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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/00950
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:00950
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
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THE CITY OF THE
VICEROYS...
INTERNATIONAL AIRWAYS
AN INDEPENDENT

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V anama American
"1st i/u? people know the truth and the country U $ofe" Abraham Lincoln,
CANADIAN
WHISKY
list TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAT, DECEMBER It, 1955
FIVE CENTS
fit
Israeli Forces Raid
______ ______ ______ (NEA Telephoto)
ATTEND CABINET MEETING President Elsenhower (right)
talks with Postmaster General Arthur Summerfield as they walk
to Laurel Cottage at Camp Davis, Md., for a meeting of the
Cabinet.
* *
Doctors'
Advice
xTake
To Ike
It Easy
Sparks
Will-He-Run Speculation
llnw^S^asraHthe party
WASHINGTON, Dec. 12(UP)
Doctors' reports that President
Elsenhower should ease his work
d touched off new Republi-
can speculation today as to
whether the President will see*
reelection.
_eS_ OOP viewpoints about Mr. Els-
^nhower's political plans seem
to
the
In 1152.
Most of the recent public and
Srlvate forecasts that the Pres-
lent will run again have come
from men who nave been re-
garded as all-out supporters of
Mr. Eisenhower.
With no obvious explanation,
disbelief appears to be running
In much greater proportion a-
mong GOP politicians not close-
ly tied to the Eisenhower wing
of the party.
President Elsenhower's doc-
tors said Saturday he is making
a basically good recovery from
his Sept. 24 heart attack.
Television
Plans Going
On Schedule
Plans for television for the U.S.
Armed Services here point to-
wards completion on schedule
with TV operating here this
spring.
On top of Ancon Hill Is a 204-
foot microwave tower, just com-
pleted for the installation of trans-
mitting antenna for he U.S. Arm-
ed Force's Pacific Side Television
Station.
A second tower Is bejng erect-
ed near Gatun Lake area of Fort
Davis to service the Atlantic Side.
Television studios will be con-
structed on the third floor of the
Ft. Clayton building now bousing
CFN radio. Army technicians are
1 ntrainlng with equipment In
the SUtes.
The two microwave antennas
which will be approximately 800
and 400 feet above sea level on
the Paclifc and Atlantic sides,
respectively, will also be .used
as part of the new microwave re-
lay link to improve communica-
tions between military installa-
tions on the Canal Zone.
However, they said he U
showing some signs of fatigue
from his increased activities and
recommendad he should ease up
for the next few weeks.
For more than a month, there
has been a steady upswing in
sxpressed hopes or beliefs that
Mr. Elsenhower will run again. ""I""""' ,w
Evidence swnnnrtlng these, .s^. ^
Ssclosed.1' eair" a0t bMD 1
Some Republicans admit wish-
ful thinking may be a factor;
others say the President is fac-
ing an unfinished Job as a world
leader, others concede they Just
have a "feeling in the bones"
that he will run again.
On the other side of the po-
litical fence, New York Demo-
cratic leader Carmine DeSapio
predicted the Democratic Presi-
dential nominee in 1956 will re-
capture the "Solid South" and
be electedeven If Mr. Eisen-
hower runs.
Ex-President Suggests New Post:
'Administrative Vice President'
NEW YORK, Dec. 12 (UP)
Former President Hoover be-
lieves Congress should create a
new post of administrative vice
president to ease the rigors of
the Presidency.
The 81-year-old former Presi-
dent made the suggestion yes-
terday In a televised Interview
(NBC's "Meet the Press") when
reporters asked him for recom-
mendations to lighten the bur-
den of the Presidency In view
of Mr. Elsenhower's illness.
Mr. Hoover said the new posi-
tion should be filled bv Presi-
dential appointment. The new
officer would be assigned such
duties as the Chief Executive
would delegate to- him, be add-
ed.
The former President said he
inks the post could be created
by Congress without amending
toe Constitution.
If tteh legislation were en-
acted, he said. "Ido not believe"
the burdensome post of the
Presidency would be beyond the
physical capabilities of any one
man.
Importers To Brief
Mr. Hoover said Sherman Ad-
ams, chief presidential alde to
President Elsenhower, does not
now have the legislative au- i tax-discount price,
thority to perform many Presi-
dential duties and functions.
On Low-duly Liquor
Wholesale liquor dealers will
Ssther tomorrow to hear a report
om the committee of importing
wholesalers who met lsst week
with representatives of the Pana
ma government is an effort to
simplify procedures for selling
tax-discount liquor to Canal Zone
clubs and individuals.
About M wholesslers are ex-
pected st tomorrow's gathering
where the four importing firms
will brief them on what appears
to be the likely procedures for
selling the tax-discount liquid for
consumption In the Canal Zone.
Meanwhile it is understood that
the Panama government is going
ahead with the preparation of the
paper stamps to go over the
mouth of each bottle and rubber
stamp which must be imprinted
on the bottle label. Both will
proclaim the goods as sold at the
Congressmen Here
iTcrStudy MHHary
Housing in Zone
He said vice presidents in re
cent years have been "brought
more and more into the admin-
istration as an aide to the Pres-
ident."
But he said this can only be
done under present law in such
fields as social snd public rela-
tions, the formulation of policy
and speech-writing.
It would take additional leg-
islation, he said, to delegate to
the vice president or a new ad-
ministrative vice presidency
many other "minor or secon-
dary" duties of the Chief Execu-
tive.
But he warned against dele-
gating any vital Presidential
power.
James P. Roberts
Funeral Services
Held At SI. Lukes
Privste funeral services for
James P. Roberts, who died sud-
denly early Friday at his Dublo
Heights home were to be held this
afternoon in All Souls Chapel, Ca-
thedral of St. Luke's Episcopal
Church, Ancon.
The late Mr. Roberts wsi s well
skipping man on the Isth-
us and was an outstanding per-
- hry m civic and social life
His widow, Mrs. Virginia K. Rob-
erts, requested that no fie wees be
sent, and that friends desiring to
do so, could donate the equrvsleat
to the Bella Vista Children's
Home.
Ashes of the deceased will be
placed to rest in the Columbarium
of the chapel.
The government is also prepar-
ing the certificate forms which
the deslers will use to get s re-
fund from the Tressury of the
tax they normally pay when the
product is Imported.____
Have You Lost
Your Handbag?
Anybody short of cash lately?
That is. did you lose your purse
with money in It?
Cristobal police are holding at
their station, as ladies handbag
which was found at Bracos
Heights.
Owner Is asked to come In to
Identify same.
National Liberal Party Convention
Nominates Goytia For Presidency
Meeting in convention at Las
Tsblss yesterday the National
Liberal Psrty of Panama nomi-
nated Dr. Victor F. Goytia to run
firm has built a number of struc-
tures on the Canal Zone.
The candidate for second vice-
president is an orthopedic physi-
for President in next May's lee- can, Dr. Luis D. Alfsro.
tion. All of the candidates' names
I were presented to the convention
Some 250 delegates were present by National Liberal leader Enri-
at the convention presided over que A. Jimenez, President of Ps-
by Dr. Daniel Chama. Jr., former nama from 1945 until IMS.
President of Che Republic. Later, afetr the nomination had
Dr. Goytia has been living for i been approved, Jimenez read s
the past two years in Miami,) letter from Dr. Goytia saying thst
Florida, where he writes a col- he would accept if the nomina-
umn for the Spanish-language tion were offered him.
newspaper Diario de las Ameri-I The National Liberal Party is
is. the only opposition group which
He is s former chief Justice of. may eater a candidate under
the Supreme Court of Panama present electoral laws.
sad was s one time edltorisl di- The convention voted to reeosn-
rector of The Panama American, mend revision of the electoral
A professor of history, he wss law prescribing that 43,000 reg-
THANetSTOOOV SEYBOLD'S LAUNCH, the e vacuatlon of a seriously in 19-year-old Pana-
manian girl by helicopter from Otoque Island was speedly carried out yesterday afternoon. The
Governor's fishing launch was In the area when help was summoned from a small craft
which reached the launch. The Governor was able to contact rescue headquarters who imme-
diatelv dispatched a helicopter. The sick girl, Carmen M. Jimnez was transferred to Santo To-
HosDltal from Albrook. Pilot was Capt. Win, Peel, co-pilot was Lt. D. Allen and Flight
mas
Surgeon was Lt. Harry Romero, photo shows the girl being taken off a stretcher at Albrook.
Eight members of the House
Committee on Banking and Cur-
rency, including five Congress-
men, arrived at Albrook Air
Force Base this afternoon for a
week-long visit in order to ex-
amine first-hand the U.S. Armed
Forces' requirements for housing
In the Canal Zone area.
The group Is on a two-week
tour of TJB. military Installa-
tions In Cuba and Puerto Rico,
u well as the Canal Zone.
Committee members Include:
Rep. Hugh J. Addonlzlo (D-N.J-).
Acting Chairman; Rep. William
A. Barrett (D-PA); Rep. Barrat
O'Hara, (D-ni); Rep. Thomas L-
Ashley, (D-Ohlo); Rep. Henry
O. Talle, (R-Iowa); John E.
Barriere, 8taff Director; Robert
R. Poston, chief Counsel; Or-
man 8- Fink, Staff Member.
Quarantine Officers Death
Said 'Accidentar VTamTitig
A coroner's report today on
the death of quarantine board-
ing officer William J. Knutson
Usted "accidental drowning" as
cause of death.
-The 37 year old American
slipped and fell off a ladder Sat-
urday morning while boarding a
ship outside of the Cristobal
breakwater. _
Speculation as to the possibil-
ity of a heart attack having
caused Knutson's death ran high
over the week-end. but the au-
topsy failed to reveal this con-
dition.
Waterfront sources today re-
called that another boarding of-
ficer, Frank Mayo also died
when he fell from a ladder while
boarding a ship several year
ago.
A board of Inquiry investigat-
ing the accident had not reach-
ed any conclusion today and the
senior member of the board. Ma-
rine Director Cant. Frank A.
Munrot Jr., said they were still
studying testimony in the case.
It was understood that Knut- 3: p.m.
g
shoes recommended for the job
of boarding a ship, but that he
had ordinary shoes on at the
time.
Memorial services will be held
Saturday at 10 a.m. at the Elks
Home at Brazos Brook
The services will be conducted
by officers of Cristobal, Canal
Zone. Lodge 1542 of the Elks.
Knutson, who was born In
Minnesota had been with the
Canal organization since 1940,
with the exception of three
years of military service during
World War II. He was made a
boarding quarantine inspector In
1949.
BALBOA TIDES
TUESDAY, MCIMIIR 13
HIGH LOW
2:56 a.m. :23 .
:IT p.m.
Big Guns Thunder
All Night Near
Sea Of Galilee
JERUSALEM, Dec. 12 (UP)Israeli and Syrian armiee
battled today near the Sea of Galilee where Israeli force
killed 50 Syrian soldiers and captured 30 others in a mas-
sive retaliatory raid into Syria.
The bitter fighting in which big guns of each sida
dueled throughout the night appeared to be as big in
scope or even bigger than the Israeli-Egyptian clash in
the El Auja demilitarized zone Nov. 4.
The fighting started Idst night when Israeli forces
stormed across the frontier into Syria on a small-scale in-
vasion aimed at halting Syrian attacks on fishing boats
the Sea of Galilee where men have fished since the
time of Christ.
Fighting also was reported
Sunday between Egypt and Is-
rael.
MaJ. Dan Qov, the Israeli mil-
itary spokesman, said Israeli ca-
sualties were only four killed
and 12 wounded in the clash
which may have been the big-
gest battle since the end of the
Jewish-Arab war in 1948.
tav said the IsraeM forees
returned to their base after
capturing an the Syrian nhere
positions which had shelled
Israeli fishing boats and de-
stroying all forfficatlons and
capturing Syrian arms.
But fighting continued
through the night as Syrian
guns roared back from their hill
positions overlooking the Sea of
Galilee.
The Israelis said the guns
were directed at the Israeli town
of Ein oev and that there were
no casualties.
A dispatch t from Damascus
said the air forces in tfrr-south-
ern part of the country bordar*
ing Israel were alerted for te-
tion and that heavy reinforce-
ments were rushed to the fron-
tier near the River Jordan in an
Incident that could embroil
Egypt as well
Key Medical Officials To Visit
US Armed Forces Chiefs In CZ
Key medical personnel of the
UJ3. armed forces, Including the
assistant secretory of defense
(health and medical), Dr. Frank
B Berry, are scheduled to ar-
rive tomorrow afternoon at Al-
brook Air Force Base for a
three-day get-together in the
Canal Zone with medical and
dental officers of the three
services.
On an 11-day tour of U.S.
military medical facilities hi
Bermuda, Florida, Cuba and
Another Marine Has Situation On Foot In Hand
principal of the Profession School.
Norn Ins ted to run for first vice-
president wss engineer Frsnclsco
A. Morales, whose contracting
adherents are necessary
te put a presidential candidate in
the field. They would reduce the
number to 30,000.
By DOT LETOFSBT
Another victim of the intrig-
uing lure of foreign lands reach-
ed Panama this morning after
four months of footing it from
Pasadena, California.
The ex-Marine is Bob Auburn,
a petroleum engineering grad-
uate of 8tanford University, who
is aiming at Argentina as his
eventual destination.
Auburn, a hearty 27-year-old,
was victimized by the same
travel lust that possessed an-
other former Marine, John
Mann, the red-bearded Iowan
who stopped here last summer.
But the two are at poles ux otn-
er aspects.
Mann was partnered by
burro on his foot Journey from
Mexico to Brasil. His compan-
ion took ill here and forced
Mann to postpone his Junket
until the dry season sets In. the Marine Corps stationed
Mann currently is in the States-
Auburn, however, is unaccom-
panied. And thus he is burden-
ed with an 0-pound pack on his
slight but wiry es-pound frame.
And this newest visitar is
set against beards. Be claims
the growth is a haven for
homeless 'neeets and be
"shaves once a week, whether
I need it or not."
Besides his unwieldy pack of
equipment, h lugs along a 10-
pound movie camera encased tn
a leather bag.
Auburn has taken motion pic-
ture courses at the University
of Southern California and In-
tends to piece together the pho-
tographic results of his esca-
pade for possible commercial
use. >
The most current Ulysses to
cross Panama Intends to rest
here five days before setting
sights toward Venezuela, where
he plans to work one or two
months to recover some of bis
lost capital.
Auburn began his self-styled
tour of the Lower Americas"
Sept. 18 from Pasadena. "They
said I was crazy," he aays, not
altogether uncertain himself,
"but I went anyway."
He has been walking and
hitching rides down the west-
ern coast of Mexico and into
Latin America. His only untime-
ly episode took place In Mexico
where a highway vandal vainly
tried to roll him.
Auburn's father was a much-
travelled secre t a r y for the
YMCA when .his son was an ur-
chin. The youngster lived In va-
rious places of the Middle East
during his first eight years be-
fore the family settled In Cr-ll.
fornla.
After a three-year hitch in
in
Hawaii, Auburn" completed bis
study at Stanford In 1952. He
worked a year and a half with
the Arabian-American Oil Com-
Siny in Saudi Arabia before
unchlng his first epic lourney.
He began a 13-month trip
through the African continent
in December IMS at Beirut,
Lebanon. He trudged on foot.
Jumped cattle boats and ased
any transportation meant he
could manage down the Nile
stiver to the Belgian Cent.
At Uganda. East Africa, he
headed across the continent to
the west coast.
From there he made his way
up the coast to North Africa and
back to the States, reaching
there last February.
Auburn worked for she Cali-
fornia Highway Divisin before
starting his new venture.
These tedious Journeys are
(Ceatiaaed an Page a, Cel e>
EX-MARINE Bel) Aabarn, a weary tourist.
Dr. FRANK B. BEBBY
Puerto Rico, as well as * C}-
nal Zone, the group wUl vtsw
medical treatment xacffiUe J
the Canal Zone and discute
programs and problems wltn
medical and dental personnel.
Dr. Berry will receive military
honors by Albrook on his arriv-
al. In addition, a Joint honor.
Euard ceremony will be held for
im at Quarry Heights with Ar-
my, Air Force and Marine Corps
troops of the Caribbean Com-
mand participar***.
In addition to Dr. Berry, the
military medical group includes:
From the Office Secretary of
Defense: Dr. Edward H. Cush-
ing, deputy assistant secretary
of defense (health and medi-
cal); Robert McCullough, repre-
sentative of assistant secretary
of defense (comptroller); Lloyd
H- Mullt, representative of as-
sistant secretary of defense
(supply and logistics): Stephen
S. Jackson, assistant general
counsel; Lt. CoL Frank BT. Law-
ford, MSC, USA. staff assistant;
Lt. Col. Kl'xabeth S- Smith. USA.
representative of assistant sec-
retary of defense (manpower,
personnel and reserva); and
Mrs. Mildred L. McBlalr. execu-
tive assistant to Dr. Berry.
From the Civilian Health and
Medical Advisory Council to Use
Assistant Secretary of Defenses
Dr. Thomas P Fox, Dr. Osear f
Hampton. Jr.; Dr. James E. Mo-
Corraack; Dr. Isidor 6. Radvln:
Dr. Anthony J. J. Rourke and
Dr. B. Noland Carter
From the US. armed forceas
(Ceatmaed ea Page , del


fAGE TWO
TO PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAltT NEWSPATBM
MONDAY, DECEMBER IS, 1953
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THE MAR BOX
AN APOLOGY TO MAHOUT
Sir:
I I apologize to Mahout, the secret Republican elephant boy,
for falling to five more complete recognition to his letter to the
y Box In my honor.
I've been attending the Congressional Hearings at Balboa
Heights where two subjects, the abandonment of the PR.R and
turning the Canal over to the Department of Commerce, Inter-
ested me Inordinately.
As a Democrat I'm against both of them. But I can't help
feellng sorry for Secretary of Commerce Douglas McKay if they
do not turn tht Canal over to him. Now that would be some-
thing to give away that would dwarf dams and pasture lands
national forests.
Labor News
And
Comment
Mahout wrote: "Shortly after Mr. Eisenhower moved into
igton with DDT and soap and water, and removed the
_ left by an Immediate predecessor, we heard the Jackass
bray that the country was indeed headed for a depression."
Let's take the DDT etc. first. The record shows that Mr.
Eisenhower had to use the DDT even before he got to Washing-
ton on the chairman of the Republican National Committee, a
fellow Kanaan. All that chap had done was to sell a building
to the state of Kansas that it already owned.
We may be thankful that his resignation was accepted be-
fore he got to Washington. While he certainly couldn't have
sold the captol to the U.S. Government while George Humphreys
was Secretary of the Treasury, he might have told the White
House or the Washington Monument to some oil-rich Texas
Republican.
I realise that DDT. soap and water an for use of Democrats,
but a little could have been used on say, Harold Talbott, secre-
tary of the Air Force, for instance.
You know now he was promoting his private business on De-
fense Department letter heads, using government stenographers,
and also using his official position for pressure purposes, in-
stead of using DDT, soap and water on him, they used violet tal-
cum powder and perfume and gave him a decoration and a spe-
cial review and commendation.
Is it possible that Mahout has never heard of the Dlxoo-
Yates contract made at the direction of the President without
competitive bidding by the Atomic Energy commission for the
benefit of the Tennessee Valley Authority and, of course, Dixon
and Yates.
It is true that the President cancelled the contract when he
was given an out by proposed construction of an electric plant
by the municipality of Memphis.
Now even the chairman of *the Atomic Energy Commission
says that the contract Is probably void because of the involve-
ment of a conflict of Interests. He refers to the part played by
one Adolphe Wensell, who played both ends against the middle
by acting as adviser to the Bureau of the Budget while still an
officer of the First Boston Company which was to finance the
Dixon-Yates deal.
None df this was mentioned in the "complete" report the
White House gave the Congressional Committee. Mr. Wenzell
Eras as aecrtt as the Unknown Soldier, it was only after Senator
'^tefauver and the Washington newspaper correspondents un-
it covered him that the government gave any sign of knowing or
ivtr having heard of him.
JJfcT Then there was the Nlcaro nickel deal, described by Fortune
i Magazine as the General Services Administrations' messiest Single
mess, which Involved the expansion of a Government-owned
" nickel plant In Cuba which netted $1,000,000 profit to the snare-
" Merritt construction company. Elephant boy, that's a lot of milk
coats and deep freezes.
And. speaking of stenches, what about Secretary of Agrl-
'. culture Benson's deal with the big cheese processors that cost
the American tax payers $3.3 million? How does that smell, ele-
.' jjhant boy?
Then there Is the case of the gentleman from Iowa, who
' -"kindly resigned before bis appointment to the Atomic Energy
'^Commission was sent to the Senate for confirmation, and one
i -obeli in the Housing administration who was pulling a Talbott,
1 "!%aA lately the head of the interstate Commerce commission...
There are more, but this letter is already too long and I am
I and I suspect the readers of the Mall Box may be tired, too.
it
ir
,1
i
i
By VICTOt RIESEL
NEW YORKThe cross country
"organiziag crusades" promised by
George Heaay and Wetter Reuther
as they lsunched the new day of
Isbor msy lose their most power-
ful weaponsupport of the Team-
sters.
That may well be the first result
of the civil wsr between Dave Beck
and Walter Reuther which flared
into the open during the new AFL-
CIO's first dsy of life. The feud
begin when word leaked out in
this column that the proposed con-
stitution of the new Industrial Un-
ion Dept., slated to be led by Wal-
ter Reuther, gave the old CIO peo-
ple the right to organise any type
of worker anywhere in the land.
Beck and his fellow Teamster
leaders st the opening convention
professed to see this as a threat
to their plans to bring the Team-
sters' membership from its cur-
rent l,tt4,ooooo duespaycrs to 3-
million. After considerable discus-
sion, Beck and the others Including
James R. Hoffa, most influential
of the Teamsters, vice presidents,
decided to Join Reuther's depart-
ment and have a strong voice in it.
Reuther opposed this move. Beck
took it to the -AFL-CIO first hh
council meeting Monday night. The
Teamsters chief was isolated. He
fought slone. President George
Meany sided with Reuther. The
high council broke old AFL pre-
cedent by not even taking Beck's
word on how many members he
hsd In industrial divisions (mean-
ing all sorts of workers lumped to-
!ether in one union without regard
or skills).
Beck mentioned the figure of
700,000 ss the number he wanted
to bring into the Industrial Union
Dept. This wss brushed sside. Beck
took this ss s deliberate Insult snd
an effort to stop the Teamsters
Brotherhood, which has become
labor's most powerful union.
That night and all through the
next day, Beck was particularly
bitter against Reuther's colleague,
James Carey, leader of the Inter-
national Union of Electrical Work-
ers and secretary-treasurer- of the
n.ew Industrial Union Dept.
(I.U.D.). It was Carey who swiftly
and sharply first rejected Becks
move into the I.U.D.
Having been rebuffed not only by
the CIO bloc but by some of their
colleagues in the old AFL, the
Teamsters met early Tuesday
morning. They decided to stay in
the AFL-CIO but not to support
those unions which were "enemies"
of the Teamsters.
In a few hours a telephone call
was made to Ohio Teamsters lead
not to support Jim Carey's
Always Something Dangerous About This Embrace!
One Washington
Merry-Go-Round
9t onmw PMAmyow
WASHINGTON-How much the
White house stsff hss been tooling
the public about the alleged prob-
lems aUegedly discussed with Pres-
ident Eisenhower wss illustrated
wnen he held his first meeting
with the Cabinet and the National
Security Council at Camp David
on November 21 and 22.
sumably so that large unused
amounts would not depress the
price of soys beans and cotton
seed when those crops came onto
the faD market
Feed-Men's Windfall
However, an investigation by a
"hlun,t members arrived |House Appropriations subeommit!
& iuPHD'Vld ,nd were *rteted|ti clsimed,that the deal was a
SL^SST"' "W8me1 * rsnged in Order to give a profit
near enough so they could easily
hear some of the conversation.
And they were flabbergasted to
give a profit
to the big feed manufacturers.
"A substantial profit was poe-
.,C y0 ere v*0*"1*? w sible as s result of the low price
hesr the President remar; in a1.1 which this vast volume5*f3
tone of great surprise: -You mean! ^^."X,T? CTKrH-lft?
biy?"
he was referring obviously to the
French walkout from the United
Nations when the UN voted to con-
sider Uie question of Algeria. This
walkout occurred September 30.
However, Henry Cabot Lodge,
U.S. Ambassador to the UN, visit-
committee.
"The price," he reported, "was
set following an Informal confer-
ence with representatives of the
American Feed Manufacturers As-
sociation held in Washington
March 24, ISM."
Here an Interesting personage
m. tVT pS5, iJ t. hUSE ent*red the Picture- w"*r Berger,
Farm Surplus Plan
. By PETER EDS0N
'term*- to-a?
"Somoone it going to bo penalixed for unneceaaary
roughness!"
ers
electrical workers' strike against
Westinghouse.
Word-bad come that baek-to-
work movements hsd developed at
Westinghouse plants in Columbus,
Mansfield snd Lima, Ohio, Sharon,
Pa., and in two plants in Balti-
more, Md. There was no wsy of
checking these reports from here,
but there is no doubt that the
Teamsters national leaders told
their midwest colleagues not to re-
spect Carey's union picket lines
any longer.
The Teamsters' attitude was that
respecting these lines of another
union meant considerable sacrifice
of their own men. If the trucks
don't go through the pickets to the
plants, the drivers, in effect, quit
sad take themselves off the payroll
although they are not directly in-
volved in the strike.
There wss .talk, too. of not re-
specting Walter Reuther's Auto
Union picket line st the marathon
strike of the Kohler plant in Wis-
consin.
If this attitude prevails among
the Teamsters after the heat of
the feud simmers away as the dele-
gates lesve New York and pass
out of esch other's daUy sight, it
could slow considerably many of
the organizational drives planned
here by the new federation.
Support from the Teamsters can
make or break a strike. If the
Teamsters respect a line and don't
cross it, no supplies can move into
a plant and no finished products
csn be lifted from warehouses to
be sold.
Usually a call from the 1 o e a)
Teamsters council is enough to set-
tle a labor dispute.
Furthermore, any new unionis-
ing drives in the south and south
west would hsve to be hooked to
the Teamsters Union, which has
the only effective operation in
many sectors there. True, there is
a strong lsbor movement in Ala-
bama and Texas. And there is the
United Mine Workers. But John
Lewis, is out of this picture snd
most of the south is organised.
So it seems that the civil war
which stirred the early hours of
the AFL-CIO marriage may shake
labor's new bouse for quite a while
WASHINGTON (NBA) De-
partment of Agriculture experts
today cast a somewhat fishy eye
on Sen. W. Kerr Scott's new farm
plan.
The North Carolina senator and
dairy farm operator unveiled his
brain child at a Democratic rally
in Council Bluffs, Iowa the very
heart of the Republican farm belt.
It got a good reception. But critics
immediately said It wouldn't work.
Big idea of the Scott plan is to
give 100 per cent of parity price
supports to little farmers. This
would be scaled down gradually,
5 per cent lower for each produc-
tion bracket, to a minimum of
00 per cent parity for big opera-
tors.
Senator Scott would combine this
with new bushel or pound limi-
tations for all the major crops
produced, except tobacco. This
would replace present acreage al-
lotments.
The Tar Heel senator says his
plan would operate on the same
f'rinciple as the graduated income
ax. The more a man has, the
higher his tax rate.
The Scott Plan is directed at
two serious farm problems. One
purpose is to give more help to
small farmers. The other is to same rate of payment, at least
discoursge big farms from pro-
ducing surpluses.
Senator Scott gives two ex
ampies of how it would work:
wheat A farmer marketing
1000 bushels would get 100 per
cent of parity price support. On
the next 500 bushels he'd get 95
per cent of parity. On the next
500 bushels, 90 per cent and so
on. For all over 4300 bushels, he'd
get only 60 per cent parity.
CottonA farmer marketing up
to IS bales would get 100 per cent
of parity. On the next 15 bales
he'd get 85 per cent, on the next
20 he'd get 90 per cent, on the
next 50 he'd get 85 per cent, on
the next 100 he'd get 80 per cent,
snd so on. For all over 500 bales,
he'd get only 60 per cent parity.
Some of the big farmers claim
this would be unfair.
Ever since the old Agricultural
Adjustment Administration days,
the government has operated on
a different principle. The govern-
ment has been making payments
for doing something. Cutting
back the big farm operators is
more vital to reducing surpluses
then cutting back little farmers
It is also recalled that former
Secretary of Agriculture Charles
F. Brannan's famous plan pro-
posed that government aid cease
on all produce over $25.000 mar-
keted from a single farm. This
was criticised as "socialistic."
The Scott plan might be difficult
to administer. It Is easy to control
the present acreage allotments just
by measuring fields. Bushel and
pound quota limitations might be
something else again.
Many farm operators might
start looking for loopholes. Big
farms could be subdivided among
sons or forty-second cousins. New
lesses could be worked out with
tenants.
Overquota production could eas-
ily be concealed. Surplus might
be diverted to a black market
What the Scott plan would do
to price levels no one can foresee.
The free market price might be
driven down to the SO per cent of
parity level.
Big farmers would then be pro-
ducing for the market Small
farmers would produce for the
government. And the surpluses
So big farmers should get. the! might become even bigger.
WalterWinchelllnNewYorK
ohspital to tell newsmen that one
of the matters he hsd discussed
with Elsenhower wss the French
walkout from the United Nations.
Ambassador Lodge made this
statement to newsmen on Octo-
ber 24.
It wss nealry one month later
that the President at Camp David.
Md., was overheard to exclaim
with surprise over the French
walkout.
Dried Milk Deal
One thing that Irks farmers is
the apparent lack of interest in
the farm problem in the highest
places in Washington. Farmers
generally recognize that the farm
problem is not an easy one, but
would feel happiej- if they were
sure some real attention was
given to the problem.
Two developments have recent-
ly Increased their disaatisafction.
One wss the statement to
the press issued from Camp David
that the farm problem "had not
even been discussed" at the first
Cabinet meeting with Eisenhower.
Naturally it seemed to farmers
that agriculture, as one of the
most pressing problems in the
nation, should have been discuss-
ed at the first Cabinet meeting
following Ike's return.
Second is the litigation started
against farmers by Secretary Ben-
Feed Manufacturers Association,
took over the job of No. 2 man
in the commodity stabilization serv
ice on March 15, just nine days
before this meeting with his old
friends of the American Feed Man-
ufacturers Association.
One month before this, another
big feed manufacturer, James A.
McConnell, head of the coopera-
tive GLF exchange in Ithaca, NY.,
one of the biggest feed dis-
tributors in the east, had become
No. 1 man In commodity stabili-
zation.
They arranged the dried-milk
deal of such benefit to the feed
manufacturers. A few farmers, be-
ing rugged Individualists, siso
bought dried milk direct from the
government, though Berger's peo-
ple seemed surprised at, this snd
bluntly remarked that the program
was designed primarily for the
feed manufacturers.
Suing Farmers
However, here is the sequel. Af-
ter Nov. l, 1954, Berger sent in-
spectors around to check on both
farmers and feed manufacturers to
see if they had mixed their feed
and those who didnt' sre now be-
ing sued for the difference be
tween the 314-cent price they paid
the governmtnt and the commer-
cial price of 17 cents.
Second, the big feed manufac-
son for falling to' mix or use up *"'^tT^^S^^i
dried milk purchased from the *.J"*1*1 *" "ff0"?^,* bJLl?
government before Nov. 1, 1954. ?rim/^Jpu.roo" *. ,eUln ***
Farmers and feed dealers who the dried milk. In other words, the
fsUed to mix or use the milk by ? manufacturers, of whose as-*
that date are being fined, in some **uti?n. "* or eight years
cases up to $5,000.
This litigation arises from the
Agriculture Department's ssle of
450.000,000 pounds of surplus dried
milk chiefly to feed deslere and
to a few farmers during the sum-
mer Of 1954
At that time soys bean and cot-
tonseed meal, which are mixed
with cattle, hog and chicken feed
to bring up the protein content, we
up In price. And supposedly for
the purpose of reducing the price
of feed the commodity stabiliza-
tion service sold half a billion
pounds of dried milk at 3V4 cents
s pound despite the fact that it
milk, but sold their feed for S-
milk, but sold their feed fir about
bout the same price.
Concluded the House Appropria-
tion committee:
"Personnel in charge of the sale
of dried milk under this program
hsve taken credit for a superla-
tive accomplishment'having sold
more dried milk at a great overall
loss to the taxpayers than ever be-
fore in all history.'''
NOTEWalter Berger, who
helped arrange the milk deal, is
the same Benson appointee whom
I revealed as having retaind his
stock In th Shea Chemical Co
which does fertilizer business with
NIOHT LITTIR TO
BROADWAY
Perhsps it is mere sentiment to-
night
That causes me to ask these
silly things ...
Or memory ... like your Eternal
Light,
That lingered like a bird with
broken wings;
I wonder if the Christmas win-
dows gleam
By any chancethrough silent
drifting snow ...
The way my mind's eye sees them
in a dream
As real as Broadway was so
long ago.
Are laughing people, now as Christ-
mas neers.
In ebb and flow along the Ave-
nue ...
Their shoulders brushing some
who conquer tears,
As I recall so msny used to do?
Does she weep or laughnow it's
December,
One among them whom I best re-
member?
Guy Fowler (H'wood)
la Dinty Moore's the other mati-
nee, a glum looking chap (usu-
ally in Miami this time of the
year) was being teased by a guy
who carries only (100 bills.
'How come," he taunted,
learn that he will be in town and
give an entertainment soon. De-
feated politicians please take par-
ticular note."
"Walter," asks the resder who
mailed it, "how old are you?"
200.
Letter to the Editor: "I'm get-
ting fatter. What can I do to
keep my husband's love?"
Melt
"Leghorn, Italy: Dear Mr. Wln-
chell," writes Capt. D. J. Walsh,
U.S. Navy, "We read you here
every day in the Rome Daily Amer-
ican. Mrs. Walsh and I recently
entertained Mr.'and Mrs. Gilbert
Kurland of Hollywood. He's with
U-I Studios. Discussing nagging
women, Mr. Kurland came up with
a good word wedding. He suggest-
ed a nagging woman could be clas-
sified ss having a 'nagative' per
sonality."
Aye, Aye, Cap'n!
Headline: "Woman Pushes Ex-
Husband Down Fire Escape."
"We're Through! Do you hear?
Threuflh!"
"Dear Mr. Winehell" writes
Howard Lanin, "I've been fascin-
ated, but puzzled, by your con-
tinued definitions of "The Torch.'
I've wanted to say: 'But torch
songs have been deed 20 years''
"you're not st Tropical Park?" until suddenly, I realized I had
"I'd leave now," was the anap-
ner, "if you would change pants!"
Roth Altasen of "Boy Frieod"
knows an actress who hss been in
so many flops she took an apart-
ment in New Haven.
been thinking in terms of 'Moan
in' Low' and the era immediately
following it in which the phrase
carrying the torch' becsme
current
"And, thinking about it at length.
11 realized that after a whole string
I of out-and-out torchers like TH
Sudden Thawt about Broadway Never Love Again' (life has lost its
naming a theatre for Helen Hayes
Nice switch seeing a theatre in-
stead of a hurricane named for a
At the RSVP a producer was
describing Broadway; "It's where
friends are made overnight and
las are made over nothing.''
From a drama
George Jean Nathan:
had a word tor it, a
ejaculation."
The show-oaf means "Ugh!"
From the 100 Years Ago Today
col'm fas the Syracuse (NY) Pest-
Standard: "Friday. Nov. 9th. IM:
The funniest man in the world is
Winehell, and we are delighted to
meaning to me); 'There Goes My
Heart' (snd here sm I); 'I've Got
to Peas Your House' (to get to
my bouse); When You Lover
Has Gone'; 'Lover Come Back To
Me'; the rhythmic it's The Talk
of the Town'; the throbbing
Stormy Weather'; the white-tie-
and tails 'Dinner For One Please
James' and many other great ones,
the torch song per se did die. But
, the moan of the heartbroken lover
monosyllabic has !*, with us s long time, and
critique by
'The Indians
always will
"There never was s more poig
nant torcher than Berlin's 'All
Atone' (by the telephone), and that
goes beck. (A fairground's painted
swings) ... These Foolish tilings
Remad Me Of You' told its story
In fandful prose and clever
rhymes, but the messsge was un-
mistakably love lost and lamented.
Cole Porter feared and antici-
pated the consequences in his 'Get
Out Of Town' (before it's too late!).
.Today the torch song is belted
with a livelier rhythm and beat
'Learnin' the 'Blues' is done at
bounce tempo; 'Ain't It A Shame'
as a rocknrolla, 'Teen-Ager's Pray-
er' as holyrollabut the wail hasn't
changed.
"To get back to the point made
earlierbecause the torch song per
se has long been out of vogue
when a pure example comes along
it is greeted ss something new and
wondrously off-beat. But *Cry Me
A River' (I cried a river over you)
goes right back to i Cried For
You' (now it's your turn to cry
over me). I'm sure your readers
can add many more/'
The Torch aa spoken: You're at
the end of her rope ... Love is
when you went everyone to know.
The Torch is when you don't .
When you make a bigger Fool of
yourself than She Did ... When
the sleep won't come and the night
mares wont go ... When Love
gets blgger'n both of you ... When
one's company and two's a crowd
... When you try to sleep counting
She . When you've reached the
end of the line after being first...
When every Tomorrow is full of
Yesterdays.
The Torch Is Over: When you
start getting bored with her get-
ting bored.
had cost the axpayer 16V4 censithe Agriculture Department. Bcr-
a pound when acquired under the'ger also proposed a plan to re*
price-support program.
It was stipulated, however, that
the dried milk had to be used up
or mixed by November 1, pre- soap and margarine makers.
move Indirect supports on vege-
table oils which would hsve meant
s $120,000,000 windfall to the big
IJktEtoBk True Life Adventures
Thb tin-/
fgak6 n6ithsk waves hoc weather. xvk
DAV ANP" NlfcHT HB KBMAIN6 ALOFT, f*jfi
t7irjik,i*. s\t tf tub r-T-^-BTfcj ** ^m S
Calvin Ponder and wife Martha
Davis star at the Blue Angel where
he plays the bass fiddle. He took
it with him in a cab to a tv re-
hearsal.
'Til bet." said the hackie, "ev
erytime you have to carry that
thing you wish you had taken up
the piccolo."
"No, I don't." said Cal, "how
many piccolo playera do you know
that are booked?"
ON CALMSK VM6, H6 LtTBK>U.y WALK16 OM TWft WAYF
SATIN6 his wiNSS awPATTeKws HeeroMf Gum&
fu i. irtmm wi+a

Some sbowfolks were gabbing
about the so-called jinx in getting
on a Time cover. A celeb said he
heard the newsmag was putting
him on.
"I wonder," he sighed. "Why
they hate me."
A playboy was telling off s cho-
rine for two-timing him. "You're
(Coatisised ea Page 1)
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT AD*
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MONDAY, DECEMBKR |* i Of?. PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
"\
US Steps Up Missile Program
To Beat Reds To Ultimate Weapon'
WASHINGTON, Dec. 1? (UP)
The United States is stepping
up Its ballistic missile program
In a rac to beat Russia to the
"ultimate weapon" of atomic-
age warfare, it was disclosed to-
day.
Informed sources said the De-
fense Department, with the ap-
proval of President Elsenhower
and the National Security Coun-
cil, is taking three steps to ac-
celerate development of long-
range, rocket-powered missile
with atomic warhead. These
\re:
1. Patting more heat and
Cesnmablv are dolan
hind the so-called "Atlas
Project" already being con-
ducted by the Air Force In co-
operation with several big in-
dastriftl and aircraft firms.
The goal is development tf
an "Intercontinental" m'ssile
with a range ef 5.0H mttee.
a. Launching a new project to
develop ah "Intermediate" mis-
sile with a range of 1,500 miles.
This project will be conducted
Jointly by the Army and N,avy,
with development effort con-
centrated at the Redstone Ar-
enal, Huntwllle, Ala., where a
Urge group of former German
rocket pert Is stationed
S Creation of a top-level com-
mittee within the Defens- De-
partment to oversee all ug*-
of the missile program, andI in-
ure that It get top priority.
Behind the expanded program
Is the concern felt by Govern-
ment leaders about JJnt
port. RUsla is making rapid
advance in missile research.
A committee of jentWa,
headed by Dr. James KilHan,
made a. secret report on so-
viet Vrogrea. to the National
Security COtineil last summer.
The report said to have
warned the Dn'ted States must
speed up Us own efforts, and
start work on an Intermediate
missile, if R hopes to stay a-
breast of Russia in the "ulti-
mate weapon" arm rae.
More recently, It 1 understood
information has been received
here Indicating Russia s li-
bme tt last month may nave
involved a hydrogen warhead
tened to a rocket device
MHItarv men call the ballistic
missile the "ultimate weapon
because there Is, at present, no
known defense against it.
The missile envisioned by sci-
entists Is a huge, multi-stage
rnn*et which can be eqvipped
with atomic warheads. Unlike a
pulled missile, which is steered
In flleht, a ballistic missile, once
("derwajr, would follow a pre-
etermned trajectory like an
ertl'lrv shell. Its rocket thrust
rould blast It far Into the outer
atmosphere, and a short while
l-*er it would come roaring
('own on Its target at a speed of
about 18,000 mlels an hour.
Roth the United States and
Bi"Vi nave been working on
ballistic missile research since
World War TX Both managed to
round up after the war some of
the German scientists who de-
veloped the V-2 rorket, a fore-
runner of the true balllstld mis-
sile which terrorized London In
the closing days of the war.
lESrf
^JAOOfTOH ttipqt
y OSWALD JACOBY
Written far NIA Service
NOBTH to
OSS
10154
? K7
? KI754
*W EAST
4Q754 4,B
JKJ731 VAQI
112. OI04J
SOUTH (D)
AKJ10S
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North-South vut.
Seam Wett N.rtk
It t'U INT- *
* Pass p ptm
Opening leadw 3 '
We continue today the erie on
the care and management of
trump suits. Even a robust trump
suit must be protected gainst the
threat of the enemy's long suit.
The protection may cost a trick,
but if this is just an overtrick .you
can well afford to give it up in
order to make sure-of your con-
tract.
In today's hand. West lead a
heart. He isn't happy about lead-
ing away from his king-jack, but
it is sound strategy to lead a long
suit when you have length In the
declarer's trump suit. Your own
long suit is your best weapon.
In this case East wins the first
trick with the ace of hearts and
leads the queen of hearts, forcing
South to ruff.
South is tempted to enter dum-
my with a diamond or club in
order to try the spade finesse.
With a successful finesse. South
will probably win 12 tricks.
If South tries the finesse, how-
ever, he will pose his contract.
West wins with the queen of
spades and leads another heart.
When South trumps, he then has
fewer trumps than West. Frofti'
that point on the hand is hopeless.
South must resist this tempta-
tion. After ruffing the second
heart, South must draw exactly
two rounds of trumps with the uce
and king. This leaves the queen
and one other trump out against
him, but South must ignore those
two trumps.
Gritting his teeth, South aban-
dons the trumps in order to cash
his good diamonds. Sooner or later
somebody will trump and lead a
heart. South will ruff with his next-
to-last trump and continue with
Airfield Coi>> oilers'
Strike Ties Up
French Air Traffic
PARIS, Dec. 12 (UP) Although
a few men trickled back to work
: today the five week old air traf-!
fie strike went on disrupting inter-
national air line services to all1
French airfields.
On srtike ire control tower staffs
and communication perso n n e 1
who have been demanding a 28
dollar a month pay boost. .The
strike started Nov. 1.
Last Friday the government pro-
mised to meet some1 of the de-
mands and one small union advised
its member to return to work.
However the large Catholic u-
nion CFTC and the Socialist Force
Ouvriere (FO) voted to tay out.
and one of the nations two major
Sllots unions, the SNOAM, set a 24
our walkout for Dec. 18 to back
them up.
Bekkai To Complete
Policy Declaration
RABAT, Morocco, Dec. 11 (UP)
Premier Si Bekkai is to meet
with his cabinet today to complete
work on the ministerial declara-
tion.
Informed source aid that Sul-
tan Mohammed V would preaide
over the meeting.
Meanwhile report com l n g m
showed at least two persons were
killed and even Injured in ter-
rorist activities yesterday, mainly
In Casablanca.
In neighboring Algeria four ter:
rorists were killed by a French pa-
trol, and a French school teacher
had his throat lit ner Fort Na-
tional. .
In Constantine another F r e ncn
patrol killed a rebel and wounded
several other, 11 of whom were
carried off by their companion.
Poll Shows Mendes-France Ahead
As Popular Choice For Premier
PARIS, Dec. 12 (UP) A poll three per cent were for Gen.
by the Kench Institute of Public I Charles de Gaulle.
Opinion aid today a cross section I The rest were divided among
of French public opinion showed; dozens of candidates.
that most Frenchmen want Pierre
Mendes-France to be their next
premier.
The poll was published in Men-
des-Fiance's own newspaper, L7-
Express while other newspa p e r s
splashed the news of the record
numbers of candidates and the
Newspapers estimated today
that "several million" more voters
than in 1951 would go to the polls
on election day with 30,000,000 ex-
pected to cast ballots.
So great was the last mi n u t e
rush to get on the electoral rolls
before they closed at midnight
Saturday, officials in some regs
record-breaking heavy registration'tratiOn centers stopped the clocks
for the Jan. 2 parliamentary elec- to ollow all prospective voters
chance to register.
Travel agencies reported that
around SO per cent of young peo-1
tions.
The poll asked the question: "Af-
good diumond and clubs. The
opponents can make their other
trump trick, and South will fulfill
his contract. South till has up
trump to make ure of regaining
the led. ...
The key to the hand 1 that
South must avoid giving up the
lead unnecessarily when the op-
ponents are battering away at bis
trump uit.
ter the coming elections a n e w >fe planning ^^"^olidsy^ over
government wUl be formed who
would you like as prime minister?"
Twnety-stven per cent repl led
Mendes-France, ten per cent re-
plied the present Premier Edgar
Faure, eight per cent were for for-
eign minister Antoine Pinay and
Christmas and the New Year spe-
cified they must return on the
morning of Jan. 2 so they could |
vote.
Great travel crushes were fore-
cast and the railways began ara
ranging for extra trains.
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set for an Admirable group of furniture.
Casa ADMIRABLE*.*,
Sswtof Macfcraa (*
Not the Lattery BaiUraa
Ceattal Ave. 10-10 T.I. 2-1111
WffMNAnONAl
SOvarMt
THIS WEEK'S WINNERS:
. Silvia Villarreal
Ruth Buchanan
Abigail Brid
Quelita do Tapia
Joseph Crawford
Samuel Sucre
e Ren Ram i re i
' e J. A. Halloran
C. de Kontaris
Harold Smith
E. Cuenther
e J. Mewerowich
Verona Pottingor
F. Daycost
And They Won For FREE
TAHITI
THE JEWELRY STORE
OPEN TIL 9 P.M.
17-47 CENTRAL AVE. (137)



paos rout
THE r AN AMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
SIDE GLANCES
By Caibraith
MONDAY, PECBMWK i MS
n, GEORGE tTNDEB
THE MARQUEE
BY DICK KlE IN E R
*1**F*13PL+**:**** *;
Our Dick:
The nicest of things happened
to rae.this week. It was my first
scene -on The Loretta Voting Show
this season. When I came through
the door, the whole company and
crew burst into applause. They
made me feel so welcome, as if
theyid really missed me. I've nev-
er been more grateful for any
applause I've ever received.
we did the show that will be on
Christmas day. I hope that when
the show's on the air those who
aee It will know that I was thinking
about all the letters I've received
from them. I do hope and pray
that each and all who let me know
they cared what happened to me
will have a real Christmas in their
hearts, too. Bless yon, Dick, and
yours, and all your readersevery
I one.
Sincerely, Loretta Yevng

Nobody likes colds, but an actor
i hates them with an intense pas-
sion. Van Heflin, the brilliant star
of "A View From the Bridge,", is
currently beset with a dilly, and
this is the way he explains its
problems:
Loretta Yeoni
1 LiGHTLY AlRED
EPSAR BER0IN (CBS-Radio):
He's been up the river more times
that an over-anxious salmon. ...
"J"he part I play is like in an
i opera. The whole play, as a mat-
ter'of fact, is Kke an opera It
builds and builds. I start out in
the lower register and get higher
i 11 ."the time.
"Well, cold are Mny. I
are
klayer get* a cold, I fuess It
__I in his arm. With an actor.
It always hits the larynx yew
knew, the voice box. You can
i ws* your lower register OK, but
I as aeon as you try to get higher,
you sound like you're creaking.
! It was se bad a few times I could
ha rally gat through the show.
"Jvhat I do is go to the doctor
very day twice on matinee
elavi. He holda my tongue down
*mjj%uirts some oily stuff way
bad. It makes, me gag. Nowadays
evetybodv seems to have a cold.
[NiAael Redgrave he's in Ti-
TAt the Gates' well. Mike
me up and asked who my
lor was/'
_Ie show, like the virus, must
|g*bn, so Hetfin Is
Igiva his trem
ture was one of those breaks,
'Johnny Eager.' It made me.
"I would have come back to
Broadway then, but the war came
and I was a reserve officer. After-
wards, 1 had to re-establish my
name and that meant a long-term
contract. So it took me 15 years
to got. back."
And what does Broadway wel-
come him with? A cold and oily
squirt.
A stagehand on Robert O. Lew-
is' (hew hod a chance to appear
before the cameras. He took his
debut seriously wont out and
bought a $S toupee.
SHOW TIM!: Margaret Sulla-
van, Robert Preston and Claude
Dauphin have themselves a ball
i in Broadway's newest comedy, > a
'frothy little number called "Jan-
1 us." This is one of the funniest
of the year, a situation comedy
that has that rare commodity a
| comic situation.
The only trouble with Beaters
and Hammerstein's latest musical,
"Pipe Dream," is that you find
yourself not particularly caring
what happens to the characters.
They have only one dimension. All
of R at H's musical magic and
it is there as much as ever
can't pull a rabbit out of an old
hat. Judy Tyler is a vivacious new|
star. Bill Johnson is good, but |
Helen Traubel is embarrassing in
a dreadful bit of miscasting.
DICK'S OUICKII: Deniae Ler's
description of a tightwad: "He s
so cheap he'd marry Manly Mon-
roe just so he could make out a.
joint income tax return."
v. na*, .a. nao*
"Don't ask me, Miriam! I've decided it's easier to got to
work on time than to bt forever thinking up excueea
for being lata!"
Young Actor
3
Answer to Previoua Punte
roan
itinoing to
gating
jis
-ay since
5 years
_J time back _.
-Philadelphia Story,
"' left Is tto Hollywood,"
[MoWn says, "a^etwe I needed a
letettdy income. Broadway is like
f o rep gomo you novar know
[hew the shew will come out. No
alter what yew mm* of Holly-
wood, you got a hock every week.
F Antf I needed It I had reepen-
elbBHios. I've hod a agenda nt since
I I toas U..
''Besides, I got turned down for
Broadway parta so often. They d
aay I was just right for the part,
but they needed 'name.' I waen L
I figured a couple of good movies
and I'd get something *
I was lucky, too my third pic
ACBOSS
I Young actor,
-----Edwards
He from
New York City
11 Revokes, as a
legacy
13 Bloc
14 Goober
15 Get free
16 Rowing
implement
17 Operated
II Conducted
20 Routes (ab.)
22 Consume
23 Title of
courtesy (pi.)
24 Expunger
26 Moccasins
27 Except
26 Drunkard
26 Bitter vetch
30 Grief
31 Minute skin
opening
33 Taciturn
36 Tastes
37 Scottish cap
31 Ark builder
40 Exist
41 Edge
4 Cornish town
*" (prefix)
43 Woolly
46 Printing
mistakes
4Ever (poet)
60 Ardent fan
51 He U a
swimmer of
52 Rows
DOWN
1 Phantasm
2 Form a notionl
I 3 Closer
4 Century (ab.)
5 Ostrich-like
bird
6 He------
majored in
drama at the
University of
Hawaii
7 Circle part
6 Kind of type
9 Victims of 3*
leprosy 28
10 Winter 38
vehicles
12 Thoroughfares
13US. coin
16 River in
Switzerland S3
21 Swords
23 Cotton fabric 14
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ufcicauarjH ijucjulj
BaaaarjkjU lUUtli I Baoasa
ji'JiDkJ i -iriUL'J a rjuai
U2JUUUC9. HI JLlUkil I
rJadtdUUn i I'JULVUtJ
uwEUBUUiurj Hurjisi
BBaaaaani II lil) Ul'JUasasaa
1-JLKdlSia ' kjlULUU'ltJaa
l.i'ULV.Ur 1CJUWI JbbbjMLJ
|A|P|A|M| ioi*ib1 IA|Bt||
iMti-l*!*-! lo|g,M| iNiAin
Steadfast
Body of water
He is a
championship
Freebooter
Key
Capuchin
monkey
Spotted
35 More sour
36 City in
Massachusetts
37 Large plant
39 Gives ear to
44 Arizona (ab.)
45 Powerful
explosive
47 Decay
46 King (Fr.)
vs/afbodif. food** Clauifadh
ffJE STORY Or MARTHA WAYNE
Martha CaUa
JO HASH fOwEU.ThEYOUE MECN HO"
JsaSJSTv VEE (Or TtftBUSK
By WILSON SCRUGGS
OtTVDUUN0ESTAND\ US ENOUGH
THAT I JUST UWJT TO BE ICOBONEC**
LEFT HJ>e7J$*!e*HG
OOwNSTASS.
ALLEY OOff
t
General Oop?
ajj V. T. HAMLJW
...WHO HAS BUT THE
NEED FOR A TAILOR
TO TAKE H15 PLACE
ON THE STAFF OF>
ALEXANDF* 1 GEcl
OFMACECON)
.IT DOEStfT LOOK
r VOC, I PONT^Ubfl LOSSAL 6
THINK THIS S /GETTINS HU3
GOING UKE /MONEYS WORTH
IT SHOULD.'Jaw DOSS rr?
^.It-
boots AND HER B'JDDI
News to Hi
BY EDGAR MARTIN
\'t> CVKWNfet "TO
9r\CW SOWfc CONCfcW OMT=^
TA>
UN
.I
\6feS0\XU*.
WHAT?
VCRW, >f*TV\ WAJaS V.VHE.
*ftv*fc HCW TC, WOo>'.
COWS HOAi "tVNCTV) O
VWfe*1. .-------------
O
.w1-
CAPTAIN EASY
Bert Helpa Oat
S LESLIE TURNER
VIC 1X1N
A Con Called "Eel"
Bv JAt HEAVIUN
PR1SCILLA-8 POP
Qakk. Change
By AL TCRMEEB
'WELL, REMEMBERS
TMAT DAY I LANDED]
jTHE FOUR-POUND f
iMsVBsftVHIL. IN A WEST CCeMU PBiSOrJ,
ANrn*B MW PLOT A COKBfACK/
IK
in i. M. 6AJUM WMieii II on* wai
H* j B Wii i
BOGS BUNNY
Alwys Helpful
Like TBatt
AH.THBtZE, AUt WORRI55Y/
THt l OMLYA FRIENCH-Y CALL
I DOMT 4AAT THAT 6LEVATC
JOB BACK/KAFF-KAFF/?
BUT WfKE- AU. WOJDERlt46 WMY
YOU LEFT H00PL6 A^MOU 5 ,
rJceREMPfilOOS-Y.'-^OD >i5-
OFTMOSE-
AU.0N*
[UT.SVNOB,
AAY VSU ccavtaixreiyi
OUT0I
' rr
r-<5AWKl5H
.UJD6CR6
I OFFEND
1O0Z
NICE 5EEii*3>DA6AiM,A EVEN IF yOD ARE SUSPICIOUS/
well, its VBfrY Simple
X l?EAO 6OMSTU1H& irt
TWI66SS MiND THAT OIDM'T
MAKE /WE TOO HAPPYO
X LEFT EFOee I COUCT5
LEARhi MOfe
AMD RBAUY
0E SORRY/
t. aaai a
Simple ?
is twat^
simple f
O



MONDAY, DK EMBER 11, 155
THF, PANAMA AMEXICAlt Alt DfDCRNDCNT DAILT NIWSPAPn
Al
# Man Kills Wile, Sell Vienna Girl With

Broiher-lnlaw
In Shooting Spree
DETROIT, Dec. 12 (UP) ' A
'Old World Charm'
Wants Texas Hubby
DALLAS, Tex., Dec. 12 (UP*
: Anna Maria Springer of Vienna,
u hi!K3LZZk?T k"ledJ"s; Austria, whosV picture indica 1 e s
^ J^.Wi;2;,aW-,!?indr,> h> W of old world charm,
?.Hv^JS*" ^fu Kd Ul*n f";'sked / Dallas editor today to
^"1 h,,rase'f *c,use "'find her a rich and lonely Texan
U^SStS*,*" h' ,P0USe",S? *:
Officers said Arthur Jackson, M
.^Iv-w , h,ii '' Mi Srpmger wrote Iditor BUI
38. sprayed 10 bullets at nine per- RueBi.. ,n- n.iiaa Morninr
TJSrSLfX v ^S^rlK1".! .h'wa^V husba'nd*
2& ^-"Sf, ,. .h.' r H^tV.' Texas who can afford to buy
h,t !S !.S *? vPJ^J..! her a 1956 Chevrolet for a wedding
She was
basement stars and her body was
found at the bottom of the stairwell.
Jackson then entered the linnft
room and pumped the remainder
of the clip from his P.-38, a fully
automatic pistol, around the room,
present. She promised Ruggtls a
mess of Viennese-schnitzel if he
delivers.
Her letter said:
"American newspaper people
said to have a right under-
saving the last bullet for himself: ]SJmZ n?tordiiir?VSrtil
Another full'clip was found on "*!"?* ^"ffuZZ %?*&
his body, police said. They said it "*,m""#asin $Jf""' *
..,. ...J-^i- niv ?.. hrth.r. rumored here in Vienna.
Well, 1 suppose I have a some-
iwhat unusual idea and therefore
to!
was "a miracle" only the brother
in-iaw, Harold Brenner, 25, was!
'1 apply to you. I do not intend
immoderately occupy your preci-
ous time. Therefore, to cut a long
story short: I should like to offer
wasgrazed! in the leg and reported with Viennese charm a hot heart
in "fair" condition in a Detroit to a lenely feeling man who is rea
' Jackson's daughter, Barbara, IS,
was the only other casualty, a-
mong the room's occupants. She
in "lair
hospital.
Ex-King Of Albania
Sells 60-Room Home
On Long Island
dy to present me with a Chevrolet
56 for a wedding gift. I am dream-
ing of Texas, this most beautiful
state of the U. S., of Its everlast-
ing sun and of its strong, husky
men-
i "I should be very grateful to you,'
if you would publish this hearts
desire of mine in your '
ly circulating newspaper. Should
mv desire realize owing to your
help, 1 shall be very glad to serve
MUTTONTOWN. NT- Dec. 121 you ^ith original Vlenneseschniti-
fUP) Former Kine Zog of A1- ei at mv wedding party."
bania sold todav the flO-r.oom! (pj5.r Texas millionaires: Miss
Lonar Island mansion which he i Springer's address is, Vienna 17,
boujrht for $105.000 In unset Haslingergasse 2-2-22, Austria, Eu-
Jewels in, 1951 but never occu-(rope.) -~
pied. - ,
ia.:te^ Loon Repoid
sold the formal, miniature pal-;w, C|- Yon re
ace and IU surrounding 5 acres After Eleven I COTS
of wardens and woodland +o; WARSAW, N. Y. (UP) -
Iendsdell Christie of Syosset,, ^ Emm, w>rner has had her
N.T.. for an undisclosed sum. ; {aln' n man's honesty reaffirmed.
Zoo's attorney. Boris Komar jjie operator of a women's ap-
sald Zoar hpd soent $4.000 In an paTe] gnop received a letter from
unsuccessful atremnt to keen hi man which contained a brief
proposed domain-ln-exlle in re-.^te of thanks and $150. Mrs.
plr. Vandals had broken many Warner said it came from a man,
of the windows' to *et In to a stranger, who persisted until
trio the Hous, of .it* valimble she loaned him one dollar back in
plumbing and weather had 1944. She never expected to see
harmed the Interior. either the stranger or the dollar
Komar said Zor would like to again.' .
find a more modest home otr But the man didnt forget. He
Lon* Taland for h'mself. Queen; said the additiona
Geraldine, and their son, Crown
Prince Skarider.
INSTALLMENTS
enclosed because the debt had re-
mained unpaid for so many years.
Spell Broken
NEW HAVEN. Conn. -fUPl-____,, ,._,
The Shore ttne Psckine Co. was! CHELSEA, Mass^ (W] -
ordered by V. S. district court to; This city received two safety
pay oft a $64AM Judgment to t*e awards for not tavini *il any
Rovernmenf ir. installments of $5 auto or pedestrian fatalities since
a week. ACJ a* it will takf^KU. Less than 241 hours later, a
24$ years.jj 5S,'n*n ***
"Hitchcock Touch" Sparks New VistaVision Thriller
TO CATCH A THIEP
Next great attraction at the "Central" Theatre.
Suspense master Alfred Hitchcock's greatest film, "TO
CATCH A THIEF," will be the next attraction at the CEN-
TRAL Theatre. Cast in the starring roles of a notorious
jewel thief and a thrill-hunting helreaa are Gary Grant and
Grace Kelly. The gripping tale of danger and intrigue was
filmed in VistaVision and Technicolor amid the glittering
splendour of the fabulous French Riviera. Advt.
t
i
^Choose a RALEIGH the worlds.
Champion Cycle
RALEIGH
'I U'lTfll IICVCll
J Tn out of ifec law , Raatiah haa txMcn
*aa ad. Tk Rate** yau buy it huih b, iM
aaaaa rw/naaia W imtmt* Woiia1 Cfcw
PiflB Rat Harria'i
.,-lrtT
Us* far tk* wart that I
* fraafcu a/ JtaJn/* InJmtnm Lm,
RADIO CLNTfcR
71t0 Bolivar Tel. 04, Coln
-HW.ia,.,.a(ata.1 MnaHanaHinH
Jeweler, Wife Held
Prisoner; Bandits
Escape With Loot
AURORA, 111.. Dec. 12 (UP)
Two bandits heJd a jeweler and
his wife prisoner in their home for
12 hours during the night and es-
caped with $5.000 worth of jewels
in a daring robbery, police report-
ed.
The masked gunmen slugged the
elderly couple and threatened to
kill them but otherwise left them
unharmed.
Victims were Joseph Fodor and
his wife, Nellie, owners of a
Swelry store in Aurora, a subur-i
in community about 25 miles
west of Chicago.
Mrs. Fodor returned to her fash-
ionable home about 7 p.m. Satur-i
day night, police said, and was,
slugged and bound by bandits, who
had been lurking in the house.
Two hours later, Fodor showed
up and was gives the same.treat-
ment. The couple have.no children.
The Fodors sat out the night
on living room chairs. Meanwhile
the bandits drank heavily but were
careful to wear gloves at all times.
Fodor was forced to turn over
the keys to the store and the com-
bination to the safe and about 5:45
a.m., one of the bandits left for
the store.
Two hours later, the second
bandit, left to'guard'the Fodors,
Drake Member
Of Production Ci
*Jotux D. Drake, a sophomorwl
Shattuck Prep School, Faribi
Minn., was a member of the
duct toa crew of "My-Three
pels" presented bjr the Shai
Dramatic Association retently;
is the son of Lt. Col. and
William A. A. Drake of Pi
mador.
received a call from his accompHc
and left. Fodor freed himself
half-hour later.
Police said about $0.000
of jewels were taken from t]
store and another $5,000 from
home.
For after five gatherings from bow on are these two short and elegant dreoaei by Caaaeo. Silk
reos that haa French laca over pole pink satia and'Jewel**
r..ll. DM**. NaT A *>< BMI... *^ *^ "" ww*^
faeod neau de acia
Staaqrtc lines (right) are
with Brincoaa linos haa crystal-pleated Bounce and nylon talle
ir:
lie petticoat.
and Jcwelee
RON C0RTEZ
RON G0RG0NA
* RON ISTMEO
COSTUME JEWELRY
COLD JEWELRY
DIAMOND
AND

FOTO





1
A RUM FOR EVERY TASTE
A RUM FOR EVERY PURSE
Hi
tto&Wtf
al
>4
If
DESTILADORA NACIONAL Si A.
(THE WOMACK AMERICAN WHISKEY CO.)

fanacraunai
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OjiiIiii turn i ia-i,
M lava*v famlataa
Nttta mefc la naa
taa am* ta kaar
a* in fata tfca
>*
'ala
Frathiaa
XJ0
t&ttooA
A M C R I C A'S
PIN N A M I
i n c i i a i t
N*
to woman can jeaiet the brilliant elegance
of Rotes watch. Nowhere in the worM
can be found a mote exquasHe variety of
watches, each one Oeneva-desagned end
Geneva-Anished, each the proud iKsaaevemont
of Swiss etaftamea.
But every >n>n knows of the fame of the
bouse of Roles for accuracy. It was Roles
who produced the world's Brat wrist -chrooc-
aaeter*in 1910. and tawtnadition of accuracy
runs riant through the whote bfoaib-taking
of Rotes
Roles have a booklet doacribing 37 carefun*-
setected ladies' watchesthe very latear
Rptex creations. If you are planning to buy
a watch, write for a copy now. Fill in that
coupon below and send it to The Rote
Watch Company Ltd.. Geneva, Swiueriand.
A ajeiie^wwaawaeaav is e iwOMSawto jaw aset
pt*4 tht ilriHfent inn ol mcimmcr imffd *.ri
an i/kii/ iriinf umiKim er tawwiaarv, anal
wkkk hm ** awaveW a evat OJtetal 7awar
Cttjfitmti.
f
ROLEX
A landmark in ike history of Time measurement
CASA FASTUCH has a
Gift for every Guy isd
Doll. A sift Itom
CASA FASTUCH
to every customer.
"Casa fa/tHch
WATCN CENTER
161 CENTRAL AVENUE. PANAMA
STORE


TU PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILf NEW8PAPBS
MONDAY, DECEMBER It, 1M
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
inexpensive }* antAds Bring Quick Results!
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA
MINIMUM librera preciado 1 Street Na. U LOURDES PHARMACY 1W La Carrasaullla LEWIS SERVICE A* ThreU No. i HOUSEHOLD EXCHANCE J ee Se la Os Ave. N*. 41 FARMACIA EL BATURRO Parase Lefevre 7 Street MINIMUM
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COMMERCIAL &
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CANAL CONK rOLTCUNK
DENTAL MEDICAL
Dr. c a rW.f. j; ;_?.*
D.l> S. lOmiMHI Uaiversllj) D.
mu (Ik f Jal) A*.. No. tlAW
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RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
JIM RIDGE
Phana Panama Z-855J
TRANSPORT BAXTIP,. S A.
Pchete Shies*" Mover
Hteawe 1-2451 2-2542
Laara Mate at
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Riding a> Jumping claim doily
1 la 5 a.m. Friese 3-0279
ar by asgelafeat.
Yankees' First
Saturday Night' Gam*
iterfield
ard, 2b
tin, ss .,
ueen, c ...
ptewart, cf ,
Joberts, lb ,
irris, 3b ..
>1L If ...
rescott, rf .
jttglnton, p
irlmsley, p
H Osorlo .
Ab R H P
.5003
3
4
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4
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3
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1
2
1
2 1
1 1
1 3
1 12
FOR SALE
Homchold
FOR SALE
Automobile*
FOR SAL:Oicillatin, tender,
4',2x6. 60-eye hi, aaw, sever
asad, $31. Harna 1531-A, Ci-
lab.ih St., Gaviln Ataa, I.Ibes
Position Offered
WANTED:Exaart English typ-
t far permanent a"*1'" Must
b. female, good personality, Mat
14 efficient. Call Pin. 3-6311
r efply after 2 M # 19 44tb
Straat, Ralla Viata.
FOR SALE: '50 Buick Super
4-Mar ia aacallaat candillos.
law mileage car. Phana AsYrssh
5112 ar Cacali 3157. ,
MISCELLANEOUS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
OX 2011. ANCN. C.Z.
OX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
FOR RENT
Apartments
FOR SALE: 1953 Chavralat
4-daar sedan, two-tone raaa,
$1000. R. Cay. 717.0, II Pra-
d. Saltea. 2.2771.
FOR SALE:1949 Lincaln. R.-
**. haatar, overdrive, boa fair.
mechanically oicelSnt. aaw
tira*. Fricad far quick aala. Call
3-5194 Paaaraa.
Iowa University Sweetheart
Is 17-Year Old Negro Beauty
IOWA CITY, low. Dec. 12 -
(UP) Dora Lee Mrtln, a 17-
year-old Negro beauty, turned to
her books today after a hectic
weekend in which ahe was Min-
ed sweetheart of the University
of low campus.
She was the first Negro ever
selected ofr the honor In the four-
year-old contest.
"I've neglected my studies
something terrible," she said.
'I'm going to really have a hit
the books today." She admitted
that she was "pretty tired.'
foil on chair to simulated a
throne..
Miss Martin, a dramatic arts
major, said she was "thrilled" at
her selection. "I did not expect
to win," she said.
She gave much of the credit for
her victory over 28 other contest-
ants to her campaign manger,
Lowetta Uightower of Clinton,
Iowa.
Mis Hightowes and six other
campaigners worked up a skit
which they presented at me n's
housing units before
introducing
Miss Martin, a pretty light-skin-!Dora as their candidate.*
ned freshman from Houston, Tex,| The winner's theme was the
reigned Saturday night at^ the;"Yellow Rose of Texas," and Do
33 2 7 24 12|
i-Lined out for Grlmsley in
0 Queen of Queens winter formal ra passed out yellow roses to the
1:dance, one of the university's topmen during the week of ens'
2social affairs. iuaigning.
0 "It was wonderful," he tad.
0| Her date was Collins Hagler, a, About 2,000 of the 5,000 m ale
2, sophomore Negro halfback on the atudent on the cmpus voted
q iootball team.
q Dor wa one of seven can-
_ didates entered in the contest by
- Currier
Carta Vieja
rtlr.ome. lb ..., 6
2b
rtir.'lf ........ 4
Friday in the queen contest.
Commandoes Seize
Biggest Arms Haul
greet* nacipuy djuic..^ ; taal I Waal
&>Ced uP aw as.faflw Blazing Battle
Hall, a woman's dormi-
tory. About 30 of the 900 girl in
the dorm are Negroes.
When she arrived at the dormi-
tory after the dance early today.
Dor wa greeted... happily by" the
ckens, rf ,
lm, ss
cf ...
ip, 3b ..
c ...
than, p
0 1 13 0
112i
\ ? 2 SlI"'* hH "leading t ther room
" and congratulated her as she
0 2 3 walked by.
1 2 I 0 Girls decorated the queen's
0 12 3 room. Thy wrapped aluminum
0 13 1
0 0 0 1
33 10 27 14
terfield 000 000 Oil2 7 1
Vieja 003 010 J0x- 10 0
IARY RBI': Wllhelm
opf 3, 'GUmp, Queen, Pro-
Mt'Earned run: carta Vieja,
Chesterfield 2. Left on base*:
Vieja 8, Chesterfield 8.
runs: Kropf, Prescott.
o base hits: Dickens, Austin,
tton, Quean. Sacrifice hits:
lonahan. stolen bases: Krppf,
imp. wild pitches: Wlglnton.
ckout by Monahan 2, by
ssley 1. Base on balls off:
snahan 4, off: Wlglnton 4.
lera record: Wlglnton 3
km. 4 hits In 3 Innings. Errors
Tntterfield (Austin). Losing
er: Wiginton (0-1). Win-
pitcher: Monahan U-o.
leplays: Wllhelm. Barti-
ne. Umpire: Thornton, cop-
Hinds. Time of game: 2:18.

amily parm
l_west rindge, n. h. -(up)-.
the farm of Mr. and Mrs. Paul
nes has been in the same family
ace 1781. '
Agents For Sale
Of Charts Sought
By U. S. Navy
NBCCHI XMAS PRBINTTk*
ii Chriataui araaant. It i tka
ijfffaravar. "Yaa .If lifca a lady
*fc the Nacchi ^. .fM^
Rt-" Praaaat year Maved mm a
taRv
INSCCHl
tkai ariataaat tatathar
ft a aeriaa af free aavrag caamat
ffca NICCHI .JTiuZZl
I. TraaV-iaa accafitad. Pricaa
thai Sfataa'. Twa-yaar taran
njr. CASA AOMIRARU.
10 Caaatfal Avaaua. aeran fram
Pine Nat'l City Bank Paaaraa.
2-1111 aad 2-2027.
The U.S. Navy Hydrographlc
Office wishes to know of busi-
ness firms Interested in hand-
ling a sales agency for the US.
Navy Branch Hydrographic Of-
fice In Coco Solo. Lt. Robert T.
Thompson, Hydro Officer at the
Naval Station, said that the
Nary Is planning on opening
two sales stores, one in Panama,
and one in Colon.
Each of the shops which will
be equipped to furnished charts
to shipper and small craft
owners, and will display the US.
Naw Hydro Placard, the hall-
mark of such agencie.
Thompson aid.
The sales store will open as
soon a agent suitable for the
Kb can be found. Mr. Thompson
asked that firms who may
be interested, call hi office at
Coco Solo 8338 or 8337.
NICOSIA. Cyprus. Dec. 12 (UP)
Royal Marine Commandos Sun-
day stormed one of the main Eoka
strongholds in the 4,000-foot Cyprus
Mountains and in a blazing gun
battle captured their biggest haul
of terrorist arms.
They also shot and wounded a
key terrorist leader, believed to
be a Greek, and rushed him to a
hospital under heavy guard. Sec-
urity officers believe the informa-
tion gained from him may crack
open the whole terrorist move-1
ment.
Among the arms captured in
five mountain top caves were a
bren gun, a German submachine
gun, a rifle and hundreds of bombs,
mostly homemade but includ i n g
some British Grenades. There
were thousands of rounds of am-
munition, scores of sticks of dy-
namite and large stocks of cloth-
ing, food, binoculars, blankets and
overcoats.
The explosives have been used
by the terrorists in an attempt to
end British rule on Cyprus and turn
the strategic island over to Greece.
It was Just after 4 a.m. Sunday
, when 43 Royal Marine Commandos
Lt. u a convoy bristling with guns
and commanded by Lt. Col. Nor-
man Taylor crept out of their
base and with dimmed lights snak-
ed through mountain passes where
six ambushes have taken place in
the last few week.
Key Medical
(Centinned from Pag* 1)
Ma}. Oen. sftas B. Hay, urgeon
general, U.S. Army, and col-
Henry R. Sydenham, DC, dental
division, office of surgeon gen-
eral, Department of the Army:
Rear Adm. B. E. Bradley, depu-
ty surgeon general. Navy; Rear
Adm. R. w. Malone, dental stir-
eon, Navy; and Lt. Thomas L.
[ollls (MSO, USN, executive as-
sistant to Bradley; Maj. Oen.
Dan c. Ogle, the surgeon gen-
eral, Air Force; and Brig. Gen.
M. E. Kennebeck, dental sur-
geon, Air Force.,
. i
Another Marine
(Continued >m Page PIY)
Rwe-Insplrlng to the wide-eyed,
imaginative world t r a v eler.
"They are the cheapest, and I
believe, the best way to see
these countries," he assures
comfort tourists.
Washing Machine
SALES ~ SERVICE
PARTS
MUEBLERA
CASA
SPARTON
Central 28-7
entrance Encanta Theatre

East German Reds
Premise To Break Up
Veterans' Meeting
BERLIN, Dec. 12 (UP) Eut
German Communist ordered riot
quads to demonstrate in the
waatera sectors today on the pre-
SPi..h?t -th Wen German
"Stahlhelm" (Steel Helmet) veter-
ans organisation had scheduled a
meeting in a cafe lnt be French
secotor of Berlin.
The French secor is on the
East-West city border.
The cafe owner said no meeting
Christmas Buying
Expands To Increase
Spark Retail Trade
NBW YORK. Dec. 10 CUP)
Retail trade last week expanded
noticeably a the Christmaa
rush picked up momentum, and
alea activity was moderately a-
bove that recorded a year ago,
Dun Si Bradstreet, Inc. reports.
The total dollar volume of re-
tall trade In the week was esti-
mated by D and B to be from
one to 5 par cent above the level
a year ago.
The Federal Reserve Board re-
?.^.ta- eld ^S* bui tbt ^om-iported department tore sales In
muniste ignored hi statement and the United State last week too-
trhftwyuT0^ bre,k jt P.'ped the comparable week last
whether it took place or not. ytu by 3 per cent, while sales
West Berlin police said they
would be on hand to repel the
Communists where the veterans
meet or not.
The riot promised to be a heal-
thy-sized one, for the cafe the
uij-aiiau aaaa, ror we caie
I Communists said they will
is on the sector border and the
Communists easily could send In
wave after wave of ass a it It
teams.
At another veteran meeting
here in May some 3,000 Commu-
nists fought with 288 police. Six-
ty-eight Communists were arrest-
ed and 34 police land acore of
Communists injured.
for the year to date registered 7
per cent higher.
Wholesale orders aulokened as
buyers sought to replenish dwln-
dlins: Christmas stocks. Advance
orders for spring merchandise
storm pushed the wholesale volume
slightiv ahead of the correspond,
inc 1854 week. DAB noted.
Regionally, trade volume In
the East was unchanged to 4 per
cent higher, while the South and
Southwest showed the way with
gains of 2 to 8 per cent.
Department stores and spec-
ialty shops accounted for moat
of the gains. Jewelry, f love, and
* B,rl2 "Sf" T? flad hwdbaf attracted the moat at-
the means of brorklng this new
provoiatJen fo the militarista.'' a
Communist tat am eat said today.
'The Communist oreas said
workers declared they will give
the steel helmet the answer it de-
erves."
tentton in women' acceaaorlea.
while volume In dresses, suits
nd cloth coats fell off slightly
from the week previous, the a-
avney said. Bales of fur coat
and stoles perked up appreci-
ably.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALI:Maa'i whiter as.
laa 17; ladras Leeds east, ehta
12. As*. 077 7-A, lahVee. Tela.
phase 2-2884.
FOR SALI:7 euff la-.ra.. 2
vanatian Miada, S ha* lesaps
chairs end 2 maltkalaraW kraid-
N rufi. Phana 2-1882.
FOR SALI:Stanatraa machina
aad caatplete ceeraa. Phana 2-
2417.
CLIARANCI SALI I 40** aft
aa ill ear ererHsa, lilvar flat arid
hallawara. wall knawn branda.
Taha advantage af thia after aad
aha early far Xaaaa. PORRAS.
Plesa 5 da Maya.
FOR SALI:lay- seas' 20" bi-
cycle, fssd cassettes, aaesa
Mlatisf. Phase 2-1881 after 4
e.a.
POR SALI.Iractrit train, track,
traatfarmar, iwitches 5741 Si-
hart. Diahla. 2-8S4S.
ATTINTION 6. I.I Jatf kuilt
sudara famished isiitataaai. I,
2 hsdrisan, hat, ceW w t a r.
Phase Pssaaas 1-4*41.
FOR RINT: Baautffel daalea
aesrtraeat, Rkerse Arias Straat,
Cesase Afssre: 2 hadrearai, hat
water, vary caal. Phana 2-2341
er 3-0284.
FOR RENT
Houses
Help Wanted
FOR RINT^Fsrsished Lhad-
reera chalet, Hying-dining reeea.
hathfaaai, kitchaa. Lavaty Ursa
lewa. Sitsated at Akamin las-
trase* la aid Colt Clukl. Far in-
fanwatlan castact Mrt. Lee, aaat
dssr sahjhhar. Phase 3-4339,
Panama.
FOR RINT:Plaaiant farniikad
srsa 2-hadrsara asartmaat: ait-
tins raaaa. kitchaa, kalhi, 2 ter-
raaai, aaafaVs saartan. isara
reera, ara(a. Call Wright 3-
822J.
FOR RINT:All fursiahadapatt-
mant. 52nd Straat Na. 20, As*.
Na. 7. Phana 3-0547.
FOR RINT: Fsrshhad a.rt-
mant. Frasssnt traaassttatiss.
Narth American saiffhhart. Tal-
cphana 3-0471.
Crime Syndicate
Victim's Widow
Tells US: 'Vote'
FOR RINT: Psrshhsd n*|.
deace. Via Iiaia Na. 20-22.
Phana 3-4037.
FOR RENT: Chalet: 2 hed-
raamt, lirtint-dinins raam, ga-
rasa. 50th Straat Na. 50. Tale-
ahssa 3-3377.
FOR RINT:2-badreeea chala*:
IMas room, dism* raam, bath-
room, kitchen, rnaid'i raer. Las
Camera*. Bsyaca St. No. 2105.
FOR RINT:Unf urnrshad thrae-
hadiaaai hsawa, two hsthraami.
livins-diains raam, rnaid'i ajsar-
esra wwb bstwrsam, gatsee, back
yard. El Casfrafc), Ave. Isiahle
A. Moralei Na. 40. Phase 3-
2922.
FOR RINT: Far2manlhl. far-
nithed chalet. 3 kadraema. Call
Paaaraa 3-0899.
NEW YORK, Dec 12 (UP)- A
gray-haired Alabama woman
whose husband's life was sacrific-
ed to desn up a "sin city" appeal-
ed to American -voters today to
'go to the polls every time you've
got a chance or maybe you won'l
nave a chance."
The slander, aft-spoken wid-
ow, Mrs. Asnas Patterson, cams
hare ta receive the annual Fisrsl-
le H. la Guardia award for evt-
etandinf achievement in munici-
pal affairs in the nsms of her
lets husband, Albert L. Patter-
son af Phenix City, Ala.
Patterson, the crusading Demo-
cratic nominee for attorney gener-
al of Alabama, was shot down in
an alley at midnight June 18, 1854,
on orders from the syndicate which
controlled the prostitution, gamb-
ling,' and ddpe peddling that made
Phenix City the cesspool of the
South.
Albert Fuller, s former Russell
County, Ala.,, chief deputy sheriff
is serving a life prison term for
100,000 Winner,
14 Pounds Lighter,
? To Celebrate Birthday
After Argentina, Auburn Is
unsure of future plan. But de-
spite bis attachment for this
earthy sight-seeing, be strongly
asserts that he Is no intending
to walk back to California.
"I assure you," he ays, "that
one trip like this through Cen-
tral America Is quite enough."
The Tender Trap'
Opens Af Fl. Amador
Service Club
No admission will be charged
at the Army's performance of
"The Tender Trap" which opens
Wednesday night at the Ft.
Amador Service Club.
The play has been planned
to bring Christmas entertain-
ment to troops stationed on
the Isthmus, but Is open to the
public, and residents of the Ca-
nal Zone and Panama art wel-
comed.
Directed by Mrs. Betty Haber-
stick, service club director, the
show will tour the Isthmus. Per-
formance dates will be announc-
ed later.
Mrs. Haberstlck staged the
tender comedy in the eeml-
round.
No tickets are necessary, fcur-
taln tuna is 8 p.m.
Noted Briton Says
Struggle For Power
Now In Middle East
LONDON. Dec. 12 (UP)For-
eign Secretary Harold Mac-
millan said today the East-west
struggle for power now "has
been transferred'' Into the Mid-
dle East
He told the House of Com-
mons at the start of a Mideast
debate that the Soviet are halt-
ed in the West He added they
have been forced to at least
a "temporary lull" in the Far
Pattersons murder. Former Ala-|sh,ow "My knees are knocking and
bama attorney general Silas Gar- R-J ** * do is go home end go
rett wss also indicted for the crime
but his case is still pending. Arch _
B. Ferrell. s former Russell Coin-,otJ"e aninior1e
ty prosecutor identified as the syn- ">e PflghUy grest-grsndmoth-
dicate's "legal adviser," was tried fj.. n,ve of Decherd. Tenn..
NEW YORK. Dec. 12 (UP)HMrs.
Ethel Park Richardson. TV's most
successful quiz contestant, ce 1 e b-
rates her 72nd birthday tomorrow
14 pounds lighter and $100,000
heavier,
A folk lore expert, Mr. Richard
son lost the pundage and won the
cash on NBC-TV's "The Big Sur
Erisc" Saturday after building up
er stake on five previous appear-
ances on the show.
The $100,000 was the largest prise
ever toted away from a giveaway
show. It topped the $4.000 won by
Marine -Capt. Richer M^utchan
snd Psychologist Joyce Brotn e is
on CBS-TV's "The $84,000 Ques-
tion."
Mrs. Richardson earned it. "I'm
still shaking," she ssid after the
to bed. I've lost so much weight
on the show, my dresses don't
for the crime but won acquittal.
"After tha criminal stem ant
teak ever In sur city we nevsr
had anything like democracy or
free election or freedom from
fear," Mrs. Patterson said.
"It took my husband's murder
to wake the state of Alabama up
to the terrible state of affairs in
our city. We've bad a cleanup all
right, but the fight isn't won as
long as the people behind the syn- deputies accosted James J. Drsut-
who now lives in Los Angeles, ssid
she would contribute some of her
winnings to three chart ties. A
source close to her said Mrs. Rich-
ardson's donation would be sub-
stantial, perhaps as much as $30,-
000.
Mrs. Richardson siso said some
Foodless Duty
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - dicate feel they've got a
for a comeback."
chance
man as be left a downtown bank
here about noon recently and es-
Mrs. Patterson said a number of corted him to criminal court. Four
persons seat to prison for their
connection with illicit traffic in
Phenix City "are coming back to
hours and one manslaughter con-
viction later, they allowed Draut-
man to go home to dinner. "I
see whether the decent folks have don't mind serving on the jury, but
let
the
up any." She said members of I wish they would wait until after
mob who escaped punishment I have lunch," Drautman said. "I
are still "lying low."
missed breakfast that day, too."
WANTID:experienced wasian
te de caahiss, washing, cleaning
far family af twe ja Gatas, Ca-
nal Zone. Gaad salary far will-
mf worker. Da net aaaly union
yes cas tumnh recent refer-
ente!. Aaaly ia seraaa te Mr.
Jeshrsi, U.S. District Court.
Cristeeal. ar after 5 a.m. and
wash asea at haute 215, Ap*.
A, Catas.
FOR RENT
Room
FOR SALI: Electric oManna
Iran. 300 araee., rsaastsd SS
trailer. Cas ha tees Panama
American settlement, Parque Le-
fevre Ne. 7, Saeacer family.
Tomboy Actress
EL CENTRO, Calif., Dec. 12 -
(UP) Charlene Measures, 17, was
cast in the load role of a tomboy
who liked football in her high
school's production of "Time Out
for Ginger." But she missed the
opening performance.
Charlene broke a finger shortly
before curtain time, in an off-tackle
smash during a neighborhood foot
ball game.
on the money would be used bo
buy a new car and to send her
grandaughter, Karen Han sen of
Fresno, Calif., on a trip abroad.
Miss Hsnsen is a student at UCLA.
"I think after taxes are taken
out," said Mrs. Richardson, "I'll
have about $28,000 left." '
RESORTS
Puxilad about a Chriitmai a if*
far tha aon that "hat every-
thing" Give a lift of health,
fus aad relaxation, A Catina re-
ier*atiea far a whole week ia
beautiful tunny Santa Clara. A
gift ta remember.
Shraeael'i furafibed hssses ea
beach at Santa Clara. Tcleektae
Thomeien. lalasa 1772.
FOSTER'S COTTAGS. One mile
salt Catino. Law rales. Phene
alboa 1166,
PHILLIPS Oceanj.de Cettigaa.
Santo Clara, lex 43S, Balboa.
Phase Pasaras 3-1877. Crata-
be I 3-1 71.
Gramlich', Santa Clara teach
Cottagei- Madera convenience!,
moderate rates. Phone Gamboa
-44T.
Wonted to Buy
WANTID TO BUY: -
tire*, tuitable far reconstruction.
Reconttructora Nacional, Aveni-
da Para 7. Phase 2-0404.
WANT TO BUY: Jeep. Mast
ha in gaad operating condition
(matarI and mutt have 4-wheel
drive. Drop a card ta M/Sgt. J.
K. Foley. USAF School, A lb reek.
WANTED
Apartments
WANTfD f Vecatian quarters,
Jan. 1. Call Gamboa 6-428.
RECEIVES MEDAL. Lt. Col. C. T. Marsh, Jr., CO 74th AAA
Bn, presents a Good Conduct medal to Pfc. Keith Baker of Btiy
A, 784th AAA Bn, at a battalion review at Fort Davis, Sp-3 Ed-
ward Miranda, 8p-3 David Pennlngton and Pfc. Joseph M. Wil-
son all of C Btry 903d AAA Bn. next to Baker, were among the
12 other enlisted men of the organization to receive the medal
for "exemplary behavior, efficiency and fidelity."
ISt PRIZE
"We believe that they may,
with steady pressure upon them,
be forced sooner or later to
ive ground In East Germany,"
e said.
"In these conditions, It Is not
surprising that the Middle Bast
has leapt suddenly into the
foreground of the picture, for
here the situation is still fluid.
"Into this area, therefore, the
struggle for power has
transferred.''
I
I
L
WINN t NO N y M IfRS
DECEMBER 11
2nd PRIZE 3rd prize
Present your tickets before Friday.
Your tickets are valid for a whole year. Keep them carefully.
j
x%
*


MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1935
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVE
V
capitolio
Mc *e.
WOMAN ON THE
BEACH
-Also: -
MAN FROM
BITTER RIDGE
T IVOLI
I5e. ------:--------- Ue.
Sterling Hayden, in
THE ETERNAL SEA
- AUo: -
LAUGHING ANNE
CENTRAL Theatre
75c7------------1------------------------ We.
SPECTACULAR RELEASE 1
JOEL McCREA VERA MILES
_ in
WICHITA
In Cinemascope and Technicolor!
LUX THEATRE
Sir .'-, .. -Of'
J:t7 4:11 : l:H p.m.
GREAT RELEASE!
David NTVEN Yvonne DE CARLO
In
TONIGHT'S THE NIGHT
, In TECHNICOLOR
DRIVE-IN Theatre
Me--------1-------------------------------- Joe.
DOUBLE WEEKEND RELEASE!
MAD AT THE WORLD
-Atao:-
FARGO
CECILIA THEATRE
Mc.
DOUBLE IN TECHNICOLOR t
ZnZn GABOR, to
BLOOD AND,LIGHTS
Plu: -
LA REINE MARGOT
(QUEEN MARGOT)
Me.
HO
Uc.
Ste.
Double ia
Cinemascope!
NIGHT PEOPLE
- AJJO: .
BROKEN LANCE
V ICTOMIA,
tat.---------------- 11
HOLLY
AfOVJfS TV MADIO
by Erskine Johnson
HOLLYWOOD (NEA)- Close-
up* and Longshots: Paramount't
handling Dean Martin and Jerry
Lewi with diplomatic gloves in
the script of their new movie,
"Pardners." Unlike "Three Ring
Circus," which helped launch their
three-alarm ieud, the lads share
50-50 in dialog, scenes, close-1 out of the
upa and romance
parent to everyone that because of
the altitude I couldn't charge
around as fast as the studio ex-
pected. But there was a deadline
to meet because I was due to
report at Paramount.
"So the studio decided to take me
, _Jt of the part. I'm glad Cagney
Sterling | took over. The role was a natural
for either one of us.
Marsh Them-wen, in Nairobi
Hayden was telling a pal on the
"Bed of Fear" set that he remem-
bers "The Asphalt Jungle'' of six
years ago not only for his great;filming "Assignment Congo,'
role in the film but "because that's; writes that maro aro so many
when I first went to a psycho-1 Hollywood pooplo in South Africa
analyst" '*" Chamber * Commerce has a
"Did you ever finish tht course?"| sign en the evtskirts t the tty
asked the curious friend. reading:
How do you ever know?" "W e 1 c o m e to Smog-Free Nal-
shrued Hayden, "You don't getrobi."
.diploma." ______ HOLLYWOOD Boulevard has
a nir of traffic signals en the become Santa Claus Lane with a
. H.T .___. I I.I' hack niahtlu riA* hu nlo aiu< tar
NeVYo* strut ? la have been et tho Stop po
Slon'tor Sh.. But ".wdrivjr.
en the tourist buses that ream the
nightly ride by Santa and a star
in his sleigh. One film star still
remembers his ride. Santa hit him
for a job as his butler after the
Z freenHy st* *|bouday.!
S^*S'%ed ^fcj* !", .LDJ! Cyr'a hubby Ted Jor-
":. rraahv has played golf with dan, is teaming up with her for a
Big Crosby has played golf with I new night-club act.
^t'^besTe^^ An ev.rdr*Tde4l set down to
with the e33u at the Bel Air front of Ruth Alfm.n et the mev-
Hounlrv C*b in Beverly HiHs. |. Ruth tagged her on the sheul-
F.r?v7n tte morning, before many dor .. whtsperod:
mmWe round. Bing strolls, "P.rdon mo, madam, tort will
tolTtftciddy house and asks, you kindly romove your earrings?"
"Whoa hot?'' *"*
The caddy currently hitting the Walter WlDchell
kail bast then takoa en Bing tor a
f II hoto, with half djen
.?her coddle a. tho gaHery. There
.re seme fancy bets with Bin*
^llTtoatoB. * ""e,i" wht"
ho wins.
MUSIC
WELL. CURL MY HAIR-An'Italian Army private geta dolled
up by a buddy for a military tableau depicting scene from Italy's
past military glories. Occasion was the military's 37th anni-
versary celebration in Rome of World War I victory over Austria.
(Continued from Pnce <)
finished," he barked, "turn in ya
mink!"
A comic, who made the Big Time
stunt in a
turned"TV.tar_. . Rory Ujmoun ^ ^ ^
rlnct^plans totComm^ to Jeen. when yo^can pick up an
Hollywood for only two movies a ______
year ini-the, *" ,. olA Item: "Television only costs a
1 tVm,,^-,k^ ml ont'' 'ew ***** day in electricity ."
lur?K J e^'r TtvTevSg oni * * " worth It.
jhxfbodi^
.ii-
NEW TO- : (UP)- What ven-
erable Pierre Monteux has been
doing at the Metropolitan Opera in
recent years, he did with the New
York Philharmonic-Symphony dur-
ing a two-week tenure as guest
conductor. That is performing
masterpieces from the French rep-
ertory with a polish and perfection
of detail infrequently achieved.
One was Vincent DTndy's well-
liked yet rarely performed 'Sym-
phony on a French Mountain Song
which, to far as this orchestra,
was concerned, waa its first
performance since IMS'. Robert
Casadesus, pianist, was soloist.
For k third concert of the tea-
eon the Little Orchestra gave a
concert version of Ravel's opera,
"The Child and the Sorcerer." for
which CoUette tuppUed the story
and words. A high point is a duet
for two cats. Lisabeth Prltchott,
soprano, sang "The China Cup,
part in barroom atarle, "The
Bat." which required her to hit
ths nig G flat, and Te Squir
rel,' whic took r no higher
than E. flat.
The *0th birthday of Jan Sibelius
was honored in Carnegie HU tc.
4 when the Symphony of the Air
gave an all-Sibelius concert 'in
Lmory- of the late Olin Downei,
fameua music critic and long-
time supporter and W*-,"
Sibelius' music. Jussi Ja as. fin
Sb conductor and SibeUus son-
Maw, conducted. The Sandia
Foundation of New York gve **
^ThfNew Orleans Phllarmonic
Symphony will make a tour of Lt-
Sn American countries nextsprint
under the sponsorship of the u..
Department of Stata.
Manager Rudolf Bing of the
Metropolitan Opera P1 a
new production of Verdi's La Tra-
viata' fof the season of IWe-J7
Which will be built around Renata
Tebaldi, soprano. That favorito
opera is absent from the repertory
this season. It's last remounting
at the Met was for the season of
1905-36.
Next season the Met won't get
around to it until February becau
Mita Tebaldi won't be available
u.til then. But in her new contract
she agreed to take part in the
company's annual spring' tour In
1W7.
Lily Pons's 25th anniversary, aa
a Met prima donna will be com-
memorated next Jan. S with a gala
performance in which abe will
appear in scenes from two operas
with which she has been particu-
larly identified "Lucia di Lam-
mermoor" and "Rigoletto." No
Other prima donna has been at the
Met for so long- She made her
debut there in January 1931, aa
Lucia, and she has been on the
roster every season since.
works of Alan Hovhaneas and
los Surinach at a recent recital
New York'a Town Hall . R
Slenczynska, California's 10-ye
That's Spencer Tracy^0" - ___
"The Mountain" set abomMGM a, B)on fast shuffle a few weeks^agownen ,.With brown ^ ^ ^
Jimmy Cagney replaced him in wou|d ^
Tribute to a Badman aner a maybe
couple of days shooting on location
in Colorado.
But it was a clash of production
schedules, not temperament.
As Tracy explained it The to
cation was at 900 feet In no
kid and after two days it wat ap-
>.SU. .. .. uu... 1W.... ....V w. .. WM, MMUJ
figure not so much maybe, but my
face. I could play down my hips
and wear loose clothes and I'd be
a natural for serious teevee."
But who'd lookatchu?
I
Stanley Steamer
Relives Hay Day
SAN LEANDRO, Calif. Robert Brown, a welder, and
Dewey Beebe, a friend, recently
rot togeSer from cast-off parts an
DbfUnt Stanley Steamer
that turn* its tpeodometer at 25
miles per hour. ..
The two hobbyists began their
labor of love by collecting mate-
rtoU for nVlles around. A few boiler
parte and tome old motorcycle
wheels provided the nucleus, and
these were applied to an -
tace Stanley Steamer engme
bought by Brown many years ago.
They built a frame and a 400-
pound box-like^body tor*. antique
vdiicle, fused these with the engM
sd came up with a sight behoto
The car has a wheeUbase of W
inches and it entirely safe from
splitting its steam-driven seams.
PRobert taw to this by installing
a precaution valve that sounds off
wh the boiler feeding tewn to
the motor heata up beyond 300
pounds of pressure per square inch^
On top of aO this the car u
poaribly^the easiert to dnvii ever
conceived. Because it is entirety
without geart, all one has to.do u
lighf the fire and push down tne
"'Brown owns another Stanley rig
that they expect to have hitting
SO -m.p.h. in another year.
Scientist Finds
Orient Parallels
Early California
BEREELEY. Calif. (UP) -
By traveling away from home. a|
University of California scientist
has found that be can know home
better
Paleontologist Ralph W. Chaney
claimed he has found that if a
Deraon wants to know what Cal-
ifornia was like 70.000* years
ago. a trip to the Orient may. re-
Chaney. recently returned from a
trip to Japan, brought back new
evidence indicating that almost
identical forests flourished both in
Asia and in the gold gravel valleys
of the Sierra Nevada tome 70,000,-
000 vears ago. He bates his study
oat fotsils.
Red Skelton says he's living in
a more expensive apartment. The
landlord raised the rent.
If you want Bourbon at its best call for
"GREEN RIVER/' Ameritas smoothest
whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS

OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NA1I0NAI LOTTERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA. REPUBLIC OP PANAMA
Complete Pre-winmm Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1918, Sunday, December 11. IM*
The whole ticket Una 44 pieces divided to two tertoa -A" -R* ei it pieces nek.
First Prize 3411 i 44,000.00
Second Prize.
Third Prize
5053 . 3,2 0 0 0 0
0014 S 6.60000
Mo.
Nil
Sill
mi
asii
Mil
su
su
tin
Nil
Nil
Prli*
132N
13J.N
I32.N
I32.N
MN.M
lazte-
uana
IXLM
I32.N
met'
!*
Mil
lilt
1211
nit
1411
1SU
1111
1T1I
1SI1
1.11
inn
I3JN
oa-,
2.2N*
IXtN
UMt
ISMI
1J2N
MM
Frboa
Mil
till
till
2JI1
U2.N
1S2.N
132.N
WM
2411 2.2N.N
2111 132.N
132.N
132.N
131. N
I32.N
ten
nu
mi
anii
Ma Prlan
I
MU I32.M
3111 132M
Stll 1MJ
Mil 132.N
MU 44.NO.N
Mil IMS*
MU 132N
3711 mJi
Mil
Mil
!S
No
Mm*
Mil I32.M
4111 132N
111 132.N
4311 132.N
Mil ZMt.N
an h:.n
Mil 132 N
4711 132.M
Mil 132 N
MU 132.N
MU 132N
till 132.N
til 13TN
Oil 132.N
MU 2.2N.N
MU 132N
Mil iMM
1711 IMM
MU IMM
Mil J1ZM
N
friso
811 1M.N
II IMM
till IMM
MU 132.N
Mil 2,3N.M
MU IMM
SI! mM
13I.N
Mo ratee
Mil Ut-N
mi IMM
Mil IMM
NU IMM
Mil 2.NO.N
NU IMM
Mil 132M
11 IMM
Nil Mil 1S2M MSM
Approximations Derived From First Prize
MM 4M.M
t
MM
4MM
t
MM MIM
MOT 4M.M
34M
34M
t
4M.M
MM
3412
3411
3414
I
4t*M-
Mil
3411
MM
MM
Mil
3411
MM
MM
MM
MM
Approximafions Derived From Second Prize
MS MIM, IMS MM M47 IMM 1IIN UMt MM MM MM t Mina llt.M lll.M 3N3 aw MS 1 ZM.N MS MM MM I SM.M ins* HIM 7MS MR MM SMM HIM HIM MM MM MM 1 MIM IMM lll.M MM SMI MM MM
MM MM lll.M 11* M MM Mil lll.M HIM MS2 MM IMM HIM
Afifrtnimariew Derived From Third Prize
MM | IMM MM t 132-M MM IMM t M14 132.M Nil MM Mlt MM MM IMM MI3 MM Nil MM M14 132-N'I 7*14 Mil MM MIS Mil MM 1 Mlt IMM | MM asi IMM as MM IMM
MM MM MM MM MI MM MM Nil MM MM * &s
Prize- winning Numbers of vestorday's Lottery Drnwinr were nt: 1st and 2nd in Panama; 3rd in Bocas del Toro
The Nine Hnndred whole ticket, ending to 1 and not toelode i In the abort list win Perty-Pewr Dollars (fggJt) each.
Tht whole ticket has 44 pitees which comprise the two seria "A" and "B"

SUrned by: ALBERTO AXEMAN. Governor of tht Province of Panama Od. 47-13119
*be Reoresentatlve of The Trenaurv RICA/ADO A- MSLENXRB
WITNESSES:
Andrs Valderrama, Cid. No. 38-370
Uovd O. McLean. Cd. No. 47-ettm
ALBERTO J. BAR8ALLO
Notary Public, Panama
PABLO A. PINRL.
EocrtUry
Ethel Bartlett and Rae Robert-
son, duo-pisnisu, introduced new
old piano prodigy of 30 yesra a
is concertizint; in France and Enj-1
lsnd She wiU make her third U.SJ
tour with the Bo.ton "Pops"
chestrs beginning next January..
Sylvia Marlowe, htrpsichordlst,
touring southeast Asia and tad
hitting places so remote from wei
ern music tsht no harpsicherdt
ihas ever played there before.
Present
Smart Silver Cuff-Links
Gold-Filled Zippo Light
Silver Key Rings
Modern Ashtrays
Radios Records *
at
OPEN DAILY
from 8:30
till 9 p.m.
CYRN0S
Avt. Tlvoli No. 16
TAKE ADVANTAGE
OR OUR
CLUB-PLAN

IL GARAGE STERLING
14th ST. AND BOLIVAR AVE. COLON
ANNOUNCES
TO THEIR CLIENTELE AND FRIENDS
GRAND CHRISTMAS PRESENT
WITH LARGEST DISCOUNTS
ON
GREAT ANNUAL REDUCED PRICES OF DECEMBER
SIZES 15 to 17..........$3.00
SIZES 18to20..........$3.50
TUBES
A COMPLETE SUPPLY OF ACCESSORIES FOR AUTOS,
BUSITOS, TRUCKS, STATION WAGONS IN ALL MODELS
) BEARINGS PISTONS # CARBURETORS
I OIL AND PISTON RINGS SPRINGS
> BRAKE LININGS TAIL PIPES MUFFLERS
j FAN BELTS RADIATOR HOSES # RADIATORS
j CONNECTING RODS HYDRAULIC BRAKE PARTS
> SHOCK ABSORBERS
SEAT COVERS____......... S4.00
ALMACN STERLING
12th 8T. AND BOLIVAR AVE. COLON
ANNOUNCES
LARGEST DISCOUNTS
FOR ONLY 7 DAYS
ON
TOYS
FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS
GLASSWARE # ELECTRIC ARTICLES
HARDWARE LARGE GAS STOVES
SMALL GAS STOVES
KEMTONE PAINTS FOR INTERIOR DECORATION
PAINT IN GENERAL
SCHOLASTIC SUPPLIES
.


iPAOFi rrr.irr
TW* **,* AMimf A* AH IJTOtFKfDWT All* HtlfiMPB
MONDAY. DECEMBER iJ,1M>
oaa
/_/ Q
etwide
Bo 5037,
J,
neon
'
ft*
Box 134, Pc
ananta
4 5/*#
U* CO J tO ..m. mlf
7/eMetS?kt0it

r**UVlAN AMBASSADOR ENTEBTAINNG TOMORBOW
VISITING TERUVIAN STATIONED IN GENEVA
The Ambassador of Eeru to Panama, Mr. German Aram-
bora Lecarbs, b giving a cocktail party tomorrow In honor of
>J a ^siting Peruvian diplomat with ambassadorial tatuUDr
Luis Alvarade Garrido, ho Is presently assigned to special
I J.work In Geneva. _____
e i
ritisa Ladies Meet to raise funds for British charita-
A form Organisation I We purposes. ..V.'w,
7a well-attended general meet- Mrs. Ian Henderson, wife of the
(tar of the ladies of the British British Ambassador, consented to
immunity was held at thv Brit- < take the chair,
fib Embassy last week with the The meeting resolved to form a
object of forming an organization Society, to be known as the _m-
BY MRS. MURIEL LAWRENCE of bed so sure of their usefulness
to us that they feel no need at all
WHEN Emmy was coming down to pursue us with demands for
with measles, fear rushed her reassuring attention,
mother in ana out of her room sill It is one kind of love that can
day with things like fruit mice,!minister to a child's weakness _
'water and rabbin alcohol. when he is weak. It Is truest love . Ar
lsh Aid Society and elected a Then red pots came out on'that hastens to replace the con
committee. Emmy. They made her look so valtescent
MEETINGS
l iknM ukaaltua te tya*.
rltte- fan. ana asm* ta mm m*
tfce mix oiutkcn Ifcte. Salt* hi -Sa-
cul awl OtfeanriM," t fcHwH
*7 ha*, ta tba uHlra. Natt*- *
eti_B ea-aat ka KiMtll _j> tala-
I
:
\\
CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE 255
GRADUATES,
of the Albrook Field Military School
Their best memory of this grand occasion
will be a

Ceremonies.
As sn added attraction, the re-
llcent graduates o Liona S e a r oh Itand speed his receevry
charm course for young ladies nwal rtpinith, too.
U D U T
Hermes Baby Typewriter

r tmmm anannnkm* tafs^BS* -ana-ama sMmms* ammmmv mmmm
1
This certificate entitles you to $10 toward
I
the purchase of a Hermes Baby Typewriter.
I
I Bring the certifcale to our office and pay
the difference.
A
OMPHROYS
No. 38 Automobile Row

Phono 3-5381
PANAMA
child's sense of hel-
Spe"c"af"provision was made for queer'that pity drove "her mother plessness with one of helpfuness.
cooperation with locsl British to lavish new attentions on hen
West Indian Organisations. |Finally relief motivated a last
Notices regarding further actlvi- surge of devoted interest in Em-
Society will appear In my.
For her red spots began to fsde-
_____ and in gratitude, her mother spent
Robert f a-bnrr much tune emptying glasses of
Of New York Pla'n w*4*'". reading from "The
bttw For Visit Wizsrd of Oz," catttmg out psper
Robert Saliabur>, publishing dl- dolls and scraping modeling day
rector of the Latin Am eric a from the bedclethea.
Time-Life Intern-tion- arrived) Emmy had betn up and about
from New York" last night, and la two days when her mother was
ties of the
the press.
spending a
fore going
bia.
day in Panama, be-
on to Bogota. Colom-
Tertulia Classes
Will Gradaste Tonight
Dr. Alfredo Canton,
for Private Schools In
Ministry of Educstion,
her rude
JvlAK, FRIENDS
badly embarrassed by
behavior.
The publicity chairman of her
club waa at the front door, deliv-
ering some invitation envelopes to
be addressed, when Emmy push-
Inspector ed herself between her and her
Panama's mother. Holding up a crayon
will be .'drawing upon which she'd been
guest "speaker and present diplo-! working, she demanded of her
mas to the Tertulie graudates of, mother. "Didnf you her me tell
Liona Stars' Ball-room Dancingiyou to look at this?"
Classes tonight at El Psnsmai WHEN the visitor had gone,
startine at 7:00 p.m. ^re followed one of those scenes
that often mark children's conva-
These youngsters between 10
and 16 yesrs of agewill awing;
and sway to Professor Luis Axe*-.
rraga's music in "Chs-cha-cha,"
"Merengue." "Llndy' and other
popular dances of the day which
they have learned in their ten
lesson course.
Seversl special numbers have
been arranged to delight the fam-
ilies snd friends who come to ob-
serve, and the usual father-dsught
ter,- mother-son bolero will be the
first dance of .the evening. Ernes-
to Boyd will act as Master of
lescence from illness and their
struggle to readjust to reduction
of our attention.
They are especially painful
scenes because of the closeness
that a child's illness create be-
twen him and .us. They do not
have to afflict us. If we are pro-
vident, we can preserve the clo-
seness with out encouraging the
spoiled, attention-demanding gree-
diness that makes everyone so un-
happy.
As the convsltscent child begins
to recover his physical strength,
we begin to make little demands
of
will appear to demonstrate model-
ing.
Miss Liona Joan Sears who has
done professional modeling In
New York, hss sdded the fmlsh-
ing touches to quslify these young
ladies for any future fashion
hows. .
They are: Miss Floriabet Enda-
ra, Miss Blaaca Moncsyo, Miss
Irene Quelque_eu, Miss Ans Ele-
na Motta, Miss Ems D'Anello.
Miss Asna Julia Garcia de Pare-
des, Miss Marta Dutary. Miss E-
Uzabeth Morrison, snd Miss Mar-
ta Eugenia Lavergne.
Families and friends of the
graduates and previous graduates
are invited. Everyone will be
asked to Join in the last dance
Pansmt's "Cumbia.'
Clayton Wives' Cl-b
Christmai Luncheon
The Fort Clayton Officers'
Wives' Club held their monthly
luncheon at the Fort Clayton Of-
ficers' Club Wednesday. Mrs. John
R. Dooley, president presided.
A delicious luncheon wss ar-
ranged by the hostesses: Mm. R.
Lovelace, Mrs. G. Powell and
Mrs. F. Van Nosdsle. Their dec-
orations for the tables and
throughout the club were in the
Christmas theme giving everyone
present the holiday spirit. U-ing
sprayed tropical foliage, three or-
naments and pomsettias. The
DURING the last dsys of chil-
dren s confinement to bed, we can
find many small, but u a e f u 1
chores for them te do. They can
shell peas for their own lunch
and prepare string beans for sup-
per. Instead of reading to them,
we can suggest that they tidy oar
sewing basket, rewind In g Its
spools and collecting its loose but-
tons.
This activity of giving breaks
the mesmeric influence of their
past weakness. They can get out
f
Most of us expect at least a
post card from friends who go
on a trip or stay out of town for
several weeks. But sometimes
we forget that the one away
from home la just as happy to
receive mail. So write the friend
who is away on a trip.
Yeur letter is bound to be ap-
preciated for it comes from
home.
Meet On Wednesday
The Fort Amador Officers'
Wives' Club announces only one
meeting for the month of De-
cember, which la to be a Christ-
mas coffee at 9:30 a.m. on
Wednesday at the Army-Navy
Club, Fort Amador.
Special program features will
be Mrs. Jaime McKenzie of
Quarry Heights as guest speak-
er, with pianist Mrs. R. cattle-
man playing Christmas music.
Travel Group Plans
Christmas Holiday
Trip To Lima, Peru
tU W/Kh
PAY CHECK ONLY PART OF
GOOD HUSBAND'S OBLIGATION
He works hard at his job, turns
his psy check over to his wife to
The Isthmian Travelalre So- budget, doesn't drink or run
ciety is making arrangements around with other women Doek
for its annual Christmas holl- his wife consider him a sstisfact-
<_ >___. _ -___,._. *-.#-* i.lnrv niiahanrl?
day tour to Lima, Peru. COPA is
furnishing a 28-passenger plane
which will depart from Tocu-
men at 6 am. Saturday, Decem-
ber 24, and return January 1,
arriving at Tocumen at 5 p.m.
Each year the society spon-
sors this 9-day trip which in-
cludes a threeday jaunt to Cuz-
co taking in the ancient inca
ruins of Machu Plcchu. plenty
of time for shopping and sight-
seeing is allowed in tit Itiner-
ary.
Military personnel have been
asked
ory husband?
It will surprise a few women to
hesr thst she does not when they
know all the (acts. He comes
home at night too tired to talk or
or be bothered by the children.
He never takes his wife anywhere.
Even though they have four small
children and no help of any kind
he never offers to dry a dish, put
the children to bed, or take a turn
at getting up with a crying baby.
His wife says: "He figures that
bis one and only, job is to support
us. But I thought when I married
I would have some companionship
to call the USO-JWB by
Hostesses "for the coffee" "will __ton,e "-molH0*-,!072, 'V^I!*! a_oth_"adnTTto tilTt in thi
be Mrs. John D. Mack and Mrs. e_r;_?Jvt'ia S?_S_. t ^evenings when the day's work i
Conrad R. Dnderdahl. bo M finaUy done."
On Wednesday at T:S0 p.m. at
the USO-JWB, colored slides will
be shown by some-of the mem-
bers of the society that made
the trip last year.
The dry season schedule of
ITS. will begin January 8 with
a jaunt Into the Darlen conn-
by visits to San
Reservations are not neces-
sary and all club members and
their guesta are cordially Invited
to this festive end-of-year
tivlty.
Esther Circle
Meets Tomorrow
ac-
_>v/w
m

Here's

a real Holiday treat!
CHRISTMAS or NEW YEAR'S WEEKEND
AT EL PANAMA For ONLY $15.00!
i
A luxury toeek-*nd at the hemisphere's most
avatlable to local resident with our SPECIAL 1
llamorous hottl
7EEK-SND PLAN!
Make your holidays reaJlj unforgettable!
Bnjoy the thriU of holiday exilement at El Panama.
$15. per person includes:
tOOM with pri-ste terrace a hark, f.r 2 .y. .. j aje*
C*mlim*l.ry II Pan.ma COCKTAIL (
Su

a**, at iny 4 tur ..alie reemi) __
DINING and DANCING. $550 4mmt, ia
alia Vis* Keen or by caMleHfk* M yaur arivat* Urraca
SUNDAY BRUNCH ! k. CM.plim.ntar- oc-taBI.
ancin, I. th. maiic f lye!.. Ascarrafla i Trie
A visit te Hie Caiina ia-ta-S-y
USI Of II Panama'. MANY ACIUTIlSCa-ana
Teamit CU. Pine-pens. ...Hl.b*..^ ,*<-,
i a playtrami.
in afffct attar l.-ch Satnraay until p.m. Snnnay be
wa cerniaHy invita you ta cnack iaj any tiata Saturday, ta it.
e.r many facrlkiaa. a nn .itra coat. Spcc.al pne* far a.tra
dey befara t attar Waak-cn.
Thase ara th. LAST TWO WEEK-ENDS this
Local Weak-end Plan will be in affect, as our
touott season begins in January.
Reservations accepted for minimum of two
adults per room. Mutt be made in dv*nre
directly wrfh hotel. Tel. 3-1660.
This special
offer good only
for local
RESIDENTS. ..
bring identifi-
cation.
decorations were unusual and
beautiful.
The program Chairman, Mrs.
W. R. Seymour, arranged en en-
joyable program of Christinas
music for the afternoon. So loa
and poem* were given by Mr.
R. B. Herndon. accompanist Mn
J. Nicely. Then the ladies pres-
ent entered into group singing of
carols. Another highlight of the
afternoon was a gut exchange.
Mrs. Dooley, club president for
the yesr who departs from the
Isthmus next week thanked the
Officers, Committee Chsirmen
snd members of the Club for the
loysl support they had given her.
She presented a gift to the Gub,
a gavel, to Mrs. W. N. Hornish
who will preside at the next
meeting. The slate of officers was
presented to the Club withe lec-
tion in January.
Guests introduced
ed by.Mrs. Dooley
trican
RAISED CELERY DELICIOUS
WIT- CHIVE BUTTER SAUCE
BY GAYNOR MADDOX
NEA Food and Markets Editor
For a change, why not serve
braised celery with chive butter
ssuce as a Sunday dish. De-
licious, really, and something dif-
ferent. ,
- Mrs. Andrew Duds, Jr., of Ovie-
do.Fla.. wife of one of the biggest
and most progressive vegetable
growers in Florida, is really a
superior cook. She gave us these
two recipes to help our readers
enjoy life a little more.
Braised Celery With
Batter Sauce
(Yield: servmgs)
Tea-stalks celery, tt inch boiling
chicken broth in saucepan, Vi tea-
spoon salt, -Vi cap butter Or mar-
garine, 2 tablespoons chopped
fresh chives, V* teaspoon salt, 1-16
teaupeon ground black pepper.
Cul celery into pieces 4 inches
Esther Circle, of the Balboa 7 followed
Union Chufch, will meet tomor-!5,a_* ?sland.8.a.nd.t!ie Interior ofimry interested in
row at 7:80 p.m. at the home of
Mrs. George Oirard, 5155 Diablo
Heights.
Mrs. Phillip steers will be co-
hosteas, and Mrs. Clyde LaClair
will be in charge of the program,
which Includes music by Mis,
Maxwell Smith and devotions
by Miss Thelma Schabold.
Panama on the following
days.
That is what some men can't get
through their heads, thst all wives
today expect moro of a husband
than a pay check.
Days Of Meal Ticket Bave Gsao
Before women entered the busK
ness world many a girl did marry
for a meal ticket.
But today the girl who is pri*
aril y interested m s pay cheek
Sun- can earn one for herself.
College Students Try
Jobs To Help Budget
If she ia primarily interested la
marriage she expects more of A
husband than financial support.
She expects companionship- She
expects her husbandt o take soma
interest in her job of homemaking
and to lend her a hand occasionat-
. ly when abe really needs it. -She
...I' H__iwsnts him to share the respopsi-
STAMTORD, Cslif.
campus fact-finding board, bent,.
upon disproving the poDulsr bU,ty {orL briB*,l up ,e,_.
thought that SUnford is _^riSl{'Bd -" ">m< ,ocul ** *>*
man's school," polled the student !Ber-
instead of the 3rd Tuesday, ow-
ing to the latter' proximity to
Christmas.
F the institution's l"'1"*' ^"T^.t'"J?I
earn all or part of "P80" her. husband to taktjeoiM
rith part-time jobs. .The d">; 1S Pt when a woman
will happily aacept a pay cheek as
a husband's sole responsibility to
his wife and children.
College Club Meets
Tomorrow
The general meeting of the
Caribbean College Club will take i body to see how many labored at a
place at the Red Cross rooms in! job as well as over the books. It' **" tet any of.t_eaa
Cristobal at 7.30 p.m. tomorrow.'found that half the institution's i thln' she
Members are reminded that! -800 attendants
thlg meeting te being held on the"- expenses w
the 2nd Tuesday of tne month,
An employment questionnaire,
sent out by the board and
answered by 4,874 students, also
revealed that:
The Monday Muslcale, who . __. ..
provided such an unusual musi- ^^'i?*/ 12 W centwpeet to
cal treat at last year's Christ- Be*^ P-rt-hme jobs before they
mas meeting, will present "The ffT__; -_, .__, -___
Firat Christmas' -by Louis A- J^StJKJT'u^t^ ik_
dolphe coerne and Cornelia *Kr P
Brooks Fenno. aejiooi.
fhi. r.ntnta t riuir>rir..ri .. 3Nearly nine per cent get fi-
.hvf ,kb_!^SfiM "ncial ajd from the government,
"the Day^of the Holy Child as, 4_0vtrl seven ^ \nt recejve
seen by the eyes of -a t*'a- i non-family aid from other sources.; pounds (about $ie,800) to provide
Mrs. Bert Watson and Mr. O. E. Mtny ,mong Stanford's working one.
Jorstad, sopranos, and Mrs. J. gtudent population toil on campus He wss somewhat surprised
M. Brown, contralto, will be ac- n such jobs as "hashing," librarylwhen headmaster L. C. Wiice of
Britisher Rejects
School Play Center
WORCESTER. Mass. >- During a visit to Rushden. Eng-
land, Arthur A. Williams, a Massa-
chusetts shoe manufacturer, noted
that the village had no children's
recreation center.
He offered to donate 8,009
companied at the piano by Mr, assisting and working in various
C. J. Genis.
All members of the Monday
Muaicale are most cordially in-
vited to attend the meeting, as
school offices. Close to 25 per cent
of all those paying their own way
were women, and many of the
part-time workers also meet their
*-ea*
' 1 teaspoon salt. Cover. Cook only
until crisp tender, about 15
minutes. Drain, if necessary. Melt
minutes. Drain, \L necessary. Melt
butter or magarine and add
chives, black pepper and salt. Pour
over celery. Serve hot as a vege-
table.
Baked Aajoa Fears Witk
Cfceeae and Crakers
(Yield: aerrlags)
Six fresh unpeeled Anjou peers,
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice,
tablespoons brown sugsr. u cup
and wekom-1 butter or margarine, cheese, crack
were Mea- era.
are guests of th* members fit $1.800 a year monetary output by I home are
t-v>_ r-_-lKh_a- *i hnlrlin. summer inha. children."
Rushden School rejected the offer,
explaining:
"This scheme is contrary to our
feelings in tne educational world.
We aay a good school and a good
ustss stJb 4*w***-1*
sufficient for
Club. holding summer jobs.
growing
1.

asmes; J. Strom, E. Voortmeyer.l Wssh and cut unpeeled pears in
and A. Smedly. half lengthwise, lesving the stem
Members present were M e s attached to one of the halves of
dames: F. 'Bowser, J. Camay, S.
Coffin, J. Collins. C. Cooper, R.
Ebbs G. Fish, E. Fltzsimmons,
S. Fowler, R. Herndon, W. Horn-
ish, k. Krueger. c. LaFever. P.
Peca A. Phelpa. E. Mecadon, S.
Messner. B. McGinn. W. Saal. A.
Sauser, C- Sauser, W. Seymour, degrees F.)
H. Str.sburger. H. Tubos. J.
Van Ernst, I. Wsshburn, S. Wein-
shelbsum.
(Continaed oa Fge I
each pear. Remove cores and
place in a 12X7X2-inch baking dish.
Brush pears with lemon juice.
Sprinkle each half with V. table-
spoon brown sugar and dot with I
teaspoon butter or margarine.
Bake in a preheated hot oven (425
25 to 30 minutes or,
until tender. Or, if desired, broil
4 inches from the source of heat
10 to 15 minutes or until tender,
fserve with cheese sad crackers.
t
i
Royal Douhon Figurines
AND
i
i
l
t
i
i
TOBY JUGS
ARE ALWAYS APPRECIATED
SELECT YOUR CHRISTMAS 6IFTS
FROM OUR LARGE ASSORTMENT!
THE FRENCH BAZAAR
JUAN PALOMERAS
-COLON-
KJrkea* HrM
CHRISTMAS CARDS
THE GREATEST ASSORTMENT IN TOWH
Give
4t
and you give the finest
i

X!fw*?iii
PIBCOlSTOa
Wl
(ffiitbeam $wbmn
a.mT mm MiiHAsna
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Moat Brautif ul Aato-
matic Patcolator
Mad*.
Finest of all way to
make perfect codec.
Best Junior
Food Miser
Made.
1 tori
tn lor per fact reawk.
*y*ty tima.
Simply set the dial forr CON-
TROLLED HIAT for perfect
cooking and frying results. Your
favorite dishes are more delicious.
No guesswork or constant watch-
ing. Water scaled element.
WATBt-SIMtO H.-MINT
1 aaa haawrw aarlra pm* at-
la caa-rel aanal la
[j, -MORRISON'S and LEWIS SERVICE
'mlrri,
ay
STUflarMTI
ytfirfrt
Lighter eight,
faater haarraa;, aaoac
aaa iron of
1 type.
rnfJrn,
It cook I- it deep
fries. Doe. mora
thugs I
WrTft.
ssaau
Now your tggt rill
be the tame eierr
tiaaec-actlr at yoa
liketbam.
Make* perfect aragaei
and loaned taod-

r


MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 185
PANAMA AMERICA* a* ITOtrrRNDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
i^Oiiat and \Jlh
erwiAe
~l~onlimi*J
I.A.vT.C. Christmas Party | lighting of the Xmas candle, ring-
Thc Colon unit of the Inter-A- m oi the sleigh bella arfd a wian
raerican Women's Club enjoyed aWiS enacved. men Ue quaint
geaprai assembly last evening. carols were sung. Tne Ciub join-
The gathering was a combina-
tion Christmas party and party
for husband* of the members.
Mrs. Ruth Morris and Mrs. Ca-
rita de Osorto gave talks on
Christmas fa) Latin America.
Prof. Emanuel Fuster accompa-
nied Miss Gaby Mendze and Mr.
Leonardo Ipolito in solo presenta-
tions, and the whole group sane
Christmas Carols.
Mrs. Isabel Bell and Mrs. Ani-
ta Edtt were in charge of re-
freshments.
SbisH toys were donattd by
those present for distribution to
the school to Puerto Pilon.
Mr. Rebasa Stopping
At Hotel El Panama
J. C. Rebaza, vice
president,
ed In singing tue well Known
Christmas carols to piano accom
panimcnt piayed by Mrs. .tugar,
as it had been done in Grandma's
parloi many years ago.
'this American Fold song pro-
gram is oniy one 01 man,, giv
en by Mrs. Sugar, her reseaarch
01 tuts music sieuimed irom ner
work In the Vetersns hospitals,
wnere she was a musical uiera-
pist, in Lyons, New Jersey, and
Roosevelt at t-eekanill .*.
Folk Music in America is not
hulbiuy songs oniy. Aiutough tne
Xmas carols sung on the pro-
gram came from the southern
mountain folk they were soothing
melodies sweet and plaintive.
These songs were gathered from
the hill peoples as they sang;
resident for longer than two years.home. 527 Morrison Street. Dta-
, ii.uauu in seeing the bio Heights, on Jan. 3 at 7:00 p.
wonderful sights of Panama and'm. Any members who who would
, ifuuinieu wftn other care to attend are also invited,
newcomers to I'anama, who win, -
try and help her adjust to happy I All star Circle
living in a new country. Has Christmas Party
------- The All Star Circle founded to
Emblem Club ll hi6 enjoyed a Christmas Party
elects Jfficers at Albrook Officers Club on
The Balos Emblem Club ~ No.; Wednesday.
,49 held tneir ecemoer n.uaiion Mrs. Maud Clinchard and Mrs.
and business meeting at the Elks' Edith Eppley were hostesses for
Home on Thursday evtntog. 'the affair at which stamp books
, Three new memoers, Mesdames, were used as both favors and
Marie Dube, Patricia Curtis and place cards.
Catherine Brown, were inititated; Outgoing officers who received
and welcomed into the club, eaec- gifts were president, Mrs. Lena
tion of officers for 1956 was held'Haas; vice president, Mrs. Mar-
aud the lollowing ofticers were e-'guerite Bouche; snd secretary,
|lected: ;Mrs Ruth Straus.
President, Mina Dee; junior1 incoming officers installed
past presioent, Floda Monaco were: president, Mrs. Olga Rowe;
1st vice president, Adelaide sel- vice president, Bessie. Pope; and
uui; aid vice president, Vera Bo- secretary, Katherine Sellens.
lek; financial secretary, Emrlyl Mother Calvert, first Worthy
Rowe; treasurer, Ursula Dewey; Matron of all Eastern Stars oa
. ..cui-uing secretary, Ann K ir- the Canal Zone, was introduced
ton. ...cnAi);!!!, ..... Ui' ft W -' _______.-J .. Um I Allfau
.....
PAGE NINE i
.nan; corresponding secretary,, Mi-
riam Smhn; and Board of Trus-
tees: Margaret G r a h a m, Ann
Hentschel and Maud Cuncnard.
Marshall, Veta Sharp; asst.
Also presented were Mrs. Louise
Sorrell. Worthy Matron and. Mrs.
Leah Green, Associate Worthy
Matron.
Those present were: Mrs. Louise
sales and advertising manager for them, as a real folk tune should
the Western Hemisphere of Col-
gate Palmolie International I n c
bt, tne lyrics always telling a
story of the Baby Jesus, and the
is-here ofr a short visit. He is wonderful meaning of his birth.
staving at the Hotel El Panama
Newcomers' Club
Marks Christmas With
Carol, Bell And Candle'
The Newcomera' Club held their dame;, Howell Wynne, L o r e n z
Tea was served with Mrs. Har
ry MaeGinness presiding at the
tea service. After which the usual
gift exchange was enjoyed.
Members present were Mes
anusI Xmas party at the home
jf Mrs. Ralph Dials in Ft. Gu-
ele Thursday afternoon. Mrs.
Charles Chadd was the assistant
iaftftss.
/ Mrs. Howell Wynne president
presided at the short business
meeting. Mrs Nathan, program
chairman then presented Mrs.
John L. Sugar, soprano, in an o-
riginal arrangement of early A
merican Christmas Carols:
rol. Bell snd Candle."
Gerspach, James Walsh, Peter
Scherlinsky, Norman Hutchinson,
A. Wilder, Harry McGinnes,, Ela-
nor Donaho, Lois Remer, Betty
Senzbach- Nathan Fuller, John
Sugar, D: E. Grler. John S n o d-
grass, Moses Hartman, Marvin
Brown, Charles Chadd, James
Johnson, Ralph Dials and OrvlUe
Jones.
Mrs Shirley Blair was a new
"c-; member, -and guests were Mrs.
Walter Gogans, Mrs. Charlotte
--------------, .----- -------,, _. jnose prest weir. ..
marshal, Helen yuinlan; asst. sorrell. Mrs. M Bouche, Mrs. Le-
marshall, Jerry Warford; 1st na Haas, Mrs. Anna Calvert, Mrs.
chaplain, Diana Bright; 2nd chap- oiga Roe, Mrs. Bessie pope,
lain, Dorothy Rose; Organist, Ger- Mrs. Katherine Sellens, Mrs. Leah
'truoe Roberto; press correspond-!Green, Mrs. R. Straus, Mrs. D.
ent, Ida Lovelady; historian, LylaiE. p0pe. Mrs.-John Crone, Mrs.
Esler; 1st guaro, Gertrude Paige;Louis Schuberg, Mrs. E. J. g'
and 2nd guard, Thelma Caroby. linton, Mrs. Ethel Clark. Mrs.
Installation night was tentative- Ann Emslle, Mrs. E. Kerr, Mrs.
ly set for Jan. 28 but definite ar- C, Calne. Mrs. Ella Brown, Mrs.
rangements will be announced lat-1 Ruth Bartozer, Mrs. Edna Mon-
er. White elephant prizes were roe, Mrs. Cec i 1 Lower, Mrs.
won by Ida Lovelady and Ly la Blanche Wright. Mi*. Y
Esler. I Mrs Selma Huff, Mrs. B. Con-
After the meeting a buffet aup-rad Mrs. Wertt, Miss Claire Og-
per was served to the lounge salden, Mrs. J. Rh*PP> "i 'v.S'
a Xmas party to which husbands Simpson. Mrs. Md of the members were also invited. Mrs. Jean Clinchrd, 1W.MW
Xmas gifts were presented to all Jpbnson, Mrs. E. Angermuuer
ft i an?_. nJUk i'(\a>0 U l*V I. M T-
Mrs. Sugar was attired to a Larson and Mrs. Betty Le Doux.
green calico dress of pioneer! \ -Lolly-pop three" and carol
style, and' wearing a white lace'song is a Xmas treat for all the
trimmed cap,-vintage nth ccntu- .mall-fry" of the Newcomers'
ry, a cap that had crossed the club members. This event is slat-
plin state's to a covered wagon.'ed for Dec. 23.
The scene was set in the living. Any woman in the Atlantic side
room of Grahma's home In a'of the Isthmus is eligible to join
await low, town, the traditional this club if she has not been a
those who attended and a socia-
ble time was enjoyed for which
Thelmas Camby, as Chairman,
, receives credit. All incoming of-
ficers will meet at the president's
Mrs. Edith Voss. Mrs. L. M ar
tin, Mrs. Eldth Eppley, Mrs. B.
Roe, Mrs. N. I. Plerobon. -M ft.
Agnes Coleraan. Mrs. Dorothy Al-
len, and Mrs. V. Di Pasca.
I
i
FOR THAT VERY SPECIAL PERSON
CHOOSE A ROYAL COPENHAGEN
FIGURINE!
5 WE HAVE THE LARGEST SELECTION
on The Isthmus i
i

THE FRENCH BAZAAR
JUAN PALOMERAS
-^COLON-
U DRIVE-IN
WEEKEND RELEASE!
i'Hived aul
rove, in
HANK KIM' CATHY KARIM
LIlEJOT IIMSELlE I'llttNEU S1IIK
"if AD AT THE WORLD"
t
PLUS:
OUOC*, TOUCH FAROO
beat that b.awi.n ewefd
...mmd paid Ihffn back -** for tu*.)!
roar nun "c,uu
Perfect Casting Marks Star Roles Fro Comedy Hit.
""ISTER ROBERTS''
Release at the "LUX" Theatre next Thursday!
"GHEAT HEART-WARMING COMEDY."
Hollywood Reporter.
THE SEVEN LITTLE FOYS"
The rollirkinr thoroughly delightful "THE SEVEN I.1T-
anlTLE FOYS," which won the Parents' Magulne Medal A -
ward as an outstanding family picture, will open soon at
the LUX Theatre, with Bob Hope starred as Eddie Foy.
The story of the most fabulous family act; in vaudeville.
the film Is a wonderful blend of music, high humor, drama
and touching romanee. Hope's dramatic performance has
been hailed by.critics and audiences everywhere. Advt.
WRIGGLE ROUTINETwo tig*' snakes and a boa constrictor
nave hit the night-club circuit In West Berlin. Germany. They're
the partners of Tenga Kalu of Venezuela, who doesn t seem to
mind them hanging around him during his unique dance routine.
And since they support him, Kalu gladly supports their 160
pounds as thoy curl and alido Over him.

Perfect type easting. Henry Fonda, who plays Lieuten-
ant Roberts in 'TWSTKR BOBEBTS," IS a real Ule naval
lieutenant in the reserve; Jack Lemmon, who portrays En-
sign Porter, is a reserve ensign, and John Ford, at the di-
rectorial helm of this Naval comedy,'In a rear admiral la
the Naval Reserve.
Leland Hayward prodneed this Warner Bros.' Cinema-
Scope comedy which was filmed off Midway Island.
The film was prodaead on location which covered 7tM
__las of travel. A great part of he story waa filmad aboard
the CSS Hewell off Midway Island. Advt.
mil
CENTRAL
THEAT RE,
.
A PRESENT for our
Patrons and Friends...
.........'"' *
"V "^-------
SHOWING AT YOUR SERVICE CENTER
THEATERS TONIGHT!
*. *.
IS
"PORT
OF HELL"-
i and
"SEVEN
ANGRY MEN"
>*......
BALBOA 6:15-8:15
Ala-CONDITIONE
Clark Susan
GabuHimrd
i i ii. i i i ewe*
DIABLO HTS. IS 7:
"O-Cteo MOOM
Hu*n HAAS -
"THE OTHER WOMAN"
Tuw. 'TAfD TO KtU." .
:U 7:5
Uwird G noniNSON
O Gorg* HAFT
-A BUUJET FOB JOEI"
Turn. "VKNOEANCK VAJXET"
CRISTOBAL :15 t:U
Alr-CanSlltoM.
. Olivia d* UAVnXAND
O Gllbwt ROLAND
; "THE LADr*
h-, ""*? *pi*. *V
LA BOCA !:
'A Laa Cuatro Vientos"
BIEBD -:1s S:tS
"ATHENA"
vsuufJbodif. JbuxdtL tflaAifuL
as
This is the pink that proves forever... pink is for girls!
lore 7h*f fktt
BUY ON TIME!
FEW DAYS LUT FOR CHRISTMAS j
Rails, Hooks, Pleated Ribbons, Rims,
Gathers and many more "Kirsch"
accessories for Curtains
f^Cfjtfot/J newest... a' pulsating pink
for lips and matching fingertips
Surprise! It's liltingly li^ht, yet lusciously bright I
We forventh/ fed that pint ie for girl.-.
and a million men agree with us! "Love
lUt /"...not a shy pink...a howo
pink! Not a whitper pink, a uhtstU pink!
hi lifkt, ye krifht...it'a your color, a*
matter what your coloring! Whether you*r.
petal-pale or brown as bronze, wear "Love
that Pink" tonight...yon'U hear the ex-
citement crackling, clear across the room!
-UwTtairmkT
N.ilEM*.4
UhI LipMick.
/,mlr tm-tmmr
1 p. Up***
,tp*aAr m*i> U
mfim wtM'"
.ni kt t*
mft)
Just Sy: "Chfrje It"
We accept your Christinas Savings
Fund Deposit Booklets for
your purchases
Open till 9 p.m.
-

Zm sTORE
FUR
21-02. 7tb Cant/al Ava. -^ Tala. 2-1R80 -1833


TAGE TE
111 )""'
THE PAN MA AMERICA! AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, DECEMBER 11, ltM
P
I
'1
i'
Slammin' Sammy Bests Bolt In Miami Playoff*
I ^
r.
^_
artinez To
Against
.i
Sub for TgSS 'Snead Shoots Record Golf
.':'
Baragao

College Cage Scores
(Saturday Night)
MIDWEST
BrtMlNGMA M(ALA.) CLASSIC
(Championship)
Alabama 12, Valparaiso 56.
If-
(For Third)
/Houston 101, Texas Christian si.
..STEEL BOWL AT FITSBUBGH
(Championship)
J TJuqueaM 71, Pitt 41.
' (ror Third)
- Geneva 80, Westminster (Pa.) $7.
OTHER GAMES
SOUTH '
Temple 73, Kentucky 91.
Maryland 61, Wake Forest 51.
Richmond 74, Virginia 73.
vJS.C. State 13, Eastn Kentucky 74
, North Carolina 92, South\ Caroma
| 75. \ '.
Furman 85, Virginia Tech 88.
" Ky. Wesleyan M, Tenneasee 72.
Georgetown (D.C.) 85, Mt. St. Ma
; ry's 78.
Dels. State 70, Hampton Inst. 5.
W'm 1 Mary 76, Hsmpden-Sydney
'68.
5 Bridgewater 101. Richmond Pro.
I Virginia St. 99, W.Va. State 85.
West'n Carolina 88, Piedmont 80.
.Hanover 80, Centro 75.
Georgetown (Ky.) 78, Vis Ma-
' donna 73.
tUnlon (Ky.) 97, Lincoln Mem!-74.
St. Petera (Jersey C.) 86, Bait.
Univ. 73.
e Morris Harvey 102, Concord (W.
Ta.) 79.
Marshall 115, Wash'n It Lee 83.
M'ph's Cha Bros. 81, Lambl
(Tenn.) 8.
Belmont 101, Florence (Als.) 78.
Fayettevls Tchrs. 96, N.C. A4VT
Amer. Univ. 63, Catholic 58.
Andrews AFB 103, Ft. Eustis 74.
Howard (D.C.) 163, J. C. Smith
75.
I Carson-Newman 95, King (Tenn.)
T8.
Cincinnati 83. West'n Kentucky 54.
Kansas 74, Wisconsin 68.
lows State 63, Tulaa 58.
Marquen* 84, S. Dakota StaU 70.
Missouri 74, Illinois 73.
Michigan 77. Nebraka 71.
South'n Methodist 82, Minnesota
Notre Dame 71, Northwestern a.
DePaul 84, Penn State 62.
Indiana 98, Kansas State 72.
Ohio State 80, Chicago Loyola 72.
Bradley 88, Texas Western 65.
Okie Univ. 84, Ohio Wesleysn 56.
Detroit 78. Toronto 50.
Miami (Ohio) 93, Bowling Green
73.
Ohio Northern 111, Bethany (W.
Kalamazoo 80, Wabaah 63.
Marietta 84, Oberlin 75.
Jlttenberg 68, Wooster 54.
ant State 82, Youngstown 75.
Aurora (111.) 84 Chicago IUini S3.
Capital 81, Muskingum 70.
Baldwin-WaUaee 84, Ball State
Wayne (Detroit) 67, West'n Re-
serve 56.
Denison S3, Otterbein 88
Rip Grande (Ohio) 85, CedsrviTJe
83,
Centrs: Michigan 73, W.Michigan
Isidro Martines, who wax de
lea ted by Pedro Taste last night
at the Colon Arena, will substi-
tute for Texts In a ten-round
134-pound feature bout with
Cuban Armando Baragafio at
the Arena Sunday, promoter Tu-
la Sanchei announced this
morning.
Tente wha wax stgaaed to
meet the yawn*, clean eat Cm-
ban, laffered a rash on the
riant eyebrow teat nifht sad
will net be able to raHtt his
eagaa-eaeent.
Martines In losing last nteht.
For Sixth Victory In Open
MIAMI. Dec IS (UP) Veteran Sam Snead,
shooting; record golf, beat Tommy Belt on the first
hole of e sadden death playoff yesterday to win the
the Miami Open Golf Tournament for an unprece-
dented sixth time.
Snead aad Belt tired at 381 at' On the extra hole. Snead had to
the end 4 the regular 34 hoi**, boot for the green from under
throwing these at* the third per- the pine trees where he sliced
aoawl match hi the past two his drive. He dropped the bsll 30
years. Belt beat the vetaran feet from the flag and left him-
"steamer** treat White Sulphiu self only an 18-inch second putt
Springs, W. Vs., hi match play from his winning par.
rouaox o both the 1854 and 1853 *
resaemkered for bte put t-
PGA champsoashipa.
It wax Saead's tura this
time
showed he still had a lot of claw The 41-year-sd "pactare awiaaer"
after his eteht-menth layoff, of goiidom two-putted tar a regul-
and it was the opinion of many lateaa par 4 oa the 408-yard ex-
that had be had a match under tra bete while Beit scared a bo
Knoxville 117, Lemoyene (Tenn.)
78.
Tenn. Wesleysn 71, Univ. Gs.
Ext. 80.
fi'hsm Sonth'n 104, Chattanooga.
83.
Atlantic Cbr'n 100, Catawba 88.
Duke 87, Georgia Tech 68.
Mercer 88, Appalachian 78.
Davidson 98, The Citadel 84.
Vanderbilt 78, Oklahoma 88.
Clarke 54, Morris Brown 50.
Eastn Tenn. 104, Virginia Mil. 58.
Auburn 97, Howard (Ala.) 54.
Florida State 81, Stetson 78.
Georgia Tears. 80, Fla. South'n
78.
Rice 83. Tulane 53..
Tenn. Tech 78. Hardin Simmons
88.
Miss. South'n 3, Miami (Pla.) 81.
Mississippi 108, David Lipacomb
78
Alma 84. Ferris 84.
Assumption (Ont.) 88, Detroit
Teoh 86.
Missouri .Valley S3,. McKendree
McPherson 54, Bethany (Kan.) 33
Concordia Sem..(8t. L.) ,58, (ul.-
Stoc'n 43.
Central (Mo.) 7T. Rolla 71.
St. Benedicts' (Kan.) 63, Kan.
Wexl'n 61. ;
Peru (Neb.) 84. Omaha 83.
Akron 81, Mt. Union 72:
John, Carroll 81, Case Tech 58.
Canyon 84, Hirsm .
Msnchester 66, Marion (Ind.) 55
Taylor 84, Indiana Central 87.
DePauw 83, Indians State 73..
St. Joseph's (Ind.) 75, Evansvllle
73. .
IUmote Cel. 8, Roa Poly 66.
Earlhrm 78, Andersen 78.
Oakland City 82, Shurtfleff 84.
Cornell (Iowa) 99, Ripen 71.
Grlnell 82, Lawrence 86;
Upper Iowa 76, .Simpson 72.
Luther (Iowa) 75. Buena Vista 62.
Neb. Wesleysn 90, Dea. Wesleysn
Doane 75. Concordia (Neb.) 73.
Chxdron 75. Midland 71.
Mayville (N.D.) 88, Minot 93.
Moorebead (Minn.) 80, Mich.
Tech 87.
Northern (S.D.) 67, North Dakota
56.
Hurot.(SJ).) 80, Kearney (Neb.)
?.D, State 6. Manicato 63.
snkton 82, S.D. Minea 76.
St. Thos. (Minn.) 73, Minn. Du-
luth 53.
Gust. Adolphus 60, St!. Mary's
(Minn.) 54.
Hamline 83, St. Johns (Minn.) 67.
South Dakota 68, St. Cloud (Minn)
7.
his belt, he would have beaten
Tesis.
The visitor, who has an im-
pressive record in Cuban rtnea
arrived st Tocumen Airport ear-
ly vesterday mnrnin with his
trainer. The pair were interest-
ed rlneside spectators durlne
the Tesis-Martines boat last
night
An attractive six-round semi-
final is on tan in which Rodol-
fo Arhpudla meets class* Clau-
dio Martinez, Isldro's kid broth-
er.
cundi ttoaped Got* Cas-
taedas In the third round
Oct. 17 In bis last r'nr ap-
nearanee. It Is no secret that
if it were net for the ea*v
tenee ef a Hoy named Teto
Ibarra. Clandte would be hr far
the meet promising- youngster
.in the local ring picture at
present.
Two other encounters round
out the program. Carlos Ortiz
battles Ortega St. Justin and
Gregorio Martinez takes on Ba-
silio Williams in four-rounders.
gey-live. The Chattanooga. Tena
Lang ressei
Ig htewaps,
Saead asad only
nine strokes an the green, rid-
iag to his record 38 ea the back
Fast Climbing Tofo barra
To Meet Cumberbatch Sunday
His longest birdie putt wsx a
promiased the green with his 12 footer for s two on the 185-
secood shot and pitched back 15 yard Uth. He followed with short
feet beyond the cup. Belt missed putts for birdies on 12 ind 13,
the long putt sod uW victory and then on 15, 16, and 17.
8X308 first price was Sao ad's.
Bolt's longest green shot wss sn
18-foot birdie on the 410-y a r d
10th. He knocked three strokes off
par going out with nine footers.
Tesis Again
Outpoints
Issy Martinez
***sw3h
Louisiana ech 80, S.E: Lpuiana(Dayton t> Toledo j,
awwi.j ,t^\ at te x t Adjusisns (S.D.) 80, Csrleton 74
Northwtern (U.) St. 78, N. Tex AuMbur, M_ MaeAlaster 7
AST
88, St. John's
Bklyn
St.
ft. Louis
Manhattan 81, Lafayette 76.
Niagara 72, La Salle 70.
Columbia 95, Rugers 49.
Harvard 81, Cornell 58.
Brown 74, Rhode Island 71.
Dartbmouth 52, Colby 41.
St. Bonaventure 68, St. Francis
(Pa.) 63.
Louisville 98, Csnlsius 83.
Amherst 66, Army 57.
Holy Cross 99, Ysle 84.
Setdn Hall 83, Roanoke 81.
Syracuse 85, Fordham 68.
Hunter 67, CCNY 62.
St. Francia (Bklyn) 81, Provi-
dence 67.
Yeahiva 68. Wilkes 63.
Williams 72, Boston College 88.
MIT 77. Pratt 63.
Augsburg 88, MacAlester 78.
Cenfl State (O.) 108, L i s c o 1 n
(Mo.) 88.
Wichita 74, S.W. Missouri 37.
East'q Mont. 65, Dickinson (N.D.)
81.
Colo. Col. 68, Air F. Academy 63
, scored a
unanimous ten-round decision
over isidro Martinez, 133, at the
Colon Arena last nhjht before a
large crowd.
The bout, which was a hard
fought affair, was the third
meeting of the two. Tesis, has
been the winner each time.
Tesis need ble counter
punching; style to best advan-
tage as he waited for has danc-
ing, fast moving foe to ad-
vance and then sidestep nim-
bly to land one-two wallop to
the face and body.
Martinez pat up a good
shewing, bat it was evident
his eight-month layoff caused
his timeu aad coordlnaton te
be off.
On two occasions he scored
solid blows to the winner's mid-
section that appeared to have
Teste shaken, but each time
Martinez failed to capitalize on
the situation.
Tesis received a cut on the
$2.200 first prise
Bolt collected $1,500.
Mike Sesschak, ef Greaaiagers,
N.Y., leading the fteM by two
.trabes teta the fteal raand.
skidded to a eae-ever-ever-pa r 11
that left him ia a tarea way
tie tor third *M.'B.
(Dutch) Barrtesa ef St. Lea
aad Frank St ran ah an, Toledo,
O., each finished with tf to
tie Soaenak.
Tommy Bolt left bis tempers-
mental "thunder" at home a n d
Sought his Lightniag to shoot the
fhul round la 64 strokes, six un-
der par, which looked more than
shod enough to win.
But Snead was hotter. Both en-
tered Use linal round for strokes
bsck of Souchsk snd few gave
Sanad a chance after hstarned
th tront nine m an even par
MBut the old competitor set the
pata lbwd Miami Swings course
ait* esr with s record-shatter-
ina- 29 on the bsck nine.
No other golfer has won a ma
jo?moo.rn-5.y PGA Tournament
iix times. Snesd first took the
msm open uuem.1937 Wd fol-
lowed witn victories in 183, was,
ts as.-.'a
!?*!
m the money ia lceme tax.
"t Was the third playoff in the
31-year luaiory of tae Miami t
pea. Fred Haaa Jr., ****"*
Se by oeaung bob. Hwujon-
Jack Burke Jr., won in 18 la s
playoff wiin inch t,>'er-hnW.n##.
ine tournament wss shortened
There waa also s playoff for
amateur honors with Ray Terry
of Cocoa, Fla., son of the former
New York Gisntx grest plsver
snd manager, Bill Terry, beating
Doug Sanders of Miami Beach on
the third extra hole. Both had
tied at 309 in the final round.
to
Montana SUte 64. Eastn Waah'ririfhtJyebrw ln.th* ^btb *h*
M poured a streak of blood until
Wash'n State 73. Gonzaga 53. I en*. The wound seemed to
Augustana (HI.) S3, N. Cen. DM- &** Martinez renewed courage
nois 76. j,nd he actually finished the
N.E. Missouri 80. IUinou St. Nor- crow pleasing battle stronger
mil 83. |U>an the winner.
Easfn IllinoU 86. Mornlngaide 75.' Tests, who had been scheduled
Knox 78, Carthage (111.) 68.
Wheaton 87, Northern Illinois 7.
L. Forest (01.) 80, 111. Wesleysn
to fight Cuban Armando Bara-
gafio Sunday, will be unable to
54 holes wnea the first day s
play was cancelled by rain.
bnead and Bolt both showed
their mastery of iron play, pin-
pointing their approach shots for
easy putts snd birdies and pars.
Pro Leaguers
Idle Tonight;
Play Tomorrow
Panama Pro League teams
take a rest today with the
next game, between the last
Place Carta Vieja Yankees
and the league leading Spur
Cola SedamMi, an top far to-
morrow night at the Olympic
Stadium.
Hard hitting bantamweight con
tender Tolo Ibarra, meets his stif-
fest test to dste Sunday st the Ns-
tional Gym, when he tackles craf-
ty, experienced Byron Cu m b e r-
batch in a ten-round 130-pound
match.
Ibarra, the 19-year youngster
who in three pro fights has rack-
ed up a like amount of knock-
outs, is listed in the January is-
sue of boxing autho r 11 y Nat
Fliescher's The Ring Magazine,
as "bantamweight Prospect of
the Month."
Toto's manager-trainer C u b an
Alfredo Perez who has been ac-
cused of picking "soft spots" for
the stocky kid from Chlriqui, said
laat week "the fans should hsve
no kick now. Toto will definitely
be upvsgainst a' tough rival when
he takes on Cumberbatch Sunday."
Recently, Cumberbatch has ac-
quired the reputation of being a
"slssher" becsuse in his last two
bouts he hss virtually cut his op-
ponents to ribbons.
He gave Roberto Murillo the
beating of his life several months
ago in a bout that had ringsiders
spalshed with Murillo's blood, snd
just a few weeks ago, his victim
was Baby Manolete of Colombia.
The visitor went homo a week
after the fight with his fsee bad-
ly marked and his eyes still
bloodshot from the terrific pun-
ishment he took.
In the six-round semifinal Murl-
Uo, who is msking his first ap-
pearance since his defeat, engages
tough Black BUI, who had a TKO
victory to his credit Over Alfredo
MsrshsU Oct. 31.
The main prelim brings togeth-
er unbeaten Sonny McKay a n d
Juan Salazar; and in the curtain
raiser Arias Mndez swapa punch
es with Juan Lezama.
TANDING
PANAMA PRO LEAGUE
Pet
1.000
.400
.200
GB
Teams Won Lost
Spur Cola............... 4 0
Chesterfield............. 2 3
Carta Vieja............. 1 4
SATURDAY NIGHTS RESULT, Olympic Stadium
Carta Vieja 6, Chesterfield 2
TONIGHTS GAME: Open Date
TOMORROW NIGHTS GAME COlympic Stadium)
Carta Vieja (Harris 0-2) vs. Spur CoU
(Tug-erson 0-0)
Game Time: 7:30
Mufti Again Beats Mossadeq
In Thrilling Stretch Battle
In The
Letter Box
night to hsve Martinet aubstt
tule for him. ,
In the eight-round semifi-
nal, Sammy Medina in a per.
formance that wa remln'e-
eent ef the days when be wm
the popular featherwel g h t
champ ef the Isthmus, won a
clearcut, unanimous verdict
ever Rafael (Bull) Brathwsite.
On repeated occasions, Medi-
na adroitly maneuvered his ri-
val Into the ropes to pound him
with right end left combina-
tions that had the crowd sp-
Elauding lustily each time. The
ull fought back gamely
throughout, but, It wss Sammy
all the way. Medina weighed
IT!1/*, to Brathwalte's 128%.
in the other bouts Ai Rodri-
guez, 135, gained a unanimous
verdict over Hankin Barrow3,
III. 135, in four heats; and Al
Stewart, 128, kayoed Battling
SvUTBvtIST
Okalahoma AIsM I, Texas Si.
Ark State Tebra 72, Ark. Col. eg.
128.
- Peewee, 128, In 1:00 in the sec-
f ill laa,enS*Seraent becauaelond of a scheduled four-round-
ol the cut Plans were made laster.
*'*"' ***i** Boston Univ. 79, Worehester Tech SnJ ^ - j^y _ ^
55
Upsala 74, Washington (kfd.) St.
Buffalo Univ. go, Alfred 78.
Princeton 72, Colgate 7L
lona 70, Alumni 41.
Massachusetts 86, Tufts eg
St. Lswrence 77, Vermont 7.
S. Ans-ira's (N.H.) , New
Hamp. 79.
iws.4 a*. Rider 81
Cortlan (NY) 72. Far!. Dicken-
aon M.
Bowdoir 84, Bates M
Howard Payne lit, Tex. Lutb'n
T4-
Texas A*l . St. Mary's Univ.
(Tax.) L
GrsmWing 88. Wiley (Tex.) SB.
Texas A4M. 78, Louisiaas State
88.
FAB WLST
A
UCLA 78, Purdue 88.
Utah ..88, Ariieaa I.
Ssvtb'r Cal. 71, Denver 48
. St. HlehaeU rt ^Mya llUm) u u Wt-|^
Ceta.
Lemiyne (N.Y.)
(Vt.) M.
Drew 72. Towson (Md.) .
Slippery Rock 78, Carnegie M. ,rFfe\lSEv7Uta* it
lieka (Ids.) 72. Carref (Meat.)
73.
Clarkson 88, Queensi (Onti M.
Rochester 79, Brooklyn Poly 8).
Potsdam 87, Geneaee 87.
Plattaburga 87. MeTltll 8f.
New'k Rutgers 84, Rutgers 8
Jersey 57.
Cooper Union 7g, Columbia Phar-
macy 43.
Wast Cheter . Sbiseeaburg tl.
Allisnce (Ps.) 70. Thiel 88
Ald'n Br'dus 88, ateekasy (W.Va )
71.
W. Liberty 88, Glee vine (W.Va i
79.'
Nsvy 88, Pean 88.
Albright 74. Gettysburg 72
Fr-khn 1 Mars! 88, W. MaryktM
SB
TL
Idaho State St.
Msbo 78. Utah ftxde 71
Mertbn Meet St, Saskatchewan
81.
Wyomaag K, Oreaee State M.
fiag ii lias gg. Arts Stale psi M
Lewis
mX
Raetere Orcaea St. Mevads M
St. MatTa (Cal j 82, CalWerste
HnaaheMe a. es Orease Tee*. It
J Jess State 88. Serraaieate ft
aervlee.
tregneat
The Yankees' Bill Harris Is
a probable starter against Jim
Tsgeraon.
Carta Vieja fans were st'll
elated today on the Yanks" 8
te t victory ever the Chester-
feld Smokers, their first of
the season, Saturday night.
Winning pitcher Ed Mana-
ban went all the way for the
winners, as be scattered seven
tilts.
Martin Wljinton, the serv-
iceman hurler signed late last
week, started for the Smokers
and waa charged with the loss.
Relief ace Rosa Grimaley took"
over in the sixth and finished
the gsme.
Johnny Krepf hit hss second
homer of the season for the
Yanks while Bobby Preacott
hit his first for the Smokers.
The Smokers, whose pitch-
In- staff became short after
Jerry Davis underwent and
emergency appendectomy last
week, were encouraged with
the news that right-hander
Den Elston would arrive early
abb) week to join the club.
Accord'ng to a United Press
dispatch published Saturday,
tht 28-year-old Elston was ae-
eulred last week by the Brook-
lyn Dodgers In the deal that
aent Buss Meyer to the Chica-
go Cabs.
WfXKLY SERVICE FROM NEW YORK
TO WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA
27*1* MARIA" ......Dae Cristobal. C. &, Dee. 14
-SAIfTA MARGARITA" Doe Cristobal, C. Z., Dee 21
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK
Oarfc St. Peget
SJ. -SANTA BARBABA'
S*. -SANTA ISABEL" .
,. Salle Cristobal, C. Z., Dee. 1*
Salla Cristobal, C. Z., Dec. 21
91
78.
ft. free, State T>, Cat Pete 48
uhlenberg 1. Lebanon Valley r^j^^ni^^<>>t<
ilan (Pa.) Tchrs. ft,

aBjBJt 84. Newsrk Eegsaee;
fcTOansfg!
FROM U. S. PACIFIC & WEST COAS1
CENTRAL AMERICA
O BALBOA AND CRISTOBAL C. Z.
N. "SANTA CBUtr .........Owe Balboa, C. Z.. Dec. 14
SJ.-SANTA FE- .............Dae Balboa. C. Z., Jan. 7
; FROM CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C. Z. TO THE
} WFJT C04ST CENTRAL AMFRICA k U. S PACIFIC
MM. -SANTA CRUZ-........Sails Cristobal, C. Z.. Dec. 22
Kings (Ps.) 83, Linete (Pa M rgga
St. Vmcest (Pa) 88, %ukUrt ./,
testy
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thtowa 104, Dick 11 see
SBBaBBBBB*BBBBVBaW
4u,i
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aed *"<.
tettbab
/ateNte
PANAMA AGENCIES CO
CmmOwuiL, 8131 2135 PANAMA: 8-85*8 8*87
BALBOA t 1881-S1SS
NataTBaa^aastBaTaaTataa
J
Elston wen 17 snd lost six
with Les Angeles, Open Claa-
slf I e a 11 e a. Pacific Coast
League, last year.
Sports Editor:
I would like JJ. Harrison
Jr., the lending baseball col-
umnist of the English lan-
guage papers, to investigate
and publish what took placo
"behind the scenes" to abort-
en the Panama League eched-
nle. Wss it to strengthen the
odds agslnst Carts Vieja?
Spur Cola snd Chesterfield
each hsve two excellent pitch-
ers snd ss long as they hsve
an easy schedule they'll be
okay. After yon get by the
f'rst two pitchers, Carta Vieja
bss a stronger staff.
Spur Cols wss supposed to
plsy four games In three days,
commencing tonight. They
have been let off tonight's
gsme snd tomorrow night's
doublehesder has been chang-
ed to a single affair. What
gives?
C. V. Fan.
EDITOR'S NOTE: There was
n0 game.listed for tonight on
the original schedule but
league officials had agreed
Friday to play the rained ent
Spur Cola-Carta Vieja contest
on this date.
The Stud Buena Re's impressive
grey Chilesn-bred colt Mufti yes-
terday made, it eight consecutive
victories when he once mere beat
his entrymate Mosssdeq in a thril-
ling finish in the featured $1,000
six-and-one-half furlong spring for
Clssses A and B imported thor-
oughbreds at the Juan Franco race
track.
Mosssdeq, owned by the Stud Miu-
ra, and Mufti are both trained by
loquacious Luis H. Fsrrugia who
at times seems to be aa good a
trainer ss he claims he is. Mos-
sadeq, reportedly more expensive
snd highly rated in his native Chi-
le, has thus far failed in hia last
three attempts to beat bis atahle-
"te 11 by less than a length in
thrilling windupa.
Yesterday, the entry went off
odds-on favorites to beat the track's
leading claimant to the track
championship, Kadir. The 1st t e r
was a well backed second choice
while Psppa Flynn was the third
choice and Barge Royal a rank out-
sider. Only five starters participat-
Ssjpe
At the start, Barge Royal shot to
the front and set a sixzling psce
with Mufti in closest pursuit. Go-
ing down the beckstretch, Mosss-
deq displsced his entrymste snd
was a forced in a battle with Barge
Royal for the lead. The two lead-
ers battled head and head until a
little before they swung into the
homestretch. At this stsge Mossa-
deq shot to the front snd opened
- one length margin, with stable-
/
rider wss sble to score more that
one victory.
mate Mufti going
length back.
only another
*K
Shaves Circles Around
, Bias Aguirre, up on Mufti, then
went to the whip and urged his
mount for all he was worth and
the plucky grey responded nobly.
He jumped post Bsrge Boyal and
was up alongside Mosssdeq in less
time then it takes to tell snd in
the finsl sixteenth outlssted the
latter to score by a half length,
with plenty left in reserve. Ksdir,
which raced fourth to the stretch,
in the final eighth to finish third,
three lengths behind Mosssdeq.
The entry paid $3.20 chicken
The dividends;
FIBST BACE
1-Llboria $5040, 9.80, I..
2Elenita $380, 2.S0.
3Montero $240.
SECOND BACE
1Young; Prince $18. 4.40. 2.80.
2Alo Alo $340, 2.40.
3Hurlecano $2.80.
First Doable: $394.48. .
THIBD BACE
1-Que Lindo $7.00, 2.80, 3.80.
2Pregonero $8.40, 4.40.
3Conquistador $4.
One-Two: $28.
, FOUBTH BAOB
1-Regla $11.20, S.30. 4.S0.
2Lady Edna $1180, 7.40.
3Avispa $2.80.
Quiniela: 11 91.
FIFTH BACE
1Historia $21, 13, 5.
1Psparrorrs $14.20, 12J0.
3Don Manuel $4.20.
SIXTH BACB
1Dainty Duchess $080, t, 7*0.
2Another Fulmar $4.80, 3.JO.
SFru Ftu $5.80.
SEVENTH MACS
1Armador $4.80, 2.80. 2.40.
2Amln Did! $3.80, 2.80.
3Newbrighton $2.40.
Second Double: $27.48.
EIGHTH RACE.
1-Onda Real $3.20, S.S0, 2.80.
2Oro purlto $6, 4.
3Iguszu $2.80.
Quiniela: $n.4S.
NINTH RACE
1-Tony $11.60, 3.60, 2.80. -
2Old Smuggler $2.20, 240.
3Psnlcus $8.
One-Two: $23.4$.
TENTH RACE
1-Muftl (e) $3.20, 2.40.
2Mosssdeq (e).
ENOCEPUT DROPS
feed when'compared to liboriV's I last eight tbuts In which the mid-
$50.40 psyoff in the first r.ce. Oth- dewleight c? m p To n hip hi.
J91JU.'^ vV,de,,dsnwere.Hist0^i,Icnn, >. oaly two have
$21 snd Young Prince's $1. No I gone the distance
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
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Cristobal
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s.s. -Yaque- .....
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isa. IS, 1958
'Also Handling Refrigerated snd Chilled Cargo
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Cristobal
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Jan. 18, 1958
Weekly saiCnrs of twelve passenger ships to New
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and Seattle.
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TELEPHONES:
TORAL 21
PANAMA


r
MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1*5
T PANAMA AMERICAN AN DfDEPKNDENT DART NEWSPAPER

PA
Rams Clinch Western Crown, To Battle Browns
Let Arm Go Forward
To Complete Pendulum
'"ffi'jrasssn^*"i"* . - m
owe the alley.
Seventh, of 18 illustrated
and Instructive
articles written tor NBA Service
By BUZZZ FAZIO
ABC Maiteri Champion
What you do with your arm aft-
er releasing the ball can make a
mighty big difference in your av-
erage.
Failing to follow through proper-
ly is one of the more common of
all bowling faults and it's a fair'
ly easy one to remedy.
The most common, natural and
easy Mow through is simply let-
ting the arm come forward and
up to complete the pendulum.
The hand should end up pointing
at the pit) at which you're aim-
ing the bail.
-1
There are other ways of follow-
ing through such as bringing the
hand up across the body, ending
.mat above the left shoulder.
Sim? bowlers swing the hand to
tlie right away from the body
but, to ha correct, they must
i?!case the ball before swinging
the arm out. L bend ray elbow as
I bring my arm up after releas-
ing the ball to give good spin
and hook to the ball.
I recommend that you work on
the type where the arm comes up
as part ef the pendulum. This is
the easiest and most natural.
It's hard to know If y o u're
following through properlyor at
allunless you consciously con-
cntrate on that part of your de-
livery. The best way is to exag-
rate the fillow through and
hold the final pose until the ball
is midway down the alley. Make
like the Statue of Liberty with
the arm up and the left foot still
In the same positioa as when
you relessed the ball.
The follow through gives direc-
tion to your ball.
If you cut the follow through
short, the ball will just fall off
the fingers without getting any
lift and spin to keep it on an ac-
curate course.
A proper follow through will
help you bowl more consistently
to deliver the balll the same way
each time.
Pro Title
Contest Set
For Dec. 26
NEW YORK, Dec. 12 (UP)
The rookie-studded Los Angeles
Rams will pit youth against
experience Dec. 26 when they
play host to the Cleveland
Browns' "oldmen" In the Na-
tional Football League cham-
pionship game.
Loa Anieles, led by rookie
Coach Sid Glllman. won the
Western Division tHIe and the
r'ght to tackle Coaeb Pawl
Brown's veteran b whlpolng
the Green Bav 'ackers San*
dav, 31-17. The Chicago Bear*.
nlv team with a chance to
'?eh To* An valet, et th
Bhlledeiphi F*rles. 17-1*. hot
finished a haK-ome behind
the Pant* as the It aro ciaba
ended their regatar seasons.
The Rams, with rookie back
Ron Waller acorin* three touch-
downs, won the Western crown
before 00.535 In sunshiny. M*
degree weather at Lo* Anele..
The Browns, who clinched their
sixth straight Eastern crown
last week, warmed up for their
title defense by scoring; 21 ooints
In the last five minutes to beat
the Chicago Cardinals in 20-de-
graa temperatura, 16-24.
Otto Graham, 34-Year-old
Cleveland onarferhaek who
win retire altar the eham-
plonsh/p game, marked his
final home appearance by
throwing three scoring passes,
including the decisive 41-yard-
ar to Ray Renfrt,
OUT OF DOORS *
In the other season finals
Sunday, Eddie LeBaron's two
touchdown passes helped the
Washington Redskins defeat the
tteburgh Steelers, 28-17; T. A.
TttU n dHugh McElhenny
sparked the San Francisco For-
iJ-^Jne" to a 35-17 victory over
the Baltimore Colts; and Frank
Glfford acorad twice to lead the
New York Giants to a 24-19 tri-
umph over the Detroit Lion.
NEXT: The straight ball, keek
and curve.
by
JOE WILLIAMS
Such was the character of offense in most col-
lege arenas the past season that many of the pun-
(! i try, as plebianly indifferent to the impeccability
of syntax as this space, began to ask whatever be-
came pf the forward pasi?
It was a good question. On the whole, there was leas forward
passing in college football than in a decade. The pass waa still a
part of every team's offense, but its use waa sharply restricted.
Even in the Southwest. Texaa particularly, where the first
thing a youngster la taught la to walk like Gary Cooper,. and
next, to throw like Sammy Baugh, the paas waa secondary.
There were, naturally, Individual exceptions. Navy, with the
lifted George Welsh, made liberal use of the overhead game
This waa in line with the philosophy of Fingy O'Connor, an
earthy Buffalo politico of another generation, who, speaking of
diamonds, observed:
1 notice them as has 'em, wears 'em."
-But even the glitter of Welsh's Jeweled passing was insuf-
ficient to prevail against an Army team that stuck to the ground,
grinding out 283 yards, while failing to gain a singla yard via
the air.
* .?..
Close to the Vest
This was an extreme example, but essentially, more or leas
typical, as the trend was definitely toward possession of the ball,
and the relative sureness of short gains by rushing.
Just what brought about the shift to conservatism is not
too clear. At the end of the season Ohio State may well have
been the top team in the nation, -and the Buckeyea were strictly
earth bound. Their coach. Woody Hayes, offered some enlight-
ment:
." **roa spend 30 minutes in each practice session working on
the pass and maybe there won't be more than two or three
times Awing the gam when the situation is sensible enough
to tise it."
Actually, the way the college game is evolving, what with
splits, or spaces, in the Une, designed to increase the effective-
ness of offensive forwards, rushing is encouraged to the subor-
dination of passing.
This does not imply there Is any danger of the pass becom-
ing obsolete, yet the inference is clear that unless there's a
ready-made passer available the coaches, granted that the trend
continues, aren't going to spend too many hours trying to de-
velop one.
a
Weekend Sports
Summary
i UNITED PRISS
SATURDAY
Zt Cb,mP*0B a>*ri' Hiniii
scored an upset technical knock-
out over World Banta m w e i g h t-
h>P*on Robert Cohen of France
m the final round of their 10-round
non-title bout,
sJT0*i ("f- ""***
Bab Murphy of Beaten battled to
a 10-retmd draw with Chic* Ve-
\!L? *"** Cent., a Km
Men Garden.
CORAL GABLES, Fls.. Dec. 12
2PJ- n* Whatlev Stable's Full
Flight scored his first win of the
year after 10 losses by dashing to
an upset triumph in the $7,500 Pon-
ce de Leon Handicap at Tropical
Park.
NEW YORK (UP)-Rlchie Ash-
burn, fleet Philadelphia Phill lies
centerfielder, officially named bat-
ting leader of the National League.
Ashburn finished with a ,SM bat-
ting mark
CINCINNATI (UP)- Pancha
malas sacred Ms sac and
strelafw victory ever WimMeda*
Champion Tawy Trabar m Mm
pr Iannis tew. Trabar want an
scar* his first pre win In tha
doubles, teaming with Rax Hart-
wit a Australia to dawn (rema-
tas and Pancha Satura.
BALTIMORE, MD. (UP)Nash-
ua was voted the "Horse of the
Year" by the nation's turf sports
writers in the Turf and Sports Dig-
est's 39th annusl poll. The brilliant
three-year-old son of Nasrullah has
been placed on the market with
the final acceptance of sealed bids
set for Dec. IS.
Sports Shorts
SEATTLE. Wash., Dec. 12 (UP)
Former Heavyweight Champion
Joe Louis, who failed in his coma-
back attempt, today praised Mid-
dleweight Champion Sugar Ray
Robinson for his successful come-
back and said "Ray's jet Bobo 01-
aon's number and he'll beat him
again knockout or decision."
IMPRiONATID BAMBOO
FISHING RODS
Sy AL MeCLANE
Fishing iditar
The increasing popularity of im-
Eregnated bamboo rods has
rought numerous inquiries late-
ly on Just what Impregnation
means to the angler.
The growth structure of bam-
boo is entirely different than that
presented by wood. The coarse,
upen cell structure characteris-
tic of various woods is totally ab-
sent. In its place are found bun-
dles of microscopic fibers laid
parallel to each other, much like
the strands within the sheath of
a bridge cable.
The spaces between adjacent
bundles or cords of the bamboo
ara filled with a thermoplastic
resin. Toward the outer surface
of the hollow shell the number i
of these fibrous strands increases
rapidly. Just below the outer pro-
tective enamel, bamboo is com-
posed slmost entirely of these cel-
lulose fibers.
Thus, considered from the in-
nermost surface outwardly, the
fiber structure, density, and
strength of bamboo vary enor-
mously. From the standpoint of
use ss a rod-building material,
the inherent characteristic is
most desirable.
The primary function of im-
pregnation process is to deposit a
waterproof solid throughout the
fiber structure, as well as along
the wsll surfaces of the wood (or
bamboo) cells. It is not intended
that the coarse open grain be im-
pregnated completely, as this
would merely add weight with-
out rendering additional benefits
from the waterproofing stand-
point.
All that is apparently neces-
sary is a complato covering of
Defense b the Tell
Dating back to the prehistoric days, defense has always bean
the primary requisite to football sueeess. One of the eternal
verities is that if the other fellow can't score he can't beat you.
Fordham and Pittsburgh must have set some sort of record
what they played three successive 0-0 games In "35. "M and 17.
And In thoee days they were big-time teams. Frank Leahy laid
the groundwork for his subsequent success at Notre Dame at
Fordham. He set up the Impregnable defenses. And, of course.
Pitt's Jock Sutherland, a true Scot, never believed in giving the
opposition an inch.
It is interesting to note the pros remain unimpressed by
the altered college concept. Most of them show a continued
preference for the sky. But even here, teams with the best
grevmd game usually w*nd up on top. The Browne, for exam-
ple, rushed for Z7S and passed for only 70, to beating Pitts-
burgh Sunday. ,
Pro alignments. In contrast to college, accent passing, and
for several reasons:
1. The customers seem to like it-
2 The pros get ready-made passers, the eraam of the col- _?**0 (N*> T P?rdne
lege field nd Wisconsin divide the all-time
.Bi< Ten leaHerhio In basketball
3. The pros don't scrimmage muer-, and-that's the only way .titles, each having won six and
to develop a strong >nlng game. snared ta seven there.
PHILADELPHIA, Dec. tt (UP)
Ace Miler Wee Saatoe, formerly
of Kansas University and present-
ly in the U.S. Marines, ran five
miles in 27 minutes and 3 second!
Gsterday to win the Penn. A. C.
ndicsp cross-country race. San-
tec, who had a :M handicap, said
he felt "a bit fatigued" at the
half-way mark but was alright af-
ter getting his second wind. San-
toe had the beat time but the race
was won by John Tibbetts, one
of Santos's mates on the Quaatico
Marine team.
BIG TEN LEADERS
the inner fibers and cells: and in
bamboo, at least, a weight depo-
sit (measured after drying a ad
curing of 20 per cent is consider-
ed adequate.
The initial pioneer work in the
plastic impregnation treatment
was done by U.S. Forest Products
Laboratory at Madison, Wiscon-
sin. The process wss originally
developed to prevent excessive
swelling and shrinking of wood
due to variations in moisture con-
tent. The wood is impregnated
with resins which serve as a
block, preventing the entrance of
moisture into the cell structure of
the wood.
Bamboo strips can be process-
ed prior to gluing into sections,
or the glued-up section may be
treated. Aside from imparting
water and weather proof char-
acteristics to the cane, undoubt-
edly the most outstanding fea-i
ture of impregnation lies in the
appearance of the finished prod-
uct.
Ordinary finishing operations
Impart a surface of extraordin-
ary beauty satin-smooth and
dark mahogany in color.
Glide No Secret
Agent In Rockies
FORT COLLINg, Colo.-(NEA)
When word reached here that
Gary Glick, the Colorado A. and
M. back named as the National
Football League bonus choice,
was considered sn unknown, foot-
ball people were stunned.
"Let's take Just one game as an
example," Coach Bob Davis said.
"We won't even bother with this
sessonwhen he wss st his bast.
"In 1984, wa beat Oklahoma A.
and M., 14-13. Glick scored twice,
kicked both extra points, blocked
Hoak's Get-Up-And-Go Would
Make Jackson GreatFrisch
By HARRRY GRAYSON
NEW YORK (NEA) -Base-
ball man, outside of Wid Mat
'rod Stan Hack, agree that
the Dodgers got sll. the best of
tus trabe which sends Ransom
Joseph Jackson, Jr., from the
Cubs for Don Hoak and Walt
Moryn.
And Director of Player Person-
nel Matthews and Manager Hack
engineered the deal for the Chica-
go Nationals, notorious for being
shortchanged in player transac-
tions.
The consensus is that the
Brooks acquired an established
distance hitting third baseman,
whom they required, for a hus-
tler who doesn't hit enough to
[lay the position in the major
eagues and an outfieldlng nobo-
dy. Jackson wss. the All-Star
third baseman of 1954.
Jackson definitely will play
third bass for the Superbae,
the extra point which meant the
game, made 15 tackles and stop-
ped the Aggies' last drive by in-
tercepting a pass.
Unknown? Than so was Whiz-
zer White."
Today Encanto .35 .20
In Cinemascope I
Lana Turner, in
"THE PRODIGAL"
Clark Gable, in
"CHINA SEAS"
Today IDSAL .20 .10
Dennis OTCeefe, In
"EVERYTHING I HATI
IS YOURS"
Van Johnson, ta
"GO FOR BROKE
which brings up the highly in
teresting question of what's going
to happen to Jackie Robinson and
his 340,000 contract.
Queried about it, Buzzy Ba-
vssl. who runs the works in
Brooklyn, replied: "He can
play some first base and out-
field."
First Fraak Frisch, then Phil
Csvsrretta and last trip Hack
Jackson, the all-round athlete
from the Southwest Conference.
Because the other Bruin infleld-
ers were no more holler guys
than himself, Randy's unobtru-f
slveness was more conspicuous at
Wrigley Field. It will not stick
out to such an txtent on the Co-
wanus.
"If Jackson had. Hoak's get-up-
and-go, he'd be great," says
Frishch, to whom the wartime
traveled collegian reported on the
west-side. "He has the poten-
tiality, but who's going to get it
out of him? It's his disposition.
Undoubtedly he is awakened in
his own manner.
"A lot of remarkable players ap-
peared lackadaisical who were a-
nythlng but,'' continues the old
Fordham Flash. 'Bob Meusal is
the beat illustration that comes
to mind offhand. Long Bob
seemed sleepy-headed and bored
Sith everything around him. bat
t played a lot of outfield with
still a matchless arm and batted be-
fort and after Babe Ruth for the
Yankees throughout the lMO's."
Frisch saya that if Jackson
would drop his head and run like
Musial from first to third and
aay to himself. Throw me oat-,'
on a ball hit through the infield,
he'd be tremendous.
He has better than average
speed. He has s fine arm and
his agility makes him considera-
bly more than adequate at third
base, where he will be helped
by Pee Wee Reese.
"I'd describe Jackson, who will
be no mora than 30 when the
season starts next spring, as a
right-handed long fly ball hitter
on the pull aide," concludes
Frank Frisch. "If he hit 21 home
runs last season, which he did.
hell hit 35 playing nearly half
his games at Ebbeta Field."
The rich get richer, etc.
*f*Slw^
llflO .SL .
ROULETTE
SI (BLACKJACK)
CRAPTABLB
POKER
CHUCK-A-LUCK
8LOT MACHINES
BAR SERVICE
Fifm.
##
tthSC
What is the difference between
VICEROYS and other filter
cigarettes? Only VICEROYS have
the super-filter with Its 20,000
filtering elements that filter the
smoke, but not that satisfying feeling
you get from every puff.
Try a VICEROY. You'll notice
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The first pack proves they're the most
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I
Outlaws NX
^Ufiic J Library
' s
DEC 13 IKS
<\
Investigations
Reveal Group Had
Shady Connections
NEW YORK, Dec. -)-
The New York State Athletic
Commission today outlawed tne
I New York Boxing Guild In a de-
cision announced by commis-
sion Chairman Julius Helfand.
He stated that the license
, of any person connected with
boxing would be suspended or
revoked *f he remained or be-
came a member of the Guild
after Jan. 15, 195.
T?Thla decision will be written
into the state boxing law aa
-Pule" B, Paragraph 17."
This decision followed an ln-
'Testlgatlon by the Commission
' which started on May 6, 1865
; and ended not. 18. More than
1,000 pages of testimony were
taken from the various witness-
es at the hearings.
' During the investigation,
Helfand said: "It was learned
from testimony that the Guild
and its parent organisation,
, the International Boxing
Guld, was a shadowy organi-
sation which apparently had
underworld connections and
was usurping the powers of
the Commission and was en-
gaging in coercion, dlscrlm'n-
boycottlng, and extor-
^gg&fc
DAILY NEWSPAPER
AN INDEPENDENT ^^^/JVHE ^jj^.
$ anama Morirn
<
Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
31st year
PANAMA, R. P., MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1955
FIVE CENTS
AFL-CIO Chief Meany Denies Labor
Will Pick Presidential Candidates
George Meany, president of the
NEW YORK, Dtc. 12 (UP) Forum," Reither said esch union "American farmers sre the for-
wlll handle its own collective bsr-' gotten msn," he said. "I have
gaining as before their merger, asked Congress for an investiga-'
Reuther also expressed concern tlona Congressional investiga-
over the plight of the American tion of the price situation."
farmer. I Reuther said he was talking a
atlon,
tlon.''
Non-Driving Cols
Leave With Cars
12
BATON ROUGE, La., Dec.
(UP) -Chief of Police Shirley S.
Arrighi ssid two sisters, 14 and
IS, and a third girl, age 14, stole
two csrs after deciding to run a-
way from home.
. Although none of the girls knew
how to drive, they managed to
maneuver one of the automobiles
onto one of Louisiana's business
highways without incident
LSL \},L
AFL-CIO, denied yesterday t h a y
the newly-merged union of 17,000,-
000 members would attempt to
domnete the choice of Presiden-
tial candidates by either party in
1955.
Meany, appearing on the CBS-
TV program, "Face the Nation,"
said the labor movement hss "no
interest" In whether President Ei-
senhower decides to run for a
second term.
"That's his (Eisenhower's) per-
sonal business," Meany ssld.
Walter P. Reuther, vice presi-
dent of the AFL-CIO, In another
television interview, denied that
the United Unions would raise
huge strike funds or call genrai
strikes.
Appearing on tne NBC televi-
sion program, "Ti.e American
/ ktAll*
Last Day!-------75 .40
1*5 4:S5 :35 9:M p.m.
.DAVBTODO-COUJNS
"* IM -imam M ISMUIIUNC SOW*
I Tomorrow! I
BY PUBLIC REQUEST!
-
THE GRANDEST OF ALL
GRAND OPERAS!
VERDI'S
Funeral Services
For Mrs. Cunningham
Tomorrow Afternoon
Funeral services for Mrs. Rose
R. Demaris Cunningham, wife
of Lt. Col. Wilbur D. Cunning-
ham, U.S.A.F. retired, will be
held tomorrow afternoon at St.
Luke's cathedral, Ancon, at
2:30 p.m. Burial will follow at
Corozal Cemetery..
Mrs. Cunningham had resided
in the Canal Zone and panam
since April 19441. Survivors in-
clude her husband, two daugh-
ters, Mrs. Audrey M. Lake of
Un'on City. >'.J and Mrs. Elaine
Freund of Weehawken N.Jj
three brothers, Joseph, Edward
and Frank Damarals. and two
sisters, Emma and Mable Belle,
all of Weehawken and Union Ci-
ty, N.J., a stepson George W.
Cunningham of Miami, and a
stepdaughter, Mrs. Albert Mot-
ta of Colon and four grandchil-
dren.
Mrs. Cunningham was educat-
ed in New Jersey. She was a
member of the Orchid Chapter,
Order of the Eastern star, in
Balboa; the Inter American
Women's club, and St. Luke's
Episcopal Church in Ancon.
IN GLORIOUS COLOR!
^Starring
SOPHIA LOREN
LOIS MAXWELL
and the voices of
RENATA TEBALDI
EBE STIGNANI
GIUSEPPE CAMPORA
and GINO BECHI
bout the "price of industrial prod-
uct*."
In another development, Mich-
ael J. Quill, president of the
Transport Workers U-nion, aa-
nounced that the union's execu-
tive board had decided by a IT
to seven vote to remain in the
AFL-CIO.
Quill had threatened during the
recent merger convention in New
York to pull his union from the
federation. He ssid be expected
TWU members to rally to the de-
cision.
.
- rfsSKS^ sS-issss
submarine, has proven so successful that
Albcore has a fish-shaped body, blimplike
bridge and airplane-type controls. This new
and Improved maneuverability. The ships is
Keys as a blimp passes overhead.
designs will be used on a new atomlTsub. t
Lton M Xi^blade<, IW"". two-man
??,? e &" range- underwater speed
shown above during a test run off the Florida
men, receives award u?\^!S8fL
London, Sir Winston Churchill (left) receives a silver Town
Crier's bell, symbolic of the new Williamsburg Award, from
Winthrop Rockefeller. Churchill u the first recipient of this
award established by the trustees of colonial Williamsburg,
________Va., which also includes a $10,000 cash award
Ft. Kobbe Officer
Dies In Car Crash
On Bruja Road
some Prince Rainier HI of Mona-
co, Europe's most eligible bache-
lor, embarked today for the U-
mted States whtre his faithful
subjects hoped he would find a
wife to save them .from taxes.
The 32-year-old Prince, whose
370* ore domain includes the gam-
bling paradise of Monte Carlo,
sailed from Le Havre aboard the
liner United States for a two-
month holiday in America.
Rainier insists he will not be
hunting a wife in the United
States but admits he want go get
married some day.
The thriving citizens of, Monaco
wa.n him to wed because if he
dits without an heir, Monaco will
automatcally revert to French
rule and they wll have to pay
pending notification of his par- *
ents in Sparta, Term. At present, Monacans are not
Only one of the three passen- burdened with taxes, because the
gers. Chief Warrant Officer Rob- income from the Monte Carlo ca-
ert F. Bledsoe was hospitalized hio t-kea care of most govern-
at Gorgas for a fractured col- ment expenses,
torbone and fractured left arm. I The Prince ssid his visit would
He Is not on the serious list. * private one. The official res-
Two other men. Daniel J. |6n wan a medical check-up at
Brandith and John Burryman. Johns Hopkins Universitv in Bal-
both privates first class, were'timore. But that will only take a
only slightly shaken by the ac- 'ew days of Rs inert schedule'.
Some local gossip had it that
the Princt r' nned to see film
star Grace Kelly during his trip.
Tax-Fearing Subjects Want Prince
To Acquire Himself American Wife
PARIS, Dec. 12 (UP) Hand- bachelorhood but protested the
lilil l*i'iili> Dm4n_ TTT _. mar____ ____
A Fort Kobbe lieutenant was
killed early yesterday morning
and three of his passengers in-
lured when the private car he
was driving on Bruja Road went
out of control and landed In a
ditch.
Army authorities are with-
holding the dead officer's name
romance
pera.
rumors in the newspa-
He once explained he liked only
girls "who look natural.'*
"I really do not like ultra-chic,
enamelled beauties," the Prince
said in a recent interview. "And
I cannot bear glamor girls or
highly-charged sexy wenches."
Rainer has often said he has no
objections to marrying an Ameri-
can girl.
His friends say this Is hii idea
of the "ideal" woman:
She should be in her 20's, have
a light complexion and long, flow-
ing fair hair.
British Navy
WiH Test New
Guided Missiles
Suspended Sentences
Given San Bias Found
On Base At Midnight
A loitering case Involving four
San Bias Indians and a three-
language discussion was resolv-
ed this morning in the Balboa
Magistrate's Court through an
Indian interpreter.
A military policeman from Ft.
Clayton testified that they were
cracking down on unauthorized
and extended visits by San Bias
Indians to their countrymen who
work on the base.
The four who were apprehend-
ed Saturday around1 midnight
were found guilty of loitering
around barracks building 130 at
Clayton. They said they were
visiting their friends who live in
the building which houses them
on the post. The defendants do
not speak English or Spanish.
The MP said that in previous
instances loiterers were Just es-
corted off the base, but that in
recent weeks the practice of
hanging around the building,
without having proper authori-
zation had increased. Hauling
the four into court was an at-
tempt by the military to cut
down on loiterers.
When asked if they would
like to say something to the
judge, one of the defendants
replied, through the Interpret-
er "How am I going to tell you
when I can't talk to you?"
To which the Judge answered
that he could express himself
through the Indian interpreter.
When he did so it developed that
he wanted the Judge to know he
hadn't been doing ''anyone any
harm there."
Leonardo Guardia, 25, one of
the defendants who said he had
Just come from the Islands, Or-
lando Garcia and Benjamin
Gardinez were each given an
Imposition of sentence suspend-
ed.
Carlos Berrea. 20, who admit-
ted having worked at Fort Kob-
be for four years was told by
the Judge:
"You should know better.
You have worked for the mill'
tary a considerable time."
He fined Berres $6. and gave
him a five-day sentence, both
of which were suspended on the
condition that he do not visit a
military post for a period of one
year without getting the proper
permission.
cident which occurred at 4 a.m
Sunday.
The car was travelling towards -
Kobbe from Rodman, and went Thev met when she was making
out of control Just past the in- ,a film in Monaco and rumors of
tersectlon with Thatcher High- romance followed,
way on Bruja Road. The car wjs Rainier's palace refused to eom-
V..bfl?,3r d*ma*ed. ment bot Philadelphia, Miss Ktl-
H..inien *re from the M^h ly's home town, is included on
field Artillery Battalion at Kob- his coast-to-coast itinersry
M, with the exception of Bled- The Prince told his subjects in
aoe who Is with the 33rd Infant- 'a Tidio address this summer that
rZ:_________________he shares their concern over his
LONDON, Dec. 12 (UP)
Britain's Royal Navy is plan-
ning tests of ship-to-ship and
ship-to-air guided missiles that
will make their American coun-
terparts obsolete, the London
Dally Mail reported today.
The Man said that the tests
will be carried out in the Medi-
terranean Zone 'next spring.
The guided missiles. It said, are
currently being tested at the
atomic proving grounds at Woo-
mera, Australia, and will be'der the program title, "Afternoon
shipped home after Christmas. Film Festival "
Khrushchev's
Should Not
NEW DELHI, India, Dec
Souitdoff On Kashmir
Be Considered Lightly'
ton? tounS.'*ted "Bd **" WonwSr,ssu^eo,o:- r to con-
.y^rpoto^^
(UP)
ing Soviet leaders said today
that their statement on Kashmir
was "very carefully drafted and
should not be considered lightly.'V
In that statement Societ Com
munist Party secretary Nikita
Khrushchev said the Kashmir is-
Organizers Gain
1200 Volunteers
For a Blood Bank
Success in organizing the Ca-
nal Zone blood bank has been
virtually asssured with more
than 1,300 volunteers having
sent in pledge cards, Carl J.
Browne, president of the Canal
Zone chapter of the American
Red Cross, announced Monday.
The Canal Zone blood bank is
being organized by the joint
endeavors of the Red Cross and
the Canal Zone Health Bureau.
The volunteer program was In-
augurated several weeks ago
and has received support for all
segments of the Canal Zone
community.
Network Acauires
British TV Films
NEW YORK, Dee. 12 (UP)
The American Broadcasting Co.
announced that it has acquired
100 British films for exclusive TV
use.
The long-term agreement, nego-
tiated with J. Arthur Rank. Ltd.
gives the network unlimited use
of such features as Genevieve,"
"Hamlet," "The Lady Vanishes,"
"The Rocking Horse Winner" and
"This Happy Breed."
ABC-TV said it would show the
first of the films on Jan. 1 un-
THE THREE WISHES
A Christmas Story
BY WALT SCOTT
yWtLrTTLt PCOPtt LCTV5DTOGOWSTTHE
TURK HOMCSyFOR THSRE WA4 ALWArS,
MUSIC AMD LAUGHTER .. ,
Over 700 volunteers have been
received from Pacific side com-
munities while approximately
500 have volunteered on the At-
lantic side. The volunteer pro-
gram will be continued since it
is hoped to have at least 1.500
names on the volunteer register
The majority of those who
have volunteered have already
had their blood typed, Mr.
Browne said. The blood types
show the normal pattern with
the majority of volunteer don-
ors having either O-plus or A-
plug blood type. Of the approx-
imately 900 blood types register-
ed to date, only two persons
have AB-mlnus and B-mlnua
types, both rarely found.
The work of keeping records
and tabulating in the blood
donor program la being done by
Red cross volunteers.
In his announcement Mon-
day. Browne was high in his
praise of the volunteers on
both aide* of the Isthmus.
"These volunteers have done an
excellent Job," he declared, "and
they dsrve the thanks of the
community."
American Turncoat
To Be Delivered
Al Border Tomorrow
HONG KONG, Dec. (UP)
American turncoat prisoner
Richard R. Tenneson will be de-
livered to the Hong Kong border
from Red China tomorrow, Brit-
ish sources said today.
Aa American Red Cross repre-
sentative, Richard Tomlim. will
meet Tenneson when he is deliv-
ered by the Chinese Communists.
Tenneson, of Alden, Minn., one
of 23 American soldiers who re-
fused repatriation at the end of
the Korean War. technically will
be in Britsh, police custody until
the U.S. Consulate General deter-
mines whether he hss done any-
thing to forfeit his American citi-
zenship.
U. S Consul S. M. Backe also
planned to go to the border and
was expected to interview Ten-
neson while en route by automo-
bile into the British protectorate.
Tennesson's arrival in Hong
Kong has been delayed two
weeks.
The Communists tried two
weeks ago to turn him over to aa
American official but the Ameri-
can ted Cro s representative
present did not have authority to
receive him.
Diplomatic quarters believed
the Chinese Communist were In-
sisting on dealing with Americans
as one more step in their itruf-
xle for international recognition.
puto between India and Pakistan
It has been partitioned pending a
referendum.)
There was a visible undercur-
rent of satisfaction among In-
dian leaders ever the Soviet at-
titude toward Kashmir and Pa-
kistan which he denounced for
belonging to a military alliance
he said was directed against
the Soviet Union.
Khrushchev, Soviet Premier Ni-
kolai Bulganin and Prime Minis-
ter Jawaharlal Nehru meanwhile
were continuing an exchange of
views on international and politic-
al questions. They were expected
to issue a communique at end of
their talks.
Means while a. London newspa
per said today that Khrushchev,
former Premier Georgi Malenkov
and an "unidentified group of ul-
tra-Extremists" sre engaged in a
three-way struggle for leadership
in Russia.
Daily Mall Diplomatic corre-
spondent Walter Parr aid the
Soviet Unio is heading for a
new series of large-scale purg-
es that will see ene or the eth-
er of the three factions emerge
triumphant.
Farr said Khrushchev is trying
to pack the February congress of
the Soviet Communist Party with
his own supporters to ensure that
his views are adopted. He said
the Congress will prove the real
test of strength of the three sec-
tions.
"The three groups differ vio-
lently on all main points of poli-
cydevelopment of the Red Ar-
my, agrrewture, the future of
be hotted up,'
Missing Prefab
Puzzles Police
PTPTSBURG, Calif., Dec. 11
(UP) Police were at loss today
to explain one of the "biggest rob-
beries" in the history of the San
Francisco Bay area.
A three-bedroom prefabrica ted
house was taken sometime during
the day Friday.
Detectives said it would have
taken at least two men with a large
truck to dismantle and move the
building, but no one in the area
remembered seeing it go.
Cold War should
Farr said.
''Uncensered reports shew
mat mere is new an a t n o-
rtf *, llrs and confusion
in high places In Moscow cent-
5frb|e *',? period imme-
diately following the end of me
Stalin ere," he said.
Farr cited as evidence of the
confusion recent errors in Pravda.
the official Communist publica-
tion, and Radio Moscow's recent
reference to Malenkov as a "first
deputy premier."
CZ Policeman Gets
Bashed On Head
By Chiva Driver
A Canal Zone policeman had
15 stitches token in his scalp
after he was overpowered and
etruck on the head with his own
revolver by a Panamanian chiva
driver resisting arrest for loiter-
ing in La Boca yesterday morn-
ing.
Today In the Balboa Magis-
trate's Court the case of assault
with a deadly weapon against
defendant John A. Blanchard,
J3, was continued until this af-
ternoon. Bail of $500 was set.
The injured policeman was
Jesse R. Martie, complainant in
the case who was in uniform
and on duty yesterday at around
11:40 a.m. in La Boca. He notic-
ed Blanchard outside of family
quarters 938, and after question-
ing the defendant told him ho
was under arrest for loitering.
It was understood that Blanch-
ard went upstairs to get a shirt,
and when he didn't reappear the
policeman went up after him.
When the Panamanian resisted
arrest, Martie was overpowered,
and his .38 caliber revolver was
pulled out of its bolster by
Blanchard.
Martie was later taken to the
hospital where three scalp lac-
erations were treated. He also
suffered a blow on the shoul-
der.
The government this morning
asked for a continuance of the
case.
TODAY X U X
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