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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/00943
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:00943
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
te RIO
THE MARVELOUS
CARIOCA CAPITAL!
f BRANIFF
INTIRNATIONAL AIRWAYS
DEC 6 1955
#0gS*
IHOiWHOBIT Jj^HsfN^ MllY BROTH--------
Panama Metcan
"Let the people know the truth and the country it $afe*9------Abraham Lincoln.
Sccwram'sV.O.
CANADIAN WHISKY
^j FIVBCBflt
31st TEAR "._______________________________________________________________ rANAMA, R. Pf MONDAY, PECBUBE* S. 1S5S
Stateside Living Costs For CZers?
;w
Shipping Lines'
View Leads Off
Canal Hearings
MAN ABOUT TO TESTIFYRobert E. Mayer (In dark suit center, with upraised arm) is pres-
ident of the Pacific American Steamship Association. This morning he was the first called
to testify before the six-man House sub-commi ttee. His two-hour testimony terminated Ins
ouestlon-and-anawer period. Also shown in the front row of spectators (1. to r.) are Howard
Munro, Walter Wagner, (second to be called to testify), and two members of Mayer's group.
* *
OPENING THE FRECEDENT-gHATTEfclNG House subcommittee hearings betag held local-
ly for the first time was chairman Edward A. Oarmati (center, in dark suit) (D-Md.) other
embers of the committee shown here are 1. to r.: T. JameTumulty (D-NJ. James A. Byrne
(D-Pa.). Oarmatz, John J. Allen, Jr. (R-Cal.) and Francis E. Dorn (R-N.Y.). Not shown in
photo Is William 8. Maillaird (R-Cal.. '
Witness Quizzed on Attitude
CZ Agent's
Ex-Manager
Bound Over
A former manager of the WU-
ford arid McKay shipping a-
tfjacy in Cristobal was bound
T VS. District Court on two
k, counts of embesslement one
was for $14,500, the other tot
rfW00.
Ri
lean, was
Magistrate
pMlimiiiwy hearing. Judge RX.
p. Tateltnan fixed ball Tor *
Difficulties Still Stymie
Low-Duty Liquor For CZ
ting refund of the tax discount.
The dealers must pay the full
tax when they purchase.
The dealers will map out sug-
gestions to present tomorrow
of
The status-quo In the matter
of tax-discount liquor for con-
sumption in the Canal Zone
seems about the same today.
A meeting in Panama tonight _
and tomorrow will attempt to afternoon to representatives
iron out some of the difficulties.
Others lie between the govern-
ments of Panama and the Unit-
ed States.
Either discouragement.
procedure.
As bet
A six-man House subcommittee of the Merchant Mar-
ine and Fisheries committee today began its first-ever lo-
cal hearing on the Panama Canal Co.
Chairman Rep. Edward A. Carmatz (D-Md.) opened the To RP Kids [H Zx>ne bChOOlS
hearings by saying that thou gh the Canal Zone's increas-
ing problems cannot be solved overnight, he hoped "sub-
stantial progress" would be m ade as a result of the three-
day hearings.
He said thit through one of the thoughts uppermost in the minds of all was the
effect of the new US-RP treaty, he had asked that testimony concerning implementa-
tion of the treaty be heard later. \
The board loom in the Administration Building was crowded as the hearings ba-
the Department of inernal Rev-
enue and; the customs in an efw flon |n addition to Garmatz, tie subcommittee comprises Reps. William K. Van Petti
**** p {w*), j JQms Tumulty Jfr-N), Jomes A jymf Pelt was arriving

j
I
son at $10,000 on each count.
After the hearing, Wilson was
returned to Cristobal Jail. Up
until noon, the hail had not
been posted.
Wilson was brought to the
Canal Zone last week from Chi-
cago, 111., after an extradition
request from Gov. John 8. 8ey-
bold was granted there on Nov.
30.
Capt. Oaddls Wall of the Ca-
nal Zone police forc was the
officer who brought Wilson bark
for trial, fltie policeman and.
h}s prisoner arrived by air early
yesterday morning;.
Wilson was represented in
court today by attorney William
J Sheridan, Jr.
Charges against Wilson were
filed last summer by the com-
plaining witness, George Hoop-
er, vice-president of the ship-
pint firm.
Wilson, however, had left the
isthmus several days earlier.
He was apprehended in Chi-
cago last month by the Federal
Bureau of Investigation.
liquor wh
ers said this mottling that they
had sold no liquor at the 75 per
cent discount off the Panama
duty as provided for in the trea-
ty of Mutual understanding and
ancillary agreement proclaimed
by Panama and the United
States last Aug. 24.
The article was to have gone
into effect immedlateljrbut has
been delayed while representa-
tiva of the two countries confr-
red in an effort to prevent un-
necessary loss of duty collec-
tions by Panama.
This morning: one dealer said
be had sold some l'qnor this
morning to mbs In the Canal
Zone, bat that they had not
seed for the discount price
and-had instead keen content
to eenMnne buying as they
have been doing: i.e. with the
promise of tax rebate when the
matter Is finally settled.
Tonight the>liquor wholesalers
(R-Cal.), Francis E. Dorn (R^I.Y.) and John J. Allen


n
and Importers of Panama and
Colon will meet at the
Club to discuss what they con-
sider excessive red tape which
has been thrown by the Pana-
ma government around the
in
utive order of Nov. 15.
It Is understood that the is-
sue between the two govern-
ments is a narrow one, namely
whether a small group o indi-
viduis resident on the Zone will
be entitled to the discount. No
rpogress has been made toward
agreement for some weeks, how-
ever.
The document providing for
the discount merely stated it
would be given on liquor sold in
Panama for consumptions the
Zone.
Czechoslovakia
Plans Nuclear
Power Station
VIENNA, Dec. 5 (UP) Com-
munist Czechoslovakia's first
nuclear power station will be o-
pened in I960, the communist
Union |entral organ "Rude Pravo" re-
ported today.
The newspaper said techni-
cians to be trained in the Soviet
Union will soon start with draft-
procedure to be employed In get- tag the plans'for the station.
i
A controversial questlon-and-
answer session developed this
morning between Robert E. May-
er, president of the Pacific Amer-
ican Steamship Association and
members of the committee -on
the question of continuing edu-
cation in U. 8. schools of Pan-
amanian children whose parents
do not work for the government.
In charging that a group of
Panamanian students using Zone
schools do make a contribution
by way of tuition but do not pay
a rate "any where near even that
paid by the Department of De-
fense," Mayer suggested that a
better contribution to the educa-
leiiiij*! iinii mm
First to testify was Robert I. Mayer, president ofthe Pacific American Steamship
Association. Mover's testimony, and questions arising from it, took the entire morning
session. y
This afternoon's testimony will be that of Walter Wpgner, president of the Cen-
tral Labor Union-Metal Trades Council, AFL and CIO.
lies apparently in policies of the
Buresu of the Budget, which Ca-
nil management feels p r ev en t
them from supplying us with ve-
ry vital information affecting the
financial structure of the Canal
and the toll rate. This will be
msde the aubject of a separate
communication to the chairman
of this Committee since it does
not Involve legislation.
"One ether point of difference
team. Food and medical supplies, which were flown to the scene of disaster, were gold for by
the American Red Cross. The operation was computed within 48 hours. From left to right
above Lt CoL T. W. Keefe, survey team's air operations officer from the Caribbean Air Com-
mand; Col. W R Seymour, military leader of survey team from headquarters, U.8. Army
Caribbean; Capt. R. C. Button (in the doorway), pilot of the Albrook-beeed aircraft; Dr. Carlos
Andrade of the Colombian Red Cross; L. 3. Merer. In charge of the survey team end the A-
mertcan Red Cross's Director of Operations in the Caribbean; a Colombian customs official;
Dr. Abello Flaquez, director of the Red Cross in Barranajillla, and a Colombia military guard.
Mayer proposed that:
1) Goods and services should be sold to Panam Ca-
nal employes at rates which would give them a cost of liv-
ing equal to that in Washington, D.C., or whatever other
U.S. area determined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics to
have the average living cost standards.
2) The Canal Company should be reimbursed for
services it performs which are the fob of the government
agencies, such as narcotics enforcement, operation of a
prison, enforcement of Federal statutes. Such reimburse-
ment is an alternative to the Treasury remitting to the
Canal Zone the income tax collected here.
3) The Department of Commerce should take over
the peacetime day-to-day operation of the Canal, with the
Department of Defense having immediate wartime requi-
sition powers.
4) Under Department of Commerce administration,
the tenure of PanCanal employes should be protected a-
gainst patronage.
5) Periodic review of Canal toll rates should be com-
pulsory. At present such reviews are at the discretion of
the board or directors.
Mayer opened by explaining [code sections, which we must
that the Pacific American Steam-1 presume hsve been arrived at by
ship Association, which he ipoke, tn. management and the Board
represented only a minority of^ directors in good fsith sfter
U & flag operators. H, was eon- ,dvic# counsel.
fident, however, that the Ameri-
can Merchant Marine Institute
and Association of American Ship
Owners, both of New York, and
making up be balance of the in-
dustry, supported the legislation
he was advocating.
He said his organisation M
not feel justified la asking aa
extensin of Canal operating
hoars, er mere overtime, at the
moment.
The company management de-
served cridit, in his opinion, "for
economies and increased efficien-
cies that have been brought a-
bout during the difficult transition
period of' reorganisation since
Public Law 841 became effective
July 1, 1951 "
He continued:
"We do not feel that more eco-
nomy and efficiency is not possi-
ble. The General Accounting Of-
fice ic its 1954 (latest) Audit Re-
port has suggested to the Con-
gress means by which about 89.7
millions more In annual ssvings
csn be msde by adjustments re-
lating to commissaries, the steam-
ship line, the railroad, sad the
rstio of U. 8. to local employes.
"The recommendations are now
before you, and wo have not pre-
pared to comment upon them
during these hesrings, except hi
the case of the railroad. We un-
derstand we wOT be a a k e d to
comment later en that when H
is taken up speciflraBy.
"The areas of difference which
we do seel exist result from pres-
ent provisions of the Canal Zone
Code ami from Canal
"Numerous changes in the
BDls are suggestedia the fol-
lowing statement. These result
from discussions with Canal of-
ficials and representatives of
the Central Labor Council, AFL
Metal Trades and the U n 11 e d
States CKixens Association, ss
well ss from further review ef
the Bill hi east week.
"We feel that the bills contain-
ing our proposals to a reasonnble
degree accomplish the principle
sought in bills supported by these
employe groups, though we do
not presume to spesk for either
of them. . A
The leglslstion he wsnted to
discuss (H.R. 7305. 736S and 7564)
Sight be called the Allen-Mail-
ird-Mttler bills he went on.
Two of the major objectives in-
volved fields of heavy annual ex-
pense to the Company, w n l en,
be said, should be largely avoid-
Ad
Mayer gaw reume o events
Panam Canals Business Losses
than tmudtiwe- extracted from the 1954 OAO audl report^
gimil.WOj given to the ed
system in Panama instead of
permitting a small minority
"who can afford lt" to send their
kids to Zone schools.
Mayer's suggestion came In re-
sponse to a Iquestion put by
Francis I. Dorn (R-N.Y.) who
asked:
"Don't you think that good re-
lations between the Republic of
Panama and the United States
are important to the continued
maintenance of the Canal?"
To which Mayer replied: "Moat
emphatically, yes."
Dorn then asked: "Don't you
think that limiting the educa-
tion of RP students using U. 8.
schools would harm our amicable
relations?"
leading up
Law 841.
to the passing of
Pblic -
Then he said:
"It was the intent of Congress
that the various business activi-
ties of the Company be self-sup-
poring. NstursUy, toll revenues
would be required in lart part
tto finance the Canal Zone Gov-
ernment, as well aa to finance
those Company activities involved
in ship transits.
"The proposed legislatiea now
before us arises in large part
eat ef the fact that these busi-
ness activities sre net self-aap-
portmg e be exeat Out Con-
gress intended. Another maler
factor prompting this legislatiea
is a heavy Canal Company cess
resulting from its finaacing
services erdlaarily supplied by
saber Government agencies.
Mayer explained that his as-
sociation believes that all Pan.
amanlan children of people who
work and live in the Zone should
have education free, on a nor
with UJS. citizen employes.
But he felt that the Panama-
nians who attend Zone school*
are in "great minority because
they come from a higher income
their children and pay the tui-
tion required.
I? E?ply * auction put by
ep. t. James Tumulty (D-Hjr.)
concerning a clarification of
Vf t**** the hipping of-
ficial amid he did not think it
relation*
think their children should be
educated in Panama "
..Tumul&Kln Prult the tople
esked. "Then your position la
there should be no children from
Panama? in effect you're say-
m5..do..awily w1* them?"
No, Mayer replied, not If
"ley are paying full tuition."
He suggested the solution
SSffc "'.i0 *%* 1*w*tk>n
which would provide that the
could attend if they pay full tui-
tion.
Rep. John J. Allen (R-Cal.)
pointed out that if tolls are re*
lleved of the burden of educat-
ing pupils in this category "then
your object has been accomplish-
ed. However, the State Depart-
ment may wish to make arrange;*
ments of its own to have Pan-
amanian students attend U S.
schools."
Mayer stated he believed that
this class of students comprise-
about five percent of the totsflLI
attending CZ schools.
1*54
MO.000
80,000
Allied maritime operations: "
Marine Terminals.................. <**
Vessel repair-----
Hotel Washington
Supporting services:
^Transportation and utilities:
Railroad ...................... sxu.oou
Motor Transportation .......... 22'25
teamshin line .................
Power system .................. 1W.000
Telephone system ...........
Teiepnone system .............. ,S'ft
WatejFwstem .................. 180,000
Employes* services:
Vnunisoarles ..................
Service enters ..... :
Housing: US. rato (Including
furniture and garage rental
and other mlseauaneons serv-
ices) .......................
Local rate ..........<.......
Other supporting services:
Engineering end maintenance ..
Supply.........................
Tivoll Quest House...........
Printing plant..................
Grounds maintenance .......... 50.000
unallocatednonrecurring corporate m- B#-l.
pane* .......................... 00.000
350,000
470,000
500.000
S50.000
neo*
50,000
Jmm SS,
1SS4
$ 930,000
840,000
210,000
1,370,000
410,000
990,000
30,000
290,000
J70,000
1,630,000
1,080.000
1,890,000
1020,000
1,920.000
70,000
110,000
120,000
100,000
760.000
VWjm S1M1MQ6
Shipping Unes
'Give Up' On
Defense Value
Shipping companies have
"given up" ever trying to estab-
lish a definite value of the de-
The two large expenM, chjec- fense of tho Canal
fives of the legislation are: | This was brought out today by
"1) To relieve commercial car- Robert B. Mayer, testifying on
goes transiting the Panama Ca- behalf of the Pacific American
nal of the expense involved in Steamship Association which
furnishing services the responsibi- represents American flag oper-
lity of other Government agencies, ators of Pacific Coast and At-
and lantlc coast lines doing business
"2) To relieve commercisl car- In the Pacific,
goes transiting the Psnsma Ca- He pointed out that in the
nal of a certain portion of the fi- whole fiscal setup of the Canal
nancial losses J sustained each'no value In accounting credit
year by certain of the business has ever been olaced on the de-
fense of the Canal.
A bill up before Congress two
year$ ago, Maver added, suggest-
ed that half the cost of running
the Canal be mid for by defense
and half by tolls.
When Reo. Francis B. Dorn
I R-W.Y.) asked Mayer whether
that was still his association's
onlnion. the shfpptas; official re.
plied he felt lt was a ^reasonable
approach."
sctivitles st the Canal."
(Ceatinued en Fsge 12)
Thursday, Friday
Are Holidays
For RP Government
The Republic of Panama will
observe two holidays this week
on consecutive days, during
which all government offices
will be cloeed.
The two-day holiday will begin
Thursday with the observance
of Mother's Day, which is feted
here annually as a national holi-
day to coincide with the Cath- ,
die Feast of the Immaculate
Conception. Stores will also be
closed Thursday-
Friday, will be a civic holiday
In observance of the birthday of
Nicanor Vlllalaz, the founding
father who designed the Pan-
amanian coat of arme- Only gov-
eniment of flees will be closed on
Friday,


r AGE TWO
mt PANAMA AMERICA* AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY. DECEMBER 5th, IMS
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
I a .*. jgagm ^t^XSmimSmmm
NAINWIO Am A. Hnw
fT. M nillT O BOX IJ4. PANAMA. >.
Teiar-MON* I-0740 LIMII
CAM Aooatie. MN,WWieN, kanaka ....
tHIII 0fHH. 1*17 CtMTMl AviMUI MTWW tlTM AN* ISTa) OltM
r*MI*N HiraiMNTATIVM. JOOHUA NWMI INC
41 Maniaem Avm. New Vnnn. IV N. V.
m___ .Tii r/g
-v tO IS.OO
Mt VIA. IN ABVAWd 0.00__________14.0
PM MeMVII. M ADVANOL^,
F0 BIX MOfrTHB IN AOVAN ~"
nit n row *owm thi riadms own coujmn
r
Labor News
And
Comment
Ah, Wilderness!
:
By VICTO RIESEL
Ttw Me- tea oo
NEW YORK-The eeend Get-
tysburg address may not make lit-
toniaa taw recalen o Tfco Fanam America* erary uistory, but Uie belief among
many national labor leaders here
is Uiat it will make political his-
tory.
UtHnJTmmhU .r.tef-lf, mm* or. ha.4Ud to hoRv t~M***
It tm eea.lamio toitat 4m* tor rmnH a) ft mmnmf* *
doy tetter, re iwnaM4 a HM^eaale wcehwwi.
B*|d>JMr*) It"/ * ^ MffWaaB *?># V# MS paaktjrej aj^awawmj a>
Meara* a* tetter rittn is baU to sUMast ooaHdawso.
hi tpmmm sssamii no iimnaian to elaSSPsaH oa
HI MMT'n rP#m P###*>n,
President Eisenhower's auddeai
decision to pipe in a alk t o d a y
to the APL-CO merger con-
vention from his Pennsylvania
farm nas convinced some vary
realistic labor men that Ike plana
to run againand that if he does
he will change partners. They
think here that Vice President
Richard Nixon is out in that e-
vent.
Cer'aimy this is speculation. But
these men who lead 15,000,00000000
un.oniau are educated political
speculators, moving in the high-
est President-making circles of
both major parties.
The speculation all began early
Wednesday morning wnen the
AFL's national leadera heard what
Companions are odious and Mahout dares me to compare', few of them hid known .f or
"your elegant Adlal tc Mr. Waenhower.'* 8o I'll try to be odlou!,omt u houri n prMident had
In a nice way changed his mind about mere.y
Adlal Stevenson does wear Brooke Brothers clothes, accord-
In to Time Mngailne. and he probably wears Hathaway shirts,
toa But somehow in his pictures instead of looking elegant, he
generally looks rumpled as though he had slept In his clothes.
I have been wearln Brooks Brothers aulta for years and alto
THE MAIL BOX
A PEW WORDS TO MAHOUT
r:
Mahout, the anonymous Republican elephant boy, saya that
I ahopped around in the- past and came up with Alf Landon to
make anoint. But Len Hall, Republican National Chairman,
about whom I was writing went all the way back to 1178 to miss
point.
uispstching a short mesaage to
the AFL-CIO convention at the
7lst Regimental Armory.
Although bis activities are re-
stricted oy the medics, and al-
own two Hathaway ahirts, but when I absent-mindedly hold my though he is pressed by critical
sun helmet before me in Panama some kind person always tries
to put a dime in it.
Now General Elsenhower u probably our sharpest dressing
President; e/en surpassing that ex-haberdasher, Ham Truman
foreign reports and haa given the
signal to our propaganda agenciea
to re-open the propaganda war
against the Russians, President Ei
surpassing tnav e*-noaa*ine, xinry uuuuu, (,u..v , ,-
who Insista on wearlni? double-breasted coats, just like my old'senhower has decided to make a
favorite, "Butch" Lagxardla dltf, when mayor of NY. President sigiilflcsnt speech to the nation
Elsenhower's clothe* never look rumpled or slept in, but perfect- laoor men. It
ly pressed and brand new. Really aharp. you know. '
That idea of Mahuut's about President Eisenhower being the
Rocky Mountains is a good one. The Republican, press agenta
ought to have Elephant Boy in Washington to help them with
their slogan. J
Crede Calhoun
-f
have come personally had he not
been ill.
The apeech will be a abort, but
definitive address. It will have to
reflect not only White House policy
but that of the Republicaa Party
ENGLISH MOTHER WITH SICK BABY
Blr:
Several weeks ago an article appreared In your paper about
a young English mother with a sick baby and two other smail
children beta removed from a ship en route to New Zealand.
A few davs later at English wife of an airman called at the
Tivoll guest hiiise anr. found this mother "lost" In a strange
place wlthoi-t relatives or friends to turn to and her tiny baby
seriously 111 )n Gorges Hospital. The baby has all this time been
in Gorgaa allowing little or -no Improvement.
Arrangementa wen- made by this airman's wife through the
Chaplain of his base to care for the mother and her other two
children while they have patiently prayed and waited for the
baby to improve so they might continue their trip to New Zea-
land and joui the husband and father. Throughout the mother's
stay here there have been many people who have offered what
they could to comfort her. The enclosed letter will better de-
scribe the appreciation of this mother's father-in-law for all that
haa been and Is boina done for this unfortunate family.
as well. It will be friendly. It will
be a break with the critical posi-
tion taken by Arlions's Seo. Bar-
ry Goidwater, head of- the GOP
Senatorial Campaign Committee.
Preparing the speech will take
time. Se wul the technical arrange-
ments. But the President decided
he would do this to svold unneces-
sarily antagonising labor.
First hint of the President* *le-
eialon to expend all this energy,
time and political activity on labor
AT SEAThe first few days
aboard a strange ahlp-ttranje M
to passengers, that is
came early Tuesdsy. Thia reporter , mosVenthrallin| eaperiances.
contacted a White Heuee source _ou havei or ,t least to mt It's ex-
and asked who would read the |cit,insr
President* messsge to the con- -.i. -
veotion. The gusrded word was There are a thousand people on
that no one would-the President the M.V. Australia, bound for Syd
It la regrettable that the names of everyone who has lent a
helping hand aren't known so that they may be personally thank-
would do it himself.
further querying revealed that
Mr. Elaenhpwer had. switched from
Monday, Nov. at, at the suggeson
: die sugg
of Labor Secretary Jame Mitchell
during a long talk in Gettysburg.
ed rather than extending thanks In this manner. 1 Mitchi: aw the President short-
It la still undetermined when the baby will be released from ( ^on. National- Republics.
ney via Sum, Oowmbo, Aoen and
Djakarta. About ITS are in the
lush first clasa. 'The rest are be-
low decks in econd class, a ad
WASHINGTON The White
Rouse conference on education,
widely advertised as the greatest
educational event since Plato
founded the academy 2.000 years
ago, convenes in Washington to-
day (Nov. M).
However, unlike Platee' Greeks
who founded democracy, It first
proposed to keep some of its mem-
ber gagged. The congressman who
have to Introduce the legislstion to
carry out any aid-to-education
program found themselves unable
to debate as delegates, and raised
such a storm of protest that con-
ference officials went into a quick
revene.
"I am affronted by this invita-
tioa and will not attend." said Con-
gressman Prank Thompson of New
Jersey, Democrat. He described
the gag rule as "approaching an
'Unless I have the status of a
delegate and tan participate in the
discussions of the conference,'1
wrote Congressman Cleveland Bai-
ley of West Virginia with irate
brevity, "I would prefer to remain
in a position where I can con-
tinue to support the legislation
approved by the House Committee
on Education a few daya prior to
the adjournment of Congress.'
Congressman Jimmy Roosevelt
of California said he waa "indig-
nant,'' their Mrs. Edith Green of
Oregon decided to remain in Pert-
land.
Aa a result, the White House
gave them full delegate status.
Behind the White House confer-
to silence congressmen is some
interesting history. It involves a
gooua hassle over who can take
vigorous haaale over who canjake
the credit for aiding education.
Last winter st the urging of Mrs.
Agnes Meyer, a personal friend of
the President ana a strong booster
for better schools, Ike included s
brief reference to schools in his
State of the Union messsge. How-
ever, Democratic lesders branded
this totally inadequate and pro-
ceeded to introduce their own
school aid bill.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Hobby,t h e n
Secretary of Health, Education,
ani Welfare, had hung back. Se
did not want legislation in 1955,
the couple verybedy likea, and the patter, and unlike a mosaic, la m^'^f nl^. "Ju?
couple everybody hatea, and the subject to dally change. And the Wmt* ^^ ""SS^^ "ft
most fs.cin.tin} of allthe role, on,* "s Vmi'SE uVe?
a big ship Is that of spectator. IlSfi* She evwi t,keB -*
Spectator At Sea
By BOB RUARK
C^rfie Washington
Merry-Go-Round
*
(
one bore that la always left won-
dering why everybody goes away.
The moaalc of these closely fitted
lives, suspended In space and time
for one month, makes a fascinating
s?5siFEste*\^'X ssas
tr-STJ'W.'S.'SSS S^2S.i'SSr*to *
* Meanwhile, Sen. Lister HU
of Alabama told Mrs. Hobby that
the educational world already
had held seven conferences, that
everyone knew what the school
needs were, and there was no use
waiting for mere conferences.
Finally, to head off the Demo-
crate, President Elsenhower sent
a special message to Congress rec-
ommending a meager school bill
for IMS. R did not go nearlv as far
aa hie multibillioo-dollar highway
Cgraan however, and later, after
.Supreme Court segregation de-
cision, Southern Democrsts also
got cold feet and proceeded to sty-
mie school construction.
Northern Democrsts still pushed
it. But, caught between uneothusf
sstle Republicans snd unenthutV
astic Southern Democrats, the
school bill was never paased.
So, with Mrs. Hobby now out of
government, the White House
conference which she so wanted
convenes today.
UfowvTvWdbrTfleBrT Opp#9iftdJft
Congressman Graham Barden.
North Carolina Democrat a great
booster of aid to schools before
the Supreme Court segregation de-
cision, moved adroitly to get
northern school-minded congress-
men out of town before today's
session. He scheduled a tempting
Junket to Puerto Rico for his Edu-
cation and Labor Committee to
study minimum wage needs there.
Barden once got more criticism
from Cardinal Spell man and Cath-
olic leaders than any other public
figure except Mrs. Roosevelt, by
pushing federal aid to education.
But since the Supreme Court de-
cision he has been Just the oppo-
site.
The Catholic College of Bishops
recently meeting in Washington Is-
sued a strong ststement that paro-
chial Schools should be Included
in any federal aid. Aa a result, the
separation -of Church and -
State issue is certain to enter the
education debate when Congress
reconvenes, and, since many north-
ern Demcrata come from Catho-
lic areas, ft may influence their
position too.
i
inste ffi Kre^nlin
r
Senator Kefkuver, while in Mos-
cow, sat in on an interesting
conversation inside the Kremlin
with Premier Bulgania and Party
Boss Khrushchev. He got the im-
pression that Khrushchev was eaa-
(Cont'nned on Page 4)
s written to an oral message on tourist and lower tourist, which ia
the hospital so It apoeara that the family will apend considerable
time here; poalbly, having to remata over the Christmas holi-
days. Anyone interested in their plight could contact the Base
Chaplain at Alcrook.
Thanks to every me who haa been ao generous and kind.
This Instance definitely Indicates that the American spirit of
helping others In need still prevails.
Sympathiser
chairman Leoierd Hall ejarfern
with Ike test Monday. It takes no
Institute of Advanced Learning log-
ician to realise that the President
discussed the decision with Hall
and that there w ment ever what basically* is, the
wooing of the nation's labor lead-
ers.
to say steerage. These are moattar
migrants and seem to be largely
Italian, for Australia haa abaoroed
rt- mere than a million "New Aus-
" trejlam"! n the .last few yeard
ed WiBrei* nnr **
All this preceded the dispatch
of a telegram later in the week by
Mitchell to George Meany. The
wire aald that the White House
woulu make all arrangement for
the telephone talk at 2: p.m. to-
d*v. when the national union
liver" his own message led to spec-
ulation over lus iaure to send
Richard Nixon with It a he did
rallows the letter tram the stranded mother a father-in-law:
825 Loxhall Rd
. Ipswich, Suffolk
M 11 SB
Blr:
I and my wife are the parnts-ln-law of Mrs. o. Trellving
who Is being cared for by you and whose child (our grandchild)
is being locked after In the American hospital. The terrible ..
shock which this tragic news gave us waa tempered to a great chiefs put together the w o r i o s
extent by her letter which aha told us of the wonderful kind- g.-eate&i labor movement,
ness and helo vhteh everyope has given her. The President
She la our only dr.ughter-ln-law and is aa dear to us as if
she was our own daughter for she lived with us quite a lot and
her children ar our only grancchlldren so we are feeling the
shock of th\s sad new greatly.
But It is a great comfort to know that somewhere in the
world there are people who without any thought of reward can
extend to ont In time of need euch kindness and help aa every-
one haa done and are still doing. We in England feel so help-
leas, we cannot be with her at a fim ewhen aha need us most but
you all complete gtrangera are living her juat that com-
fort and aid whici we are unable to do,
My wife and I both wish you to let the Commanding Offi-
cers, the Doctors, and nurses, the Chaplain and especially those
American airmen who donated blood for him, that we feel we
can never repay you for all you have done.
Whatever the outcome of this terrible happening la, we will
forever be mindful of the spontaneous, practical and spiritual
helD wheih vou all have extended to her In her time of need
and we hop-' and ornv that you will some day be rewarded for
your goodneas-
We thank everyone from the bottom of our hearts and may
God bless you all
as once welud a large eec'
tec ef English, German, Polea,
now the quotas seem to concen-
trate a Italian passant*.
There are two doctors en this
ship, and they will be kept busy,
for there will be births, one or
mora death*, and a variety of Ill-
nesses. The doctors work harder
than the other officera.
There wul be fiat fights, and pos-
sibly a stabbing. There will be a
marriage, undoubtedly, for the
priest to conduct. Women bound
outward to marry men they do not
know, on longdistance contract,
will suffer a sea change and take
up with a fellow passenger, and
taen there will be trouble.
In the lush, but Just aa crowded
flritelass, the pattern already be-
sana to shspe. The psiring off, the
it IMS. It has been pointed out thst oUecon Into groups, has started,
Nixon was booed at the APL'a con-
vener Ir, St. Louia that year-
and the ArL's pertly detentes
are usually reserved snd silent
men on the convention floor.
But, this yesr. than re hun-
dr-ds of CIO delegstes who hate
NUen. A demonstration might wel)
develop against the Vice Presi-
dent. Of course, the Whit, House
wants to avoid such a headline-
making possibility.
Faltering Philip:
ffturtffa stf a (altea) wrt eruim
Weil-wem aftssj aa* nun be aaee
Btmitn wwasl lean Ma hosnr like ee
* A. CTaaeWsie too* the rttwt mi
So the President's decision ia In-
terpreted by labor leaders here aa
evidence of Ikt'a realisation that
Nixon ia a liability on the labor
front.
The conclusion here ia that the
President would not be westing all
this time snd energy on an ad-
dress to woo labor U h planned
to antagonise ft automatically by
running again with Dick Nixon.
Theri ar'e labor delegate ben
from the west coaat who have been
lr touch with their friends, highly
Saced in the Republican Party.
km delegstes from California
say that this Is the conclusion, too,
of some wntern RepubUcana,
That'g why they say hen the
second Gettysburg address will
make political history, even if not
recited through the agea.
even before toe ship has cleared
Messina, bound for Port Said.
I can write the script for you
without even seeing it unroll. The
will.be the ususl quota of ship-
board romancea, including mad by
fatuattoas for the handaom ships
officersromances which atare
with magic fin and explode into
nothing.
There will be romances between
the passengers, and most will start
so esrly that the lovers wul not
be speaking by the time we hit
Colombo, and a new Mt of ro-
mances will have begun, to tinto
out slong sbout Premsntle time.
I have already spotted two can-
didates, for the role of aeagoing col-
lege widow, the pennaial msa-
chaser on any ocesn-golni veeeaL
There la the wolf, and the wise
5y, th bored wife, the bored
husband, the debutante, the hus-
banchaser, the llfc-ef-toe-party.
the fugitive from liae, ane he
drunk. There la the disapproving
dowager, the gay grandma, and
tnV craw mlxedup kid. There is
ADVICE TO YOUNG
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich-(UP)
-Leo C. Beebe, a Tord Motor Co.
executive, told 2,300 school teach-
n hen that A r i e ai^Indus-
try wants young people "who are
not afraid to work, who are ma-
tured thinkers and have unpjaaeed
on their minda the thought that
to labor dUignUy and hweetly U
te labor for the glory of God and
Switzerland changes
(definition of "chronometer"
Until November 15th, 1931, the Swiss Federation
of Watch Manufacturan ruled that the term
"chronometer" was descriptive of: "A precision
watch regulated in different positions and various
temperatures, capable of obtaining aa Official
Timing Certificate."
On November 16th, 1951, the Federation modified
this ruling. It now reads as follows: "A precision watch
regulated in different positions, havtno obtains an
Official Timing Certificate."
In other words, in accordance with this new Swiss
regulation, no watch may be termed "ctmoNOMprn"
unless its precision has been proved by a Swiss Govern-
ment Testing Station or by an Observatory.
Rolcx welcome this new, logical, and clear-cut
definition. We feel it will prove beneficial both to the
public and to the Swiss watch industry.
We have always considered it necessary to submit
our watches to the impartial tests of the Swiss Govern-
ment. Every Rolcx chronometer offered for sale has
previously obtained an omcuL Timing Certificate
and bears the words officially caaraiHU cmsono-
meto on the dial.
This new definition, therefore, vindicates a policy
which we have applied strictly for a great many years.
t
f
ROLEX
A landmark in tht history of Tn measurement
9
MArlbMuMM;
%
Having bean pioneers in the development of the wrist-watch sinos it was first timidly introduced
at the turn of the century, we record with pride these landmarks ia the recent history of tas
measurement:
Our factory is Ik Srtl te muruSftCta
DM (for wrbf-waidMt) with Anwr eteaaa
-wr
w
0 1914
f I9M
J1
Roa itenimlnii, u Swiw O u i i Ttettas atenea.
ISM a setaU wrist-watch cu te mt* acevnw tmom$m to
tain aa OPPICIA L Tiaung Cart Veal
At lb worid-fanou* Kw Obaarvatory. Ratal oauia the
flrtt clan "A" Certifica avar awardad a nail wriu-watca.
(That* strinsent tests (astee 44 days ia (iva timing canton*
and threa temperaturw aa4 waa iisaticil M thee* asfHed
to larga chronocaatara, ao aUowaaca being BMSa far the
smaller ii ef rai-w,ch moveanali. Taj. a*. fact,
the am wrht-cmmwmtm avar prodaeas.)
Ta ensera lasting orafcuo to tsta aacaracy of taair wriet-
wileh mavamaals. Roles invent and patent tea Worid'i
fim waterproof ceat. kaowa today every i
famous Ratal "OyiMr."
Ta aneara even raster accuracy raaa* a
tanatea ef taw maimones. Ratal mtreaaee the l
oftUm*4~*wnm.*,*hm,lk,Um-,-Oy%mrv9mtml"
wtah the mif-wlndmf *f I
At the Beaaa Oflaaal
ft a4* the aelf-w
t99* AiateBtajae
I JOI-l000,AU. obtain aa I
Timiag CertaVeie with iba asearan Especially sood
rasan*," thus previas at lee* u 14 year ago that the
serial maaufactare of wrist oWoiaetnu had been
1949 Rata introduce ahe (amoa* DelejuM." lb* world1! first
waterproof aad aaV-wiadsaa wml-chranaaaatar tbowia(
nW law automatically.
1*49 Roan obtain 140 dam "A" CartaVatm from Raw Obaar-
vatory far 140 small round chronometer mm maat of
23.? aun., a performance which ao startled the watch
industry thai its veracity was aariouaiy questioned.
1949 total set a aaw aaaaawr* rarer' far writt-chrenoaeaters at
the umous Geneva Obaarvatory for a round mm natas I
of 2.5 mm., with S point.
1951 Te data. Roan has obtained ajera than I7J.0O0 OJfUM
Tsattej Ctataatetes far wriet-chwansaeter free eat
x vaneu* Swisa Government Tastana Stattata, of which
121,6*3
t
t
#-!
f II
Vl
I
12l.e5 are or ee*wa/ wrlM-ahrs.oatsisii. fWMu.
the last am yaar* tJH CartnVataa have aarriad the
aawatea "inilisti awad laaata.-) v
le
THI ROUX WATCH COafPANY UMITBD (AT. WIU90M*, OO VMMMUfG DUZCTOM), ORHRVA (S wrntlRLAND)
uTvCaixi fa/Uich
WATCH CENTER
161 CINTtAL AVINUIe PANAMA
i
STOHi


i*nwi>AY. DECEMBER Sth. 1H1
PANAMA AMERICA!* AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
111 -l '
New* King- Size
joins the
1
:

a

/
Almost everyone appreciates the best.
and now you can get it in two convenient
sizesthe same fine quality in both. Nothing
else- in the world gives you the bracing sparkle
and bright little lift that are so delightfully
yours in ice-cold Coca-Cola. Keep a plentiful
supply of the real thing at home in both
sizesStandard and new King-Size, j
*
Fifty million times a day...at home, at work
or on the way "There's nothing like a Coke?*
Drink
\0^cie.
.
*
(&Ct&
mi
cw

Standard-size
King-size
Now available in
2 convenient sizes
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
MCOCA-C9U
THE PANAMA COCA-COLA BOTTLING Co
-OW-ta,


PAGE FOLK
TBIt PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TERRY AMD THE PIRATES
MONDAY, DECEMRER Sth, IMS
By Oswald Jacoby
Written far NBA Service
NOETH 14
AAS
. VJ74J
? 13
AQM4
WEST EAST
4QJ9743 *K10i
VKt vio
? K74: 1015
A5 ?J97I2
SOLTH l
k ? AQS53
? AQJ
AAK10
North-South vul.
Seat* Wett Nertb Beat
2V 2A 3 SA
? 4A 5V SA
1 Put Pail IV Pan
1 Put Paat
Opening lead A Q
today i hand was played in the
pean Team Cnampionahips,
hid in July in Amsterdam. The
biding waa high, wide, and hand-
aoane, wjtn play to match.
test would nave sacrificed at
ai spades, going down only 700,
ept that he* hoped to make
n !k* with both o the red kings
a inat six hearts. As It turned
v however, the failure to sacri-
fl i was a clue to declarer's cor-
i play.

Teat opened the queen of spades,
declarer won In dummy with
ace. It aeemed clear that West
1 been bidding on a queen-high
de auit. This fact, together with
pt'a failure to sacrifice at six
idea, perauaded declarer thef
fc had both of the red kings.
Eith this thought-in mind South
led dummy's second spade and
icoVthe ace of trumps. There ws,
liter all, a fair chance that the
king of heart would drop on the
* .When nothing startling happened
on the ace of hearts, South con-
t.aued with the ace and Wag of
chibs. Weat discarded a spade, ana
South abandoned !*" ""
to lead a second round of trumps.
Now West was on play wi b no
f* wav to get out. II be tea a
SideSouth would ru w h i le
dummy discarded the losing i-
mond. If West instead le a ia^
"oT South would geta free
finesse. Either way South was
Jure to make hia slam < contract.
The Washington
Merry-Go-Round
(Continued from Page t)
ily the more dominating of the
Despite his toughness, Khrush-!
chev has a contagious sense of
humor and at one time was telling
Kefauver and other U.S. senators
how he waa trying to move 200.-
000 people to Eastern Russia, but,
they wouldnt' go.
! "You see, we have trouble with
our constituents, too," said the topi
.leader of the Communist party.
At another point in the conversa-
tion, Khrushchev an Bulganin had
an argument in front of the sena-
tors, after which Bulganin turned'
to them and said:
"You see, we have our conflicts,!
!too."
At one point a senator asked
Bulganin and Khrushchev why!
the Russians were opposed to the
, United States having bases abroad.1
"How would you like it if we!
built a base down in Cuba?" was
Khrushchev's quick rejoinder.
"We'd" bomb the hell out of
you.'' replied Senator Malone of
Nevada.
W.ihiofteo Pipeltn*
, John Foster Dulles will fly to
Paris next month to attend a NATO
meeting and try to bolster our
Western allies ... Political denial
of the week; Harlow Curtice,
head of General Motors, insists
he was a strong Eisenhower man
from the start. (Everyone remem*
hers how hard he plumped for
Taft!) ... According to An son Yea-
ger of the Sioux Falla
Argus-Leader, war hero Go v. Joe
Foss "may not take seriously ar-
ticles about bis being mentioned
for the vice presidency." . The
heck he doesn't . Civil Defense
has finally acted on the suggestion
of Gordon Lange to use trailers
and trailer parka for evacuation
centers outside,cities in case of,
centers outside cities in case of
atomic war.
SIDE GLANCES
By Cofbraith
"But, Marge, I'm not asking muchI only want you to
bo my wife!"
Michigan Town
Loses Elms, Smithy
Of Hemingway Fame
MORTON BAY, Mich. -(UP)
Notice to Ernest Hemingway:
The elms are gone; the ami thy.
too.
It waa in this little northern
Michivan community that the fa-
mous novelist, then an unknown,
convalesced from wounds suffered
as an ambulance driver in World
War I He rested beneath the rows
of stately elms and gathered mate-
rial for hia stories on northern
Michigan in Dilworth's blacksmith
ehop.
Now, both the erme and the
l blacksmith shop are gone, victims
of a county road-widening project.
Local authorities decided,the elms
I presented a traffic hazard ana a
'task force of construction workers
cut them down.
The new road will run across the
site where Dilworth's smithy stood.
Those of the town's 75 inhabitants
who remember Hemingway were
saddened as they watched the big
trees fall. But to others this was
Just another sign of progress.
MEDICAL HAZARD
WATERBURY, Conn. (UP)
Mrs. Sarah Hubbard felt worse
after leaving a doctor's office, but
it wasn't the fault of the physi-
cian. While getting up from a wait-
ing room chair to see the doctor,
Mrs. Sarah Hubbard slipped and
broke her ankle.
I GEORGE WTJNDRR
UH,>OUNOTOWEE,1
I'VE MAPIEP yOUK
tM*f*5m6550UT
HettCCwlTETEHTlV
*9Cw*yeJts.
esstMsm.t. RUM
ALLEY OOP
In the Clink
m f y. aamum
:.YEARMAN!'VW
DOWN DEEP.'YOU GOi|/GEE
MORE CHAOSES
AQN YOU THAN
ANY RFTY 6UVS
EVER HEARD OF..
BOOTS AMD BRR ROTMHRB
News
AT EDGAR MARTIN
"Let's go tomo place where we can talkl
fsthifbodi^
STORY OP MARTHA WATNE
!
Timely Visit
By WILSON SCRUGGS
PRISCILLA'S POP
\
Man at the Window
By AL YiRMEER
m^>AO3Uy^...HCNrt&%0 r1
vktor.'>w,xv*wwx iyy^
c*>. i h ** **- T- * " '* <*
IAIN
CAPTAIN BAST
The Spade
By LBSUE TURNER
ffJSStA
RiriDOMTMl
gM
TIC FLINT
Proof?
BT JAT HEAVILTN
on suMomiwa esni.ai
aaajnat
1**1 nn WAT
m J R. wru-iai
RUGS BUNNY
Ife Off!
UkaThatT
OXAV, 60 WE BOTH WAhWA
/MANAGE /ViORRl666y/'
YOU ALLUS GOT YER TEfJT-
R.AP MOUTH SOltf' ABOUT
0E|tf A ATWALETe VUL
SOX VA,RA4SL6 VA Of*.
Pitch pe*jmie6 to ee who
Wlh4$/~-PUT p ve*
DOKES AM" IU CRACK
THAT eXlT BULB YO
WEAR FOR______
I
AH, jamb.' taa \tioaie>**
Youe crude- R0woyi COULD REDUCSVO TOA ft
HEAP Or BLUBBER WITH OtfD
BloW IP I WEREN'T A ,
POLISHED 6BNTLajMAKJ/
BUT X WARhi YOULET
MORRlSSEY ALOrt ____-
eeFOReAy_ r~^*.
IRE 16 ,
AROUSED/
a nose-/.
IV-o
^
4IM6
IE6KA
r.LI op osBA-i
a


Monday, December 5th. iss
THE PANAMA AMEMCAW AH DEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPE
page ittsJl.
'Peace, Prosperity Issue
Will Be Hit Hard By GOP
Mario Lanza Denies Refusing $2000 Offer To Sing One Song
week that he turned down a
$2,000 offer to sing one song for
a Miami nightclub opening.
WASHINGTON, DEc. 5 (UP) into that issue several time our- The temperamental tenor took
House GOP leader J.ose ph- W, I seivea in the past." a, few minutes off between takes
Martin Jr., and an olaVUne Re-! "Of course were going to de- 0f his new picture to explain that
publican agreed today that Re->bate foreign policy," Capehart,ne hasn't brushed off any deals
publicans will hit the -peace and! said "but we must be factual a- because they never come direct-
about this stuff in the
HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 5 (UP) _,-Got to catch up for all the time
Mario Lanza denied reports this I've missed and
who've stuck by me during the
past couple of years wh e n I
wasn't working.
-peace and said "but we must oe iacraai a- because they never come direct
prosperity" issue hard in the 1958 bout it. Peace and prosperity lsi|y to him
election campaign come what* good factual theme. '% read _
may. Sen. Joseph C. O. Mahoney (D-;papers and that's the end of it,'
Martin, who conferred with'iWyo), who appeared with Cape- i,,. 6sld. "i g. ve my agent or-
Presicent Eisenhower Saturday, hart on the NBC television rpo- ders nott o bother me with o-
ais* predicted the GOP will hold gram, "American Forum, said,,,.,.,. And I don't want anything
the White House and regain con-! that in 1852 the Republicans hurl-,^ d with nightclubs.'
trpl o Congress next year even ied "20 years of treason" charg-, The singer ambled from the
the President retires. He said he es at the Democrats. He implied lSet 0f "Serenada to his portable
is "not one of those fellow* who'that the GOP can expect retalla-, Messing room and pointed with
think all 1* lost if Ike does not Hon next year. i pride to a glided sign on the
run Other political developments: door reading: "Beware of the
simultaneously, the Democratic! 1. Humphrey declared anew_ he!tiger."
member* of the House Foreign, would consider it s 'distinct non-1 v.
S^ammlUee served notice or" to run for vice president Mario Storde aide and began
CwaiS'e a^ministratonlwith Adlai E. Stevenson heading I explaining the features ofthe.1
foreian DOCJ in the"uSScam- the Democratic ticket. He added plush room with all the pride of,
SS dffie inv mT t romthat "one doe. not campaign for,, kid showmg off Christmas pres->
the President or Secretary of the office of vice president. ieBls., ,. lhi- _, voa w*
5fii tfnsss srsti'sasr sxv, rJ
VtUekon former President Tru-'no such thing as peaceful co-ex- here feu> aJayoat like J,
man and his secretary of State, istence" with Russia. Harrimanl He dropped into a c h a 1 r in
Dean A?aon|*ey want to!made the statement a. the con- front of a full-lengh mirror white
tak" foreign olicy out of poli- ferred with Oklahoma Democratic!, makeup man daubed at his
tits leaders in Oklahoma City. pse with a powder puff. A
"mociStie Natteual Chairman 3. Martin said he fully realizes, the makeup man " tnrou^
FiulTsutierhas ssld that If and so doe President Eisenhow-Mario opened sw't drink an d
the Keuvniicau campaign on the er. that that Republcans must began to talk about the Picture,
peace" issue they can expect come up next year with *\ he i
rum^riu t fir hack with en- tion to "help the small farmer. 'Its a great roie ior me, ne
SciTm of the ,,EUBhuweV^l Htrrimnn and Stevenson, to-,Id. ";. dram, withiMript
forVlin oolicv He called on Pres-, gether with former President Tru-' a typical Hollywood musical. I
dent'Einnower rule out the!m.n .nd Sen. Este. Kef.uver. "AndI I dont want any urn off |
"* toZtiV? (touched off the furor over the after this picture. "I've got to go
But Mtrtin and Sen. Homer'role of foreign policy In the- 1956,
Caoehart (R-Iod.i. a one time; campaign with running attacks oni T00 YOUNG
En" agreed the GOP the administrations handling of
ill go to the voters with with:foreign affairs STORRS, Conn. -(UP)- Cuss-|
the "pe nd Prosperity"' slo-: Dulles appealed to both Demo- jn can Wcked out of the
gui Martin said it is surefire-1 cr.u and Republicans to refram Univerity of Connecticut If
you're under 21. The university re-:
cently adopted a new policy that
prescribes suspension for students
under 21 who are heard using
"profane or vulgar language."
"I have two more pictures I1 Marios still wary of personal
want to doand I may m a k e i questions and refuses to discuss
them right here at W a rner I nte weight o rhis health. He looks
Brothera." trim, and his co-workers report
he hasn't blown his top Since
The barrel-chested tenor doesn't the cameras began rolling nine
"Do you know mv- album of come out with it, but he's as'weeks ago.
Thp Student Prince' was the top proud as a peacock that "Sere-,
seller or more than 12 months? i nade" is being complete on time. "In: always in great shape"
After a year Ind a half If. still'when he signed for the film he said, walking back to the et,
number fouV That s loyalty, for smart guys were giving 20-1 oddsi "and if anybody wants to argue
vo And rm not letting he fans'he'd never start it-much less about it, send them around to see
V fl.I.k tk. mm 1<. Tilt*
Singing Nude
Poses Problem
In London Theater
A Milkman's WHef
Is Not A Happy
down.
finish the movie.
me
an. Martin saw n. ie ranut- oi . ,K .;.....
''We Republicans have bumped from "partl.an cxccsac.
Knife-wielding Kidnap-rapist
Takes 5 On Wild Chicago Ride
QiiAi finauvitd!

LovAy Italian purse
Hand painted dessert plates
Assorted dog figurines
Beautiful miniature radios



CYRNOS

Tlvofl Ave. No. 16
Open from 8:30 a.m. thru 6:00 p.m.
CLEVELAND, Ohio. Dec. ft
(UP Mrs. Lorrene Oliver wiem
^ranted an unconterted divorce
.'today on the rounds her *us-
,.,l?H,C1;. Eniland- J*',' band Paul had Tlslted other
| ; rang down the curtain today on gVle ;old the court he dld not
the question of whether a nude;d to extra-marital affairs.
'MOWRirt is movirii when ,*>(*, WJW a mmtman when yl
- WllrewKle;Suner JaWS 'n "ong- 'married me." she said he tfid
The theater created some coi..lh0r. .Tm jtm a mlikman aid
corn in Brkain. where nud.y0u know seeln- other WOmenis
showgirls are permlssable on,an occupational hazard of mUk-
stai? eas lone as they stand stock: men > .
still, when it was reported that!!-----,--------------------- r
? he new# Hippodrome show In newsoaper said a pohcemsjpi
Norwich' would feature a nude would Investigate the new Hh>-
sinner. 'podrome show.
A spokesman for London's j The Hlprjodrome compromise)!.
Windmill Theater, famous for its' "We've decided the nude wSl
still nudes, said "singing is mov-: not sine," a snokesman said.
ine\" But. will only stand there like
A story In the Sunday Pictorial a singer while a record plays."
OPEN EVENINGS TILL 9 P.M.
We accept Christmas
Savings Book of
Caja de Ahorros
NEW STORE:
No. 22-06 Central Ate.
Next to
Chase Manhattan Bank
Tel. 2-1773
TOY CENTER:
No. 21 Central Ave.
Cathedral Plaza
Tel. 2-0210
CHICAGO, Dec. (UP) A 25
year-old knife-wielding kidnaper
!a. captured yesterday and po- j
re began an immediate search
lor a young woman be admitted,
raping during a, wild all-n ig h t;
riue in a stolen cab.
Police- Identified-the man '
Fatrlck Pillon, a factory worker.
He was'seized a* he entered his;
honif en the South Side.
Dillon's capture ended one
phase of an all-out search by Chi-
cago and suburban police after
he forced fove persons. Including
two women, into a stolen cab
and took them on a wild ride
thrugh the city's South Sidi aid
into the western suburbs.
Police said Dillon confessed to'
the entire episode as related by
his victims. He waa unable to
explain any motive.
'I dldnt know what I was do-
ing,'' be aid. ,. m-\
uruing the terrifying ride DU-i
Ion witched seating a r range-
menu of his passengers twice
and tried to force a male victim
to raoleat a second woman in the
CAT.
Dillon aaid he could not re-
member detalla of the ride, but
police held him for a complete
statement.
He said he let his last passen-
ger out of the cer a few min-
ute* before bis capture, ahe
boarded a bus and apparently
beaded for home, he said
Police-.eaid, however, that the.
woman,! Chiriey Naddy, 25. had
po known address and pressed s
search throughout the South Sie.
Monte Anderson, 48, a cab driv-
er, told police the riae beang aft-
er the man brandishing a knife^
entered e South Side tavern and
forced him and the other four pa-,
trons into Anderson's cab.
He assigned definite seating ar-.
xangements for all of them, or-
dering Anderson to take over the
rHl'.n8other passengers W*re Rob-
ert Nelson, 37, his; wife M*rUn;
36, end Rlley Minier, 24, all of
The last two to leave the car
were Minier and Mr. Nelson,
who were ordered out on a lone-
ly road in a far weatern suburb
after Minier refused the kidnap-
er's command to remove Mrs.
Nelson clothing.
They were picked up by a me-
torist who took them to the Du-
Page Ceamty aheriff o f f i e e.
Meanwhile Anderson, and Nelson
ldej*gatllifide.
'i hev aaid the lean took me
wheel shortly after the ride start-
ed and headed south from the Chi-
cago* tavern. He pulled into an
alley, they said, telling them be
had to see his wife.
They said a dark-skinned wom-
an about 25 emerged from a
doorway when the man tooted
his horn. He called her "Irene,''
they said and told her "to call
Mike. And tell him what the
deal is and what I should do."
'The woman went Into the
house and returned to aay that
"Mike" did not answer his phone.
His terrified passengers said they
heard the woman plead U let
them go and "come back
me.' _. r
"It's too late no
gone,'' they quoted
tor as aaying. y '
Tbey aaid he sped out of the
alley and headed west, taking
them about 30 mile west, run-
ning through trsfflc lights and
stop signs and making frequent
turna off highways onto aide
roads.
too far
abduc-
'
MA'S two for ono
vocation trip to
KINGSTON
and MIAMI
WMw one tf
I round trip
0 Cotonlil Klngsten ita It wssra cuneta... hits carat Maches..4
myrttrioui Calypso nuslc.
MAW, p!y-oft*n4 af the Awe/leas..". felt, fishing, atar skllsf, herse
race only mlnutu from fetelous hotel* and world famous atares.
FNeMi eery Monday, Vetnesosy ana Friday.
Leave at a comfortable 11:46 la the moraine,, arriving at Klaastoa at
3:00 in the afteraeea in timo for a nlm. The sisee continue* to
arriving at 1:21 p. m.

M mort
in/erwuUitn *
P\\ hiijucw
need
1*0 5J.PTY.KIN-MIA V
Ponomo: I Street No. 5, Tel. 2-0o70; Celem Solas Bld9., Tel. 1097
His pasaengers said he stopped
the car at one point and ordered
a change in aeating arrangements
to put Mis* Naddy in. the front
aeat with him.
At this point Anderson made a
break and fled across a fie Id,
later hitchhiking a ride to the
DuPage County sheriff's office.
About two miles further on the
driver ordered Nelson out of the
csr leaving Nelson's wife in the
rear seat with Minier..
Minier told police that the
driver told Miss Naddy to remove
het underclothing and ordered
Minier to see that bis companion
did the same.
Angered at Miniert refusal he
Dung open the resr door and told
him and Mr*. Nelson to "beat it.'
They said he continued his drive 1
westward with Miaa Naddy.
Two SDA Leaders
To Be Speakers
At Central Church
Elder 8. D- Dunn and T. L
Peterson, associate secretaries of
the General Conference of Sev-
enth Day Adventlsts, Washing-
ton. D.C will be guest speakers
'at the Central 8-D.A. Church
' this evening at 7
1 Seats will be limited, so the
general public la asked to at-
tend early.
Elders Peterson and Dunn
leave tomorrow for Colombia.

i
t
i
i
i ANTONIO'S INNOVACIN
TOYS
from all parts of the world!
(OME AND SEE OUR WONDERFIL
DISPLAY!
ij

I
>





'
INSTANTANCOUS 8EC0ND


' '
e 21 JEWELS
e WATERPROOF
e SHOCKPROOF
e ANTIMAGNETIC
TEMPERATURE RESISTANT
e UNBREAKABLE SPRING



.

MANS DRESS SET RHINESTONE JEWELRY
$1.89 up primed from 95c.
TAHITI
THE JEWELRY STORE*
OPEN TILL 9 P.M.
18-47 (137) Onlrsl Ave.



f AGE SIX
TBS PANAMA AMERICA.'* AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPEK
MONDAT, DECEMBER 5th, 19XS
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY

inexpensive Want Ads Bring Quick Results!
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA
t MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
librera preciado
I atrasa Na. a
Agendas Internal, de Publicacin**
Na I Latan* Jaaa
** CASA ZALOO ,
taatral Ave. U
LOURDES-PHARMACY
UU La Carcaagallla
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
lia M "1 Straat
MORRISON
at* af Jal; n JU.
LEWIS SERVICE
AM TiraU Na. *
FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS
Mi Caairal Avesma
FARMACIA LUX
It Ceateal Avaaaa
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
Jfcii.li Out Ava. Ma. U
FOTO DOMY
Jut. Arsweaieaa Ata. na* a SL
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS
51 Strert'Na. 13
FARMACIA EL BATURRO
rarga* Lefevre 1 Mraat
FARMACIA "SAS"
via mm 111
NOVEDADES ATHIS
V-a r.i Ava.
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
XOMMERCIAL b
!: PROFESSIONAL
FOR SALE
Household

i
CANAL *OM POLTCLWIC
DENTAL MEDICAL
Of f a. riartra Dr. R. A vlla Jr.
MraM (a af Job) *a,J.V*l*!t
.(MVlla Anta rtiaal fto|ral)
' "*^ Tal. I-2ll ranaas*.
RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
JIM RIDGE
fhone fanama -9539
FOR SALE:6m range, hat wa-
ter teak. 60-cytla Frigiaairr. 0>
will trad* tt keresene rafrifer-
atar. lalaaa 116*.
PACKAGE DIAL ala Maj!*,
stave, aft. wttfc erraagamant
raatal 2-brfraam chair. San
Francisca. Call 3-3677 alter C
p.m.
FOR SALE
Automobiles
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE: 1*51 Ch.vralat
Pawarglida aalast tuaar- a*cal-
lent $fM caih. Call Navy 2021.
Leaving Isthmus.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
IOX 2011. AN CON. C.Z.
IOX 1211. CaiSTOIAL. C.Z.
FOR SALE: Divan aa aad
chair, o..!ulfa $25. Phaae
alhaa 2341.
a -
;:
TRANSPORTES lAXTIat. $ A.
P.ckars Shippars *ever
hanas I-24I 2-2562
L..,n Riding at___
PANAMA HIDING SCHOOL
Riding Jumping classes 4aH
SMS .. tone 1-0279
r by appaintma
FOR SALE: Sim mem davea-
pert-bed, large liaa. vary goad
condition; living room chair and
hatiack; imall raund wichar ta-
bla; twa Hear lama*; miicrlla-
naaus dilhai. Curunau 2100-1.
Phana 13-6151.
FOR SALE:1941 Daag. ..I..
Kiaflsway 4-daar. axcallant caa-
dftia. n awncr, dee* la eagle
whita sidewatl ayUa tires $450.
Phaaa Ratbaa 4201.____________
FOR SALE:1*50 Oiaamahila-
91 4-aoor .rain, rada hy-
arametic, paad cendirlen and
apeaeraace. Si 2124. Haaaa
532-A Cantada Hta.
HAVE YOUR PIANO repeirod.
rtgulafaa 1 tunca by Hyams e>
Mo.*.. 2-4S43.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE:60- hauia rcfrigaratar. *-cu. ft.,
parcalain, pood candrtian. $65.
Phaaa Paraiaa S31. '
| Annular Eclipse
3H Sun To Occur
I On December 14
n
FOR SALE:3-piaca living raam
suite, lima green plaatlc, vary
gaad condition $10. Phona 16-
7U9.
FOR SALE:Mahagany plarfarm
reckar, raaa uphahuary, $25.
Eveninpi 765, Aft. 17. Iirnaby.
II
MANILA. Dec. 5 -(UP) An
annular eclipse of the tun will
occur on Dec. 14 beginning at
3:30 p.m., toe weather bureau's
astronomical division announced
I", today.
(Weather bureau astronomers
defined an annular solar eclipse
sa one in which almost the
entire solar disk except its rim
would be complete!? covered by
I the moon, resulting in the forma-
tion of a giant, ring of light with
' a dark center.)
Full details of the solar pheno-
menon were not disclosed but
the announcement said th maxi-
i mum point of obscuration of mid-
' dl* phase would be reached at
' 5:10 p.m. when tbe annular ring
1 around tbe sun's disk would be
completely visible to observers.
The last phase of the eclipse
would occur after tbe hours of
sunset so that the sun still would
be partilaly covered by the moon
at sunset which will be at 5:20
, pm.
The weather bureau said the
' last annular eclipse occurred on
! Christmas Day last year b u t
was ndt visible in The Philippines.
FOR SALE: Wringer waahinp
machina, 60- alactric cntala tawing machina
$65; five eiceHanf maternity
nutriii, .... 12 $20. Albraak
7276.
FOR SALE:1951 Karwr. par-
fact conditian. w/a/w tiras, ra-
dio Caad prica. Eaty payment.
Phaaa 3-572$ tram 2 ta 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1941 Raick Can-
vtrtibla in paad candrtian. Ra-
dio, naw tires, tea aad scat cav-
an. Duty pahi. Call 2-1256 Sal-
baa. C.Z. Unin ON Ce., La Sa-
ca Read, from 7 a.m. ta 4 p.m.
$350.
FOR SALE:Oatk, hanch w/-
waad vite, baby scaku, lawn
chain, harhacaa .land, card ta-
bla, tabla, twin ttrallar, playpen
w/pad 4/1*'. Qtr. 514, Curun-
au Ht. 13-3136.
FOR SALE: Crib, hipk chair.
Phana 2-43SI. Haute 1524-C,
Gaviln Area, lalbaa.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ATTENTION G. U Just built
apeara Earalabaa apartments, I,
2 beeVeeau. bat. aid wat as*
Phana Panama 3-4941.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RENT: Furnished chalat.
2 hi dreams, maid', raam. Phana
3-3321, Iram 7 a.m. te 4:30
p.m.
FOR RENT: Nicely lumUhcd
ana-badraam apartment far ceu-
pla witbant children, $65. Tela-
phane 3-5024.
FOR RENT Famished apart-
meat, livinf raam, dininp raam.
2 badraamt, refrigerator, gas
ttava. 43rd Street Na. 64.
FOR RENT:Apartment with 2
bedroom., parlor-dininp raam,
balh, kitchen, bat water instal-
lation, servant', raam aad ta-
rafe. Calle 41 #37. Baila Vis-
ta. Information: Camila A. Pa-
rral, Tal. 3-6411 office. 3-0434
rasidenca.
LOST & FOUND
LOST:Waally black dap. asar
Gamboa. Answan ta asma af
"lacky." Phaaa Gambaa Perica
Statian. Reward.
FOR SALE: Shawcasae, B*r-
rouph. cash rapiatar, flasir alaa-
tric faa, cabin its, displays. Kar-
ata, dash sad ether article.. Al-
io right ta hays. Central Avenue
115.
FOR SALE ar exchanee: Will
tall naw craet-bew wMteat strip.
Small twa-wbaalad bicycle (will
sail ar exchange far tricycle>,
Hou.e S75. Morgan Ava. Tele-
pkane 2-1214.
LOST:Hack paascaa
ing cdula, driver's license, etc.
$10 raward. Phaaa 3-0*91,
jiaeaatnam.
haafar, almo.t naw $60; plastic
garden basa. Call Panama 3-
6733.
FOR SALE:S-40-S HsHicraft-
ar radia, deluxe Remington pert-
able typewriter, girl's bicycle
24". metal typewriter table. Ft,
Claytan 613. Qtn. 379-S.
Democratic Solons
To Rap Foreign
Policy 'Mistakes'
WASHirwroN, pec. s (Ui>
Two Democrttc^jJienrbers ff the
House Foraign JWtirs Comttittee
dec Is red yesterday they intend to
criticize the administration's for
elgn policy "Mistakes" during thelfcction
Plqnemaker
Glenn Martin
Dies at 69
BALTIMORE, Md^ Dec. 5 (UP)
Aviation pioneer Glenn L. Mar-
tin, one of the nation's largvSt
airplane builders, died last night
of a cerebral hemmorhage. He
waa 6ft \ \
Fame's Censorship
Of Radio, TV Butt
Of Attack By Mendes
PARIS, Dec'S (UP) Former
Premier Pierre Mendes France
bsnded with other leftist politics!
leaders today and attacked Pre-
mier Edgar Faure on grounds
he has imposed an "unscrupulous
censorship" on French radio and
iaion networks to aid his r*
POR ENT: Apartments $30;
Room. $20. Sabana., Chorrillo.
Phana 3-0150 ar 2-150*.
FOR RINT:
era home.
$130.-Far
2633.
3-bedroom mad-
reiidential district,
information call 3-
WANTED
Houses
RESORTS
WANTED: Amaricen couple.
no children, de.ire 3-bedreom
hou.e. preferably in "El Cangre-
jo." Phana 3-4729.
Position Offered
FOR RENT:Furni.hed I-bed-
room chalat, living-dining ream.
bathroom, kitchen Lovely larga
lawn. Situated at Altamira 'en-
trance ta aid Calf Club). Far in-
formation contact Mrs. Lap, next
dear neighbor. Phone 3-4339,
Panama.
FOR RENT: Cempletely fur-
ni.hed apartment at El Cangre-
ja, in a 2-stary hoasa: living-
dininp raam, 2 bedrooms, bath-
room, hat water, telephone,
kitchen, maid's raam, garage
and lawn. Independent entrance
ta apartment, near Hotel II Pan-
ama. Call, far Infarntatiea, 3-
6796 Panama.
FOR RINT: Furnished apart-
men! $50, complete. Nerth A-
maricen neighbors. 1-0471.
FOR RENT
Rooms
FOR RENT: Larga coal fi-
nished raam with independent
entrance.Inquire First Straat, Pe-
rejH Na. 7-100. apartment I,
fram 7 ta I p.m.
Help Wanted
1956 election campaign.
Martin wait stricken at bJi;"!^" ^P-
farm home hear Rock Hall, Md.,1 .. .____ _.A as.
where be had been recuperating i Med*s-Franca) juamed wl**fc
from a heavy cold and virua &\**W*?'* fSESP^JSXk
his physi-,11** aDd the Socu
cian.
according ta
(UDSR) in a solid leftist block to
WANTED:Twa maids: English
peaking nursemaid aad general
maid with cooking ratpon.ikili-
tie.. Apt. 2, hou.e I, Alberta
Navarra Straat. Phana Pan. 3-
733.
Paper Says Britain

w
GARRARD
Record-changers
Sales 8*rvic*
Pnrt*
Reps. Omar Burleson
and Wayn L..flays (DO.) said
nothing makes the administration
immune from attack. They a-
reed with Chairman Jamas P.
ichards (DSC.) who said last
week that Republicans would be
"unreasonable'' to expect a poli-
tical truce on the issue.
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles, backed up by President
Eisenhower, has appealed to both
Democrats and Republicans to go
alow on the foreign policy issue.
He asked both parties to refrain
from "partisan excesses."
(D-Tex.);ere
treatment.
i% ivvvswhrj arar M40 p|
, where k. wu- d-ittt *\**g*f. % K &]
ly drawn for tbe forthcoming
Martin, former bead of tbe
The cast for "She Forgot to
Remember" which the Canal;
Zone Jtmlor CollSge will present
Wednesday only at the Diablo
Heights Theater, was announc-
ed Saturday by Director Subert
Turbyfill as-follows:
Mary, Rose, Esther Reynolds,
Shirley Million. Shirley Meyer,
Vilma Lopez, Ann Livingston,
Tonla Kinsel. Norma Jenks. and
Beth Hatchett are the young la-
dies of the cast for the slapstick,
farce-comedy.
Young men In the cast will be
Kurt Menzel. Gus Mellander. Bill
McKeown, Louis Hassmann, and
| Jerry Fox. They are cast in
terday to join them to a formal world's largest ever H-bomb next widely different types for the
alliance to ensure a leftist major- year fast-paced, running-fire comedy
ity in parliament.. Buti socialists jhe empir* news said that the show.
campaign.
1 The Communists,
largest H-Bomb
._.------ ---------------e~ ~ Jay that
openly invited the socialists yes-;Britain i planning to explode the!Jerry Fox. They are
huge Glenn L. Martin, Co., which I Tn commumsif w0,# Jf4,
he8io3 fct outside o B.1U-:votes in the N.Uor,.! AssemWy LONDON, Dec. 8 (UP)
more, and largely relinquished give them the balance^ of_ power. | London newspaper said toda
active management of ten firm.
But before his illness he had
been working on a secret ar-
mament development in een-
juaction with th egovernment.
As early as 1907, Martin was
building gliders. He designed
and buut the old "pusher-type'"
plane in 1908 and taught himself
to fly. A year later he opened
A
FOR RENT: Madam cencrata
naw chalet: 3 bed raam. with
bathream. living ream, dining
raam, kitchen, 2 parchas, ampia
closet, maid's raam, bat water,
garage, fenced lawn, good loca-
tion Information: Via Parras
I -B.__________________________
FOR SENT:2-bedreem chalat:
living raam, dining raam, kitch-
en, separate maid's roam, ga-
rage, perch, yard, hat water. "F"
St., SI Cangrejo, Icing painted.
Ready far occupancy the 10th.
Phana Panama 3-4533 ar Sal-
baa 125*.
PUBLIC ACCOUNTING firm re-
gaifa, accountant with goad ac-
counting background Auditing
experience de.irable bat net es-
sential. Send letter with photo-
graph outlining education, expe-
rience, age, etc. fa handwriting
te Sax 459, Panama, R.P.
WANTED: Experienced Span-
ish-English stenagrepber. Tahiti
Jewelry Stare, 11-45 Central
Avenue.
PHILLIPS Oceaaside Cartages,
Santa Clara. Sai 435, Balboa.
Phone Panama 3-1S77. Criata-
b.l 3-1673.
--------------------------------_
Cramlich's Santa Clara Beach
Cottages. Modern conveniences,
M#*etefeWV fltflt
6-441.
Shrapnel's furni.bed
baech at Santa Clare. Telephone
Thampscn. Balboa 1772.
FOSTERS COTTAGES. Oaa mile
pest Catino. Law ratas. Phana
Balsee I SU.
WANTED
Apartments
AMERICAN want. 1-2 bedroom
apartment in Balls Vista area far
S95-S100 e month. Must have
screens, hat water, 60-cycle cur-
rent. Call 3253 a, 2106 (after
6 p.m.). Part Kabbe.
Slapstick Comedy
Al Diablo Heights
Wednesday Night
indicated they were joining Men-
des-France instead.
Sen. Hubert H. H. Humphrey
(D-Minn.) said on the ABC-TV

RADIO CENTER
has the
automatic record changer
with
TYLE! FEATURES! LOW PRICE!
920/
DELUXE AUTOMATIC THREE-SPEED CHANGER
Is av -
' I0"'" $42.50 A8VTERM.
VI I L C Beautiful mahogany-grained plstic base
plus golden ton* arm and record support arm. Modern stream-
lined design. Here's a handsome addition to any, room.
program, "College Press
X:
Conier-
one of the first airplane factories;day thejr would for:
in this country.
After Msrtin launched his first
airplane factory, he expanded
The exeuctlve committee of the _
Socialist Party for the Pas pe union. Date and place for
Calais department anrounced w.testing will be announced
id.
t
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it
it
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i
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?
25-Cycl* Motor*
Mueblera
CASA
SPART0N
CENTRAL M-79
Entrance ta Encanto Theater
ence,'' that Republicans s h o ul d steadily as aviation grew,
repent" past attacks on former He became one of the leading
President Trumatt and ex Sec re- plane manufacturers for the old
tary of State Dean Acheson if i Army Air Corps and later
they want a foreign policy Hruce *
next year..
The administration's headling of
the Near EasV criis appeared to
be a prime Democratic target
Hays also raised a question
about the recent Geneva confer-
ences, but Burleson said he had
I aot criticism of the administration
'on this score.
said he cannot "subscribe
U. S. Air Force.
One of Martin's greatest avia-
tion "firsts'* came in 1921 when
Martin-built aircraft sank two
battleships and other vessels in
bombing experiments.
Martin also threw bombs from
one of his aircraft ln-the Army's
first bombing operiments in San
Diego in 1913.
Hays said he cannot "subscrioe He was awarded the Collier
to the theory that any mistakes Trophy by the late Preaident
in foreign policy ahould be glow-;Roosevelt for the greatest i
ed ever." Burleson agreed there
is "do reason why the adminis-
tration should be immune'' fram
honest criticism.
bomb, plans for which it said are | The stag staff is headed by
"far advanced," is far more pow- Frank Fu)e>r as stage manager.,
erful than sny so far tested by!with Dick Johnson in charge of
the United States or the Soviet'stage lighting. Allen Bartholo- j
t h e mew as stage carpenter and Ad-1
aeon, ele Melssner and Ellen Joan;
n ! il ld' Smith doina the properties,
only with Mendes. It apecincairy; Tnere WM B0 ojfjfcig] ffonrlma-1 Business management is un-1
rejected the Communist invitation, tlon o ^ %mpir, News- Btory. jder the general direction of Ann l
and it was belwytd the party But the paper said that Royal Livingston, financial director.
whole would do likewise lAir Fore* operational bomber with Beth Hatchett doing the
Though both Faure and Mendev gquadrons wou 1 d be equipped advertising. Frank Mott the!
with the bomb within It months, posters, and Mildred Damerau
The Empire News said that the in charge of ticket sales and ar- ;
iviet Union's offer last we ek'rnngements. The Phi Theta
if thejKappa national honorary schol-
west would stop too may ha ve.asMc fraternity will furnish the!
France are members of the Ra-
dical Socialist Party. Faure is
leading the right-wing in tie
campaign and Mendes the 1 . 11- t0 gto. t^i,,, H-bombs
Indications today were thai ...... _u ., , _.,
wing.
Faure could muster about 301 >jp been M ,tteB)pt ^ ftrate the ushers for the laugh show,
porters and Mendes 22.. >ut "";forthcoming British teats of the Curtain time for the play will1
bsttle was not even started offi ..,Uper.bomb." 'be 8 p.m.
ally.
KILLERS ON A FURLOUGH FROM HELL.,
"CRASHOUT*
Release at the "LUX" Theatre next Thursday!
chievement in aeronautic* In
merlca in 1932.
Commons Debates
Anti-British
Terror in Cyprus
FEATURES!
drthat shuts off every
Enjoy the convenience of Siesta
SwitcrTthat shuts off everything (amplifier and appliance re-
ceptacle in base too!) after last record plays. Record protecting
tri-o-matic spindle gently lovers records to spindle shelf.
2-needle ton* arm for finest reproduction of any size, any
speed records. Automatic record handling. g
LOW PRICE! * $42.50
RADIO CENTER
7110 BOLIVAR
TEL. 40, COLON
X'

RP Choral Croup
To Be Presented
At Balboa JWB
v
The Balboa USO-JWB Armed
Forces Service Center will pre-
sent the Orfen Ricardo Zoaaya
choral ajroup Wednesday at 8:15
p.m........ ,
The concert will also feature
tne typical Panamanian folk-
dance group of the National In-
stitute of Panama.
Conductor of the choral group
t itp Tlw i the Chilean professor. Luis
LONDON .Dec. 5 (LPI .Vergara q whose performance
?0UI.l o ^T^r/nH-nVi^ti?1 s a tenor-soloist delighted the
day the mounting anti-British ter_ tn went ^^
rorism on .W,^ ""iff^rt at the USO-JWB
reports BrlUm might make puo- ? otfM0I Petra Escobar Is in
'iC SrJSSS &" ^ eli^WwUor. dance.
to the strife-torn island.
Laborite members of p a r 11 *
ment called for the debate last
week and Colonial Secretary Alan
LLennonx-Bovd said the govern-
fment also felt the question should
[be discussed. Informed sources
expedted Lennox-Boyd to mention
the new peace plans In th* de-
bate.
Admission will be free.
Next Issue
Of 'Lo Prensa1
Will Be Free
BUENOS AIRES, Dec. 4(UTi
The last C.G.T.-controll*d h-
Costas Partasside*. Communist sue of the famous Argentine
Mayor of Limassol, one of Cy- newspaper"La Prensais ofi
prus' largest towns, wss in Lon- the press. The paper seized by
don to attend the debate. He said,Juan Peron In 1951 Is to be re
he would urge the opposition Lab- turned to its rightful owners as
orites to support Cypriot self -de-' soon as ]egal details are com-
I termination.
9tmg aetres* Otarla Talbot shares !*
ipaon. all
vtet. In scenes aboard a train far "CRARHOIT," eaplo-
Fast-rising
tie aaaanento
iff w*
wrfh
plated. That's expected to take
about a week, after which Al-
berto Oainza Pas, will resume ns
'a fne and independent pub-
Usher
Marshall Thorns
playing an escaped
arre Fllmakers drama.
Ce-stars oU'CRAaWOlT Inelnde William Bendix. Ar-
thur Kennedy. Lather Adiar, WUilam Taiman. Gene Evans
and Beverly Michaels. Adrt.
V
Reports from Cyprus said cus-
toms sgents there raided a
Greek ship Sundsy and seized a
shipment of arms which could
have set "the what* island alight
had they fallen into terrorist
hands The ship, the Aeolia, was
boarded at Limassol by agents LEUNOTON, N.C.. Dec. 5 tUPi
who found submachmeguns. pis-----A Lexlnffon children's shop
tola, mines, ammunition, hand advertises "Clothes for children
fafjaud** aad amok* frenad**, i from ha* van to twelve."
For Little Angels

DECEMBER
1st PRIZE
2no* PRIZE
3rd prize
i
i
L
Present your tickets before Friday.
Your tickets are valid for a whole year. Keep them carefully.
j


'
MONDAY, DECEMBER 5th, 1955
i
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDEN! DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SET
*/

>>
13
ToddY The best pictures at the best movie-houses in town lOdoY
camtolio
35c. -------------- 20c.
Double In Technicolor
and 8uperscope!
ESCAPE to BURMA
- Also: -
PEARL OF SOUTH
PACIFIC
T / VOL/
S5 ------------L-XB. 20c.
Double In Spanish!
Jorge Mistral, In
CABO DE HORNOS
- Also: -
ESPALDAS
MOJADAS
CENTRAL Theatre
Oc.
30c.
1:05 8:87 4:5$ 0:3 1:47 p.m.
VIOLENT RELEASE!
Tarley GRANGER Anthony QILNN
Anne BANCROFT, in
THE NAKED STREET
LUX THEATRE
Oc.
30c.
3:00 4:10 5:47 7:14 t:03 pan.
SENSATIONAL RELEASE!
Thrilling Murder Mystery...!
Paul LANGTON Barbara PATTON
in
MURDER IS MY BEAT
DR.VE-IN Theatre
60c.
30c.
WEEKEND RELEASE!
GEORGE MONTGOMERY
SILVIA FINDLEY, in
ROBBERS ROOTS
In COLOR *-
CECILIA THEATRE
60c. --------------------------- ***.
STERLING HAYDEN, in
THE ETERNAL SEA

MARGARET LOCKWOOD, in
LAUGHING ANNE
In TECHNICOLOR!
R I O
35c.
20c.
Double in Spanish!
UNA GALLEGA EN
LA HABANA
- Also: -
CASA DE
PERDICIN
V IC TO*
I5c. ----------------~
lie.

S H A N G H A V-
STO R Y
FORTUNE HUNTER]
- Also: -
8 H O R T I
HOLLY
i
MOVIES-. TV HADIO
by Erokint Johnson
HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Ex-' Burt Lancaster's paging Gene
clusively Yours: Tyrone Power andTierney for his film version oil
Eva Gaoor are lignting up the sky George Bernard Shaw's "The Dev-
arouhd New York and pals who ll's Disciple." .. . Most exciting
were doubtlul at iirst are now pre- celluloid of the year: The bobsled
dieting marriage. .Kathryn Gray-;and jet plane rides "you" take in
son and Mario Lanza are talking-cinerama Holiday.'' Both arc
about doing another musical to-,spine-crackers. . Edward G.
gcther. Her illness isn't serious but] Robinson's "Black Tuesday," held
has left her In a weakened cpndi-iup by the British censors for
tion. the real reason why' she months because of its high content
wasn't up to doing "Port Afri-jof violence, was finally, okayed
que'' overseas . John Wayne's | for showings in London. But yards
young teen-aged son, Pat, is nowiand yards of the rough stuff was
caJing his pappy in the popular- cut out of the picture.
iy poll list of Motion Picture ma- THIS IS HOLLYWOOD, Mrs.
gazme! Jones: Line given by his press.
null) VANITY" may be on the agent to io-)ear-old actor Richard
shelf at 20th Century-Fox, but Bob gyer after a date with Zsa Zsa'
Wagner isnt. Gaoor s 8-year-old Franceses:
Loan-outs for "A Kiss Before | -she's just like her mother. She1
Dying" and Paramount's "The! wants me to trade in my American
Mountain,'' says Bob, din't mean bicycle on a foreign job.''
he's maoe his last illm lor the; ,-------
studio that zoomed him to star-; Hollywood hears that Jackie
dom. iGleason will shelve The Honey-
"I saw Darryl Znuck the other, mooners as a weekly stanza to play i
night,* he says, "and everything s; a new western character, Okla-j
great. It doesn't look as if we 11 noma Idaho . When Dick
do Vanity'but Zanuck said he was ] Haymes warbles "Why Not Take
readying a picture for me. I hope i 0f Me?" he could amost ded-
lt's another western." icate the number to Uncle Sam's
Hob's beaming over the chance U^ collectors. They're now taking
to do some high powered emoting! 0et-h-d of his weekly salary for
witn Spencer 'iracy In "The Moun-. unpaid taxes.
tain7 but since returning from the
French Alps, where most of the
picture was shot, and a week s
stay in Paris he's frowning about
the romantic department.
"What s happened?" he sasy.
"There's a big shortage ! oools equipment."
In Hollywood.
The Witnet: Tennessee Ernie
FoTd about a fading, but still spot-
lighted, cinema queen: "I don't
know how old she is, but she's at
that age when teeth are optional!
Dog Wanton Copes
With Hornet's Nest
lhats what the man said, gula.
Even after a couple of earlier
spats, Jack Webb and Dorothy
Towne surprised Hollywood with
news of their latest domestic woes,
?rrtA? ^ CADILLAC, Mich.-ft>-The
-They bSaT Dragnet style-ta Cadlliac-Wexford dog*#vvsrsen.
whisnw" Stapeny Herrn, modestly admits
EYEBROW .LIFTING quotes he is a versatile man.
SSf duff PSSS?. who^1'r- a housewife called city police
Seed Marlon Brando, in "The recently to complain that a, hornet
Fcvntian" and who seems to be, nest near her home was ready to
S Brando minded these days: ; topple. The police immediately
I sometimes wonder If it s; suggested she present her prob-
worth while? In Hollywood, I was iem to the city masager, who in
alwavs cooperative. I did things!turn politely but firmly referred
fr! one take but they spread aU her to the local conservation of-
sorts of stories about my being: fi.er.
HUE S Marlon SSdoW | From the conservation office, her
scene Then you're called brU- clU was directed to the fire de-
Uant ' Ipartment.. But fire officials sad
What Brando wUl be calling Pur- iwects were a litUe out of their
om I'm sure, will be unprinta-; iiM and suggested she try the
; police station again.
Finally. Herrn came to the res-
cue of hesitant city officials and
gingerly disposed of the nest, hor-
nets and all. .
"I just cut them down, pourea
a little gasoline on them and
burned the whole thing," he ex-
plained.
We.
New Products
By JOSEPH W. MICHALSKI
NEW YORK (UP) A new,
Smed*^ PollUS Mflke
wtfa^iise^ou/ffi 2" j Homes For Hungry
^The stain-remover, applied di pnk Caterpillars
rectly to the waUpaper in paste-
like form from a four-ounce fold- LQS geles (UP) -Fan.
up metal tube, will not mar e' lm may be handsome in the.
design of the paper, t laclaimea. d but it bas created aj
The cleanser Is spread with knife rew husenoid problem in southern!
or spatula to form a layer one- California_an invasion of homes
ighth thick over the stain ''bY upholsterv-chewlng fan palm
allowing to dry thoroughly for ,.
about 44 minutes, the dry powder unersity of California Ente-
can be removed bywping (ently R Penee reported
with a soft clean cloth. Most stains g^gjcat/rpillsrs naturaUy feed
will have disappeared but stubborn,e^ua k^ sDln iMt co_,
ones may require a second appU- onuw P i {aU ^ ^
cation. (Inwood Products Co., Nw8^ he>vy wina,, they ,.
York 35, N. Y.) !ter homes where they shred
~,ni.i n1h7"for all-leather clothes, drapes, upholstered furai-
A special paint for ail!leatner expensive rugs.
SHOWING at row SERVICE center
THEATERS TONIGHT! ____
BALBOA 6:15 20
UM-mriMTinvw
DIABLO HTS. :15 7:50
Jnhnny WBSSMUIXKX
Aniwl STKVKNS
"DEVIL GODDESS"

Tac* "VBttJEANCE VALLEY-
MARGARITA 0:1S 7:M
Kirk DOUGLAS
Jninnt CRAW
MAN WITHOUT A STAR"
Technicolor I ,
Tmw. "TOO YOUNG TO KNOW"
Vn HKrUN Al* KAY
Battle Cry" Cinemascope ft Color!
Twmaj TMALE ON TUT BEACH"
a La Medida."
AMP BIERD 0:15 0:05
"His Majestj OKeefe"
Actress
Answar to Previous Puxxlo
I
ACBOSS 55 Opposed to lee
1 Actress. 50 Crucifix
Jaiiet- DOWN
0 She performs i Town in
on------ Ontario
11 Depends 2 French region
12 Large African 3 Mortgage
antelopes 4 Low haunts
14 Concurrence 5 Hops' kiln
anuLii i- auuisau
is,
0 Regular (ab.)
7 Drinks made
with malt
8 Short barb
Chant
13 Clans
19 Meaning
20 Accomplish
21 Dinner course
15 Girl's
nickname
10 Mr. Musial
and Mr.
Laurel
17 Small verandai Hateful
18 Port of call xi Grates
(ab.)
19 Fish
22 Woody fruit
23 Dirk
25 Negativo
prefix
28 Promontory
27 Huge tub
29 Article
31 Follower
32 Narrow inlet
33 Breakfast or
lunch, for
instance
36 Born
38 Insurgents
(ab.)
42 Smith and
Rosen, for
instance
43 Pedal digit
44 African worm
45 Coin of.
Switzerland
48 She is a------
actress
50 Pilots
52 One who
dispatches
53 Masculine
appellation
54 Diners
u
I
^1
w =
llJ
24 Wicked
28 Approach
28 Near
30 Greeting
exclamation
33 Bog
34 Puffs up
35 Feature
37 Daybreak
(comb, form)
30 Evades
40 Blunders
(slang)
41 Wise ones
40 Wahoo
47 God of love
48 Period of time
40 Preposition
51 Elders (ab.)
52 Dry, as win*

&m fob the new a/i/mai



Smart
.
GIFT Items...
Tta Wagons
.-
Ice Buckets
Paper basketa
Crystalware
Portable Bars
Trays, round and square
Ashtrays, glass
Table Center
Warmers
and many mort articles to choose from
RELEASE
with FARLEY GRANGER and ANTHONY QUINN, in
THE NAKED STREET"
TODAY at th "CFNTRAL"
It happened on THE NAKED STREET... the thrill-
packed story of an underworld Kinsbrought to his knees
by a two-bit punk... THE NAKED STREET starring Parley
GrangerAnthony QuinnAnne Bancroft... THE NAKED
STREET, gangster, their private and public problems and
their loTea lives, are the subject of "THE NAKED STREET,"
a study in violence and suspense. Advt.
3sj

Pleasant Comfort with
SIMMONS Furniture
from the European Furniture Store
SOFA BED

This comfortable piece of furniture is an additional bed when necessary.

CLUB $4.50
Ttie most perfect
Simmons Product
$ the Mattress.
The "Beauty Rest" guar-
antees restful slumber.
Ask for our 1956 Carta-
logue inquire about
our special Christmas.
Plan.
MONTHLY S12.50
The Simmons products
are known
the world over.
The European Furniture
Store offers you an Easy
Payment Plan to get new
furniture for Chriftmaa
Just say, "Charge It"
MONTHLY $10.00

34-20
Jasto Aresemena
Tel. 3-0201
Ave.
LUB $325
t >
The Ideal Companion for
the famous Beauty Rest
There's only one "Ace-Coil"
in the world.
We accept your Christmas
Savings Fund deposit booklets
for your purchases.
Open till 9 p.m.
Remember our GRAND
CHRI3TMAS PHILCO RAFFLI
ask for your free ticket for the
Grand Raffle for every dollar
you spend or for every $1.00
you pay as down payment.
MONTHLY $5.00
CLUB $1.50
EUROPEAN
21-02, 7th Central Ave.
Furniture Store
Phones 2-1830 2-1833
i
sMjbodi^ ftaddu glajJptu



T"
fAGE EIGHT

TH1 PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, DECEMBER Mh, IMA
Social
an
enuiSe
&* 5037, J,
neo*
or
& Staff'"
J, mff L MtmmJ If 1,I'P~
tf
1-0HO m 2-0 741
Box 134, Panama
9 JO -J tO *4> mtf

AND MRS. TOMAS GABRIEL ALTAMIRANO DUQUE
^ raairiW this inpming at the Sacred Heart Chapel in An-
co The bride is the iurraer Miss Sonla Adelma Mantovani.
i
AMBASSADOR HARRINGTON ENTERTAINING TONIGHT
FORjviSmNG MEMBERS OF HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Ambassador JuHar. F. Harrington will be hist this evening
Iron until pj. at cocktails. The party is given In honor
f the Unite! State Congressmen visiting the Isthmus.

Miss Wantovan' Weds
Mr. Altlmlrano Duque
; In Am on Chapel
Gallery of the USO-JWB Armed
i Forces Service Center In Balbu
'are the watercolora o Maud
Pacettl. Mrs. PacetU's paintings
I are exhibited under the auspices
'of the Canal Zone Art League
Mrs Pacettl studied oil paint
line in Norfolk, Virginia with
Miss Glenna Latimore. For six
years in Hollywood, California.
Mrs. Pacettl studied with M1M
Nell Brooker May hew in the
fields of oil painting and etch-
ing. At the same time she stud-
ied water colors with Miss
Schuster. In St. Augustine Flor-
ida, she worked with Mr. Walter
Oroniger.
Mrs. PacetU's watercolort.
which include still life, portraits
and scenic subjects show Ima-
ginative quality and delicacy of
composition. Her work has been
exhibited several times on the
Isthmus and quite a number or
times at the USO-JWB gallery.
The exhibit will remain open
until December 10.
Invitation is extended to res-
idents of the Canal Zone ana
the Republic of Panama to visit
the art gallery at the USO-JWB
which Is open from 9:00 a.m. u>
10:00 p.m. daily.
' Zarak-Alfaro Wedding
At Cristo Rev Church
At Cristo Rey Church in Bella
Vista Saturday evening, Mu
Maritza Alfaro, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Jorge Luis Alfaro. was
married to Luis Carlos Zara*,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Jorge Za-
rak.
Sponsors for the wedding were
the parents of the bridal couple.
Dr. Ricardo J. Alfaro, Mrs. Gra-
ciela de la Guardia. Mr. Carlos
Marauez, Mrs. Matilde Brlceho,
Mr. Emilio Silvestre, Mrs. Berta
Brcefto de Perez BaUardares.
Mr. Guillermo Mrquez, Mrs.
Myriam Lopez de Munden, Mr.
Sergio Altamiranda, Mrs. isa-
bel U. de Wolf, Mr. and Mrs. An-
tonio Eskildsen, Dr. and Mrs. Ri-
cardo Alemn. Antonio Zarak,
Mrs. Julieta de Estrlpeaut. Mr.
MEETINGS
Mttta ft* Htiin
iiwll euaeainee
tilica i
"5
tala, telly tai *-
Otfctrwi-e,"
Orchid Society Members
Will Receive Seedling
At Tomorrow MecLwg
The Canal Zone Orchid Socie-
ty will meet tomorrow at the
USO-JWB.
A seedling of white chalenbp-
sls will be given to each mem-
ber present and also to each
member bringing an orchid
plant in bloom.
A talk on the famous vanda
hybrid, J. Nellie Morley will be
given by Mr. Dale Merrlweatn-
er.
Seedlings of V. Nellie Morley
were given to members at the
last monthly meeting In No-
vember.
Mr. Harry Dunn saill bow
colored elides of Central Amer-
ican orchids. These slides are o
great interest to local orchia
collectors.
Visitors arC welcome.
36-Year Old Woman Begins 5th Year
In Coma Caused By Auto Accident
STOCKTON, Calif., Dec. I (UP)
A blonde, blue-eyed former
nurse's aide began her fifth year
of "living death-' yesterday.
Mrs. Abbie Lelah Howlsnd, M,
has been in a coma since Dec.
4, 1951, when she suffered s brain
injury in an automobile accident.
It is the longest coma on record.
Officials at Sea Joaqun Gener-
al Hospital where sb* is
said there
for her.
was no
confined
possible airo
"It's possible that he will
live to a ripe old age," Robert
Brissonden, acting administrator
of the hospital said, "but she wiU
still be in a coma. There is ab-
et
FATHER FELIX ALVARADO CUCALN receives the blessing
of his mother, Mrs. Adriana C. de Alvarado, at the end of the
ordination masa held yesterday at Panama's Metropolitan
Cathedral. Father Alvardo Is the 25th Panamanian to be
ordained by the Catholic Church. He will hold his first mass
at the Santa Ana Church 'his pariah church)' on Thursday
at 10 a.m. The ordination was conducted by Archbishop Fran-
cis Beckman, who at the end of the ceremony asked the new
priest If he wished to pronounce his first benediction. Fa-
ther Alvarado asked his mother to come to the altar to re-
ceive It, after Which she in turn blessed her son.
Min'ster Entertains
i For Congressmen
Minister of Public Works and
HssSOni Adelma Manto- Mrs. Eric Delvalle were host, ,
vam^ughter ol Mrs. Anselmo 'Set evening .1.the Unto.Cub ; ^ ^'s Cf os d* ^ Muenr.
Mantovani, became itbride of a a gal Ption b.ono rtnt the , J d ,, R
Mr. Tomas Gabriel Altuniiano : visiting Congiessmen. mV Lucas Zarak. Mrs. Anna de
Duque at 7:30 this morning at a Some 3W) gUesU attended the |Fabrega, Mr. and Mr. Juan de
beautiful ceremony periormed affalr n ^ upsU|r8 ballroom. i. Guardia Paredes and Mrs.
United States and Panama flags Elida Z. de la Guardia, Mr. and
fere used in conjunction with IMrs. Emmett A- Collins, Mr. and
floral decorations for the table! Mrs. Federico Brid, Mr. and lgrs-|
qui Arosemena. Miss Gena Cam-
pagnanl and Miss Elenlta Stagg.
Rest men for the bridegroom
were Mr. Juan Antonio de la
Guardia and Mr. Erasmo Arias.
Ushers were Mr. Eduardo de la
Guardia, Mr. Adolfo Icaza, Mr.
Gabriel Jimenez. Mr. Rodolfo
Estrlpeaut, Mr. Raul Arango, Jr.,
Mr. "Eduardo Maduro. Jr.. Mr.
Ricardo Maduro and Mr. Marco
Antonio de Janon.
Bombay Archbishop
Warns Catholics
Of 'Godless Forces'
Cristobal Emblem Club
Meria Tomorrow
The Cristobal Emblem Club
No. 52, will hold its regular
business meeting and initiation
tomorrow at the Elks Home In
Margarita at 7:80 p.m.
Election of officers for lflM
will be held and the new Su-
preme District Deputy of the
Canal Zone, Mrs. Ann Hentschel.
will be introduced.
Refreshment will he served
following the meeting.
Fleet Reserve
Meets Tomorrow
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Fleet Reserve Association Unit
77, will hold their regular
monthly business meeting to-
morrow at 7:30 pjn. at the Rod-
man C.P.O. Club.
The meeting will be follnwed
bv a Christmas Party at which
gifts will be exchanged, and re-
freshment served.
at the Ohape.1 of
Heart to Ancon.
the Sacred
The groom is the son of Mr.
Adolfo Altlmirano Browne, and
oi Mrs rsabel Dudjue de Kodat
f of Panama.
and the club.
Pilots Association
Enjoys Party
Members of the Pilots Assocla-
Bcsides Mr. and Mrs- Manto- j tion of the Canal Zone and their
r j, and Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert wives enjoyed a gala evening on
Kedat, sponsors for the wed Saturday at Hotel El Panama,
i Da included Mr. and Mrs. To- Among the guests were several
' visiting Congressmen and their
Antonio Sierra, Dr. and Mrs.
Alfredo Orillac. Jr.. Mr. and Mrs.
Erasmo Orillac, Mr. and Mrs.
Roy" Icaza. and Mr. and Mrs.
Marcial Diaz.
Flower Show Tea'cht
Will Show Decorations
For Christmas
The completion of the flower
arrangement course at the Bal-
boa YMCA-USO will be featured
by a big flower show at 8:00 p.m.
Caribbean Club Executive Board
Meets Tonight
The Executive Board of the
Caribbean College Club will
meet at the home of Mrs. J. M.
Brown. 8510A. Margarita, at
7:30 p.m.
; MANILA. Dec. 5 (UP) His
Eminence Valerian Cardinal Gra-
cias, Archbishop of Bombay, Sat-
urday warned Asia's Catholics a-
gaiost forces "wh;ch would seek
to draw hundred; of millions of... -*
Asiatics away from God." LUeI*tu,re Siud* Grttn
The Indian p-elate spoke to,"El" %*S!!!L o*,.a
more than 1,000 delegates on the! fh* lte,r'lure 255? Group
first Asia congre.s of the lay a- II1t' C.ar'bbean, Co,le*e ^ub
postolate which opened it six-day *",me* * home of Mrs. C.
conference here yesterday. ' He delivered a stirring d i s- p V1; t0"J70W- W1 _. .
court* on the need for recon-i Mrs Biakowskl will read a
The special theme thl year|atructing ,nd upholding Christian; P*P*r on Manama in fiction"
wDl be Christmas arraneements. :prlncipieg nourished in faith and!
.* in .HMJ aolutely nothing that wo know
members and guesU will tend that can be done for her."
the December luncheon. Pleas
call Mrs. K. G. Klnsel, phono Vi-
6121 prior to noon tomorrow.
Cristobal Woman Club
Change Speaker
Surgery during the first year
after the accident showed that
there had been severe injury to
the "mid-brain," which is incap-
able of correction, officials aid.
Meanwhile, she stares unseeing-
Due to illness, the Cristobal r m a >tate of "suspended ant-
Woman's Club will have a
change of guest speaker for Its
Wednesday meeting.
Mr. John Surany will speak on
"The Collecting of Objects of
Art."
Pacific Evergreen Garden CM
The Pacific Evergreen Oar-
den Club will hold a special
meeting tomorrow evening at
7:30 in La Boca.
Rainbow Ctty
Civil Defense
The Civil Defense Warden
Service of Rainbow City will
hold their regular meeting and
a graduation for 40 Civil De-
fense workers who have com-
pleted first aid training at the
Rainbow City High School Study
Hall on Wednesday, Dec. 7, at
6:30 p.m.
W. G. Dolan, Chief, Civil De-
fense will d and motion picture'Fire fighting
matlon." She cannot move% or
spejk. She is fed through tube.
But otherwise she is In excel-
lent condition. Bnssenden said
"she is oae of our healthiest pa-
tients." '.,
Mrs. Howiand and her husband,
Donald, had been separated aboug
two years before the accident. ,
Two and a half years ago he
took their son, Ralph, now U. to
live in Wichita, Kan., their for-
mer home.
Although medical men hold out
no hope for her.recovery, a close
friend, Doris Wilson, is confident
that Mrs. Howiand one day will
regain consciousness.
ft was Miss Wilson who was
driving the morning a car ap-
proaching from "the other direc-
tion collided with their ante.
Both women were working a tne-
same hospital. .,
Snice that day. Misa" Wflson
has visited her friend alsmot dsi-
Howland
ily. She gives Mrs. Howiand. a
All residents of Rainbow
re invited to attend.
City
Civil Defense Warden
Servcf of Margarita
The Civil Defense Warden
Service meeting for Margarita
will be held Wednesday 9 a.m.
Dec. 7, at the Service Center
Theater.
W. G. Dolan, Chief. Civil De-
fense will discuss Blast Effects
of Nuclear Weapons and tr.e
motion picture Self Preservation
in an Atomic Attack will be
shown.
Steam Locomotive
Derailed; Ties Up
Passaoe Of Trains
a permsnent.wav* evet> thrift
months. '
Miss Wilson Insist* that MTa;
Howiand can recognize' her de-
spite what the doctor aay. She
insists that her friend ha* smiled
*"I*know shell get' vell in
time"' Miss Wilson sid. "1
wouldnt' spend all this WBie with .
her if I didn't." a
Brissenden said Mrs. Howiand s
hospital bill so far has totaled a-
bout $30,0000. From M,0oO u M.twO
was paid from insurance *;b ut
we've written of the rert, a*
said.
Reds Promise
To Return
43 Japanese


A special section of tho show
i Gabriel Duque, Mr. and
:^rs. Alejandro Duque, Mr. and
rs. Luis Vergara. Mr. and Mrs.
,A. Vlegas Arango, Dr. and Mrs.
' V. Caco Diaz, Mr. and Mrs. Jo-
se GAbrlel Duque and
Mrs. Etanislao Garcia.
wives.
Mrs. Maud Pacettl'
Work On Display
Mr. and At JWBCSO
i Currently showing at the Art
The bride wore a gown of | being devoted to this subject.
Every student will be eapected
to submit a Christmas arrange-
ment.
white tulle nppliqued with eat-
In, a coronet of tiny white flow-
ers, a veil of Illusion tulle.
Matron of honor was Mrs.
Marcela de la Guardia. Miss An-
nette Alfaro was her sister's
maid of honor. Bridesmaids were
Miss Gladys Altamiranda, Miss
Choli Vallarino, Miss Belli Va-
llarlno. Miss Ana Cecilia Valdes,
Miss Marietta Orillac, Miss. Ll-
The public is invited and there
is no charge.
*tu^*r~
The Esterbrook Fountain Pen is
deaigned to pleaae everyone ... to fit every
hand, every writing job.
Esterbrook offera 38 different point
style and a variety of exquisitely colored
barrels. You simply fit the point you
choose into the barrel you choose ...
for the-perfect writing instrument.
When you give ESTERBROOK, you give the
pen with the right point for every writing
style ... a truly personal gift, to be
used and remembered.

Your Esterbrook dealer will help you
make your Christmas gift selections.

'*

Wt
e*. This
EsmaaooK Fountain Pen and nutrhing
Push-Prndl set la a popular gift ehoie*.
Each matching pencil la vailabta in
beautifully AaaigMd regular or thin lead
model . writes for month without
reloading.
See* our selection of
TOYS and HOBBIES
GOME IW TODAY
VND MAKE YOUR
CHOICE EARLY
CRAWFORD
AGENCIES
"J" St. No. 13-A-30
Phone*
2-2386, 2-2142. 2-3265
doctrine.
"Aa effective and well-organiz-
ed lay apostlate is till in t b e
making," ha declared, "but no a-
mount of organization can bear
the fruit of success unless Chris-
tiana have a clesr idea of a lay
apostolate in its responsibili-
ties.''
The conJerence delegates ln-
clusing representatives of the
clergy and lay apostolate of IS
participating countries of South-
east Asia and the Far E a s t
heard Cardinal Gracias advocate
the cultivation of truth and "to
learn how to take things as they
are." ,
The Cardinal exhorted C a t h o-
lics In Asia to "come out of your
shells and take your place in
the world as Apostles of Christ."
He said the need for increased
participation by the laity in apos-
tolic work was made imperative
by developments indicating a full-
scale drive by "Godless force" to
enslave millions of Aslsn into
their fold.
Participating In the talks were
delegates from the Philippines,
Australia, South Vietnam, T h a i-
land. Republic of- Korea, Japan,
Indonesia, India and Hong Kong,
Portuguese GOA, Nationalist Chi-
na, Burma, Ceylon, Malaya and
Singapore.
Clayton Officers Wives
Meet On Wednesday
The Port Clayton Officers*
Wives' dub will hold their reg-
ular monthly luncheon Wednes-
day at 13:00 at the Port Clay-
ton Officers Club.
Since there la to be no, coffee
and business meeting this
month It If reported that all
COPENHAGEN, Dec 5 (UP!
A giant steam locomotive was
derailed at Copenhagen's central
station last night blocking the
passage of sleeping ears for Nor-
way and Sweden.
The 200-ton engine had hauled
the Italy to- Scandinavia express
into the meta station later, while fCroes to Its
shunting the sleepers for Norway
and Sweden into a separate train,
it was derailed at a switch caus-
ing all the sleepers to be "lock-
ed up" for several hours. With a
delay passengers were trsnsfered
to the Seden-ferry by ordinary
passenger cars.
TOKYO. Dee. I CUP) soviet
Russia notified Japan today that
it would return 43 Japanese Na-
tionals, including 11 sick war
criminsls who have not complet-
ed their prison terms.
Notification was made in a mes-
sage from the Ru.seisn Bed
Japanese counter-
part. It said II more Japanese
nationals would be released tor
repatriation in. addition to JS pre-
viously promised. _
The Japanese vessel Taiaei Ma-
ra Is scheduled to depart for the
Siberian port of Nakaedks Dec.
* to.pick up the 41 repatriates.
Jorge Gardo Arosemena, M. D.
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY SPECIALIST
(fractures, bone and joint diseases)
o^EUgvEL* rtior: M ~ * *-*
Saturday................ II t 1 MB.
Located at the "Cent. Mediee" (Jlth Street and
Cabe Avenan
TELS.:
Office: j-U Be*.
S-1IM

If you want Bourbon at its best call for
"GREEN RIVER/' America's smoothest
whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS


Each time you wash your face.


.i

.
&te/dtjoof
M I t I C A'S
IN NAME
NCI lilt
s. ^^L
THE THEATRE GUILD
Presents
"ROPE"
by Patrick Hamilton
TOIWCHT THROUGH SATURDAY AT 8 O'CLOCK
AT THE THEATRE GUILD PLAYHOUSE
Sorry no seats available for tonight.
For reservations for other nights, call Balboa 1513
your
skin is in danger
^2m.
Drynest, coarsened testare, 'shrivelisf*
can start then
After washing your face, your skin is "opea*
to trouble for 1 to 3 hours. Because when
you wash away dirt, you also remove natural
kin protectors. During this 1 to 3 hour
periodserious skin problems can begin.
Don't leave your ikjn un-protected a singfe
momont after washing. Re-establish its
defenses instantly with a quick Pond's Cold
Creaming. It combats dryoses. Keeps pores
clear, keeps skin texture ine and smooth.
And always a deep cleansing-
at bedtime
Besides a quick Pond' Cold Cresntag
attar each washing, your skin rtmit m
deep clematng every night. World-famous
Pond's Cold Gressn is tpeifeaii made
to get down toand remove the
embedded dirt mat ordinary, lest affective
deansiags doss over. Stimulate, ejreala-
Mon, Your atan t immmulmwli/ cUmmd-
aad show Hwsth a raeW. young* lack.


-


The lovely daughter f the Usted Stats.
Amhattaeior to Spaia *y, "A quick Pood"
Cold Creaming after face iiiaBag i the most
vahuibk heenty hehst IVe liaseed. Aad at
Udtsme, I Jway (torn cierna, with PoseTt."
FOKOT COU> CUUM
mod and bvd by mor*
waane. man aav other face


[ MONDAY, DECEMBER 5th. 195S
-I
TOE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE NINE
WAK FRIENDS
to he influenced by Al Hibbler. Paramount); "Memories Are Made
THE MARQUEE
BY D!CK KLEINER
??>?***'
LITTLE BUT LOUDFolks in Washington, D.C., thought this
tiny German Isetta had an awfully big hornuntil they took a
econd look. Then they saw it was a tuba sticking out the
top. The one-cylinder auto is owned by Col. George S. Howard,
conductor o the U.S. Air Force band. He's shown giving a ride
to one of his musicians, M/Sgt. Edward Grace of Boston. The
auto, said to be the only one of its kind in the United Slates,
uppcsedly gets 70 miles per gallon.

The Unforgettable of Wyatt Earp...in
"WICHITA"
, Release next Thursday at the "Central" Theatre!
if
f (
If your teen-age son has ac-
cumulated too many possessions
ior his room ao that it can nev-
er be made to look tidy, don't
go in some day and start throw-
ing away things you consider
"Junk." Have him decide which
things to save and which to
throw away.
The privacy of ene'a own
room Isn't real privacy If a
mother dees the throwing away
of possessions without consult-
ing their owner.
Holiday Tour
To Lima Peru
For Christmas
iw
One of the most vicious, brutal fist fights ever staged
for a motion picture is a highlight of "WICHITA,'' Cinema-
Scope feature. The brawl is staged between Joel McCrea and
Lloyd Bridges and Is a real knock-down alugfest. Vera Miles,
Wallace Ford, Edgar Buchanan and Peter Graves' also star
in Allied Artists' Technicolor attraction. Advt,
The Isthmian Travelalre So-
ciety la making- arrangements
tor its annual Christmas Holiday,
Tour to Lima. Peru. COPA is
furnlshin" a 28 passenger plane
which will depart from Tom-
men at 6 a.m. Saturday. Dec. 34
and return Jan. 1, arriving at
Tocumen at 5 p.m. Each year
the Society sponsors this 9-day
trip which Includes a three-day
jaunt to Cuco taking In the
ancient Inca ruin* of Mchu
Picchu. Plenty of time for shop-
Dine' and sightseelne- is allowed
in the Itinerary. Military per-
sonnel are asked to cell the
ITRO-JWB bv obone at. Balboa
1072. if interested. Civilians re
ssked to call the secretary of
the Isthmian Travelalre 8oclety
at Balboa 4394
On Wednesday. Dec. 14 at 7:80
n.m. at the USO-JWp, colored
sHdes will be shown by some of
the members of the society that
made the trln last year. The
public Is invited to attend
The dry season schedule of
I.T.8. will beein on Jan. S with
a launt into the Darlen country
followed bv visits to 8an Bias
islands and the Interior of Pan-
ama on the following; Sundays.
For Information call the above
mentioned persons....
The Record Shop: BUI Haley
Is understandably excited these
days. He's going to be an actor.
The Decca maestro has been sum-
moned to Hollywood, with his Com-
ets, for a musical. They've even
handed Bill a pretty fair-sized1
speaking role. He says he's never!
acted in his life and never felt the
urge to do si.
"But 11 just do what the di-
rector says," he figures. "I've read
the script and my lines seem to be
fairly simple. I hope.''
The Comets, incidentally, s u r-!
vived the big. desertion by three of
its six musicians who left to form
their own act, called The Jodhnars.
BUI says "Lady Luck was with
me." He picked up a guitarist
from benny Goodman, a baritone
sax from Ralph Marterie, got
back his original bass man and
added one more. So the Comets
are sailing along.
After aU these years.AI Hibbler
is a sensation. And it's a nice feel-
ing for the singer who long has
been the pet of the jazz set.
Kibbler's records of "Unchained
> Melody'' and "He" on Decca have
won him friends among non-jazz
lovers. He has a way of pouring
his soul into his songs that
Intrigues most people. There's a
reason for it, too.
Al Hibbler Is blind. Re was ben
bind. He fonad Joy ka aiagmg,
from his earliest days m Little
Reck, Ark. This snasical love was
shared bv ethers m his family.
Another brother was bora blind,
toe. and leaned to play the piaste.
"He plays classical,' Al says,
shaking his head. "I don't know
how he can do It. Has to memorise
everything."
Al's voice changed relatively late
In Ufe. He was a soprano until he
was around It. As such, he was
in great demand with vocal groups.
"I had two ambitions as a high
school kid," he says. "One was to
sing with Duke EWntgen. The
other was to sing with a b a c It-
ground of strings."
It teek a long time, but he
achieved both. Re started rtatajl-
lag with the jazz bands arenad! the
Senth-baads wHh es tike Dub
Jeakias and His Playmates and
Beets aad His Bodies. He **
through Arkansas, Tenfcesswa.d
Tesas. Eveatnalry, ene of Duke
or
Al Hibbler
Dick's Picks: Maybe Eddie Fish-
er has an overdue hit In the bounc-
ing "Dungaree Doll'' (RCAi. Oth-
ers: "Alabamy Bound" (Rosalind
Pagle. MGM); "Uve Me Again"
(The Rever Roys, ABC-Para-
mount); "Rock-a-Beatin Boogie'
(Bill Haley, Decca); "Silver Bells"
(The Featane Sisters, Dot); "Not
One Goodbye" (Jaye P. Morgan,
RCA): "Aim" It a Pity and a
shame" (Frankle Laine and the
Four Lads, Columbia); "My Trea-
sure" (Connie Francia, MGM);
"Vanessa" (Berate Wayae, ABC
of This" (Gale Storm, Dot).
More intriguing "vault originals''
i from Label "X" to make you feel
| old. Among these re-issues are al-
bums featurning Tenag Blag
Crosby. The Happiness Boys (Bll-
ly Jones and Ernie Hare), Rius
Coluaabo, Ethel Mermaa and Ger-
I trade Niesea, Fred Astalre, Fraak
Cr-iMMit. Helen Morgan, Fanale
Brice, and Gene Anaua. Astaire,
,on one number, plays the accor-
!dion, and how many knew he
i could do that?
Some interesting classical coUec-
tionson Epic,Paul Sachar con-
ducts The Chamber Orchestra of "
Basel through the six Bach Bran~- .
denburg Concert!; (aniden has an-
other Inexpensive grouping, this
called "A Treasury o Favorite
Symphonies' and it's a good way~
to get started; Columbia has the
Bndapest Striag Quartet playing
the complete string quartets of
Johannes Brahms.
. Joha S. Yomaa- ("Make Up Your
Mind.' CBS-Radio): Civilization ia
a scheme devised by women to get
men to go to work for them. '.
Bill Haley
Ellington's scouts heard kin aad'
he joined Duke (ambition number
eae) and sang ia the Ellington
hand for 8tt years.
In 1951. he left Ellington and!
went on his own. It took almost
four years for his first hit record;
to happen..That was "Unchained
Melody,'' done with a background
of strings (ambition number two).
Hibbler says his powerful style
Is a result of severs! things. First
he does songs with stories in the
lyriche says that way "I can
feel the words." And be spent his
youth listening, to aU the singers
and admits he profited from bor-
rowing their styles. Among the
ones who influenced him most are
Bing Crosby, the late Buddy Clark,
Dick Haymes and Fraak Siaatra.
Nowadays, some of them seem
BOTHERED BY
ACID
INDIGESTION
ITS LIKE
MONEY
IN THE BANK...
>
______________________________________ _____________________________
.. ..... - .

'
^"^"""
"
V
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
All sales and delivery of our BEERS and
CANADA DRY products will be suspended
at all our plants in celebration of
Panama's
MOTHERS DAY
December 8th
Please place your order in time for deliveries.
WE WILL REOPEN FRIDAY,
DECEMBER 9th

cervecera nacional s. a
NATIONAL BREWERY INC
h can ruin your appetite, spoil your
whole day. But famous antacid Sal
Heptica gives speedy relief this way:
Just take Vi teaspoon of spark ling.
antacid Sal Heptica in a glass of
water,-and-feel-how fast it relieves
your stomach upset.
The mild Iaxatjon which may also
accompany, its alkaline action help*
relieve tbe constipation that often
goes with acid indigestion.
So be wiseget tbe economy-size
bottle of Sal Heptica today! Have
it on hand when indieestion rtrkes.
Toko sparkling
SAL
HEPTICA
andsmU.
s s
. WHEN YOU WIN
IN OUR
FREE WEEKLY RAFFLE!
THIS WEEK'S WINNERS:
R, P. O'CONNOR
LETICIA VARGAS
CHARLES E. HARRISON
Capt. JOS. TVVOMBLY
JILMA C. DE-MASCARIN
C.W.O. CEO S. HANLEN
DANIEL ADAMS
C. R. HEARD
e
H. D. MOSIER
H. FRANK DAVI8
LUIS C. ROQUESERT
Sra. MILAS
ANTONIA DE BORCHARD
Dr. M. M. HARTMAN
LOLA DE'LA GUARDIA
W. REID
Rattan (Headquarter*, the hOtHC of Vcrtikal Blinds and PIsitT-Av
"OVR FVRWTURE GRACES THE LOVELIEST HOMES'
OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOnERY OF BENEFICENCE
PANAMA. REPUBLIC OF PANAMA
Complete Prize-winninj Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1917, Sunday, December 4, 1955
The whole ticket has 4 piece divided la two series "A" "B" ef 22 pieces each.
First Prize 0435 $ 44,000.00
Second Prize 0809 5 13,2 0 0 00
Third Prize 2401 5 6.600 00
He.
133
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132.H
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Prtua Nu Pries* Me Prtav
I32.M MM IM.M MM IM.M
ISZM SIM I32.M 133 I3Z.M
I12.M S235 I12.M MM I32M
I1ZM SM* IM.M MM I12.M
.2M.M S433 -.2M.M MM 22SCM
112.M SS15 IM.M MIS 132.M
lltM M 112.H MM 132.M
I32.M S7M 132 M TM IS2M
1M.M ml 112.M MS 132.M
11Z.M SMS 132.M MM 132.M
Approximations Derived From Rift Prize
427
S
4W.M
MM
a
MM
MM
MSI
a
MM
MM
MB
MM MM
437
S
MM
MM
MM
S
tt.M
Ml
Ml
S
MM
MM
8S
s
MM
Approxiratrons Derived From Second Prize
Approximations Derived From Third Prize
112 M
ltei
s
1M.M
S
ISZM
UM MM
MM I BM
MM
MM
MM
S
1114
32
SMI
S
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2M2
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112 M 7MI
MM I MM
MM < MM
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SMI
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I 2M MM
141* MM
Prtte-irlnnlnf Humbers of vesterday'a Lottery Drawlna were at: 1st In Colon; 2nd and 3rd in ParnoBst
The Nine Handrod whole tickets eadint; In S and net lacladle i ia the above Us* wia rerty-Four OetWs H44.H each.
The whole Uctet has 44 pieces which eomprUe the two serlea "An and "t"
Sirned by: ALBERTO AJ-IMAN Governor of the Province of Panama Cd. 47-12155
The Re prese ntattte Of The Treasur? RICARDO A
WITNE8ES: Flix Antonio Veta A., Cd. No. 47427H
Simn Aranclbia, Cd. No. 47-484*71 ,
AUBRTO J. BAR8ALLO
Notary Public. Panama
PABLO A PIKBL,
aecretanr



K-


FAGE TEN
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
MONDAY, DECEMBER 5th, IMS
[
^ -earn
Cleveland Browns Clinch Eastern Division Title
Grid Champs to Defend
! Against Western Team
jDay After Christmas
By EARL WRIGHT
NEW YORK, Dec. 5 (UP)The fabulous Cleve-
land Browns, one of the most successful teams in the
history of professional sport*, will defend their Na-
tional Football League championship Dec. 26 against
the Los Angeles Rams or Chicago Bears.
as the regular season end neat
Sunday, downed the Chicago
ttr&n^w&K
&W&* *Sl5E Cardln-al. in yesterday.
won PPi~i gixth' game, 274.
other
suns i-?tss5-
mWSssBfttSt
ger when it deleated the Waan
ington Redskins. _,.,,.
While the Brownies qualified
lor a league championship tor
the 10th time in II[many trie,
the tight Western Division race
narrowed down to the Rams and
Sear. Los Angeles held Its hal-
dame lead by downing the Bai-
fie coiu; 20-14. The Bears
remained close behind by rally-
ing to edge the Detroit Lions,
! 81x2i Angele knocked Baltl-
I wore out of contention and the
Green Bay Packet also bowed
But although they whipped the
San Francisco Forty-Nlners, 28-
7
The Philadelphia Eagles, who
will help decide the Western
champion by visiting the Bears
Last Day! .75 and .40
3:05 5:99 1:09 9:90 pm.
M-6-M's
LOR ao-
jo jwaw.; na.
StaTUYlOR
QANORPiUKER
IBfcUUI
Today incauto J5 JO
In ClnemaBcope!
Robert Ryan, in
HOUSE OP BAMBOO"
Plus: Moira Shearer, in
"Man Who Levad
Today IDEAL .20 -.70
Janet Leigh, In
"ANGELS la the OUTFIELD"
Howard Keel, In
DESPERATE SEARCH"
Los Angele winds up Its reg-
ular campaign by entertaining
the Packers. The Bears-Eagles
game will be over before the
West Coast game begins so
coach Sid GlHman'a Rama will
know what they have to do
when they take the field. Cleve-
land will end its regular cam-
paign in a home game with the
Cardinals while the Rams and
Bears decide who will play host
in the championship game.
The Browns, who won four di-
vision and league champion-
ships in the now-defunct All-
America Conference, added to
the record of five straight NF.
L. division crowns which they
set last year. Quarterback Otto
Graham an dtackle Lou O roza,
key players on the most consis-
tent team in pro football histo-
ry, led the Brownie offense at
Pittsburgh.
Georgia Tech Lists
Ten-Game Gridiron
Schedule For 1956
ATLANTA. Dee. 5 fUPl
Georgia Tech will open the foot-
ball season next year with Ken-
tucky and wade through ten
games without a breather, in-
cluding eight Southeastern Con-
ference contests.
The 1958 schedule gives the
Easjlaeera a K0M| shot at the
SIC *rn due to the large
nuseber af conference feet but
should the leo be well bal-
anced again. Teeh wffl be fac-
ing a reeky read,
Kentucky replaces Miami while
the Engineers' only breather
this year, Florida State is suc-
ceeded by Tulane.
Five home games are includ-
edwith Louisiana State, Au-
burn, Tulane, Tennessee and
Alabama, all conference foes.
Other SBC games art with Flor-
ida and Georgia.
Oatslde the SEC. Teeh will
Meet Duke at Durham. NX*,
and Southern Methodist at
Dallas, Tmu.
The schedule:
Sept 22-KentuckT at Lexing-
ton, Ky.
Sept. 2fSMU at Dallas. Tex
Oct. -open.
Oct. 11LRU at home. '.
Oct. 20Auburn at bone.
Oct. 27-Tulane at bone.
Nov. 2Duke at Durham. W.C.
Rov. 10Tennessee at bone.
Nov. 17Alabama at bone.
Nov. 34Florida at Jackson-
ville. Fla.
Dec. 1-Georgla at Athens, oa
On The Alleys...
COLONIAL INSURANCEMEN
TAKE FOUR POINTS FROM
LEAD-LEADING SEYMOUR
AGENCY IN MAJOR LEAGUE
The Colonial Insurance Agen-
cy team, meeting the league-
leadlng Seymour Agency Insur-
ancemen last Tuesday night in
the Major Bowling League.
knocked over the Seym u or
group for three games and four
points to tighten up the league
a little. For Colonial. Schlrmer
had a fat 24 with games of 208,
201 and 215, followed by George
Zeletes with 571. For Seymour
only Colbert with 587 and Kaelln
with 527 were able to hit over
500.
On adjacent alleys. Tahiti
Jewelers and H. I. Homa Co.
tilesetters split four point* a
Homa took the first and final
games with Tahiti taking the
second game and pintail. Lyons
led for Homa with 563 with
Bud Balcer following with 551.
For Tahiti, substitute ''Mitch'
MarkakisTed with M9. Chief
Larrabee bad high game of the
night with a big 234 in the sec-
opfl rtmc.
The Summit Hills Golf Club
aggregation knocked over the
Max R- Stance! and Son team
three points to one, with the
Stempel lnsurancemen taking
only the last game, despite a
2712 series, which would have
taken five of the remaining six
matches. The Stempeleers led
six marks going tato the ninth
rrame of the second game but
splits and misses, while Kunkle
and Anderson for Summit Hllis,
struck out cost them the game.
For Summit, Kunkle led with
577, followed by Anderson with
587. Coffev was high for Stemoel
with 631, which was high for the
evening. / '
In the final match, the Fuer-
za y Lu team again screed
through for their second consec-
utive four-point victory by de-
feating the Agenda Olud team.
Stephens led for the "Read* RH-
owatts" with 592. followed by
Welch with 580, while substitute
Ki'tsea led for Olud with 5**.
followed by Harry Klumpp with
54*
The ten hleh-average howler
after the nth week of the 28-
week season:
Name Games Ave.
Coffey-..........83 205^
Balcer........ S3
Jacober......, 33
Rchlrmer .. .... .. 53
McGarvey......SI
Stephens.....* .. 1'
Colbert ........ 188+n
Zeletes........33 188 + 23
Lane..........SO 188+17
Oleichman......33 188+ 4
Brundage Criticizes 'Good
Will Tours By US Athletes
ALL ALONEEarl Blair must have felt lonesome in the' clear
and catching the-paas that set up Mississippi's first touchdown
against Mississippi State at Starkville. Charging in are the Ma-
roons' Jim Barren. 70, and Frank Sabbatini, 33. Ole Miss went
on to win. 28-0. and qualify to meet Texas Christian in the DaUas
Cotton Bowl. Jan. 2.
TAHDIHG
LOUISVILLE, Kentucky, Dec.
5 (UP) A very Brundage, pres-
ident of the International Olym-
pic Committee, last night sharp-
ly criticized recent internation-
al "good will tours" by Ameri-
can athletes under spbnsoiship
ot the State Department.
Speak, ng to the National
AAU convention here, Brun-
dage said such use of athletes
for propaganda purposes loM
the United States open to the
same criticism in other coun-
tries that is heaped open
Communist nations for their
exploitation of athletes.
Brundage cited numerous ex-
amples from the foreign preys
of blasts at American profes-
sionalism in supposedly amaLeur
athletics. Some of these were
aimed at the current program
under which the Armed Forces
are enabling military personnel
to train for Olympic competi-
tion.
Mossadeq Cops Feature
In Juan Franco Thriller
The Stud Mlura's mud-loving
Mossadeq yesterday found con-
ditions to his liking and raced
to a thrilling one-length victory
over Quematodba after overcom-
ing serious interference in the
featured |750 six-and-one-half
furlong sprint for Class B Im-
ports at the Juan Franco race
track.
The four-year-old chestnut
Chilean-bred son of Flexton-
Damlanl went off the odds-on
mutuels choice and amply Justi-
fied the bettors' confidence In
him. Right after the break,
Mossadeq was boxed in by the
field and did not get clear un-
til rounding into the back-
stretch.
Confident Jockey King Flores
did not become rattled but bided
his time while Quematodos,
with Cristian Rebolledo aboard,
was cutting out a sizzling pace,
People in other nations see no several lengths on top. Mossadeq
difference between Russia using gained rapidly when sent three
its military forces to develoD furlongs out and by the time
athletes and the United States Quematodos reached the hume-
dolng what appears to them to stretch turn, his previously long
be V*i same htag.
"Wb are being classed with
the Communist countries," he
warned, "and It is up to the AAU
to do something about It."
Brundage said that he* had
planned to drop something of
an atomic bomb on the sub-
ject of amateurism In his
speech, but at the last mo-
ment, he decided to delete
that portion of his address.
His decision to omit a re-
sounding blast at growing pro-
fessionalism in the U n i t ed
States came, reliable sources
said, after he learned that the
AAU executive committee is
planning to appoint a special
committee tq investigate recent
violations of the amateur code,
including the recent suspension
and subsequent reinstatement cf
America's record holder in the
mile run, Wes Santee.
lead had dwindled to only one
icngth.
When Flores attempted to
drive Mossadeq through an
opening on the outside, the wily
Cristian shot for the extreme
outer rail, causing Flores .to take
up and shift in with Mossadeq
The diminutive chestnut was
not to be
ever, and
denied
in the
victory, how-
straightaway
1844- 7
1944- S
1*4- 8
1874- 9
187+ 5
e a
-?"
Won Lost
1 0
.. .. 1 0
.... 0 2
The present standing of the
tems:
Tea m Won Lean} Pet
Reymonr Agency 2*
Summit Hills ... 38
Tahiti Jewelry ... 28
stempel and Son !
R. I. Homa .... 18
Fuerzo y Lng .... IT
Agenda Glad ... IS
Teams-
Chesterfield
Spur Cow..
Carta Vieja
SATURDAY NIGHTS W5SULT, Olympic Stadium
Spur Cola 9, Carta Vieja 6
TONIGHT'S GAME: Open Date
TOMORROW NIGHTS GAME (Olympic Stadium)
Spur Cola (Tugerson) vs. Carta Vieja (Hockenbury)
Game Time: 7:30
The scores of the matches:
Colonial Tranee
chlrmer . 2*8 2M 215
Bnrals , 1 ill W?
Allen .... 1M 213 1M
Tlete* ... ITS JtO 1M
Gleichmsn ISO 1SS 177
7S
!W4
571
S45
j. j. kci/Aon A.
SM 973 910 2749
ONE OF TB most cnthatoe-
Uc fans at Uta Olympic Stadium
Saturday night dertog the gas-
in which the Spar Cesa Sodas
came from behind to driest the
Carta Vieja Tankee 9 to . we*
President Hlearda ftteky, Artne.
!
'>MI
GRACE LINE
"Santa" ahlpt uniting the
with fast and frequent
service.
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM NEW YORK
TO WEST COASTOF SOUTH AMERICA
ft ^Si E^',;.......ftf Crbrtbal. C. I., Dee. 7
9LS. "SANTA CECILIA......Due Cristobal, C. Z., Dec T
WEEKLY SERVICE- FROM THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO HEW YORK
S-SANTA MAKGABTTA'
"SANTA BABEABA ...
. i
. \m
AJbrKtea 191
Martas* 231.
UfllkM . 139
Kellman's Killers
CAUTA VIEJA
art i to me, IV, v*
Shant., 2b.....
Porter, H.......
PhiH.p. rf
AS
5
4
4
5
Wimclm. M ...... S
Kropf. cf ........ 3
Gljm, lb ..,.,.. J
D.btk, c ........ 4
atton. c ........ 0
MrlhB, p ..... 2
Stawpal, ...... '
Strytk, p ..*.. "0
sHsckrnbury..... 1
Hisfifti, ....... 0
R
0
1
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
5
2
4
1 0
2
4
0
4
1
1
0
0
o
0
Ttli
.37 ( 124 I
ALONSO tmATHWAITE wai
taken oat of the sodamen's Tntt, p .
lineup when they took the field Aftfcei, p
in the fifth frame because he is
being bothered with a sore kirn.
SWR COLA A0
Gl.nn. f........ 3
Al. Irjthw.ft, 2b. 2
Ch.rlM, 3b...... 2
Lopti. 3b-2b .... $
At. Inthwiitt, rf.,4
Moor*. M ....... 4
G-.n.ld. rf ...... 3
Kellmin, c .< 4
Cordon, lb ...... 1
9. Oiorio. Ill .... 1
... 2
... 0
PO
1
. 0
4
2
0
1
1
6
10
2
0
0
Brathwaite made a throwing er-
ror In the previous inning which
' a run to score.
YANKEE nmsrrtM AI Kub-
ski. although crestfallen over
tus dab's two straight loisc,
still manage a wry smile
tn the dressing room after the
l total of
"I thraght
yMehera had goad staff
re l sent tbesa la. bat
hit the
for.
Tea aaasaVt think ft
Witter
Beyer
JatCffcfT
r MM
ISS 90
I9S US
179
9o7
wn
914
. .aUa*teaal, C. t. Dee. g
Sail Cristobal, C. Z., Dae. U
FROM
U S. PAOFIC k WEST COAST
CEWTRAL AMERICA
TO BALBOA AND CRISTOBAL, C. Z.
Bw BmlbM, C. E.. Dec. 14
* Beshea, C. E, Jan. 7
FRO* CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C Z. TO THE
WEST COAST CEPTTRAL AMERICA ft U. S. PACIFIC
C E, Deen
annum
Bttwrn ,
Andersen
Kunkle .
Jacober
at
i
PANAMA AGENCIES CO
- rAJiajgA:
Totri. .......1.31 13 27
.-Struck out fr Sfryika la IHi.
Sect* ty'laBitnji
C.rt. Vhi.......100 300 2006
Spur Col. ........001 020 5la9
RBIPhillip I, Arch* Srathwaitt
3. Krop. Moor. Kollm.n. Glenn.
Charlat. GreiuM 2. Im4 Runt
C.rt. Viaja 4. Spur Cala 6. Uft "
9.1.1Carta Viaja 7, Saw Cela 10.
Twa Sata HlH Arehi. Sr^hwarta 2.
Sh.nn. PhiliifM, K.llm.ri. Moor.,
Grtnald. Sacrifice HrttGrcn.14 2.
Aicbi. Sratbwafra. 6or*o, Gl.nn.
St.l.n laiatPartar. Maora. Hit by
PHtk Sfrytka Trice. MeaalB". Srrtrckeat by
Trice 3. Arthur 3, Man.h.n 1. Saw
ea Sail, affTriee 3. Arthur 1.
Manaban 4. Sremaa' 2. Prtch.rt kec-
or.M.n.han 3 m.. 6 bit. la 4-
VViru^DCB-lNrin.nrR 2'I Inn.naa.- Stempel 4 ren. 3 h-t
Dkkeas WM not In thf iH i_2/|. Trica 4 run.. 7 hit in 7;
, getordey night because $,(,, i run. 2 hfH in 2/3. Irren
ef a oahsfel right wrist that j-Jr cola 3 'AUn. grathwait.,
Kaw-tl aald be eould "hardly m,. 2),- Caria Vies. 1 (Stamael).
tanad before the game" Corky L^, pitcherStempal (O-n.Wia-
Tleere, who sobstltotod ferLi.. p^cKcTrice u-o. n..bi.-
ajaayed third base pUyCberiaa (.riite4). Up.re.
mUlBWUfW, -------- Th.rtten. Wllllamaaa. WaHen.
ZriSmfr rm I**** expert two Hind. Tim. ef a.me-2-57.
'f^trhers to report tetJierrow.
~ fee was with
Corpas CbrbetJ, class B Big
net ssaaon, l
trhy from Boeas
. esaf aw Tbomaa^n
_!ffee awheel to ffee <3pea Clesel.
j Ijij twri W,M"t~' 9MtHe Cepet Usrue
mmmmm te to Of In from UkTvUW
teffat^pWaVaV . * ***** tmt "*** wear-
2TiaiZI atoaeWoPil *f?f _**V Spar Tele to the
, bat rstarrMd
AJaOiieats a#v-
* tH i !5 9Hlsf9p op ee e Mmtht ptev J T*:*ft
Paraso Sports
Racing Pigeon's
Owner Claims New
Long Distance Mark
W1TUMPKA, Ala., Dec. 5 (UP)
Dr j. p. Hunter, a Wetumpka
dentist claimed a long-dlstanct
record of 1,000 miles today for
his prize racing pigeon, "The
Duke."
Hunter, vice president of on
Alabama pigeon fanciers? club,
said his bird flew from Windsor,
Canada, to Wetumpka between
Oct. 25 and Nov. 27, arriving
witth sURhtry tattered feathers
but otherwise none the worse
for wear.
Hunter said he renamed the
pigeon "The Duke Of Windsor"
in honor of the flight.
'Underwater In RP'
SuhW\ At lecture
In Balboa Tomorrow
"Under water in Panama"
will he the *ub1ect of the lecture
it the Palbao Y.M C.A.-U.S.O.
tomorrow, Dec. 6 at T:30 p.m.
Anthonv Mnn. Panama Ca-
nal civil Engineer, will be the
sneaker. Mann will show both
slides and movies.
T" addition, actual enuloment
"ed in 8kln diving will be ex-
hibited.
On the following Tuesdav,
""rank 3. Vlolette will show r.lc-
t.ures of deeo-sea fishing in pan-
am waters, the last in the se-
ries of "Outdoor Adventures."
These lectures re free and
re open to residents of both
Panama and the Canal Zone.
he again moved to Quematodos,
wearing him down in the drive
to the wire. 'Mossadeq crossed
the finish line a full length to
the good. Bradomln, second un-
til displaced by the winner, held
on to wind up third several
lengths behind. Barlyon, Persian
Countess, Hipocrates and Chlvl-
lingo trailed In that order
The winner returned $3.*),
$2.80 and $2.30 across the board
small pickings when compared
to the $8.20 win payoff by Ma-
rianlna in the aecond race. Ma-
rlanlna was the main cause of
a $611.60 doubles combination
formed with upsetter Fru Fru
($16.20) in the first race.
Guillermo Sanchea sco r e r!
three consecutive v 1 e t cries
(sixth, seventh and eighth rac
es) to top the riders. ^
The dividends:
F1BST RACE
1Fru Fru $16.20, 7.40. 4.
2El Pasha $2040, 7.80.
3Redondita $6.
SECOND RACE
l~5?arl?nln& w-a, is M, s.
2Coral gg.eo, 4.30.
3Fontalneblaau $S.
Second Double: SCUM.
, THIRD RACE
1Engreda $5.80. 2.60.
2La Pampanlnl $2.80.
One-Two: $19.49.
FOURTH RACE,
1College Girl $15.40. 4.M, 4 4g
2Don Jaime $720, l.fJO,
3-Dr. Bill $2.60.
Quiniela: $59.
FIFTH RACE
I-Don Popo $5.20, 3, 2M.
2-Bbony $280, 2.40.
3Coran $2.20.
.. .. SIXTH RACE
1-Black Gold $540 (No place off
how betting). mmm w
i *i 5f.VM RACR
1Eric $18, 5.60, 380.
2Onda Real $3, 280.
3Merry Mason $320.
Doable: $85.29.
EIGHTH RACE
1Regla $7.20, 4.60. 220.
2-Bull Flea *f,.*0. 3 JO.
3Joe $2.20.
Qnin'eta: ttl.ff.
, > NINTH RACE
1Salero $7, 4.80, 280.
$Persiflage $480, 380.
3^-Alo Alo $2.80.
One-Twe: ,$41.$9.
i TENTH RACE
1Mossadeq $380, ISO, 130.
2-^Quematodos $380, 3.30.
3Bradomln $3.20.
Pedro Tesis
To Substitute
For Plummer
Former featherweight ehaot-
pion Pedro Tests will lukstf-
tnte for injured Federica
Plummer against Iridra Mar-
tines 'n a ten-round 134-pound
feature bent at the Arena Co-
lon Sondar, prometer Nicanor
Desman announced today.
Plummer suffered a fractur-
ed finger during a werkout
last week and Panama Bex
lng Commission doctors have
ordered htm to call off his en-
garement.
Tesis returned recently from
Puerto Rice where he dea>
sloned Francisco Colea Gar-
cia.
Mart'nei will be making hi*
first appearance since be wen
a verdict from Dave? Moore
early this year.
c
reverto, thai ha
i
...mm m tU'JT^ U **mm te tbe fleeem*. en
Stephens , \rf
Thomas ... 181
Luttentoerfer 199
PUachowsil .212
Welsh ... 301
KeMBBP eBlpirs*
tS* X *Hm
nay ^%WnW%
Ora nata
Klumpp .
Pue .
.Woodcock
Kutach .
Agencia Clad
. ISO 172
210 144
172 139
148 190
304 153
Hants Rosa
Mliford ..
Iiprlngfleld
Mobile ..
ensacla
.. ..
..
Wen Last
. 8 0
. 5 1
3. S
3 4
3 4
I *
0 4
Robert Fste's Santa Rosa was
crrrwned champion of the boys
volleyball intramural bv defeat-
ing Mobile 1S-S. 18-6. They made
g risen sweep of the league.
Fred MeKenzia's Lake View
kept en the heel of Santa Rosa
hoping for en upset, bv taking
Pentecola In hand ifl-io, 13-8.
Sam Bailey's Dallai are con-
tented in third place hy defeat-
ing Rnthwln Samuels' Mliford
by a score of 15-8. 18-9
penseeols manager D. Foster
U heplne to ret In the win coi-
riwHi when his team meet Mo-
R the Interachool anorta. a-
lit with Rsinhow Pit?
Birla wars defeated and the
i took tha victory Milch en-
4 them to be in good stand- ,
ae far to the schadul goes, i
ANOTHER
SHIP IN PORT!
MARACAS BAY
Discharging cargo from
Miami and Kingston.
Loading for Puerto Limon,
Puerto Cortea. Puerto
Barrios, and Belize.
HFWGERATE0 and DRY CARGO Strict
PeawW - Depsnfjtji txktUn
SHIPPERS IMPOITIIS IXP0ITIIS
ear Sailing Datos and CeeAsaeto $<9*aWes. CeosaB
W. ANDREWS 4V CO.
Cristobal Tiliplw.ee. 21*1 fc*a Tslielinw 12SS
? r?7toe&p/u
Me* Office. Mtoeai. Fterlea
an Cargo Cro
M


MONDAY, DECEMBER 5th, 195S
TBS PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE
Buzz Fazio Shows How To Get^More Pins'
By NBA Service
2P.
_!R Ban Baal* has far foar ciaaiuallva ft
on tha harary All-Anaerlcsji awHns; tea.
College Cage Scores
Hamilton M, Denieon (0.) 2.
N. Britain (Conn.) 7, W'iiald
(Masi.) 58.
Massachusetts 60, Toronto 61.
Falr'gh Dkk'son M. Toronto 1.
Lycominf 76, Wash'n A Jefferson
1.
Neward Rutgers 80, Alumni 68.
Worcester TaCta. 72, Bowdoln 6L.----------.
Assumption (Man.) 77, Stonehlll!ilon thay wera dafaatad.
(Saturday)
WARM-UP TOURNEY
..... (At Montgomery, W.Va.) ...
W.Va. Ttch 74, Al'n Brdua 70
(Cbamponshlp)
W.Va. State 97, Em. A Henry
78 (for 3rd)
OTHER GAMES
SOUTH
Kentucky 62, Loulaiana State 51.
Alabama 90, W. Kentucky 85.
N. Carolina 73, Clemson St.
S. Carolina $0, Wofford 64.
S.Carolina 80, Wofford 64.
Richmond 96, Randolph-Ma con S3.
Navy 90, Delaware 70.
Tennessee 77, Davidson 64.
Kentucky State M, KnOxvUle 92.
West irginia M, Carnegie Tech
79.
N.C. State 76. Penn State 42.
Auburn 81, Blrm'hanrSouther 64.
Georgetown (D.C.) 74, Roanoke
S3.
Miami 92, Florida Southern M.
Xulana 95, Southw'n (Memphis)
SO.
VanderbUt 7, Texas AAM 69
Stetson 99, Georgia' Tchn. 93
Missouri Minea 70, Blackburn (III.)
S3.
Illinois College 85. Greenvillw 93.
Mnskingum 88, Case 77.
Detroit 77. Western Ontario Sf.
Hope 84, Hlsdale SO.
Steubenvilla 91, John Carroll 76.
Baldwin-Wallace 97, Ohio Weale-
yan II.
Ball State 77, Michigan Normal
ft
Albion 70. Trlstate (Ind.) 43.
Kirksville (Mo.) 71, Quincy (Dl.)
69.
Alma 70, Olivet 56
Kenyon 81, Fenn (Ohio) 55.
Cent! State (Ohio1 79. Capital t.
Marietta 101, Rio Grande (Ohio)
If you were to observe Basil
Fazio strolling down the street,
you would hardly be inclined to
consider the diminutive Detroiter
as a top-flight athlete.
Buss Fazio's five-foot, six-inch
fr-me resembles that of a jock-
ey perhaps, but It hardly seems
possible tha'. he should be the
American Bowling Congress Mas-
ters champion.
Fazios' prowess placed bom on
the first Ail-American bowling
team in 1952-53-54-55, earned bim
tha All-Star doubles championship
two years in a row.
Nov. Fazio has written 18 illus-
trated and instructive articles on
bowling for (Name Your Paper).
Starting with the fundamentals,
Fazio tells bowlers bow to im-
prove their scores.
Fazio's popularity and high
ranking lc not derived from his
unorthodox behavior atfer releas-
ing the ball. He earned his 1 na-
tional reputation and position as
captain of the Stroha' and mem-
ber of the Brunswick advisory
staff of bowling champions by
knocking over more pins than op-
ponents.
MANY CITY CHAMPIONSHIPS
in his former home town, Akron,
O., fell t oFaiio, and he extend-
ed his activities to the famed Pe-
tersen Classic in Chicago, where
he finished second in 1945.
That same year, Buzz qualified
for the National Individual Match
Game Championships for the first
time, and he made the finals of
thia rugged bowling teat. After he
had defeated the great Joe Nor-
ria, then captain of the Stroh'a,
Fazio waa asked by Norria if he
were interested in moving to De-
troit to bowl with this famoua ai
gregatton.
For several years, the Stroh'a
experimented with a number of
men. but in 1950-51 Captain Fazio
waa certain he had the material
from which champions sra made
Twice in the next two years, the
Strohs won the right to chal-
lenge the E A B team of Detroit
for the National Match Game
Championship, but on each occa-
Social Outcast Timing More Important
74. Gallaudet 61.
Hiwaasee M, Breverd (N.C.) 82.
Milligan 79, MaryvUle (Tenn.) 63.
Washington (Md.) M, Alumni 53.
Eastern Kentucky 83, Middle
Tenn. 69.
Murray (Ky.) 95, Tennessee Tech.
82.
Berea 71, Lincoln Memorial 65.
Miss. M Meridian (Mias.) All
Stars 84.
North Texas 81, Northwestern
(La.) 70.
Northeasfn (Okla.) S5. Ark St.
Schrs 71.
Eaat Tenn 79, Florida State 54.
Kentucky Wesleyan 99, Centre
SO.
V. Mad'na (Ky.) 68, Hanover
(Ind.) IT.
Catholic Univ. M, Baltimore U-
niv. 79.
Appalachian N, King (Tenn.) 74.
Winston-Salem 80, Bluefld (W.
Va.l 87.
Erskine 97, North Georgia 68.
McCrary Eagles 100, Eton 91.
Hlh Pt. 109, Atlantic Christisn
94.
East Carolina 77, Gulford 7.
W. Maryld 75, Rutgers (8. Jer-
sey) as.
Arckansas Col. 3, L a m b u t h
(Tenn.) 77.
Arkansas State M, Austin Peay
L7.
Presbyterian 117, The Citadel 67.
N.C. College 66, Virginia State
55.
Pieamont (Ga.) Col. 63, Newber-
57.
Western Carolina 85, Catawba 72.
63.
Providence 71, Brown 53.
Alfred 62, Brockport 69.
Fredonia Tchrs. 69, MacMaater
(Ont.) 35.
Albany (N.Y.) Tchrs. 92, Now
Plata 51.
BuckneU 71, Juniata M.
Lemoyne (N.Y.) 73, St. Peter's
(NJ.) 9.
Norwich 84. Merrimack 69.
Phila. Textile 80, Kings (N.Y.) 62.
MIDWEST
Minnesota 83. DePaul 71.
Indiana 93, Ohio Univ. 74.
Ohio State 73, Butler 51.
Purdue 62. Missouri 38.
Dayton 97, Gustavus Adulphua
n.
Iowa State M, NDak. State CO.
Iowa 66, Nebraska 31.
THEN CABE A GREAT day to
1933 when the Stroh'a were once
again challenging their rivals for
the national title. The E A B
team now waa known as the
Pfeiffer'a and they opened up a
healthy lead in the opening half
of the match. But tb* Strohs
eame roaring back in the final
half to win by a 422-pin m a r-
ln and reign as the National
latch Game Team Champions.
An equally peat thrill for Buzz
fasto waa his capture of the ABC
Masters championship in 19.
The Detroit star showed Ma pin-
point control In this important
national tourney by twice convert-
ing the almost impossible 7-10
rauroad. .
Making every pin count a* a
Fasto trademark!
Huntington (Ind.)
49.
Ohio Northern M,
Bowling Green 94
90, Cedarville
Bluffton 76.
Findlay 90.
Lawrence Tech. 87, Assumption
(Ont.) 73.
Youngstown 80, Western .Reserve
65.
Utah 73, Wichita 51.
Mich. Tech. 95, Moorbead (Mum.)
90
Central (Mo.) 93, St. L. Concor-
dia SS.
Indiana Cent! M. Marian 63.
Anderson 72, Franklin 81.
Manchester 77. Kent State 74.
DePauw 90, Earlham 79.
MeKendree (DL) 100, atoott AFB
Ham Jewell 32. Ottawa (Kan.)
62
Lenoir Rhyne 81, Belmont Abbey Maryv'te. (Mo.) C, St Ben'cte
TO-
(N.-
EAST
Niagara 73, Fordham 70.
Muhlenberg 69. LaSalle M.
Pitt 75, Michigan 66.
Cornell 83, Buffalo Univ. 73.
Dartmouth 64, Mtddlabury 59.
Holy Cross 80, St. Alselms
H.) 55.
Hofstra 68, Princeton 60.
Seton Hall 70, Scranton 54.
St. Bonav're 85, St. Vincent (Pa.)
m.
Yale M, Colby 74.
C'anlsius 87, Syracuse 75.
St. Joseph's (Ps.) 84, Rhode Is-
land 72.
Colgate 80. Reneselser S3.
Lafayette 73, Swarthmore 41.
Albright 73, Dlckinaon (Pa.}_T8.
Brooklyn Poly 83,
(Conn.) 75, ,
St Francis (B'klyn) M, Loyol*
(Bahi.) 65.
Gettyaburn 73. Lebanon Valley 70.
Utiea 62, Rochester 60.
Hobart 74, Buffalo Tchrs. 81.
Plattsburgh 76, Oneoota 54
Geneva 88, Indian (Pa.) 80.
AUegheny 99. Ednboro 62.
Harpur 74, Geneaeo Tears. 66.
Westminister (Pa.> 97, Slips Rock
67
Now At Hialeah
For Big Stakes
America's most travsled race
horse and third leading money-
winner of the vearSocial Out-
castagain will be pointed for
the Palm Beach, McLennan and
Wldener handicaps at Hialeah,
trainer Bill Winfrey revealed
Sunday after unloading the gel-
ding Irom Alfred Vanderbllfs
Sagamore Farm In Maryland,
the Miami Herald said today.
At Hialeah laat winter, 'Old
Sesh" ran second In the Palm
5Beach, .first In the McLennan
nd third as favorite in the
100.000 added Wldener. Since
then, he has traveled more than
12,000 miles In a coasi-to-eoaat
campaign which saw him win-
ning seven stakes in six states,
setting three track records,
earning $390.775 and moving In-
to seventh place on the all-time
standings.
Seeeeaaor to Native Dancer
U Vanderbllfs big atar, Social
Outcaat aleo earned safe than
any gelding In history for a
stogie season tha year, top-
ping Armis $376,326 of IM7.
Armed remains the. champion
taonev-wlautey geMing with
$917,473, at the five-year-old
Sedal Outcast Is second with
$824490. He lifetime record
reads53-13-6-6.
"We'll keep him in light train-
ing for the present and have
him on the track within the
next few days," Winfrey aald.
"Later, well step up his routine
for a stakes schedule similar to
the one he had at Hialeah last
winter.
"He is also nominated for the
Than Muscles In Bowling
outstanding player of aa All-
America team. Bob Pellegrini
proudly bold the Walter Camp
Memorial Trophy. Maryland a
center cloaca out his college ca-
reer against Oklahoma in the
Miami Orange Bowl, Jaa 2.
(Kan,) SO.
Wayne (Neb.) 84 Aug'na (Sioux
Fatts) 70.
MePheraon 88. Bethany tern.
(Chi.) 55. .._..
Rockhurst 90. Emporia (Kan.) 67.
Valparaiso 91, South Dakota 55.
South'n Illinois 67, Wabash 60.
Defiance 87, Concordia (Ind.) 79.
Taylor 99, Indiana Tech. M. Arlxona 96, Ariz. St. (Flagstaff)
Mornlngside 79, St. Cloud (Minn.) g7,
T2. Rice 82. Abilene Christian 42.
Grinnell 73, Iowa Tchrs. 52. axes Western 87, New Mxleo
Omaha 92, Simpson 93. 52.
Hastings 84. Kansas Wesleyan 61. Arix. St. (Tempe) 92, S. Diego
Okls. Baptist 73, Drury M. St 76.
East'n IL'inoU 91, m. Wesleyan southwest Texas 97, Howard
17 Payne 60.
Whitewater M, Nortea Dlinoia FAR WEST
wniiewswr ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^
On'lo i a c Dubuque 83, Wisconsin Tech. 70. Colorado 63, Oregon State S3.
Stevens Pt (Wis.) OS, Lawrence Stanford 73, Washington 68.
II Denver 57, Regis Sf.
Hamllne 81, Wheaton 89. Seattle 68, San Jose State 48.
Loyola (Chicago) M. Rlpoo S3. Montana State 66, Wyoming 37.
Illinois Normal 108, Lewis )HI.) pacific Univ. 63, Puget Sound
MuUikm 93. N. Central Illinois 61. South'n Utah 79. Chaffey (CiL)
Carthage (0L> Midland (Neb.) I it
West'n Illinois 116, lows
yan 90.
Bradley 97, Rolltos 61.
ov.Iw /wv. v ,- suthanv (W MaeAlester 79, Cutber (Iowa) 69 Brigham Young 67,
v^"i ,} *,aBy ( Ahuebur, 76 Concordia (Minn.) Montana 70, Idaho
Eastern Wash 63, Wkitmaa 4$.
Week- Seattle Pacific 74, Ore. Education
66.
Utah SUta 69, Idaho State 56.
Brigham Young 47, UCLA 68.
liege of Idaho
M
Colorado AAM SI, Colorado State
M.
Westminister (Utah) 64, West
Mont 54.
Air Force Academy 79, Eegls
M^HaSey 107, Gtonv> (W.S.D State $2. St Thoasas (Mean
Da'vis ?' Elk. 95. Potomac State, Ma.vviue (N.D.) 91, atotttaeaa fiar.
*&;.. .jw&SFsSag.-
First of 18 illnstrsted and In
strnctlve articles written for
NBA Service ,
By BUZZ FAZIO
ABC Matters Champion
THERE Is one question I'm
asked more than any other:
"You're a little guy, Bnxs. How
do you manage to knock down so
many pin?"
The answer is the key to the
sport's tremendous popularity
everybody can bowl and enjoy It.
Muscles and sise dont' mean a
thing to bowling. Timing and co-
ordinetion do. That's why bowling
is grat fun for a teen-age date, an
afternoon housewives' gathering
or for fellows of 16 or 80.
When I won the Masters Cham-
pionship at the American Bowling j
Congress Tournament, I was
matched against some of the beat
in the nation and I believe I was
outweighed by almoat all of them.
At 3-6 and 145 pounds, I'd be no
match In many aporta agalnet 6-4
BtUy Welu, a top tenpto star from
St. Louis. A bowling ban to a
great equalizer.
If you know the simple funda-
mentals, which Ml discuss in this
series of articles, you can bowl
well enough to enjoy the game.
What mere male, for example,
could feel confident of outocering
the remarkable Marion Ladewtog,
who averagea 200-plus vear after
year It's Interesting to know that
Santa Anita Handicap, and ~
pending later developments ~
there's a possibility he'll be
named for the San Juan Capls-
trano, the grass stake at Sama
Anita which has a later closing-
So It's Just possible hall have a
two-coast campaign."
Marion and her fabulous girls'
team bowl in all-male leagues in
Grand Rapids, Mich.
But what boat my bowling?
Well, rve got a secret which
helps build up my average. It
should help most bowlers get
more stuff on the ball for better
pin action.
Ill discusa It during this series.
NEXT: Choosing a ball and hew
to held it
pxtsiJi^noj^dhe gy&
Mlottfrr
9:00 w.m.
ROULETTE
21 (BLACKJACK)
CRAP TABLE
POKER
CHUCK-A-LCK
SLOT MACHINES
BAR SERVICE
=
FISHIN'SFUN!
Order now for
Xmas Special
TED ?J^8
CASA CHACON
Panama 2-2121 across from
Hotel Internacional
Wm. Violarte Supply
Panama 3-4318

hxjbDdxf. tstadL g(a&Ajiu/A,
"I made the 10-day test


it'
111 I
6 1955


.
US, Athletic 'Goodwill Tours
m
Millonaire
On $330,000
Swindle Spot
MONTREAL. Dec 5 (UP)
Millionaire playboy Robert
Schleslnger returns voluntarily
to New York today to face
' charges of swindling three men
of $330,000.
The 37-year-old son of the
wealthy Countess Mona Bis-
marck, agreed to return with
two members of New York dis-
trict attorney Frank Hogan's
staff, to avoid the coatly proce-
dure and red tape of extradi-
tion.
4'
AN INDEPENDENT ^/UB>\^MN NEWSPAPER
fanama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
.Read story on page 10
31st YEAR
PANAMA, R. P- MONDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1955
FIVE CENT8
Stateside Living Costs For CZers?
(Contlnned from Page 1>
w
TV
Schlestnger, who was trailed
' through eight countries since
. his indictment lastyJuhe 1 on
a grand arteny charge, refus-
td to comment on the phoney
oil deal in which he alleaedly
swindled three American bust-
neismen.
. The Indictment charged that
Schleslnger sought a large part
oisthe money to pay $100.000 due
on Jewelry he had given movie
actress Linda Christian, divorc-
ed wife of Tyrone Power.
He had gotten the Jewels on
Jrredlt from Van Cleef Arpis, an
exclusive Fifth Avenue firm.
Miss Christian later returned
tW.Jewelry, and Schleslnger said
at the "time, she had been paid
Jot her 'inconvenience." but re-
fused to say how much.
Schleslnger told a reporter,
"I would rather not say" what
he was going in Montreal, how
long he had been here, or what
ha thought about the swind-
! Una charge that led to his in-
dictment in New York last
' June 1.
"I wish I could say something.
_t I'm afraid I can't." he said.
I'm going to let my lawyer talk
about the charges against me. I
eart't say a word."
f His lawyer apparently was not
with him In Canada.
Leonard Newman, New York
.assistant district attorney, said
he would accompany him back
-to New York, with a detective.
"The son of the fabulously
wealthy Countess Bismarck, who
inherited $100.000,000 when her
"third husband, Harrison Wil-
. Hams, died In 1953, was charged
with swindling a Los Angeles
automobile dealer and two re-
tired Milwaukee department
ore owners.
rtoma Makes Only Bid
For Soundproofing
Diablo School
Tf. I. Homa made an offer of
$2,994 for the tnstallt<"on of
sound proof material -on the
floors, stairways and ceilings of
the Diablo Heights Elementary
School, bids for which were op-
ened this morning In the Balboa
Heights Administration Build-
In?. Mr. Homa was the only eon-
tractor to make a bid on the
work.
The Diablo Heights School Is
Mtag used as an experiment to
fcce What can be done to reduce
>^B>Kmount of noise In several
o*her Canal Zone schools. Most
of the work Is scheduled to be
completed during the Christmas
vacation period which falls be-
tween Dec. 24 and Jan. 1.
The work will consist of the
Installation of accoustlcal mate-
rial on corridor ceilings, the in-
s'allatlon of linoleum with a felt
base on the floors, corridors and
ofher stair lands and the use of
vryl tile moulded treads on the
ir.teaior stairs.
BALBOA TIDES
TUiSDAY,
HISH
Sift ..
9.41 p.m.
MCIMMft
LOW
2:44 a
liN
These two items, be estimated,
amounted to from $7 million o
$8 million yearly. He comment-
ed that the large annual interest
expense (around $9 million last
Sear) on the government's direct
westment In the Canal was a
lever upward on tolls and down-
ward on employe benefits.
Going on to discuss other gov-
ernment agency service sup-
plied by the Canal Zone Govern-
ment, Mayer said that under
present accounting over 80 per
cent of the coat of Canal Zone
Government comes out of tolls.
In advocating the reimburse-
ment of these expenses, rather
than the plowing-back of income
tax collected on the Zone, Mayer
said the legislation he was pro-
posing sought to accomplish re-
imbursement of the Canal Com-
pany for the following items:
1) The providing of Immigra-
tion and Customs service for the
Republic of Panama.
2) The service of other Govern
ment agencies performed by the
Canal Zone Government.
3) That portion of the cost of
Canal Zone Government and Pa-
nama CanalCompany as are re-
presented by use by the Military.
4) The use of the Canal Zone
schools by children of certain ci-
tizens ofv Panama.
"With respect to the first item,
"Mayer sala," it is our under-
stsnding that the Canal Zone
Government provides some of the
Immigration and Customs service!
for the Republic of Panama.
"We do not know to what extent
that continuas at the present
tima, but if it does, the Canal
Zone Government should bo re-
imbursed by rho Republic of
Panama, by some other Govern-
ment agency, or by moan* of
s credit to the expenso of t h e
Canal Zone Government.
"Total set Immigration and
Customs expenses in 1954 were
$393,000. some portion of which
iresumably arose out of this serv-
es to the Republic of Pa-
nama.
"Reimbursement for services of
other agencies we believe requires
no further comment. We believe,
however, that "* ^e Committee
acts favorably on the legislation
the legislative record should
make it clear that it is not the
intent of the Congress that each
of the various Government agen
des who would normally provide
these various services, establish
offices here.
"We believe that for economy
reasons, ss well as for some
important policy reasons which
the Zone Government might put
forth, these functions should conti-
nue to be performed by the Ca-
nal Zone Goverment.
"In all of this srea of the leg-
islation we are seeking economy
and not added expense which In-
evitably results from the estsb-
lishment of more Governmental
units.
"The military uses many aervl-
ices of the Canal Zone Govern-
ment, including Dolice, schools,
hospitals, post office, sanitation,
ana public health; as well as Ca-
nal Zone streets and roads, which
are maintained by the Company
"We do not mean to indicate
that the Military makea no con-
tribution. Tuition revenue foe 19541
is shown aa $1 million, which pre-
sumably comes partly from mil-
itary and partly from Panama-
nians.
"iut rho GAO audrt report for
Km asmo year indicated that if
|u*t the Canal Zone Government
had collected Ira full coat from
"Wo understand that a situa-
tion is developing where ulti-
mately there may not bo room
for this classification of Pana-
manian student and that, there-
fore, this problem may solve it-
self by attrition.
"We are also informed, how-
ever, that there are varying
prossuros within our own Gov-
ernment in connection with this
subject, some of which would
tend to continue this situation.
"Therefore, in order to resolve
the question and to relieve our
various Government Departments
of the responsibility, as well as of
pressures upon them, it is suggest-
ed that it be solved by legislation
Appropriate amending language
will be submitted.
"Other language changes are
indicated in other portions of the
reimbursement section, and they
will be submitted.
Mayer then turned to the Canal
Company's business activities.
He referred to the $27,00,000
tolls recovery suit against the Ca-
nal, presently pending in Federal
court in New York, and contend-
ed while the GAO, by its own state-
ments, agreed with the legal con-
clusions of the shipping lines
which filed the suit, it did not a-
gree with the moral result, and
had suggested the law be chang-
ed so that Canal users would ab-
sorb loosses incurred in the Ca-
nal's business activities.
The bill he proposed, Mayer
went on, said that Canal activities
other than directly providing tran-
sits should be self-supporting ac-
cording to a specific formula.
This formula would require
such activities to earn overhead
maintenance, operation, depre-
ciation, interest on the invest-
ment of rho government, and a
proporcinate share of the not
cost of the Canal Zone Govern-
ment.
But this self-support formula
Panamanian citizens act employedj should not be imposed on the ssle
by the Company, or the Zone Gov- of goods and services to employes,
ernment, and, of course, not resid- he said.
ing in the Zone. "It is not general business prac-
"We understand that while they tice for American corporations o-
the military for that year, its
revenues would have boon in-
creased by $2 million.
"Wo understand the need for
close Canal Company and Zone
Government liaison with the
Military, but do not think that
it should extend to the point
of a $2 million annual subsidy.
"We understand that the Com-
pany and Government do not nec-
essarily agree with this "subsidy
conclusion, but it is a definite
conclusion of the GAO, which Is
the official accounting arm of the
Congress, snd if their conclusion
is not correct, then it would
seem that this Committee should
have an explanation to the con-
trary from the Company.
"The Bill as now drawn would
not properly cover the items men-
tioned above and new language
wil be submitted to the Commit-
tee.
"With respect, however, to the
use of Zone schools by citizens of
Panama, we would like to go on
record suggesting a change in the
Bill as it now reads. We under-
stand that there are two types of
Panamanian students ip the Zone
schools.
"The first consist of children of
Panamanian citizens who work for
the Canal Company, or the Gov-
ernment, and reside in the Zone.
The Bill as now drawn would re-
quire the Republic of Panama to
be billed for their full cost of tui-
tion.
"We do no* believe that such
would bo a reasonable adjust-
ment. The Canal operation pro-
vides schools for children of A-
merican citizens working here.
If wo provide schools for thorn,
as of course wo must, then the
samo provision should be made
for the children of Panamanian
citizens who are residing in the
Zone for the convenience of the
Com pony.
"The second group of Panama-
nian students using Zone scholols
understand to be children of
we
do make a contribution by way of
reduced tuition, these people do
not pay a rate anywhere near ev-
en that paid by the Defense De-
partment.
Military Personnel
Will Be Protected
In Foreign Courts

t
I
I
I
I
I

t
ft
i
TODAY .** U X"
| tee-------Ste. I 1
.1
SHOWS:
:M 4:19 1:47
7:24 9:92 p.m.
I
EXCITING RELEASE!
m.ieoatf.
m,/SS.
t
WASHINGTON, Dec. S (UP)
The Defense Department has
laid down strict procedures to
be followed by overseas com-
manders to protect to "the maxi-
mum extent possible" u. 8. mili-
tary personnel tried in foreign
courts, it was disclosed today.
A new directive sent to all
military commands declares It
Is Defense Department policy
that all steps be taken to assure
"fair trial and ialr treatment"
of men and women facing
charges in foreign civil courts.
The dlrectlv eofders overseas
commanders to follow closely the
course of the trials, provide free
counsel If necessary, check on
prison conditions and protest
through diplomatic channels If
they consider the trial or sen-
tences unfair.
Under so-called status of force
treaties, u. 8. servicemen over-
seas can be tried by foreign
courts for crimes committed
while they are off duty. In turn,
foreign troops stationed here art
subject to U. 8. laws.
The American Legion, together
with about a dozen congressmen,
led a drive during the last ses-
sion for legislation which would
direct the President to seek revi-
sion of the treaties or withdraw
from them The fight Is expect-
ed to be renewed In the next
session.
Leeion official* charged the
treaties deprive Amrelcans of
their constitutional rights.
Derating in foreign coutnries to
chsrge their employes with the
full cost of furnishing such goods
snd services in a foreign land.
"We, therefore, recommend that
the Bill be changed and will sub-
mit language to that end so as to
exempt the sale of goods and serv
ices to employes from the self -
supporting formula.
"At the same time, we will sub-
mit language wich would price the
sale of goods and services to em-
ployes at rates which would ac
complish for them in the Canal
Zone a cost of living equal to that
in Washington, D. C. as determln
ed by the Bureau of Labor Sta
"The Bureau of Labor Statistics
living cost standard is sn estab-
lished fact add now has wide ac-
ceptance in government and in-
dustry. It seems s fair means for
measuring living costs and cer
Uinly is considered to be the most
reliable one available.
"Referring then to the attach-
ed list of business activities,
new language which we will
submit specifically exempt com-
missaries. Service Centers, Hous-
ing snd the Tlvoll Ouest House
from the self-support formula.
"While there Is some minor de-
gree of outside use of Commissa-
ries and Service Centers, it would
appear to be so negligible as to
make the exemption valid on the
ground that these exist only for
furnishing goods and services to
employe*.
"The Tivoli Guest House differs
somewhat in that the Company
uses it to some extent for hous-
ing people Who must reside on the
Pacific side temporarily; for pi-
lots, etc. However, these are all
strictly Company expenses.
"Therefore, requiring that the
service performed for these peo-
,ple be on a self support basis
would merely result in unneces
sary bookkeeping. Here again the
outside use- u believed to be ne-
gligible.
"The balance of t h e activities,
however, are those in which* s
substantial proportion of reven u e
comes from 'outside' sources. Thst
Is, from purely com m e r c i a 1
sources, or from the military.
Mayer ended his submissions- by
references to other major portions
of the bills under discussion.
These portions would place the
Panama Canal in the Department
of Commerce, would make man-
datory a review of tolls from time
to time, would make the decision
in the tolls hearing subject to re-
view in the Federal Circuit Court
of Appeals, and, finally, would a-1
mend in a technical fashion the
formula for allocating costs of the
Canal Zone Government, between
the revenues from tolls as related
to revenues from other business
activities.


l??IJJil?AXTrh &&yW^H*r5?K 8cwlmm (center), a Kansas City attorney, and Matthew J Connelly
*S2t ??eri Whiteu Houae PPolntoient ecretary, have been Indicted by a Federal Grand
Jury in 8t. Louis on charges of conspiracy, bribery and perjury In the handling of tax cases
AFL-GO Merger Today Heals
20-year-old Punch in Nose

NEW YORK, Dec. 5 (UP) The
AFL-CIO merger scheduled for to-
day will heal a 20-year breach in
the labor movement caused by a
punch In the nose landed by John
L. Lewis.
But/none of the principals in the
dispute that split the ranks of la-
bor In 1936 will be present to shake
hands at the unity convention.
Lewis has chosen to remain out
of the new organization, and the
man he struck has died.
The labor leaders who were pres-
idents of the AFL and CIO 20 years
sgo siso are gone.
The crisis that shook the labor
movement occurred at the AFL
convention in Atlantic City in 1935.
Lewis, leader of the movement
toward organizing unions by indus-
try instead of by craft, became so
angered over a remark by William
L. Hutchinson, Carpenter's Union
president, thst he struck him In
the
Panama Canal Co.
Has (3 Vacancies;
50 In Craft Group
Sixth-three positions are pre-
sently available in the Panama
Canal service, according to the
list of vacancies contained in
the transfer vacancy bulletin is-
sued by the Personnel Bureau.
Thirteen are in the classified
and related group and 50 are In
the craft group. The polstions
may be filled by transfer of eli-
gible employes and applications
should be transmitted to the
Employment and Utilization Di-
vision.
Vacancies In the following
types of work are listed In the
classified. and related groups:
bookkeeping machine operator,
checker, clerk-stenographer, me-
chanical engineer, marine In-
spection assistant, marine traf-
fic controller trainee, and super-
visory clerical assistant.
Positions open In the craft
group Include: battery and igni-
tion electrician, steam locomo-
tive crane engineer, telephone
Inataller-maintalner. carpenter
lead foremman, scaling and
painting lead foreman, machi-
nist, air hoist onerator, lock
operator and rigger.
Sir Anthony Eden
To Visit President
At While House
The rift caused that day still has
not been healed as far as Lewis
is concerned.
Shortly after his altercation with
Hutchinson, Lewis formed the
Committee for Industrial Organi-
zation, to promote industrial u-
nions along the lines he advocat-
ed.
By the end of 1937, the-CIO had
outstripped the AFL by 3,700,000
to 3,400,0000 members. This w s s
more than double the total AFL
membership at the time of the 1995
breach.
An effort to re-unify the two
groups almost succeeded in 1937,
but Lewis torpedoed the move be-
cause he wanted more power than
had been offered him. He chang-
ed the name of his union to the
Congress of Industrial Organiza-
tions in 193t.
The AFL has a much older his-
tory. It grew from the small craft
union; established with great dif-
ficulty early in the nation's his-
tory and finally became the Amer-
ican Federation of Labor in 188*
Samuel Compera was the first
president. He wss succeeded by
William Green, who held the post
for 28 years.
On Green's death, George Mea-
ny, a former Bronx plumber, was*
named to head the AFL. He will
be the president of the new AFL-
CIO, which with 16 million mem-
bers will be the largest labor or-
ganization In the free world.
The 16 million members will
represent less than 25 per cent of
the nation's total labor force of 85
million men and women, but labor
GETTYSBURG, Pa., Dec. 5
(UP) British Prime Minister
Sir Anthony Eden will strive in
Washington Jan. ,30 for a White
House visit and conference with
President Eisenhower, it was an-
nounced today.
. Announcement of the P r e s 1-
dent's Invitation to Eden, and the
Prime Minister's acceptance, was
made simultaneously here in Lon-
don.
President Eisenhower today
started another busy week in his
work-snd-rest recUDersttve period
at his Gettysburg farm.
His work schedule Included
drafting of a cngratulatory mes-
sage to the newly-merged AFL
and CIO. The President was to
deliver his good wishes by tele-
phone to the convention of the
two unions In New York at
2:30 p.m.
He also scheduled s conference
with Nelson Rockefeller, a sneclsl
assistant on international affairs.
Tomorrow, Defense Secretary
Charles E. Wilson snd Budget
Director Rowland R. Hughes will
come to Gettysburg to continue
their discussions with Mr. Eisen-
hower on the defense budget to
be submitted to congress next
month.
On Wednesday, the President
will resume his weekly talks
with Arthus F. Burns, chairman
of his council o fEconmic advis-
ers, and Gabriel Hauge, a eme-
ber of the council and a White
H"iise administrative assistant.
The President will meet Thurs-
day with the National Security "lengthy and very cordial," a
Council and the Cabinet at Camp' Vatican offical said. No details of
David some 22 miles away. the talk were released.
Pope Phis Gets
Detailed Report
On Argentina
VATICAN CITY. Dec. 5 (UP)
Pope Pius VII today recieved his
first eye-witness account of the
overthrow of Gen. Juan D. Pe-
ron and the end of his distator-
ship from Santiago Luis Cardinal
Copello, Archbishop of Buenos
Aires.
The 75-year-old primate'of Ar-
gentina also deliyered a detailed
report to the Pontiff on the sit-
uation of the Catholic Church in
Argentina.
The audeinco was held in the
Pope's private library and waa
cordial,"
WILD BILL HICKOK
By Russ Winterbetham and Raloh Lane
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lesders hope to lncresse that fig-
ure through organizing drives.
The present status of Isbor as s
political and economic force in the
nation provides s sharp contrast
to its modest beginnings.
In 1842 only a little more than
a century ago courts regarded
unions s "illegal conspiracies.''
But by 1905, two million persons
belonged to the AFL, snd by the
end of World War I, there were
5 million members. These were
ained' through long and persistent
ittles by labor leaders.
During World Wsr I, lsbor waa
on friendly terms with the admin-
istration of Woodrow Wilson, but
It went into a tailspln during the
prosperous 1920s'.
Waht the.unions called "patern-
alism'' among Industrialists cut
into labor's rsnks, reducing mem-
bership to 3tt million.
The depression of the 1930's re-
duced membership still farther,
but then President Franklin D.
Roosevelt's "New Deal'' gave the
labor movement a shot in the srm.
Then the squabble between labor
leaders began, with Lewis spear-
heading the dissension.
After be formed the CIO, the
political force, and in 1940 he stak-
ed his job ss CIO President that
Wendell L. Willkle would defent
Roosevelt for the presidency.
Lewis lost his "bet'' and resign-
ed, turning the post over to Philip
Murray, one of his trusted lieu-
tenants in the Mine Workers Un-
ion. Thst arrangement was not to
Lewis' liking, however, and he fin-
ally quit the CIO altogether, tak-
ing; his mine workers with him.
Later he returned to the AFL,
but left again in a feud over the
Taft-Hartley Act.
The labor movement emerged,
from World War II with the high-
est wages on record and a record
14 million members.
Whst followed was the worst
strike wave In the nation's history,
with unions demanding higher and
higher wages to offset highei liv-
ing costs.
Wages hsve continued to r i a e
until now the average pay receiv-
ed by factory workers is $78.69 a
week.
Twenty years ago it was $20.13.
The average hourly wage is up
from SS cents to $1.91.
Swiss Watchmakers
Attack IK Action
On Watch Machinery
BIENNE, Switzerland, Dec. -
(UP) Maurice Vaueher, Presi-
dent of the Swiss federation of
watch manufacturers, bitterly at-
tacked the U. S. Justice Depart-
ment antitrust action on Swiss
watch machinery here last night.
"There is evidently no limit to
the stubborn Ingenuity of the
present American administra-
tion's destructive efforts to eli-
mnete the' Swiss jewelled watch
as a competitive product on the
U. S. market," he ssid in a state-
ment for the press.
"This new antitrust is more
than unfriendly, since it immeid-
atey follows the visit of a Swiss
wstch industry delegation to the
U. S. for the purpose of seeking
s basis of understanding with A-
merican watch manufacturers
and government officials.''
"Vaueher accused 'certain U. S.
groups' of showing 'cynical disre-
gard for the principles of liberal
trade' and of ignoring "the fact
that 8wltzreland buys twice a
much as it sells in the U. S."
>

Tomorrow-BELLA VISTA
Ceixtxttry Fox.
spectacularly spreads heBote
jyouthevelwt2ape and
violent age of
Sir Walter Raleigh
and.
^^n*

IMliaill) JMVOIW
^^<^*'
JAY ROBINSON HERBERT MARSHALL-DAN O'HERUHY

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