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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/00959
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:00959
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
to LIMA
THE CITY OF THE
VICEROYS...
it. BRANIFF
INTKRHATIONA'L AIRWAYS
AN INDEPENDENT

rnu&m
DAILY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
list TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER tl, MM
Britain Charges Foreign Country
Incited Anti-West Jordan Rioting
LONDON, Dec. 21 (UP) Britain charged today that the bjoody Jordan riot* war
"deliberately incited by misrepresentations from outside the country of the policy of
the Jordan government."
Opposition Socialists countered with charges in Parliament that Britain's Eden
government itself "bungled" the effort to entice Jordan into the Baghdad pact and
now apears to be in the position of trying to "thrust it down their throat."
More Military
Foreign undesecretary Lord
John Hope did not say in his
House of Commons statement
what countries Britain accuses
of inciting the riots.
Deposed pro-British premier
Hazza Majali yesterday blamed
Saudi Arabian "bribery."
Egypt and Syria have rigor-
ously opposed British efforts
to get JOVdan into the West's
Baghdad pact. But the Bagh-
dad pact itself is a defense al-
liance to counter Soviet Rus-
sia's intrusion in the Middle
East.
Hope told M.P.'s it seemed
likely that the riots "were de- to the pact."
connection with the Baghdad
pact."
Hope said Britain has "never
concealed from the Jordan gov-
ernment their hope that the
Jordan government will accede
llberately incited by mlsrepre
sentatlons from outside the
country of the policy of the Jor-
dan government, especially in
RICHARD R. WILSON Is shown leaving the U.S. District Court
Room l Cristbal following his arraignment on a charge of
embezzling $21,500. The case was continued for plea. Wilson
is a frnsner manager of the Wllford & McKay shipping agency
iii Cristbal. He was brought back to the Canal Zone recently
from Chicago,.where he had been located by the FBI. An A-
merlcan citizen, he had been manager of the shipping agency
for many years, and left the Isthmus suddenly last July. He
is in jail In default of posting $20.000. considered to be one of
the largest sums set for ball in the Canal Zone in many years.
Wilson Is being represented by attorney William J. Sheri-
dan, Jr.
Crop Of Adoption Cases Brings
Xmas Spirit To Cristobal Court
The Christmas spirit seemed
to pervade the Cristobal court-
house yesterday as a procession
of children, all sizes and na-
tionalities figured in a series of
adoption cases which ended
happily for the aspiring sets of
parents..
Cases covered a wide range of
situations, from a woman a-
doptlng her sister's child, to a
Meanwhile peace returned to
riot-torn Joroan today as a new
premier promised to restore or-
der to the country and carry
out elections that will deter-
mine whether this crucial Arao
country will Join the American-
uackea Bagnaad pact
Jordan's King Hussein named
aging Ibrahim Pasha Hashem to
form a caretaker government
until tne country can go to the
polls to determine Its future pol-
icy on the pro-Western and an*
ti-commumst "northern tier"
alliance.
Snahem took over from Hazza
Majali, whose appointment as
premier and his intentions to
put Jordan squarely into the
Middle East splitting pact
touched off a series of riots
throughout the country.
Hashem said today that h's
government had no policy ex-
cept to restore order and
tranquillity to the country and
carry out elections.
"The elections will be neutraj
and honest to ascertain public
opinion on the major Issue
namely, whether to join or not
to join the Baghdad pact," he
said.
"if one of these two aims is
aaMeved, theis- my
biPhccompllshed," he _.
If the 75-year-old one-time
premier can form an interim
government, its first duty wlit
be to hold elections called la
the hope of restoring order lb
the nailon.
Bisters, apparently aroused
over the chance Jorgan might
join the pro-Western Baghdad
pact, attacked the American
consulate In Jordanian Jeru-
salem yesterday. They ripped
down the Stars and Stripes
and horned it.
They were driven back by A-
rab Legionnaires. A number of
demonstrators were reported
wounded when the Legionnaires
opened fire.
No Americans were reported
injured in the attack on the
consulate but many were a-
larmed by the violence and
took refuge in the guarded area
1,0,200,000 Ford Co.
Shares To Be Put On Sale
WASHINGTON, Dec. 11 (UP)
The Ford Motor Co, announc-
ed today it plans to offer 10,-
200,000 shares of its eommon
stock for public salethe first
such public offering In its 52-
year history.
This* would be the largest cor-
porate offering in history. A
registration statement filed with
the Securities St Exchange Com-
mission Indicated that the com-
mon stock will be offered to the
public at about $75 a share.
The actual price will be an-
nounced before the securities
are put on sale next month.
The registration statement re-
vealed publicly for the first
time in the firm's history the
Ford Co. financial status.
It showed that from 1946
through' Sept. 30, 1955, Ford's
net profits totaled 91J36J0O,-
000.
For the nine years 1946
through 1954, Ford's net earn-
ings were $1,224,600,000. This
compares with $4,775.000,000 by
Its chief rivalGeneral Motors
Corp.and $688,000,000 by Chry-
sler during the same period.
A 39-page prospectus also re-
vealed:
1. Sales during the first nine
months of this year totaled $*.-
042,600,000.
2. Consolidated net income for
the first nine months of this
year was $312,200,000.
3. Total capital and earnings
retained in the business as of
last Sept. 30 amounted to $1,-
840,000,000.
4. The compeny-vlane-to **-
a new line Of passen-
ger cars.
5. The company had factory
sales of 1.991,100 passenger cars
and trucks daring 1954. This
represented 30.2 per cent of the
industry's total sales.
8. Factory sales of passenger
cars and trucks for the first nine
months this year totaled 1.901.-
000 or 27.5 per cent of the indus-
try's total factory sales.
The prospectus showed that
the company's directors already
have voted a dividend of OOcents
a share for the first quarter of
next year. ... t
Future quarterly dividends
will be subject *U> business
conditions" and the company's
operating and financial posi-
tion, a statement accompany-
ing the statement said.
So far this year, dividends
were paid equal to $3.27 oer
share on the newlv classified
capital stock. The dividend was
declared on the basis of profits
:ss.s ^r-te.*}* i; oTSizx-cV^^f
entrance to the Israel side
Jerusalem.
of
walked away he seemed to be
smiling Inside.
A Rainbow City couple told,-TV Arr,, r\ a.'
the judge.they were the "nat- I O ASSUiTie UUfieS
urfti parents" of the two boys,
aged 15 and 10, who appeared
with them in court. They ex-
Jewish Soldiers
FRIEDBERG, Germany, Dec. 21
(UP)Jewish soldiers of the U.S.
Sachs St Co., ICuhn, Loeb & Co,
Lehman Brothers, White Weld ft
Co., and Merrill, Lynch, Pierce,
Fenner St Beane.
The seven, in turn, will ask 700
smaller brokerage houses
throughout the nation to parti-
cipate In the sale of the stock
to the public. A local broker said
the word in security circles is
that the major underwriters will
ask that individual allotments
be limited to five or 10 shares to
Insure wide public holding.
A heavy demand for the stock
could enable the original Indivi-
dual buyer to turn a quick prof-
it upon receipt of his stock, if
he wishes.
Young Motorcyclist
Geb 'Not Guilty'
Present For Xmas
A young American motorcyclist
got s $15 Christmas present from
the Cristobal division of the U. 8.
District Court yesterday when
Judge Guthrie F. Crowe entered
a finding of not guilty to a reck-
less driving charge.
The defendant. Earl Roger Bo-
land, who works ss an apnren-
tice at Mt. Hope Industrial Divi-
sion sppealed s $15 fine imposed
on him by the Cristobal magis-
trate for reckless driving.
gttgffffff^
PC On Liquor
Accusation:
'No Comment'
A spokesman for the Pass-
a Casal Co. said today that
they hve "no comment'* ea al-
legations made recently by
wholesale liquor dealers in Pa-
nama City that what was hold-
ing up the tax reduced If q n o r
for feiians was the fset that
the Casal has not Issued free
entry sKm for the liquor as yet.
The Panama liquor dealers
complained that the Canal Zone
authorities apparently do not
want to issoo Hie permits which,
thy say, would make it possi-
ble for residents of the Canal
Zone who are eligible to sor-
chase the duty-free liquor.
A spokesman for the C s a a I
earlier ststed thst no permits
had been issued and they had
"no idea'' when suck permits
would he forthcoming.
Christmas Songs
By Zone Students
To Be Broadcast
Recordings of the Christmas
music programs given by the
pupils ol three Canal Zone ele-
mentary schools and the Balboa
and Cristobal High Schools will
be broadcast this week over the
Armed Forces Network.
The elementary scl.
grams will be flve-mlnute broad-. They do not expect to have
Congressmen See
Need For Action
In CZ, PR, Cuba \
WASHINGTON, Dec. 21 .(UP) Congrats will bo
urged next year to authorize additional housing for the
familias of servicemen in Puerto Rico, Cuba and the Ca-
nal Zone, it was learned today.
Staff officials reported that visits to those areas \bis
month convinced a House Banking and Currency subcom-
mittee of the need for action to remedy a morale-dampen-
ing shortage of housing there.
The touring Congressional group, headed by Rep.
Hugh J. Addonizio of New Jersey, reportedly found marry
servicemen without their families because of the shortage
and the wives and children of others crowded into sub-
standard housing.
This, they said, was particularly true around Ramey
Air Force base in Puerto Rico, Guantanamo naval base in
Cuba and various military installations in the Canal Zone.
The committee staff has be-
gun its study of the data accu-
mulated during the three-week
The elementary school pro-jtrlp wWch ended Saturday.
" broad-. They do not expect to ha
casts. The first two are sched-| the formal report in final
-February.
"of the sentl-
uled for Thursday when 30 pu-, shape bejore mid
f the JflgfcSaBd second' But on the basis
Jn presenting the youth's sp- grdes of Balboa meotary ment of. the six congressmen
"' school will be heard at 6:55 p.m. who made the survey, they aid,
600,000 in the first nine months
of 1955.
The Ford Foundation w)|i sell -
the common stock to seven large; tersection of Guhck Road ind
underwritersBlyth St Co.. The Brazos Boulevard suddenly, caus-
First Boston Corp.. Ooldman.' ing him to stop his car shsrply.
peal his attorney. S. T. Frankel
pointed out to the court the erro-
neous impression people hsve of
motorcyclists in general.
"A famous jurist was once
known to say that anyone who
rides a motorcycle is guilty of
reckless driving,'' he said.
Frankel called to the stand Bo-
und's rommate, Ralph D. Harris,
who accomoanied the defendant
on Dec. 3 from Ft. G u 1 i c k to
Cristobal. Both men were on mo-
torcycles. Harris described how
Boland's evele stalled and how
they pulled it off the left side of
the road to avoid a traffic hold-
up.
The government called s sol-
dier to the stand who testified he
and his wife and their small son
were riding in a car which had | 1 will be recorded and will be
to slow down to permit the two\h*"d over CFN Saturday after-
motorcyclists to pass. In stopping
the child was 'knocked off the
fron seat, but there was no se-
rious injury. He claimed the mo-
torcyclists pulled out from the In
and Christmas carols sung by 30
pupils from the fifth and sixth
grades of the Diablo Heights
Elementary School will be heard
over the,air Thursday night at
7:25 o'clock. Students from the
South Margarita School will be
heard at 7:55 to 8:00 p.m. Sat-
urday.
A recording- of the Christmas'
music concert given Tuesday
night by the orchestra, band
and chorus of the Balboa High
School in the Balboa Stadium,
will be broadcast in a
the following recommendations
are strong possibilities:
1. That the Army does not
need more housing In Puerto
Rico.
2. That the Army housing
problem will be eased but not
cured by the construction of 400
additional units, schedule'd to
start shortly after New Year's.
3. That the shortage for the
families of naval officers and
enlisted men in Puerto Rico de-
M-mlnut mands consideration of amend-jareas, consideration should also
Srcgr^SK Ame! oyot "te t0 the cost-limltation.be given to a* Increase of the
SetSork FridVyhninTe.tOPTo Jfjg of the National Hous- j ^^aUons, as In the case
That the mortgage pro-
times lacked running water and
plumbing.
In the Canal Zone, the short-
age was said to be less acute.
But the available homing was
said to be outdated and
satislactory^Scme HOD
vrmliwtam mtwlbed
mite-ridden Wooden shacks,
built long oat} to provide tem-
porary shelter for unmarried
construction workers.
After a look, the congressmen
reportedly agreed when an Ar-
my general said of his own 40-
year-old. frame house in the
Zone;
v 'M tn? termites ever stop
holding hands, this thing wlfi
come crashing down on ray
head."
5. That, if the mortgage pro-
visions are extended to those
o'clock
The Christmas concert to be
given this week by the mem-
bers of the chorus and orches-
tra to the Cristobal High School
noon from 1:30 to 2 o'clock.
BALBOA TIDES
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22
HIGH LOW
ril a.m. 1.59 a.m.
9:07 p.m. 3:14 p.m.
4.
visions of the act should be ex-
tended to bases in Cuba and
the Canal Zone. The original
law did include them among
the areas where the govern-
ment could underwrite miUta-
rp housing through acceptance
of the mortgages.
At Guantanamo, the congress-
New Safely Posters
To Be Used In CZ
A new approach in Panama Ca-
nal Company-Canal Zone govern-
m"n todTsttatlon slmlrlo! J,"* 8afy P">ram will 1* the
the one at Ramey. Navy men's ?rfla* JWJT ?,fe,y ^
families were said to be living '5"^"* 10 **...u ieV*
In small Cuban towns where X*"ou* ""tegic positions in t
their cramped quarters some- tMa.
plained that a relative had a- 29,n Fifld Artillery Battalion will
dopted the boys some years ago, " all posts on Christmas Dsy to
but had now retired and return-five Christisn soldiers free time| _..__.,. n. ,,,
ed to Barbados. They wanted: for religious services. *sm^JL? JLip
couple adopting two sons who'the custody of their sons back. Aa Army announcement said the \ The worlds nm "'vf^';"*,.
were really their own. When asked by the judge Jewish soldiers had volunteered to ered naval ships g^oeo *-
One father was seeking to I whether that was svhat he stand guard, do kitchen PO1 i c e i sde ^rar- prwaniy win j"
take on the responsibility of two [wanted, the oldest son nodded work and all other necessary tasks i the fleet la "on"r'*'*'*"*"'
of his wife's children by a for- his head and said he would a-! on the holiday. defern ay.
mer marriage, and announced I gree to sign any papers to that
to the court that she had just i effect.
Slven birth and couldn't appear
) testify. A young Navy enlisted man
Some of the tots brought be- and his attractive wife brought
fore Judge Guthrie F- Crowe a cute, dark-haired babe-in-
smiled, some fidgeted, but one'arms before the Judge and told
little Jamaican boy took the how they had gone to Costa Ri-
whole matter so seriously he ca to adopt him. The couple said
solemnly raised his right hand they reside at Coco Slito andi
when his new parents were;were financially able to support
being sworn In, and kept it the child, and give him all
there until the oath was admin- rights as their true heir,
istered. ] The lack of a medical exam-
A husky master sergeant who inatlon of a little boy figured in
Is stationed at Ft. Kobbe but one of the cases. The prospec-
ltves in Coco Slito became the'tlve parents (the husband Is a
proud father of two Chinese;local-rate Army employe at
boys, his wife's children by a .Clayton) told the court that
former marriage. He also petl-lthey were going to be charged
tloned that they get his surname *15 by Coco Solo Hospital, forl
as their own. !the examination required by
The older of the two boys, law in adoption cases. Instead!
handsome child of about seven they went into Panama to have
listened intently to the Judge a doctbr make up the certificate
Navy To Get First A-Cruiser In Three Years
holding tightly on to the ser-
geant's hand. Afterwards as he

READ THE ADS
ffEMEAIKR
NEEDY
They were informed in court
that a certificate from Panama
could not be accepted.
Arrangements were then made
for the examination to be se-
cured by the Army. Doctors of!
the Armed Forces, the Judge i
said, could perform this service!
for emplyoes, and'the examina-;
tion would then be valid
One mother, who asked to a-'
dopt her sitter's child, was sc
nervous she raised her left
hand when being sworn. She
.quickly switched with- an em-
'barrsssed smile. The pretty.
curly-haired blond youngster in
a perky white pinafore seemed
i unconcerned by it all. She as
i awarded the child's custody.
Funds to start work on the re- the administration expects to spend
volutionary new man o' war will an extra 200 million dollars for
be sought in the 35,500,000.000 de- foreign sid next year.
fense budget which the admihls-1
tration will present to Congress
next month.
Defense secretary Chsrles E. WU-
sin confirmed yesterday that the
budget calls for s $1,000,000,000 in-
crease over the current rate of de-
fense sty ding.
The budget also will provide for ment pj,M to spend 1 billion dol-
Thls, plus th. 1 billion ind.-
fease spending, may put a ser-
eos crimp In congressional hopes
for an election-year tax cut.
Wilson, who said most of the ex-
tra ironey will go to the Air
Force, said the Defense Depart
To be used in addition to the
hundreds of smaller posters now
seen all over the Canal Zone, the
big posters will be purchased
from the National Safety council
by the Panama Canal Safety
figures for this work. But he said Branch and will be changed each
It also would Include s speed-up month.
of development work on an atomic-
powered airplane
He also said the present mili-
tary manpower ceiling of 2,859,-
90 will be Increased in the next
fiscal year to 2,9911,900 to eive the
variew services greater flexibili-
ty in handling th?ir missions.
Wilsin attributed the increa s c d the Balboa Heights
defense spending chiefly to increas-,tion Building.
ed costs of labor, material and the
Bids for furnishing and install-
ing the seven large metal siga
boards on which the safety post-
ers will be installed, are now
being advertised by the Panama
Canal Company. The bids will be
opened at 10 Friday morning in
Administra-
He said the missile
at his hour-long news conference,'Pier 18 entrance of Balboa; the
program u/ilson said "more emphasis" will, entrance to the pier area in Cris-
I will include missiles, often descrlb- ^ ,iaeed on the development of'tobal; entrances to the Pedro
|ed as the "ultimate weapon. ballistic missiles which would be. Miguel Miraflores and Gatun
stepped-up development.and pro-lsr, in fiscal. 1957 on the develop- development of 'new eapons. Positions chosen for the I
a M.0mu! increaseTn^h strirt menl *U d Discussing/missiles development Ution of the i w sign boarda
manpower ceilings imposed upon
the military last year.
Wilon, In outlining, the buda-
2L"iJ ZZliZ^ZeuZr,4^ Such a missile, when perfected;;be" o7"s7eeding'rh'roh'pace Locks'smmI'a site on Gaillard
f^di^JSS L? ^oTfar .- iC0Uld "P" <*"" raf"r of at distances up to 5000 miles. Highway near the Aids to isaviga-
ISf- T.-JT .!fnf .kin imtnuteaand wreak devastation on wi|son reflued ^ specui,te on tion Building in Gamboa and a
' Ian enemy target. whethei the United States is ahead site on the Bolivar Highway out-
er behind Russia in Vv*l Wilson said the department plans 0f tne ballistic missiles, against commissary warehouse area,
to increaae its work on the devel- w|)ich the,, jS now no known de
opment of an atomic-powered sur fen4e
face ship of cruiser size. ______^_
He said it would have guided n as
missile capabilities. JU(Jge KulCS MGll
His cryptic statement foreshad-
ows a revolution in naval strategy
as great sa that which occurred
when navies shifted from wind to
coal for power.
Wilsesv also said soase ef tat
increased fends woeM be ased
to speed work on the develop-
ment of the nation's first atomic-
powered airplane.
He disclosed officially that de-
fense spending will run about V>'i
billion dollars in the fiscal year be-
fwinning next July 1, on about 1 bil-
lon dollars more in the current fis-
cal year. The size of the increase
The secretory gave no spending
1956 Designated
As 'Wilson Year'
May See Children
Comet Jet Airliner
May Tour U. S.,
South America
The yesr 1956
This is the holiday season.
Judge Guthrie F. Crowe yesler-; .___._..
day told a battling couple in the MONTREAL. Dec. 21 (UPl-PV
Cnstqbai Division of the U. S. tot John Cunningham flew Brit
which marks the District Court, "If a man wants ains Comet I I.jetliner here toda
ca year, ine site n me increase iw jer wjo, uitn n..o --------- ------,.._- ------ ZZH tm tlu. n.xt t/t-laict Inn f > inhav
previously was lesked' to report- 100th anniversary of. the birth, o see hi, children he should on the "e^W ito. of a lob*
a White House
WINSOME little Miriam Qulntanar, one of 40 girl guests at a
Christmas party sponsored by the Fort Clayton Officers Wlve's
Club this week, concentrates on opening one of her presents
here. Miriam and her 39 friend* from the Bella Vista Orphan-
age had a Christmas dinner at the Fort Clayton Officers' Club,
and Santa Claus presented them all with another gift not to be
opened until Dec. 25.
(VS. Army Photo)
ers following
briefing.
Wilson also told a news confer-
ence the administration will ask-
Congiess for 35 billion dollars in
new appropriations for fiscal 1997.
aa Increase of 2 billion dollsrs over
this year.
Not all funds provided by Con
Woodrow Wilson. 28th President of have the opportunity to do so." fjrdJing tost flight and aidj
the united States, has been deslg- The udge was ruling on a case fantast,i t*raw ahonh
n.ted Woodrow Wilsor. .-,*h.ch .volved a weman who re. '"^^^'^b^ywe] ^^
nial Year in the Canal Zone, ac- fused to give her former husband
cording to a proclamation issued:permission to vlst their two chil-
by Governor J S. Seybold dren The man has now become
Residents of the Csnal Zone1 her brother-inlsw. having recent-
are urged to Join in the observ-.ly married her sister
anee honoring the former Presi Permitting i mil to see
gress for a given year art' spent dent who during his tenure of of own children the judge l
m that period ifice. waa closely connected with hiS neural due despite whatev-, ha I" h
Earlier Secretory of State John j the completion/inauguration and er altercations the couple *yl**Vonw*
Footer Dulles told reporters that early operation of the *'
the 500 m ph.. 0-passenger^kJM
would tour tht United States Jg9
South America next year becauea
"Americans havent seen eeetj)W
his of it '
own children, the judge ruled was|. "Maybe this one will give them
fice, waa closely connected with his n-aural due, despite whatav- "

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a lanar wfar n Mi la atriata* caalHsaaa.
, a.a_>) _a_M_a______l a__aja_aj- -.a.ill*-. laa> #>*___ e___k__ta (_a ______-
"a^faT^raVV anaS **_ # VvpfMBf-PUlTT >T_,f_-W_,Wa B V*/taaraTaW
^B Mian tfm tea daw.
Me mail box
W/D* SCREEN
Sir:
*- In answer to "Help the Poor MM.," the following conflden-
____.Mai infonaMttion has been uncovered.
["he ttry authorities have planned to erect a large screen
md the Canal Zone In order that no TV waves trom the
Armad force* TV station escape Into the Republic of Panama.
Tifia Meen will serve a two-fold purpose. It will keep the
Canal Zana TV waves out of Panama and also will protect the
Canal Zona from the Panama TV waves. It is expected that a
light chara will be made to Panama for this service.
E-. The Electronics Kid.
Labor News
And
Comment
SOSA SAUCER
Sir:
/
Veil, here once again Is a report to add to the sightings of
How-secluded unidentified objects file. This sighting was
by a .small group in front of the Balboa Service Center
r. 10 _t 1:08 In the morning.
ie object that was under surveillance is of the ring type
aa been sighted as well as labeled and catalogued through
is parts of the world as the ring.
his object was about the size of the circular park In front
i Service Center. The park is about 30 to SO yards in dla-
_. The cross-sectional view of the object was about the same
Is thai of a good-sized water main, which is about 60 to 80
is in diameter.
lie object, or ring as we shall call It. was first seen ap-
hlng Sota Hill from the Pier 18 aide at a fairly rapid rate
sed. Tne ring stopped about 50 yards from the top of Sosa
,nd hovered for a period of 20 minute,
lie result? It disappeared. Qu pasa?
An Interested QbstTVtT,
Mr:
!
UNFRIENDS WANTED
Hsf
I wonder 11 you could or would put me in touch with some-
jn Panama to whom I could write as a Pen Friend, either
male or female, age anywhere between 18 and 80.
I may cay I understand a little Spanish, but am in no way
flient in it, as it is not very often spoken here.
I will guarantee to answer all letters, and will be pleased to
send views of Vancouver Island (where I live) to anyone who
will write to me.
I am not very greatly Interested In sports, unless It is yachts
d model building. I have a 42ft, power cruiser, and lot* of
parr time.
*' I am a Canadian citizen, sailed through the Panama Canal
In 1050. and liked what I saw, and may someday return to .stay.
I am not seeking anything but friendship.
Jot. A. Sewell,
302 Skinner Street,
Victoria. B.C.,
. -......,.__._ Canada.
y VICTOR RIISIL
For some two months now a ma-
jor labor war, costing well over
8200,800,000, has been nprve-rack-
ing 40 communities, alerting state
police and unleashing pickets on
a front from Wall Street itself
to the midwest. Yet, outside of the
struck cities, the public has paid
it little attention, though the issues
are crucial.
For weeks now 53,000 workers
have struck the Westinghouse Elec-
tric Corp., makers of everything
from broilers to stomic motors
to mighty turbines. These strikers
have been losing about $1,000,000
a day in wages. Executives, en-
gineers and scientists have had
their pay slashed in hslf by the
company for the duration.
_,"__company itself lost about
1130,000,000 in production during
the first 60 days of strikewhich
M7kja?lafiM< by J,m Carey'
AFL-CIO International Union of
Electrical Workers, but in part
top, by the Sovieteering indepen-
dent United Electrical Workers
Carey leads 44,000 strikers. The
other 11,000 are spoken for by a
veteran pro-Communist, Jim Mat-
les, frequently accused before Con-
gressionsl committees of being one
of the top Communist labor func-
tionaries in the nation.
When both sides lose heavily in
a long strike, the realists know
that tnere are behind-the scenes
reasons for the costly showdown
reasons which don't crop up in
the running exchanges oetween
company and union. As business
circies see it, one of the issues in
this $200,000,000 strike is whether
or not a major company must
shut down production and refrain
from recruiting non-strikers when
a union throw picket lines arouno
its piant.
Westinghouse Corp. refused to
shut.the gates of its plants. Thus
Westinghouse becsme thejirst ma-
jor mass industry company to at-
tempt Co dely A*_-CU> union pico
et unes in many years, 'mere
nave oeen smaner
"Just Whot We Needed-Money!"
f^e Washington
Merry-Go-Round
t DWalW PMWtON

WASHINGTON-One of the most
HHmite ,,,d,en re'"e, in the
one*o?iti,nState'^11.8 *"* n~
""e or two very
er maintained an office in (he Bank
JLAmer" buil"in, but used of-
fice number 607 in the building as
a mailing address," '-
one or two very hieh nerVon,' l..-li "" """ress, the congres-
tJie United Sutes' "J?_ h h? ..m" npo2 "tf""*. This, he
wouldn't. W,h he aJ_ WM tte ^ess of Thomas
lkm-ir. NCoUe M,Uxa- * mil-
lionaire Romanian industrialist
.-- industrialist
r?Pii?. 5 ?ftner of Hermann
Goeruigs brother and once gave
A?,6'!?' l0. Communist Premie?
Ana Pauker. but who hired Vice
President Nixon's law firm and
?. n t " S ,lw Part"er. Thom-
",.Bew'fy. secretary of his corpo-
ra ion. After that his troubles for
a urae seemed to vanish.
In rLS* Speal bU1 introduced
in Congress by Nixon's close friend
congressman Pat Hillings of Cali-
hVr D'r,mjuin* mm to sUy In
the United States.
c V? *"" ncver Passed, however.
Suddenly Congressman Francis
Bewley.
Bewley was Nhton's jaw part-/:
ner. Though Nixon claimed he hid/
severed relations with his law
ilr.m.i.Ule. B,nk ** America build-
ing directory as late as 1952 show-
ed Senator Nixon, Thomas Bew-
ey and Western Tube occupying
the same offices-Rooms 607, 608
jnd 609. The Whittier phone book
for 1952 also showed them having
the same phone numbers.
QUICKIE TAX WRITE OFF .
Nixon went much further. He
igned a letter dated Sept. 14,
Walter (D ^TrnUrvened.^top 51; M',nl> "***> &
'"P I fense production administrator ask-
ing him to grant a quick tax write-
ped the bill and has now made
thorough probe of the entire Ma-
laxa situation.
The story behind Malaxa and his
many moves to pull wires in high-
up political places is probably the
most amazing of any refugee en-
tering this country.
IN JUDITH COPLON'S PURSE
Where The Water Falls
By PETER EDS0N
t -
I^wcuWUke^aa amendment toj particular parts of a watershed
nave tried to operate one struck has issued new orders that i
piantout no national corporation ,mall flood-control projects,
nas attempted a baca to worn
movement in decades.
Westinghouse has now. There
nai oeeu violence. A umon oui-
tiai. tar was uiowu up. cao,e
nave been au-etcueu auisja Math
ates. uuip,u>e uunieu aun one
A4i'tw*y II..L- ueen atuuetj. n poie
Was iulni.au uiiuu*ii Upe.,ia-
,***' '*ea*A' ve iuu uieu
;>'Cj Utkt.at.UV.-U.
share Jte^wSFffiZlte l^ Hop^Aiken Act to put this into development, the local coTZTe
he iimiNi .Li V.i i!. ef,ecl' Th,t I,nt ltely nw. This!is down to 10 percent. But the
ficlarie, ^ **** j8'1 Philosophy of the Eisen- average is close to 50 per cent
. ( '.'(- - -
REPORTER

Sir:
Some mea have gone back, to
wur* in auine-tpnnij. jiiii carey
nas aptMtaieu to toe i.nue House-
ami ut-',.i.ttfiifjae*ffas remaiiicu
ueuu-ai, as u sasu it wouu iu au
uui uauouai euiei'tenciea.
Being an oW-Hmer in the Zone, I was very Interested In the
recsnt oongreaaional hearings. I attended them, and read all
the printed matter on the subject; v
One thin? Or should I sav one person, Impressed me at tn
hearings. I refer tto. the reporter. How one man could hold up
for days as he did is beyond me. I still can't see why his fingers
didn't get numb working at that shorthand machine as long
as he did.
1 weuld like to alve a big aalute to Leo Harrington for the
wonderful Job he did. I hope some day to meet him, and tell
him personally what a .great Job he did. '
sirs. G.H.D.
CHICKEN FEED
Sir: '
As an itinerant on the Canal Zone (three years, that is*
many things have mystlf'.ed me. Latest question Is, whojn the
Army aU the 40 sacks of chicken feed I saw being unloaded from
the Army transport Peterson at pier 18 Nov. 35. Or will this
ilcken feed make up the Chrlstma* menu for the soldiers?
yusf Curious.
ThUu the pattern of industry't.
I'VoiatiMii... iw iu. o.,,,., uy utuiK.
Mi.j. , u, auiaUie*' 1.0,.,,>,.-
ici awuu ui aiiu uccu ui,,, umtmf
et nuc, ..UW W iiVe a li.aju.
u,l"""" lakui on a luajuv 4--
Ul/l MWIU) rfllll 0.v>, UuV At Ult.
eiAOt men wuu nuite up ule cxec-
".. ,t- t,UUIlUH,t OA l.,f Utr> new
WAV.
COMPAA panamea
DE TABACO, S. A.
v takf a pleasure in announcing payment o
its annual dividend of 7.1/2% on its Pre*
ferred Stock, corresponding to the last
semester of 1955.

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
if the corporation wins, it will
** * >lliUtu UtC U.u.lltlll At
;aSMaui4 w p.i.et une au^
-UAVU-,C>AA> iu.tUUt IHaillS Uut-
-.1* A etilAtt.. OUUI a nctoiy Wu,
....~>t waicy tuiijiuciaoiy uij,ut.
...J o.vu uii.u.i. it la iiut n.eiy uta,
ae Win ain.iuti meekiy.
lieu ui wiui ulia auundown i.
the u.uC Ol Ule tJ.li,la,i; j 114.1.
.O p.Cpaltl lilt! Wy AIM' sttuam-
..ilt y. wautuw.1tviutu aolue uavt.
aCa(>awU to * AutMumtiUii nun-
uut (AUUitAilK ule buiuii, ui Mrult.
t-iicaaji tut* .>un ia caueu tuvj
ui ''AutvulauUU atAAMC. it>Ut.io
a", \> eat.nviiuuoe ut.0an atuu^-
u.m the unit, aim llli/...i useu uj
iu tiup.ujcj. incie ia some uio-
tyuif V+iit vrneuiei u.e cuiuuuuy at-
vtiany uiu, 111' just wauteu m ut
itlVutid p.wtuie taiOeirta to |iiKiu>-
kiauii tta |>euti>e ail work.
Carey sprang at this, charging
ficiaries.
la the past, Corps of Engineers
hss borne the whole cost.
The change in policy will be of
interest to everyone who wants
the government to do something
about a crick that goes on a ram-
page.
The plan follows policy set
for the Department of Agriculture's
Soil Conservation Service under
the Hope-Aiken small watershed
act of 1954.
It indicates that after years of
bureaucratic red tape, the federal
government has at last made a
small start toward getting a uni-
fied water policy.
per cent
hower administration. It believes! The alternative to the SCS pan
in larger local participation for all is to get Congress to pass a special
public works. I appropriation to have Corps of
This is the way the Hope-Aiken Engineers handle a project.
Act works now:- Army Engineers' now have only
Department of Agriculture Soil. two projects where local costs may
Conservation Service is authorized| be assessed. These are the Salt
to receive application from local I Creek-Wahoo and the Gering-Mit-
watershed organizations for up- chell developments in eastern Ne-
suream flood control and reservoir, braska. Local costs on parts of the
development. :ialt Creak papject have been set
SCS surveys the b. a? "11 per cent. They're still umler
mines first if benefits would ex- negotiation on Gering-Mitchell.
eeed costs. Then it determines .how' For the future, however, local
much of the cost can be born by costs will be assessed on all
much of the cost can be borne by projects under 5000 acre-feet. A
local beneficiaries. SCS next makes I typical reservoir would cover 500
When the second annual Water- an agreement with them on this acresabout three-fourths of a
square milewith 10 feet of water.
Its costs would be between $250,000
Washington a few days ago, there Congress. If Congress doesn't turn
was one principal bellyache. it down in 60 days, the project
Thst concerned tod much variad stands approved. Local authorities
ation in assessing the local cost can then let contracts, after rais-
ins their bare of the costs.
Tldate, 450 of these applica-
tions bave been received from
When Judith Copln was arrest-
ed by the FBI for delivering pa-
pers to a Russian United Nations
representative, in her purse was
found a secret central intelligence
report on Malaxa from CIA as-
sistant director Alan R. McCrack'
en to D. M. Ladd, assistant di-
rector of the FBI.
The memo was made part of
the Judith Copln Court record and
is therefore privileged, It gives a
detailed account of the way Ma-
off to Malaxa's firm. This letter is
a matter of official record and I
have obtained a photostat copy.
One reason for the cooled rela-
tions between Nixon and Senator
Knowland was the fact that Nix-
on got his colleague Knowland to
sign the letter, too, asking for the
tsx write-off, a letter written on
Nixon's own committee stationery.
Knowland had no idea of the
Communist-Naxi background of the
L' Romanian refugee for whom he
intervened to get a tax write-off
worth several millions dollars.
In other words, Malaxa, the for-
mer partner of Hermann Goerlng
and former trade delegate of a
Communist government, wanted to
laxa had pushed ahead in Ro- 5u"dJ1JL'. inerS,s by borrowinl
share.
Downstream city folk gat their
flood-prevention works from Army
Engineers free. Upstream farmers \ drainage districts and watershed
who got their work done by Soil1 associations in 42 states. One nun-
Conservation Service had to pay a'dred and twenty-three have been
share of the costs. And .this share approved. SCS will have 25 work
varied from 15 to 80 per cent of
the total, they complained.
In the backs of their minds, of
and $500,000.
Estimates have been made that
there are some 1600 up-stream
flood prevention and conservation
projects that could be developed.
Thats a 100-year job. The total
cost might be 25 to 30 billion
plans ready for submission to Con
gress in Jsnuary. Another 25 will
be ready before Congress adjourns.
dollars.
This is, of course, prohibitive.
But it gives an idea of what's
ahead if Congress should decide to
go into this thing in s big way.
and put the full cost on the good
old U.S. taxpayer.
WalterWinchelllnNewYorK
secret of good writing is rewriting.
So he re-wrota it and named it
"The Matchmaker.'' The Big
Street's latest smash laugh-riot.. .
w Ruth Gordon, who lights up that
thai lue luiutiuuy wa wepai'in* I hit, also won the Candor Trophy.
to automate iu piaiiui uu siasu'
wage* anu jooa. carey uemairaeo
wimen guiautecs Ulat no joos
wotuu oe lost, ine company cuun-
tereu witn a oeuiano lor a live-
year contract, carey s union and
ine Unueu aiectricai Worser saia
A
BROADWAY STAGE DOOR I ment, he Is paUent with people,
honest, and he doesn't play
"The Merchant of Yonkers" was games. To this day, I stand in his
a quick flop several seaons ago. I presence' ... Success doesn't elim-
Thornton Wilder proved another mate insecurity. Jack Webb told
---------' mJ rtnnA '*>il>n<> at vmnrilinn Sail nt PfU rtt,"#r ''fVAftltnfl
m'
aid, in effect,
Confessed she's 60. (Looks 20 years
younger)... The Music Hall's
Yule show is always a treat. Merry
as Jingle Bells . "Janus"
(starring Margaret Sulla van) has
the added distinction of making an
Income-tax collector seem amusing
... H. Clurman, Director of "Pipe
Dream." told Cue Mag: "Judy
Tyler is a supremely confident girl
an interviewer: "Nothing is for
ever, particularly on teevee. I am
guilty of being in too many tele-
pictures. I feel I am wearing out
my welcome." (That's why they
say: "Save Your Money. Some-
day It'll Save You")... Talk about
admissions: Anita Ekberg told a
newsman that she indulges in nood
swimming in Sweden. (Yumpin'
Yimlnee!) .. A movie mag letter-
writer inquires: "What is the exact
Susan Hayward and Red Barry?"
The mag answered:" Neighborly."
(As, we presume, in Love Thy-
2ssa^uaT&arthe lUnl^: nd" W ms to have been easy!Neighbor) ... The Power of Yup:
Booster: "If you arc going to por-
tray love and be convincing, you
have to fall in love alittle"...
Have you whirled Patricia Scot's
disc.'* "So Many Beautiful Men"?
... A Bouncing Beauty ... We
still can't get over the oddity of
the only two $64,000 contesUnU to
go all the way The gal is a fight ex-
mania by bribery of this regime or
that, how he played balf with eith-
er Communist or Nazis.
"During 1927," stated the CIA
report, "Malaxa began his collab-
oration with the Nazi regime in
Germany. He estsbiished close re-
relations with German industrial-
ists, including Albert Goering,
brother of Hermann Goering.
Malaxa gave Goering an interest
in all his companies, including the
Resitza Iron and Steel Works.
"At about the same time sub-
ject (Malaxa) began to subsidize
the Tomanian Iron Guard, a Fas-
cist organization.
"After the coup d'eUt of Aug. 25,
1955," continued the CIA re-
port, "Malaxa attempted to leave
Romania< but was unable to se-
cure a passport. Within a short
time, however, he' had establish-
ed good relations with the Ro-
manian Communists and the So-
viet authorities. He secured the re-
turn of three of his factories, and
was given additional compensation
amounting to half a million do!
lars for the profits which he could
nave' made during the preceding
three years had these factories
been under his control."
The report also told how Malaxa
came to the United States origi-
nally as part of a Communist
trade mission. He was the only
industrialist whom the Communists
favored by returning his property.
HELPED BY NIXON

Once in the United Stiles, Mal-
axa got the support of a man who
had made his reputation fighting
CommunistsRichard M. Nixon,
then senator from California. Mal-
axa made Nixon's law partner sec-
retary of the Western Tube Corp.,
a wholly-owned Malaxa corpora-
building a plant near Whittier,
Calif., Nixon's home town. This
was in 1951.
Last monthfour years later-
Congressman Walter sent an in-
vestigator, William Wheeler, toi
Whittier to report on the prog-
ress made by the Western Tube |
Company since its incorporation
in 1951. He reported that no build-
ing had been built and a concrete
foundation had been removed.
"Construction of the factory was
Credicated on the approval of a
an from the RFC of approxi-
mately $30,000,000," Wheeler re-
ported. "The loan was refused.
"Harold Lutz, Bank of America,'
$30,000,000 from Uncle Sam, get-
ting a Ux write-off from Uncle
Sam, and he used the prestige
of the Nixon law firm to help him
do it.
He did not succeed. It will be
interesting to see whether he is
readmitted to the United States
and for how long.
art TkA man I. h.xWLu. < naroio luiz, nan* of America,
LITTLE LIFESAVER Meet
the "Reserve Midget," a 17-
ounce, balloon-like resuscitator
and anesthesia machine. It was
developed in Cleveland, Ohio,
where it has been used in mora
than 3500 operations. Squeezing
the bag forces an anesthetic, or
pure oxygen, into the patient's
lungs. Dr. Robert A. Hingson
of Western Reserve University's
School of MeaUcine conceived
the idea for the portable ma-
chine, used in minor or enter
I gency operations, or for revlv
' Ing drowning or suffocating vic-
[ tims. It can also be used in the
home as a resuscitator by some
heart patients.
fering to International Knowledge:
"European women aren't so nerv-
ous about girdles" ... Variety
noted that Shelley Winters was hail-
ed by the Times critic for her su-
performance in "Hatful of Rain"
sutus of the friendship between1 m th **me edition that the film
oracle was unkind to the hottest
Winters ... The Lunts' secret of
artistry is hard work. They often
start rehearsing a play ten months
before opening night.
S
pickets into Wall Street to parade
before the company offices and
those of a brokerage house .one
The late Robert E. Sherwood was
for her. My problem is to make her Gary Cooper's 80 movies grossed
*""> '""Imore nervous." (Hissss!) ... Bur-1 over $250 million.
' tk. .mmn ^nrnWH hv .nHlnir leak is banned in Our Town but: ,--------
8 you can get strip-teasers in "Silk; Movie star Rpsanna PodesU,s!defiinedJ,f.b?orae1" dramatist. He
Stockings," "Fanny" and "Damn communique: "The bosoms in it- JL"*erea;nu ""lP'ay when he was
Yankees" .. The Glamour of Stsr-I aly were three years ago. Now the!?0 .Some authors have golden

I
yS rffirrTitaTwaan'i*^ tired of thts"."TheVubTil,yPewr..ter,!t.'''0 Timt l0 S*r"
of whose officers ghouse,,_ ._ .,.._ ^ Am- V,.* *.. must understand new actresses are I *e,nts cucked * tv
JEWELRY
rtirartor le* in "Di,ry of Anne Frank," rises
TWt .'the Ss KM 000-a-dav strike ' 9 m l* high-school, goes
roEoV vTrtuaTu^O*lb!-the*; to homework and then to
nation, though it miy fct prece- "> neaire. _____
d^wns'Vw/eatfiVKl D-* worry about Av. Gardner,
business next year.

folks. Her contract brings her $200.-
000 per year foe the next four.
t aaaWat'ai atott asa Vial
Then she's eligible for her studio's
generous pension . What kind Of
experience Is essential for being a
successful playwriglst? Well, Ten
nessee Williams was an ajevator
operator, waiter, teletypist, restau-
rant cashier and movie usher be-
diffarent in Italy. They have
changed. They want to be actresses
If beautiful, a good bust is better."
(Way Better) ... One of Shirley
MacLaine's routines incudes 55 con-
secutive ballet spins . Motion
Picture Mag includes Sinatra's la-
ment to S. Davis, jr:, after the split
from Ava: "Sam, I've got prob-
lems. Baby. But we'll work them
out. That's what happens when you
get hung on a chick" ... As the old
crack: "Love is what makes the
world go round-with that pained
(Continued on Page 7)
ZENITH RADIOS
A VERY APPROPRIATE AND APPRECIATED
GIFT THAT WILL OUTWEAR MANY SEASON'S
CRAWFORD AGENCIES
(Home of Quality Merchandise)
")" St. No. 13-A-30 Tlvoll Ave.
Tel. 2-2386 2-2142 2-3285
OPEN TILL 9 P.M. UNTIL XMAS
MVg<-g4-aa-
fore The Big Break ... Never I expression" ... Broadway: Where
Give Up. Kids: A film producer you know they appreciate your tal-
onee brushed Shelley Winters with: ent when they try to Imitate it.'
"You're not photogenic. You canj --------
act. Your voice is bad" . Then Only the poor rich people In
there's "The Fsther." which was a "
large flap several seaons ago. But
an actress in it caught Hollywood's
attention: Grace Kelly . Jaye P.
Morgan's platter of "Not One Good-
bye" sounds mighty jukeable
. . One supreme privilege of being
a backer of a Broadway show: TheiPsycnistnc
producer allows you to BUY first-cured him
night seats!
Hollywood now hsve swimming'
pools. The rich-rich (like the Dick!
Powells) hsve their own private
coming "Giant" film. .The price
of success: After Brando clicked
the emotional turmoil gave him
headaches whim lasted four days,
therapy, he says,
.Love-letter from the
"TREND" I
CH
Ml
/
Shirley Booth Show: "We a 11
-t. ,. k"w.wh,t '*rge hand you have.
The ultimate in tributes: Joan had in making this olav the'
Crawford's salute to ex-MGM Boss smash hit It i, |
L. B. Mayar: He has great judg- Audrey Hepburn's Jtyebrow-'
*r
TABADar* FATRBN
SWEDISH CBYSTAI. BY "BODA'
WE ARE PLEASED TO PRESENT
TO YOU THIS SUPERB CHINA
"Of FINEST QUALITY AND IN
MOOERN DESIGNS 99-pe. SETS
Shaw% S. A.
PANAMA
14. TivAli A.caaa
COLON I
4, *ra*t Stiaa*


WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER W, 1ISV
THK PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
Government To Ask Congress
For New Foreign Aid Money
WASHINGTON, Dec. 21 (UP) -
The ttuuuuikuauuU WW tsK COD-
fc' cdS HM" t;i uu.toil uuwm d in
new foreign a i u nppiU|ii.iOiu
DcaI >t >.:Uul Wm OUO&t jltllltl SpellU-
ui* oniy uo irtiuiuii uuuais o-cit-
l-.y 01 iuaie joiiu roster i/Uues
MmI iuUuj.
^mies Miid the abarply-increas-
CU Jtjj^iUfii.iiuu 10 un.ui.u iu a>>'
auie uu
llC.lli 10 Ulu .CuUilllj HH1LO O.Ci
lue lOUg puU anu 10 Ousei tvu-
Sio kioxmji cuauen^e 10 U. a.
It'duiiauip ui uie iuiuuie anu t*t
swa u
ua uld the appropriations re-
tjutol Wuulu UlCluue aouui. o uu-
lion uouars lor limitary aiu anu
aoutli Xtt unnon uuudid lu" an
i acceieraiea economic aid p r o-
' |'4 iue secretary act tht aid spend -
. fc^ ukure iur uie new iooi iac**
year biarung next July 1 at a-
Uuul k4, curren-, ouuay 01 min,iA)u,um
he warneu Uit a i u ayeuuing
, lnust cuumiue at aooUt tiicacu.
leven ior tome nie.
bee Icing to expiani conflicting
tejiuns wm.cn have uwcileu uu a
* coiigresSiouai iiuor over uie aiu
piuram, uiuies ioiu a new cun-
li.-n.JCe uie culliUsiuil atena nw.il
lue tact uie government ueaia in
lluul appixj-i.atiuua anu tabu
j-iiiuni* uu.e.
ooiue tvuticMiUto leu a bipar-
tiaau Wnne aouae orituing i**i
WeeK W1U1 Uie Ulipicaoiua tiiat ule
new appropriation* request vmjuiu
oe auuui i.,iuO,uuj,Ouu. uu.iea aaiu
be regi-etteu Wnai ne uiuieu
tins nuaunuerstanuing.
v.oiiic irequeuuy appropri
ttx iiiuuey IU u.ouce,' ,H.tu-
lany lor military ueiu autu as
htiif, piauua auU laujto W U 1 t u
' ntuai be oruereu years aneau.
rue CMou >yeuuiilto i.*uie, uwe>-
ei, is Uie one uiai iwunut in ue-
iL.iniuriig lue Suite Ox uit uuuget-
xue utwuiaKers awropirateu
2 t urilio UUU4K ior i.t^u aiu
Ui.a jear. 'lue auniruibuauou Wl
lilfl-t M> Iffl y,*uu,t>v,lAA ue-
cause 11 uau luuius leav over from
pcviOua year mu, j*it 01 uie
ptuyoseu new aptuufr-iutuuns *u,
v,,a oe a^ent ui mtuie /utr.
x/uues Saiu nan ue pruyuaed
2vO UlullOU uO.iai sunuUl in-
citase woula go ior a tiexuue ec-
OuuiuiL am L-.ti^ianl' in uie *i
M, lne resi, ue aiu, wouiu
be UbCU U> tieait a s.uiuar iiulu
rjhfi Ul IOule tasi Wuere AUa-
*.*' naS H*t,jiea Uji IIS yiopaftau-
u orteniive.
xjuues aaiu It will be necessary
to aeu4>..|nKHif 4 piUlunr uoiiars
in nfljj muuary aiu appiufiia-
tions 'HB^ ly appropna>eu lunu aie neany
uepievao. Congress appropnau
omy 1 OUliafa uouars OK uiis pur-
pose last jftsar.
aiu "iig.
ooiiais more toau was Oupi
la., year and aoout 200 mmion
(tuoais more than congress vousu.
r>eien*e olficiais said the Vi
biuion nollars in leltover military
am Iliads available at the sun
oi Uie current uscal ydar last'
july tf expected to snrmlt to a-
buui 'a Diuion douars oy next
June 30. .
_,, faistuasing the ioreign a i a
rlan, Dulles quesuohett ine sm-
laif-ieerivy oi Kussias recent aid oi-
*Nler to underdeveloped nations.
He said he nopes sucn oiiers are
Lot to be used "as a trojan horse
id penetrate, ana then UKe over,
dependent countries."
He said the United States aids
inderdeveloped countries to pro-
mote their independence, "b u t
iaat jwi.
1* DuuuaiSoUars economic
Krfr- iTafct 10 million
there is likely to be a question as
to whether the Soviet really seeks
to promote the vigorous i n d e-
pendence o free nations.''
Music
NEW YORK -(UPj- More than
400 orchestras throughout the
world are honoring Jean Sibelius
this season. Mrs. Serge Kous-
sevitzky, honorary chairman of the
International Sibelius Festival, was
especially proud that many small
orchestras were reviving lesser
works which have disappeared
from the repertoires of the major
orchestras.
The mechanics of the plan to
salute the venerable composer as
he attained his 90th birthday (on
Dec. S) were handled by the Phila-
delphia Orchestra. Among co-
operating American orchestras, in
addition to the Philadelphia, were
the New York Philharmonic-Sym-
Kiony and the orchestras in
etroit, Cincinnati and Boston.
The Philadelphians invited the
Finnish conductor, Jussi Jalas, a
Sibelius son-in-law, to come over
and serve as a guest conductor.
He and Eugene Ormandy shared
the podium for the second concert
of the orchestra's Sibelius cycle
which featured the sixth symphony,
the violin concerto, and the tone
poems "En Saga" and "The Ocean-
ides."
The soloist for the concerto was
Anshel Brusilow of the Cleveland
Orchestra. In its observance, the
New York Philharmonic-Symphony
also featured the concerto, with
Ivry Gitlis, young Israeli violinist,
making his New York debut.
George Szell, music director of
the Cleveland Orchestra, was con-
ductinghe is making his annual
appearance with the orchestra as
guest conductor. The week before
the orchestra "had played the sec-
ond symphony, and the week
before that, Jalas led the Sym-
phony-of the Air in an all-Sibelius
program in Carnegie Hall.
New York's Little Orchestra
gave the world premiere of a new
children's opera Saturday "The
Tree That Found Christmas" with
music by George Kleinsinger and
books and lyrics by Joe Darion.
A big portion of New York's
musical Christmas was the Little
Orchestra's annual performance of
Berlioz's "L'Enfance du Christ."
This was' the fifth consecutive
Christmas season for the major
work which is little known in this
country.
The Metropolitan Opera grabbed
the famous Italian tenor Gianni
Poggi between South American and
Italian engagements, and inserted
him into its current season for one
guest appearanceas the duke in
Verdi's "Rigoletlo."
There was much enthusiasm or
the Met's "revised" production of
"Tosca," with Renata Tebaldi in
the title role, supported by Richard
Tucker, Leonard Warren, and with
Dimitri Mitropoulos conducting.
The first "Faust" of the season
was made memorable by Giuseppe
di Stefano's singing of Faust.
Halina Czerny-Stefanska. newest
of "behlnd-the-iron-curtain" artists
to make their'debuts in this coun-
try, played a Chopin and a Mozart
piano concerto in New Yerk. The
critics thought her Mozart was not
good but saw individuality and
much beauty in her Chopin.
She is from Poland, a descendant
of Karl Czerny who was a friend
of Beethoven and author of piano
exercises which still torment
would-be players.
BLUE RIBBON CHAMP Taking a drink Is the 204-pound
Hampshire which won the Grand Champion's blue ribbon for
barrows at Chicago's International Livestock show. Proudly wav-
ing his hat is owner George McGulre, 83, whose Hampshire farm
Is in Wisner, Neb. ^^
I
GIVE A
GIRARD PERREGAUX
Fine Walt he unce 1 791
AND
1VE
'ERFECTION
;^
&&$&
wter resist ^ _Q
totfAdtuled.-- ,
,* row. nettri.w'

? *.
PORRAS Plaza 5 de Mayo
PREPARE FOR HOLIDAY & CARNIVAL FUN
Learn and Pick Your Favorite Dances
BALLROOM DANCE PARADE
if LATIN DANCES v
Cha-Cha-Cha Mambo Merengue Guaracha
Rumba Pasodoble Samba Tango.
* AMERICAN DANCES *
Rock'n Roll Sluefoot Jitterbug Waltz Foxtrot
Charleston'- Peabody Onestep Polka La
Varsouvianna Viennese Waltz.
* NATIVE DANCES *
Tarnborito Cumbia*- Punto Pasillo.
* PARTY DANCES *
Cha-Cha Cho-Cho Caboose Raspa Bunny
Hop-Hokoy Pokey Paul Jones.
CLASSES FOR

Pre-Teens Teenagers Couples Class
& Private Lessons by Appointment ONLY
Call Balboa 2-4230 or Panama 3-1660
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No. 1 VIA ESPAA
Tel. 3-0383
George Lays Down Gauntlet
Faces Biggest Test Since 38
VIENNA, Ga Dec. 1 (UP)
Veteran Sen. Walter F. George
laid down the gauntlet yesterday
jfor his last big campaign scrap.
He almost certainly will face
young Herman Talmadge In his
toughest rote test since he boat-
ed both Talmadge's father and a
presidential "purge" in 1938.
"I will be a candidate for nom-
ination in the Democratic prima-
ry for the office of United States
senator next year," George an-
nounced at a brief press confer-
ence in his old office here.
"If my friends in Georgia de-
sire to return me to the Senate
next year, I hope it will be my
last term,'' be said.
Thus did George,' who will be
78 ext month but proclaims
himself robust aid ready, set
the stage for his most dramatic
race since 18 years age when
President Roosevelt put la a
personal appearance to try to
beat Mm.
All that is needed to make it
official is Talmadge's announce-
ment, that he will oppose George
in the. September primary.
Planning quietly since his term
as governor expired last January,
the 42-year-old son of Eugene Tal
madge is regarded as almost a
certainty to oppose George.
"I will have a statement for
the people of Georgia next
spring," Talmadge said when ho
heard of George's announcement.
, Sut it was- known Talmadge
had, been hoping George would
step down after 33 years, oat of
respect for both his age and his
talent for turning out the voters
when he gets dowr to bare-knuc-
kle, poli-ticking on his home
grounds.
As the man who suggested the
"summit" conference in Geneva
and piloted the critical Formosan
resolution through the Senate,
George has never enjoyed higher
prestige. But he said he now
ieels a vital responsiblity to wprlc
for relief of farmers and taxpay-
ers. After this is accomplished,
he said, he feels he will have
earned retirement at 84.
George said that a solid agri-
culture program and security
for farmers is as essential to
the nation's welfare as defense
spding and that it must be car-
ried through "regardless of
cost."
He said he had a "number of
things" in mind that would help
market farm products and con-
serve soil and water.
George is a former chairman of
the Senate Finance Committee
and still its ranking Democrat.
But he relinquished that post
when the Democrats regained con-
trol in the last Congress so he
could take the foreign relations
chairmanship at the request of
the Republican. administration.
George, speaking to reporetrs
and a few friends in his law of-
fice, recalled he had played a
part in introducing about 12 mil-
lion dt'.lars in tax bills to finance
"war, threats of war and the
Hoover depression." But If he is
elected to one more term, he
said, he hopes to play a key role
in legislation to revise taxes
downward.
Before he can get down to cam-
Eaigning, George added, It will be
Is duty to remain in Washington
at the second/ session of the 84th
Congress because tax and farm
relief and "the foreign affairs of
the country will require immedi-
ate attention."
Another term for George would
round out almost 40 years in the
Senate.
. i w- n
Help somebody to see not only the beauty
of Christmas but -hear it- -with a' hearing
air] an aid for every need and purse.
CRAWFORD AGENCIES
(Home of Quality Merchpndue)
"3" St. 13-A-30 Tivoli Ave. No. 18-20
Tel, .2-238A* 2-3266-9-4142
OPEN TUL t ML' trrWlLTrJtAS
, Ll t -at MT
Fatterm^PtiHip!
MUrrar* Ufe la Oiled with bruises, .
(Tell-wora steps and rags he.asea.
Repairs would late Ids home like new.
?. A. aasstnods. faot the riant elne! '
fF"

1
i
XONQU 1ST ADOR"
BY
\n.c 1 i |

DOXA
I .'; I .It- ,
......r>il*#ii|v >

A'VraYPLAT .....
WATERPROOF
WATCH" IN GOLD
'
.

i
"*-
4 svad !*>



Avenid Tivoli
.
T -CO
- i
i

*
k.
a wctnaf e#U
: ..'.. .
M
Few things are more precious to a woman
than her Sterling silver.., So .this. Christmas
gire her those pieces she needs to complete
to &*iiiEZrJ2?\
... those few remaining place settings.
iyjfa*re"vrjr mclty^|^'B3fbe"tlie "
one to start her iH QfTowle Wlnflssjl|
Let us show you the many lovely Towie
patterns, all solid silver, all designed ia
traditions of master craftsmanship,
all moderately
QaAa JoAtlkh ha th&
ChALimo $jift foh swsAif
3uif and 0tdl, a 3pp*M out^Qq/O^QAM
QaAa Jcudlkh to jjou! store
MBB^BBVBflBBsVSBlBM
SILVER CENTER
161 CENTRAL AVENUI,


.
PAGE FOUR
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AM
INDEPENDENT DAM NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1955
American Homes Will Use
$50 Million In Xmas Trees
*AMBHGTON (UP) Some
a retail value of $50,-
ristmai tree with
2. Fufi, symmetrical shape.
3. Limb strength adequate to
tree wiui support ornaments and lights.
e of the leading pro 4 Sufficient non-prickly foliage
Vui be dUplayed in;of a healthy green color.
M this year, accord- 5. Fragrant odor
ntrtmnt of Agricul- 6. Springy branches that can be
jpanmenv u. I Ued for shipment without break-
than 9 000,000 trees arc ling and regain their nape whenj
each vcar from Canada'. released,
oatl] ignifieant outside |
la Mai years, mail num- Tynes s
(tan brought in from ,,
Labrador and the1 While no one tree is best
bu" ,ihere are several species which
W cent of U. S. I conform closely to the depart
_atl at 21.500.000 ment's list of des.rable character
TSacvfom private land. istics.
fee b cut from federal,
, sad eoaMtjr property.
Plantations
l&ile the bu of the nation's
The balsam fir. found in central
and eastern . S. Christmas tree
markets, is the most commonly
used tree. Its short, fiat, dark
green needles are attached to op-
fcow in'a "natural positc sides of the tree limbs in a
^t UBdO arc cultivate feathcrllke arranf-ement.
^nuitonT About 100,000 The Douglas f.r's bUic-green or
riVMf o which are dark yellow-green ineedles, soft and
ZjffSL^- are now de- pliable-are at ached all the way
E .-------i._i- around the limb, giving it a Dusn-
ier, fuller appearance. This tree,
common in the west, is marketed
nationally.
Christinas tree planting.
. 6mm Ripanies are re-
fer pr*H*ion and dis-
ci Christmas trees. Their
ve contract with wood
s for tree delivery at
_ railroad siding,
iflpment to urban areas,
hi ire forwarded by whole-
ba fh various retail outlets,
iaaferr.se
etinrnoditien.
department which says
, to no bent all-around CbrUt-
, rfM species," lists the lollow-
eMrncU-ristics as the most
rabie'
Retention of needles, from
: cutting through .Christmas
JW- '
The black spruce, grown hi the
swampy areas of northern Minne-
sota, is a small, thickly-needled
tree usually selected for coloring.
Most of the colored trees seen on
,r the market are of this variety.
f other semi-perish There are a doxen other species
in Christmas tree production, some
of which have one or more un-
desirable characteristics. The
white spruce, for example, while
holding H needles well, gives off
a disagreeable odor. And all of the
five species of southern pine-lob-
lolly, longleuf, slash, pitch and
shortleaf have prickly cones.
IDE GLANCES
By Colbraith

^^
T. HN.V.I ft OB.
e. ii>7u *"< "
Mi**fur*n*. H It
'Do you notd any htJp?"
TERRT AND TBB MR ATE
Rr OEOKOE TUND
We are pleased to announce that we have
been appointed SERVEL REFRIGERATOR
.DISTRIBUTOR for Electric Compretaor
Refrigerators and Aircbrtditioners.
We are now equipped far Service
a well a Sale
CRAWFORD AGENCIES
"t" 8t. 13-A-S0 Tlvoli Ave. No. 18-20
Tela. 2-238A 2-32S5 2-2142
OPEN TILL TM. UNTIL *MA8
aixEi or
Bum Deal
f T. UAMLL*
FLOTA MERCANTE
GRANCOLOMBIANA, S. A.
ANNOUNCES
THE ARRIVAL OF THE
S.S. "KftlStEN TORM"
ON DECEMBER 21, 19$6 FROM CANADIAN PORTS.
GENERAL CARGO WILL BE ACCEPTED FOR
rtiV.MYGOO'NES&l
OUT AND HER BUDDIE*
Dinner Guest
1 EDGAR MARTI*
3H

%3ST, TV. V*A t^ UJCWMWi *CrR\ \S>
|>WM..iAR8L, I wowww
wet... nsJ uwcoo*6
vm wra^wikvkws was
CAPTA EAS1
Cine in Note
m> LESLIE TURNER
^Y I66ETH6
LETTER TM6V lluU
VOU WKITB TO
your non/un?
vsfcUK,eA*yiceRM.w
* WHERE 9 A TO if
UY TKMK! r* h\AO T
TOVAJMAMOYWWTIOIIIP
MM IOVEKHSAKP HIM
CN6Cl>*5)6 WAMKIB5
?UPORN PfPARTlWE
**-
BP

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rr COULP %* CLAIfcABD, OR YOUR FKIENP
WOUlP B OTWeP, AMP ALARM MRITWUI
*I5, THIS CERRMVO A.CCOWPIICE MAYRT
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WANTBP TO
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WHEN I fAlUJP
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Aie)HT,oPe BATOR
TWO-iMTV...TMO^
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H4URDDIO HOUSE
MAJUH HOOrU OLT Ol WA1
ail J. aV WULMMt
YOL> MEWORY 16 A C0BR8CT A
A PHOHB 00K.AA3OR/TWe
ACR06AT WHO MAD TOt-EN
MR". /HORRIMBY'S Af FECTIOJ6
WA6 KlLLtD VjMENl Mt -IPP6D
)M A 6LICK POT Ort TH6
TA6E -H6 COPS
4U5PeCTED SOMeBDDV
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AND HUNTED FOC
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6AD,TWI66/ M0RRi6Ey
f?AD IM VOUR MiriO Th^AT
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WOJPSB I FEBH. LOUy
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t^^Vil:



WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, IMS
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE PIT*
Bon 5037, ^4>
Social and \JlkerwAe
B, Staff.. &> t34> P<
neon
anama

MRS. FLO BERNARD, left, receives thegavel from^^ outgoing
resident, Mrs. Minnie Boyldn, at Monday's installation of of-
ficers for the Wilma Miles Navy Wives Club The ceremony
took olace at a dinner dance at the CPO Club, . Naval
Station, Rodman. -v \.
(Offieial U.S. Navy Pheto)
After dinner, Miss Claire Odgen,
beloved housemother for. the
home, introduced a few of her
girls, who gave some "specialty
numbers"some sang and others
recited poetry. The children's ta-
bles were removed, and the girls
sat in a semicircle in front of
the gift tables, loaded with inter-
estingly wrapped parcels. When
the lights were dimmed and ev-
eryone was singing "Silent Night,"
Santa Claus himself appeared,
Elayed heartily and convincingly
y Mr. George C. Anderson. San-
ta, with the assistance of Harry
Willis as Spanish interpreter, dis-
tributed presents among the chil-
dren, while the Rev. Jessee K.
Renew took pictures.
Cadet Adami Hem*
Far Holidays
Cadet Peter Adams, who .has
been attending The Valley Forge
Military Academy at Wayne,
Pennsylvania, flew -own Satur-
day to visit his parents. Colonel
and Mrs. John C. L. Adams, for
Christmas. Peter has won h i s
stars in studies for two past
terms of school, and also has
been promoted to temporary Ser-
Seant of Cadets. He will return
an. 2.
Mr. and Mrs. Piala
Have Houm Guests
Mr. and Mrs. James Plaia of
the Pacific Side have welcomed
home their son, Dean Plaia, now
a student at the Cranweli School
Lenox,-Mass., who will remain
through the holidays.
Dean was accompanied from
the States by his grandmother,
Mrs. James Dean, of Brooklyn,
Don't say, "I prefer my own
brand," when someone offers
you a clgaret. It is much more
gracious to say, "Thank you, but
I have my own right here."
It Is rarely more trouble to
make the gracious remark than-
the ungracious one.
warn
Roast Pork Loin Makes
Splendid Holiday Eating
y CAYNOR MADDOX
NEA Food and Markats Editor
------o
N. Y., who will remain with her
son-in-law and daughter for a win-
ter visit.
Mr. Caster's Mother
Here Per Visit
Mrs. George PDomm of Ridge-
wood, N. J., arrived yesterdsy
for a winter visit with her son
and daughter-in-law, Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Casler of Golf
Heights, and her four young
grandchildren.
David Mcllhtrmy
Hor For Christmas
Mr. David Mcllhenny arrived
yesterday from Houston, where
he attends Rice Institute, for a
holiday visit with his parents.
Mr. and Mrs. I. F. Mcllhenny of
Diablo.
(Continued on Pago 9))
HOT MONEY
NEW BRITAIN, Conn. (UP)
-r Thieves knew where to look for
the dough at the Glass Hat res-
taurant. They took $200 in cash
from a kitchen oven where pro-
prietor George Bialek had placed
a portion of the day's receipts.
PRESIDENT, FIRST LADY ENTERTAIN
AMBASSADOR AND MRS. ROBERTO ARIAS
The President and Mrs. Ricardo Arlas were hosts last eve-
nine fer a party at the Presidencia at which the guests or
honor were the Ambassador of Panama to Great Britain ana
Mrs. Roberto Aria* (Margot Fonteyn).
'
NECCHI
Fortign Eolations CevncH
Oivos Luncheon
For Ambassador Harrington
Panama's .foreign Relations
Council entertained today at a
luncheon honoring the United
States, Ambassador Julian F. Har-
ringtoaJthe affair wsspheki at
the Union Club. .
Bakers Announce
Birth Of Son
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Baker of
Houston, Tex.i announce the birth
of their first/child, a son, Frank
Joseph.
Mrs. Baker is the former Miss
Janet Willoe of Balboa. 'Both par-
ents are graduates of Balboa
High School. Mr. and Baker is
presently attending Houston Uni-
versity.
Maternal grandparents are Mr.
and Mrs. Frank T. Willoe of Bal-
boa; paternal grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. Jake Baker of
Gamboa. '
Mr. Aid Mrs. Gordon
Duo From Connecticut
Mr.! and Mrs. William A. Gor-
don, Jr., of Stanford, Conn., are
arriving today via the Panama
Une for avCSftstinas visit They
first came to the Isthmus as
SiuSsts of Mr. and Mrs. I. F. Mc-
henny of Diablo Heights, but
will stop at Hotel El Panama this
time.
Children Enjoy \
Towor Club Party
The Tower Club Christmas Par-
op Morris Hall for the children of
op Morris Hall for the ehildreno I
the Bella Vista Children's Home,
was felt to have been an unsual-
ly happy occasionlargely as the
result of the wholehearted parti-
cipation of the little girls them-
selves.
In addition to a very large turn-
out of members of the club, the
Right Rev. and Mrs. R. Heber
Gooden were able to attend.
The mood was sent while Tow-
er Club members and "las ninnas"
were queuing up for turkey din-
ner "with all the fixings" by the
arrival of Mr. Fred Gerhardt
with a large group of Barbershop
Quartet singers in excellent
voicethey rendered, to every-
one's enjoyment, many Christmas
carols and beautiful, old-fashioned
Christmas hymns.
R
H
O
D
A
THE MOST BEAUTIFUL
DRESSES
NIGHT DRESSES
COCKTAIL DRESSES
FINE COTTON DRESSES
EMBROIDERED DRESSES
* SHOES, by DeLiao, Jules
Schoen, Palizzio, etc.
ir LINGERIE, by Van Raalte.
Silvette, etc.
it HANDBAGS, by Elite, oto.
BRASSIERES,
by Exquisite Form
ir COSMETICS, by Charlo* of
the Ritz
ir COSTUME JEWELRY,
by Pandora
ir SWEATERS. (Italian)
by in Happiness
ir GIRDLES, by Materna-Line.
Swisttex
and many other article* all of the finest and
moat known in th* United Stats
WE HAVE A STORE SPECIALLY FOR Z0NIAN6
IN FRONT OF THE ANCN POST OFFICE
TEL. PANAMA 2-3121
Give af
Christmas Time
a NECCHI

Monthly
Standard, straight at'rtch treadle..........5.12
Standard, straight stitch, electric..........6.67
All purpose, portable, in aeroplano caso
with wonder whool...................10.07
All purpose, in household cabinet, treadle
with WONDER WHEEL...... .........12.78
All purpose, in Super-Deluxe cabinet,
electric, with WONDER WHEEL.........14.36

NO DOWN PAYMENT REQUIRED
NECCHI is th* only fully automatic sewing
machine; and th* only machine with th*
WONDER WHEEL.
Casa ADMIRABLE
Th* establishment of th* ADMIRABLE furniture
Central Ave. 1I-3S next to the Lottery Building
Tel. 2-1111
Now is the time to take advan-
tage of low prices for delicious
pork products. So let's read the
advice of the National Live Stock
and Meat Board on how to cook
the many pork products on the
markets. >
Braised Pork Chops
Brown them first in their own
or a small amount of added fat.
Then cover the pan and let them
cook slowly for 45 minutes to one
hour, depending upon the thick-
ness. Arrange the golden-brown
chops on a platter and garnish
with mincemeat apples.
Mincemeat Apples
(fer pork chops)
Five medium-sized baking ap-
ples, 5 tablespoons mincemeat, 2Vt
teaspoons butter, 1 cup sugar, l
cup water..
Wash and core apples. Place In
a deep baking dish. Fill the cavi-
ties with 1 tablespoon mincemeat
and Vi teaspoon butter. Boil sugar
and water together for 5 minutes-,
pour over apples in baking dish.
Bake uncovered in a moderate
oven (360 degrees F.) one hour,
basting frequently with syrup.
Pork Cuts for Roasting: Center-
cut loin roast; sirloin and blade
loin roasts, cut from the ends of
the loin and equally as flavorsome
as the center cut, usually retailing
for several cents per pound under
the demanded center cut; tender-
loin; crown roast, an "occasion"
roast made of rib sections formed
into the shape of a crown; Boston
butt, section of the pork shoulder;
smoked shoulder butt, the boneless
"eye" of the Boston butt which is
cured and smoked; whole ham;
butt and shank halves of ham;
thick ham slice; sparer i bs; shoul-
der; cushion-style picnic, boned
shoulder with pocket formed for
stuffing; Canadian-style bacon, the
boneless back strip cured and
smoked.
Smokod Pork Cuts for Broiling:
! Canadian-style bacon; thick ham
slices; smoked shoulder butt slices;
| bacon.
Pork Cuts for Pan-frying: Thin
ham slices; tenderloin; Canadian-
style bacon; thin pork chops; thin
smoked shoulder butt slices; fresh
shoulder butt slices; fresh side
pork; salt pork; bacon.
Funeral Services
Tomorrow For
Susan Morrison
Funeral services for Mrs. Susan
Morrison, who died Monday in
Paraiso, will be held tomorrow
afternoon at 12:30 in the Bethel
Mission Church in Paraso, where
the body will be on view from 10
a.m
Burial will follow at C o r o z a 1
Cemetery at 1:30 p.m.
Two-Port Xmas
Program Tonight
On La Boca
The
gram
annual
of the
>nignr
Campus
Christmas prJC
School orchestra and chorus wT
La Boca
%
he held tonight at 8 on the La'
Boca campus.
Gilberto A. Peres will direr*
the orchestra and Robert C. Jo-
seph will lead the 200-voiceA
chorus during the two-part pro*
gram aimed at emphasizing?
both the meditative and merry*
making phases of Christmas. a
The public In general Is ir*-.
vited. *
We are pleased to announce that we have
been appointed Distributors for
MAYTAG
Automatic and Conventional Washers
We are equipped for Service as well as Sales .
CRAWFORD AGENCIES
(Home of Quality Merchandise)
Tlvoll Ave. No. 18-20 and "J" St No. 13-A-30 ft
Tels. 2-2388 2-3265 2-2142
OPEN TILL 9 P.M. UNTIL XMAS
Double Your
Money FREE
In Our Big Raffle

TAHITI
18-47 (137) CENTRAL AVE.
OPEN 'TIL 9 P.M.

V
Mi I AHA
(VIA SAN JOSE AND MANAGUA)
94



ieekly D06y^i*W (tourist) flights very Thursday
Stopovers at Sin Jos and Managua ppmitted
120 day round-trip ticket limit
Departure: 2.30 p. m. Arrival: 9.55 p. in.
Immediate connections at Miami to all principal U. S. cities with
economic tourist flights.

NOW ONLY
171
U.S. Cy. one way (Sov* 35.00 U. S. Cy.)
U. S. Cy. round trip (tova 61.20 U. S. Cy.)
Ank ytrur
Trmvl Afml
laW thitnm.
flight oreaU
P/W /lUKlifClK
WORLD'S MOST tXPlRUNOD AIRlINf
Panamo. I Street No. 5. T.I. 2-0670, Colon, Sales Bldo, To. 107
n'N m *ia


w------f
PAGE MX
TWO. PANAMA AMERirAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NErVSPAPa
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1951
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
inexpensive Want Ads Bring Quick BesutisJ
! \
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET/PANAMA
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
librera preciado
7 Street Na. 11
Agencias Internal, de Publicacin*)
No 3 Loiter) rita
CASA ZALDO
(tilril AT*,
LOURDES PHARMACY
1U La Carrara.*"!*
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
Ha 2. "W Mraat
MORRISON
4th of Julf Ave > .
LEWIS SERVICE
Aw TtvoU Na.
FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS
MJ Central Aveauo
FARMACIA LUX
> Central Aveaaa
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
J. r** *5* la Owa Ave. Na. 1
FOTO DOMY
Jute Areteaaeaa Ave. an* Si St
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS
t* Street Na. H
FARMACIA EL BATURRO
reran. Leferre I Street
FARMACIA "8AS"
Via rana* ill
NOVEDADES ATHIS
V.e baaaa Ara. ,
' ' iii
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
Nd
;OMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
CAMAI ION* rOLYCLINIC
DENTAL MEDICAL
l>, l . rauresa Or. K. Avile Jr.
O.l-S i'tr#*lw* :nivarall) M
le Ancn Seheal Plevfrnaad)
le. I-IS1I - P*n*m*
FOR SALE
HouM'hold
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SALE One Weifinghouee
aufamatic wether, 2 linfla ma-
hogany ecd framai. I *
Compren i Encyclopedia Phone
Panama 3-4870.
FOR SALE:1948 Hudson 4-
deer, Iwo-lene, perfect condi-
tion, duty paid. (300. See Ha-
yos. Phone 3-0152.
MISCELLANEOUS FOR RENT
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031, AN CON, CZ.
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.2.
RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
JIM RIDGE
fhone Panama t-1532
TRANSPORTES BAXTIR. SA
Pecker. Shippe" **
PjimmJ-245) 2-252
Learn Riding at
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding & Jumping elai.ei dallv
3 fa 5 p.m. Phana 3-0279
or ay apaimwM.
FOR SALE:Cat love 4-fcurn-
r, oven brollar; Maytag waih-
iag machine, 60-cyclr; Atcot faa
wafer heater. Above units used
only 10 months and are lib* now.
Ported palms, plante. Panama
3-6212.__________________
FOR SAL!.FriffMJalrt. 4-burn-
*r electric stove, 30-inch oven.
Phono Albrook 5294.
FOR SALE:1951 Ford Custom
Tudor, excellent condition. Vary
cheap. Hat radio, heater, clock.
Phono Coco Solo 8342.
FOR SALE:Livinp room tot. 6
pieces, newly refinithed. $50.
34-6241. Qtrt. 131-A Kobbo.
FOR SALE: Fri.idaire electric
refrigerator. 60-cyclc. 6 cubic
too*, ood $40; aba 33-1/3 rpm
electric record player, thru radio
Philca, new, $12. Apartment 17,
Tivoli Ave. No. 10, above Sean.
FOR SALE:1950 Cadillac-62
4 door, 7000 miles since over-
haul; new tubeleif whitewalls;
brome oil filter; vapo-jot; by-
dramatic with panino gear,
$1450. ($450 down). Gatun
579.______________________________
TOR SALE:1952 Ford Fordor
V-8. radio, heater, 19,000 miles,
perfect finish and chrome, spot-
lets interior Panama 3-6282.
FOR SALE: 1950 Hudson 4-
door. low miloaflo, like new, duty
paid $525. Phono 2-1235.
FOR SALE: Hi-Fi record for
Chrtftmai. AGENCIAS DIAZ.
37th Street No. 6-A
>lf
All 18 Aboard Killed
In Florida Air Crash
JACKSONVILLE, lift., Dec. 21
Jec 21 (UP) An Eastern Air-
lines Constellation crashed a n d |
rWproded during a routine landing
at the Municipal Airport early to-
da v, killing the 18 persons aboard
- The plane was making a land
ing run when it plunged into the
ground about three-fourths of a
mile from the Jacksonville airport
at about 3:46 a.m.
A terrific explosion that a-
wakened sleepers in homes lor
lives round followed the crash.
All aboard were believed flood
traDoed inside the shattered air
CT
explosion caused a flood of
te .one calls into switchboards
of tne patrol and' of other law en-
forcemeat agencies. !
All available anfbulances ana
other emergency spparatui were
dispaHchcd to^he .scene.
Bailie Berros Health
Verdict Due From
Chicago Physicians
CHICAGO, Dec. 21 (UP) -Wes
ley Memorial Hospital puyaicians
prepared today to give a final
veruict on the healui of Uruguay-
an President Luis Batlle Berres
alter a wee* o exhaustive medl<
CaliiicSi-iesident, who suffered an
cut intestinal attack last \jedncs-.
y was scheduled Co "undergo a,
last examination this morning.
rt lew dim A-ra>s wm be is*
en befori the medical staff that
has occn attcnuing him goes init
onierence to evaluate t.ie labo-
ratory testa and other information
n his illness, a hospital urce .
told the united Press
It is expected that Dr. Samuo.
Abrahams, " .PreaMjwi *
apecialist, wiU issue the medical
bulletin. |
Although all the formation had
ot Seen assembled, hospital phy-
uciam have already rtued out
theneed for any '". mediate surg;
ical intervention or for major
treatment.
Everything points toward ihe
prolonged but mild treatment u
sually applied m such cases of
stomah disorder.
FOR SALE:5-pc. sectional Ur-
ine, room tot, now plastic uphol-
stery. 316-1 Albrook. 16-7193.
Wanted to Buy
WANTED TO BUY: Smooth
tiro*, lertable tor reconstruction.
Reconstructed Nacional. Aveni-
da Porn 7. Phono 2-0406.
LOST & FOUND
FOR SALE: 1956 Chevrolet.
Christmas brand new deluxe club
sedan ready te deliver. Has VI
engine, powerglide transmission.
radio, .'tintad fias*, white-side
tires, air foam and custom all
vinyl interior, special tu-tane
paint. Will accapt trade-in. lal-
boa 2-1515.
LOST:Class ring West Point.
Owner'* initial* on outside, name
inside. Reward. Call Panama 3-
6221.
Wanted Position
English and Spanish ipeaking
Bookkeeper, successful candidato
of the Univertity of Cambridge
Eiami. Gerardo Durin Silvera
Jr., Phono 2-4556.
FOR SALE: 47 Olds Todor.
food running condition. Quick
alo. C*M 4-6241. 131-A
Kabbe. s.
_,j_------------------------------
FOR SALE:1954 Olds Super
8 Holiday, hydramatk, radio.
w/*/w tire*. Phone "Davit 13-
21 S3. 2 p.m.-IQ p.m. ||
FOR SALE:3-piece overatuft
od living room set with cover*
$60. Roadmatter bicycle SI 2.50.
Phone Balboa 2416.
FOR SALE:'48 Buick 2-deer
sedan. Duty paid $300 or bait
offer. Carl Anderson, 87-3172,
Fort Clayton.
FOR SALETo young in heart*
'52 Skyline Plymouth Convertid
ble. blue seal covers, radio, en-
tra. Duty paid. A-1 throughout.
Best buy in town. See anytime:
Hotel Roosevelt, Apt. 304. Par-
ame.
:i
Tir Jose A Mora. Uruguayan
.mbass'ador to the United1 ates,
told the United Presa that he be.
Km the exhaustive checkup ana
33SS&SS oaufbodi, *Wi- CkM&idA
great deal of good." [
u

-
*
r
r
*,
s
GARRARD
Record-changara
Salts Service
Part-
<**.
TAT
25-Cycla Wotora
Mueblera
CASA
SPART0N
CENTRAL BB-TB
Entrance t*> Encanto Theater
SPEEVAK WAINBERti
Batteries
Tirel *V Tubes
No. 31
Automobile Raw
Tel. 2-4624
\KW TiRKS
Quirmtecd 12 Months
1st Lint
100 Level
Size Black White Wall
600x16 15.50 18.50
670x16 15.95 18.95
710x15 16.95 19.95
760x15 18.95 22.95
800x15 23.95 25.95.
820x15 24.95 2.95
With Old 1 ires -
Credit If
TUBELESS
Sist
670x15
710x15
760x15
800x15
820x15
19.95
21.95
23.95
27.45
23.45
26.45
29.95
30.95
4
Puxaled about a Xmas Gift? Then
way not give the IDEAL gift that
will, prove a tatting benefit to an
Adult or a Teenage*. Give a
Ballroom Dancing C o u r o by
HARHETT & DUNN. Call Bal-
boa 2r4239 or Panama.3-1660.
. Announcing to the residents of
the Canal Zone the arrival a our
Virotypo Embossing Machine.
' Personalize your Xmas cards,
personal cards 6- wedding cards.
IMPRENTA UNIVERSAL, No.
19-32 ' Av*.. Pbom 2-2950,
75 yards from Paul's Market;
Branch Store. No. I3A-44 16th
Street We*t. Phono 2-2050.
Apartments
ATTENTION C. I.I Just built
modern furnished apartments, I,
2 bod room*, bat, cold water.
Phone Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT:Ready to bo occu-
pied: 2-bedroom apartment, hot
water, in the boat residential dis-
trict. Call 3-1890.
FOR RENT:Modern two-bed-
room apartment, porch, living-
dining room, kitchen, maid's and
laundry room. Screened, hot wa-
ter, for further particulars tele-
phone 3-4946 or 3-6737.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous

'
FOR SALE:Used electric train,
very good condition^with all **-
cessories $70. Call Donald, tele-
phone 2-0324 Panama.
CLEARANCE SALE! 40% off
on all our tterling silver flat and
holloware, well known brand*.
Taha advenate of thi* offer and
hop early for Xmas. PORRAS.
Plata 5 da Mayo.
PRIZE NEEDLEWORKThis exquisite wedding gown is the
Grand Prize winner in the 19* Nationwide Crochet contest held
recently in New York City, ft^vaa made by Mrs. Roy Johnson/
right, o Oakland, Calif., for hr U-year-old daughter's wedding.
Margare* Wallace of New York models the gown, crocheted in a
delicate shell stitch pattern. .-,.
-------------------_ ..... -----------------------. '-*->._ "---------------------- T"'.
Black White Wall
18.95 21.95
No Mounting Charge
Desired.
GRAND SALE: Beautiful an-
tiques and large assortment nov-
elties. Received new rtocks Per-
fect for Christmas gift*. LUM'S,
4th of July Ave. Phono 2-2446.
FOR RENT: Magnificent two-
bedroom apartment, tea view.
Corner 47th Street. Bella Vita.
Call 3-0934.
WANTED
Apartments
WANTED: Vacation quarters
for couple without children or
pet*, starting January I. Refer-
ences furnished. Balboa 2-3171.
Junior College
Activities
By GUS MELLA.NDER
RESORTS
PHILLIPS Oce.ns.de Cottage*,
Santo Clara. Box 435. Bolboo.
Phone Panama 3-1877. Cristo-
bal 3-1673.
Gramlich'j Santa Clara Beach
Cottage*. Modern conveniences,
moderate rate*. Phone Gamboa
6-441.
Shropnol'i furnished houses on
beach' of Santa Clero. Telephone
Thompson. Balboa 1772.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. One mile
past Casino. Lew ratea. Phone
Bolboo 1166.
Baldwin's furnished apartment*
at Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Proback, Balboa 1224.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT:3-bedr.en, chalet
in Bello Viera, unfurnished. Tel-
ephone Ft. Clayton 6110 off feo
hour.
FOR RENT:Beautiful furnish-
ed bedroom with porch, hot wa-
ter, fee married couple without
children. Meal* available. Apply
pereonally: Avenido Cub* No.
38-29. ne.t te "Comisariato
Don lotee."
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED: Living} room oat,
hrgft eherr, Motor* Auto Repair
Manual. Call Curimdu 2*54.
Position Offered
Indian Woman Solon
Speaks Up For US
Beavers Fruitlessly
NEW DELHI, India, Dec. 21
(UP)An Indian woman politician
today failed to convince the gov-
ernment that American beavers
are dam builders of the highest
order.
Mrs. Kamlendumati Shah, mem-
ber of Parliament from Te h r i-
Sarhwal, said beavers should be
imported from the United States
FOR SALE: Winchester 52
heavy target rifle, very good
$65; many accessories. Call aft-
er 6 p.m. Diablo 2-4455.
Tomorrow is the Uat rlatf that to he|P fiRnt erosion. But the dep-
yoTnTin^ 'vo'uf d"t I gjj ^JJJJIl** JaisuM,
donations for the Children's home I HI" k ,.J^i ,ho /nli.
in Panama City. The freAmen "lu0ifsh.ah ,8ked.the followiB
FOR $ALE:20" boy* used bi-
cycle, good condition, needs
pointing. Call 2-1163 after 4
p.m.
FOR SALE:Bargain! Baby bed
$15; new high chair $8. 2513-
A, C*>Mli._Call 67-8101.
FOR SALE:Black & Docker '/*
inch electric drill set with twelve
attachment*, all new. An ideal
Christmas present. Phone Al-
brook 5294.
ajt in-------i- i .....- -
FOR SALE: Several ton* of
scrap iron. Call Panama phono
3-1462.
are still leading the sophomores
in volume of goods brought in.
But sophomore President Virginia
iKam is confident that her class
, will pull through and beato t h e
freshmen. So freshmen; let's
show them who has the best
i class. Bring in your donation to-
1 morrow.

Our Christmas Formal, be
car
questions:
"Will the minister of irrigation
and power please answer:
FOR SALE: Luxurious PLAY.
BOY runabout, 14 ft. brand now,
with 25-hp, electric starter, now
Evinrndo motor, brand now bat-
tery; wraparound bine tinted
windshield, modern and conveni-
ent TRAILCAR, precious beat-
tap, all accessories. Wat built for
a discriminate person. Ask for a
demonstration in CASA CHA-
CON. B Avenue, opposite Inter-
national Hotel. Phone 2-2121
Panama.
WANTED: Receptionist and]
secretary, English spooking En-
dote photo, enalrficofiont, Boa
CM. 134, Panamo. \
WANTED: Totevitiei. techni-
cian and radio technician capable
of learning televisin, rood* and
speaks English. Applicants pleat*)
contact Curundu Rodn) Shop,
after 4 p.m.

FOR RENT
Rooms,.
FOR RENT:One small furnish-
ed bedroom with bath, for tingle
person. Apply personally to Ave.
Cub* No. 18-29. neat te "Co-
mitariate Don Bote*)."
WANTED: Rodm technician
experienced in cemnroerfcatieni
and television. Motorola Distri-
butor. Jos Francisco da la Osta
Ava. No. 38 (Automobile Row)
after 3 p.m. any week day.
PERSONALS
HARNETT 4V DUNN withe, their
many friend* 6" students A Mer-
ry Xmat O Happy Dancing fee
1956.

MOTHERS! Why not tro your
TEENAGE daughter a SIFT that
will really be appreciated. A
CHARM course that will give
hoe GRACE. POISE. PERSONAL-
ITY, CARE OP SKIN. FASHION.
SOCIAL ASSURANCE & SELP
S5HFIDENCE. Call MtSS HAR-
ETT Balboa 2-4239 or Pa*.
3-1660. 7
ers have been credited with sav- MAN BITES DOG
ing thousands of acres in north-
west American from erosion, and
Whether it is a fact that an whether the government proposes
animal called the beaver is used to tp import these animals for a aim-
construct
States.
dams in the United
ilar purpose."
FOR SALE: One electric fan.
large metal desk I mahogany co-
lor!, and wash botin for boeuty
parlor. Apply personally to Ave.
Cuba No. 39-29. noit to "Co-
misariato Don B-osco."
ALPENA, Mich. CUP)- Roger
Cole has state police troopers to
confirm-his story about a house
hitting his car. -Cole's /car was
parked on the. shoulder M US-23,
Hathi replied that "H is; under- about seven miles south of here
"Whether it is a fact that the stood beavers are used ? such in i when a ^^WStf/!^ .?
above animal can finish an l8-fot- logging ateas,'UAJie sa.d he had Pn^ ^'.W^' aK "^5
iv, i ,/r, \, long, six-foot-wide dam in about no informationgBfesons twd'or the ho4* clij
i otn c\l VntimSL E h> fn three weeks. and three, andiiTiof plan such a Cole s carM
c^nf^'thTyea" Our Snow "aether it is fact that bew-lj-rogram.;
i Queen was elected Monday. Her I
, name is . oops. I almost for-'
sotit's a secpet, I will tell youl
'this, she's quite a doll. U you
"'haven't got your ticket yet, see.
[Virginia Kam for one. I under-
stand that the floor show will fea-
ture something "new," so don't
forget to come.
| With Christmas Just around the
corner a group of JC girls head-
ed by Gloria Samson decorated
'the student lounge. Christmas tree
- and all. It redly improved the
looks of the old den, thanx. Sev-
eral of the students wrote on the
board what the wanted for Christ-
i mas an I'm coDying some of
them down here because I don't
think that San will visit t h e
lounge (too much nicotine in the
AORADO HEROSMO. Azores, a")- Milly Damaurue wants her
Dec. 21 (UP) Tw American Pj Arlene Vandergnft wants
Thunderiets crashed- within m0-!everybody to notice her new
ments of each other late 1 a s t glasses, and Don Dolan wantsi hu
night while flying in formation girls to use smear proof lipstick.
1 hate to remind you, but our
Companion US Jets
Crash Al Intervals
with two others near here.
The first jet went down In
The flight of four lets was be-
I lieved enroute from Newfound-
land.
It was not known what caused
the crashes. Air Force officials
withheld identification of the pi-
lot*
TOUCH LUCK GUY
CC term paper is' due Friday.
Mr, Bowen made it rather clear
flames near a village named^uring Monday's classes that the
i Cruz and its pilot was burned to deadline would stick. And a Mer-
death. The second crash-landed ry Christmas to you, Mr. Bowen.
moments later close to the near! T_ -._
bv joint American-Portuguese Air I Familiar Scenes at JC: Gary
'Base. The pilot jumped out of Maddox (our recently married
his'plane unhurt. colleague Sneaking into his eight
o'clock class 10 minutes late.
Jimmy McKeown telling us how
much the girls love his new Pon-
tiac. Yours truly .staggering into
his classes wth that What am I
doing here?" expression. Jerry
Fok telling us in Business Math
how sharp he looks in Bermuda
shorts. Nina Brown siting in the
sunlight and flashing her d i a-
shorts. Nina Brown sitting in the
lounge, (I heard Charly Giavelli
giving Duane Rigby odds five to
BROCKTON. Mass. (UP) one that Fred was glued to hte
Three years ago Ronald Poudrier's: chair. Writing on the bo ara
automobile was wrecked in a crash. |."Woodrow has reformed, we won-
The driver who caused the accident der why." Thats all carried no insurance. Recently he ry Christmas to the faculty and
bought a new car and parked it,to-the student body ,olt the great-
outside his home. Hearing a crash, est little ole junior college m the
he looked out and saw that another'world. I'll sec all you students:
car had crashed into his. The driv; you know where, and when, and
er was uninsured. even why.
\ LIQUIDATION SALE! \
HISTORIC PHOTO BELIES KHRUSHCHEVSoviet Communist party boss Nlkita Kbrustehev'a
declaration in Rangoon, Burma, that before World War II England, Franco and the United States,
groomed Adolf Hitler "as their bloodhound intending to set him free against the USSR" doesn't,
jibe with the event pictured in the historic pho to above. It shows Soviet and German leaders in
genial friendship just after signing the German-Soviet nonatgression pact of 1939 in Moscow.; '
Architects of the treaty were German Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop and Soviet For-,
eign Minister Vyaeheslav M. Molotov, who is still a top Soviet leader. Captured German foreign
office documents, published by the U.S. State Department in 1948, show that Hitler and Stalin al-
most agreed in 1940 on a plan for liquidating the British Empire and carving up all the Eurasian-
African continents into German and Soviet spheres of influence. Left to right in photo are: Ton
Ribbentrop, Nazi Under-States Secretary Gaus, Marshal Josef Stalin and Molotov.
t i of
i We
t N
I 11
t
I Tels.
i 2-33B4 2-2SK
\\
II
Lamps!
We are selling all these Lamps far below
Our Cost
NOW 60% discount
Take advantage of this opportunity
I
Panama Radio
At*.
Central
Aereas
a Merced
Church
13
I Ml$ WEIGHT IN SILVERMyron A. Hoff. 5-year-old River Sioux. Iowa, catte dealer.
SSSJSnflvSsiW on a scaTe in Chicago a. he gets hi. weight in silver doUIrt ta. prise for
L inrX a fattle-judging contest sponsored by a feed firm. At one dollar for each ounce of hia
M^SSnd. hei colierted $2976. Mrs. Hoff stand, beside him a. Bevarle. Wltaon .hotels out the
cein. Brink, guard Paul Gallagher watches.

'I





t WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1953
THE PANAMA AMERICAN. AN DDEPENDENT DAILT NEW8FAF1B
PAGE BEVEH
^___
[CAPITOLIO
ttc -----------*
Debor Kerr, in
THE END OF THE
AFFAIR
- Alo: -
THE ATOMIC
BRAIN
TodttY The best pictures at the best movie-houses in town TOfiClT
" TIVOLI
25c. ------------- ISO-
BANK NIGHT!
A BULLET FOR
JOEY
- Atoo: -
THE BEACHCOMBER
CENTRAL Theatre
6c.
30c.
A GREAT ATTRACTION I
Tony Curtis Frank Lorejoy, In
BEACHHEAD
in Technicolor!
WILLIAM HOLDEN. In
THE MOON IS BLUE
LUX THEATRE
60c. ---------------------------------------- *,
3:15 5:10 7:2 8:59 p.m.
David NIVEN Yvonne DE CARLO
Barry FITZGERALD, in
TONIGHT'S THE NIGHT
In TECHNICOLOR!
DRIVE-IN Theatre
POPULAR NIGHT!
fl.10 PER CAR!
Ben JOHNSON Edgar BUCHANAN
In
WILD STALLION
In COLOR!
CECILIA THEATRE
de. _______------------------------------ **
DOUBLE ATTRACTION 1
JAMES CAGNEY, in
RUN FOR COVER
VISTAVISION arid COLOR
THE BOWERY BOYS, In
HIGH SOCIETY
26c.
15c
THE SHANGHAI
8TORY
- Atoo:
PORTRAIT OF
JEANNIE
V ICTOH
15c
f
AGAINST ALL
FLAGS
- Atoo: -
WYOMING MAO.
R THE "BEAR"Russia'! top leader, Party Chief
IH?Khrus ev, left, and Premier Nikolai Bj.lf.nln. .mil.
gingerly at their new tiger cub. The aeven-nonth-o.d cub wai
Presentid to them during their viiit to a .tate farm In Bareilly.
'ndia.
Walter Winchell
(Continued fren Pac. 2>
and the stage. Of course, it's a
movie mint, too ... Chuckles can
become nuggets. Among Bob
Hope's properties are two great
ranches worth over one million
bux. He also owns scads of oil
wells ... Dana Wynter was a
medical student before she was in-
fected by greasepaint . Add Nif-
ty Ballad Titles: "I Had To Lose
You To Love You" ;.. Lucky
Pierre's (the Frenchy spot) is The
Pygmalion at 56th and 2nd ...
Sheree North's counsel to you
dolls: "Don't kid the man. At
least once a week, appear as you
really arewith no waist pincers,
no falsies, no false eyelashes. Get
them to appreciate your mind. To
hell with animal magnetism!"
(And Then The Shovel Broke) .. .
Add Goldwynisms: "Do me a fa-
vor. Don't do me any favors!"
"Dear Walter," writes Daniel
Blum, "have you all forgotten that
a theatre was also named for Alia
.Naiimova?" ... The Vatican has
l ordered 50,000 copies of the cur-
rent Cosmopolitan Magazine. His
favorite color photo ... Juleen
Compton plays a maid in "The
Cherry Orchard." In real life she
hires several maids and a butler
and chauffeur. She's a 23-year-old
heiress ... Jayne Mansfield ap-
Bsars in a scene in "Hell On The
ock" and doesn't get a mention
in the credits ... Add Show-Oafs:
Emery Lewis in Cue: "Throughout
the first act, the four reveal then-
selves in boastful apologiae pro
vitae suae." (Chop Suae?) ... Most
popular play in the Nation? It
doesn't appear in New York. It is
"Time Out For Ginger," a vow
with amateurs. It was one of the
comedies that gave us the ho-
hums ... Pat Weaver has .every
confidence his "Parade of the Com-
edians" will click. Last time he
tried the theme (as a Summer re-
placement) it unveiled a star:
George Gobel ... Marilyn's Kin-
sey quote: "Certainly there's sex
in Hollywood. But most of it is on
the aereen" ... (Onowlook!)
f
JUST RECEIVED
I IN THE LAST MOMENT FOR XMAS!


# Tiny Crystal Perfume Bottles
Crystal Vases
^ Handcut Crystal Decanters
i j
HOLLYWOOD (NEA)
On-1 the part was nw right for La
CURB-SIDE VACUUM CLEANER-Streets in Washington, D.C.,
are being cleaned these days by an ingenious device with a tie-1
snendous appetite for rubbish. It's a Jeep with a six-inch suction
hose that snuffs up the day's accumulation of litter, chews it to
bits and then blows the pulp into the burlap bag n, at the rear.
Department of Sanitation officials designed the outfit, shown
here in front' of the Capitol. It cleans the gutters about six times
u fast as the traditional white-wing with a broom and pushcart.
ELECTROLUX KEROSENE REFRIGERATOR
The most practical and appropriate Xmas Gift
six different sizes
, CRAWFORD AGENCIES
(Home of Quality Merchandise)
"J" St. No. 13-A-20 Tivoli Ave. 18-20
OPEN TILL 9 P.M. UNTIL XMAS
stage, Offstage & Upstage: There's Grayson, anyhow, and that she was
no business"hke show business, first choice in the first place.
tra-lah, but it's time for somebody --------
to say "No" to this Kim business Vanessa Brown has been offered
in show business. 'the Jane Ac. role In the television
There are now three KimsNo-'of the old radio rib-tickler, "lasy
l DO YOU HAVE A COMMUNICATION PROBLEM?


CYRNOS

No. 16 TIVOLI AVE.
OPEN FROM 8:30 A. M.
TIL 9:00 P.M.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUIU
CLUB PLAN!
J
vale. Hunter and Stanleyand it's
downright embarrassing says the
original /Kim who started it all
back in/1943.
L^I'm /not suing or anything,"
Kim Hnter laughed on a CBS-TV
" earsal stage, "but I feel sorry
pie who get mixed tip about
Kims. I've been called 'Miss
Kim Novak's been called
"Mis/ Hunter' and Kim Stanley's
now adding to the confusion."
N Stanley has a better right to
name than anyone because her
He name is Kimberiy.
vid O. Selmick gav. the Kim
led Hunter the name when she
movie starlet. He remem
it from the
Aces," for NBC-TV. The raiding of
"My favorite Husband" at CBS
prompted the offer.
The Witnef: Los Angeles night-
club advertisement:
"Six Dancing Girls."
"Five Beautiful Costumes."
How's that again?
Not in The Script: Marie Wilson
to Groucho Marx: "If your wife
wants to learn to drive, don't stand
in the way."
This is Hollywood, Mrs. Jones:
New hardware store owner Alan
Ladd is due for a cover en Hard-
ware News, the hardware Indus-
try's trade paper. It would be
character* in mere appropriate far some hard-
Ferbor's "Showboat" who; wearing stars you all know,
a named Kim by her pop in
ionor of three stte, Kentucky,
Illinois and Missouri.
We now have three Kimsone,
for each state.
Please, dolls, that's enough
Kims.
Deborah Kerr's 20-foot hoop skirt
lor her role of Anna in "The King
and I" requires her to sit in a
special chair between scenes. A
gagstef on the set put this sign on
the chair:
"For the Fanny of Annie,**
Anything wrong between Kath-
ryn Grayson and Pier Angeli?
Some of Pier's remarks to Brit-
ish scribes about replacing Kath-
ryn in "Port Afrique" are eyebrow
raising. Like her insistence that; Many Splintered Thing."
Lili Gentle, the Birmingham.
Ala., TV discovery just signed by
Fox, and Vanderbilt U. grid star
Gkika Morgan are keeping the love
fires burning via long-distance
phone calls.
Wcsmx

CAN SOLVE IT FOR YOU
Radio Teletype Circuits Privacy Equipment
Microwave Motorola Fixed and Mobile
Give Your Memory
a Holiday
i

'
/
For information coll
Wesfrex Co. Caribbean 3-1186
31st SI. No. 4-53
Ear Witness: Richard Lyon, son
of Bebe Daniels and Ben Lyon,
and staiaet Jill Ireland are
rumored altar-bound. She was with
young Lyon in his recent auto acci-
dent .. Jackie Collins, the shapely
18-year-old kid sister of Joan (Girl
On a Red Velvet Swing) Collins is
whizzing along in British TV as a
glamor starlet. . And Lisa Kirk
would like to dedicate a love song
to Charlie McCarthy: "Love is a
THE BIG BUXOM BEAUTIFUL MUSICAL...
"GENTLEMEN HARRY BRUNETTES"
Release Sunday 25 at the "CENTRAL" Theatre.
^rfCH
GIFT IDEAS FOR
. vith the Seamastcr Calendar
...... *
The new self-winding Seataw*et Calendar watch , thenw*fekhJ ~
ful sen*** of time erer devised kf watervmking icicastT.-.-.
telling the eseact tiene and-day of Aemonth... accurately, ante- ^
matically. Yon can discard your wall calendar, yon can forget
old-fashioned stem winding. The Seaneaater Calendar winds itaelf )
with every flick of your wrist. Automatically, too, the date
;? mechanissa changes every 24 hows. It's simple, stntdy, foolproof. | j
i' Fro
For "GENTLMEN MARRY BRUNETTES," the Cinema -
Scope Technicolor musical filmed by Runfield Voyager
Froduetions, through United Artists release, Jane Russell
*d Jeanne Crain. who play the Jones Sisters of 1955 and
924. each have 27 fabulous costumes. Designed by Holly-
wood's William Travilla. materials for the costumes and
fantastic Jewell for the matching accessories were garner-
ed from fashion center s ofthe Old and New worlds.
In their first appearance in the film the New York
Night Club cabaret act Jane and Jeanne wear Identical
full-length dresses in leopardskin satin, skin tight. Advt.
Pajamas
Shirts
- Slacks
Tiss
o Cubana Sett
. Slippers

Costume Jewelry
Perfumes
Handbags
. Lingerie
. Sleepers
. Swim Suits
Ik-

Self-winding waterproof, dm/proof, ontimagietie, tbotkprotteted.
Apelable m Sttybrite steel mi 18 karat goU.

o
OMEGA ^ .
PANAMA
COLON
THE WATCH THE WORLD HAS LEARNED TO TJtuij
GENERAL DISTRIBUTOR OFFICIAL AGENT
\
u&iybody, finada. (laAAifhdA,
OPEN TILL o P.M.
.The bel signifies quality
*


PAGE EIGHT
THE
/
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER
mm
JACOHT OH BlttPOl
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NIA Service

NORTH (D>
AKJ84
*K76
? K7
? QJ42
WEST EA8T
*75 *62
VQJI054 VA932
? 06 ? 10 543
KISS 10 7 6
SOUTH
A A Q 10 9 ?
/I
? AQJ8J
? AS
Both sides vul.
last South
Psss 14
Pass 4 N.T.
Pass 6*
P*M
North
Pass
3*
5*
Piss
West
Pass
Past
Pass
Opening leadV Q
When gift-dayt-caH for that
"extra pecial" touchmake
the gift a 'Fidelia'! The authen-
. tie high fidelity phonograph!
Select either Champagne
i Blonde or- African Mahogany
V at the tame price. Rich Walnut
and Luetroua Ebony available
too. Legs, black or braaa finish
arfd record shelf, optional
EASY TERMS
Look for the
\ RADIO CENTER
7110 Bolivar Tel. 40, Coln

*
As a general rule, the place to
look for a ruffing trick is in dum
my's shortest suit. Sometimes, how-
ever, the ruffing trick can be
transferred to some other suit, as
we see in today's hand.
It was easy for South to bid a
slam after North had jumped to
three spades. This showed strong
support for spades and the sort of
hand that wasn't far from an open-
ing bid.
For a moment, South thought
of a grand slam. If North had an
ace, a couple o: kings, and the
queen of spades ... all would be
well. South used the Blackwood
bid of four no-trump to find out,
and the response of five clubs
showed that North had no aces
at all. That was the end of grand
slam ambitions, but South bid the
small slam anyway.
West opened the queen of hearts,'
and South played low from the dum,
my. West wouldn't be leading from i
the ce of hearts against the small |
slam contract, to it could do no'
5ood to play dummy's king. Equal-
' important. South didn't want to
let East win the trick and shift
to clubs so early in the hand.
West continued hearts at the
second trick, and South ruffed.
Declarer drew trumps in two
rounds and then took the king and
ace of diamonds. Fortunately the
suit broke, so South knew that he
wouldn't need a club finesse.
South then proceeded to lead the
queen, the jack, and the last dia-
mond from his hand, discarding
three clubs from the dummy. This
created a club shortness in dum-
I my where none had existed before.
Now South could lead the ace of
clubs, taking care of dummy's last
I club, after which it was a cinch to
lead the nine of clubs and ruff in
dummy. ^
I You might not think im media te-
j ly of ruffing a club in the dummy,
but tnis maneuver is simple and
I safe, assuring the slam contract
L i
Ft. Gulick Nursery
School Students
Put On Xmas Show
children of the Port Gulick Nur-
,aery School at Fort Gulick. C.Z.
were on their finest behavior re-
cently when they put on a short
I Christmas skit for their parents
1 guests.
Beginning with a Christmas wel-
come song, the children went on
to act out the Nativity acene and
also the House of Christmas scene.
The "Opening Day" run waa
completed with a good-bye Santa
Clans song with all of the children,
dressed in their costumes of an-
gels, wise men. and the like giv-
ing out in their best soprano voic-
: es.
Directed by Mrs. Thomas F. Gib-
son, Fort Gulick Nursety School
. director, and assisted by Mrs. Lea-
lie Anderson with Pfc Ric h a r d
Crose providing musical accompa-
niment, the program lasted for ap-
proximately 20 minutes.
Following the stage show, a tea
was held with refreshments provid-
! ed for the' entertainers, parents,
and guests.
New Products
SOCKO STYLESomething special for the teen-aged set is this
new heavy-knit bobby sock with a pocket on each cuff. Combs,
keys, change and lipstick can be kept In them. Cotton sock has a
thick-ribbed top that can be rolled ither to expose the pocket or
cover It m-.....-----------!--------------------
| MAKE CRAWFORD AGENCIES *
| YOUR GIFT HEADQUARTERS
{ Give year around pleasure
% Fuller Brushes Electrolux Vacuum
Cleaners Polishers and Refrigerators
Zenith Radios Fleishmann H.O. Electric
Trains Hobby Items Toys Wagons
* ,______________ '______________________________
.

i
t

*
u
I


A treasure
in
your hands

.. .and many.. many more.
j Special items for Season and at low prices.
mostly at USA prices: Dennison Wrapping
decorations.
%
y JOSEPH W. MICHALSKI
United Press Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK -(UP) A new
iroduct that automatically refl-
ates the use, of sprinkler systems
has been developed.
The hose timer automatically
shuts off water in periods of use
ranging from one minute to one
hour. It is designed to serve on
heavy-duty sprinkler systems as
well as smaller ones. Wide appli-
cation of its use is expected for
homes, golf courses, parks, ceme-
teries and truck gardens. The
valve is .constructed of non-corrod-
ing solid brass and contains a
vacuum breaker. (Kaye Miller
Machine Co., Culver City, Calif.)
If your secretary is threatening
to wear fur-lined mukluks at her
desk to keep her feet warm, get
her a foot warmer instead. A new
one is described as suitable for
workers of all types, and it is said
to increase efficiency and cut ab-
senteeism due to colds. The porta-
ble warmers are 14 x 21-inch neo-
Srene rubber mats that throw off
eat with the use of less power
than a 75-watt light bulb. (General
Industrial Co., Chicago, 111.)
I CRAWFORD AGENCIES
& Open till 9 p.m. until Xmas
World Waters
Answer te Previous Punto I
ACKOSS
4
S5
1 Shakespeare's
river w
S It flows into
the sea of
Azov
S African river
12 Siberian river
13 Blackbird of
cuckoo family
14 Presently
(dial.)
15 Plant
IS One of the
"Little
Women"
17 Row
18 Florentine bis J|
20 Church
festiyal 23
22 Bern 25
24 River (Sp.)
23 Rivers also are 24
called------
2 It flows into
the Columbia
In Washington IT
state
33 Cornish town
(prefix)
34 Belongs to it
36 Jewel
37 Affirmative
vote
38 Scottish
heepfold
3* Yale
40 Sherry
43 Working rule
4< Seine
4SAge
49 Subdue
52 Confusion
5 Shield bearing
57-----Darya.
Asiatic river
0 Athena
61 Layer
62 Dower
property
53 Humid
Small children
Summer (Pr.)
Poker stake
DOWN
Too
Swerve
Heavy blow
Feminine
appellation
River barrier ,
Individual *7
River in Africa2S
Canadian riverSQ
Initial (ab.) 31
Solitary 32
Pitcher 35
Body of water 41
Three-toed 42
sloths 44
Prince 15
Principal river
of lower world'
Large plant 47
f-Ji Jt-Ji j
1 iwr.im i ntii,
laau ui"ii ju mi
HI IUUNU
rjui iu uufcji i ti.i>-<
UJI IT! HI !!. uMiiii: jriii o'.mui .
UUU|LI1 II njUCrHj
I I'ITItI l
Irect
Pace
Awry
Iodine source
Exude
Withered
Penetrates
Observe
Bitter vetch
The Yukon
River begins
in------
Barter
43 American
religious
worker
50 Operatic sele
51 Winter vehicle
53 Wolfhound
54 Lease
55 The Great
------s empty
into the
St Lawrence
58 Witticism
56 Employ
Come in and see our selection
(The Home of Quality Merchandise)
"J" St No. 13-A-30 Tivoli Ave. 18-20
Tels. 2-2386 2-3265 2-2142
Dsfbodii\ fisadL, Qlxm^istdA
ipe'
the |
4
A newly developed television re-
ceiver serial which the manufac-
turer states is half the size of a
regular conical-type roof TV an-
tenna and capable of helping wipe1,
|out "ghosts" and "snow" on the'
screen is on the market. The an
tenna is supposed to he highly .
sistant to strong wind blasts as a
result of its small size and light!
weight. The antenna looks like a
big letter H with one leg larger
than the other. Aluminum reflector
discs on the larger leg are die-cut
with holes to withstand high veloci-
ty winds. (Snyder Manufacturing
Co., Philadelphia, Pa.)
Tumble-proof, chip-proof dinner-
ware for children is available in
set consisting of an 8-inch plate, a
large bowl and 6-ounce mug made
of plastic. Said to be as luxurious-
looking ar fine china, it has clown
pictures in bright colors on a
bone white background. Non-
fading, non toxic colors can't peel
off, it is pointed out. (Lord George
Ltd., New York, N. Y.)
PRIZE PORKER-Sming proudly over the
his prize Yorkshire barrow, "Champ," is Donald Hi
old farmer from Clinton, Wis. The 230-pound hog wo
shssspiimaap jsi ska Jtsneui swium slum at Chicago's
national Livestock Exposition.. Age limit for junii
Ihli I .....Ii II MgWMsWgtM
.back, oci
20-year-.
randj
Inters

'/
for Xmas-Forever
Sewing Darning... Embroidering... Making RffBriHSles... S*wTf
on buttons: all this is FUN with the miraculous NECCHI MIRA BU!
This sensational sewing machine does the most amazing and intri-
cate designs., while YOU sit back and watch! There is no limit to
the beautiful things you can make and decorate-for your horns'
and your family.
For zig-zag and straight stitch... for electric or tfea'dle drive... fitted)
Into a skilfully designed cabinet or into a handy suitcase: the
NECCHI MIRA will be at your service for a life-tune performance.
The nearest NECCHI Dealer is always ready to welcome you. Why
not pay him a visit and try one of the fabulous machines yourself?
NECCHI
Ca ADMIRABLE
a sewing
i
i
Across from Nati. City Bank
Cantral Ava. 10-30 Phona 2-1111
machine* Eaay long term Trada-in.
Balow States pries*.
a
4
8fre> \pcvhi Sewing courses Brief, modern, easy Join today 11
Make her really happy with
Electrolux Vacuum Cleaner
SaF EMPTYING SEE NO DUST
TOUCH NO DUST NO SMELL
CRAWFORD AGENCIES
(Home of Quality Merchandise)
"J" St. No. 13-A-30 e Tivoli An. 18-20
Tels. 2-2386 2-3265 2-2142
OPEN TUX f P.M. UNTIL XMAS '
Avoid last minute Rush
GET YOUR
HERCULES I
f before the last day.
>
J Accessories: Three Speed Hub, J
} hubite, speedometer, kick stand,
>
I OMPHROY'S \
Automobile Row 38 Tala.: 3-5381 3-8382 fe
Make sure it is a Hercules
1


WBDNESDAT. DECEMBER 21, 1955
PANAMA AMERICA AN INDEPENDENT DA1XI NEWSPAPER
PAGE NINB t,
Social and \Jtn
erwic
(.onlinitta
Officer, Seven Cadets To Remain
At Carib School Over Xmas Holidays
Cm* Mm Officers'
Wives' Club
The December meeting of the
Ceco Solo Officers' Wives' Club
we called to order by the presi-
dent, Helen Zarrielio.
The luncheon tables were gaily
decorated in the khristmas
theme. Mrs. Dot Olsen, Mrs. Phyl-
lis Faucett and Mrs. Barbara
Haberthier were hostesses for the
day.
New members welcomed into
the club were Mrs. Elsie Connol-
ly, Mrs. fay Starbuck and Mrs.
Betty Ann Smith.
Farewell was said to Mrs. Peg
Cockroft and Mrs. Nancy Fleish-
Mri. Butler wai the guest of
Mrs. Ruth Humphrey and Mrs.
Bieck was the guest of Mrs.'
Joan Rieck.
Forllowing the business meet
lag, nominations were presented
from the floor for the election of;
officers in the January meet-!
i?> '
Mrs. Ruby Taylor won the door-:
prize, a Boda vase.
ttex-atrrwctl Ritas
Performed At Albroefc
Or Saturday evening, Miss Ol-
ga Berrocal, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Ignacio Berrocal of Panama
City antf A-2C Jack Essex, son
of Mr. and Mrs. John S. Essex
of Paramount, California, were
joined in matrimony at t h e Al-
brook AFB Chapel.
One bride was attended b> Miss
Carmen jCuesta of Panama City
and, the best man was A-3C
John Kimble, also of Albrook
AFB. The ceremony was con-
ducted bv Protestant Chaplain
Fred P. Jones of Albrook AFB
and music was furnished by Sgt.
V/ii'iam Johnson.
Both the brido and groom are
popular i Ike Panama area. Mrs.
Essex ror\her many starring,
roles at the National Theatre and;
Mrs. Essex for his work as an
announcer and> disc-jockey with
th* English-language radio ata-
tion HOG in Panama City.
The bride it employed with the
S'ijer Sawing Machine Company j
in Panania City.
'lr. Easatx is stationed with the
D rectoral af intelligence, Hq.
C-r.lbeafi Air Command, Albrook
Darina{yMk.>Eaex, tour with the
U.S. Ai? Torce in the Canal
Zone, the cottple wUl make .their
home ta'anama City.
lers and their guest One officer and seven cadets course and will remain at the
dontheS "now suits* and meet from Nicaragua, who recently,school to complete a ser.ea. of
at the Service club which is be- grada ted from the Engineer, courses.
ing converted into a 'winter won-course at the USARCARIB; They wil terminate studies at
Serland" for the occasion. I School, Fort Gulick, will remain the School in June 1953 and. then,
Artificial snow drifts made out i at the school during the Christ-; return to Nicaragua for assign-
of micro snow, snow men, icicles,mas holidays to attend specialiroent.
and silver bells will be accentual-1courses in four instructional dl-; The ,tadents enroUed ta this
ed in this years decoration mo-,visions. _____ ______,__ ___ nune ,re; Lt. Raul Herdocia
Uf. Mrs. Caldwell and her Serv- The divisions presenting sp- --
ice club committee have prepared I cial inrtruction will be: Automo- &Ecte c de? J uan AntoX
miniature "snow village" re-Uve division, 24 hours; Commu- V1'*ieg Vadet aKo
plete with a SanU Claus, r e i n- nicatlona dlvson, 40 hours; FoodMeled Arguelles^ Cadet Albmo
deer, skating pond, fire place and Service division, 1 lhours; and "Xtrira? Cadet Luis M ThT
Christmas carolers. "Alf the ef-! Military Police division. 40 hours. rC"ltr'r,,(?^^ Mu,si ni.lob s
fects of Christmas at home are The automotve division's objec-!*" R Cadet Luis M \ iHa lobo
going into this year's S r v i ce Uve will be to provide a basic P "d c"et Ju,n J08e b a'
club "White Xmas' theme," says background in vehicular main-|nnc" *
"Mom" CaldweU. tenance so as to prepare student I
Highlighting the holiday dance | for aU phases of military main-
will be the piano artistry of Del- tenance. i
phino Williams and a weiner and! The aim of communications dl-'
hamburger roast with aU the vision is to acquanti the students
'Yuletide trimmings."
Dutch Treat Club
Admisl First Woman
Nicaraguans Leant
Meal Cutting, Baking
Al Ft. Gulick School
Eight Nicaraguan enlisted men,
enrolled in a cooking course at
the USARCARIB School, Fort Gu-
lick. are learning U. 8. Army
meat cutting and baking methods
which they plan to incorporate in
instruction in their own army up-
on fir suda tion.
j with communications available in
units, to Include the infantry reg-
ment, unit maintenance of equip-! NEW yqrk Dec 21 (UP)
ment dutie* of the regimental, The Dutch Treat club broke a rule
I communication officer in general o{ half-century today and admit-
. ted its first woman member.
I terms.
The Food Service division seeks j jjiected to a life membership in
to inform the students of common jj,, nationally-known organization
methods used to insure adequate of m m,|e editors, authora and
mce canitatinn in thp field. _^i_.. ____ if;., u.,,.. vMA ...h^
The course, instituted due to
an interest shown by Latin Amer-
ican countries, began Oct. 17 and
will terminate Dec. 30.
mess sanitation in the field.
Duties and functions of military
police will be offered by the Mil-
itary Police division.
Upon completion of this special
instruction, the students wiU en-
roll in the infantry we a p o n s
armiet
Students enrolled in this course
are Pvt. Roberto J. Gomez M.,
Pvt. Gonxalo Alvarado V a 1 d e s,
Pvt. Lula- A. Picado, Pvt. Ecar-
nacion Bravo Rocha, Pvt. Pedro
Jose Zepeda Cruz. vt. Herberto
Previous, cooking and m ess,^mUi Arias, Pvt. Rasallo Espino-
sa Alemn, and Pvt. Antonio Ze-
laya Taleno.
rTiSB P for 4&
wrigKvjaiaJsssJ i planned _ for
SttsrvUS
Pit Ot*
CrtwrigL*
J. 6 arCn EflrVClub at Mar
fifi'*- Reservations may be
ma.n: by calling Delia Noon an at
MBS. L. R. Sparks. 2-2522,
George Cockle, \lflS5, W, Peter-
son, 3-262JT dr^N/'iCshtenytm?
Cartwright has been employed
by the Canal for 'the p" as t SO
years, to-tire cold storage plant -
*r 4n Hawse
Army-Navy Club
Christmas Bva
lemhers of the Army-Navy
Club, Ft. Amador, will be treat-
ed to beer on the house on Christ-
mas Eve afternoon between the
hours of 2 p.m. and 4 p.m.
management courses were held at
the school and no provision was
made to teach the students eith-
er meat cutting or baking. With
the newly-found interest of Latin
American armies, the course has
become pail of the school's reg-
ular curriculum.
During the operation of these
courses the Food Service Division,
headed by Gapt. Leonard Cofield,
planned and directed the phases
of instruction. Regular facilities in
the Food Service division ara
used to instruct the student bak-
ers while the meat cutting phase
is taught in the post commissary
under the supervision of Capt.
George Parker. There the stu-
dents learn the various techniques
involved in meat cutting through
practical and textbook study.
With cooking instructions as of-
fered at the school, Nicaragua and
other' Latin AmertcJlB* countries i
can use'its graduates from the
course for planning purposes and
as Instructors in lood strvice I
courses being taught by their own
artists was Miss Betty Knop, who
in 18 jears as secretary to the late
Ray Vir Den, the club's president,
came to be known as "the little
mother.''
Miss Knop, who handled the de-
tails of the club's star-studded
weekly lunches and annual dinners,
was <> special guest of honor at
today's lunch. John Chapman, act-
ing president and drama critic of
the Ntw York Dally News, hand-
ed Mies Knop her certificate of
life membership.
"Betty once said she was in love
with 400 guys," Chapman ex-
plained. "So we decided to take
her in.*"
a
United Electrical Union Run
By Reds, Atty. Gen. Charges
WASHINGTON, Dec. 21 Workersaccused the attorney
Atty. Gen. Herbert Brownell Jr.,, general of using the iaw as a
charged today that the independ-1 "strike-breaking weapon."
ent United Electrical Workers U- Brownell predicted the charges
nion is run by a Communist again?', the UEW likewise wiU be
clique and urged that it de de- greeted "with cries of union-bust-
prived of any bargaining rights., ing by the Communist press."
Brownell, who accused leaders some 11,000 members of the
of the union of trying to carry UEW arc on strike against West-
out the Kremlin's aims, formally inghouse plants in 10 cities.
asked the government's Subver-' . ....__. m .. .
sivc Activities Control Board to .Brw"e11, s *?*ll0n ch*r,g!th?,t
declare the 100,000 member UFW.,he ef,?c"'e 'eadfrs.?' ^cr *
a Communist-infiltrated organiza- nion coUaborate with such Com-
fion munist leaders as Ctu, Hall and
w Robert Thompson two of the 11
Under present law, such a de- top Reds convicted of conspiring
signstion by the SACB would de-:to overthrow the U. S. govern-
prrve- the union o* all rights be- ment in the first trial under the
fore the National Labor Relations Smith Act. '
Board and its members of bene-
fits under the Taft-Hartley Labor Brownell identified the unions
Act. secretary-treasurer as Julius Em-
The UFW was one of five u- spak, wno was indicted for con-
nions expelled by the CIO in 1949 tempt of Congress last year. The
and 1950 on charges thev were Supreme Court recently threw out
dominated by Reds. Brownell the indictment,
said hi* petition is designed to Brownell said the unions lead-
aid members of the- u n i o n to ers also use the organization's
"clean their organization of Com- personnel and resources to pro-
munlsl dictators even as the CIO mote Communist Party caucuses,
cleaned its organization in 19 4 9. cells, clubs and groups,
and 1950."
The UEW case was the seconds He charged that the unions
brought by Brownell under the'monthly publicationthe UE
1954 Communist Control Act. The Newsis not a trade union ma-
I'ii def-n-lant-the International gaziife but "merely reflects poll-
Union of Mine, MU and Smeltercies of the Communist Party.'
FOR THE FINEST IN BONE CHINA and *J
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CRAWFORD AGENCIES
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WMTMtaay
king its haUs with "lots of
folly" during the holiday season
is the Post of Fort Kobbe. Among
the numerous. Yuletide activities
scheduled for the Lifeliners is a
"spalsh party" and dance next
Wednesday evening.
Through the efforts of Mrs.
Dorris B. CaldweU, Post Service
Club director, and Capt. Elmer J.
Gainok. Special Service officer,
the Poll pool will be reserve for
enlisted personnel only from
7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Twenty-five
Service club hostesses have been
invited to partake in the "beach
.

'
and you give the finest
Vm^n.i
party by the pool."
Following the pool party,
the
& Wiff.il
.ASH TBACHIS A LESSON:
BUILD CARS FOR SAFETY
Memo to automobile manufac-
turan: The next time I buy a car
I am going to be only faintly in-
terested in its "long, low linea','
whether or not the windows move
up and down with the press of a ,
button, the beauty of the uphol-1
stery, the ease with which the
driver's seat moves back or
forward, all those things your
salesmen keep talking about.
Next time I buy a car I am
going to be looking at Just one
thingits safety features.
1 am a woman and so you may
be surprised at such indifference
tf the beauty of an automobile.
But I am also the recent victim
of a head-on crash. It threw me
against the steering wheel so hard
that breathing is still painful, then
knocked me into the dashboard
where a protruding instrument cut
a long, deep and ugly gash in my
forehead.
I was fortunate in one thing. 1
was driving alone.
But if I should ever again ex
eience that moment of realiza-
i that a crash is coming and
than feel that indescribable shock
ef impact, I-may not be alone.
Ann to for the safety of whoever
else Is in the car as well as for my
own protection I want to be driving
a car But is as safe in every way
at engineering genius can make it.
I don't think I am alone hi feel-
lag the way I do. Last year nearly
two million, persons were injured
in automobile accidents. The num-
ber this year isn't likely to be less.
And it takes just one painful
accident to make a driver more
interested in the safety of a car
than its long, low lines or its two-
teecd color Job, or Ms fancy
upholstery.
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*J+J^^^W^**^^^^+*^^^^^^^^^^"^
'


V
PAGE TEN
THE PANAMA AMEKK AH AN INDKPENDJEKT DA1L1 NEWSPAPER

NEW!
Fasl-Thinking Truck
Driver Credited With
Saving 40 Children
HENDERSON, N. C, Dec. 21 -
(UP) With a driver' "q u i c k-
thinlcing," that prevented any loss
of iife, a big transport turck aide-
swiped a school bu> carrying 40
pupils yesterday, then plunged o-
ver an embankment into a prison
work detail.
"Police said it was "incredible"
that no one was killed. There Balboa Service
were no serious injuries, though at 7 30
several involved were shaken up I items'on the agenda Include
L 3w Efii Akn ??otoI Hles installation of 1956 officers, re-
,truck ripped and battered the nnrt on the rnn-rPMir.n.i hr.
MEETINGS
aac* aettee tat McIuOm la am
cxIumji eheaJa aeelil*a hi tm-
rlltea fwa ana lite U M I
til* tn avahan nata* eallj la -So-
cial aaa OtbarwiM," at ael'ece
bjr kaaa la lha aiflca. Mtttrn W
..tie*. cae4 ha acteatee *r hats*
Lodge 14, AFGE,
To Meet Tonight
The Pacific Branch of Lodge
No. 14 of the AFGE meets at
Center tonight
Impressive Christmas Ceremonies
To Brighten Holiday In Holy Land
port on the Congressional hear-
ings recently held, and discus-
sion on legislation now before
or to be Introduced in the sec-
ond session of the 84th Con-
gress.
steel side of the school bus as it
sliced into its side when the stu-
dent, driver pulled over for a
left turn off U. S. 1SS.
But driver Willie Hargrove
quickly pulled the bus into the
right lane.
The truck, cutting sharply to I
avoid the collision, veered off the
road and over the 15-foot embank-'
ment "on top of" 25 prisoners L Annlinn/>A kA
and guards clearing brush on the III AUOIIdlltC AQ
slope. The truck brushed several
prisoners.
Use Of Wise Men
"They would have been crushed
if it has overturned," said inves-
tigating police officer J. B.
Reeves.
Truck driver Willie Young of
Kannapolis, N. C, fought to keep
the truck upright and to halt it
in its wild plunge. The t ru c k
stopped just short of another 15-
foot embankment above a creek.
Said In Bad Tasfe
LONDON, Dec. 21 (UP) The
government described as an "er-
ror of judgment" today a wash-
ing mac^'ne advertisement show-
ing the Three Wise Men with a
sign, "Wise men choose gifts that
last."
The Earl of Munstr. minister
without portfolio, said In the House
of Lords the advertisement in a
nationalized electricity b o a r d's
show window was withdrawn b
ONLY
Battery vvith
GUARANTEE
"Young did what appears In-
credible in avoiding any loss of.
life with no regard for his own Is00" the government protested
personsl safety/' Reeves said. "It! The advertisement was the work
was split-second timing.-' of ,ne Merseyside and North Wales
He praised Young's quick-think- Electricity Board. The government
tag in the collision, saying it;advlsed board that it "deeply
"certainly saved lives." lreTctted *"? cen-, ,
The prisoners and guards didn't! Pl" howed the Three
see the truck until it came over W|S* Men Prpferring.a washing
the embankment "on top ofmachlne-,an 'ectnc cooker and a
them." | refrigerator.____________________
The high school students from
Henderson Institute were en route music. The accident occurred as
to a local radio station's studio the bus began a turn into the
to record a program of Christmas station's driveway.

Good -in
'
JERUSALEM (UP) -.Solemn
voices of tiers of choir boys und
soft, sacred music will signal the
beginning of the high pontifical
mass at midnight Dec. 24 in the
nearby little town of Bethlehem
where the savior was horn almost
2,000 years ago.
Clad in robes of purple and gold,
his Beatitude, the Latin Patriarch
Alberto Gori will open the service
in the Church of St. Catherinean
ornate modem-looking Bethlehem
building making up one of a cluster,
of structures comprising the
Church of the Nativity.
Preceded by double rows of altar
boys bearing tall candles, the Ro-
man Catholic Patriarch for the
Holy Land will step slowly out of
the sacristy.
At midnight, great candelabra in
the church will blaze forth and
bells in the Tower of the Nativity
will ring. An image of the holy
Infant will appear on a high, shin-
ing altar. As Monsignor Gori takes
the symbol of the Child In his
srms, strains of sacred songs will
fill the edifice.
Then, a solemn procession of
choir boys, acolytes and priests
carrying flickering candles will
wind through the church followed
by high church dignitaries and
Monsignor Gori bearing the Holy
Image. The figure of the Infant
Jesus will be borne from the
Church of St. Catherine into the
Chapel of St. Jerome. This is a
cave with walls of masonry where,
according to. tradition, Jerpme
labored during his translation of
the Bible into Latin.
Old F-86 Has Quiet
Life As Showpiece
Of American Jel Age
BOISE, Ida. (UP) The boss-
es at North American Aviation who
might wonder whatever happened
to "old 47619" could find their an-
swer squatting comfortably on a
National Guard aircraft taxi apron
at Go wen Field here.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBEB , 1
'.-
scribed the following Latin words;
He de Virgine Maria Jesus Chris-
tus Natua Esthere of the Virgin
Mary was Jesus Christ born.
When Monsignor Gori arrive;
here with his entourage the after
."TepresMUUve^f Kta^l?:...^ OW 47619 was the 14th F-t* jet
of 3iW&^ ever built. She was
the Nativity. The afternoon and
evening will be spent In vespers,
meditation and masses until the
symbolic re-enactment of the
Christ Child's birth at the mid-
night mats.
The devout will converge on
Bethlehem in two lines Christmas
Eve. The traditional road from
Jerusalem to Bethlehem will be
open only to diplomatic and con-
sular officials and UN personnel.
All others, including clergy and
lay people, will move more slowly
over a parallel road in Jordan
Territory. The first two miles of
the traditional 5Mi-mile road from
Jerusalem to Bethlehem are in
Israeli territory.
Dominating the eastern part of
Bethlehem Is the Church of the
Nativity built over the Grotto of
i completed by North American, the
only aviation firm which constructs
F-8's, in 1947. This sbout makes
her a "model-A" of the American
jet age.
She's an unusual ship by any
standards. For one thing, she was
designed as a killer but never saw
a minute of combat. And she's
likely the only jet fighter in his-
tory that can log a 10th as much
time on public highways as in the
air.
What other jet can lay claim to
the distinction of being stuck at
least twice in roadside ditches and
having its wingtips damaged on a
highway shoulder bank?
The old lady is not flyable now
and may never be again, but she
still performs a vital service. The
plane used by the 190th Air Na-
tional Guard Squadron of Boise to
train mechanics, armorers and oth
UJei.M*J!i?e-r*ti!-iictu'iL ""[thp'ace er ground crew personnel.
To climax the Roman Catholic
services, the procession will move
carefully down a flight of slippery
steps into the Grotto of the Nativ-
ity, a depression hollowed out of
rock 20 feet below the choir floor
where nuns keep watch over the
spot where Jesus was born.
Monsignor Gori will place the
image of the Jesus on an altar
above a
of the Christ Child. Like the Holy
Sepulchre in Jerusalem, jurisdic-
tion over it is shared by the
Roman Catholics, Greek Orthodox
and Armenian faiths.
The Protocol of the Status Quo,
signed after the Crimean War by
Britain, France, Italy and Russia,
laid down the churches' rights in
[the Holy Places. This charter put
an end to an undignified scuffle in
Bethlehem.
FOR THE SWIIT TOOTH
NEW YORK (UP) Include
a box of homemade stuffed datns
among your Christmas gift pack-
ages. Remove the stones and fill
silver starthe Star of the centers with homemade fon-
Bethlehamaround which are in- dant flavored with vanilla extract.
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The ship was taken by the Air
Force almost as soon as she rolled
out of North American's assembly
shop for use as a research craft
at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base
in Dayton, O. She was turned over
to the Air Guard Bureau with just
200 hours of air time and was as-
signed to the 190th. The ship was
flown to Boise by Maj. Kenneth
Nordling of the 190th. who com-
mented as he set her down at Gow-
en Field she was the fastest F-8
he had flown.
She was, however, grounded im-
mediately and hasn't been flown
since.
The plane performs many other
useful functions in addition to help-
ing train "week-end airmen." She
makes an excellent display piece
at fairs and other public functions
to give citizens the idea of some
of the air machinery Uncle Sam
uses to protect the home shores.
It is impossible to estimate how
many jet-minded children and adult
have crawled over the fuselage and
through the" cockpit. It was during
one of the trips to these celebra-
tions that the F-86 piled up about
20 hours worth of road time. And
she managed to get stuck in a ditch
both outings.
YOUNG RELATIVES
GRAND JUNCTION. I. (W)
Renee Hillman, daughter of Mr
and Mrs. Rolland Hillman, and her
aunt, Michelle Hillman, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Psyson Hillman,
attend classes at the Grand Junc-
tion consolidated school here. E^ch
is five years old.
ROCKED TO SLEEP. AND UFE-Thirteen-raonth-oM Irene
buarez, a polio patient, aleeps peacefully on a rocking bed at
Herman Kiefer Hospital In Detroit, Mich. Gentle rocking of the
motorized bed, purchased with March of Dimes funds, helos little
Irene breathe, so she doesn't need an iron luna. ^^
Avr
NIVEN DE CARLO
-a FITZGERALD
THR
n
FIRST AND BIGGESTFirst turbine-driven and largest iuli-
copter transport is the 40-passenger YH-16A, shown on its first
flight in Philadelphia, Pa. Built by the Piaseckl Corporation of
Morton, Pa., for the Air Force's Afar Research and Development
Command, the YH-16A is poweted by two YTrSi Shaft turbines
whose1 power-W harnessed to *rn the swb siel fdtdrs instead' of i
providing thrust. The 16-ton tandem helicopter has a top speed
of about 150' m.p.h. Fuselage can hold three Jeeps._______,
cu>
IN TECHNICOLOR!
*^
BALBOA'S
HOLIDAY PRESENTATION
DECEMBER 24-25-26
iilll... Walt Disney unfolds the rich treasures
of nature as he reaches deep into the heart of America
to bring you the different, the daring,
the remarkable in entertainment!
Stirring NiW True-Life Adventure Feature!
<
SHOWING AT YOUR SERVICE CENTER
THEATERS TONIGHTt [
BALBOA 6:15 8:10
AIK-CONDITIONED
M-O-M rKSINTS TMC LOVC fTOM
Of THi acAurr ano thi samaai
m COLOR ano 1
i i i Maa^w'tMamisg
JUPITER*
DARIIVd
nuM ESTHER
WILLIAMS
HOWARD vi
KEEl *J
MARGE ano GOWER I
CHAMPION
GEORGE
SANDERS,
Abo Sbawtas THUMDAT1
DIABLO HTS. <:15 1:05
Jeff CHANDLER .
O Joan CRAWFORD
Tmale Ob The Beach''
Thunday "She** Worklaj Rat
Way Tareas* Caliese"
GAMBOA 7:M
CARTOON. SHOW!
Tkara. TAID TO Km."
MARGARITA 6:15 7:55
O Dane CLARK
e Paul CARPENTO
'TAID TO KILL*
Than. "Afeare aa< Beyeaa'"
CRISTOBAL S:15 1:20
Ah--Caa*(iaaaa-
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T".

WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 81. 1955
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE ELETW
Religious Team Helping Restoration
Of 184-Year-Old California Mission
MONTEREY. Calif. (UP) begin to decay visibly. Mission Sao Jack Gaver, editor of CRITICS'
A Franciscan monk gathers up his Juan became a historical has-been. CHOICE NE WYORK DRAMA
brown robes, climbs a ladder and a monument nobody seemed to CRITICS'PRIZE PLAYS 1935-55
fixes into its place on the old mis-care much about.' (Hawthorn) says somewhat wist
sion wall a naw piece of colored I Then the present Franciscans fully in the book's dedication:
tile. took over' the you've never seen "For Claudia who is not yet old
He steps down to view his handi- such dust flying-. With $300,000 of. enough to realize that one does not
work and realizes that a long and the Order's money, plus some $50,- love a drama critic."
expensive project is nearly fin-ooo worth of. contributions, they Professional critics, like profes-
ished I started from the ground up with sional teachers, though they may
This skull-capped brother is part,* completely renovated mission in create no science or art of their
of the 10-man religious team that1 mind. own, inculcate their readers and
runs the 184 year-old Mission San Local viewers agree they've pupils with understanding of the
Juan de Padua in the Santa Lucia made it.
Mountains near here. In recent
years, he has seen bis beloved mis-
sion, one of Father Juniper Ser-- |
ra's early California foundations,
rise from a battered ruin to a once-
more attractive structure.
The holy place's inhabitants and
admirers have worked hard to
make this amazing state of
restoration possible. When the
Brother's work started, only the I
church's four walls, 12 arches and
two wine vats were whole and
Standing. Now even the most crit-,
1 leal observers agree that the orig-
inal buildings couldn't have looked
" better.
The first Catholic workers to use
Mission San Juan moved in about
177], and were given the task of
spreading Christianity to the Cal-
ifornia Indians. By 1805. they had
taken in over 1,300 native conver-
sions, a feat made possible only,
through patience and understand-!
ing on the brothers' parts.
An old Indian legend did help
ujjkt Franciscans of Father Serra
fc *m spreading their gospel. Neophyte1
warriors told the padres that many'
.' year before they had established;
San Juan, a man had come from
over the bills to teach them the
ways oft he church. The Indian
elders so admired this first mis-
sionary that the new generation,
came forward to hear more.
The fathers didn't believe this at
first, for there were no available;
iecords of such a lone journey into i
the California wilderness. But their
charges,-were so adamant in ac-
cepting the tale that they soon
took it to heart.
Through the years, Mission San
Juan de Padua saw much prog-
ress. Ditches were dug to a near-1
by stream to furnish plenty of
ater, sheep and cattle were raised
it number and mission cooks
the reputation of baking the
.. bread In the West.'
Bat hard use took a toll of the,
settlement. By the late IMO's it!
achievements of others. Their place
in our culture is assured, if not
always comfortable.
Critics' Circle awards of the past
20 years have been justified not
only by their long Broadway runs,
but also by the reverence and af-
fection held for them by the popu-
lace generally. There is hardly a
community of reasonable size,
whose amateur drama groups have
not produced such plays as
Winterset," "Of Mice snd Men,"
"The Time of Your Life," "Watch
on the Rhine," "Death of a Sales-
man," and the others contained in
this collection. Of the sixteen,
three are by Tennessee Williams,
two each by Maxwell Anderson,
| Sidney Kingsley, and Arthur Miller
and one each by John Steinbeck,
William Saroyan, Lillian Hellman,
Carson McCullers. John van Dru-
ten. William Inge and John
Patrick.
Gaver, drama critic of the
United Press, delves into the his
tory of the New York Drama
Critics' Circle, which he says,
"was not organized for mutual
protection of beleagured critics any
more than it was to 'save' the
America drama."
These are not necessarily the
best sixteen plays of the last
twenty years. Indeed Gaver dis-
agrees strongly with several of the
selections. But they do have the
prestige of Circle awards.
Each of the plays is prefaced by
an informative discussion of the
nature of the award, what was
current in the theater at the time,
what contemporary actors were
doing and other bits of spicy
miscellany . .
THE PURPLE MASK"
PRERELEASE AT THE "LUX" THEATRE NEXT
SUNDAY 25th
THE SUNNY WHERE?The sight of ice-covered fire-fighting equipment and wires is common
enough this time of yearexcept in the South. Proving that it gets old there, too. is this picture
taken in Atlanta. Ga. Temperatures were in the low 20's when firemen were called to extinguish the
blaze at the New York Stock House, a clothing establishment.
CONTRAST-Here's the long
and short of it at the Western
Specialty dog show in Chicago.
Evangers Blitz, the Great Dane,
and Fistel'i Sassie, a Chihua-
hua, show their good breeding
by remaining friendly while
posing for this picture.
l
MERRY-GO-ROUND
- **
Propelled Two Seater
For a century the story of the
shrine of Lourdes and the miracu-
lous cures attributed to it have
held the imagination of millions.
Fervent adoration has. been mixed
with skepticism yet today 2,000,000
persons visit Lourdes every year
and doctors and scientists from all
parts of the world have hailed
Lourdes for achieving what was
beyond their power.
Now Ruth Cranston in THE
MIRACLE OF LOURDES (Mc-
Graw-Hill) presents a superb re-
Krt of the inspiring story of
urdes. Working as a reporter,
striving for impartiality, Mrs.
| Cranston tells of the miracles, the
medical controls, what doctors say,
the role of the Catholic Church
; and what the people themselves
say about Lourdes.
In 190 years, the Church has
I proclaimed only 51 "miraculous"
cures but the Lourdes medical
bureau lists hundreds of recoveries
as "inexplicable" by scientific
terms. Because this is a story of
faith and of people from all walks
of life, Mrs. Cranston's account
throbs with reality and excitement.
~1-^We. holidays .. S&rOe>
gg Hoe-

*
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5 eggs
1 ', - cups sugar
1 Vi pints cream
1 pint RON CARTA VIEJA
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in ron carta Vieja
thoroughly and placa enfire
mixture in punch bowl.
Sprinkle with nutmeg and
place in refrigerator to chill.
Serva in punch cups.
Tony Curtis, whose fondest desire for the past several
years has been to star in remakes of some of the old Deng
Fairbanks swashbucklers, hasn't achieved the ambition as
yetbut comes formidably close to it with his title por-
trayal in Universal-International's "THE PURPLE MASK."
Filmed in Cinemascope and Technicolor, "THE PURPLE
MASK" also star Colleen Miller with Gene Barry, Dan O-
Herlihy and Angela Lansbury seen in co-starring roles.
"THE PURPLE MASK" encompasses a great deal ef the
highly-successful Douglas Fairbanks antics including bal-
cony-jumping, fast and furfons swordplay and devil-may-
care aiding of damsels in distress. And Tony, ever on the
alert to show his bosses at the studio that he has the old
Fairbanks moxie, plays his title role to the hilt. Aivt.
I

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more, science will be the msster of
man. The engines he will have
invented will be beyond his
strength to control. Some day
science may have the existence of
mankind in its pouter, and the
human race commit suicide by
blowing up the world."
The author was Henry Adams;
the time of the writing, April 11,
1862. The occasion was the first
news of the iron ram Merrimac's
preliminary victory over the Fed-
eral wooden fleet.
Henry Adams was a man of
many parts, as were many of his
forebears and descendants.
The forecase, if he meant it to
be so, is one of the many facets of
die man which Elizabeth Steven-
son, writes bout in HENRY
ADAMS, A BIOGRAPHY (Mae
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"N
rAOE, TWELVE
i
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER;
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER SI, IfH
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Pianos
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J" ft. No. 13-A-30
Tels. 2-23M 2-3265 2-2142
BALLERINA AND AMBASSADOR
Miss Margot Fonteyn, first ballerina of the Sadler's Wells Ballet Com-
pany, chats with her husband, Dr. Roberto Arias, and others, it an in-
formal party the couple gave on Monday evening. The Ambassador of Panama to Great Britain and Mrs. Arias
are- temporarily housed in the home of Mrs. Cecilia Pinel Remon in Bella Vista, where the party was given. In the
top picture, left to right, are Minister of Government and Justice Alejandro Remon, Mrs. Arias, Foreign. Minister
AJberto Boyd, Mr. Clifford Carver of New England, wjio was the" honor guest at the informal gathering and
Ambassador Ariasf In the bottom picture,, the dietinguishad ballerina enjoys a joke with Mr. Carver, left, and her
husband.
-

r/tnim new aggregation, the Isthmian Toastmasters Club of Toastmastara
TOASTMASTERS CLUB FORMED International heW their regular masting last night. Quest speakers
for the evening were Ivan HiHiard, Fofd-Taber, Howard Spicker, Roland Ely, Scuder Keh/ie, Keith York and
Thomas Robb. This Clob is a new organised group of ambitious, capable men, over 21 years of age, who seek to
improve themerivss in the arts of speaeh and leadership. Any persons interested in joining such a group should
contact Roland P. Ely. phone tiavy Pacific 3578.


Tire fAKAMA AME1ICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEW8PAFEB
PACE
Uf/MlU UCC DAM AM A lCnimt Dr. Udia Standes, a noted Panamanian gynecdlofiet, was chosen
WUMAN HbALO PANAMA MCUKUd head of the Panama Medical Society recently. Here aha is shown
assuming the office vacated by Or. Alfredo Figueroa. Others in the photograph eomposs the new board of di-
rectora.


OFFICERS,
OLD AND NEW
Retiring and newly elected
officers of the Fort Culick
NCO Wives Club a recent
semi annual installation
dinner held in the Bamboo
room in the Post NCO club.
From left to right are:
Mrs. Jean Stiffens, retiring
president; Mrs. Oaisy Gon-
zalez, retiring vice-pres-
ident; Mrs. Carol Hankin-
son, retiring s^cr t a r y :
Mrs. Carol Milne; past
treasurer who was re-elect-
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Connie Hosking, new pros
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new vice-president; and
Mrs. Janice Finnigan, new
secretary.
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**s
PAGE PO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENllPNT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21,1
iii in
Carta Vieja Yankees To Attempt Herculean Tas
i
^ Cookie Stempel Opposes

Stanley Arthurs Tonight


.1
By J.J.HARRISON. JR.
The lowly Carta Vieja Yankees, who trail the
league-leading Spur Cola Sodamen by seven and one-
half games, will again attempt to beat the Sodamen,
a feat which has not yet been accomplished this sea-
son.
Assigned to perform this Her-
culean task, considering the
manner in which the league
leaders have run roughshod over
the opposition to date, is Cookie
Stempel, who will oppose Stan-
ley Arthurs on the mound.-
Stempel, with a nothing and
one record, suffered his lone de-
feat at the hands of the- Soda-
men Dec. 3 after giving up three
hits and four runs in one and
two-third innings.
Arthurs will be making his
first start, although he appear-
ed against the Yankees three
times in relief.
The Dint-sited hurler, who
probably weighs no more than
145 pounds, has been always
effect re against the Yankees..
When the once-m'rhw Yanks
were regarded m the Gollaths
f the loop, Arthurs invariably
played the role of David, the
slingshot kid, whenever he
pitched aralnst them.
Last night a squeeze bunt
off Humberto Robinson of the
Chesterfield Smokers, by star-
ring Spar Cola inflelder Her-
man Charles with one out and
the bases loaded 'n the top of
th* n'n'h frame brought In
Alonso Brathwalte from third
to break a four-all tie to give
the Sodamen their eighth
consecutive win of the rea-
son. Spur Cola has yet to loso
a gamt.
QJUL U*k
7MtK
TODAY! - .60 30
1:0, 2:50, 4:45, 6:45, 9:M p.m.
BRICAOOON
a
CINemaScOP
COLOR'X
m\ SATURDAY! |^
YOU'LL LOVE IT..
The run was the second of
the four tallies the winners I
rcored in that Inning. Final
score was 7 to 4.
The Sodamen were trailing 4
to 3 in the ninth, with Rooln
.on appearing to be well on his
way to his second triumph, when;
trouble started.
Reinaldo orenald, the first
batter, filed out to left. Leon'
Kellman, with two strikes a-1
oalnst him punched a solid sin-1
ele to left and Arthur' came in i
to run for him.
Alonso Brathwalte dropped a
ball for a perfect bunt along thei
third base line that Pair is al-
lowed to roll, hoping it would go
foul. But the ball settled on the
line halfway down to third and
there were two on.
Pepe Osorlo came'ln to bat for i
pitcher. Jim Tugerson.
With the count one ball and
no strikes, rain interrupted the
ame for the second time and
time was called.
When *p!ar was resumed five
minutes later, Pepe hit a ball
to second that Pablo Bernard
fielded as'ly. He flipned to
Austin covering the keystone
sack hut th. hall a*ed over
Austin's head for Bernard's
second m'scue of the evening
while Arthurs legged It hdme
to tie up the score. Brath-
walte moving to third and
Pepe to second.
This set the stage for Charles'
surprise squeeze to move the So-
damen out front 5 to 4, and two
more tallies crossed the plate
for Insurance.
Bob Trice came In to retire
the Smokers in the bottom of
the ninth. Tugerson, who took,
over for starter Vlbert Clarke IrJ
the sixth won his third game a-
gainst no losses.
The Smokers had taken their,
4 to 3 lea.d in the fifth v/heni
outfielder Billy Stewart homer-1
ed with two on.
Don Newcombe
OK s $8,000
Raise For '56
BROOKLYN, N.Y., Dee. 11
(UP)The Brooklyn Dodgers'
fears that signing the'r new
world champions might prove
a troublesome task were dis-
solved today with the sudden
agreement to terms fo 29-game
winner Don Ntweombe.
Newcombe, who shaped up
as perhaps the moat difficult
of the Dodgers to sign, came
to terms yesterday for an es-
timated S26.M0. That repre-
sented a raise of about 58,090
and Just about set the scale
for other Dodger stars nego-
tiating with the front office.
Newcombe, who won 11
stra'ght games to open the
season and hit .399 during a
spectacular campaign, had a
3.19 earned run average.
Newcombe started and lost
the first game of the World
Series with the New York Yan-
kees and never appeared in
the classic again due to a sore
arm. )
Spur(ed)
Spur Cola Ab R
Glenn, cf ..-/-----4 3
Charles, 3b-lb ... 4 0
Lopez, 2b-3b ..... 3 0
Ar. Brathwalte. 50
Trick, p ......... 0 0
Moore, ss ........ 5
Grenaid, if .
Kellman," c ..
Arthurs .....
McDonald, c .
Gordon, lb ..
O. Thome.......
Al. Brathwalte, 2b
Clarke, p ........ 2 1
Tugerson, p .___1 0
P. Osorlo. rf ,*... 1 1
H Fo A
2 4 0
3 1
1
0
1
4
3
5
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
1
San Francisco Forty-Niners
Fire Head Coach Red Strader
HE'S FLYING-Sergio Cervato has got a long way to fall after ',
UiE!^.* t?.U.,iUf2*? of ? *" ""ring \ soccer game at
Milan, Italy. He played for a Florence team.
Ff. Kobbe Holiday
Sports Program
Mow Underway
37 7 12 27 13
Thome grounded out for Gor-j
don in 6th.
.Arthurs ran-for Kellman in
0th.
Chesterfeld
Austin, ss ....... 5 1 1
Prescott, rf ..'.... 4 0 0 1
Roberts, lb ...... 3 1 0
Stewart, cf ......4 1 2
Schell, If ........5 0 1
parrls, 3b ..,... 4 11
Queen, c ........ 0 0 fl
Bernard, 2b .....4 0 2
Robinson.- p .....4 0.0
33 4 7 27 IS
It's a joyous
screenful of music,
spectacle and
happiness!
M CMpristti
The
Glass
Slipper
/%%<
*&Gif in Spectacular >^
^^OLOIII>\^
MM nt tar cm*
LESLIECARON
MICHAEL
A spectacular holiday sports
program, consisting of nine re-
creational events, is currently in
session at the post of Fort Kob-
be. Sponsored under the auspi-
ces of the Post's.Special Service
office, competition is beinjc nro-
vlded in both inter and intfda-
company athletics.
Types of events include swim
mlng, basketball, bowling, soft-
ball, volleyball, tennis, table
tennis, horseshoes and golf. The
snort are beln vidual, company arid battalion
levels.
During the neriod Dec 1
tr"-oiih jn. 2, normal tmlntni
arrivlries have ben susoen^ed
with the mom'n through Fridav belne- r)vnted to
these or^aHred athletics. The
regular hoMa schedule is in
effect, at all otnr time*. All
"Oirmnny sire unite at F"rt K"b.
be are nertfr'natln* In this
mammoth nn'ts nrcwram and
sun"''1" tbe.lr own e<"i'nmenf.
officials for all activities are
bel"" furnished by the nart'cl-
pa*'na- i>nt a-oent for th final*.
To determ'ne the mot r>"t-
t*r"*ln nit in the holldav
snorts nrO"rm a tvnt award
vstem Is b*ine wtli*e*i w,fh
tronbles to ha Hre#n*d to fba
I'lnrtln coronan' In bVeti"",
nftbali. voi'e.vball, bwol'n: one
?rooh to th* wlpnbv balt"nn
'n w'rnrPrng: and on tronhy
[ach to th. w 'n horseshoes, tennis, table ten-
nis and golf.
Sour Cola 000 030 0047 12 1
Chester. 010 030 0004 7 3
1
SUMMARY: RBI's: Parrls,
Glenn 2. Lopez, Stewart 3,
Charles, Archie Brathwalte ?.
Earned runs: Spur Cola 5, Ches-
terfield 4. Left on bases: .Spur
Cola 7. Chesterfield 10. Home
runs: Parrls, Stewart. Two base
hits: Glenn. Lopez, Austin,
Stewart, sacrifice hits: Charles.
Stolen bases: Lopez. Hit by
Ditch: Robinson (Kellman).
Ptruckout by: Robinson 6, by
Clarke 1, Tugerson 2. Trice 2.
Pase on balls off: Robinson 2,
off Clarke 1. Tugerson 2, Trice
">.. Base on balls off: Robinson
2. off Clarke 4. Pitchers' record:
Clarke 4 runs. 0 hits In S in-
t;'ngs (pitched to two batters 'n
th). Tuoerson 0 runs, 1 hit in 3
inning- Frrors: Pour Cola 1 (Ar.
Prathwaite. Chesterfield 3
(Austin, Bernard 2). Losing
nltcher: Robinson (1-2). Win-
nine pitcher: Tugerson (3-0).
Doubleplays: Bernard. Austin,
Roberts (2): Brathwalte, MooreJ
Charles. Umpires: Thornton,
Hinds, coppln Time of game:
3:06.
FOOTBALL
Here's a repor: on the *.afety
and dangerof high school
football.
Six high school football play-
ers were killed during the 1955
season. That's a death rate of
zero-point-90 per 100,000 players.
It compares th death rate for
total Injuries in the same age
eroup, which is 40 per 100-
thousand.
This year's death rate s the
second lowest on record. Twelve
high school players died In 1954
10 in 1953.
Billy Pierce Tops
American League
In Earned Runs
CHICAQO, Dec. 21(UP)
Figures released today show
Billy pierce of the Chicago
White Sox compiled the lowest
earned run average in the
American League since 1946.
The southpaw posted an aver-
age of one-point-97 earned runs
per game. That's the best since
Hal Newhouser had an average
of one-polnt-94 nine years ago.
Pierce gave up only 45 earned
runs in 206 innings: He also
racked up 157 strike-outs.
Rookie Herb Score set "a strike-
out record for flrst-year-men by
.'annlng 245 batters. That tops
Grover Cleveland Alexander's
freshman record of 227, set In
1911.
American League pitchers had
a rather poor season, aside from
the performance of Pierce and
Score. It was the first season In
Its history in. which the Ameri-
can League didn't produce a 20-
game winner.
Alan Ameche Named
Pro Grid League's
Rookie-of-lhe-Year
NEW YORK, Dec. 21(UP)
Fullback Alan Ameche has been
named rookie of the-year in the
National Football League.
The star of the Baltimore
Colts received 17 votes from 30
sportswriters voting In the an-
nual United Press poll. His clos-
est competition was furnished
by his team-mate, quarterback
George Shaw, who got five
votes. Halfback Ron Waller of
the Los Angeles Rams was next
with four votes. Halfback Rick
Casares of the Chicago Bears
received two votes, and tackle
J. D. Klmmel and halfback Bert
Zagers of the Washington Red-
skins received one vote apiece.
Amechea former All Ameri-
ca from Wisconsinran 79 yards
for a touchdown the first time
he got the ball in a pro game.
He went on to become the first
rookie to win the league ball-
carrying title since 1943. Ame-
che ran for 961 yards on 213
tries.
KEENNM WVNN-- ESTE11 1
u^UHia-IMMB
H M'lCTUtC
Todoy Encanto .25 .?5
Tyrone Power, in
-A YANK IN THE IVAM."
Victor Mature, in
"CRY OF THE CITY"
"r
Today I9EAL .20 10
Arturo de Cordova, In
"EN LA PALMA DE LAS
MAN
T.n-Tan, in
El HIJO DESOBEDIENTE"
Caribbean Series
Tickets On Sale
The Panama Professional
Baseball League today began
taking ticket reiervatons for
the eighth Caribbean baseball
series to be played at the
Olympic Stadium here Feb. 10
to 15.
Reservations are being re-
ceived bv series eoordinator
Arturo Gomes do Castro, Tel.
42-2678.
The tickets, which can be
bought on installments,, are
be'n rsold at $25 for box seats,
grandstand 312 and bleachers
15. Each ticket will be good
for all 12 games of the series,
between the champion pro
teams of Panama, Venezuela,
Puerto Rico and Cuba.
Sports Shorts
BASKETBALL
The University of San Fran-
cisco once again tops the week-
ly basketball ratings of the
United Press board of coaches.
Thirty-three of the 35 coaches
in the poll rated San Francisco
on top.
BOXING
Boxing promoter Tex Sullivan
denies that anyone Is consider-
ing transferring his Monday
night fights from St. Nicholas
Arena in New York to Boston.
Promoter Sam Silverman has
said there is a possibility the
fights might move to Boston
next month. '
Distributors: MOTTA Y MOTTA Ltd.. Panam
t
BOWL BRIEFS
NASHVILLE, Tennessee-Wlth
mid-term examinations out of
the way, Vanderbilt got In
some extra work yesterday for
the Dec. 31 game with Auburn
In the Gator Bowl.
Coach Art Guepe had his
quad viewing movies of the
powerful Tigers in the morning
and put them through a two-
hour workout In the afternoon.
The two-a-day sessions, some-
thing the Commodores haven't
gone through since pre-season
practice last fall, will,, continue
for the remainder of the pre-
Chrlstmas practice.
AXFORD, Mississippi Mis-
sissippi ran off one of its rough-
est scrimmages to date yester-
day getting ready for the Cot-
ton Bowl encounter with Texas
Christian University.
Coach Johnny Vaught says the
Players came through the of-
fensive and defensive sessions
without injury. -
After the scrimmages, quar-
terbacks Eagle Day. John Bla-
lack and Ray Brown went
through a long passing drill.
The linemen concentrated on
one-on-one and sled blocking.
AUBURN, Alabama Auburn
staged a short drill on offense
Monday with halfback Bobby
Hoppe showing to advantage.
However, coach Ralph Jordan
was far from pleased with the
condition of his team for their
Gator Bowl meeting with Van-
derbilt. says Jordan "Maybe
It was just 'Blue Monday', but
it Is also evident that the boys
need plenty of running to get
their legs back in shape."
He has told the squad that
they will have to do additional
work during the holidays on
their own.
NEW YORK, Dec. 21(UP)
The San Francisco Forty-Niners
have given coach Norman "Red"
Strader his walking papers.
8trader was fired yesterday
after coaching the Forty-Niners
to a next-to-last-place finish in
the Western Division of the Na-
tional Football League.
San Francisco was supposed
t have the best talent fa the
league this season, but won
only four games while losing
eight. The Forty-Niners had
been tabbed the team to heat,
partly because of a sensation-
al pre-season record of five
wins and one loss games. But Injuries to key
players kept the Forty-Niners
from llvfar up to their ad-
vance billing.
There have been repeated re-
ports of dissension, both among
the players and among the
coaching staff. A few days ago a
San Francisco newspaper
The News reported back field
coach Frankie Albert was quit-
ting, because he couldn't get a-
long with Strader. Later Albert
admitted he was thinking about
aettinr uot, but both he and
Strader denied that there had
been any squabbling between
them.
8trader was hired only a ytar
o. He replaced Lawrence
"Buck" Shaw, who had been
fired for failing to win a cham-
pionship in nine years.
_ Owner Tony Morabito says
The trouble was not all Strad-
getting out, but both he and
the players were Incompatible.
There was a certain amount of
resentment on the part of the
plavers over some of the rules
laid down by Strader. j admit
there are several cry-babies on
the club, and they'll find out a-
bout It later." Morabito contin-
ues"it is not possible to treat
a group of grwon men^iike
ooys.
Strader denies that charge
and says, "Never in my 25 years
with athletes."
t
- .10 "" Strader for
not hiring- guard Bruno |an-
duecl. but Strader denies hat
negotiations were f mloll_
when I came Into the picture.
m i?,et5. wen* to Banduccl
and tried to get the thing
then.1 Th, coach saya, "His
contract always has been han-
dled by the Morabitos."
wiTh.,tLo,Ange.!f? Rm w"i *
w. V.2l the en** of their
first-string fullback in their
championship game next Mon-
vm;rai" reve* fullback Tank
InS^i ^aSwa ha,rl,ne cra<* n
iJO* i.ver*ebra, Doctors say the
mfjhtl8.nt 8erl0U8' but Younger
might suffer serious injury If
Th.pl,"y,8 bei0re the * heals
Luldn the Rams fin' game
covered till today.
*52aSh.8,d 0Uan says hell
art Dan Towler at fullback In
BtSwne?' Wlth the ^inS
TAHDIHG
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
Teams Won Lost Pctf
SPurCok .......... 8 0 1.000
Chesterfield.......... 3 4 U29
Carta Vieja.......... 1 8 .111
LAST NIGHT'S RESULT (Olympic Stadium)
Spur Cola 7, Chesterfield 4
TONIGHT'S GAME-(7:30)-Olympic Stadiui
Carta Vieja (Stempel 0-1) vs. Spur Cola
(Arthurs 0-0)
College Cage Scores

77.
CARROUSEL TOURNAMENT
(*IMT ROUND)
Colgate 8, Davidson 51.
Wake Forest 95, Mississippi
SUte 68.
Tennessee SO, Boston University
Clement 94, Florid State T6.
WE8T TEXAS TOURNAMENT
(FIRST ROUND)
Murray SUte 111, Hamllne 90.
West Texas 99, New Mexico 80.
HAMMOND KIWANIS
TOURNAMINT
(FIRST BOUND)
Mississippi Coll. 71, Culver-
Stockton 53. _
Southeastern La. M, Westmin-
ster 69.
EAST
Alabama 89, Holy Cross 94.
Duquesne 71, Loyola (LA.) 55.
Manhattan 85, Connecticut 82.
Massachusetts 91, Boston Col-
lege 73.
St. Anselm's 3, Colby 52
Brooklyn College 66, Hunter" 56
Steubenville (O.) 82, Adelphi 94.
Salem 88, Bloomfield 78.
Rider 99, Panzer 75.
St Francis 93, Yesniva 68.
SOUTH
VanderbUt 95, Georgia 61*
Ohio State 72, Tulane 66.
Florida 74, Miami 69.
High Point 99, Coll Charleston
East Tennessee SUte 74, Spring-
field 59.
Tampa 99, West Carolina 91.
Keesler AFB 73, Louisiana Col.
59.
Linfield 91, St. Martin's 66.
Willamette 97, Western Wi
lose your shirt
on wrong
campaigns
Mvcttisc
in the
iPanama-Americanj
and keep it on!
Centenary 82, S'western La In
stituet 75.
Jackson College 9., Kentucky in ton 62.
St. 63.
.,, ^ Wsho State 95, Western Mc
Atl. Christian 91, Pikeville Col- na 51.
leee 76.
N'west Louisiana St. 61, E. Tex San Diego St. 57, San Jose
St. 55.
MIDWEST
Illinois 97, Depaul 79.
Indiana 90, Cincinnati 91.
Wisconsin 71, Nebraka 52.
W.chiU 79, Texas
o time.
Missouri 91, Idaho 57.
Bowling Gr. 91, HOlsdale .
Xavier 90, Georgetown 52.,
Se'aat Missouri St. 73, Otd
Univ 42.
Eastern Illinois 99, AndeJ
(Ind) 73. c
Jamestown (S.D.) 88, Bet]
(Minn. 72.
S. Illinois 91, Missouri Mine*
Friends 85, Phillips 77.
Greenville (111) 90, Upper
97.
Indiana Central 95, Bailan
SS.
Missouri Valley 102, Shurl
(111) 81.
St Mary's 74, Lewis (111) 98. |
SOUTHWEST
Rice 75, Kansas 66.
Air Force All-SUrs 78, Tl
Tech 94.
Menphis St. 71, Texas We
70.
McNeese St. 96, Sam Houa
(Tex) 94.
FAR WEST
- t, S. Csliforak
Iowa St. 72, Colorado AAM
Utah State 64, Montana
59.' <
' California 94, Arizona 74.
Arizona St. 89, Westminster,
Uh) 99.
Seattle 73, St. Mary's (Cal)
Fresno SUte 72, Eastern Wi
ington 92.
Whlttier 91, Sacramento
S. Oregon 99, HumboUt
57.
50.
9j9|s^p^^^ iy
WrUL

^SMOjBh

*}$e}|
1%
IC*
5 9
1/
\%
ROOM FOR NOBODYBoston's Arnie Risen, right tried to rat i
in on a ball-control squabble between teammate Ernie Barrett,
center, and Philadelphia's Neil Johnstonbut all he did was
knock the ball away from both. Johnston came out of this
National Basketball fracas with a bumped eye.
Make her really happy with an
ELECTROLUX FLOOR POLISHER
A Gilt that is practical, useful and deal
CRAWFORD AGENCIES
(Home ef Qaattty Merchandise)
-J" St No. 13-A-JO TlvoU Ave. 18-20
Tela. 2-23*8-2-3265-2-2142
OPEN TILL 9 FJ. UNTO, XMAS
*


/
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 81, 1955
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART NEWSPAPER
PAGE
Aim
Long Frustrated Dodgers Take Headline Honors For 1955
Cross-Alley Rule Applies
To Most Spare Setups
TOUCHA WwtWi Ml la sbont t make the -! split.
Twelfth tf II illustrated and in-
structive articles written far
NBA Service
By BUZZ PAZIO
ABC Masters Champion
ONE of the bigger thrills I gol
winning the ABC Masters Cham-j
pionship was in making the "im-
| possible" 7-10 apUt or railroad!
twice.
This deasn't make me an ex-
I pert on how to convert the 7-101
because it is one of the toughest!
! shots.
But the more common split!
j and spares can be made regu-
larly with food aim and tech-
nique.
The general cross-alley rule ap-
plies to most setups, but there are
exceptions. The 5, for example, is
shot from the center. So is the
5-9. with the ball aimed toward
the right side of the 5.
The 1-2-4-7 can be picked up
from the* right-had corner with the
ball aimed to hit between the 1
and 2, sending the 4 over against
the 7. Do it just the opposite for
1-2-B-10.
The 2-4-5-8 cluster should be
played from the right-hand or-
ner,. bringing the ball full against
the right half of the 2 to take out
the 5. ,
A common split is the 3-10. it is
played with the ball delivered
from the left-hand corner. Have
the ball hit the right side of the 3
and deflect to hit the 10.
The 5-7 split plagues bowlers
who make thin pocket hits on
their first ball. To pick it up, the
ball is rolled from the center of
the alley to hit the 5 thin on the
right side, thus sliding it over lo
hit the 7.
The 4-# can be made by rolling
from the right-hand corner to fit
the ball squarely between lb
pins. When the 5- or 5-6-10 splits
are to be made, this procedure is
There are the really difficult
ones like the 6-7, 4-7-10. 8-10 and
7-10. The rate of conversion on
these is low.
The best thing to do is take the
pin or pins you're sure of unless
you must have a spare to win a
game or match.
NEXT: Spot, pin and line bowl-
ing.
by
JOE WILL1

i(i'.">'

Nashua Gives
Bums Hearty
Run For Top

y OSCAR FRALEY
NEW YORK, Dec. 21(UP)
The long frustrated Brooklyn
Dodgers, hanging their tatters
for a tuxedo as they finally
reached the end of the glory
toad, took the headline honors
in sports for 1955.
Sis times beaten in previous
World Series, the beloved
Bums turned in the year's out-
stand inn sports feat s they
came off the floor to defeat
the mlrhty New York Yan-
kees.
Yet, in analyzing the year's
top sports stories, the Dodgers
were given a hearty run by Na-
shua, the bouncing bay beauty
from Belair.
Nashua cracked Into the Ms*
headlines three times. The first
was In defeat, when he bowed to
Swaps in the Kentucky Derby;
the second when he flattened
Swaps in a match race, and the
third time when he was sold for
an all-time record price of $1,-
251.200.
The top 16 ports stories tn
this corner were:
1. Brooklyn's World Ser es
win.
2. Nashua-Swaps match raee.
3. Jack Fleck's U.S. Open
win over Ben Hogani
4. Ray Robinson's comeback.
5. Rocky Marclano's win
over Archie Moore.
. Rill Vukovich's Indiana-
polls death.
7. Swaps wins Kentucky
Derby.
8. Sale of Nashua.
r. Laszlo Taborl's 3:59 mile.
18. Australia's Davis Cap
landslide.
This relegates to the also-ran
division such top stories as Don
Canipbell's 261.2 mile per hour
speedboat record; the Cleveland
Browns' 10th straight division
title in pro football; Paul An-
derson's world record weight
lifting; Honus Wagner's death;
Willie Hartack's 400 plus riding
It seems plausible, as the gentleman in charge of the iVlctorlas; Cary M id dlecofrs
surmised, that the unidentified person who bid $1.10 fot Vanira*;''\faaers triumph, and Doug
the 3-year-old turf champion, wds a prankster: '" Ford's P.Q.A. victory.
Obviously, It was the Judgment of Leslie Combs, the Ken- Fleck, Robinson and Marcia-
-tueky breeder, and his associates, that the horse was worth quite
a bit more. They bid him In for $1,251,200, highest price ever
paid anywhere for a thoroughbred.
And yet surmise and fact are two totally different things.
Preposterous as the $1.10 bid may appear to be It is possible it
was on the level. One of the fallacies o Ufe Is that everybody
FRIENDLY NOWRomraie Lpudd of UCLA, left, and teammate Herdiman Cureton, right, join
hands with Michigan State's Norm Masters New York. They 11 be trying to bang each other apart in the Rose Bowl game, Jan. 2.
Hockey, '55, Something
Rickard Never Did Seed'
loves a horse.
This department has long known and respected Mr. Combs,
a gracious host and excellent judge of rare potables, but the
conviction persista that animal affection played little, or no
part, in this transaction. ... .. ._...
In. fact Mr.- Combs confirms the point when he explains way
his group went as high as they did to land Nashua: "We figure
his stud potential at between 7O0JO00 and $800,000, and we hope
he can make tip the difference in purses next year.'
Some people are Incurably addicted to auctions. No matter
what's offereda 1910 policeman's helmet, a Jim Jeffries puncn-
lng bag, a Betsy Ross house slipper, or even a Nashuathey
must satisfy a pathological compulsion to participate.
ARE BANKERS. PEOPLE? i
Thus, to dismiss a $1.10 hid for Nashua from snch a person
as a prankster would be infinitely worse than Incorrect: It would
betray an excusable lack of understanding and sympathy for an
affliction which countless unfortunates suffer, mostly women.
This sale was conducted in a bank by bankers. Di such a
^ climate an austere singleness of purpose and grim financial con-
centration, preclude deep consideration of human emotions. In- sale.
no all rate extremely high a?
in;" vidual performers. The
unknwnn Iowa golf pro scored
a smashing upset when he de-
feated Hogan, shoot'iir, for a
record fifth open, in a play-
off.
Robinson smashed an ages-old
boxing jinx when he knocked
out Bobo Olson and, regaining
the middleweight crown, became
the first man ever to come out
of retirement and win back a
title, Marciano ran himself out
of more competition with a de-
cisve trumph over Moore.
Bob Swiekert won the rugged
Indianapolis 500 when the lead-
footed Vukovich, running out in
front in his search for a record
third straight victory, overturn-
ed and was decapitated.
Swapa started his feud with
Nashua by winning the Ken-
tucky Derby but Nashua, after
his match raee vengeance,
still was running at the head-
lines in his record year-end
By HARRY CRAYSON
NEW YORK (NEA)Hockey
is celebrating its 30th anniversary
in New York and the east. By
this time, it is crystal clear that
the glittering game has come out
or the north to stay.
It was a lifesaver for major
arenas in New York, Boston, De-
troit and Chicago, not to mention
exhibition buiidings in m i n-o r
league cities. By now ven t n e
late Tex Richard would be con-
vinced that they no longer could
survive on revenue derived from
boxing, wrestling and the circus.
Heavyweight fighters aren't what
they were in Richard's daynot in
mumber or ability.
It is significant that Madison
Square Garden's old $3,000,000
mortgage was torn up and drop-
ped into the Stanley Cup when
the Rangers won it in 1940, 18
years after the Garden Corpora-
tion's own club entered the Na-
tional Hockey League. The rather
ill-fated Americans, operated by
1 the bootlegging ana racing figure,
,Big Bill Dwyer, were the original
New Yorke ntry. The Americans,
I sorely hobbled by a prohibitive
I rental arrangement, folded as
wards of the league after the sea-
son of 1941-42.
THE RANGBRS HBVER have
failed to show a seasonal profit of
$100,000.
Hockey has never had it so good
in attendance and personnel. At,
i tendance is up close to 20 per cent
in Montreal, Toronto and Detroit.
It's well up in New York. Boston
and Chicago. __,-.
Little was known about hockey.
in New York when the sport crash-
ed the big town that December
night of 1925 for the formal open-
ing of the present Garden.
Richard didn't believe It would
go. He asked whether it was play-
ed on horse back. But when 17,000
turned out on opening night to see
Lea Canadiens beat The Ameri-
cans. 3-1, the man from the gold
fields of Alaska, the cattle ranches
of South America and the Reno
gambling hall reiterated his fa-
mous line: "I never seed anything
like it.''
What have been the changes in1
the game in 30 winters?
"FQR ONI THINO, It's twice
as fast," says Lester Patrick, who
organized the original Rangers.
"Squads are larger. Lineups are
changed more frequently.
"Stars formerly played three
or four minutes at a stretch. Now
they're rarely on the. ice longer
than a minute and a half at a
time. It used to be that one line
the center and right and left wings
played most of the time. Clubs
had three lines then, too, but the
second line played little, the third
hardly at all. Now each club has
three good lines. Some have four.
There are more defensemen and
they, too, are changed more fre-
quently."
With one fresh deal after anoth-
er, the tempo of the game has
stepped up. It could be that speed
has supplanted subtleness.
"The center red line gives play-
ers an extra area in whichh to
make passes," points, out Silver
Fox Patrick. "Emphasis is on
checking whereas when hockey
started in the east, players back-
checked. No longer are there pas-
sing plays with no opposition. That
could be the most pronounced
change.
"THE MOST IMPROVED play-
ers are the goaltenders. the only
ones left who go the route. They
have better training and equip-
ment. .,
"There is stricter discipline.
Coaches spend more time with
teams and individuals, take mure
pains. Some coaches formerly play-
ed. If the coach wasn't in the
thick of the action, he permitted
stars to have their own way.
Now the hired hands are under
direction. They are told what to
do in the way of'set plsy and
there are more plays." ______

deed. It was an extraordinary departure from banking etiquete
eveii to attribute the bid to prankstertsm. .
Nashua may be an authentic all-time great. He is admired
by millions and properly so. But great horses, like great men, do
not always escape calumny. When Nashua, favored in the btt-
Tabori, a Hungarian, ran
through the four minute mile
barrier in a race noteworthy in
that two other runs also broke
fuor minutes. And the Aussies
lisio, was. beaten in the Derby, there were few kind Words from |Were. magnificent In their Davis
the losers.
Instead you heard: "Why did Ieter throw my dough away
o that pigV "He's just another one of them bums from
the East,'.' etc., etc.
On that May afternoon in Louisville, Just after the race, it
is bv no means certain many of the losers would have been eager
I' to take Nashua off young William Woodward-* hands for $1.10.
r And rstneor lingers long in the glacial heart of the frustrated
lure-thing bettor.
Another possible explanation of the dime-store bid is that
It was intended as a subtle denunciation of the immorality of
gambling. By fixing Nashua's value at $1.10, the moralist would
express his scathing disdain for racing, as well as people who
"sacrifice millions of dollars at the tote board altar.

Cup sweep.
Those 10 stories will take
lot of beating In 1956.
On The Alleys...
Girl Who Bid $24 For Nashua
Gets Saddle Horse For Xmas
o
// NASHUA STAYS SOUND
Fdrt Kobbe's enlisted person-
nel are "on strike" at the Post's
alleyways in preparation for the
annual Post bowling tournament
vhlch takes place in January-
February.
Under the supervision of
Capt. Elmer J. Galnok, Post
Special Service officer, the
Let's return to reality and examine the prospects of Mr. [highest scoring bowlers will be
Com nd his co-lnnvestors getting their money back. A large | elected to represent Fort Kobbe
part of the answer must necessarily depend on how well Nashua m the 1956 USARCARIB Com'
fres in handicaps next season. jpanv Level bowling matches.
TJie fact that he was beaten once by older horses last season jjlne games will be piaved In
is not too significant. For one thino. 3-i/ear-olds don't make a "the local tourney with the two
practice t/ beating older horses. For another, Nashua was an highest scoring teams declared
improving horse, even after he clobbered Swaps in the Chtcaao Fort Kobbe's champs and run-
irtdrc* race ner-ups respectively. In case of
If he doten't get hurl atid u not asked to carry imrssibleB ti three-game roll-off im-
zceight, he will win much more often than he loses And the mediatelv followine the last
fsJthat Sunny Jim Fitzsimmvns will continue to train him J^?, V^pItlttS wUI
males for added optimism. determine the winner
Mr. Combs has also acquired an intangible of great poten- Team. w1m & Pomortsed of
llal that has not been mentioned. Nashua means publicity nd Lje*m* Xan tennlavm and
ore prospective horse buyers with, not unlikely, a general In-, n'm,or!f "?.P !*" "m-
crease in prices. A sound Nashua can make this one of the c
soundest deals ever made. At $1.10, of course. It would have been
even sounder.
ZENITH RADIOS
MAKE APPROPRIATE XMAS GIFTS
live Year roand pleasure of Entertainment for the home.
A Zenith Radio, Radlophonograph. Console, or High
Fidelity is always an appreciated gift.
CRAWFORD AGENCIES
(Home of Quality Merchandise
"J" 8t. 13-A-30 Tlvoll Ave. No. 18-20
Tel 2-2366 2-2142 2-3265
OPEN TILL $ P.M. UNTIL XMAS
pany sized units located on the
osot All personnel of the 33d
Infantry regiment and 504 th
Field Artillerv battalion are eli-
gible to participate with the
company to which assigned for
duty.
Scheduling of alleys for intra-
battallon competition will be
coordinated with Special Servic-
es allowing seven days of ad-
vance notice for competition
date*
Post champions will be deter-
mined during the week of Feb-
ruary 1 Awards fco the Individ-
uals and chamoionship team
compiling the highest aggregate
score will be presented.
Volnts for LIfellner trophy
credit will be awarded to parti-
cipating units.
NEW YORK, Dec. 21 (UP) 1
The bankers who last week soldi
Nashua for $1,251,200 chipped in
today to buy a Christmas saddle,
norse tor a f2-year-oW girl who
had bid $2403 for the champion
racer
Officials of the Hanovtr Bank,
executors of the estate of tne
Iste William Woodward Jr.,
owner of Nashua, chippea in t
buy the horse for KareO Ann
McOulre of Vahalla, NY.
"This is the most wonderful
Christmas present any kid ev-
er received," Karen said.
Although Karen's bid for Na-
shua $1.251,175.97 short of the
luccessful bid, bank officials
were Impressed by the drawing
of Nashua which she had in-
cluded along with her hid.
"So we decided that her bid
should not be in vain," a spokes-
man for the bank said.
"We were so touched by her
letter that we felt we Just had
to get her a horse," R. E. Mc-
Neill Jr. president of Hanover,
explained.
After stating tn her letter
that'she had $2443 to spend
fer a horse, the basel-eyed g>l
wrote:
"I read in the paper that you
are going to sell Nashua and his
friends. If you have a horse that
no one will buy, I would like to.
Maybe by the time you open
the bids I will have earned some
more monev and I can pay a lit-
tle higher."
Today she said she had an-
other dollar, making a total of
$25 03 she has earned by walk-
ing dogs, running errands and
"scrubbing my momma's sink."
When told she was being giv
en the horse for Christmas, Ka
ren emphatically exclaimed that
"I'm not going to race him and
nobody else will either.''
"Maybe,'' she washed, "I can '
get Eddie Arcaro to come np
and show me how to ride." Ar
caro rode Nashua In most of
his races.
After Woodward was acciden-
tally killed by his wife, who
mistook him for a prowler, the
executors of his estate decided
to sell Nashua and the other
horses in the stable by sealed
bids. Leslie B. Combs II. owner
of Spendthrift Farms at Lex-
ington, Ky., was the successful
bidder.
Billy Kkaard
COMEBACK Fullback Billy
Kinard is. a major reason why
Mississippi hopes to erase last
year's Sugar Bowl debacle with
a victory over'T.C.U. at the Cot-
ton Bowl in Dallas, Jan. 2.
Preferred by men who have tried them all because. the
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tough no skin too under. Only Shavemaster has the
smooth, comfortable continuous-round head with 3000
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million shaving actions pejj rfft [Z
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If you want Bourbon at its best call for
"GREEN RIVER," Americas smoothest
whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS
(NBA Telephotoi
SOLD Nashua, the three-
year-old "Horse of the Year,"
became the hlghest-p r I c e d
thoroughbred in turf history '
when he was sold by execuWs 1
or the William Woodward es- /
tate to Kentucky horseman
Leslie Combs II for the sum
$1.251,200.
Panam
Exclusive Distributors
CIA. CYRNOS, S. A,
Cotn


^

Ameche Pro Footballs Rookie-of-Year

Eden s Team
Shuffled
Drastically
LONDON, Dec. 21 (UP)Prime
Minister Sir Anthony Eden dras
tically snaffled his cabinet today
to answer Russia's new coexist-
ence offensive abroad and grow
ins inflation at home.
He indicated Britain's deter-
biatlon to maintain its milita-
ry strength by installing a
strong new tea at the defense
try with the accent on air
power. .
As foreign recretary, Eden
picked Selwyn Lloyd, a 51-year-
old diplomatic strategist who
duelled the Russians in four years
at the United Nations.
As his own chief deputy Eden
promoted R. A. Butler, 53, u t-
golng Chancellor of the Exche-
quer and chief architect of finan j
eial policy. ,
He will be majority leader
AN INDEPENDENT
Sfe
.Read siory on
page 1,
DAILY NEWSPAPER
Hanatna American
"Let the people know the tmth and the country is safe1' Abraham Lincoln.
3lst YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 1955
FIVE CENTS
President, Dulles Plan To Look
At Status Of Europe Defenses
epo
of the North Atlantic Treaty Coun
cil.
the* House of Commons and Lord I fenses occupied President
Privy Seal, a cabinet post with- hower
out portfolio.
The present foreign secretsry,
Harold Macmlllan, was named
Chancellor of the Exchequer with
rank below Butler. Macmillan had
been under fire for his conduct
o foreign policy,
Eden reorganised the cabinet
from top to bottom. Sis major
nainiate retired. Most of the
major posts were switches.
Lloyd, earnest and nlmble-
tonguod, gets the job of meeting
Communist challenges to Western
policy in the Middle East and A-
His four years at the United
Nation were vital experience in
preparing for the role.
He will accompany Eden to
Washington next month for t h e
conference with President Eisen-
hower, it was officially announc-
aTicial sources said House
leader Butler, the economist who
framed Churchill's back-to-pow-
er platform beforet he 1951 Social-
ist defeat, wlU b in effect E-
WASHINGTON. Dec. 21 (UP) Their daughter-in-law, Barbara ington since Nov. 14, recovering
in The status of western Europe's del Eisenhower, was at nearby Walter, from his heart attack. He plans to
Eisen-IReed Army Hospital. The baby
was expected soon.
The President and Mrs. Ei-
He summoned Secretary of senhower visited their daughter -
State John Foster Dulles to an > in-law late yesterday in the hospi-
aftemoon conference for first tal's presidential suite. The an-
hand report on last week's meeting | xious father, Maj. John Eisenho-
wer, also was present.
Mr. Eisenhower grinned
the visit and
looks fine.'
said:
after
"Why, she
Dulles on his return from the
Paris meeting Sunday was glow-
ingly optimistic. He said the na-| The Eisenhowers returned to
tions of western Europe feel the White House yesterday a day
"more than ever secure.
The President and Outlet al-
an might discuss administration
plans to ask Congress for HMO,
000,900 in for.ian aid next
yearalmost double th appro-
priation for this year. Dulles
was reported to have discussed
th increase at Paris.
Announcement of the admini-
stration's foreign aid proposals has
stirred up strong opposition in
Congress.
den'a deputy prime minister.
i
Rebel Terrorists
Order Officials
To Quit Their Jobs
ALGIERS, Algeria, Dec. 21 (UP)
Rebel terrorista have ordered
Algerian native officials to ouit
their Jobs by Jan. 2 and backed the
demand up with threats, informed
source; said today.
Reports of the rebel underground
ultimatum circulated in Algiers to-
day together with other reports
that the rebels are planning
Christmas eve demonstrations
that could lead to new bloodshed
throughout the tinder-box territo-
ry
They followed arrival of 1,400
-French soldiers Tuesday to rein-
force the security Setup in Alge-
ria and an official report of a
new clash Tuesday afternoon be-
tween troops and rebels near
Dra-El-Mizan in which eight re
bels were slain.
Meanwhile, the President and
Mrs. Eisenhower completed plans
for celebrating Christmas at the
White House and waited for news
of the birth of their fourth grand
child.
earlier than planned from their
farm at Gettysburg, Pa. White
House Press Secretary James Ha
gerty said the move to Wash-
ington, originally scheduled for to-
day, was changed so Mrs. Eisen
hower could get to work on some
Christmas arrangements.
The President had been at his
farm with one side trip to Wash-
Poujadisles Force
MRP To Cancel
Election Rallies
PARIS, Dec. 21 (UP) Pierre
Adlai's Son Badly
Hur In Car Collision
GOSHEN, Ind., Dec. 21 (UP)-
Adlai Stevenson's son, John, 19,
was seriously injured in a car-
truck collision today which killed
two Harvard University class-
mates riding in his car.
The dead were William S. North
III, 19, Lake Forest, 111., and Wil-
liam C. Boyden, Jr., 19. Chicago.
The son of the Presidential can-
didate was taken to Goshen Gen-
eral Hospital in serious condition.
He suffered a broken knee cap.
cuts and bruises. Also injured
was another classmate. James
Gilligan, 19, Nebraska City, Neb.
Police said a truck dirven by
Fred GiU, 29, Detroit, Mich., col-
lided head-on with the westbound
Stevenson car. Gill's truck was
attempting to pass another truck
and was in the wrong lane when it
struck the youths' auto, police
said.
The trucker was not hurt.
The accident occurred on U.S.
20 about 10 miles northeast of here.
Stevenson's car was on an incline!
approaching a bridge over a rail
road.
Russia's Roving
Rulers Arrive Home
To Gay Welcome
MOSCOW, Dec. 21 (UP)- Rus-
sia s roving rulers arrived home to
a gay welcome today at the end
of their long Asian tour.
Tens of thousands of Russians
lined both sides of the city's main
throughfares to give triim p h a n t
cheers to Premier Nikolai Bulganin
and Communist Party Chief Niki-
ta Khrushchev.
From the central airport where
their plane landed, all the way a-
long Leninerad Highway and Gor-
ki Street, the Soviet leaders drew
halls snd applause.
Traffic along the procession route
had been shut off one and one-half
hours before the plane's scheduled
arrival.
go south after the Christmas holi-
days.
Mr. Eisenhower got his first
look last night at the 45- foot
national Christmas tree which
ho lighted by remoto control
from Gettysburg Sunday. The
brilliantly lighted tree it in th
park behind the White House.
It took the President just 26 min-
utes to fly from his farm to Wash-
ington in his small two engine
plane. Mrs. Eisenhower, who a-
voids small planes because of a
minor heart condition, followed by
automobile.
President Eisenhower looked
rested as he arrived at Washing-
ton National Airport. He went di-
rectly to the White House for a
slon has been made as to when
Storm Death Toll Now 22
In Bitterly-Cold Europe
LONDON, Dec. 21(UP)The ways. Several ships ran aground
death tlol In Europe's iciest but were saved by rescue vessels
storm reached 22 today andj Meanwhile In the United
there were fears that the crews
of three missing ships had died
in the stormy Baltic Sea where
the bitterest cold In 100 years
was reported.
Widespread aerial searches-
were ordered today for the ships
weather permitting. But the
blizzards sweeping down from
Siberia almost wiped out hope thost
the sailors would be fuond.
The missing ships were the
Swedish- freighter Hoeken
(Hawk) with 15 men aboard and
the German freighters Sibylle
and Ernie with a total of 12
crew members.
Earlier searches over the
great expanse of the Baltic fail
States, snowshofc weather spread
eastward across the nation
leaving the Midwest still in a
deep freeze, while heavy rain-
storms brought floods In the
Pacific Northwest.
the President will leave for the ed t0 ^ite the missing vessels.
South or where he will go. Augus- Raln fog and gaie winds
ta is considered the most likely |ple snlppin_ ^ the North
place because the President has Sea whlle ,ce added to ^ dan.
spent considerable time there. Iger ^ other European water
It warmed up slightly In oe-
numbed Minnesota, but only
from Arctic .temperatures to
more befitting Canada.
At Bemldjl, Minn., the ther-
mometer moved from 45 below
zero to 11 below and it WRs
three below at Minneapolis
Forecasters said snow would
continue in the Great Lakes re-
gion, with scattered snow in
northern New York and parts
fo the Ohio Valley.
Argentine Government Hauls
In More 'Plotting Disorders
BUENOS AIRES, Dec. 21 (UP)
The revolutionary government
announced today that 18 persons
including five retired Army of-
brief period ot work and his pre-^ieers-have been arrested in the
scribed mid-day rest. western provincial capital of Men-
Depending on when the child ls!^"for "Plotting PUbhc disor-
born, the President plans to leave d
Washington shortly after Christ
mas for the two week trip to the
South that his doctors have sug-
gested. He probably will go to Au-
gusta, Ga., for some sunshine
and mild exercise.
The President conferred briefly
yesterday with Dillon S. Anderson,
his special assistant on security
affairs, before leaving Gettysburg.
Anderson helped him with the a-
genda for tomorrow's National Se-
curity Council meeting. The chief
executive had no formal ap-
pointments for the rest of the day.
The President was In a jovial-
mood as he boarded his small
plan* at Gettysburg. Scanning
the bright Mu* sky, he teW re-
porters that "It's a batter day
than we've been having areund
here." ,
He also chatted briefly with his
pilot, Col. William G. Draper, and
paused at the plane's door for pho-
tographers to snap his picture.
With him was James Rowley,
chief of the White House
Service detail.
Hagerty
The date of the arrests and the
names of the prisoners were not
m."de public.
Laborista said the plot against
the government of President Pe-
dro E. Aramburu was due to
break out after Christmas. Other
newspapers however, played down
or ignored the La Plata raids.
According to El Laborista's
story, the principal raid was car-
ried cut at dawn last Thursday,
when 59 Peronlsts.Vere seized.
It reiterated the report that
The "Army Ministry announced Gen. Eraclio Ferrazzano, Gentil-
yesterday that retired Col. Fede-lhuomo, Col. Norberto Ugolini and
rico Gentiluomo and 23 others Lt. Col. Hermenegildo Barbosa al-
were arrested on similar charges so were arrested last week,
two weeks ago in La Plata, Capi-
tal of Buenos Aires Province.
Yesterday guards at the g o v
eminent House were strengthened
and additional security forces
were sent to Buenos Aires In-
ternational Ezelza Airport to
forestall a possible counter-revolu
tionary plot.
Reports from Rosarlo, the coun
try's second largest city, said
marine units had occupied the
busy dock area In the Parana
River waterfront and that the lo-
cal police and infantry garrison
were confined to barracks since
Monday night.
The suspense arose from last
week raids on Peronist centers
in La Plata in which up to 200
Secret I persons were reported to have
I been arrested.
in the newspaper
An Army statement said those
taken were Gentllhuomo, an
Army non-commissioned officer
and 22 clvilianm en and wom-
en. They were "plotting to cre-
ate general unrest" and all of
them beeonged to the Peronist
Party, the statement said.
Buenos Aires provincial police
confirmed hat another raid was
made Thursday on the provincial
government's printing plant. It
said that 22 printers and mecha-
nics were held in custody af Her
questioning.
The provincial police also dis-
closed that some 200 other per-
sons were arrested in a raid car-
ried out at midnight Friday in the
big industrial and brewing center
of Quilines, south of Buenos Ai-
res.
Extremely cold weather pre-
vailed over the eastern half of
the nation and lt will stay cold
another day, the weatherman
warned. Temperatures Included
10 at Boston, 16 in New York
and 29 In Washington.
It was a balmy 60 at San
Francisco and Los Angeles but
the Northwest rainstorms ex-
tended into upper California,
causing floods.
Monday night winds of no
mies an hour hit Mt. Tamal-
pals near San Francisco.
Creeks and rivers left their
banks in northern California
from the violent rainstorms,
which were blamed for at least
one death.
Ten other persons were res-
cued from flooded care. Th re-1
sort town of Guernesville was1
slwtS: the rampag,n* rhs-i
Wind justs up to 90 miles an
hour with temperatures 33 de-
Ef? be.l0,w zer0 rnarooned 'our
wSt.tt1.ev,5,on "hi'neers atop
tSSngton ta ,cy N'*
JrnBrS1^w*r* 8trande<* when
snowcaots- . unable to
1V?em down from storm-
ad televised army rescue train-
PARIS BEAUTY Sixteen-
year-old Genevieve Janet is
"Miss Paris" of 1955. The long-
legged beauty was chosen by
her city to compete for the
title of "Miss France." Shown
here in Paris, she has studied
classical dancing since she was
eight years old.
The Harvard students were on
. their way home from school for
Poujades rowdy 'Commandos Christmas vacation. The car was
forced the Catholic Popular Re- loaded with gKi equipment,
publicans (MRP) to cancel their
election rallies in central France
today.
Undaunted by a stink bomb tos-
sed at their leader, P o u j a d e's
tough supporters swept through
the campaign for the Jan. 2 elec-
tions throwing insults and eggs in
their battle against the Fourth
Republic.
Statement Secretary for Econo-
mic Affairs Pierre Abelin charged
that his MRP party has called off Frank M. Clark. Edmund P. Rad-
the meetings in the Vienne depart- wan, and Frank Thompson, Jr
ment because its candidates were (were to arrive in Cristobal this
rovghed up by Poujadtites. afternoon from New York aboard
tht Panama Liner Ancon.
- He charged "the commu n 1 s t s
have issued instructions not to at- The Congressional visitors are
tack the Poujade movement to be-, accompanied by their wives
Senator. 3 House
Members Arriving
Af Cristobal Today
U. S. Sen. Clifford F. Case,
of New Jersey and U. S. Rep s.
Cuddly Bear loose;
tie Girls Nay Get
Christmas Surprise
ATLANTA, Dec. 21 (UP) _
Smokey the bear has eone sissv
and the U. S. Forest S*e r v i c
tears that somewhere on Christ-
m morning a little girl may
fh heJih<>ck her ,iie *hen
sne cuddles her cute new doll
For Smokey, the service's mas-
cot in its forest fire
campaign, was the
voice switch in
ry.
prevention
victim of a
some toy facto-
AFTER SANTAS VISIT happy children of the Medalla Milagrosa Orphanage In David, Republic of Panam, try out the gifts
they received during the Caribbean Air Command's "Operation Christmas" yesterday. Gifts were also distributed at the Pan-
am Red Cross Day Nursery and the Charity Hospital of David. More than 100 children were treated during the day as person-
nel from Albrook Air Force Base gava Santo a helping hand. (Air Force photo)
THETH_REE WISHES A Christmas Story
BY WALT SCOfT
Instead of barking its gruff
warning about wood fires, a talk-
ing version of the stuffed bear
over in South Carolina created
pandermonium in the state fores-
try office by uttering in a dainty
little voice:
"Now I lay me down to sleep.
I pray the Lord my soul to keep
God bless Mommy. God Bless
Daddy. Amen.''
The Smokey with the wrong
voice was one of 9 Smokey bears
ordered by the South Carolina
Forestry Commission. The service
permits private manufacturers to
sell the talking models.
When news of the toy-maker's
fumble was received here, region-
al employes of the service could
only speculate that Smokey's real
voice wound up in a little girl
doll. 8o instead of childish pray
Security Council
To Discuss Japan's
Admission Tomorroi
UNITED NATIONS, Dec. 21
(UP)The Security Council
meets at 10:30 a.m. today to be-
Sin a discussion likely to draw
ussia's 11th veto in a week on
a watered-down proposal for Ja-
panese membership in the United
Nations.
The meeting was called to dis
cuss a British resolution sayinj
the council recognizes Japan';
qualifications for membership
and hopes the General Assembly
will do something about them as
soon as possible.
The Russians have vetoes Ja-
pan three times previously, and
12 other nations once each, in the
past week. The veto of the other
non-Communist countries was
withdrawn later, but Russian op-
position to Japanesne admission
is adamant.
Also awaiting attention by the
council is a report by Canadian
Maj. Gen. E. L. M. Burns on Is-
rael's Dec. 11 attack on Syrian
forces on the shores of the Sea
of Galilee. This subject probably
will not be discussed until the
counci' takes up a Syrian com-
plaint tomorrow.
aefit from its excesses."
Gainza Paz Formally
Gets His Paper Today
ind rr embers of their families
and rre schedulec to sail on the
same ship Saturday on the return
trip to New York.
Case la a Republican from Rah
way, N. J., and is a member of
the Post Office and Civil Service
and the District of Columbia
Committees. Forrrerlv a member
of the New Jersey House of As-
sembly, he wab elected to the U.
S. Senate In 1954 .
BUENOS AIRES. Dec 21 (UP)-
Df. Alberto Gainza Paz takes form-
al title at 4:30 p.m. today to the
principal properties of the newspa-
per La Prensa, confiscated from
him more than four years ac byj Clark U a Democrat from Bes
fepoacd Dictator Juan D. Peron. semer, Pa., and is a member of
_ jthe Merchant Marine and Flsh-
The La Prensa building and the eries and Public Works Commit-
pnnting plant, six blocks away, tees. He has been a member of
wore handed over Monday to Ma- the U. S. Congress since 1954.
auel Ordonez, chief counsel of the
Pat family, but today's ceremony I Had wan is a Republican from
formally marks restitution of the Buffalo, N. Y. He is a member
properties. | of the Foreign Affairs Com
' mittee and has been in Congress
Peron converted La Prensa into since 1996.
a propaganda organ for his CGT Thompson is a Democrat from
abor federation, which continued I Trenton, N. J., and is a member
ta run the paper until the present of the Education and Labor and
revolutionary government decided House Administration Co an m i t
to return it to Gainza Pas. The tees. Formerly minority leader in
newspaper is scheduled to reap, the New Jeraey General Assem
pear under his direction as soon as| bly be was elected to <>mg"+* in
an lavaptory completed. 1964.
T"?*F,*5 *!=** W,TH a capital m
*INTMCBk UCXJSC THAT NI6HT
AtuSH AGAiKf
TM SO HUNGRY
I COUtO SAT .
PtZZY DRAKE?
Freed Missionaries
Head For Philippines
Under Doctors' Care
HONG KONG, Dec. 21 (UP) -
Dr. and Mrs. Homer Bradshaw
weak and 111 after nearly f i v t
years in Communist prisons, lef
for a U.S. Air Force hospital is
the Phillippines today under th<
cart of two doctors and a high
ranking nurse.
A special Air Force ambulant
plane, fitted with berths for p
erTthTdoir will WffVB5|&fiT 'a' tW SSSTtS
big-bear manner: I sumaries to America \
"I'm Smokey the bear, 'I'm
Smokey the 'bear.
Base in the Pacific Island nation
where they will be treated at th
20Sth Air Force Hospital.
"Running and looking for smoke
In the air.
"I warn careless people and
tell them 'take care.'
"Please prevent forest fires,
says Smokey the bear."
They were accompanied by Drs.
Charles Louis and Jacob Simler
Nurse Corps Maj. M. Bucko, and
Richard Tomlin and Mar g a r e I
Strathle, representatives of the
American and British Red Cross
organizations.
"Thanks to everybody," Brad-
shaw said as he boarded the plane
"Merry Christmas to you all!"
The Bradshsws, who were im-
prisoned by the Communists Jal
China in 1941. were barely able
East Reds Will Try
Other Allied Soldiers
BERLIN. Dec, 21 (UP) East,
German Communists said t o d a y i ** ,whJen trv retu.el.to ftt
tiiey will try Western allied na- <"" I" Hon8 Kon yesterday. Both
tionala before Communist courts improved overnight,
if they commit crimes in East Ber-
lin.
In another clear indication that
four-power agreements on Ber 11 n
are considered dead by the Com-
munists, the Communist Berli n e r
Zeltung said, "The German Dem-
ocratic Republic is a sovereign
tute with own laws that must be
respected by visitors.
"Therefore It will be necessary
that li. futura criminals be tried
by our own court", for violation of
laws on the territory of the German
Democratic Repuh
The paper made th statement In
an angry editorial on the acntilttai
by 0 I Army courts martial of
twa Amarlsan aoldlan charged by
the Communists with breaung up
Communist eter.
Bradshaw suffered a phy s I e a I
breakdown in May, and his wife's
mind gave way under the strata)
of Red captivity. She has been al-
most totally unaware of her sur-
roundings for months, and it baa
been difficult to persuade her ot
sat.
Porgy And Bess*
Cast In Moscow
' MOSCOW, Dec. 21 (UP) Th
New Yok Everyman T h e at e r
Company arrived yesterday to
present a series of performances
of George Gershwin's "Porgy ami
Bess "
The year 195 which marks thjaj
grarl and come to Moscow in the
second week of January.