, 9:00 p.m.
A XMAS GIFT YOU'LL LOVE!
3* "Romance
of tire > ,
>feAttl
M-O-M presents
The
Glass
Slipp
M LEMCN
-mm
uvmmmm
oloi
fodoy Encanto .35 -
In Cinema
William Hojdgffni
"LOVE ,4rMAir
-stniNWlRED tiRm;"
- IDEAL .25
Edward O. Robinson. In
-A nrLLET FOR JOEY"
John Wayne, in
"RED RIVER"


^#
ND it came to pass in those days, that there
went out decree from Caesar Augustus,
that all the, world would be taxed.
And all wc
his own city.
And Joseph i
unto the city of David, which
be taxed with Mary his espous
And so it was, that, while they were there...sha
brought forth her first-born son,\and wrapped him in
swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger; because
there was no room for them in the
to be taxed, everyone into
went up from Galilee...
called Bethlehem ... tc
wife...
And there were in the same count
ing in the field keeping watch over
. shepherds abid-
i. flock by night.
And, lo, the angel of the Lord come upon them, and
the glory of the Lord shone 'round about them: and
they were sore afraid.
And Hie angel said unto them, "Fear not: for, behold,
I bring you good tidings of great joy, which sh\ll bo
to ail people. \
Tor unto you is bom this day in the city of Davkf <
Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.
"And this shall be a sign unto you; Ya shall find the
babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger."
And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude
of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,
"Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace,
good will toward men."
And it came to pass, as the angels were gone away
from them into heaven, the shepherds said one to an*
other, "Let us go even unto Bethlehem, and see this
thing which is come to pass, which the Lord bath modo
known to us."
And they came with haste, and found Mary, and
Joseph, and the babe lying in a manger.
"HERE came wise men from the east to Jeru-
salem.
Saying, "Where is he that is born King
of the Jews? For we have seen bis star in
the east, and an come to worship him."
When Herod the king had hoard these
things, he was troubled ...
And when he had gathered all the chief priests and
scribes of the people together, he demanded of them
where Christ should be born.
And they said unto him, "In Bethlehem of Judea: for
thus it is written by the prophet:
" 'And thou Bethlehem, in the land- of Judo, art not
Hie least among the princes of Juda; for out of thee
shall come a Governor, that shall rule my people Israel.'"
Then Herod, when he had . colled Hie wise men,
inquired of them diligently what time the star hod
appeared.
And he sent them to Bethlehem, and said, "Go and
search diligently for the young child; and when ya
have found him, bring me word again, that I may come
and worship him abo."
When they had heard the king, they departed; and,
'>:.. lo, the star which they saw in the East, went before
them, tul it came and stood over where the young
When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceed-
ing great joy.
And when they ware come into the house, they saw
the young jiild with Mary his mother, and fell down,
and worshipped him: and when they had opened their
treasures, they presented him with gifts; gold, and
frankincense, and myrrh.
From St. Luke 2:1-16
and St. Matthew 2:1-11.
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* HOLIDAY^
'$ SONG g*
h* MATES fe
1111
B
JUST WHO'S IN THE PICTURE?
Nt

AMD UNO mu
UGH! HAZY MESSAGE
P 13
appropriate and popular
pastime la tola season of Joy-
ous song la a gama callad "Musi-
cal Matas." Any rumbar of play-
ara, young or old, may Join In.
Host or boataaa writes down
tha words, Una toy Una, to a num-
ber of Christmas aira. Thesa ara
shuffled and distributed, one to
each guest.
Guests are asked to find part-
nanthat la, other recipients of
linea to their particular tune.
First group to congregate and
ing tha aong in hand wins.
Two holiday favorites are pro-
vided as a starter below. Key-
boards are giren above.
Dl a o O A B B B Ol r b r a or.a
O Christ-mas free, 0 Christ ma tree. Should auld ao ouoin tono* be for got.
B A B rt a a your branch / a r r a a n
How lovo * re And neo or brought to mtodf
Dl a a a A B B B D2 os a a r ero
O Chriit mas (res. 0 Chritt mat tret, Should auld ao tat* tanca 6e for got,
B A B O rt a o a a r di m ci r
Boao lovo Jv are your branch ol And days o/ auld long synef
m Dfl B Bt Df mo o D2 ci a a r a r o
In turn-mtr KM or win tor snotc, Por au Id la na tyno, my dear.
O O A Dl O as b DS OS A A OS OS
A dress o/ preen you al-way show, For au Id la ug syne,
Dl o a O A B B B D2 os a a r o r
O Chrwt mas tree. 0 Christ- ma tro, V*VB take a cup & kind no yt,
B A B O rt a o a o r di di oi r
Hot low- ly aro your branch ctl For au Id la ng syne. i------- M. 1 1 -
Just any.
body to tha
principal ngura in
tha drawing at
right, toot enca-
ona very much to
tha picture today.
It'a possible, by
careful scrutiny,
to pick out aev-
eral figures la
the mase of linee,
but a whole tot
easier to make
- tha central char-
acter appear by
applying colors
an follows:
BBlue
RRed
rv-pink
BRBrawn
BKBlack
V-k-Vtolat
OOreen
How quickly
can you Oil It iat
IIDOU
What time U it
when a minee pie
to divided among
four hungry
boyar"
Mea t
eso Santa Bemre THREE IN A ROW
BIG CHIEF above is pounding out a message to
his tribe obviously enough, but the message It-
self (at top of drawing) Isn't very olear. Certain
missing lines must be restored in order to make
the three words readable In English. How quickly
can you determine what he's saying?
_.___ ._____' __..-waifia w paej Swam tr| *eea|| laaraova lai-ioitij tg :uui|
SIGHTSEEING THRU A KALEWOSTRIP
For a Santa Clans Game
THERE'S an
1 imaginary way
of playing hide
and seek in which
this cut-out of
Santa (at left)
makes an amus-
tog pawn. Some-
one who to "It,"
chooses to hide
Santa somewhere
In the roomup
the chimney, to a
candy dish, ate.
For a due, ha or
she placea tha
cut out on tha
opposite aide of
the room facing the imaginary hiding place. Seek-
ers are given live minutes in which to find tha hid-
ing place. Then someone else tries.
Some Are Out of Place
' I 'HERE is a time and place for everything. How.
* ever, some of the things mentioned below are
definitely out of place. As a test of knowledge and
wits take some time to determine which they are.
See If you can get all six answers correct.
1. One of these is not a tree: fir, spruce, hem-
lock, holly, wintergreen, mulberry.
2. One of these does not apply to hones: Thor-
oughbred, Morgan, Perdieron. Hackney, Guern-
sey.
S. One of these la not among Santa's chargers:
Dasher, Pranoer, Dancer, Stepper, Blitzen.
4. One of thane Is not a kind of puzzle: Charade,
rebus, anagram, spectrum.
5. One of these does not have strings: Lyre, late,
flute, mandolin, either.
6. One of these was not a Vice President: Tra-
man, CooUdge, Garner, Hoover, T. Roosevelt.
jsaooh "9 Wij 1 iniutsedg
f -JXKUJ8 s 'Xsetusno i 'Bau*ieiait 1 lesaaaev
nrwo Christmas
I acensa ara
represented in
tha kaleldo-strlp
at right To see
either clearly,
proceed as fol-
lows:
Cut picture
finder (right naif
of drawing) and
picture atrip (left
half) from page.
Separate these by
cutting along
heavy dividing
line.
Now cut out
sections of pic-
ture finder mark-
ed 1, S, 8 and 4.
Place picture
finder over pic*
ture atrip, until
only one acene
shows. Slide
finder either left
or right for the
second scene.
Those who wish
to color the pic-
tures will find it
a aomewhat
easier task if scrap paper is
used to cover separate sections.
Sharp crayons or colored pencils
are auggeated. Viewflnder may
also be colorad if desired.
Merry-Go-Round
hARS. JONES has four sons.
" 1 She would like to give each
one a bicycle for Christmas, but
can only afford to purchase two
bikes. Therefore, they will be
able to go on cycling expeditions
only two at a time. In how many
different pairs can they go?
Answer the poser In one min-
ute, if you can.
;aa
oa -or o"U. a pne O H V *J i*Vt aaod
dng U|W ju9jflip x|( ai inarar
JONES, O'Reilly, McTavtoh and
Smith live to the same row of
four houaea to Suburbiathe
only houaea to the lock. All four
keep dogsTerrier, Dachshund,
Spaniel and Greyhound, but not
rAopoetrvely.
Smith has a Dachshund; Joaea
has'only taw neighbor, but
McTavlah has two. Tha Spaa?
iel'a owner lives next door but
one from the Dachshund While
O'Reillys neighbor Is of English
ancestry according to his name;
and the Greyhound has only one
"doggy" neighbor.
Name tha owners of the dog*
and state the order la which they
Uva in the row.
fa teuor :ena|*s
'"PHERB usually
* an many re-
flections to a
shiny Christmas
ball. This one
reflects only keen
witsif you solve
the problem It
The missing
digits la the cir-
cles, right, an l,
1,1. 4,8, 6, T and
t. Insert them
ao that the sum
of any three numbers
across, will equal 182.
William J. Baumgartner, who originated thia
poser, adda this hint: Nota that tha total onda la 2.
therefore arranged the "unit" digits first, or 1, 3, 2
and 6. Tha others will be to the "tena" placo.
Grandma's Prank A NER VE TEST
GRANDMA,.a prankster, puz-
zled members of the family
with her invitations to Christmas
dinner. She included part of the
menu to the form of anagrams.
This is the way she put It:
HAND MX CRUET:
Not Boab
Suet or poay
Try our steak
Mink pop pie
In anagrams, letters
arranged to form new words. Sea
If you can decipher the dinner
courses Grandma listed.
aid aindiund
xnjnj irtoj 'dnae j;sxo tanq
>q QHVD ON3H tfHJ. :
J
are re-
PUS test will help indicate if
your nrvea an holding up
under tha strain of this hectic
season.
Take two drinking straws, a
plain band ring and a two-Inch
nail Just hick enough fo fit into
one of the straws.
Insert the nail in the end of
one of the straw and balance
the latter in the ring which you
hold on the end of the other
straw.
The slightest trembling of your
hand will cause the balanced
straw to topple, therefore. If you
can do this stunt you will know
that your nrvea an steady.
*t it-ej it aanaoaeq -xueaostioq ftipwH i senates,
CUT-OUT TOYS TO DISTRIBUTE
THIS little girl
* (right) ex-
pected to see a
red stocking over
the fireplace, and
a few big special
presents around
her tree after
Santa's visit. Can
you please fix it
ao that her wish
es may come
trae? Just color
tha plctun and
the things that
an underneath it,
using colored
penclla or cray-
ons. Then cut out
tha pic ture, can-
fully, along the
straight outside
Unas, and pasta it
to a piece of con-
struction paper
or wrapping
papar. Next,
carefully cut out
the red stocking
and paste It over
the fireplaoe.
Carefully cut out
doll present and
basinet, also dog
and ball and see how neatly you an able
to place them a the picture. Of course,
her expression will probably change
smile, and you may want to fix that.
to a
too.
Making Christmas Connections
i5S,,
^^..^^^..^v^^v-c^ It's Your Move
i iz (gRosswoRD With Wisdom from the Wble
I low quickly can you complete
* the drawing hove? Begin
at dot 1 and draw connecting
linee from dot to dot consecu-
tively. vTbero two numbers an
beside one dot, use it for both.
YULEIIUE MINI-1 ESI
IN the U. 8. we hang stockings
' at Chriatmaa In what coun-
try la it an old custom for chil-
dren to receive gifts in shoes?
-spavtietnaN HI *l *
By Eucene Shefer
HORIZONTAL
1When the giant lived /hose
tons were slsin by David and
hi servante (2 Sam 21:22)
5 A bad child might find thia In
his atocking.
10Biblical term of contempt
(Mat 5:22)
14 Plant of lily family.
15 Ventilated.
18Sacred image.
17Countenance.
18Bury.
19Opening.
20 Scourging.
22If we delight in the Lord He
will give us what of our
hearte? (Pa 37.4)
24Hi* wife turned Into a pillar
of salt (Gen. 19:13)
25Something to be expected of
a Christmas cake.
28 He died on the top of Mount
Hor (Num. 33:38)
29Corroded.
30Cancel.
34Small eecluded valley.
85Mince, pumpkin, apple, coco-
nut, etc.
JftSbuHned
37Part of Adam from whlea Eve
was msde (Gen. 2:22)
38Where Omri was burled (1 KL
16:28)
40 Salutation
41Turns inside out
43Deface
44 Prayer ending.
45Conger fisherman.
48Came together.
47Mohammedan princea
48Sound.
SODude.
51Give authority to.
54Guiltless.
58Vex.
59River in West Africa
81Arrow poison.
82A relative generally on the
Christmas card list
83Oriental weights.
84Sweetsop.
85Cape.
66Puse, a a metal.
67Anglo-Indian weights.
VERTICAL
1Whom, with his brethren, did
Zebu! thrust out from dwell-
ing in Shecbem? (Judg. 9:41)
2White substance of central
nervous system.
3Pedal digits
4Biblical name (Ezek. 47:15)
5Godly person.
6High, metallic sound.
7Worthless bit
8Slender, pointed Instrument
9Where Oa bettled wltb the Is-
raelites (Num. 21:33)
10Mediterranean resort coast
11Genus of maples.
12-*Ice cream bolder.
13Insects.
21Electrified particle.
23Chief of the priest (Acts 19:
14)
25Sent off vapor.
26Coincida
27Living.
28 Resist by force.
29What recipiente of toy pistols
take.
31Border city in the lot of
Naphtali children (Joah. 19:
33) ,
32-Cut*
33Paradises.
35Dance step.
SONorse goddess.
38W h a t Pharaoh cohimanded
should not be given to the Ia-
raellte for making bricks (Ex.
1:7)
e UM, Blag reataras gyaaiaHa. tae.
39Rodent
42Insurrection.
44One to whom Paul sent special
greeting (Rom. 16:)
48Sister of Aaron (Ex. 15:20)
47Eternity.
49 Penitential season (Posa)
50Before all others. .
31Son of Shuthelsh (Num. 28:
53Bomemuig to be found in a
new. blouse.
54Vend.
51=^'^
57Soap-frame bar.
60-To the right!
x By MilZard Hopper
STRATEGICALLY, White can't
bold a candle to Black. But
White provea be has a lot of
checker know-how. White moves
first, upboard, and wins in four
moves in this, teat.
JB-tl-nj mui -t-sc xoeta
tt-fi mM "taxi *>ew -ig-ic .Jim
-ft saeta >I- atiiua 'ne|ea
r-ir-iHt-: .! :;
h rtui: iiiKP
i.:m- rct-;fR>i
' ' r Filala' H
Pr-ll!' M) a
III Efj FCl! I BE
fc.Hfl#finF0!5FjH'/P:ilPl
i iji f : tiu hi
ii. t : j
a~h.w"i" ) *.M,' i .CFT, -0
OBVB8WUBD rezara iiirniK




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k'
DO-IT-YOURSELF RAINMAKERA British soldier examines an apparatus that is de-
' signed to nyake rain and thus avoid the expense of cloud-seeding from a plane. The
22J small machine, in Wiltshire, England, burns a fuel containing silver iodide particles
and invisible moke is carried up by air movements. It forms ice crystals in clouds. fAVORfTE WITH FARMERSTelevision director Phil Alam-
pi is honoring Ann Duvall (left), of Frederick, Md., and
Mrs. Herbert Smith of Calverton, Long Island, as New
York's Favorite Farmer's Daughter and Wife at.show.
TOP OF TMI liftBarbara Hilgenberg, a real western gal, makes this picture pretty,
as she cavorts around Tucson, Ariz., corral. She's Miss Arizona and the first candi-
date to submit her entry for the Miss America contest in Atlantic City next September.
A PORTABLE ISLAND
ERCHED pine storks above the Mississippi river i* a mammoth portable island
A that may be used for off-shore radar stations or "floating" docks as well as off-
shore oil drilling. The two-million-dollar platform is shown in action near Vicksburg.
Miss. The platform can be lowered to the water, floated from one operating site to
the next, then quickly hoisted above the waves again. This particular portable island
is going to be floated 400 miles down stream to the Gulf o Mexico for oil exploration. *
NO COMMENTEight-raonth-ld Robert Roggeveen does
not seem to know what to do when photographers train,
cameras on him at New York's Idlewild airport. Robert was
off for a month's vacation in Holland with grandparents.
PUSHCART IS PASSEWith the brightly lighted dome of the Capitol in background.
Washington's unique Jeep makes nightly rounds vacuuming the city's gutter debris.
It also grinds litter to-a pulp and blows it into a collection bag in rear of vehicle.
The platform is climbing skyward en Its 140-foot, storm-proof sea logs after moving.
"DOLL PRINCESS"Judy Fosher, a 18-year-old Creve Coeur, Mo., girl, shows a group
of children at a West Berlin, Germany, refugee camp her handmade dolls, which re-
semble Henry VIII and his six wives. Her trip to Germany is part of prize she won
with her dolls. Judy brought 200 dolls from American girls to poor kids of Europe.
NO COLO WEATHER HUESWintry blasts don't bother
Pstti Norman. She lives in the vacation resort of Phoenix,
Ariz., where it's possible to swim throughout the winter.
King rtmtTtt ywrftosf
I
)
This Is position for Hie mammoth platform when it is in operation above the waves



V

>*j

4.
tfs Christmas Morning
You Can Open Your Presents Now!
m 77, SUNDAY
American
Supplement
^^^_-
rANAMA. B. F SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1955
'<5-
=5
/


TEDDY RENTER pats the alligator la this navel display at Santa Claaa
4-
r
K'<
w
THIS CHORDS has 132 dolls in It (and hi-fi underneath)
THE BOWEN CAROLLERS are, I to r, Bobby, Rasty
Mary Anne.
Christmas On
fix a ndtsxt'
Pix and text
New arrivals in the Canal Zone
sometimes ask, "What do you do
at Christmas time, with no cold
weather, no snow, nor any tradi-
tional Christmas briskness in the
ir?"
The answer seems to be. "We
celebrate it without cold, or snow
but with plenty o briskness."
Take carolling, or example.
Enough Christmas carols are sung
by various groups to replace any.
Stateside community in this re-'
meet. There is no shortage of
Christmas music, real or record-
ed.
Driving through the various sec-
tions of the residential area, one
is struck by the clever ornaments
and decorations some people pro-
vide for the pleasure of the pub-
lic. It is or the public, remember.
They don't just sit and look at
their decorations themselves. In
a way, it is a Merry Christmas
gesture to all who may pass their
homes.
Santa Ciaus Lane in Balboa
been famous or years or iU con-
certed presentation of a Christ
mas pageant. It is excellent again
this year and there are included
on these pages, some of its eat*
ures. :
Outstanding this' season is the
top level of houses at Curund*
Heights. Here again, a communi*
ty consciousness has enabled aa
especially fine view of Christmas
decorations to reward the visitor.
Not only the parents, but t h a
children provide something at Cu
rundu Heights.
As one drives to the top of tha
hill, boys ask politely, "Pleas
dim your lights." And, as on*
leaves, young girls say, "Merry -
Christmas. Come again." There is
suficient illumination from tha
colored lights so that car lights
are unnecessary.
Close by the Amador Beach
Club is a really extraordinary San-
ta Claus. He is about to get air-
borne behind a target plane, radio-
controlled, and both are on tha
launching rack ready for action.'
One little girb who saw this,
and was told that Santa's sleigh

HOW did yaa raaet to this? See the story a this page
EVEN the t'meaoandiag General has a tree. Da yaa s'pase he
hangs ap his stocking?
SUN*MYs ECBMBER 25^ -H>5&


i L

OUNG MASTER DE JANON Inspects the religions motif
nta CUu Une.
he Isthmus
i radio-controlled, was all for
lug home and trying to "dial
Santa to be sure to reap a
rxtiful holiday:
lust think, friends, mebbe next
ar Santa will come by TV. Just
me sliding down of that Quar-
. Heights antennae, and with
(at momentum, cover the whole
gcific side.
I Have you beard about C. L.
les' doll collection which he ex-
hits at his Balboa home each
.hristmas? There are 132 dolls
rom 30 countries. And some from
ie individual provinces within a
-ountry, too. AU these dolls a
Irranged in a big chorus. .
With a hi-fi speaker concealed
nder the chorus rack. F o i 1 e a
nakes his collection sound .liko
eal talented dolls, and there are
hristmas carols played all even-
Bg-
Also Foiles has a nativity scene,
be principals of which are inside
hollowed-ont gourd! R Is most
Dusual. He grew the gourd on bis
KAY SERGEANT pwbaWy has the atily Cot* Rlcan oxcart full of presents In the fA-rl
own Interior place, and made the
scene himself. ^.
Costa Rican Christmas air is
sensed at the Dick Sergeant-W.W.
Wood display on Morgan Avenue.
-There's a painted ox cart drawn
by oxen and loaded with presents
and a montuno'd- Santa. There
are many figures and original
painted displays here.
In some locations there are a
series of religius motifs, usually
based on Bible texts which are
pleasing, being done on large
murals easily seen. An example is
the Curundu entrance gate.
Some people have been startled
to see the big illuminated sign a-
top the old Curundu Commissary
wich has a picture of a birthday
cake and presents for little Jesus.'
It seemed rather shocking at first,
but from a juvenile standpoint, it
is logical.
Perhaps the children recall
more clearly than their parents
sometimes, that Christmas in in-
deed the birthday of Jesus. And to
(Contused a Page )
INSIDE THIS GOURD is a nativity scene real Panama style.

AERY MYERS ballt a chimney for Santa Clans, States-style,
at Caranda Heights. ,
RADIO PLAN and Santa's sled get ready fee take off at Amader.
SUHPA.Y, JP6QSJCBil,$6, (186aV.
f%o>.
PAfc; Y1*1A*&.


THE PANAMA^MERldAN
OWNIO AND PUSLIsfttO SV VHS PANAMA AMBHICAM
ounmo v niuon ecUNSKVZX*. w t
HAN MOMO ARIAS, orco*
7 h imn r o o> 194 ruuiu. n. r p.
TlltPHOM 2-0740 IB Li in I
CAtLI ODRIt!. PANAMSSICAN. PANAMA
fOlON OP-IC 12.17 ClNTRAl AVINtl MtWilN I2TH AND 1JTM TRCtTI
FOHCION RCPRCALNTATIVE, JOSHUA POWERS. INC.
3 48 MADISON AVS. NEW VOAK. 117 M. Y.
ISCAL >r NAB.

S^IJlaMtT
Pr Month, in advanci____
FOP (IX MONTHS. IN ADVANCE-
. FOP ONf VIA* IN AOVA.NCt _
IS BO
BS.OO
POETS'CORNER
By Frederick L. Saur
GREATER THAN THE NIGHT
Strange Is the night, all heaven seen awake
As if the night was part o a new plan.
There is no cloud to mar the pattern there
As each star greets me with its cheerful light.
There's need for cheer, my sheep are not asleep
But move about e'en though there Is no sound
To mar their slumber. No small blade of grass
Has moved, except when crushed beneath my feet,
For I am restless too. Would that I knew
What new woe will descend upon this land.
Oh, God of Jacob, is it not enough
That Romans rule these hills my fathers loved.
That slavery is such a common thing,
That other gods infest this promised land?
Give me the night to tend my sheep, apart
From lust and greed, alone with that sweat peace
That David found, when with his flock he roamed.
It is so still and strange, I am aware
Of every breath I take, of every star...
Oh. what is this? Awake, shephers, awake!
It is no longer night, for a new star
Has turned the night to day. I am afraid.
What punishment is this that comes to me,
A shepherd on the hills of Bethlehem;
Jehovah, hear my cry. Thy handiwork'
Is greater than the night, it shines as day.
Protect me with Thy mercy from this thing.
My eyes are made mad by this holy light
For now I see an angel of Thy host.
Oh, give attention, ears, and hear him apeak.
This is not madness that I feel tonight
For rightly should thus be announced the birth
Of Christ the Lord. I pray forgive me, God,
If I sin when I Join this hymn of praise:
"Peace among men on earth." Come, shephers,
To Bethlehem with me for I would see
And worship Him of whom the angels sing.
My flock is steeping now. Their rest is peace.
The night is peaceful too, and though my heart
Is full of great content I cannot sleep.
I watch the star and In its promised light
I see the glory of the child, my King,
And from the glow of that same star I feel
The warmth of promises fulfilled. My life
Has meaning now, my soul is now at peace,
For in the coming years, before I die,
I know I will see this King claim his own.
N
^Washington News Notebook
SfK>pping-Holiday-Marria9eBaft
Visitors-Meat BaHs-BettingOdcJs
y DOUGLAS LAKSEN and KENNETH O. GILMORE
Glimere
JOSEPH'S SLUMBER SONG
Sleep, dear child,
I am watching o'er you?
Mystery,
Yet I do adore you.
Yes, my eyes
Are filled with hope and
Blessed, ask i
As you an Messed with,slumber.
Holy One,
I watch you in your sleeping.
Grateful. J. > ^^
MaVwakes1 """ "*"* ** '^^ ehr
jgfp """****
And reassure your keeping.
Her's, the need ^^
Of promise to fulfill.
Mine, the deed
Te earry out God's will.
(BsMTOsVg NOR: Frederick t Sear, he
above seems, is aa Isthasiae wee < ata Ui
Cristbal). seems nes,
* mi
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANf Aft*
'XL
WASHINGON NBAf- Bulle-
tins from the Christmas 'shopping
front:
Vice President Nixon is going te
get something special in the way
of neckties. His wife Pat spent a
halt hour la the men s tie depart-
aaeat of the meat exclusive depart -
Mat stare a town aad walked out
withea aaakaag a parchase, sake
fiad anything te suit her
Secretary of Treasury Humphrey
sad Secretary if State Dulles are
waitiag until they get to Paris to
buy for heir wives. They'll be
there for a NATO conference Just
before Christmas.
Far meet ef the easiest it will
Christmas wMh the Idas. The
WHjHM wiB he is Dorset with
their six chiUrea sad 15 grand
The BrowaeBs win be
here with their Jew offspring.
The seseas wiM have four of
their chiidrea tare with these, hut
twe married, saos living ia the
eaat make it
You've sever sees such a crowd
lef eager, priaseiag,eyelaeh-battmg
debutantes as are abroad this asa-
As sac yaag Ah- Fores oflker
remarked at a reeeat big tab
party. 'They're set eaVy jet-i
feUW thie year, batata*
their aftei bureis cut aa too
Mere's the reasea:
The haaalsome 43-year-eM
aiaier n ef Monaco is going] to
be tews far twe months
for a wife. Hla priacipality
net iaclude much ra
Monte Carlo gamhliag resort
what there ia ef it is gay and
cslerful
la addition, the priace Is an ex-
celleat skier, deep-ssa diver sad
racing car enthusiast.
"Well,- ttacaheie said, "they're
the greatest bunch ef needrinkers
and Beatippers wove ever had
towa."
The meat baH reatiae ia Wash
mgtoa ia getting out ef head. New
[you can't eves taste the hamburg.
Seems every embassy here
waatat o add a special flavor. At
s private party for Pakistan Am-
bassador Mohammed All sad his
wife the other evening, meat
balls were all ever the buffet.
called
three
to sauce.
t-nro-
have
Even that Ike will play his first
Irenes of geif before Easter.
lity dees
than >e
me*. But
CAN FILL YOUR NEEDS!
Whet former N. Y. Lt. Gov
Frank C Moore drove up to the
betel where the big White House
Conference on Education was be-
ing held, the cab driver askht him:
"Dent ted ase you're eae of
them eoaasften1 with that meet
taj?"
"Yea," Moore replied, "I hap-
pen to be a member ef the
committee*-
In Pakistan this
kofta. They served
ways yet. Spiced, dry
eWiHUl
Two to one that the Cemmuaist
embassies close their epea-secial-
door policy here helare the winter
is ever.
Five te eae against Margaret
Truman becomaag sagaged te New
JJtasy Ger. Hebert aTltoyuee.
Odds are less ea a New York TV
actor.
rTkeres serious doubt hi aviation
vreles that the Beds invented the
btet airplane, aa they claim. But
there's no denying that they've
WMne up with a pretty historic
baby-sitting idea ia this town. At
the Czech embassy, at least, mem-
bers of the staff can bring their
kids o parties sad park them up-
stairs under the guidance ef a
nurse.
This could defec the auras is
democracy, but it suits Lt. Col.
Fraaticek Tiahler, military at-
tach* and his wife. "Greatest so-
cial advaaee hi yosrs,"* he claims.
Who's kiddfa* whs dent.: After
the Czech party the enthusiastic
wife of a wilt known weal piako
cooed to everyone within a St feet
FashioTnotas: Michigan's *ev.
G. Mennen Williams dazzled the
fames at the Women's National
Democratic Club when be ad-
dressed them the other day. It
wnsat his speech.
He wore geld cuff links the size
of a silver dollar stamped with
the seal ef his state.
'BUT IT'S WARM Here'e,
something for the woman who
wants to be warmall over'
and gutter like the stars. It's
a mink coat with a mink mask
decorated wKh diamonda
Shown recently ha Paris, it was
created by Jacques Helm. And
U sells for only SsoVOOO,
'"^nvM-M
'W ..
!O:


tlabor News
And Comment
By Victor Riese!
HEARD ON THIS BEAT:
Christmas season bargain hunt-
ers seeking to save pennies have
just handed the sacrilegious Sov-
iet satellites a neat bundle of
American cash with which to pay
for a colder war on us. Our peo-
ple have bought an estimated $25,-
000,000 worth of Communist-made
Christmas decorations and reli-
gious objects, as well as canned
food, glassware, hats and other
textile materials for inexpensive
gifts.
The Poles have dumped some
20,000,000 Christmas decorations
and thousands of packed haras
(in tins) into the U.S. for Yuletide
shoppers. The glass, religious ob-
jects and hats came from Czecho-
slovakia. And from Communist
China, via Western Germany, no
less, and other nations came silks,
handkerchiefs and cotton good
All made by slave labor. . .
Quick like a rabbit, the Soviets
nan Comrade K. Emelyanova wirei
the union full acceptanceand re-'
port that they had four plumbers'
ready to pack their bags. The Rus-
sian plumbers, however, may nev-,4
er see the Inside of an American1!
SPe-The State Dept. won't waive
i finger printing regulation on
visas for the U.S. The Russians
refuse to-be fingerprinted. The
head of the California Plumbers
local now says it's up to the In-
ternational Plumbers Union in
Washington and the Plumb-
ers leaders in Washington say
they ve not been contacted by
Moscow and don't care if they
never are. ... -
At a Press conference in Sacra-
mento last Tuesday, California's
Gov. Goodwin Knight called at-
tention to a story in this column,
saying he hoped it wasn't true.
The Governor referred to the re
Sort here that President Eisen
ower had personally decided that
Republican policy would be to
challenge AFL-CIO labor leaders
politically and go over their beads
in an attempt to reach the rank-
and-file.
The story is true. My good friend,
the Governor, could have seen evi-
dence of the launching of this GOP
drive to by-pass the nation's top
labor chiefs with Republican ap-
peals for labor votes. The first
moves were made by Harold Stas-
sen and New Jersey's Sen. Alex-
ander Smithboth of whom al-
ways reflect the President's per-
sonal wishes. Both men said pub-
licly that millions of rank-and file
labor people would vote Republi-
can in 1958.
Neither of these statements was
accidental. They were well
planned and well timed. Soon the
national Republican political as-
sault on labor leaders especial-
ly Walter Reutherwill be un-
leashed.
President Eisenhower's personal
view is that whenever the labor
leaders attack bis party on the
political front, they shall be treat-
ed as political, not labor, leaders
and shall be attacked in turn.
Word now is that Teamster's
president Dave Beck is not well
and is planning to retire after
making a trip around the world
next summer. He then can be-
come president emeritus of the
Teamsters, thus retaining his AFL-
CIO vice-presidency. He win still
be a power in the merged fed-
eration. ...
You may never have heard nf
the Pest Control Council of Amer-
ica or the Knife-Makers Brother-
hood or the Anti-Friction Bearing
Workers Union or the Independent
Radime Workers of America
but these are just a few of several
thousand American labor outfits
which did net merge with the big
AFL-CIO. The grand total of little
known independent unions runs to
over 2,000,000 members.
They've scheduled a Washington
conference for Feb. , 1956, under
the leadership of something called
Jhe National Independent Union
Council. The independent chiefs
hope they'll be able to launch a
new federation then to compete
with the AFL-CIO. . .
There has been no rush of top
industry executives to apply far
the job as financial advisor urn
business manager of Dave Dubm-
sky's *175,0O0,O International La-
dies Garment Workers Union.
Dubinksy has been offering $25,000
a year for someone out of finan-
cial, real estate or business circles
to run the union's complex busi-
ness enterprises. . .
PSv?&&M^^E*r'' -* -PPI-. a small lake near Liber.,.
her. The sooaT^ee f ,nZZ^ * chop hta yny * the ice with a four-by-four to free
j!i^^$^pi^^^S^tffJ^ moteI operator',U8t didn* * r
Despite all the talk about Prof.
Robert Hutchina' control of the
Fund for the Republic, consider
able power inside the organiza-
tion la held by an old labor-hand,
W. H. (Ping) Ferry, an associate
of the late Sidney Hillman. Ferry
is Vice President of the Fund.
He was publicity chief of the
CIO. Political Action Committee
during the l44 campaign.. ..
Now Russia has whipped up a
delegation of four Moscow plumb-
ers to tour America and inspect
cur pipes. It all storied when a
Plumbers Union local in the Sab
Francisco Bay area, Richmond,
Calif., was overwhelmed by the
spirit of Geneva and telegraphed
Premier Nikolai Bidganin an in-
vitation to send ever mane pipe
fixers to work here for a while
and see how- demoeraticAmeri-
can unions operate.
Everybody's singing the Hit Pa-
rade's smash song "Sixteen Tons"
and thinking only of Tennessee Er-
nie, whose voice is heard en
every juke box and mike these
days. But the genius behind the
song is no Tin Pan Alley sipper
of Lindy's coffee. The words and
music come from Morle Travis,
son of a miner ia Beech Creek,
Muhlepberg County, Ky.
Travis has just written to John
Lewis' people that the "Number
Nine Mine mentioned in the soag
actually existed in the southwest-
ern Kentucky coal fields.
Travis ia the son of a i
miner and recalls that he would
have starved during strikes if not
for the "aid hali" where '-'jut*
enough bean and salt pork to
keep body and soul together" was
distributed to strikers' families
Now Travis, who is living in Hoi
lywood. is making more out of one
song than his- Dad did out of a
lifetime of-coal digging: .
WaherWinchelllnNewYork
I DO NOT CARE!
I do not care now if I hear
You call my nameor see a
tear,
Or if you sob and weep and call
It will not bother me at all.
I do not care how bright the
burn
Your flaming torch, or if you
turn
And walk, down some familiar
street.
To hope that we may chance to
meet.
I do not care now if you wake
Forgotten songs for oht tunes'
sake,
Or If oyu phoneyou'll phone in
vain
You Will Not Break This Heart
Again!
Mary Ann Michael
Benny Fields delighted the Lin-
dy's crowd with the one abeat the
despised Hollywood director, who
was cruel to actors..
One day Mr. Brink beckoned to
Otis studio tyrant and they gave
him an elaborate funeral. Many
thousands showed up.
After the services two actors
discussed the event. "I can't un-
derstand the large turnout for such
a louse," one hmfd.
"Very simple," said the other,
"always give the people what they
Want!''
They once had a friendly argu-
ment about the merit of their ghost-
ed speeches.
"Mine for FDR had to be better
than yours for Adlai," joshed
Bob, "they ran for twelve years!"
"So what?" shrugged De Voto.
"Look at the cast you had!"
Broadway: Where some wise-
guys still have their first dollar
but the wiser ones still have their
first friends.
Some of the Dubrow patrons
wondered what Bulganin and
Khrushchev (the fellow-travelers)
expected to accomplish by then-
trip to various countries.
''Who knows," chuckled a wag,
"maybe they just wanted to get
out of Russia!"
Frank Goodman relays a note
Hal March of 164,000 Question re-
ceived from an alphabet expert
The number alongside each letter
of -March's name, it said, it its
Mating ia the alphabet, to wit:
H. () ... A. (1) ... L.(12) ...
M (13) ... A. (1) ... R. (M) ...
C. (3) ... H.(t). . Total: 4.
Pufflicity: "Nick Adama, who
is ia Warner's 'Our Miss Brooks,'
returned to Jersey City far the
first time in 4 years and was
welcomed by more than 2000 in
front of his parents' home."
A lynch mob?
Geddoff, Mye, Beck
Lize.
Lize, Awl.
The Beginning of the End: When
she promises to call and doesn't
... When you remember her birth-
day and she forgets yours ...
When she breaks a date with you
"to go shopping witlr the girls" ...
When she complains it's "vulgar"
to sit in a parked car ... When
she keeps telling you to go on a
diet ... When her Little White Lies
give you The Blues.
Bert Parks knows a feller whose
private life is so revolting the scan
dal mags refuse .to expose him.
Herewith And solution V Sunday Crossword Pun-'
ale No. la. published today.
Answer tor Baa Pay. Nev. 10, Crvaosejnips: PE-
DANTIC COLLEGE PROFESSOR FAILS TO UN-
DERSTAND FRUSTRATED TEEN-AGERS.
ug3 Ljijurao finaron airca
nasa aHDHn aaaay nnxn
~3LJHUliaLi Suj ?SainllIKd
L3ZLS 3BUaJ 33e:l
sJUiiUB ^aaua asa yanacu
aauuau jbj ua aaauaa
ul smcu ajanr-a hose
fflHU IJWaw JUkJ UJL? L4BJ
aaaua uaaaana uaauaaa
auuzi uauasjua ynsu
asiaaaaLi HOuauuaid aiauu-a
anu tiuau ana auna asa
?qql3 nanuna anua ausa
-ana ana uu raaaaa
aaaa QLJ aaaaa uusiaa
yuya uauaui auaa
uiuijy yuuuuiduyUUu aujya
a^uu lianas aaaau anu
::j 'J2l!u azxjaH anas
catwinntMi.
Arthur Brown, of the new Bev
erly night spot, withes to be the
first to wish you a Happy New
Year with "Loto of Nineteen Fifty
Sixcess."
Overheard about Georgia's Gov
He seems to have stopped into
Hummin Talmadge's shoes."
"Don'tcha moan sheets?"
Some Hollywood starlets at the
Stork Club were chatting about
Jane Russell, Marilyn Monroe and
Gia* Leloete.
"Remember," one observed,
"when all a girl needed to stop
traille was a trim pair of ankles? "
Hobday Card: The shortest dss-
iance between people ia a smile.
"The closer you. get to Christ-
mas the closer you get to people."
"You've got it wrong. The closer
you get to people the closer yen
get to Christmas!"
Barnard De Voto, the Americana
writer, and playwright Robert E.
Sherwood were some of the ghost-
writers- for Stevenson and FDR.
"J>ear Walter: This i* a love )*V
tor that has been filed fondly ia
my mind: for a long time. Many
years ago (on our way back to
Harrisburg, Pa., convinced New
York would have none of us) I
picked up Oho Mirror at the Pennsy
Station and saw a squib I sent
you. My first break.
"I'm sure hat happenstance
changed my life. Because I decided
to stick it out right here on The
Big Time, Th punchline ia that
today I start as managing editor
for The Brooklyn Daily.
"That's it,~WaKer. I've waited
too long to tell you how grateful
I am for the little squib you print-
ed which grew into a newspaper -in
Brooklyn. There are many guys
who owe their start to your en-
couragement and I am certainly
one of the appreciative gangEarl
Foreman."
The Torch Is Over: When you
step feeling sorry for you and
start feeling sorry for him!
Headline: "Ford Gives 500 Mil-
lions to Charity."
Perhaps the Reda now know why
some Americans do not hate Capi-
talists.
Add Madvertising Agency Names
Beaize, Toomey. Kldd A fVynn .
Leigh, Downe A Die ... Long.
Tyme, Nozee Ce. . Petrie, Fyed
A Stiph ... Surten, Lee. Knott
. Lets, Duitt A Ssywedint . .
D'Ameur
I burned a hidden torch,
Consumed in secret flame,
Never told my love.
Dared not speak his name.
Then I got quite bold
My Leva was an open book,
For all the world to see,
And no one stopped to look.
Meredith Anderson
At McCarthy's Steak House we
heard about the millionaire bache-
lor, who married a widow with
three yuingsters.
This is his first Chritmas with
kids and he was worried sick.
"I know all about Santa Clans."
he said, "but what the heck do you
tip a gay like that?"
Add Show-Oafs: Don Ross in the
Trib: "The play is chockfi of
unexpected confrontations." (lead-
ed with arguments) ... A. Mann
(same paper): "An actor of Stew-
wart's metric.*' (An actor with
tallan) ... Lewis Gannett: "They
reread their own matutinal prose.'
(Early prose) . Editorial title
in the WTS: "Let's Not Be Pusil-
lanimous." (Cowardly) . Harriet
Van Home: "Execrable." (Gosh,
awful) ... Jay S. Uarrhen:
"Homogeneity of sonority."
(Blended tones) ... Sam ZokHow
in the Times: "Vis-a-vis." (Op-
posite) . G. Mlllstein: "Coajiud-
ed on a tenderly epithalamic note"
(Acted like they were wed) ...
Howard Taubman: "Brouhaha."
(Big fuss) . W. K. ZHser: "Hie
mother is a termagant." (Scold)
. .. John McCarten in the New
Yorker: "Smarmy." (Which ian't
in Funk A Wagnall's.)
Two nurses were talking shop.
"You should see our ho-mital now,"
bragged the Brat. "We have a
teevee set In every room."
You should see oit-." topped
the other, "we've got a TV star
in every room."
On Broadway a Real Friend is
a Guy Who Doesn't Chsne* When
Your Luck Does.
oaAybudif. food*, CtahhifiedA
AUh nvK


)
Christmas On The Isthmus
(Continued from Page THREE)
children, birthday* mean cakes
and gifts.
To almost everyone on the Ca-
nal Zone, Christmas means gifts.
In the various churches of difer-
ent faiths, today, will be mention-
ed the great gift received by the
world which Is commemorated to-
day.
John Arey, on the cover, has
of eye and flash
that brightness
of happy smile which epitomizes,social function judging by
Christmas morning for the very freshly pressed white suit
rise and continue on his way
l3o the apathetic public watched
to see what would happen. And Ufe
auto horns grew in crescendo, all
aimed at a bewildered, tired, aged
man far too old or this type of
work.
Stepping out from one o the
cars stalled by the incident, came
an American from the Canal Zone.
He appeared to be headed for a
the
young. A worls-wide acceptance of
the principles of the true Christ-
mas and its message for mankind,
would make joy like John's pos-
Walkig briskly to the pushcart,
he put a handker chief on the
grimy rails to protect his suit,
hooked his arms under the handl-
sible throughout all nations every- ed and gave a mighty push. The
Where cart started forward. Bracing his
And here is a Panama Christ-!feet against the favement, he pa*
mas story, based on an incident
Premier Sunday Cross-Word Puzzle |
ry, based on
that really happened.
On a very busy day at the busi-
est hour, and old man was trying
to push a heavy cart up over a
slight rise on one of the principal
streets of the capital city. Filled
with holiday merchandise, the
pushcart was overloaded, and the
poor scrawny old- man just
couldn't move it another inch up
the slope. Behind him traffic start-
ed jamming up. _,.,
Bus drivers honked impatiently.
Other motorists honked impatient-
ly. Passers-by stood on the side-
walk and watched. From the doors
of their shops, storekeepers gazed
curiosly.
One thing was most apparent.
The old man wasn't going to be
able to push that cart up over the
W
all his strength Into a series of
Eushes which, .together with the
elp of the old man, brought the
cart up over the slope and in
the level street.
As the two men both mopped the
sweat from their foreheads, the
tattered old Panamanian and the
white-suited American exchanged
an understanding glance. "Un mi-
lln de gracias,'' said the push-
cart man. "No hay de que ami-
go," replied the Gringo.
But the BiWe says more lhaa
that. In Matthew 25, It tells how
Christ Jesus related the parable
of the sheep and the goats. Part
of the 40th verse reads. "Inas-
much as ye have done it unto one
of the least of these my brethren,
ye have dona it unto me."
Merry Christmas!
NAVY GOES DOWN UNDER-U S. Navy Photographer Striker
D. F. Williams glides past a submerged submarine on an under-
water photogiapblc mission. The Navy is exploring possibilities
of underwater military photography. It is studying operation of
still, motion picture and television cameras built specifically for
under witer use.
A GIFT FOR IKEEmbroidered portrait of President Eisenhower
Is displayed by Juana Maria Luz Alo.iu on her arrival In New
York from Spain. It took her almost a year to complete the
embroidery, sometimes spending 13 ho >rs a day on it. Much of
the thread In the portrait, which she hopas to present personally
, to the President, is made from gold. .
1Young
salmon
8Drug-
plant
10Thrum
15Beat,
as wings
19Liliaceous
plant
20Strange
21Stop
22River
of
Russia
23Official
stamp
24Romantic
26English
River
27Assuag-
ing pain
29Brace '
SOSupport-
to
S2Pronf ,
S3Meaner
35Thin
SOldest
Dravidian
. language
39Point
of
compass
41Be in-
debted
43 Attain
47Imitation
pearl
49Hurt
GODeface
61Pounding
imple-
ment
HORIZONTAL
62Ascend
63Inter-.
roaratlve
66Water
bottle
57Pack
56Pulpy
fruit
69Derisive
cry
60Flying
mammal
61Agave
fiber
63Evening
(poetic)
64Import
66North
SUr
6Oorrecter
71Join
together
73Of a
mem-
brane
of eye
75Bombast
76River'
of
Woe
Myth.)
79Qacine
61Ray
84Oolf
standard
85-Jog
87Hindu
cymbals
88Homed
rumi-
nant
60Res
91Footless
animal
93Kettle- v.
drum
65Bed
96Sharp
sound
97Rescind
99lived
100Hole
10Gloomy
103Step
104Fairy
Queen
105Move
slowly
107Under-
ground
worker
108Mature
110Oray-
faced
112Dregs
114Setting
in
ground
118That
119Falcon
123Roar of
surf
124Sharer.
127Heart
128Heron-
like
bird
129Colder
130Rescuer
131Air
132Muddle '
133Principle
184 Abrasive
135Check
1Defile
2On
shielded
aide
SCourse
4-Pertain-
ing
6Indian
black
buck
6Cricket
team
1Ennead
8Mesh
9Inspirit
10Setting
11Denary
12New
Zealand
tree
ISEmploy-
able
14Affray
15Lvemeos
16Son of
Jacob
17Soon'
18Throe
26Crush
28Roofing,
material
31Vetch
S3Dry, of
wines
34Ostrich
cry
36Molding
37Existent
38Man-
hater
40Eloquent
speaker
41-Fold
VERTICAL
44Formal
authen-
tication
45Spice
46Chopper
48Couple
60Of the
morning
61Run out
54Vine
65Keelllte
(BoL)
56Pina<*oue
tree
59Spirit
60Sweet
62Cease!
65Discern
67Admit
68Sink
70Secrettosi
of cuttle-
fish
72Maxim
74Envoy
76Away
77Mediter-
ranean
shrub
78Negative
80Edible
fern'
stock
82Taut
83Fervent
86New
Zealand
evergreen
89Fortify
92Precious-
94Baby
. (India)
96 Legal
claim -
96Cuts in
three
- parts
98Passage
100TO
postulate
10SAugury
104Threaten
166Smart- -
(cortoq.)
106Tree
of
the elm
family
109Small
singing
bird
111Garment
113Ingresa
114Formally
115Roundea
division
116Hima-
laya
plant
117Broad
smile ,
1194-1/asli\n
120Defeat
utterly
121Sea ,
'Dint
122Abound
125Golf
mound
136Knave
Of
clubs
CRYPTOQUIPS
YVXFCSOM MKNNVHV YGKQVRRKG QFONR
XVGRSFCXQ.GBR8GFSVX 8VVC-FHVGR.
Artras* Hsm f Mtaliw: St alaste*:-Distributed by Ktag Features Syndicate*
IK B C-
For The Best In Fotos & Features
... It's The Sunday American
PA1 SIX
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25, 196$


1.
Review Of The Week
WORLD-WIDE
SPORTS
ISTHMIAN
PRESIDENT and Mr. Elsenhower played host for
700 guests at a pre-Christmas reception In the
White House.
Members of the White House staff, Including the
secret service detail and police force, and newsmen
attended. Each got as a gift a copy of Mr..Eisen-
hower's latest painting along with the first family's
personal Christmas card.
Mr. Elsenhower started the painting a Rocky
Mountain scene before his heart attack of last
September. He finished it during his convalescence.
On the past two Christmases, the President has given
copies of his paintings of Washington, and Lincoln.
That Ford stock has attracted crowds of eager
customers even before it goes on sale.
Some 10,000,000 Ford shares will go on sale next
month, the first public offering of Ford stock in
history.
Wall Street brokers say orders already are pour-
THE U.S.' TOP thoroughbred "Nashua" will
continue his racing career.
Nashua was purchased Dec. 15 for a record price
of more than one and one-quarter million dollars. It
had been thought the new owner Leslie Combs of
Lexington, Kentucky, might retire Nashua to stud. But
Combs says hell keep the colt racing.
Combs paid the estate of William Woodward. Junior,
$1,251,200 for Nashua, In a sale that meant the end
of the famous Belair Stud Stable. It was the highest
Erice ever paid for a race horse. The 61 other Belair
orses went to other purchasers.
Combs says "two or three" other persons helped
him purchase Nashua, but adds he isn't able to
reveal their names.
At Miami. Old Sunny Jim Fitzsimmons says he'll
continue as Nashua's trainer. The 81-year-old Mr. Fita
says Combs told him by telephone "Take the
horse and do what you want with him." Sunny Jim
LAST-MINUTE CHRISTMAS shoppers were
still scurrying in an out of stores as Panama
and tbe Csnal Zone prepared to welcome el Nio
Dios in the traditional Christmas observance. Some
early starters were already reeking with Christmas
cheer.
Extra police vigilance during the Christmas and
New Year holidays was promised earlier in the
week by police chief Bolivar Vallarino, as Panama-
nians geared their festive scheduled to enjoy the
two-day Christmas holiday. All business and gov-
ernment offices are closed today and tomorrow.
Shirt salesman Jaime Icekson got the "best Christ-
mas gift of his "life" Thursday when Fifth Circuit
Court Judge Temistocles de la Barrera cleared him
of a swindling charge filed by a group of business-
men
Icekson and Miss Rose Epstein, a former employe
of the U. S. Embassy here, were charged with swind-
ing in.-They say "everybody and his brother" wants "~ rjnder those conditions I will be happy to have oi tne u. 8. Embassy here, were charged with swina-
to buy. They agree that the demand "passes any- 7? horse -.-in "Fitzsimmons says he wouldn't have "V the group out of between $200.000 and $287,000
thing' seen before or, as one puts It, "passes the wanted to train the horse for. as he puts It, "Just w"h_an. alleged scheme to Import bars of gold from
anybody."
bounds of reason."
' Actually orders aren't being taken formally. Brokers
are merely noting customer requests. Those requests
will become orders when 700 firms across the country
start selling the stock on a pro-rata basis mostly
In lots of les than 100 shares. The cost: About $75
a share.
Indian Prime Minister Nehru Is still walking the
tightrope of neutrality between .the East and the
West.
Nehru made his first comments on the.recent In-
dian tour Soviet leaders Bulganln and Khruschev.
Among other things the Russians had accused the
Western powers of sending the Nazis against the
Soviet Union in World War Two.
Nehru told delegates to a meeting of his Indian
Congress Party that the Russian charge was "twist-
ing history." Furthermore, the delegates reported,
he found the accusation "embarrassing." But the
prime minister had no objection to less specific at-
tacks on the West by Bulganln and Khrushchev.
Fire has wiped out any hope.of a happy Christmas
ior the families of its 20 victims.
Thirteen of the 20 were children. And seven of the
victims died in tenement fires in New York City and
8t. Louis.
At New York, a blaze raced through two tenement
buildings, killing two little girls their mother and
an aged woman. Three other persons were burned
severely.
The St. Louis fire resulted In death for two chttdren
dropped from a third-floor tenement window by their
mother. The mother was Injured seriously when she
jumped after them and an elderly, bed-ridden man
Inside the building was killed.
At Indianapolis three small children perished In a
lire that destroyed their home while their mother
was away visiting a neighbor.
Three more children were killed at Davenport,
Iowa, In a fire and explosion in their frame house.
And Ohio counted four persons dead in scattered
/ires.
Fire caused another loss the historic old Way-
side Inn In Sudbury. Mass. Once a shelter for George
Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette. It was
made immortal In the poems of Henry Wadsworth
Longfellow.
i J*!?"* "hlny new automobile got the blame for the
latest increase in the cost of living.
The government announced its average of livlne f*0"8 Tonyu8 headline quality.. He
costs went* up another one loth of on. r.*i? ber mt' ahead of l*t year's leader
the month endednNoVeem0Der * And. rays^ BurUu hK?phla- Art Lar8en O 8an ^
Under Fltssimmon, Nashua won more than
$M5,*M more than any other horse except "Cita-
tion." Fitsslmmons says he'll point the colt for the
SIM.tM Wldener Handicap at Hialeah Park this
winter. Nashua also is eligible for tbe $5fl,M Mc-
Lennan Handicap at Hialeah.
In California, an official of the Santa Anita track
says'Combs phoned him and said he'd like to have
Nashua run in the $100.000 Santa Anita Handicap.
But the official says Combs told him the final deci-
sion would be up to Fitzsimmons.
A Texas golfer has levelled charges that could
produce quite a rhubarb in golf.
Tommy Bolt says that fans in the galleries have
illegally aided Slammy Sammy Snead at tourna-
ments by kicking or. throwing his balls to more
favorable lies.
Snecd defeated Bolt in a playoff for the recent
Miami Open. Bolt says that on the sudden death
playoff hole he is "reasonably sure that a fan kick-
ed Snead's ball out toward the fairway." He says "I
saw Snead's drive roll to a stop and no one can
convince me that some spectator didn't kick it toward
the fairway." M
Bolt goes on to say that Snead is a crowd favorite
in North Carolina and "he gets the best of breaks."
Bolt says that fans at the Greensboro Open have
thrown Snead's ball onto the green after he has hit
Into the crowd.
The Texas pro emphasizes that he doesnt blame
Snead for what the crowd does. He says that Sammy
"Is a fine golfer." But. says Bolt, it Isn't right for
him "to get unwarranted help from spectator
sources."
Other members of the P.G.A. tournament circuit
have seconded the charges by Bolt. Bob Crow of
Minneapolis says he has been at Greensboro and
other tournaments. According to Crow, "What Tom-
my says Is absolutely right."
National Open champion Tony Trabert of Cincin-
nati now a pro still ranks at the top of the
amateur tennis list for 195S.
Trabert turned pro in the fall and now is head-
lining a cross country tour for the play-for-pay boys
under Jack Kramer.
The listing announced by the ranking committee
of the United Spates Lawn Tennis Association under-
scores Tony's headline quality... He is ranked num-
Vic Seixas of
Leandro, California,
Is third.
The rest of the top ten, in order:
Bernard Bartzen of Dallas; Ed Moylan of Trenton,
New Jersey; Gil Shea of Los Angeles; Hamilton
Richardson of Westfleld, New Jersey; Herb Flam of
Beverly Hills, California; Sammy Glammalva of
Houston, Texas; and Tom Brown, Junior, or San
Francisco.
o
m J^T Sto*tou. the higher price of new car
models Is responsible for most of the increase.
4RepwUca.n. aenato,r George Bender of Ohio promises
Bwkeye state COtato* campaign a hot one in the
f?nieri.leaed. H1*.1 nta Probab,e opponent next
year in the senatorial race will be Democratic Gov-
try, Lausche and Bender both are champion vote ae>- ***?. rinM2!L among women tennla ,tats ,or **" "*- minute's"
ters. and Bender promises to show his techniaue nd ond straight year.
energy in every county in Ohio. Bender says he will Mlss H&.^ *urned pro a teach,erw **!*' M season* Of the 21 men on both sides of the Isthmus three
base his speeches on his record of support for the ** a top-flight net ace, during which she was among failed the teat and will be required to .brush up on
the United States. Miss Epstein, who,is now a res-
ident of Chester. Pa., was tried in absentia, but
Icekson was being held In jail up until the time of
the trial.
Judge de la Barrera commented In his verdict on
the fact that all persons In the case are Hebrews,
who he said are known for business acumen. The
judge speculated that the true facts involved in the
case had not been revealed, either by the alleged
victims or the defendant.
Two other Panama businessmen, however, will
probably spend their Christmas having nightmares
about the huge fines they will have to pay Into
the Treasury or go to Jail. .
The General Administrator of Internal Revenue
slapped fines of $11,498.40 each on ship" chandler
Allan Sasso and package liquor store proprietor Ma-
nuel G. Barcia for conspiracy to defraud the gov-
ernment of tax revenue.
Sasso was charged with ordering his employe
Neville L. Simons to withdraw 56 cases of imported
liquor from the government's bonded warehouse un-
der the pretext of supplying It to ah Ecuadorean
vessel berthed at Rodman. A customs Inspector was
allegedly bribed" Into not accompanying the ship-
ment until delivery was made. Part of the liquor
was said to have been found In Barcia's home.
R resolution expressing confidence the V. 8. would"
take prompt action .regarding legislation to Im-
plement the new Panama-U. S. treaty was ap-
Sroved Thursday by the National Assembly, which
ollowed up the resolution with the appointment
f Assemblymen Jorge Mueca. Inocencio Galindo
and Max Heurtematte to go to Washington to de-
liver the resolution to the Senate.
Speedy action concerning more housing for mil-
itary personnel seemed forthcoming after a House
subcommittee which had Just completed a tour of
the Isthmus returned to Washington and reported
they would urge authorization of additional quarters
for servicemen on the Zone.
r
The subcommittee headed by Rep. Hugh J. Ad-
donizio of New Jersey said they found many service
personnel and their families living in crowded sub-
standard housing, and pointed out that duj to the
shortage many families could not come to Join their
husbands here.
Although the shortage here was "less acate"
than in Puerto Rico and Cuba, the committee said
It would authorise about 24M units.
Some Marten which they visited were described
as "termite-ridden wooden shacks" built long ago
to provide temporary shelter for unmarried con-
struction workers.
Following closely on the heels of a tragic drowning
of an American quarantine boarding officer, the
complex staff of boarding men were subjected t a
"floatation" test wherein they were required to jump
fully clothed into the water and float for five
Elsenhower administration.
Lausche. although a Democrat, frequently has
praised Mr. Elsenhower. It may end up that the two
veteran campaigners will both be shouting "I like
Ike' as the campaign rolls along.
An Army court martial has ended with a verdict
that military legal experts called "the next best
thing to acquittal."
The trial, at Fort Lewis. Washington was the first
one in which a West Point graduate was court-mar-
tialed for collaborating with the enemy. Lt. Col.
Von Liles was convicted of discrediting th*
the top 10 women tennis players each" season. This
year, the tall blonde from Florida retained her
national championship. That made top ranking prac-
tically automatic.
The rating announced this week is a recom-
mendation of the Lawn Tennis Association's rank-
ing committee. It has to be approved by the As-
sociation at its meeting next month. But that is
considered a formality.
8hlrley Fry of St. Petersburg, Florida long-time
doubles partner of Mies Hart is ranked second.
Wimbledon champion Louise Brought of Beverly
Hills, california, Is third, with Mrs. Dorothy. Head
Knode of New York In fourth place and Mrs. Beverly
service by making propcnda recoidlngs for his Com'- Baker Fleitz of Long Beach, California, fifth.
munlst captors In Korea. The others In the top ten: Mrs. Barbara Davidson
The M-year-old career officer from Birmingham S? M"w,aukef{?KBarba Bre,t, Noh Hollywood.
Ala. was suspended from rank for two years. He ateo California; Althea Gibson Qf New York; Darlene
lost his authority to exercise military command Hard of Montebello. California; and Mrs. Dorothy
But Liles was smiling as he left the military court- Cheney of Santa Monica. California.
rom. He said he felt he did what was right when he
was a prisoner and would try for complete vindica-
tion through an appeal.
America's No. 1 Communist is reported in hot water
over a Social Security mixup.
The Communist newspaper Daily Worker says Party
Chairman William Foster has been ordered to fork
over exactly, $100.006.50 to the government.
The paper says the Social Security Administration
wants Foster to return the money paid to him In
federal Social Security benefits. The government
agency refused to confirm or deny the report.
wia \ J,------------- "* ***- **-KVS*. MS* 11 i CU'll 111 10T
The 74-year-old Foster has been under Indictment into voluntary exile
since 1948 on charges of conspiring to teach and
advocate the violent overthrow of the government.
Familiar hands are once again at the helm of a
world-famous newspaper.
Dr. Alberto Galnza Paz formally has taken ovar
direction of the Argentine newspaper "La Prensa.
Some 2000 friends and former employes crowded the
newspaper building in Buenos Aires to watch cere-
monies reinstating Galnza Paz as director.
La Prensa had been confiscated by ousted Dictator
Juan Peron In 1948. And its editor-publisher want
their swimming. The test came exactly 12 days after
William J. Knutson, an Atlantic-side boarding officer
slipped off a ladder and drowned while trying to
board a ship.
Zonians were dispirited as the discount liquor
situation appeared stagnant. Panama liquor deal-
ers complained that the fact that Canal Zone
authorities are not issuing permits for residents to
permit them to purchase the duty-free liquor was
what was holding up the works.
When queried about these complaints, the Panama
Canal Co. had "no comment" to make. Permit slips
have not yet been Issued, and no one appears to
know when they will be made available to employes.
At the national level, agreement has not been
reached between the two governments on implementa-
tion of the treaty article covering the discount.
A former shipping agent's manager. Richard H.
Wilson, was still in Jail In default of posting $20.000
ball. The case in which he Is accused of embezzling
$21,500 from the Wllford & McKay shipping ageti.-v
In Cristobal was continued for plea. He was picked
up by the FBI in Chicago and brought back to the
Canal Zone to face charges.
Another embezzlement, this one to the tune of
$3,322, was lodged against the former manager of
the Pedro Miguel Boat Club, an Irishman iviincd
Thomas R. Qreevy, The 44-year-old defend n< was
manager of the club for ten months and handled
all income from the kitchen, bar and members' fees. .
Me Is awaiting trial in District Court
s#Ay>.mQzww %>, i&>
^is^^^^^i^^^r^^ wr* jp^t*inp^mnp
i'AGJK ivw. -


Central Avenue Santa Claus does things in a big way.


. .',- - -r r-vr-r^. -"-'
m
"^"t*?'
^P
TOOTG, THE BOSS 18 A TERROR
TO WORK FOR.' **'S an irritable,
FAULT-F|NDlNS,qUlCK- TBMPEJBB.
DEMON! NOTHING PLEAT "
HIM.' I. CANT TAKE
IT MUCH'LONGER.
:
{^CASPER, t CANT,BEUEVE
THAT MR. PLUNKER IS AS
BAD AS VOU SAW HE'S
ALWAYS BEEN SO KIND^
AND CONSIDERA!
TOME.'
SURE, THE OLD FRAUD lS AS
GENTLE AS CAN BE TO OTHERS,
BUT TO HIS EMPLOYEES HE'S
UKE A WILD TIGER ON THE
L*1
I'LL NEVER
BELIEVE NICE
MR.PLUNKER
IS THETVRANT1
YOU PAINT
HIM TOBE.'
BE AT MY OFFICE.AT IO AJA. HARP*
ANO-SEE M1M IN ACTION P*'*"
WRONG I'LL BL
THAT-NEW HA1
WAMTINOJ
QUICK, TOOTS, HIDE IN THE NEXT
ROOM WHERE YOU CAN HEAR EVERY-
THING THAT*
AAID.' HERE
COMES THE BOSS
STORMING IN
UMM-----THERESA SLIGHT DELAY
THIS MORNINGHE USUALLY BARGES
IN HERE THE VERY FIRST THING.'
AH-H, HERE HE COMESNOW
WATCH THE FUR FLY/
YOU'RE TOO CONSCIENTIOUS,
MY BOY BUT ILL NOT ALLOW
YOU TO JEOPARPIXE YOUR HEALTH
BY PUTTING IN TOO-LONG HOURS
AT YOUR
SKIP THE REPORTS, CASPER, AND TAKE CARE
OF YOURSELF. YOUR HEALTH COMES FIRST.'
TAKE A WEE
OFF AT FUL
PAY AND
REST UP.'
TAKE
WIFE ON
ATRIP,'
,]
ILL RUN ALONG
NOW, BEN, BUT
I'AA TILL NOT
CONVINCED
THATVOU"R
WOTATyRANT'
TO YOUR
HELP,'
KATE, MV
DEAR, I'M AS
TAME ASA
^KITTEN'
THAT EXPLAINS IT.' HE
WAS ON HIS GOOD
BEHAVIOR BECAUSE
MS WIPE WAS LISTEN-
IN.
WHY HAVENT YOU FINISHED
THOSE REPORTS?.'?*.'.'tV
OET THEM READY BYMORNlN
IF YOU HAVE TO WORK ALL
NIGHT.'
O^, BROTHER,
IF TOOTS HAD
ONLY STAYED
AROUND ONE
MORE MINUTE/
[3mmV>
ft2222



i .
w
American
Comic supplement



.
I
i
f


> *

- :#>



* -H
GOOD
EVENING,
SIR/
AND,MOM,THISJS
BOBBILLOM/-HE
WORKS INJ DADS
OFFICE/
r>
sir down/
THERE'S A GOOD]
SHOW ON T.V.
IN A PEW
MINUTES.'

WJ>
2
13
VOU AND I HAVE SOME UN-
FINISHED BUSINESS/ r
BUZZ/NK5
you//
HE'S A WHIZ
AT BIZ ANO J
LOADED WITH/
PEISSONALITY.
I MEAN, HE
ACTUALLY^
IO-25
YOU FATHEB WUt
BE GLAD TO HELP
HIM, WONT VOU,
HE'S ALfcEAD/*
GETTING AHEAD
FASTEN THAN ANy
OTHER BCV IN THE
OFFICE/
HE'S BEEN KITH
THE COMPANY]
TWO WEEKS,
AND HESDflTNSl
THE BOSS'S.
0AU6MTER/






COLLY, I'M TERRIBLE 6LAP
THEY30T THESE ESCA-LA7RS'
- THE FURNITURE DEfWTMENT
IS FIVE FLOORS UPAN' THEY
. WDULPNT LET ME SET OM
^ THE ELEVATOR.^y
WELL, THIS IS A SWfTCHL
SOMEONE BRINGING US
A CHAIR INSTEAP OF,
SAA-A-A-Y--LET
ME LOOK AC'
VES, SIR- EOT "miS IS ONLV
A KlP-SlZE CHAlRi VW
oOHTA see rmnom-up
^CHAIRS MR.HARPM4FLE
MAKES/
Il;'''4i

1 fifAX
AN'MR. HAROHAPLE
MACES 'EM ALL BY
HIMSELF/ VOU CAN
EASY SEE MOW
IS, AN'
H'M'MM*M-ER-AH
^M'M'M- YOUNG
LAPY, ILLMAkE-MY
OWM DCCIS**'

JUST LEAVE THE LITTLE ROCKER
HERE. PLEASE/ AH, MISS
CASE. TAKE THE YOUNG LAPVS
NAME ANP APPRESS ON
HER WAY OUT'
^H,HERE YOU ARE.' WHAT'S
HAPPENEP? WHERE'S VOUR
LITTLE CHAIR?' YOU LOOK
WLPEKEDJ
lit
60LLY, miss Berry
I WISH I KNEW WHAT
PIP HAPPEN! I NEVER EVEN
SOT A CHANCE TO USE MY
(SALES TALK.' I WAS IN-THENI
POOP, I WAS OUT/ ITS
TOO FAST FOR ME.'i
'-......
......
* -
.> ' HI



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