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PAGE TWELTE
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 38, IMS

Carta Vieja Will Field A Strong, Well Balanced Team/ Says Al
.
Auburn, Vanderbilt Agree
On Dec. 31 Gator Bowl Date

By DAWSON OPPENMEIMER
JACKSONVILLE, Fls., Nov. 30
(UP)Auburn and Vanderbilt
agreed yesterday to i Dec. 31
date in the Gator Bowl that
won't make them rich but will
provide balm for their disappoint-
ment over not going to bigger
-bowl*..
For Auburn it will make a
third straight trip to the Jackson-
ville festivities where the Plains-
men from Alabama dropped their
opener to Texas Tech but gained
revenge last year against Baylor.
For Vanderbilt if will be the
first excursion to a bowl a n y-
where and the climzx of a suc-
cess story that just missed being .
a real thrilltr when Ar Guepes *Jn52? "f ,MIaaith?ug,ai
Commodores succumbed to Ten- *"" l iounded "P1" J- *..
nessee in the final quarter last
members have been matched in
any bowl, Georgia Tech and
Mississippi having met in the
IMS Sugar Bowl.
The Gator bowl seats 35,612
fans small-size as the bowls go,
but if it is a sell-out this year
each team is expected to get
about $70,000 compared with the
$35.000 top in the past. The in-
crease is partly expected from
the sa.'e of television rights and
partly because the competing
schools do not have to allot as
much of their cut to the South-
eastern Conference as in the
past.
Ths will be the 11th game in
Basilio Solid
8-5 Favorite
Over DeMarco
Qualifying Rounds For Esso
Tourney To Start This Week
Saturday. Had Vandy won that
one, the Sugar Bowl was theirs.
Auburn at the same time was
>ft at the doorstep twice when
first the Sugar Bowl then t h e
Cotton Bowl passed up the
Plainsmen in favor o Georgia
Tech and Mississippi, the South-
eastern Conference champ, re-
spectively.
First, resentful reaction of Au-
The game was shifted to New
Year's Eve in 1954, with the ef-
fect of having two games that
tear.
Auburn was tied by Kentucky
and fell flat on its face before
Tulane in New Orleans, which
was believed the main reason the
Plainsmen were not palatable for
the Sugar Bowl. Otherwise they
had an all-winning season, num-
bering Georgia Tech among their
Vanderbilt lost early season
burn players and coaches was v,'m?
not to CO to ahy bowl, it was vanae..
learned, but S players thought pmes to Georg.a and Mteissippl
t over'during die, weekened and bul: had a iivewm streak going
tie senior members, led by theIwhen. >t bowed to Tennessee in
brilliant Fob James Jr., and Joe the nnaie.
Childress, decided they would ------------------
Tomorrow Is Deadline
To Buy Tickets For
Martin Club Banquet
like one more game together.
At a" vote yesterday, the au-
burn players showed they "want-
ed very badly ft) go to Jackson-
ville," said Coach Ralph Jordan,
who directed the Plainsmen to
an 8-1-1 record, and second place
In the Southeastern Conference
this season.
"The hospitality of the Gator
Bowl committee and the people
in Jacksonville makes the Au-
burn team apd coaches feel as If
they are spending the holidays at
home,-' added Athletie Director
Jeff Beard. .
The Oator Bowl was "delight-
ed" to come up with the game
between two Southeastern Confer-
ence prowers, ssid Sam But x,
chairman of the selection com-
mittee, and -is- "looking forward
to seeing one of the best bowl
names in' the country."
It to t heflrst time the 8EC
had had two teams In one bowl
ad tto<
time two of tta- for this year.
Panama Marljn Club will hold
its annual banquet at the Hotel
El Panama at 7 p.m. Friday,
Those planning to attend are
cautiosed that tickets for the af-
fair cannot be purchased that
night but must be obtained be-,
fore tomorrow. Frank Violette,
Col. Burkahart, Velma Burkhart,
Ken Middleton and Eddie Ken-
nard have tickets for sale.
In order to properly cater for
the banquet, the hotel must know
how many will be attending, for
this reason tickets must be pur-
chased by tomorrow. The custom-
ary system of reservations fol-
lowed in the past will not obtain
C****** g\6^
Opin Nifhtlv fro**
8:00 ..
ROULETTE
21 (BLACKJACK)
CRAP TABLE
POKER
CHUCK-A-LUCK
8LOT MACHINES
BAR SERVICE
ar-CMalttoaa*
BOSTON, Nor. 30 (UP).
Rugged, hard-hitting Carmen
Basilio today was a solid 8-to-S
favorite to retain his world
welterweight championship in
his defense against former
champion Tony DeMarco on
the hitter's home grounds in
the Boston Garden.
This will be Baalim's first
defense of the 147-pound
crown he lifted from DeMar-
co s head by a 12th round TKO
on June 10 of this year. That
also was DeMarco first defense
after taking the title from
Johnny Saxion.
A capacity crowd of 13,008 Is
expected to pay $198,888 to
watch what promises to be
another slugfest between these
two punchers.
The champion's record Is 47-
11-7, Including 21 knockouts
and he has never been stop-
ped. DeMarco has won 41, lost
five, drew once, including 28
KO's but hag been stopped
three times.
DeMarco, the shorter of the
two, Is 23 yers old while the
champion is 28.

.
til}
j. /. hjoUUUAon h.
SHORTS
SENIOR BACKFIELD
Providence, R. I. (NEA)
Brown graduates its entire two-
deep backfield and a total of lr
seniors.
BANDAID BOWL
Houston, Tex. (NEA) Be-
cause of the clubs' multiple in-
juries, Baylor publicist George
Wrieht labeled the Bears' finale
at Rice as the Bandaid Bowl
game.
TROYS WORKABLE 17
Los Angeles (NEA) For-
rest Twogood pared the Southern
California basketball squad to
what he calls a workable 17.
SIXTEEN Carta Vieja Yankees
breezed in by plane from Miami
yesterday afternoon. The team,
under the supervision of man-
ager Al Kubski, had been train-
ing under the Florida sun for
nearly two weeks.
THREE LADIES, Mrs. Kub-
ski, Mrs. GUford Dickens, and
Mrs. Ray Dabek, accompanied
Uie team to Panama. Mrs. Da-
bek Is the former M'as Joan
Ardelle Reed, Who was a Cris-
tobal girl before getting mar-
ried and moving to Buffalo,
N.Y., where her husband
makes his home.
THE PLANE TRIP was un-
eventful, they said, with the ex-
ception of the last hour and one-
half of the flight, when some
rough weather was encountered.
According to Kubski, the most
composed traveler throughout
was Master Oil Kubski, Alrs 13-
month-old son. Little Oil was
named after his godfather, Oil
Morland of Cristobal, who Is the
dominant behind the scenes
figure of the Yankees' front of-
fice.
FOR THE TIME being, at least,
the group is housed at the Ho-
tel Colombia, on Fourth Street
near the Presidencia.
In a quiet neighborhood, the
hotel is far away from the en-
ticing sounds and stimulating
beverages of the city's night
clubs and beer gardens.
Special arrangements have
been made for the party to have
meals at the Union Club which
Is Just a stone's throw from the
hostelry.
first crisis developed ear-
ly last night, when the visitors
Strike the
right note




The food host strikes the right
note by serving Bead: 4 White"; it
is the drink most appscqued by his
guests. Every drop of this famous
whisky is distilled end bottled in

. .
DUtilled and Bottled in Scotland
BIACK'WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKY
.Jt-'Usln
*
sisrrft-a
SAHBS SUCHASAM a CO. 1TS>.. SIAISSW, SCOTLAWt
D1STR1BUTOBS
AGENCIAS W. H. DOEL, S. A.
CENTRAL AVE. 8-28 Tl 2-2771
FUERZA Y LUZ CRUMPLES
STEMPEL INSURANCEMEN IN
MAJOR KEGLING LEAGUE,
WELCH HITS 81
The "Ready Kilowatts" (bet-
ter known In Sapnlsh " *;
Listo Kllovoltio") from the Fuer-
za y Luz, ^ho previously had
won only 9 points In 9 weeks,
rmashV tne^Max X Stem*}
and Son Insurancemenfor four
points last Tuesday night as To-
ny Luttenberger.wlth a big 2
., coupled with a 193
^dlM. bowled a MB 6M while
Pllachowski added to the fuel
with a big 221 150 and a 196 to
score S67 to bring in the bacon
with Welch as anchor with 225.
182 and 224 for 631, hieh for the
fenlng. Stechens andI Thomas,
members of the team for i
"em and usually the high scor-
rn had to be satisfied with
Smttt and 581, respectively
The Stempel-erj bowled games
of 9 and 922 the first two
amis which would have won
R but two of all the firs two
games bowled but the addltlon-
1 load of Luttenberg and Pila
chowskl was too ""eh and the
Stempeleers capitulated weakly
in the third game. Bill Coffey
Sored a fine 613 for the inaur-
ailcernen. followed by Bob Boy-
CTOn adjacent alleys, the Sum-
mit Hills Golf Club swung, back
from the previous weeks down-
fall to score a four-point victo-
ry over the Agenda Olud team
as Dewey Anderson scored a fat
620 with games of 201. 180 and
239. followed by Bill Jamison
with 573 and Jacober with 569
McOarvey led for Olud with 66L
The win put the Qolf Club back
into second place.
The Seymour Agency insur
nee boys staved on top of the
heap In the Major League, how-
ever, with a three point win over
the Tahiti Jewelers as all men
except one scored over 550 for a
nice 2771 three-game total, for
Tahiti, Lane scored a fine '572,
followed by Hermann with 554.
In the final match, the Colon-
ial insurancemen went into
third place with a three-point
vlctorv over the HI- Homa Co.
tllesettlera Olelchman led for
Colonlnl with 541. Bud Balcer
with 58D was unable to win but
th first rime.
Scores for the play:
Max R. Stemael and Sea
WUber .
Fef er .
Borer .
Wtnoulst
Coffey .
173
181
210
188
203
183
170
174
180
235
152
ITS
170
158
175
508
524
5M
484
613
935 922 826 2683
Fueras y Los
Stephens . 171 212
Thomas ,? 193 104
Luttenberger 198 188
Pllachowski 221 150
Welch .... 225 182
180
St
198
224
573
681
624
567
631
(The 2978 series by
Luz also smashed th
series record thus far
1956 season held by
with 2930).
Fuer y
e 3-game
in the
Stempei
Klumpp
Oranata
Pue . .
Woodcock
McOarvey
Agenda Glud
. 147 158
. 144
165
187
179
191
175
186
204
124
170
.176
180
178
429
505
516
533
561
822 914 808 2544
Summit Hills Golf Club
Jamison
Bowen .
Anderson
Kunkel .
Jacober .
160
174
201
176
200
223
186
180
203
185
190
201
239
169
184
573
641
620
548
569
911 957 983 2851
Schirmer
Burgls .
Bedsaul .
Zeletes .'.
Olelchman
Colonial Insurance
167
145
139
160
187
170
173
165
177
183
193
182
201
190
171
330
500
495
527
541
798 858 937 2593
H. I. Homa Co.
Lyons .... 176 165 159 500
Almeda 158 157 187 482
Nelson ... 167 168 179 514
Lowande . 178 148 176 602
Balcer ... 199 199 182 680
878 837 863 2678
Bates
Kaelin .
Hammer
Rogers .
Colbert .
Seymour Agency
. 156 189 187
194
214
158
206
176
204
204
148
188
148
199
200
532
558
566
561
554
928 921 922 2771
Tahiti Jewelers
Hermann . 300 178 178 654
Snellbaker 187 158 188 511
Albritton 175 194 178 542
Lane ... f. 183 224 185 372
Larrabee 182 176 188 841
927 928 867 2720
The standings of
League teams:
the Major
Team
Seymour Aeeney
Summit Hills
Colonial Ins.
Tahiti Jewelry
stempei and Pon
H. I. Horn* Co.
Agenda Olud
Fuerxa v Lus
W-LPtn
W L Ave Ave
29 11 .721 908
23 17 517 903
17 57* 900
23 17 575 9"0
18 22 .4*0 89
16 24 *O0 87S
15 25 .375 .847
13 27 .325 877
The ten high average bowleis
after 10 weeks of the 28-week
jueon:
Mase Gatsws
1003 926 1049 2978
Coffey ..
Jacober ..
Balen
Schirmer ..
McOarvey
Ce'rert .
7letea
* re
Olelchman
K*eUn ..
SO
80
30
SO
21
JW
30
F*.
SO
SO
Ave.
204+23
195+ 8
195+ 8
ltt+15
187+ 9
1W+14
1^ + 18
got back from the dub where
they had supper.
A frantic Mrs. Kubski made
a disconcerting disc every:
There was no suitable bed for
Master Gil.
Seems that Al had asked that
a special child's bed be furnish-
ed for his "energetic" heir. Mas-
ter Oil is a very lively boy and
if adequate barriers are not
placed around his bed to keep
him in, the tireless young man
is prone to leap, or tumble out,
much to the consternation of
his young mother.
A bed was provided for th*
youngster, which by no means
met the approval of Mrs. Kub-
ski. When this scrivener left th
hotel last night, the problem was
as yet unsolved, but ft Is believer'
that Kubski, ingenious man
that he is. probably found a way
to keep the mischievous Oil in
bed through the night.
REMEMBER Clem (8cooter>
Koshorek, the pint-sized short'
stop who played In the Canal
Zone League before coming to
the Panama Trn Teague with the
Carta Vleia club?
.Well, the Scooter Is running
a team In Venezuela's Occi-
dental League at present.
Clem's club, Esnadon, is not
doing so well. They are run-
ning a far last in the loop,
and with one team, Gavilanes,
threatening to ran away and
hide from the opposition, the
circuit seems to be fold ng, be-
cause of poor attendance.
Olpp Dickens had been work-
ing for Clem, but because of fi-
nancial difficulties, he and other
high salaried players have been
released from the team.
On h(s way home Olpp stop-
ped in Miami and contacted
Kubski about coming to Pana-
ma. By-this time Al was in a
spot for an outfielder because
Bob Rles announced he would
not accompany the club to Pan-
ama' when his mother fell ill.
Kubski grabbed at the oppor-
tunity of signing up Olpp. And
that's the story of how Dickens
Is In Panama today.
....... -.;, ...
1JNUSUAL PITCH Mike
_rrci keeps his pitching eye
harp and arm in shape operat-
ng a sewing machine. It's part
>f the work involved in operat-
ng. the Indian pitcher's dry
leaning shop in Cleveland.
Sports Shorts
COLUMBUS, O.(UP)-The
Havana Sugar Kings of the In-
ternational League will operate
under a now curfew law next
season in which night games
can continue until 12:50 a.m.
local time.
That Is the same curfew rule
which Is in effect in all of the
other league cities But .because
of a local'ordinance which hao
been m effect previously at Ha-
vana, games there ended at
midnight local time regardless
of whether they had been com-
pleted. ______
HEJDELBERQ, Germany
The U.S. Army announced to-
day It will build eight golf
courses in France and Germa-
ny at a ost of 8420.000. But It
said none of the money win
come out of the taxpayers' pock-
ets
Five of the courses will be
built in Prance and three in
Germany
An Army spokesman said fi-
nancing of the courses will be
don* "entirely" from non-ap-
propriated funds
The Esso Tournament qualify-
ing rounds started this week.
The tournament will be play-
ed at the Panama Oolf course
and all members are Invited to
participate. Play will be in two
flights. Members with handi-
caps of 10 or less will play in the
first flight and members with
handicaps of 11 through 24 will
play In the second flight. Handi-
caps as of Dec. 1 will be used
throughout the tournament and
maximum handicap allowed will
be 24. Full handicap will be used
in medal play qualifying round
and seven-eighths of the differ-
ence In handicap will be used in
match play rounds.
The qualifying rounds of 18
holes medal play may be plaved
between Nov. 29 through Dec. 4.
both dates inclusive. Match play
rounds will start on Dec. 4. Dur-
ing the qualifying rounds play
may be in two. three or four ball
matches. U.8.G.A. rules as modi-
fled by local rules will govern all
plays. All cards must be dated,
attested and marked "Esso Qual-
ifying Round."
The 32 players having lowest
net'scores will qualify In each
flight. Ties for last .position will
be decided by Tournament Com-
mittee by draw.
Match play rounds will be
played as follows w 11 h all
matches to be completed on or
before the date shown. Official
starting time, 'unless mutually
changed, will be 9 am on the
date shown. Matches will be
played ahead of time, but under
no circumstances will they be
scheduled for later date than
hown. AM matches will he 18
hoi rounds except the finals
which will be 36 hojea.
' First round on or before Dec.
11, second round on or before
Dec. 18. third round, an or before
Dec. 25. fourth round on or be-
fore Jan. 1..Finals on or before
fan. 8.
The 18 olayers In each flight
who are defeated in first rrmnd
match will be nelred in two "De-
feated 18" fllehts and will con-
tinue play on the following
schedule;:
first round on or before De-
cember 18.
Second round on or before
December 25.
Third round on or before
January 1.
Flnau on or before Janua-
ry S.
Matches finishing' all even
will continue play as per sched-
ule fc tie. as posted on the Bul-
letin Bdard.
Prizes of 10 beautiful sterling
silver are to be dlsplftved at the
Club and will be awarded to'the
fo'lowtns: winners:
Low net medalist in each
flight.
Winner In each flight. .
Pnnner-up in each flight.
Winner in each "Defeated 16"
fli'ht.
Rtir>Dr-up in each "Defeated
16" flifht.
The Esso Standard Oil voices
the hone tht ever-v rolfer. mem-
ber of the Club, wll' enter th's
tournament snd at least trv to
nuallfv for one nf the fUsrhta.
Everyone has a chance of win-
nine one of the beauMfu and
valuable s'lver crises which ro
to be dlsn's* very soon at the
Panama Oolf Club.
tevertoen Ttors
Cam Grid Utters
seventeen football pi ayers
earned letters at CHB- aftes the
close of a most successful sea-
son. Having the smallest team
In football history, thev made
up for their shortcomings in
team spirit, cooperation and
fight. Only-two points separated
them from a tie with the mighty
Bulldogs ss the two games that
ended in 6-6 ties with JC and
Balboa meant the difference.
- Many of the mainstay will be
missing from the 1956 roster as
seven stsrtln seniors grtduate
but Ooaehes Palumbo and Mo-
ser are hopeful that as the
voungsters move up they will
take charge next year as this
group did in 1955.
The seniors leaving are Louis
Taber, Captain and tackle lead-
ing the fghtlng Tigers. Kaiser
Basan, the hrdest chareing
hack in Canal Zone history,
Char'es Fears. all-Cani Zone
guard who never knew the word
ouit; Luke Palumbo. 8H-C1
Zone center who made his Dad
oroud to have him on his team:
Ricardo Lorences, alV-Canal
Zone p-uard: Allen Roblnette,
nd, who m'wed one rsire due
to an lnlured leg and wt handi-
capped but played excellent: bH:
Flovd McDermitt, 160 lb. tackle
who in the last two game* show-
ed what he could do when he
set his heart to It These boys
will be surelv missed next sea-
son but m a rood tbrn end we wish them luck wherever
the* (jo.
The other Tiger lettermen are
Juniors: Barry Davlson. center:
Milton Orover, tackle; David
Hawthorne, back. Bill Rankin.
back; Iamolne Werlein. back
ind end: Ray Croft, back. P-oph-
rmres: John Forrest, end; Wen-
dy Sasso back, jack willoughby,
guard; Bill Gibson, end.
THERE FOR KICEOFF
Dsyton, O (NEA) Co-
r*4.'7; --re'psUf profits mide ty the cotain and end Jimmv Kateev-
iF3+4lArmy's post exchange system in age started every Dayton '
ffi+UlsErope. baB game for three yeara
foot-
Locally Unbeaten Manager
Expects Tough, 3-Cornered
Battle Throughout Season
' 0 '
By J. T. HARRISON, JR.
'The Yankees will field a strong;, well balanced
team this season, but I expect a tough, three-corner-
ed battle all the way because, on paper at least, the
opposition appears greatly improved."
Those were the words of manager Al Kubski of
the Carta Vieja Yankees as he sat in the lobby of
the Hotel Colombia last night after the team had
returned from supper at the nearby Union Club.
The Yankees flew In from Mi-
ami yesterday at 2:30 p.m., Kub-
ski, looking hale and hearty and
with his usual affability, added:
"Last year Spur Cola's main
problem was pitching. Clarfce
(Vlbert) had a bad year. So-
cha (George) was a complete
disappointment. The balk of
the hurling duties was canted
by little Stanley Arthurs, who
did an excellent Job, but eer-
ta'nly couldn't carry the load
alone.
"This time the situation seems
to be different," went on Kub-
ski. "Clarke, who always has
great potential, is back With the
Spurs. Then there's Bob Trice, a
real solid moundsman; Jim Tu-
gerson had a fine season with
Dallas; the boy from San Diego,
Bill Thomason, is a right good
flinger; and Arthurs can alwvrs
be counted on for effective re-
lief work."
Kubski also believes the Ches-
terfield squad will be a hard nut
to crack and spoke particularly
o an improved Humberto Rob-
inson and a more experienced
Tommy Hughes on the hill for
the Smokers.
"That Robby certainly gaye
as a rough time last year."
said Kubski, "and he seems to
be getting better all the time "
The Yankee skipper also said
that he felt that Hughes could
develop lno one "helluva" of a
pitcher one day. "That kid can
certainly burn them across."
Kubski is undecided as to who
he will start against the Smok-
ers In the opener tomorrow
night at the Olympic stadium.
' He said he would "very much"
like to use Bill Harris, who was
the Smokers' nemesis last year,
but added he would leave the
decision up to Harris himself.
"I will ask Bill hew he feels
National Distillers
Sponsor Ringer
Al Summit Hills
The National Distillers are
sponsoring a ringer at the Sum-
mit Hills Oolf dub. This tour-
nament Is known as the "Royal
Mounted Whiskey Ringer," and
will continue through January
14.
A total of 18 bottles of Royal
Mounted will be awarded as
prizes. In addition a bottle will
be given each week to the low-
est gross and net scores. This is
a handicap affair with the
handicaps of Jan. 1, 1958, being
used to determine the net scores.
Low scores for the first week
of play are as follows:
lBtTted
Leo Eberenx ............ 76
Ben Williams ...........76
Snd Tied
R. Larrabee ........... 81
H. Tettenburn .......... 81
3rd
H. Colbert .............. 82
Ben Williams took home the
first two bottles for the low
gross and low net prizes of the
week.
AL KUBSKI
Thursday morning, "taM the
CV pilot, "and if he says he's
okay, Hi f-re him the assign-
ment."
If Harris does not go, Kubski
will use either Ed Monahan, a
locally-signed serviceman who
Is the property of the Kansas,
City Athletics, or Cookie stem-
pel, who lives in Panama.
Monahan has been playing
regularly in Canal Zone service
games and Stempei has report-
edly been going through stren-
uous workouts.
Kubski would not commit
himself in-furnishing the press
a final lineup but agreed that
the following team could take
the field tomorrow night. V
Tony Bartirome, lb
Billy Shanti, 2b
Corky Glamp ft
Spider Wllhelm, m
Orpp Diekens, If
Johnny Kropf, cf
Eddie Fhlllips, rf
Bay Dabek, e
BiU Harris, p
Game time tomorrow night,
weather permitting, n 7:80.
Jerry Waring Has
Inside Track On GM
Job For Macon Club
COLUMBUS, Ohio, Nov. 30
(UP> Jerry Waring, who was
Eeneral manger at Elmira, N.Y.,
> the Eastern League, was re-
ported tonight to be in line for
the general managership of the
Macon, Ga dub of the Bally
League.
Fresco Thompson, vice pres-
ident of the Brooklyn Dodgers
and in charge of their farm oper-
stlons. said no general manager
or field manager for the Macos
club would be announced "until
next week."
"ITl only say that both of them
will come from within our orga-
nization,'' Thompson added.
However, it was learned that
Waring, who stands high with the
parent Dodger officials, had the
inside track for the general man-
agership while Pete Reiser, for-
mer centerifelder for the Dodg-
er*, was the lesding candidate as
field manager.
It was pointed out that Waring
would only be shifting clubs, and
not league classifications for Ma-
con. like Elmira, is a member,
a Class A minor league team:
The Dodgers dropped their El-
mira franchise two weeks ago
and added Macon. Maeon ha* a
working agreement with the Chi-
cago Cubs In 1955.
SHOWING AT YOUR SERVICE CENTER
THEATERS TONIGHT!
BALBOA 6:15 7:55
AlK-TONOITIOHt
DIABLO HTS. 6:15 7:58
MaurMD OHARA
Macdonald CAREY
"FDXE OVER AFRICA"
Tiran, "calasutt jawx-
OAMBOA 7:8*.
"Man from Bitter Ridge"
rrL tpw a t t"
MARGARITA 6:1* 7:8
TELL 2455. DEATH ROW*
TfcMt. "8tfJ < Thr
6:15 8:25
It
CRISTOBAL
a u
Glenn rOKD
Ktaanor PARKS*
Interrupted Melody"
Supancop* Color
Ato ShurlM imJMDAY! I.
BOCA 7:1
"FINGER MAN"
AMP BIERD 6:18 8:1
"CARMEN JOV
gy


t
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 31, 155
f*
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
' PAOK TROTEEN
little League Is Far Off Base When Off Volimear B$
Five Challenge West Virginia
In Southern Conference Race
Thirl of alae college basket-
ball roundups written by fa boms
coaches far NEA Service
By FRED SCHAUS,
West Virginia Coach
MORGANTOWN, W. V. -
(NEA) As defending Southern
Conference champion, West V i r-
ginia could not fed shakier about
the coining season has the Moun-
taineers finished In the cellar last
time out.
George Washington and Rich-
mond have real power basketball.
Darrell Floyd, probably the best
ahot in the college ranks, automa-
tically makes Furman as tough
as can be found.
Bill Reinhart at George Wash-
ington has lost Corky Devlin, but
Joe HouP *. eon* back. He is
conference's top All-America pros-
pect.
With a scorer of bis caliber we
naturally pin a lot of our offense
to us, too. We're hoping either
Lloyd Sharrer, -9, or Paul Wat-
ting, 6-? fill the bill for some
needed height.
It would be a mistake to over-
Marshall. 6-5: Barry Storick, 6-3,
Barclay Smith, 6-5; and Don Flora
6-2,'have had solid seasoning. In-
experience hurt last season, when
Washington and Lee was fourth.
The Generals could surprise.
a fine scorn and combined with
Joe Petcavlch, 6-5, can create a
strong underneath problem for
any defense.
Richmond was third in the con-
ference last season, behind West
Virginia and George Washington.
This year, Les Hooker sends out
a veteran! team of twin figure
scorers. Walt Lysaght and Ken
Daniel, both W; Bob Witt, -2;
and Ed Harrison, 5-10, return and
they bit from all over.
West VlrgwT^as Rod Hund-
ley geared for what I feel wUl
be his finest season. Hot Rod,
as he is known, has all the shots.
5? immg^^l'^nes F.r-a-'a Ployd help. hi. club
with itand I feel e ha. it now. run up telephone number scores
"- every time. out. In the past, de-
fensive shortcomings hav hurt,
most of them stemming from lack
of height. Bill Hanks, 6-8, and
Bob Thomas, the -7 center, are
their only players with ite. But
on a hot night, Floyd can turn
any game around.
William and Mary ha. four
seviee returnees and could cre-
ate troble. Dick Savage, M; Bob
Hovtama, -3: Pul Furlong. -2;
and Jim Kaplan, 6-1, form a good
club which could use more
height.
Davidson, with Hobby Cobb,
Virginia Military, Virginia Tech
and The Citadel complete our
conference and although not
ranked highly In pre-season poll,
I've yet to see a team consistent-
ly breeze past them.
By RARRV GRAYSQN
LITTLE LEAGUE Baseball
started in 1939 with a few boys
from 2 to 12 running the base. In
Williamsport. Pa.
It has become a nightmarish
affair costing socle to 2300,000 an-
nually to administer. There are
30 on the national headquarters'
payroll alone and some of them
are not on speaking terms.
For a large corporation, this
would be fine, save for the fact
ni turan> pin a iub ux our uucuk wuuiu uc ihic, save jui wic mi
on him. Willie Bergines, 6-6, and I that big business would pot stand
Clyde Kishbeugh, 6-1, mean a lot for dissension. For an organl-
ation promoting the suranwr
activities Of futzy-based young-
sters, the present Little League
situation is an atrocity.
For this reason, Carl E. Stot,
win founded Little League be-
took Washington and Lee. Lee cause his pint-sized nephew, had
You would have to rate him the
. Ballot. I.r the 1* annual Coach of the Tear **
IM k the New York World-Telegrami and Sun and the
Si- .o. saars area 2
^^7w^^ sar sum
hpen extended the Invitation to weigh the relative nans i
SS dWtoffin of th08e who wW*"^**-
merit:. Influence on players, generalship, and organizing ami
W There Is no regulation barring: 11 winner g^WgL
the list PoseT StrlkinR ant-pathy among the voters to naming a coach
^PtS'wSSSS So' stand out again, ^with.the *o^rof
precdint.M5htaK election not toJJ^^gLffJSS.
Sanders. UC'-A. 1954- Jim T*tum, Maryland 1953, ChsrlejCM*
well Princeton, 1950: Bud Wilkinson, Oklahoma, m*. Bennic
osterbain Michigan; 1948, and Red Blalk, Army, IMS. .
Reni wuttiebut among the coachingfraternity has ^ey-
ed ud the chance, of quite a few fresh contenders, one of whom
UHh (Duffy) Dauffterty of Michigan State, which goe. Into
^H& 3 fora seW time with UCLA onJaaJ-
Althougn Duffy s Spartan, were beaten by MldfU.,-7.
in the second game of the season hi. record-a" M*eawre
head coach was phenomenal. L..t year, when Dangherty ane-
ceedea Biggie Munn, whose assistant he had been for eight years
Michigan State won only 3 and lost .
i Among other qualities, Duffy posses.e a kn sense of hu-
mor. Addressing ar. alumni gathering recent y.he, uM. The
1954 team was mine. It lost much more often than it won. Thl.
1955 eleven, beaten only once, undoubtedly Is your..
| Ohio State, undeieated in six Western Conference games
'with a smatnlcg 17-0 finale against Michigan, but outswred by
Stanford and Duke, believe, it has a food chance to repeat m
the coaches' ooll with Woody Ijayes. The Buckeye won in 1944
W%CEddle SSSSS of Navy make. It five out of.* over Red
Blalk at Philadelphia on Saturday, the onetime St_Maryt end
will move into the contention despite th 31-7 defeat of the
Midshipmen by Notre Dame. # g
TERRY BRENNAN IN RUNNING
Terry Brennan. second-yea: pilot of the PlShting W*-*
another fotnldable entry. Teiry's charges toe; to Michigan
SUte 21-7, but If thev overcome USC at Los Angeles there may
be a powerful .wing toward the popular Terry.
Off Co'umbla's 1 and 8 recoid. the veteran Lou Little, never
a Coach of .he Year winner, certainly doe. not.qualify on the
basis of hi. team's achievements. But Columbia men feel that
Loudefinite.y Is a standout In the five other points listed
Does the winner have to be from a major university? De-
finitely NO. Amos Alonzo 8tagg was elected In 1943 when he
was at the College of the Pacific, and Lafayette provided the-
1937 choice 'n Hooks Mylin. ...,j. n.
Unbeaten candidates from the minor company ,"ud* D*n
Jes.ee, Trinity of Hartford; Ara Parseghlan, of Ohtes Miami, and
Bill Hick., of Juniata. Hick., who came to J>niata to:INS, ha
wen M straight. The little team from Huntingdin, Pa., repre- tlvjt players hve been seeklne
NEXT: Adolph Ens took
the Southeast Ceafereaee.
Enthusiasm Grows
For Atlantic Side
Softball League
Ry TREVOR SIMONS
E,er since the announcement jf hV. M*. Uagu. pb
no pi.ee to play, wound up In a
wrangle with Little League Base-
ball, Inc., which put the kids'
.ports on the news wires in an
unsavory light. Thing, are com-
pletely out of hand with the de-
posed commissioner suing an or-
ganization conducting the play of
children for $300,000 for breach
of contract.
Little League get off base when
it went off a voluntary basis.
Stotz required money as Little
League, fashioned after his orig-
inal, spread across the country.
A rubber company came to the
rescue and with the neces.ary
monev came Little League Bae-
ball, Inc., and a board of directors
compoed largely of imposing
names. .
Stotz was ulckly pushed Into
the background, although the pay
regained good$14,000 a year
plus $7,500 expense.. The rub-
ber company installed Peter J.
McGovern, one-time Pennsyl-
vania oarsman, a. chairman of
the board and president.
The Canadian-American League
of professional baseball having
folded, director Thomas H. Rich-
ardson installed its president, Al-
bert E. Houghton, as secretary-
treasurer of LLB, Inc., at $10,000
a year, plus $3,0000000 for present
as organizational setup. Tommy
Richard.on, long-time president
of the Eastern League, wa. tak-
ing care of an old pal. Mickey
McConnell came from the Brook-
lyn farm system at close to $10,-
000 per and expenses, etc.
Basically, Stot beef Is that the
volunteer field personnel no long-
two week, avo that the dormant
Atlantic Softball League woulo
be revived, interest and enthu-
siasm has been on a continuous
swing until now it seems that,
everv able-bodied man on the
cy decisions.
He called a meeting of approx-
imately 100 field director, in
Pittsburgh, Dec. 40-11. when he
expect, to win an Important de-
cision.
Stotz wisely wants to return
Robinson Doesn't Believe!
Olson Has Changed Much)
By HARRY GRAY80N
LAKE, N.
HIS BOY___Le*ter Patrick congratulates Coach Phil Wauon nf
the Ranger, on Madnon Square Garden ice, Patrick. 71. served as
the New York hockey club s head man for 23 years. WaUon broke
in as a National Leaguer-under the retired veteran in 1935
OUT OF DOORS with
tossum
PINE TROUT STREAM
IN MONTANA
By Al. McCLANE
Fishing Editor
The Madison River, in Monta-
na, is one of the finest trout
streams I have ever fished. Be-
low Hebgen Dam, the Madison is
a large, turbulent river. Round,
glassy-smooth boulders coupled
with the fast current make wad-
ing difficult, for neither felt soles
nor hobnail, hold well on the
smooth rocks.
About July 12, when irrigation
water is needed in the valleys, ad-
ditional water i. released from
Hebgen Dam. The heavy flow con-
tinues into September, except for
GREENWOOD LAKE, N. Y-
(NE.M Off his performance a
gainst Tiger Jones, Ray Robinson
did not belong in he ring.
Off his effort against Rocky
Castellan!, Sugar Ray Robinson
did not belong in the same battle
pit with the Bobo Olson who came
to Yankee Stadium to be knocked
out by Archie Moore.
But off the form Robinson is
showing at Greenwood Lake, the
notion is that the Harlem land-
lord now not only belongs la the
same enclosure with Olson at the
Chicago Stadium, Dec. 9, but he
also i. the best-looking 3-1 under-
dog we've Men since the last big
upset in the beak-busting business.
That is, Robinson i. a good
longshot against the post-Moore
Olson, who, in addition to hi.
marital difficulties, was anything
but a ball of Are against Jimmy
Martine and Joey Giambra.
In both of the latter fights, Ol-
son was considerably heavier
than 160 pounds, which be must
make in defense of the middle,
weight championship. Robinson
has no such problem.
Robinson points out that he Is
boxing well for the first time
since financial short, in his busi-
ness enterprises froced him to
come back 14 month, ago after
having been song and dance
man for two year, and .even
month..
Against Jone., Castell.nl and
those guys, I had to club fight,''
explain, the 35-year-old who not
a few considered the finest fight-
er of his inches. "I must have
looked something awful, but
of July, before water is released r r\."
for irrigation. With the d.m"^"1 do nytblng else. I had
closed, the river is not hard to r0,.*?*
wade.
Dry flies work far better
him open up, so I coaM utw ham
1 ^^srsjfs^A'S''
wet files in the lower Madison.
The big fish He in water .bout
three feet deep, moving about
thre* miles an hour.
Btcause of the boulder, that
iave the bed of the river, the sur-
ace is rough and flecked with
foam In order to keep your dry
fly under observation you need
something that will float high,
and light enough in color to be
easily .ten.
Pattern does not matter much
than day *nd donl 1hor- Mv le|"
running easier. I get up on
toes in the ring and move, -snj
just starting to find a. much of
mvself as there is left."
Robinson is making three spar-
ring partnersJoe and Lee Wil-
liams and Ricco Kingcome to
him. as he expects Olson to do.
He picked off and sidestepped
punche., countered with damag-
ing flurrie..
the last five _
ped cut and dM M.
"I deal befwv
much.''
RoMaaea'. only
going 13 roada
Sugar Ray that
must carry the
let him rest
Sugar Ray at
old Hablas.
was asked if he
He
If Roblase. 1. right physically,,anything wateaomg

_ seem
those accustomed to s m a 1 le r,
more placid streams. The techy
nique mightU> described as wet
fly fishing with a dry .Jff, be
him the first time
tm auaaa vlipi
....... - lnaa mutiniu*. ... ..>~w .-----Tea. oy WUrKUl* aiUIlg t l u a c ' ! ,,.h.....6 ...... -., .-,,
of the old ,tny g withdrawing its sole up-! shore, using wet flies except when .cause all you do is keep casting
ue, thl re- port 0f the program effective Dec. g.n happen to be surface-feeding, until a fish takes the fly with no
ie will fea- 3it DUt will continue co-sponsor- jne inning rod .ngler i. well particular regard to delicacy or
the old - hiD. Peter McGovern says LLB ,0UlDDed to reach deep water accuracy of cast.
Atlantic Softball League
erouplng of the leatru*
ture the young and the old a-.ahip. Peter McGovern says
like. The lid Is nlmot tightlv mc.f could be operated very >, spot C\0M w the bank.
shut on the "wind-mill" pitch modetly" on franchise money a
nut me ... ju ,1
with further b*n* on sneedoau
pltchine likely to be put into ef-
fect before the league gets un-
derway in January.
lone
There are $.77 f r a n c i a e d
leagues in the United States and
15 foreign countries. Every state
is represented with 250.00 lads
The purpose of this ruling Is participating.
.Un, m mavtmnm rmtrt nf The onlv thl
to allow a maximum eroun of
nlayers In all ace clashes to par-
ticipate. Also seeking entrv Into
the league will be the .Timers
Club from colon which will be
led by an old-time baseball and
softboll favorite, Lloyd Alberga.
Enthus'awn has own to such
an extent that several prosoec-
Late fall fishing is good in the
lower Madison, although the best
time of the year is the last week
or .0 in June and the first part
water accuracy of cast.
But just one three-pound rain-
bow in water like this will keep
you alert for hours after the fish
is landed.
(Distributed by NEA Service)
seatbtf aienraUment of . hasn't tost a f-tbafl game ,lnce
the 13 finale with Lebanon Valley, 13-1.
AIM to i.f reckoned with In this competition are Bobby Dodd.
of Georgia Tech; Abe Martin, TCU, and Johnny Mlchelosen, who
this year shifted from the pro. to Pittsburgh -
If, as appears almost certain. Howard Cassady. Ohio State
back, lands the Heisman Trophy and Hayei. hto coach, get!1 the
Scrlpps-Howard award, the Les HOrvath-Wlddoes triumph of
1M4InVll1939 mPEddiedAnderson and Nilea Klnnlck of Iowa took
the double, and In 1946 it was achieved by Blalk and Glenn
Meanwhile, the votes for the Coach of the Year are coming
In. and not matter who wins, 1955 will produce a fine, represen-
tative addition to the gallant and brilliant list.
to become enrolled nn one of the
tepi^. All who desire to n!ay
and have not yet been contact-
ed by a team manager are nreed
to ptend nr*t Mondav nlcht's.
The only thing of Importance I
that Little League basebaU be
continued. .
H tbey keep it mainly on a gra-1
tuitous basis, there will be .on
fighting about jobs.
And the bulk of the program on
a local level.
" STILL AROUND "
Mlnneapoll. (NBA) Vern
Mikkelien 1 the only remaining
member of the Minneapolis Lak-
ers' one-unbeatable basketball
to pHenri nxt Mondav nieht's."8 .u,,_ r.irc> Mikan
*** t the Marearit. gym- ?*%Z re/ed' M
**-*- v."., V l*iv UBIlDl^a ..'III
nasinm. Everyone will he olaced
on a team and if there p* too
many "xtras" *n additional
team will be admitted Into the
le**ue.
Monday night's nretln-
the Mart-arlta erm will hecin at
T otlocl-. All interested parti*
" '"fri to ttnd and suhir.lt
their proposals towards making
the 1955 Atlantic Softball League
a success. '
.All opinions and suggestions
t will be welcome Inasmuch as-thc
Army Closes Books On Season
Made Glorious By Upset Win
o --
By JOHN GRIPPIN
Overjoyed Army closed the
Looks today on a 1955 college
football season made Bjorlotu
for the Cadets by their Inspired
upset victory over Navy, but
there will be still another chap-
ter for bowl-bound Georgia
Tech and Mississippi.
triumphant by
ence title. It will be the fifth
straight bowl apearance In as
many years for the Engineers,
and they'll be looking for their
fifth straight victory.
Texas Tech got the Sun
Bowl berth along with the
Border Conference champ on-
''ilp when Arizona State of
Tempe, which had been lead-
ing the league, lost to Arkona.
7-6.
The Cadete, ---------
14-6 over Navy In Saturdays
will oe welcome ajannwii <- dramatic gridiron classic at
loop intends to impose certain, phlladeiphla .returned to the
rules and restrictions not speci- military Academy at West Point. Soy them California didn't get
ticclly contained In the rule vesterd.v for a tumultuous ce.- any bowl bid, but it gained
h atJonT ""' ",h*n mii*~i
book.
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
New Orleans Servic
Arrive
Cristobal
Great White Fleet
S.S. "TELDE"....................................J**- ]
S.S. *AQUK" ...................................."? *
8.S. TMARNA" .................... ..............* ,
S.S. "MORAEAN" ....................,...........JJ* }>
S.S. "SIXAOLA" ..................................S" i!
S.S. -AGGERSBORG" ............................Su" 2
SA -YAOUE" ..............................t.: 1 a5
*&. -MOBAZAN" ...........................a. 1.1W
MiuidUna Refrigerated Chilled and Gral Cargo
New York Service
S.S. "PARISMINA"
SS. -OTTA" .....
8.8. BERI.'.NGA" .
8-S. "LTMON" .....
S.S. -ESPARTA" .
8 . "JUNIOR" ..
...............
Arrives
Cri-t-bal
.......lHe.
..... Dee. 11
.......Dee.
.......Dee. W
.......Doe. tt
Jan. I, ltM
Weeklv ailines of twelve aassenKer shiw to New
York. New Orleans. 10* An'des. San Francisco
and Seattle.
Special round trip fares from Cristobal to New
York. Los Anjreles, San Francisco and Seattle.
To New York.....................$2*0.00
To Los Angele and San Francisco ... .$270.00
To Seattle .......................$J#*.00
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121
PANAMA 2-2904
Parity Granger and Anthony Quinn two hoods in
violent gangster story...
THE NAKED STREET*
Release tomorrow at the "CENTRAL" Theatre!
I
?>.
..../ay vtmun. as a raeaeieer wn'o makes and ******
a pank gangster, give a performance f l'***!*****
cafikre in the exciting drama. "THE NAKED STREET.'
Ovina, a Brooklyn* atoboter with big-shot connections,
learns that his sister, played by Anne Bancroft, la In love
with a punk gangster, played by Parley Granger, who U |
slated to go tothe ehair. By hriMag and strong-arming wit-
lny *m Km IDC CIUH1. ay ilinaf ~mm-w 1 m .-
ease into lying or disappearing. Qadna gets Granger ac
SuRtcd for lack of evidence at a new trial. Then when
ranger lams out to be ungratef!. surly and cansina Mau
Bancroft (new his wife) a great deal of nbappiness, Quinn
display, aa esaal ameaat of diligence In framing hint back
into the hot seat. It Is a story rife with drama, sosense
and excitement a gangster pletars wRh an off-beat
script and seam very stack on-bent haraetertsaUen
the to one of which la the aforementioned Anthony
Qntnn'a Peter Grares Is fine as a crusading newspaper i-
porter who falla in tore with Man. Bancroft Advt.
Georgia Tech quickly accept-
ed a bid to the Sugar Bowl and
_ .. *_ l_. ...n*.J m Wa>.'tn 111
sweet revenge when It walloocd
Notre Deme. 42-20. at Los An-
ecies as Jon Arnett scored
three touchdowns. Two T.D.
Xfoumci
Scotch
CELLULOSE
TAPE
n> nnw.J^ei Swm n1
Mlssissipl accepted a berth In Passes by Jim contratto broke
the Cotton Bowl after each|the game open In the closing
wound up Its regular season
with an impressive victory on
Saturday. That completed the
following lineup for the major
bowls on Jan. 2:
Rose Bowl at Pasadena.
Calif UCLA vs. Michigan
SUte.
Orante Bowl at Miami. Fla.
Oklahoma vs. Maryland.
Sugar Bowl at New Orleans
Georgia Terh v.. Pittsburgh.
Cotton Bowl at Dalla*. Tex.
Texas Christian vs. Misss-
aiopT.
The Gator Bowl at Jsckson-
vllle, Pla.. was scheduled to hold
a meeting today at which the
two teems would be selected It
was believed that three South-
eastern Conference teams wore
the ones from which the choice!
would be madeAuburn, Ten-
nes/ec, and Vanderbllt.
The Sun Bowl at El Paso Tex.. I
filled one berth with Texas
I Tech. but did not expect to an-
inounce the other for "several
days."
Mlssissilp clinched its :-.rond
straight Southeastern Conier-
ence championship with a 28-0
l rout of Mississippi State as Earl
Blair scored two touchdown.'!,
f-nnd finished with a 9-1 record.
Texas Christian, which already I
1 had clinched the other Cotton '
Bowl berth, made It a battV of
champions by taking the South-
west Conference crown with a 1
30-13 victory over Southern
Methodist in which Jim 8w:nk
scored two touchdowns, also fin-
ishing with a 9-1 mark.
Oeortla Tech landed the Sug-
ar Bowl berth by ripping Geor-
gia. 21-3. although misslriK out
on the Southeastern Confer- .',
minutes.
Oklshoms. the Nstlon's No. 1
team, completed s perfect sea-
son with the expected 53-0 vic-
tory over Oklahoma A. and M.
Nine different Sooner, .cored In
the team*. 29th straight victory
belling Up Nights
If yju uTer from UatUns Up
Kla*ta. Backache, L*t Pain, Ixwa
f Vigour. N*rvouan*M or waali-
> you ahould help your Proal!
Gland ImmOSIataly with ROOKNA.
Vhii aroadar madlrlaa main
j u fl ftiifir. troaaar ad
Ia wlffcnatlaUrrupiUn CM
ROOKS'A fn.m yur rh.mlt tMUf.
ti^.rtinfl nuiami.
MM packagaa rtU Tase.
A auk kit enalto tab.
Distributors: CIA. ATLAS. 8. A.
Scotch" brand colored Upas are printed In
with aser'. aaaaa and .ihtlistlssi. by Oi
Atlas S. A, Til.phnoe S-SaSS,
P. O. Boa 1067
mybodij, AsadL CtaifM
If you want Bourbon at Ks best cal ftr
GREEN RIVER/' Americas biiiH
whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas aad ban
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS
,


PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Panama American
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/00938
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:00938
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text

.
to RIO
THE MARVELOUS
CARIOCA CAPITAL!
It's
INTERNATIONAL AIRWAY
AN WDEHKDEMT 4p^f *
Vwivm Amontan
"Let tfu people hume the truth and the country U eafe" Abraham Lincoln.
ScacivamsV.O.
CANADIAN WHISKY
lift TEAR
PANAMA. B. P., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER SS, IMS
FIYE CENTS
Eisenhower Warns
Chiang Kai-shek
WASHINGTON, Nov. 30 (UP) President Eisenhower
hat warned Nation*!'** China that its position in tho United
Nations will be shaken badly if it uet its voto to block
tha admission of Outsr Mongolia, administration sources
said today.
They said the warning was ona of several points Mr.
Eisenhower made in two special messages ha sent recently
to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek.
The United States is under-
stood to be willing to let Outer
Mongolia Into the united Na-
tions in return for Russia's
agreement to permit the entry
of 17 other nations, most of
which are members of the free
world bloc
Nationalist China has,serrad
notice, however, that it would
use its Security Council veto,
if necessary, to block Outer
Mongolia's admission. It holds
this would be a step toward
the admission of Red China
which it does not recognise.
The US. warning to National-
ist China has been sounded not
only by President Eisenhower but
by other high administration of-
ficials in talks with China's am-
bassador hefe and with Chinese
officials at the U.N. in New York.
Chiang Is said to have turned
down Mr. Eisenhower's first ap-
peal. This message was dispatch-
ed through US. diplomatic chan-
nels to Formosa within the last
two weeks. Chiang has not re-
plied to the second Elsenhower
message which was dispatched
last weekend.
Retorts fresa Tals*i indicate
this appeal also will be turned
down. But Mr. Eisenhower and
his advisers are said to be still
hopeful that Chiang vilTcasas
around.
Mr. Eisenhower, State Depart-
m Caribbean Command
ment and the American delega-
tion to the UN. are said to have
made these arguments to Na-
tionalist China:
L Nationalist China's U.N. Se-
curity Council seat could be Jeo-
pardized very quickly because
general world opinion supports
Outer Mongolia's admission so
that 17 other nations can get
Into the world organization.
3. The United States basically
opposes use of the veto to block
the admission of U.N. members.
S. It is vitally important to
break the deadlock on new mem-
bers.'
4. The United States does not
like the Idea of letting Outer
Mongolia in but the disadvan-
tages of keeping It out would far
outwelght the problems of let-
ting it in.
Meanwhile in London, the For-
eign Office said today Britain is
for letting Outer Mongolia Into
the United Nations if it would
break the current membership
deadlock. ,
An fflclal spokesman said
Britain was ready "to acanita ec
hi tha admission of all It ait.
standing applicant to the
United Nations oven if the
qualification of some of them
arc open to doubt"
'Among tha latter-is Outer
Mongolia," the spokesman said.
"We would, however, even be
prepared to acquiesce In the ad-
misison of Outer Mongolia.
"On the other hand If there
were general support for the ad-
For Colombia
A ten-men Caribbean Com-
mand disaster survey team left
tua morning for flood-stricken
Colombia from All'rook AFB In
an Air Force C-47. More than
40,000 persons are reported to
have bean made homeless by
floods in the stricken lower Mag-
dalena Valley.
The Colombian government
requested UJS. assistance from
the Caribbean Command through
the US. Embassies In Colombia
and Panam to assist in-fighting
the country's worst flood in for-
ty years.
The survey team will deter-
mine what aid is required and
which can.be furnished imme-
diately by the American Red
Cross and by the U.8. Armed
Forces in the Canal Zone. The
C-47 will land at Barranqullla,
where arrangements will be
made with Colombian and US.
Embassy officials to survey the
flooded area.
Beading the team is L. J.
Mayer, director of operations, A-
merican Red Cross, Caribbean.
The military leader is Col. W. R.
Seymour, Fort Amador.
Other team members are: air
operations officer Lt. Col. T.
W. Keefe, Caribbean Air Com-
mand; supply officer Capt V.
C. Moon, Fort Amador; medical
officer Capt M. O. Patton.
Fort Clayton: communications
officer First Lt R. A. Keck,
Jr.. Signal Carps, Post of Coro-
sal: and four enlisted men
M/Sgt. D. L. Orubbs, Fort Ama-
dor; and Sic W. L Paulson, So-2
Jean B. Bucfaer and 8p-3 Willy
. Austin, Signal Corps, Coroaal.
The Albrook craw of the C-47
Includes Capt. M. A. Oakes. pi-
lot: Cgnt E. J. Bwald, co-pilot:
8/Sgt. E. Boucher, engineer and
A3/e L. M. Parsons, radio op-
erator.
a
Eden Nibbles At H-Test Truce
Congressmen
Gather For
PC Hearing
Four members of the Congres-
sional committee to hold hear-
ings here next week on Panama
Canal affairs will arrive aboard
the Panama liner Ancon tomor-
row afternoon. Two others of
the committee are arriving
Thursday by plane and another
tt already on the Isthmus.
The Ancon is not scheduled to
arrive In Cristobal until about
3:30 o'clock, some hours later
than Its normal schedule.
The group will be met at ship-
side by Oov. John 8. Seybold
and the entire party will be
brought to the Pacific side by
Panama Railroad motor ear.
The group aboard the Anean,
which includes the counsel and
chief clerk of the House Mer-
chant Marine and Fisheries
Committee, is beaded by Rep.
Edward A. Garmatz (D-Md.i.
chairman of the Panama Canal
subcommittee which will hold
the hearings starting Monday at
Balboa Heights.
Others arriving by ship are
Ben, T. James Tumulty (D-NJ),
Rep. William K. Van Pelt (R-
Wls.). and James A. Byrne Pa.), Bernard Zincke. counsel:
and Mrs. Frances Still, chief
clerk. All of the Congressmen
are accompanied by their wives.
Arriving by plane tomorrow
are Rep. John J. Allen (R-Cal.).
and Francis B Dorn (R-NY).
Rep. William 8. Mailliard (R-
LA PRENSA
RETURNED
TO OWNERS
BUENOS AIRES. Nov. 30 (UP)
The provisional government
of Argentina restored "La Pren-
sa" to its legitimate owners by a
decree Issued today.
Another decree annulled the
32,700,000 fine levied by the
ousted regime of Juan D. Peron
against the world famous news-
paper for alleged violations of
custom duties on newsprints.
La Prensa, implacable foe of
Peronlsm. was seised by the de-
posed dictator In 1951 and turn-
ed over to the General Confed-
eration of Labor (COT).
Seizure of the newspaper, the
most influential in Latin Amer-
ica, touched off worldwide pro-
tests.
With the fall of Peron came
appeals for,the return of La
Prensa to its fcrmer owners.
Monday, provisional President
Pedro E. Aramburu announced
that his government would cor-
rect the "outrage" perpetrated
by Peron "against this great
newspaper.*
'56 License Plates
Will Go On Sale
In Zone Tomorrow
Stomoed To Death
AWQOLA. La.. Nov. 10 Orp,
The Angolite. orison weekly, ssm
May a rattlesnake bit cork-
kfged Marion Benton on his
game leg at the prison farm
and the snake died.
spokesman told news
men at the regular foreign ofT
fice news conference.
"We should agree to any solu-
tion to break the deadlock and
which would secure and admis-
sion of such nations as Ceylon,
a feliow member of the Com-
monwealth, which we regard as
especially qualified."
AFGE Distributes
Ballots To Elect
1956 Officers
Bsllots for the election of of-
ficers of the American Federation
of Government Employes, Lodge
14, for ltM are being distributed
to union members.
The election committee his rul-
ed that completed ballots must be
received by 10 a.m. on Dec. 1
in order to be counted.
Candidates for the various posts
were nominated at the regular
netting of the lodge held Nov. U."
New officers will be installed oa
Dee. 21.
R. M. Lovelady and Walter
Wagner vie for the position of
president while Hersehel G a n dy
an i Robert Blaney are candidates
for first vice-president.
Harry C. Egold and C. J. Ge-
nis ware proposed for second
vice-president and third vice-pres-
ident, respectively while A. C.
Nagy is candidate for the post of
secretary treasurer. Sgt.-at-arms
candidate is Mahlon Davit and
Robert D. Kelly was nominated for
guide.
The following were named as
candidates for trustees, out of
which seven will be chosen:
H. D. Raymond, G. L. KoonU,
Ben Chisholm, Jack DaG r u m-
mond, B. J. Hackett. Jr., Otto
Helmerkhs. Harry Pearl, Eddie
Coyle, D. Keigley Leo Krzin,
Walter Allen, R. H. Hicks, K. R.
Booth. Jsmes Hatcher,. Curtis
snn.
Pa.). Granaban Moot ffmember
of the Merchant Marine and
Fisheries Committee and he and
his wife plan to return to the
States on the same ship.
Most of the members of the
Panama Canal subcommittee
plan to spend about ten days on
the Isthmus.
The formal hearings, the first
sstonal hearings held in
ares
Canal Zone in several years, nal Zone vehicle license plate a-
" cross the counter at the License
Section, applicants must present
their current registration cards
and pay a fee of $5. As in the
past, owners of motorcycles, mo-
tor bikes, and motor' scooters
should remit $2. >
Coate and Tneodore JaTeG
~L-----~T~
are scheduled to begin Monday
and to continue for at least two
days. .
In addition to the hearings,
members of the subcommittee
have planned to inspect various
Canal facilities and installations
during their present visit to ga-
ther first-hand Information m
connection with pending legis-
lation relating to the Panama
Canal Company and Canal Zone
Government.
Bad Weather Forces
Down Jingle-Engine
Plane From Paitilla
An American pUot missing In
a flight from Panam to Esme-
raldas. Ecuador was reported
safe when he was spotted this
morning in Jaqu where his
single-engine Lustombe had been
forced down due to bad weather.
Two Albrook SA-lse went out
to search for the -America, Jo-
seph J. Seelock, whose plane left
Marcos Oelabert airport Mon-
day headed for Esmeraldas, With
one stop scheduled at Buenaven-
tura.
The air search was ordered
when he did not arrive at his
destination. Seelock's small
plane was located by one of the
ha-18s this morning.
At tha same time license plates
will be mailed out through the
Canal Zone Post Office to those
applicants who sent In their ap-
plications through the mail. Li-
cense plates may be attached to
automobiles as soon as they sre
received.
In order to obtain a 1956 Ca-
Applications by mail must be
accompanied by the current reg-
istration card and a check or
money order payable to the
Treasurer of the Panama canal
Company. The envelope should
be securely sealed and the re-
turn address enclosed.
In order to avoid delay in ob-
taining the new registration, car
owners, who have completed
payments on cars since obtain-
ing; their 1955 registration should
bring a Hen clearance into the
License Section Office together
with their applications.
Canal Zone residents also have
been reminded that in order to
avoid the renewal rush period,
applications should be mailed or
brought to the License Section
Office ss soon as possible.
Warden Service
Meeting Tomorrow
The Civil Defense Warden
Service meeting for Balboa will
be held tomorrow at 9 a.m. at
the UBO-JWB. Balboa.
W. O. Dotan, cheif of Civil
The sec- Defense will discuss "blast ef-
USCA To Hear
DHweg Report
At Diablo Sunday
A report on the status of the
Canal Zone income tax case and
a review of enacted and pend-
ing; legislation by La Vern R.
Dflwog. legal representative cf
the US. Citizens' Association
will be given members on Sun-
day.
The general m m b e rshlp
meeting of the USCA will begin
at 3 p.m. at the Diablo Servir
Center. Admission will be by
membership card.
For the convenience of these
not yet members, it was an-
nounced that cards ceaM be
purchased at the deer.
In addition to conducting reg-
ular business, the primary pur-
pose of this meeting i8 to give
members the opportunity of
meeting Dllweg, who arrives to-
morrow from Washington.
important Rema ef business
to be discussed includes a re-
view of enacted and pending
legislatlen; repeal an the stat-
us of the income tax ease, and
the progress ef past efforts to-
ward accomplish'ng he alma
ef the association.
Officials of the USCA express
a particular desire that all those
who have Joined the association
this year for the first time at-
tend this meeting to see their
organization in action and to
learn of the work lt la doing.
#:
With Christmas only 21 shop-
ping days away, the question of
tax-discount liquor for Csnal
Zone clubs and individuals is
still enmeshed in red-tape or
governmental, dickering or both.
The three-month, seven-
day eld issue seems stymied a-
ronnd two questions:
(1) Who will be entitled indi-
vidually to purchase the tax-
free spirits?
(2) When will President Ri-
cardo Arlas* executive order of
Nov. 15 be published in the Pan-
ama's Official Gazette, thus
making it effective so that 11-
ouor-dealers can at once give
the discount to clubs on the
Zone?
Whether the matter win be
discussed at this afternoon's
meeting of Panama's Foreign
Relations council is uncertain.
There are predictions It will be.
When President Arias an-
nounced the order to the local
press many readers at first
thought Panama and the United
States had agreed on regulations
to implement the article in the
recent treaty revision which
says that liquor soM In Panama
shall be su
-d!
The meeting will be conduct-- for consumption
ed in the usual manner,
elected member* of the
of .directors have a voice
'72 MMM
sWene order of nus'ncss,
SW mlHmatMtiim be
participate.
All delegates and alternates
elected to the board of directors
Ln r* 19M wU1 constitute the
board for this meeting and are
expected to attend.
For the convenience of the At-
lantic area members, there will'
be another, similar, general
membership meeting held at
Margarita Service center Thurs-
day. Dec. 8 at 7:30 p.m. Alfdel-
egates and members of the At-
lantic side are urged to attend
both meetings.
in the Canal
ct to a 75 per
Declares Britain
Ready To Discuss
Idea, But Hedges
LONDON, Nov. 30 (UP) Prime Minister Sir An-
thony Eden said today Britain is "ready to discuss" ces-
sation of hydrogen bomb explosions with the United States
and Russia.
But certain conditions would have to be met, Eden
said. He indicated one of these might be consideration for
the fact that Britain has not yet tested her H-bomb.
The United States and Russia already have made H
bomb explosion tests.
At any rate, Eden said, the Soviet government has
not yet communicated with Britain about any such agree-
ment to ban test blasts as a Moscow radio commentator
spoke of yesterday.
/
Ex-Chiva Driver
Gels 18 Months
For Cable Theft
For stealing a piece of Army
cable wire which he ''figured
wssn t any good," a husky Pana-
manian, Tirul Hanes was sentenc-
ed to spend 18 months i the pen-
itetury by Judge, Guthrie F.
Crowe.
Haynes' probation was revoked
ss a result of an earlier convic-
tion of petit larceny'in the Bal-
boa Magistrate's Court.
The defendant, who was a chi-
va driver some time sgo enjoy-
ed what court circles termed a
"spectacular' career with regard
to the amount and type of traf-
fic violations be committed
Haynes record also shews
petit larceny coirnctions.
Lsst year he was placed on an
le-meatb sentence wmb wss sus-
pended for a period of three
years. The theft of the Army ca-
ble caused the Judge to revoke
Hayndf probation.
11 U. S. District Court the de-
fendant pleaded that the cable he
Jil
tSjSasal
States authi. _
Panama Canai authorities re-
iterate, under anestlen I n g,
that they are studying the de-
cree. A United States Embas-
sy spokesman said the matter
rematas fa the same status
(Continued en Page 6, Cat. 4)
Wheat-Laden Ship
Docks Af Balboa
With Stem Upended
The Moscow Radie announce-
ment suggested thst Russia was
prepared to agree with the unit-
ed States and Britain to cease
H-bomb test blasts.
Labor party leader Clement
Attlee asked Eden In the House
of Commons for a government
statement on this announce-
ment.
In reply, Eden said:
stole was "already broken," bat
ond rescue plane, piloted by feet of nuclear weapons." Also it wss learned that the cable
Capt. Carlos L. Pox, landed the motion picture "Self Pre- w-s still fastened to Army com-
nearby to offer any assistance I scrvation in an Atomic Attack"! municatlons line snd in use
the missing pilot might need, iwlll be shown. it was cut off by the defendant.
About one-third of its cargo,
or 3000 tons of wheat will prob-
ably spoil aboard the Charlton
Pride, an English ship which
was towed in by the tugs Taboga
and Oatun yesterday.
The ship docked at Pier 14 in
Balboa with her bow submerged
45 feet in the water.
Payne and Wardlaw, agents
for the 499-foot vessel, said to-
day one-third of the wheat
would probably be lost because
of contact with water. A Pana-
ma Canal Co. diver waa sched-
uled to investigate the condition
of the bottom of the vessel.
The ship arrived at the Bal-
boa anchorage late last night
her bow 46 feet in water and
her propeller and rudder high
and dry. She is believed to have
struck an underwater object
while nearing the Canal en-
trance.
Marine officials immediately
nine i boarded the ship. The problem
was to raise the vessel's bow in-
asmuch as the depth of the wa-
ter at the dockslde In Balboa at
low tide Is 40 feet.
The forward part of the shio,
including holds No. 1 and 2,
/here some of the wheat is
stored, was flooded. .Ship's
Dumoe were in operation to keep
her from sinking further.
The Charlton Pride Is en
route to Rotterdam from Van-
couver and lists a cargo of 9300
tons of wheat.
* government have natftid
communication on this subject
from the Soviet government.
"The announcement to which
Mr. Attlee refers was made by a
commentator on the Moscow ra-
dio. Its terms and scope are far
from clear and might have ap-
peared in better light if It had
been made before the recent So-
viet explosion of which Mr.
Khrushchev has spoken in such
enthusiastic terms.
"Her Majesty's government are
ready to discuss these matters at
any time, but I must make it
clear that in such discussions re-
gard will have to be paid to the
number and nature of the tests
which each country has already
made, a> well at to the number
and nature of the tests propos-
ed."
This statement by Eden ap-
peared to be an important'stak-
ingout of the British bargaining
position should any negotiations
start to ban test blasts.
He appeared to be hinting that
Britain would not want to be
penalized by such a cessation,
and the fact is that Britain Is
the only one of the hydrogen big
three without at least one H-
bomb test blast on record.
The British are believed plan-
ning to loose an H-bomb explo-
sion next year.
Attlee had earlier asked the
government In a statement pub-
lished today to accept Russia's
offers to stop hydrogen bomb
test if Britain and the United
States stop too.
"Some time ago I pressed the
government as a first step to
seek agreement with the UJS.A.
and UB.S.R. to cease experi-
mental explosiona of the H-
bombs," Attlee said in the Labor
Party organ, The Dally Herald,
i "I hope, therefore, that our
Rovernment will meet this pro-
posal of the U.8.8.R. and seek
agreement with the USA. for
the total cessation of experi-
mental explosiona"
Secretary of State John
Foster Dulles yesterday turned
a acid ahealderat least for
Farmers Roll Out Bright New Tractor For Ike
GETTYSBURG, Pa., Nov. 30 Association members la
(UP) Farmers from three
'sutes figures eat today what to
' ^!The;tolW*^.^etry-w
tractor for President Eisenhower.
It wasn't as V the president and newspapermen,
really needed a tractor, although! The equipment was the latest
ihe no doubt ca fiad a oaa far in a continuing flow of gifts re-
Sake did not.die from the pite.
aras stomped to death.
Indiana, sign. rt Joint Chiefs af Staff
Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Spruce trees and flowering "This Is just a regular
Officials of the three groups quince line the President's half- lng of the Security Council,
were oa hand for the presentation mile-long drivewaygifts, resoec- erty told newsmen, "and
as were representativee of the tively, of the 48 state Republican I President wanted to attend."
manufacturers, 'photogra p b e r S, chairmen and members of the President Elsenhower, who
President's cabinet kept on his farm by 90
There have been many other temperatures, orgiaslly had
'It. Four tractors alseady are la
operation on the approximately
SOS acres Mr. Eisenhower owes
or controls.
None of them, however, actual-
ly belongs to the President.
1 Like most of the equipment in
one en his tracts, they are own-
ed by Brig. Gen Arthus S.
vina, who supervises the
iJsW sft
"The "newest
sen hewer
gift of Farm
W VWH-
celved by the President snd Mrs.
Eiieahnwir since they bought
their farm home here in Itso.
Th ftp* include a growing
herd of Aberdeen Angus cattle
and a couple ef milk cows. Also
the motorized Surrey with a
fringe oa top" in which the Preav
idept likes to tour his rolling a-
eres.
hold his second budget conference
meet- with the President tomorrow
Hsg- mornisg.
the Hagerty called it a "continuing
discussion" ef pre Mam involved
in preparing the annual budget
degree message to Congress ia January.
I plan-, The administration hopes to ba-
to ned to skip the council meeting, anee the current budget and clear
It will mark the second time the wsy far tax cuts In the ISM
posbibly the President has met with h ie.presidential election year
:s light top military aad foreign advisers Wilson snd Bedford w* cosier
pis mind at bis Cetectia Mountain retrest with President Eisenhower Fri-
th attend since he arrivmd here from Dea- day. The conference win mark a
a meeting of the National sscur- v> for s rest-end-work recupera- renewal of regalar aopoiutments
3i Coaneil at nearby Tmtrmoot, t;o* from his heart attack. Wiisen aad Bedford beep with
d., tomorrow Officials who attended the pre- the President.
Press secretary James C. Hag- vious meeting; last week were Hagerty asid Wilson will Join in
nowoa a Russian offer te
stop testing A-bombs and it-
bombs if other atomic
will follow suit.
Dulles told a news conference
in Washington that many
months of study by the United
States had failed to produce an
effective method for bannine;
nuclear tests and protecting the
Interests of the free world.
Other American officials aud
stronger language privately >*_'
They termed the Soviet CB-W
a propaganda gesture designed
to counteract Adverse world re-
action to Russia's recent explo-
sion of Its most powerful 1f-
bomb yet.
The Atomic Energy Commis-
sion said yesterday the current
Soviet tests "have resulted in
widespread radioactive fallout."
Bat it said falleat detected
in this country has been far
below the level which would
endanger human beings, crops
or animals.
Fallout from the Russian testa
previously had been reported
v/idely in Europe and Japan. A
Japanese scientists said yester-
day in Tokyo that atmospheric
shock waves showed the bomb
was exploded In the Gobi Desert
of Outer Mongolia on Nov. S3.
Russia's offer to discontinue
nuclear tests, which waa uneatU
cial at this point, was cont
in an English language br
cast beamed to North Ame
Radio Moscow and picked
London.
Asserting that Russia
discontinue its atomic wea
program as long as the
States and Britain make
test such weapons, the
cast suggested a halt to all A^
bomb and H-bomb teats "ae oner
of the first moves to disarm, f
"We are ready to do so right
here and now if the other pew
possessing such weapons agree t
the same," it added.
Dalles, who had read news
service accounts of the Sovtft ~
offer before going te his news
conference, said the ejaeatiO
la whether any baa en atomic
tests would be effective and tal
the interests ef the United
SUtes and its allies.
He then noted that many
months of study had gone Into
the problem without finding any
safe formula.
He also said such a ban would
Involve many highly-technical
problems.
Dulles did not close the door
on the possibility of some future
ban on nuclear tests, however,
saying only that the United
States so far has not come te
any positive conclusions on the
feasibility of such action.
Ban On Aborte-
lifted In Russia
LONDON, Nov. SO tUP Rue.
gifts, most of them
farm Hie.
Prescient
ached use.
keyed
i
erty. who stressed that no "emer- flown m by Air bree heBcopter
Somebody gsve him a flag poie.fency" waa involved, also said.Hagerty believed feme of them bet
with golden eagjf on top. It is the President will resume regular would use the airlift again te- Hul
mounted near tt formal garden
-Iso s g*/> suapart the
U. i. flag ss# Ptessdcattal en-
meetings with Defense Secreury morrow.
Charlee E. Wilson and Ada. Ar- Hagerty also said Budget
ttmr W. Bedford, chairman of the rector lowland B. Hughes
sly-anaeunced
the President
next Tuesday te discuss
the defense budget.
Di-! The President had planned ot
will pap in a brief stint of paper
work at bis downtown Gettysburg
office yesterday, but the sub-frees.
lag weather changed his mind.
Instead, President Eisenhower
had Col. Andrew J. Goodpaster of
the White House Secretarial staff
and his own private secretary|Sto ^ j*gii,ecl abortion, M#
drop by the farm with some rou-'cow rmi,, reported toda
tine papers and to take some die K quoted the government
ft*"11' ,_, newspaper Isvestia as saljttj
The President then redeisgnsted that a decree adopted by i
Ross Rixley as chairman tnd Jo- praesidium of the laBsBsfmnna1
sepa P. Ads mi aa vice chairman preme Soviet on Nov. SSreX^H
cf the Civil Aeronautics Beard the prohibition of abortlon.
for one-year terms expiring Doc. I Isvestia said that the '^TlgS
SI. ISM "points out that the me^^H
President Elsenhower, in his carried out by alte Soviet S*J
brief business session, aim read for the encouragement of ms]
without comment newspaper ac- erhood and the welfare ef^^tt
counts of remarks by Repblicas dren together with the conatagj*
national chairman Leonard W. imorovement in the ate
Hall that be is more ture than women, now makes It poesfll
ever that the President will run to drop the legal prohibition g
for n auction. j abortion.


"PAGE
TWO
THI PANAMA AMERICAN AN INPEPENDTNT DAILY NEWSPAPER
"~ WEDNESDAY, NOVEMflEB St, JM5
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
r-NSf >d 'uauaHto thb Panama ambmkan h. inc.
rMHDi> bt NkXaWN NOUNSSVSU. ID
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THE MAIL BOX
I CREDE, ADLAI, IKE, ETC.
m
See In the Mail Box where our local political seer Mr. Crede
Calhoun, has been making noises faintly JeminJ*e"i fri;
Democratic lackass, but his braying doesn't have that fine ring-
ing tone which carries conviction.
Mr. Calhoun shops around In the past and comes up with
lf Landon. to make a point! Why not compare your elegant
Adlal" to Mr Eisenhorer, Crede? Now there's a comparison that
ur loyal Democrats avoid like the plague, and for obvious rea-
sons. You dont convince many people when you compare a
handful of pebbles to the Rocky Mountains.
Shortly after Mr. Elsenhower moved Into Washington with
f>DT and soap and water, and removed the stench left by an
Immediate predecessor, we heard the Jackass bray that the coun-
try was indeed headed straight for a depression. We 1, that
Moved to be Just what It sounded likethe braying of a Jackass.
Our country is now In an eri of greater prosperity than ever,
frith more employment, higher income and lower taxes than
the Democrats ever produced at any time the nation wasn t
engaged in a war, "police action*- or emergency of sorts.
Better give up, Mr. Calhoun. Adlal's own wife couldnt stand
turn, and she probably knew him a lot better than your -2*1,000,000
Iheep, who dutiullv voted for him last time. In fact she prob-
ably knew him even a little better than you do!
Mahout
By VICTOR RIESEL
When Pierre Mendes-Fradce
was Premier of France and spent
much of his time surrendering a
part of the world to the Commu-
nist armies, he needed little pub-
licity. The front page was his.
Now, he Is coming to America
again, merely as a prominent
French politician. And hU public
ity is not quite as guaranteed as
It was. So It is being handled by
the man who also ran a committee
In behalf of two Soviet spies who
died in the hot chair in Sing Sing.
Mendes-France's publicity man
is Joseph Bralnin, the charming
fellow who headed the National
Committee to secure justice in
the Rosenberg case. This band
did terrific harm to American
prestige abroad, especially in lor-
elgn labor circles which they
wnipped up against us across the
world.
Bralnin is a close friend of
Albert Kahn, one of the men
who handled the professional liar
for hire, Harvey Matusow. And
Mendes-France may. yet be pre-
mier of his country again ...
J '
"Let's Put It in His Glove~-For. Luck"

ir:
Xdlal Stevenson, candidate for the Democratic nomination
for President of the United State,.la not such a big egghead as
the Republicans claim. In a recent oreas conference he admitted
that theer were some things he didn't know. -.'-.
He even questioned some -of the slogans turned out by the
best brains of the advertising profession. Slogans like "A big-
ger bang for a buck"-that.will go blnglng and banging down
through the corridors of time.^
When asked where he stood generally as a so-called middle-
-the-road'' Democrat, Stevenson replied:
"I don't know that I can be very helpful to you. I have
led to make my views clear from time to time on a number of
ngs for a number of years. I am not one of those who be-
es that vou cap characterize a philosophy on public Issues by
pans,
"I have never been sure what progressive conservatism
means, or was It conservative progresslvism? I have forgotten.
And I am not sure what dynamic moderation or moderate dy-
namism means, I am not even sure what it means when one
lays that he is a conservative in fiscal affairs and a liberal In
human affaire
"I assume what it means is that you will strongly recommend
jht building of a great many schools to accommodate our needs,
fut not provide the money."
Such a woeful lack of understanding of some of the out-
standing political pronouncements of the century does not befit
I man who seeks the highest office in his country's government,
f r doe* It?

Crede Calhoun

.
The cold war is hitting a high
note in one of the many duels
which keep breaking out on the
propaganda front.
In this set-to the weapons are
musicians. We're using the jazz
maestros abroad and the Russians
are digging us with the long-hairs
and mighty good ones they are.
Recently, the soviets sent over the
great pianist, Emit Gllete, and the
violinist who did us so much cul-
tural damage in Japan last sum-
mer, David Olstrakh.
Not willing Just to have these
mea play, the Russians tried to
male a little extra propaganda
profit on the visits. They sent
Uile'.s up to the Musicians Union,
Local 802 In New York and had
him pay dues and initiation fees
and sign papers.
Then the pro-Russian propa-
anda madhne began needling
FL president George Meany. The
Chicago Bulletin of the Council of
Soviet-American Friendship was
snide. It said the other day that
It hopes that Mr. Meany takes
this membership "in the spirit of
peaceful co-existence and not as
a plot to infiltrate the AFL.''
...eany has been refusing to send
labor delegations to Moscow and
this was an obvious dig. But what
the friends of the Soviets are not
telling the country is that the AFL
wants no avowed Communists,
even if they are pianists. When
Al Manuti, president of the Musi-
cians Federation, Local 802, dis-
covered what had happened, he
returned the Russian's dues moen.
ey, and tore up the membership
card.
There is no AFL-unlted front
with citizens of a nation which
regiments culture.
One Washington
Merry-Go-Round
_______T DMW PIARSON
i
WASHINGTON Many diplo-
mats will consider me a Pollyana
when I predict that t least one
thing can be salvaged from the
abortive Geneva conference. I ad-
mit that Secretary Dulles' gloomy
report to President Eisenhower
gave^ittle to k grateful for at
the Thanksgiving season, but it
seems to me you have to remem-
ber three important facts about
the so-called "Spirit of Geneva."
1. The Madison Avenue public-
ity boys who surround the White
Geneva, and 'in fact all during the
past three years, has been to
prove France wrong and himself
right. To do this he had to unite
Germany. And he couldn't unit*
Gtrmany without Russias co-oper-
ion.
UNDER IKES SMILE
So Foster's strategy at tne first
Geneva conference was to force
Russia, under the glow and giam-
or of Ike's smile, to come to
uik terms on Germany. Buiganin,
House exaggerated the initial re- Khrushchev, et .l, would not want
suits of the Geneva conference all | to break up the happy hands
oui of proportion and for pure po- across tne iron Curtain, uulies
liti;al reasons. figured, by blocking the unity of
2. Great forcea In world politics. Germany, for he Plugged this a-
do nut come to a stop easily. You head of everything else at the
do not change the course of emp-l summit meeting, 5*
ires in a night. The Moslem world \ For Dulles knew that If he didn't
which set out to take over "the
Christian world by force of
arms, kept at it for years, then
suddenly found that it could live in
peace beside the Christian world.
The British Empire took over
enough of the globe so the sun nev-
er set on the Union Jack before it
decided feat trade could flourish
without conquest. So it will take
time to bring the forces of com-
munism to a full stop. Despite the
Madison Avenue boys, no presi-
dent, no matter how charming his
unite Germany, tike Russians
would, and the price they would
ex'ct In return was West Ger-
many's withdrawal from NATO.
However, Foster auu knew, or
should have known, that the Rus-
sians weren't going to buagc an
inch on uniting Germany unless
they got the credit, fto good poker
player discards his aces, and the
great game of diplomacy is pretty
much like poker.
So in real fact, Foster Dulles
was playing diplomacy at Ge-
POWER POLITICS
He also seemed surprised. If not
Disposal Of Farm Surplus
By PETER EDSON
smue, could have made the Ge-1 neva with tne blindfold of self-de*
neva spirit work in four years or lusion over his head,
even eight years.
3. There was one important
foot-in-the-door to peace scored al
Geneva which can pry it open
further if we are smart, energetic, deluded, when the Russians went
and doil't get too easuy discour-jlnto Egypt with otters ef arms,
aged This was the exchange cf experts, and money while the spir-
people between Russia and the it *f Geneva was supposedly per-
United States which Eisenhower ~
proposed and which Buiganin ac-
cepted.
Though this has been battered
and belittled since Geneva, the
real fact is that It has already
scored so.ne success. It can score
more.
About Girls
Answer to Preview Puzzle
I ACROSS
' tremalas
* appellation
,f Girl's name
11 Expunges
' 13 Form a notion
14 Befall
, ISSseond
II mentioned
If Caliese cheer
;i7Mlmle
III Anger
30 Fruit drink
1 Zl Preposition
51 Units of
puth
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-Scottish
HI aheepfold
tl Assam
I sITAwuiua
HHops-kiln
II Conger
Z4Bulk
XI Royal Italian
| family name
:Igatte
141 Pronoun
East (Ft.)
; Emirs
Diminutive
of Leonard
51 Compass point
PuriSes
r|fl Rugged
mountain
crests
II Occupant
M Obvious
MCubte meter
17 Female hones
DOWN
IMIes Pagct
mountain
nymphs
J Sister of
Leah (Bib.)
.Equal
(comb, form)
I Seminary
(ab.)
6 Feminine
name
7 Obtain
I Country
I Everlasting
(poet)
10 WHhera
12 Chair
11 Island (Fr.)
II Hawaiian
food
22 Labors
24 Got up
28 Hardy heroine
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Summer (Fr.
Cereal grass
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Bed canopy
Hebrew
ascetic
40 Actualities
42 Fillip
) 44 Tries
Type of boat
River in
Switzerland
50 Mariner's
direction
52 Mais sheep
53 Greek letter
After two and a half years
of going it alone, the controversial
international Long shoir men's
Assn. will formally tie Itself up
with sn AFL union this week,
I LA leaders will sign a mutual
assistance isct with the AFL
Teamsters in New York's Hotel
Statler, making them a powerful
force in the eastern and Gulf coast
ports from Maine to Texas.
The Longshoremen win prob-
ably apply for re-admission to the
AFI. within six months. ...
Seldom have labor leaders Deed
so alrmed by foreign competition
as they are by what Is being
dumped here by Japan. A quick
survey reveals that U.S. labor
men will switch their opinions and
come out for high tariffs to bloc
Jap goods. The union officials fig-
ure that Japan imports will cost
tJ.8. workers 500,000 jobs within
a few yean,.
So AFL unions hsve been run-
ning demonstrations against the
Japaneseand plan to demon-
strate on the streets of some big
cities the day before Christmas...
The businessmen in the Repub.
lican Party who want a showdown
with labor leaders in the coming
Eresidential campaign will not
ave President Eisenhower's sup-
port.
He will beck up Secretary of
Labor James Mitchell, whose
pocy is to work closely with as
many labor men as possible. It
has never been reported but Pres-
ident Eisenhower not too long ago
got on the cross continental tele-
phone personally to .urge Califor-
nia's Governor Goodwin Knight to
fight certain legislation (right to
work laws) which labor loathes.
The businessmen and their Re-
publican colleagues in Congress
want a showdown because thev
feel that labor, after the AFL-CIO
merger, will use union dues to
finance national radio, TV broad-
coasts and political machinery
against the Republicans regard-
WASHINGTON (NEA) " A
drive to sweep the U.S. govern-
ment's storage warehouses clean
of its seven-billion-dollar holdings
in surplus farm products is head-
ing for the next Congress.
The idea behind this proposal is
that these surpluses now overhang
the market and depress current
farm prices. What's considered
even worse, the huge surpluses
make high price support levels
unpopular.
If the surpluses could be liqui-
dated, it is argued that scarcities
would be crested and prices would
go up. Then, at high support lev-
els, farmers could begin unlimited
overproduction snd stsrt building
up another surplus. That's the vi-
cious grele surrounding this
plus'- liquidation proposal.
The Senate Agriculture Commit-
tee under Chairman Allen J. El-
lender (D'La) now touring the
country, has actually heard pro-
posals that the surpluses be
dumped in the ocean. This shock-
in suggestion came from former
Utah state Sen. Hyrum Gibbons
and from Idaho cattleman Ivan
Pierce.
No political leader has yet dared
go that far. What they fear is an-
other reaction like former Secre-
tary of Agriculture Henry A.
Wallace got from his depression
relief plan for killing off the sur-
plus pigs to raise hog prices.
The actual destruction of food
and fiber when there are millions
of underfed and poorly clothed
people in the world would cavse
great revulsion. It would let Com-
munist propagandists point out
hew the selfish capitalists de-
stroyed food snd let people starve,
just to keep prices high.
Whst has to be found, as both
Secretary of Agriculture Eira Taft
Benson and his predecessor, Sen.
Clinton Anderson (D-NM) point
out Is some wsy to market these
surpluses.
They can't be given away indis-
criminately without breaking farm
markets over the. world. Even the
sale at cut [.rices' can ruin foreign
farmers.
The Agricultural Trade Develop-
sur- ments Act of 1933, intended tqj
deal with this problem, hasn't
been adequate. It provided for
sale of surpluses for foreign cur-
rencies, bsrter, giveaway for di-
saster relief, school lunch pro-
grams and the like.
About 1.5 billion dollars of these
surpluses have been disposed of in
the last two years. But 7.4 billion
dollars worth of surpluses remain
8 billions dollars owned out-
right and 1.6 billion dollars held
by Commodity Credit Corporation
as security against crop loan ad-
vances to farmers.
The surplus consists of 2.7 bil-
lon dollars worth of wheat, 1.8
billion dollars wbrth of cotton and
its products, 1.4 billion dollars
corn, 500 million dollars tobacco,
38' million dollars rice and small
feed grains, 326 million dollars
dairy products, 99 million dollars
wool and 250 million dollars other
products like honey and tung oil.
How much the U.S. taxpayers
would stand to lose it fhese were
dumped is uncertain. If the United
States had to pay transportation
charges for moving the surpluses
to the bottom of the ocean, the
loss would be more than seven
billion.
So far, products which cost CCC
469 million dollars have been sold
at world market prices for 364
million dollars. The loss, 105 mil-
lion dollars or 22 per cent. If the
U.S. seven-billion-dollar surplus
could be disposed of at that dis-
count, the loss would be around
1.5 .billion dollars.
From the politician's standpoint,
this would be a cheap price to
pay for farm vote support next
election day. '
The rationalization for getting
rid of U.S. surpluses at cut prices
is that this is what was done with
surplus arms, ammunition aad de-
fenie plants at the end of the war.
"If its all right to sell guns at
10 cents on th- dollar, why isn't
it also all right to do it with but-
ter? ask farm lobbyists.
This is said to be the price
th* public must pay to get abun-
dant production and to keep agri-
culture prosperous and happy.
vading the countryside.
He should net, however, have
been surprised. For his ambassa-
dor in Moscow, Cmp Bobien, had
reported in some detail that the
Russians were sore as biases be-
cause we had gone into Iran
at their own back door and signed
a military alliancealso when the
DULLES' BLIND SPOT spirit of Geneva was supposedly
The reason John Foster Dulles pervading the countryside,
doesn't see the importance of this,' Foster also knew, or. if he didn't
and the reason he was so full'ol I remember,1 his Russian experts
woe after his collapse st Genevs, were there to remind him, that
ATtlBl thai t'nrlnx Uat .1.....1 *.:_ !**, OiiubluB ! ii------_______.1__
was thst Foster bet almost his
whole stake on a United Germany.
He bet his own prestige, the pres-
tige of the United States, and the
success of Geneva on a goal which
he could not possibly win. .
He was bound to lose for a very, tightened our ties with Italy they
simple reason. If Germany Is going j took over Hungary. .
to be united the Russians want to) This, of course, is standard pro-
get the credit for uniting it. They cedure in power politics. We don't
the Russkles slways move on the
European chess hoard to counter
our moves. When we moved into
Turkey and Greece with the Tru-
man doctrine, they moved into
Czechoslovakia. And when we
don't want us to get the credit.
To undersand Foster Dulles'
poor poker strategy at Geneva you
have to go back in his life almost

.
When-you-catch-me Travel
By BOB RUARK
This has been a tremendous cheated by the money-changers,' It does not seem comely to me
....*. w a uvr in ,a ,ue uiiusi iiauun, ior instance, maop aoaoty
30 years when he was the lawyer'weak by the Civil War and when
for the big New York bankers who the British were making noises
were pouring U.S. millions into about regaining certain part* of
Germany as a so-called "very.the Western Hemisphere, we got
sound investment'' after World ths Russians to station their fleet
War I, and when Dulles, a re- ,in New York harbor.SEdawasptiw-
spectcd grandson of a former sec- cr politics of (he kiflrVfWprs-
retary of state, made many state- dated.
ments sssuring the public that Recently,' the shoe has sne-
their^ money was perfectly safe in times been ont he other foot. Wren
we threatened Mexico over the x-
propriatios of our oil companies
in 1927, Mexico sent emissaries to
every Latin-American country to
stir up resentment against us. She
didn't have an army that could
challenge us, so she used the most
effective type of power politics,
an-* It worked.
There are some of the things
the Madison Avenue publicity boys
haven't been telling the public
about Geneva and one reason the
public feels such a letdown.
Ip my humble opinion, however.
Germany.
It was, of course, not safe at
all. Most of it was lost ss Hitler
came into power. So Foster Dul-
les, as secretary of state, has
cherished the great ambition of
building a new and strong Ger-
manythe kind he said was there
in 1925 but which wasn't there at
aJ.
While Dulles has been- telling
this to France In 1955, the French
haue been telling him in- turn that
he is all wet, that you cannot trust
Germany, that Germany, is sure
vjermany, mat uerman.v, is sure ip my numDle opinion, nowever,
to pull out o (NATO and make a | there were some gainsalong with
deal with Russia. the setbacksand 111 try to de>
So Dulles' whole strategy at'scribe them in an early column,.
year for tourists, and I am in-
clined to blame it on the easy-
pa y m e n t plan. You can
go to Europe these days for pea-
nut, because you. can cuff ths
airplane, and get a little book that
will feed you at the right restau-
rants, hire you a car, put you up
at hotels, and go down for the
new&pspers.
The only catch is thst you're
supposed to psy for it on the in-
stalment plan when you get home,
and this I do not particularly care
for. I once defined a hangover
as long-term psyment on last
night's ecstasy^ and it seems to
me that having a vacation and
paying for it later takes some of
the luster off the experience.
A friend of mine nsmed Jack
Long, who works for Americsn
Magazine, has been doing one of
these tours with all expenses paid
as an article for his magaine,
aad he says bfa various little
credit books are the greatest in-
vention since money
snd robbed by the concierge, ndito shoot s lion on the cuff, which
being canceled out of hotels with-;is exactly what I had managed to
out warning? jdo. It does not seem right to take
This blue-plate-special travel is in Montmartre and pay for it
fine, if you like to travel in i next year, or to watch a bullfight
Soups, and have all the famous i with the dreadful certainty of to-
aces pointed out to youif yoc morrow's reckoning in the cold
like to go to hotels that are listed I dawn hanging over you like a
In the book, and to restaurants i canopy.
lhat arc listed in the Txiok. Ij But I must say it is excellent
Imagine it saves a stranger a lot business for the purveyors of
of time and trouble.
But the idea of paying for it
later rankles, somehow. Travel is
travel, and probably will attract
more people to more places than
any gimmick since they flushed
a luxury, unless you are as lucky,the bugs out of the early airplane.
as me, who manages to mske a; I am a boat man, myself, but'
business of Itsnd luxuries should I it does make some sense that a
be prepaid. Luxuries are a present person with only two weeks' vaca-
to yourself, snd as such should be tion can grab a fast bird to Eu-
bought before presentation. rope, spend 12 of the 14 days,
I am not knocking the credit i abroad, and spend the next 12
system, because I bought nearly months paying for his 12 days'
everything I ever owned on the fun.
when-you-catch-me plan, and a
pcsonal-loan outfit and I were on
close terms for years. But I bor-
Travel has been, in past, a thing
only for the rich or the lucky ones
who work at it, and there is no
.^.l. S^m.tthi^ gJaSffl"d J" me! Africa was merely a memory, ex-
rebels at the idea. Where, for in- t fort he nquiries from my
rowed a safari, once, and I can reason today why any person of
remember the pain of paying when I moderate means can't get out of
I was back home in New-York and, his rut and see this great, wide,
wonderful world we live in. This is
stance, is the pleasure of finding
a joint to eat in, all on your own?
Where is the pleasure of being
bank.
not to knock, eves though I seem
to have been knocking it.
(Cam FsstticlTs Gift to Every Customer)
less of what-the GOP candidate
i believes.
They point out that New York
Sen. Irving I ves has long been a
friend of laborbut when he ran
against Averell Harriman for
I Governor of New York last yesr.
Ives got little labor support and
Harriman squeezed through by
11,000 votes...
/ _____
Most unique labor goal of "56
will be the AFL Insurance Agents
Union drive for state laws which
would suspend payments of insur-
ance premiums by strikers dur-
ing walkouts. ..
Australian unions have' devel-
opad a new strike technique which
hurts production, but provides a
pay envelope at the same time.
Thev strike one dsy a week, every
week and alow down between
stowages. American unionists
are watching and may adopt
th- technique as they did the
French sltdown strikes.
PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT AD*
.CAN FILL YOUR NEEDS!
'/ y* &**'< u*tck bard near yet insist on
stylt 4M-I ait, wacy, wa recommend the
ROIEX OYSTKR" uaterproof, dust proof,
winds i*sdf tvitL every ^notion of your umst.
THE
DUTY
"REE
STORE
L
Co/a fa/tlich
WATCH CENTER
161 CENTAl AVENUE. PANAM>

welcome it, but every nation does
it, snd we have done It ourselves.^
When we were a much weaken
nation, for instance, made doubly
1



\
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1955 v.
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART NEWSPAPER
PAGE
9
THE MARQUEE ; H
ovniTK KLEJNF. R K^
BY DICK KLEINER
FEW FAST FACTS: Ente
Koran and company are coming
back to TV, doing a daytime five-
a-week aerie over NBC-TV, which
ia the nicest thing to happen to
housewives since the invention of
the electric egg cup . Max
Lfcbmaa't "Babes In Toyland," a
big hit last year, will be repeated
on the day before Christmas, mak-
ing it the first spectacular to be
given a repeat performance. Lieb-
man would like to make it an
annual event. .. Barry Joe Brow,
who turns out the "Crossroads"
series, has bought the rights to
the Ernest Hayhox western sto-
ries for next season . NBC
hopes to sign Jayne Mansfield of
"Will Success Spoil Rock Hunt-
er?" for a spectacular. Miss
Mansfield is pretty much of a
spectacular all by herself.
Skitch Henderson finally con-
fessed the real reason for his
beard. Seems he's a great admirer
of the bearded British batoneer,
Sir Thomas Beecham, and figures
that maybe a beard will give him
a headstart toward his ambition.
Skitch would dearly Uve to devote
his later years to serious music;
in fact, he's hoping he can go to
Europe and study. That's Skitch s
tteh.
The first thing Jsnis Paige did
when she hit New York for i
week's vacation was to go see
"The Pajama Came." This Is sort
of like a discharged GI going back
to the scene of his basic training,
because Janls was the star of
"The Pajama Game" in 478 per-
formances, ______^__
LIGHTLY AIRED
GALEN DRAKE (CBS-Radio):
A little boy who went to the ballet
for the first time with lus father
watched the girls dancing around
on their toes for a while, then
asked, "Why don't they just
taller glrlat"____________
"But that was the first time I'd
ever really seen,the show, ihe
says. "It was really a lot of fun.
BIRTHDAY STAMP Going
on sale in Washington, D.C.,
Dec 20 is this stamp marking
(he centennial of the birth of
Andrew W. Mellon. He served
as secretary of the treasury
from 1921 to 1932 under Presi-
dents Harding, Cooiidge and
Hoover. Likeness of Mellon is
reproduced from a portrait by
Oswald Birtey. i
Janls Pain
The second thing she did was to
go buy five hats. She's a hat-wear-
ing gal but doesn't have much
chance to wear them in California,
where she's filming her dew TV
series, "It's Always Jan." She was
wearing one of the five a feath-
ery white Job like an inverted
flower pot and with her startling
red hair she looked something like
an exceptionally beautiful white
leghorn.
Nowadays, she's practically com-
muting between coasts. Her work
is out West, her beloved New
York is back East.
"It's a very unsettled life," she
says. She'd like to have homes
in both places but finds that a
little too rich for her purse.
'It's toe expensive to keep apart-
ments on each coast," she says.
"I had to close my New York
apartment in three dsys when the
time came to leave. It meant hav-
ing to sell some of my prise pos-
sessions, hot I put some other
things in storsge a bed that
was specially built for me, some
paintings and my hats."
Her TV series which is a typ-
ical situation comedy, brought to
life mostly by her vivacity will
be through in January. At least,
that's when the first batch will
all be "in the can." After that,
her plana are slightly up in the
sir.
"Ill either do s movie." she
said, starting to tick the aitema-
tivts off on her fingers, "or 111
rest or I'll do nightclubs or 111
do TV guest shots or maybe 111
do some of esch. I'm definitely
committed to a Las Vegas club in
April or Msy. And msybe 111 do
records, if I get the tune."
One of the record computes
wants her to As an album of the
songs she salts into 'It's Always
Jan."
In between all this, she will un-
doubtedly buy a few hats.
CBS-TVs soap opera, "Valiant
Lady," haa a new policy guest
stars like Signe flssso, Shelly Win-
ters and Charlton Boston. They 11
have to call a sosp optra with
guest stars "extrs Sudsy.''
Elaine Malbin, starring in NBC-
TVs epers version of "Madama
Butterfly," is no shy tittle butter-
fly herself. Her lifelong ambition
is to slag at the Met, and she
says, frankly, "After many years
of studying sad learning, I believe
I am now ready for the Met."
DICK'S QUICKIE: Red SkeRon
is a do-it-yourself bug. "Whenever
my wife asks me to fix some-
thing," Red says, "I toll her. 'Do
It yourself.' -
LITTLE MAN WITH TWO COUNTRIES-Little Gary Watts,
5, will soon become a regular commuter between San Francisco
and Formosa. Judge In a custody suit granted Joint custody to
Gary's parents. So the youngster will spend six months in
Formosa, where his father, Capt. Roy Watts, is s pilot for the
Chinese Nationalists. Then hell spend six months with his
mother, above, now Mrs. Natalie Boyson. Gary is shown in his
mother's San francisco apartment ohjehjgg maps. _,
NOTICE
In conformity with Article 13 of the Articles of In-
corporation, and by decision of the Board of Directors
shareholders of SPECIAL ORDINARY STOCK, of tho
PANAMA BANK A TRUST COMPANY, INC. (Banco
Fiduciario do Panama, S. A.) duly registered in the
book. of the Company, are hereby summoned to attend
an EXTRAORDINARY ASSEMBLY of stockholders
which will be held at the Company's offices, situated
at No. T-2-30 of "I" Street, Panama City, at 3 p.m.
on December sixteenth, 1955, in order to consider an
amendment of Articles 5 and 6 of the Articles of
Incorporation.
Panama, Nov. 29, 1955.
PANAMA BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, INC.
The Secretary.


OPEN until 9 p.m.
EVERY EVENING
FELIX'S NEW STORE
No. 22-06 CENTRAL AVENUE
ib mm next to Chase Manhattan Bank
lOYS on 2nd Floor
SWEDE AND LOVELY-
Actress Anita Ekberg posee
provocatively for photographers
after arriving in Stockholm,
Sweden. It was the first visit
home since 1091 for the Swed-
ish beauty who made good in
Hollywood. Anita came to the
U.S. after winning tho title of
"Miss Sweden," ___________

For the first time
Complete assortment of
Smart GIFTS
-
at Junior Bazaar
Evening handbags and Pattern leather
Fine Costume Jewelry
e Fluffy peticoats
We offer a nice variety of Gift Articles
from 75*





rwer
azeccA
79 Justo Arosemena Ave.
Tel. 3-1126, Panama

r
New Low Fores to
(tourist) Service
Daily service in PAA's famous Constellation type Clippers*
with pressurised and air-conditioned cabins.
* ..ruht fOnumoilSrmtHo.5.Ul2-0670,Coio>t:Sa\atK9,ltL\097
I h H(i5 rrr-uo --------------------------------- -------- ---------*
Junior College
Activities
By GD8 MBLLANDER
Monday morning as I dragged
myself into the lounge, I was
greeted by the most sorrowful
looking group of students I have
ever seen. The Thanksgiving
holidays had taken their toll. It
seemed to be the general con-
sensus of opinion that a four-
day holiday was more than we
could take.
With parties, trips to Santa
Clara and all, one la rather tired
on Monday morning. But we'll
live through it
Our turkey hop last Wednes-
day was a bigger success than
anticipated, over 140 persons at-
tended. There were games of
chance and skill for all- Profes-
sor Salami, imported from the
Orient for the occasion, amazed
one and all with his prophesies.
If you don't believe me ask Vel-
via Brlngas, I understand he hit
her fortune right on the head.
Gloria Samson and her com-
mittee certainly deserve orchids
for doing such a great job.
Gary Maddox is taking the
"fateful lunge" on Saturday. He
claims there is no other way to
live. Martin oisen, Charles Mc-
Glade and myself. Junior Col-
lege's confirmed bachelors, are
trylnp to talk him out of it. But
I think it's a lost cause.------Good
luck, Gary.
i
Next Wednesday is the night
of the all-star production, "She
Forgot to Remember." All-8.A.
members are admitted free.
Tickets for guests cost $1. Bring
ths family along for an enter-
taining evening. Curtain time Is
8 p.m.
Kurt Mensel asked me to put
his name in this column. Okay
Kurt satisfied? By the way,
how many of you girls saw Joe
"Buckles" wood's trousers on
Monday. It had two buckles on
it, one gold one and a silver one.
Arlene Vandergrift's bowling
team battled pat Foster's team
on Monday afternoon. Each
team won one game. For those
of you who weren't fortunate
enough to watch our "muscle"
girls in action, ask either Pat or
Arlene when the next game Is
scheduled for, and don't forget
to let me know.
FAMILIAR SCENES at JC:
Mario Hopiak flirting with aU
the girls Prank Fuller and John
Riley looking like "wharf rats"
with their 5 o'clock shadows.
The boys in the laboratory mix-
ing H2804 with ferj-lc sulflde.
We still haven't been able to
aerate the first floor properly
Rogelio Fong getting "At" *
all of his subjects.
in
CONTAX
MADE IN WEST OERMANT 1
THE CAMERA
FOR THE
1 AMATEUR
AND
SCIENTIST


' i
a
I *
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in our
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OVBBAAUHiTHfEfORe-




9
WEDNESP \Y. NOVEMBER 3, 1*35
ATE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INPEPENPEW1 PA1LT NEWSPAfER
IAWC To Show Wizard Of Oz
Assist Deaf, Dumb Sfudents

*
m
)
The Escuela de Sordomudos
(School for the Deaf and Dumb) is
located on Avenida Justo Arose-!
mena and 44th Street. It h a s i
been said that the only thing to
distinguish it from other neighbor-
hood schools is the complete lack
of noise made by the active chil-
dren within its yards. The 55 stu-
dents are almost totally mute.
The school now operated by the
Panama government was founded
five years ago by Mrs. Maria C.
de Moreno. Its need was redis-
covered this year by th Inter |
American Woman's Club, which
Cromptly formed a cojnmittee to1
elp raise money for badly need-;
ed school materials.
Tke Committee is headed by
Mrs William Boy and Mrs. Y- i
venae del Valle.
Testimony is given to the won-
derful work done by the faculty I
by the 1500 word spoken voca-:
biliary that each student has up-;
on graduation. The pupils arj
' first taught to understand spokertj
- words by nutting their hands on j
each other's vocal cords and be-
coming accustomed to the sound
vibrations made. After this has
been acomnli attempt to imitate the sound
wav#s voeallv. Bv the a m e
method, substituting the v i b r a-
tions of a pUno for those of th
voeal cords, they ream the mean
in* of rhvthm and to sing.
A vocabulary of 1500 words is
huee for on- Who has always
been mute. Howevtr, many more,
words are understood afW stii-;
students complete their VTDK>'e!,
tag course in the school. The na-
tience that the teaching of this
aubtot requ'res is enormous
But If *e can imagine the -
escltement of giving a blind}
man a pair of *"' ,
strong enough to enable him to
ee, he can readily imagine the
excitement of the teachers as
the world of sound becomes re-
vaaled t# these handicapped
Further to aid the students, Dr.
Carlos Arango and others give
psychlstric treatment where nee-,
essary to help the youngsters ad-
just to their condition and to
their families.
Other regular' school subjects
re taught, plus carpentry and
sewing as a means ^J**^
viding the boys and girls with a
self supporting trade.
As iti first drive for sehool
funds, the IWAC committee is
shewing the wonderful movie
Wlxsrd stOi"w haturday at
1 a.m .
The Bella Vista theatre his
donated its facilities for the oc-
cation and Mr. Louis Si tap son
brough Metro GoWwyuMayer
Xs donated the film which won
Judy Garland an Academy Award
gome few years ago.
The tickets are on sale now ana
may be bought for only twenty-
five (25) cents s piece, from com-
mittee members, or at the Bella
Vista theatre on Saturday morn
tag as well. . '. ...
All children from the School for
the Deaf and Dumb are b eiin g
sent in a group by Boyd Broth-
ers An anonymous contributor
h.; asked to send the 96 girls
from the Ojpranage of Our U
dy. National Willeries is end
tag the children from the Ma-
,mbo Orphanage, and Mrs. .Ben-
nin Chen is uking the girls
.rom the Bells Vista Home, Bra-
niff International Airways is re-
sponsible for the Asilo de la In-
fancia attending.
eonS ataN.&W.5
JSdV Chase Manhattan B a nk
are all sending the children of
rath of their employes. PanA-
areriean Airways *",
large group of boys and g i r f s.
and* "Rudy' Rudesheim is givmg
tickets to the members of hi
Junior riding classes
, Sears Roebuck u giving the
School $25 worth of needei edu-
cational **"" h"?ff "id
rirnentry wors-bench. AU "
mbckcU have been contrct-
il"advance Since the jea-
Mats 1080, there is still plen-
ty of room for U-________
Nautilus Completes
25,000 Hiles
Without Refueling
CTjp^i^UnSibKriS
NauUluT cVmpleted Its 25.000th
nauttca mile without refueling
^Stavy SecreUry Charles 8
Thomas, aboard the powerful
awhen the milestone was
reached, returned to port; to_say
the NtutUus "has far exceeded
the Navy's most optimistic ex-
^la^s;.dth.Uhep.rtorm-
ffi proved the feasibility of nu-
clear power for other navai
-It Is not too much to say that
the Nautilus has passed out ot
the experimental stage and can
now be considered a fully com-
bat operations submarine In all
reanects," he said.
Nver before in history has
any vehicle traveled so far with-
out taking on more fuel The
Navy hw not said how far It
Vean to before the craft's power
plant must receive a new radio-
active element
BORSCHT REPORT
HARTFORD. Cone -fin
S S-n. William V l'i" IR-
Com- i. back from s trip ftohrnd
? imn 'ii
thin* much of Russian o
n the bm-scht lau'l as
there aa it U in Jsnerict. i* said
TWO GIRL STUDENTS are amone the group learning to embroi-
der and applique at Panama's School for the Deaf and Dumb.
OPEN TONIGHT
and every night 'till Christmas
tmiiM^nx.
on the
ISTHMUS
YOU DON'T NIID CASH FOR CHRISTMAS GIFTS... UK MARS IAS Y PAYMINT PLAN
Kenmore Gifts For The Home
MALE STUDENTS LEARN CARPENTRY and other manu train-
ing skii-s at Panama's School for the Dead and Dun.
THE IDEAL GIFT FOR CHRISTMAS...
Beautiful 4 Living. Room Suite
Choice of Colors ......................150.00
Mahogany Double Beds with New Mattreaa 69-00
Modern Mahogany Pining Room Suites ....... 79.00
Mahogn>*1WardToil|*^rVoritosid) .'..... 79.00
China Closets (Licorera) ................. 68.00
Vanitie with Large Mirror................. 96.00
Modern Mahogany Sideboard ............ 39.00
ALSO: Kitchen Cabinet. Folding Bed, Youth Bed,
Kerosene Stove, Sofa-cama, Bureaus,
Metal Filing Cabinet, etc., etc.
ANY ARTICLE DELIVERED TO YOU
WITHOUT DOWN PAYMENT
jVc COSIGNER EASIEST Terms
YOUR DOLLAR GOES FURTHER AT
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
41 National Ave. (Auto Row) Tel. 3-4911
NOW!

Firestone
Retreads for yenr
Tires.
SAVE up to V% .
of new tire cost!
Have your tires
retreaded the
Factory-Method
way
Naw Tire Safety
Throngh tire inspection ^
before "<* after
re-traading.
FiaasTOMf a*
(Hpc yon tha
OOALtTY trwd lalcrtaU
M MEW TMS.
fitttton*
AUTW...W.BILE ROW 39
Tal.: 3-4564
!
>*
',
POLISHER and SCRUBBER
Regular 77.95
Special 55.55
Wilh 8 labor-saving Aliar hmrnts
^VACUUM CLEANER
Tank-type KENMORE with 4/10 HP. motor
Tip-toe switch ad easy -empty dust bag
Call or wrft SEARS for a free home trial
WHAT SEARS SELLS SEARS SERVICES TOO!
ShopSears Catalog for 124,000 Xma Gift linns a^P1 A V%A Shop bolh Stores Panama and Colim
latuf PANAMA Tivoli Avt. Phone Pon 7-C931
COLON M4ndz Ave. & !0tn St. Pliona Cnlon 1137




PAGE SIX
r.<
TOT PANAMA AMERICA!! . If INDEPEXDBfT I.AILI NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY. NO
VEMBER
SO. ItSI
YOU CAN PUCE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
inexpensive Want Ads Bring Quick Results!
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA
\
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
librera preciado
T street Na. a
Agencias Infernal. da Publicaciones
Me > teeterj Plata
. CASA ZALDO
teatral At*, u V.
LOURO.ES PHARMACY
tU U Carr.iaain
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
* m -a- um
MORRISON
40 at Jalv An < J K
LEWIS SERVICE
4e Th-eti Me.
FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS
141 UtM mm
FARMACIA LUX
teatral At(
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
canal rows roLTCumc
DENTAL MEDICAL
^^Tel. S-SMI -
FOR SALE
Honsehold
FOR SALE
Automobiles
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
* See d* bj On* At*, He. |
FOTO DOMY
i Am. MiSIl
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DUS
j
N*.
RETIREMENT, LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
JIM RIDGE
Phoac ranasns Z-SS51
FOR SALI: is.pr.ne $15;
bereteee *m $9.95; wata-
reee. $25; MM ejeeeaaev
beds *H w .artreu $69;
ntetel nkm $22.10; tree-
beards $39; Irrrag 4.4 w|
ream taire vary cheap. Many
tfcer Brf in> , n.w .*. UHt
Feraitnre. N. Da/ Payasee*.
Wa Deliver. HOUSIHOLD IX-
CHANSI. 41 Nat-aal Awn
Atste Ra'. Pkeee 3-4911.
FOR SAL 1952 Bu.cl Arria-
ra by War Steeriac, $1000. T.l-
3-5713.
POR SALI: 1950 l-,H,
k Saac.il. dvaafk. eacel-
lent ceadrtiea, law .leer*. Di-
pfeaut leas-teg Panama.
4973.
MISCELLANEOUS
FARMACIA EL BATURRO
r>a:*u* Left\r* I Sircel
FARMACIA "SAS"
ia ran** III
NOVEDADES ATHIS
V a taaeaa Ave.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
BOX 2031. ANCN. CZ.
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. CZ.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous)
FOR RENT
Apartment!
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
FOR RENT
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE
Real Estate
ATTINTION 6. 1.1 Jew bar
*>ni fetninbid aaarranli. I.
2 sadteaeji. hut, ceM tin,
3-4941.
POR SAL2 fwia bed .M
*l <> inattteiing aajWrai.
$130 aaw. Para Amw Na.
35-19. greaad Haar. left.
POR SALI:1941 Ferd 2....
Sedea. See it at Ava. Cuba aaa]
41t Street Na. 51. Aat. S, free*
5 ta 7 .m.
FOR SALI:SO-cycla Frieidarre
7.4 ta. ft., Lira* freeier aaraat
tee. Mi. a*w, $150 Pfaeae 2-
4449.
Position Offered
POR SALI<, ,amm. bat wa-
far teak. S0-cycle Friaidaira. Or
"id trade far b treat aa refrsear-
i as.
POR SALI:La. XV mummm,
. reetineble. Pbaaa 3-1949.
Vansaeolo Street Na. 4.
FOR SALI: Mat.....mtmj
reee. $300; Rattaa Hvrae: teee
$160; 7 cable Hut refrigerate*
$125; water heater $100. AN
tur $600. Pbene 3-5707.
IF tOU h, kil a. ., M
veart a activa TV tervice aad
MWaUatia* experience, wa ara
rta.aa.aa1 .a tark.aa ta aaa.
Present ecceaetieo ar military
atete* aa heedkae ta aar after.
CaM Paa. 3-1215 Far interview
eaeeiattaea*.
WANTRD: Mtnagot mtmHfm
elaa la' Caaal Zaaa. Writ Ra.
23, Balbea. livinf ,, ravi-
ee tanerience, re faience* end
ulary delirad. Haar free* %
9.. ta CHMtaa.
FOR SAL: Gibaaa nm .;,
ctndltlencr, % -taa. iaalaw type
I 10-.. 60-cy. Used I Vt mente
ta State*. CaM Careada 7225
Sunday ar aftar 5 a, week-
day. $245.
FOR SALI: 2 air caaaWiar.
Sytvaaia *>-ha. 110 vat, ia
aarfact caadlHaa. Quu4 Ht al-
ic ar aaalraam. RaJwcaal ta
$150 aaca far auick sala. Oriaj-
>J| arka $400. Call Panama I-
0226 B-12 aaaa. 2-5 p.m.
FOR RINT: furnhhui aaart-
maat urn Saa Fraaciaca Hajhway
Na. 120. aa.iaa Raaaavak Tka-
tar. avarlaakiaaj SAS. Cam-
arnary. Plraaa 3-5024.
FOR RINT:Caal. aiat twa-
viaw. Cam*. 47th Straat. CaM
3-0434.
FOR RINT: fuMmi aaart-
rtat. ad BtiUria*. Army rataatct-
Via tata. haul* Mara
Jaaa Fraaca.
FOR NT>- Caiwutlal tacal
ia fraat af Hard II PaaaM..
Aaaty rwtm Hakaa 9-12 aaaa.
2-6 p.m. p. aaa 3-1179.
BABY ORCHIDS,
aaaH SiBnaiaal aaywlwra USA,
Irtfcaan, Xma*. tvary aay. Tal-
*aaa Panama 3-0771. Criata-
al 1033.
Help Wanted
POR SAL: Naw maaal 12
Wlaiaaatai aanaa tu>, aay'i ai-
1511.
FOR SALI: Dalmatian aar..
raa tamal*, t m a n h ..
Matrfal 4m. $50 caa. Criata-
aal 3-1716.
FOR SALI:Saaatrtal maaaaa-
ny aar with caaiaaN, akam. aU
*uun ana" thra* aairran; faar p-
haiata.aa' chair, with bach. A
haaaty ami real aaraala. Cash ar
credit with camfartaal* *.,-
maan. Phaaa 2-4902.
BUSINfSS RMP10 Y M I N T
Waataal yaaag aaaa. bHiagaal
with cammarcial kmamUmi, far
a*nr.l affica aaa* utaa warh.
Avania*a Jat* Fraaciaca da U Or-
la A... Nachtaal) Na. 41.
Henri,., & Garaall. lac.
Escaped (onvicl
Tongay Hitch Hikes
To California
FOR SALI:VVararah. 2 aaar.
with mirrari. MMMaatlaa baa-
afa naw, twa naw Rattaa chain,
am naw Oriental rua 12.14 ft.,
Rattaa aafa, twa iriall tablar,
aaa cabiaat. mn atava with four
huraara ana avaa, aaa rafritafa-
rar 60-cyel.. n. baby* carriaaa
a bath arui athar artickn. Tal-
aahaaa 2-1919.
WANTED
Apartments
AMIRICAN want. 1-2 mairimT
aartmaat ia Bella Vi,. ,, f,r
S95-SIOO a manth. Matt ha.a
cra.n.. bat wa.,, 60-cycU car-
raat. CM 3253 ar 2106 'aftar
6 p.m.). Fart Kabba.
FOR RENT
Rooms

FOR RINT: F.mh.a raam.
aawain Stadia Sata. 4th Jalp
Avanaa Na. 7.
POR RINT: Nicety faraishad
caal. raam. aaa ar twa aim a*.
46th Street Na. 9, Apt. 4. Tele-
phene 3-4347.
FOR RNT:Urge airy raam in
c*afat, with aaa. lie
. atar. Phaaa 3-53J
chalet, with ear. light, retriaer-
I507
~
FOR RENT
llouses

I
POR SALI: On. Uaaarwaad
typewriter in gaaa canditian. CaM
Panama 2-3621.
LIAVING ISTHMUS:'54 Mar.
cary Maataiie 4-d**r Saaaa;
furnitare. alaatl. Chaap. 2354.
A. Owaa St.. BakW
FOR SAL:A, K. C. ra girt arad
female wire-haired terrier I year
aid. Reaaenably gricad. Phaaa 3-
1937 from 9 ta 11:30 a.m. aad
aftar 5 p.m.
FOR XMAS GIFTS aad all acca-
fiaai 10-Karat aalid gald hand-
mad* Orchid dciign earrings with
aeaaiaa aearli far delivery aay*
where U.SIA.. Panama and Ca-
aal Zaaa. lafarmatiaa telephone
Panjma 3-0771,
FOR RINT:Uatararrbed twa-
bedroom jpartmeat, hat-cahi wa-
tar. Call Clayton 6110, affica
FOR RINT:Nice faraiahad a-
partmenf. twa bedraomi, bat aad
cald water, all rervicei. caal aad
with Miami window!. He*. 27.
43rd Straat. Mb Viata. Phone
3-4976.
FOR RINTi-
nirhed apartmaat. Aata Raw.
Phaaa Balboa 2470.
FOR RINT: Madera two-bed-
room apartment, patch, living-
dining raam, kitchen, maid'i aad
laundry raam. Screened, hat wa-
fer. Far farther garticnlari tab).
pbaaa 3-4946 ar 3-6737.
FOR RINT.Seat located, aaa-
roem faraiahed apartmaat. Clean
and independent. 43rd Street
Na. 13.
WANTID: laaariaacad cook.
Oary tbaee with aiccllent rafar-
4 Na. 4. lagahll A. Meraler St.,
B Cangrejo. 1-3679.
FOR SALI:2-badrae
ry cartage urn beach ia Naw Go. -
ona. Jaat ceaajlatad bailding.
Naw caadrtraa. Camplataly far-
rabad. Ineihaaatrble aaaply pure
laaamg water. Hat ehawen.
Modern pmmblag. Ilactricity.
Saaatrfal Uwn aad flean. Ideal
far retired employe. Several re-
tired ampiare Uva ia ncifhbor-
haad. Telephone rervic* ta Pan-
ama aad Zaaa. $3,500 cash. Sea
by lapitMIIIMl. Phan
Balboa 2-3047 after 5 p.m.
RESORTS
Baldwin1 faraiahed
at Santa Clara Beach.
Probad., Balboa 1224
PHILLIPS Oce.n.ide Catlaga.
Santa Clara. Uu 435. lalbaa.
Fheae Pan.m. 3-1177. Criete-
M3-L673.______________^__
Cramlkhi Santa C I a r a Beach
CaHaaa. Madara convenience.
moderate rate*.
6-441.
Wonted to Buy
WANTID: Ueed m&mt au-
ehine. Pbaaa Pan.ma 2-0552.
-*fB^*T*l *l(faihfaiRa RfHMI SMI
beech at Sano Clara. Tatajaaaa
Thampiea, Balboa J 772.

fOSTR-S COTTAGIS. Or*, mria
past Catino. Law rate*.
Balbae I $66.
FOR RINT: Faraiahad apart-
ment. twa badreeaa*. twa bath,
reams, all screened, far twa cea
lei. Salla Vista. Pbaaa 3-164$.
GRAND SAL: Chinese aa.
tiaaat aad bamboo Rattaa nov-
elties, large assortment mat ra-
ceived fraat Hong Kong. Perfect
for Christmas gifts LUM, Fourth
af July Are., front af Qaarry
Height*.
|US Congressman


POR RINT:2-bedroom chalet,
living raam, dining raam, sepr-
ete maid's raam, garage, porch,
r*rd. "F" Straat, fl Cangrejo.
Being painted. Ready far occu-
pancy Dec. 10. Phaaa Panama
3-4533 ar Balboa 1256.
TAIXAHASaZE. Not. 30 (UP)
Extradition pape were mail-
ed U> California Oov. Goodwin
J. Knlfht today to have Miami
swlmrnlnp, inatructor Ruuell
Tongay returned to Florida to
rlnlsh a 10-year maolsufhtcraj ., A _
^ntence .,. rails 11 On Tour
Tongsy, Btfflttneed for tbei,imj " VII IVUI
hlp.h-dlvedeathof hi five-year-1 _. a> -^__ |a|HJ
old daughter, Kathy. li preient- |f| l7tJdf6nif3lf3 Wllfli
ly In a Los Angeles BosplUl " ""VHISJIIJ ffllUJ
where he said he will fight ex- NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 30 (UP)
tradition. Tongsy persuaded Rep. Kenneth Gray (D-Ill), was
Florida off leala to send him to in Baptist Hospital here today
New Orleans for treatment of a|*lt*r being stricken and trans- .
lung ailment bat escaped fromiPOfted by car and plane from the test which was sponsored by La
his guard in New Orleans and wild back country of Guatemala Boc* Civ,c Council, resulted In
ties for both first and second
places.
The winners were Glanvllle
Davis and M Coote, who tied for
first, and Ernest Sandlford and
C. Coots wh0 tied for second
place.
Judges were Cleveland Rob-
Winners Of La Boca
Civic Council's
Talent Contest
Saturday night's Talent Con-
17".________ -x
SAL Da.h., filing ceh4- A m
, tata, twa air-conditioning "
tines %-tea Admiral, metal
FOR RINT:Apartment, $30;
ream, $20, Sabana, Carraaejui-
II. Phone 3-OS50 ar 2-150$.
POR RINT: Furnished apart-
ment, $50. $$5. Regalar trans-
portation, North American neigh-
bors Phaaa 3-0471.
FOR
net.
machina*
cabinet* 'glass aaar), chair
and athar offic* furniture. Tel*
ephane 2-4902.
FOR SALI: Ilectric aaidaring
iron. 300 ama*., mounted an
trailer. Can be aaa Paname
American settlemeni, Paraae La*
fevre Na. 7, Spencer family.
Faraiehed apart,
mipertad. Via
Phone 3-2061.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors

FOR SALI:-----10-hg. Johnson
outboard matar. $74 Margan
A.. B.tbee ISf '
e
Liquor
(Continued trota Paga 1)
secaral
hitch-hiked to CsHfornis. Jrhe^"J,tr oM congressman.
J. Edwin Gsy, administrative I one of taw younscat men in Con-
aasUtant to Oov. LeRoy Collins, P**8 became ill while he and
asked the California governor to|otner finbera of the ninc-m a a
have Los Angeles County Sheriff congressional party were inspect-
E. W. BUcailuz notify Florida of- ln$ work op the new Inter-Ameri-
ficials when he Is ready to de-.c" Hi*wj; bo" w miles
liver Toneav to Florida agents ,roin ""stemala Citj-.
He wrote Knight that If he',,RP- J. A. Thompson fD U) erU.C. B. Prescott and Mrs. Ell-
derides to hold an extradition |?TOV,C nl*nt tnrouh ^e moun- sa Davis. Mrs. Davis, however,
hearina for Toneay to wire Flor-I1*"1 country to get Grav to the .disqualified herself, since her son
Itoitculture^ Ouatemala OHv from! was one of the contestants.
Nathan MavowhMedeSr^^ w" "w to New Or-! The winners from both groups r,
runs the Prisons Division.
Long Inactive
Volcano Erupts,
Moscow Radio Says
LONDON. Nov. 30 (UP).Ra-
dio Moscow reported today thst
a> volcano on Kamchatka penin-
eja north of the Japaneas la-
nds had erupted after hun-
dreds of years of inactivity and
was spewing ashes six miles Into
the sky.
The broadcast said that Be
tymkanny volcano on Kahchatka
"has been In eruption for the
past 'five days."
The volcano which "for aev-
ersl hundred years has beei
snnakiered extinct and inactive"
first showed signs of activity in
October, the broadcast aald.
"During the first days ashes
rose In s pall to a height of up
to five kilometers and In the
middle of November,tbLi reach-
ed 10 kilometers In height."
So it has been for
weeks.
The unresolved Issues are
known to relate to how Individ-
uals who are not members of
Canal Zone clubs entitled to sell
liquor will make their purchas-
es.
Panama Line
Sailings
POET AMADOU'S SERVICE CtTJB is the winner of the first Inter-club buUetin board contest,
but in close balloting over last weekend they had to beat a strong entry by Fort Kobbe to win.
Lt. Col. L. C. Wood (holding plaque i, executive officer, Special Services. USRCARIB, here
prssenU Amador Service Club director Mrs. Betty Haberstlck with the plaque and a check for
$25 as winner. Looking on are (left to right i Pvt. Leroy Janson, Pvt. Sharpsteen and 8p-3
Lonnie Maneas The Judges were headed by USARCARIB illustrator Jim Carter
Alma Burnett Weds
Horacio Oftey
Al Episcopal Rile
'Carlos Haye. Theodore Punnett
| and Sonny Williams.
Following the ceremony they
motored to the home of the
bride's parents at Rio Abajo
where a reception was held
which was presided over by the
bride's brother Conrad Burnett.
The following persons attend-
Miss Alma Burnett and Hora- ?*-, "**? l&Jt Jon^' *?
The area of disagreement
and Mrs. c. W. Hayes, Rev. C.
Sixty-three passengers are
scheduled to sail from New York
tomorrow for Cristobal aboard,. ,. larrle* '*" i w- ye
!^^b,^mE!iW Wit* -
who will be eligible to buy at the
discount. It is further under-
'f|KedXp^-.uV^ Mr. and Mri-Ma,.
stood to have narrowed down to
very minimal differences of
opinion relating to the status of
certain individual Canal Zone
'JJ .will be decided at the final pro-
Thompson said he was told by [gram Dec. 10. which will include
doctor at Baptist Hospital todav contestants from Rainbow City,
that Grays condition was not This project is to raise money
critical. The nature of his Ulneaslfor a Christmaa treat for the
was not diaeloied. children of La Boc*.
THE SLEEPING TIGER"
U o vary unusual drama, full of suspense release
FRIBAY at the "LUX" Theatre.
ti.
Church in Rio Abajo by the Rev.!
Father Clarence W. Hayes.
shall, Mr. and Mrs. R. Jones,
Mr. and Mrs. Ricardo McLean,
Mr. and Mrs. Cornwall, Mr. and
Mrs. Burgins. Mr. and Mrs. Pof
McLean, Mrs. LenoO, Mrs.
Greaves, Mrs. Johnson, Mrs.
Roade; Misses Bertha Boles,
Norma DeSouza, Vilma Burnett,
G. Gaskin, Mildred Wilson; Mes-
srs. O'Connor Burnett. Lloyd
Wheatley, Harold Gordon, Leon
Kellman. Phillip Henry. Caleb
Lambert and Headley Lennaa.
The treaty made no qualifica-
tions.
MTHDRM
Washing Machines
SALES ~ SERVICE
ARTS
MUEBLERA
CASA
SFART0N
teatral 26-7S
asttranee Encanto Theatre
The complete advance passen-
ger list for Cristobal follows:
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Aschner;
Dr. and Mrs. James Ralph: P.
Harold Bradley: Mr. and Mrs.
James H. Burns: Billy W. Cole;
Dr. Robert Coolidge; Mhts Betty
Daday; Mr. and Mrs. Edward J.
If the matter is dealt with at'Dlonam: Mr. and Mrs. isak Pa>
the Foreign Relations Council ilelde; Mr. and Mrs. Martin Get-
meeting this afternoon.-arul the I try; David M. Gillespie; Miss
council's recommendation U ac- Graciela Gonzalez: Mr. and Mr. wh|t* sunset lilies
cepted by Panama, there might William F- Grady; Mr. and Mr.,
be fast action to settle the ques- james Graham; Mr. and Mrs.! The bride was attended by
tlon that has become a tlreaome Gilberto J. Guardia: Frank A. i Miss daudette Barnabas as
subject. Hartman: Mr. and Mrs. James maid of honor who wore whits!
P Hayman: Gilberto J. finar- lace and crimp nylon taffeta. "
da; Frank A Hartman; Mr and I Others In the entourage in- ,
Mrs. James P. Hayman: Oswald i eluded Miss Rachel Johnsoi>, I
p. Heck: Mr. and Mrs. Frank g.jMildred Jarrett and Grace Bod- I
The bride was attired In a
gown of full chantllly lace with
white nylon and rhlnestones. De-
signed by the bride's cousin, |
Mrs. O. Lennan Her veil was a'
flowing waist-length of nylon
tulle sustained bv a rhlnestone
studded crown. She was led to
the altar by her brother Charles
Burnett who acted as father-
giver. She carried a bouquet of
FOR RENT
Well conditioned office with two private
offices, general office, large and mall
atore rooms, centrally located. All with
air-conditioning, lei. 2-4902.
Delay has abba directed sn
undue amount of attention to
the matter, many American*
and Panamanians have stated.
Hess: Milton A. Jones and Miss
Gertrude Joustra.
Ruben Lazarus; Miss Anne
Wn. They were escorted In or-
der by Eustace Ottey, who was
best .man, Mauricio Winloff,
Last Thursday, lt appeared
that the Gazette might publish
President Arias order In a *s^McKay: Mrs. Nye C *OtTh:"aaT.|,
days, thus permitting sales to;and Mrf mnIieM w ptiton. lUl.l UfL- Ufaajj,
clubs. The weekend and the In- |Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Paz and son- "*
dependence Day holiday inter-1 Mr. and Mrs. Carl Quarnstrom:
vened.
Of feting a eampletely out-of-the-ordinary subject. "THE
SLEEPING TIGER.' nbtch RKO Radio will release at the
LlX Theatre, starting Friday stars Alexis Smith and Alex-
ander Knox with Dirk Kagardr aad H baaed on a pay chalo-
gkal theme highly aiaised by the worM critica for Ita sin -
awlarity and the excellent manner la which the plot at put
together. '
The star rcvelvee aroand the experiment af a psychia-
tries ta refera a habitual crlsainai whe tried to held him
p and reb Bisa. This delteqrjeat is given the chelet ef go-
ing to Jail or Mvtng la the Doctor* haaae far sis tenth* as
hi* "guinea aig."
g sHaattons which deveiep when this "guin-
i daily assiiaat with the tsHsltsaa ef his
seta the seantifal wife af the decer ta whose
hesae be is to Uve for Jx maaths win held ta*j hi asamenaa
daring the whale exhibrUeat af the ptotere. Advt.
This morning the Panama
fovemment pranterv let it be
nown that the Gasette aalght
rail off the presses tonight, or
sorely tomorrow. Later, how-
ever. It reported a I'netype
machine had broken down.
'ibrarvWCiVwess
Award Dies In Want
excttln
BBBBBT ilaaaaBBBB
past Ufe and
Mr. and Mrs. Erwin F Ramsey!
and three children: Mr. andi
Mrs. Nathan Rosen; Miss Gret-1
chen E. Runge: Mr. and Mrs.1
William E. Scofield: Mrs. Sally
Slmms; LJdla G. Soganus-.res;
Mr. and if" Mvron J> staht-' NEW YORK. Nov. SS (UP>
Mr. and Mrs. Panl 8. Stewart' He,en WMt Prt'sr. 3. a nainter
Miss Bdith H. stoll; Miss Emily and Brmt ">a*r whose work
At midday the matter rested vaughs; Mr. and Mrs William'h,iyts ta """ie* and l^rari-s
tn*re- L. Wlllumsen: Emmet Zemer |here tn in rwe: and Wash-
-----, ________, in-rton, d'ed in Rellevne w^soi-
The crux of the whole matter
has been how to give the dii- a. .. _. .
count, yet discourage smuggling. United states officials hsve rv"* rlWTfllC
stated they wish to make sure a a a a rv
the cost to Panama of this con- II**** I rftt USktltsat
c^saton to the US U a mnimoiT"v"w "I rmHCl
one, yet St the same time pro-
tect their people under Um>|SMT. JOY. Pa
terms of the document.
tal as a ward of the citv io days
ago. It was learned-toda
Her body lies at the BeHevue
morwue oending tha arrival nf
her husband who police sakl ap-
pjrentlr ha-t been delayed ea
route from Canton. 111.
Phoose a RALEIGH the world',
Champion Cycle
Nefirhbnr- said Mrs. Heller
UP) Motor- had lived for many vears la ai
ists who park overtiaie in this-lower Fast Ride tenement, most,
community now receive a helpful'recently working on abstract
President Artas statfl Ameri-, assist iroso toe policemen on the oaintinp. She wa* receivin* old
can-citizen employes of Canal hest t%e assistance payments from
Zone federal agencies who live' ., 'he rttv department welfare at
in Panama would get the dlS- u****t' ,w ayatsm Inaugurated the time of her death.
I by the borough council, the police-' Mrs. HeXer was a native f
count, but others would not.
BALBOA TIDES
THURSDAY. MCIMSH t
HIGH LOW
4:*0 a as. 10 41 a.m
4:5 p.a. 1|:I0 aa.
man puu a nickel ia the meter
of the delinquent Darker.
A pink ticket also la left under
RushvOle. 111. Her work hangs in
the Library of Congress, which
awarded her a prise ia 1940. the
the windshield wiper asking the Brooklyn Museum. Chicsto Muni
motoriat to return the nickel tc cipal Museum, the Smithsoa'ar
the burgess' office within 48 Institution, and the New York
hours, aad the usual $i floe wm,Public Library, among other
bo forgotten. pia.
RALEIGH
' an-tree. ic v c i
I rear ooi of the last *, Biiili has__
aTheSakiaiiroobuyUWailiari
nafrsaa srao j.iiaji x4 WarM
f ":------"|-i
taak far tea aevt that aaaa aeity
4 rVadaet */ mirngk immmt, Lmmi. Xmimmm. mtfm
RADIO CENTER
7110 Bolivar Tel. 04, Coln
J alane-tea ai ili>
4
O
i


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER SO, 1955
*HE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEN
mm.

|
C AH T OLIO
3*.----------1------- Wc-
Double in Technicolor
*'AN WITHOUT
A STAR
- Also: -
LAND OF FURY
T VOL/
ttc-----------------lie
RANK NIGHT!
LUST POR GOLD
- Alio: -
. SIROCCO
CENTRAL Theatre
.75*.
4*c.
l:M, f:IS. 4:4*. :. I:tt p.m.
SPECTACULAR RELEASE!
Faith DOMERGUE Jelf MORROW
in
THIS ISLAND EARTH
In TECHNICOLOR!
LUX THEATRE
Me. --------------*i-------I------------ Me.
A
S:M 4:*7 :4S 1:4 pan.
ACTION RELEASE!
Nigel PATRICK Elizabeth SELLARS
In
FORBIDDEN CARGO
DRtVE-IN Theatre
POPULAR NIGHT!
fill PER CAR!
Donald O'CONNOR Martha IIV'FR
ln-
FRNCIS IN THE NAVY
CECILIA THEATRE
50c. --------------------- ------------- tot-
SENSATIONAL DOUBLE!
Joan Crawford, In
FEMALE ON THE BEACH
Plu:
RED BALL EXPRESS
RIO
tie. --------- BANKS
SSM.M
Jane Russell, in
MACAO
- Also: -
SUDDEN FEAR
V lCTC*l
15c. <
daNgerqus
M O N E Y
STAGE TRUCK
C BKEOKEE
U PRISING
imaiasaManiER of invention
AIR-CONDITIONING BV BEES. yy
TO COOL TH INTNWON Of* TH
>ki k aw or Hwee tanp at tub bntkancc
,^'^m.nSim FKP6H aim with rum*.***.
MOTY
MOVItS TV RADIO
by Erskin* Johnson
Japan Government
Proposes Reduction
In Imports To US
TOKYO. Wed., Nov. SO (UP
The Japanese government has
proposed a voluntary reduction in
export of cotton blouses to the
United States, the economic
Newspaper Ninon Xelzai a i d
Tuajwa.y
The Ministry of International
Trade and Industry proposed lim-
iting blouse export to 1,100,000
dozen next year, according to the
paper. Exports this year are ex-
pected to total 2,500,0000 doten.
The Nihon Kelzai said the min-
istry proposed the blouse quota
to the Japan Textiles Products
Export Assn. as a way to fore-
stall posaible American barriers
against Japanese cotton goods en-
tering the United Sutes.
M YEAR8 LATE
HIDDLESBORO, Ky. ~-
Sam Rose looked over some real
bargains in a mail order house
catalogue he received in the mail
recently. A handsome "all-brass
spotlight" wss listed st St cents,
and Model T radiators were on sale
at only $820. The SO-year-old auto
parts catalogue had lain hidoan m
the Cumberland Gap Post Office
since 1925.
HOLLYWOOD - rl on TV: No more filmed
fer Frahkle Leine. .
"It juat doesn't seem to work for:
aipgece-," Mr. Mul Train say. |
Live TV doe.some.thing t yeuj
insid ives jou
*P'-
FraaMe i* beaming o\ >
auecesB of Perry ("Ohio's one-hour
hew, *eiioViag i will se the
future pattern, for singers on home
screens. '
An hour show for Frankie is on
th CBS planning boards, he told
me between scenes for a-Shower
of. Stars stan, .
Laine warbled in M telefilms,
now in' syndication.
"But km option time came
around,' me said, "I sTMn't say
anything. Neither did the prodnc-
en and that was fine with me.'
Boh Crosby landed In the dog-
house with one of his network
bosses for refusing to baHyhoo
Arthur Godfrey on his show Bobs
never met the gent but takes a
dim' Yiew of him..... Despite
denials Studio One moves to Holly-
wood Feb. l. ... Red Skeltons
Mining rating this season is the
talk of TV alley. . Quote of the
month from Ray Bolger about his
late but not lamented show:,
"If we had it to do over again,
w# wouldn't do it-'1 ,
Famed Playwright Maxwell An-
derson is Bing Crosby s new song
ly3 of th.iu.es Bing warble, m
the one-hour telefilmusical version
of Anderson's "High Tor1 were
Moncd by the suthor to the music
/"Arthur Schwartz. 8chwart al-
March release on CBS-T.
so is producing the show '' *
It wss Anderson who wrote tne
lyrics for the famed "September
Song" but this is hi first musicsi
effort tor TV. Among the tunes sre
"A Little Love, s Little while,
tod Is the Life of Sailor
Wife." and a typical Crosby Jilt,
I.ivnV One Day at a TW
Schwart*. compostr o i dancing
in the Bark" and "Soroetlung to
^member You By/' W.^-
wn-wrote the word tor Sad Is
the Lfle" overnight "and I ant
have to chsnge a single word or
ote of music. He's a remarkable
*SSn" Te is the first tnUlenflh
ri"inal nsarical whtte. tor TV
,-d will he hewn to movie tkea-
ten entat* Sill*- Bing aeqalres
* STeftor two ahowtog. -
Channel Chatter: LucUle Ball
drums for -their movie, "Forever
Darling." They own 50 per cent ol\
the celluloid. . Loretta Young
reported to the NBC photo gallery
foe her first portrait sitting since
her Illness. Posed for.60 color shots
'A
and Back," dreamed up a newj
panel show, "Preview Panel
Hollywood stars cast, on NBC's
new daytime "Matinee1' .dramatic
series have to shine in the dark.
For her appearance the other day
Mary Anderson wss up at 4:30 a.m.
to keep a 0:30 a.m. dress rehearsal
date.
Souta-Of-The-Border TV notes
from a U.S. tourist:
A Mexico City TV station leaned
the idea and now Tamaleland is
agog over the M.IOM peso question
But a U.S. embassy official there
is blushing. An 18-year-old Univer-
sity of Mexico student picked U.S.
history and called in the embassy
man as his expert when he resched
the top platean.
But the lad couldn't answer the
BIG questionand neither could
the embassy official.
Andy Russell Is the star of the
Spanish version of "Stop the
Music" hot he can't he getting
rich. Biggest TV. show In Mexico
City, an hour variety staas, has
a complete budget of MM*. The
star ( the shew collects only $48
**** u j
Orosn from our tourist friend:
"They even run old English movie
with Spsnish titles^
SENTENCE
MITCHELL, S. D. (UP) Mu-
nicipal Judge Merton B Tice
turned stern schoolmaster recently
and sentenced tv.o Huron, S.D.
yourg men to write a thousand
times, "I will not destroy anyone
else* poperty." They were
cbsiged with malicious nvschiot
for throwing beer bottles at a
truck.
Webcor
3-speaker
Fonograf with
stereofonic
sound!
Here listening ueu
you Will long remember.
The Weheor 3-ipeed -
"Musicslc" fonogrsf fills
the entire room with
unbelievably true-
to-life tones.
Has a special G.
magnetic cartridge:
a powerful 5 wan
amplifier and thru
super-sensitive speakers. }
Delivers from 50 to -
15,000 cycles. _
SUPERS
. FREE IN DEC.
with EACH MUSICALE
I2f.se in Columbia
10" L. P. Records
EASY TERMS AVAILABLE
45th St. No. 3
Tel. 3-1285
m*rrr
own a sfw&tK react
CAMAL ZONE
DELIVERY
(Ricadr
VuokavmYMJU
OPEN TONIGHT
and every night 'til! Christmas
nj"ii*HM,i
YOU DON'T Ml CASH FOR CMHIITMAS ITO... USI SUM IASY PAY**** PUN
Let SEARS Provide Your Christmas Feat
St*.
WIN
PORKY PIG, JR.
BY GUESSING
HIS WEIGHT!
< i

It's easy! Just com* into our Freezer
Department and ask for a free entry blank. Take a look at Porky
Pig, Jr., on display in a Coldspot Freexer and mark your guess in
the space provided. Absolutely no obligation!
li SEE These Feature-packed Contest Specials!
I4.7CU.FT. 1955 COLDSPOT
CHEST-TYPE FREEZER
HOLDS OVER
514 LBS. OF FOOD
519.
%
22.00 a month on SEARS
Easy Payment Plan
e Air-tigh! Super Wpl 'ruction
e Easy-to-use out-front
e Countfir-balono d lid with liqht
e Genuine porcelan
*
"'z,
'/<

7^=
1955,11.7 cu. ft. Coldspot
. I 30>30 indies of floor
E > Irain
Joor
r f-o ittion
FREEZES AND STORES
409 lbs. of FOOD
95
469.
19.50 a month on Sears
Easy Payment Plan
- Xi,-
....
Shop Scars Catalog for 124,000 Xmas Gift Items
'Saristecien 0Kff*f<< o. r Mo/iy Back
PANAMA Tivoli Ave. Phone Pan 7-C93)
M
Shop bath Stores Panam ami Colon
'V> 5ari taif Payment Plc
COLON Mslndez Art. & iDHi St. Pkone Coln H$T
nn^'. I I iJ.li.wnjlisaajs>sssBS^
P. A. CLASSIFIEDS


^PAOI BIGHT
PANAMA ASmUCAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY. NOVBMH . 1S#1
Social and \Jth
erwie
80* 3037, ^4,
neon
a% Staff.
Bo, 134, P*
anama
ft. nm-k tH~***, &U P~t -ir~t~Ul mJJ ^A U~J~ ~
J, Jf. L'~~J t, i.t~ *w P
3-0/40 m 2-0741
Umm 900 ~J 10
-4
CHINESE AMBASSADOR AND WIPE ENTERTAIN
FOREIGN MINISTER AND MRS. ALBERTO BOYD
Tbc AnkuMdor of Chin and Mr*. Wane Teh * w*
heat* last evening at a reception honoring the Foreign Minu-
ter ef Panam and Mr*. Alberto Boyd. _____
Mr. ana Mra. raaaar Jower CM *jy"
.iwteunce Daughters Birth Salk Leeture. Dinner
Mr nd Mrt! S Paul Kramer Last Monday evening roem-
of Now York a*d Waahlngton fcera o the Tower Club (couples
have announced the birth of a
daughter, Louise.
club associated wtlh the Cathe-
dral of St. Luke) enjoyed a de-
licious catered supper.
Mt. Kramer'wHe Is a partner! '.' ___
In the firm of Auerbach. Pollak! They also heard an engrossing
and Richardson, has visited the talk on the question of ^ne new 1 of American Pen Women, asks
Isthmus many> times.
Bridge Winner
Winners of Duplicate Bridge
games, played Monday evening
at the Tivoli Quest House were:
1st: Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Hodgson;
2nd: Mr. and Mrs. H I. Boma;
3rd: Mr. and Mrs. E. Kohn; 4th:
Mrs. Palmer and Mr. flanchea;
5th: Mr. and Mrs. M. Zelenka;
th: Mr. T. O. Dean and Mr. R.
Carter.
Paint ngi For fcxlnblt
At Pan Women Gallery
Mrs. Francis Greening, gallery
chairman of the Canai Zone
Branch of the National League
'Salk vaccine for polio, given by-all Pen Women artista to bring
Dr.. Eric R- Osterbarg. Chief of two paintings to the business
New Books
The story of the five Elsen-
hower brothers, Arthur, Edgar,
Dwight. Earl and Milton, and
the late Roy J. Eisenhower, Is
told In "The Great American
Heritage," one of the books plac-
ed In circulation this week by
the Canal Zone Library.
A personal family biography as
well as an important historical
document, the book was written
by Bela Kornltzer. former Hun-
garian refugee, who feels that
(he essence of democracy is re-l
fleeted in the tolerant demo-1
era tic attitude of the typical
American family. The book In-
cludes an exclusive 32-page pic-
ture sequence from the Eisen-
hower family albums.
The complete list of new books
and their authors anonunced by
the library this week follows:
Non-fiction Pension Plan-
ning. Couper: Chemicals of Life,
Aslmov: The Viking Rocket Sto-
ry, Rosen: Grin and Bear It,
Lichty; The Hotspur Story,
Loomis: Holsters and Heroes,
Western writers of America;
i_lACO*T OH ttltXt
By Oswald Jacoby
Written for NEA Service
A lively discussion followed.
Members of the club are re-
British Ambassador,
Mrs. Henderson
Entertain at Cocktail
Her BritanrHc Majesty's Am-
bassador and Mrs. Ian L. Hen-1 minded that the Christmas
derson gave a-cocktail party at meeting is in the offing and
the British Embassy on Satur- that more donors
day to which, $hey
umber of their friends. Ithe Bella'
i
the Division of Preventive Med- meeting, tomorrow night at 7:30 American in Italy. Kubly; The
cine and Quarantine.
at the Tivoli Guest House.
Paintings will be hung in the
new exhibit at the Little Gallery
of the TivolL
are reqi
ista Children's Home.
Daughter Born To
uired 1 Farmer Zonta*
T-Sgt. and Mrs. Nolan H.
Spencer of Langley Field, Virgl
nia, have announced the biiili
of their third child; second
daughter.
The baby born Nov. 20 is the
granadaugnter of Mr. and Mrs.
James F. G. Trimble of Marga-
rita. She has been named Ste-
phanie Ann.
8gt. spencer Is scheduled to
leave in January for an as-
signment in French Morocco.
SURPRISE FORTUNE
PROVIDENCE, R. I. C-UP)-
Miss Winifred Devine, an *)-year-
old spinster who lived alone, used
randies instead of electric lights
because they were less'expensive
When she died, a search of her/old
farm home disclosed more than
$100.000, including Szf 506 in each
stuffed Id vases, dlsraHert cigar
boxes and o*A envelopes. Cousins
share the estate. satiat*
Great American Heritage, Kor-
nitaer; Air Commando, vacuhe.
Fiction Erfcelsior, Bonner:
The Flower Girls, Dane; Teach
You A Lesson, Hollls; Shadows
I in the Dusk, Jennings; Scales of
Justice, Marsh; The Sixth of
June. Shapiro; Officers and
Gentlemen, Waugh.
AUTO FIGURES
DETROIT < UP) The aversge
driven 9,200 miles per year, ac-
automobile in the United States is
cording to latest figures from the
WEST
qi
VJ1004J
? 7S12
? <
East
1*
Paw
Pass
Pass
NORTH
? K3
865
? A84
? KJ72
BAST (D>
OI0752
/AKQJ
? QJ9
*5
SOUTH
4.AJ4
? K108
? AQ10983
North-South vul.
SeaUi West North
2 Pass 2 N.T.
3* Pass I*
** Pasa 3 +
Pass Pasa
!
Opening leadV J
. When today's hand was played
in the recen National Champion-
snips in Chicago, seversl experts
played the hand at three no-trump
and had the humiliation of losing
the first five heart tricks. The good
bidders played the hand at five
clubs, but not all of them male
this excellent contract.
The opening lead was the jack
of hearts at all tables, and the
NERTfftf
O
I
it* ! an** a*V aa -t-
cssi Ml. oekarwstV* m atoma
r basa t* mm en-, awn
CHRISTMAS COMES BUT ONCE A YEAR-That'a why Santa
Clans Lucky S. Squire is signing up for a postholiday-season job
in New York City. After all, Santa has to eat the year round.
Automobile Manufacturers' Asao- suit was continued, South ruff:ni
cut ion. The average driver in the the second round. Several declar
milea ers finessed the Jack of sapdes
United SUtes
per year.
New Planes
For K. L. M.
K.L.M. Royal Dutch Airlines
received a cablegram from their
Head Office in Holland signed
by Dr. Aler, President o K.L.M.,
informing that the Company or-
dered eight DC-8 Jet planes at
90 million dollars Including
snares. Delivery of the planes
will take place on March 1900.
(Mercurio 1
V
new shopping service
comes to Panama!
1
Yes, Burdine's in Miami, your nearest
U.S. Department Store, bring yon a NEW,
convenient, easy-to-uee hopping servir.
A servir that leta you actually shop in the
comfort of your own home, or in a conven-
iently located air-conditioned sales office,
and have top-quality merchandise deliv-
ered to you quietly by air at new, low
rates. Beat of all, this wonderful new shop-
ping service ia youra to use as often as
you wsnt for free!
To make this service available to you, Burdine's has named LOU GLUD,
long-time resident and business man on the Isthmus of Panama, to take your
orders over the phone or help you shop at Burdine's in his conveniently located
sales Dice around the corner from the A noon Post Office. By shopping at
Burdine's with Lou Glud. you can AH all the wants of yourself, your family,
and your home through the facilities of Burdine's complete department store.
- Think of the advantagesf shopping at Burdinea with Lou Glud..
Fresh, high-quality merchandise for the entire family and your home.
Easy shopping by phonecaH Panama 2-2978or a conveniently locat
air-conditioned sales office for you to visit.
Convenient credit terms arranged.
Fast delivery by air from nearby Miami at new low ratea, via At A.
Complete customer confidence in Burdine's character and integrity.
You SAVEBurdine's shopping service ia freeyou pay regular Miami prices.
Special for Your Christmas Orden I *
Here is a big plus for you right now. Juat in time for Christmas are Burdine's
Toy Catalog and Burdine's Christmas Gift Catalog, both loaded with wonderful
gifts for everybody. You can get your copies at Lou Glud'a salea office or by
telephoning Panama 2-2978.
And, here is a convenient and eaay way for you to use these Cataloga to
play Santa to all your friends and relatives in the State. Do your Chriatmas
shopping at Burdine's with Lou Gludorder the things you want sent to folks
in the U.S.A."and let Burdine's do the rest. We will fill your orders, provide
a FREK Christmas gift wrap (or a deluxe wrap at small extra charge), enclose
your card, wrap and mail your gift, and you pay only the price in the Catalog
and transportation costs from Miami.
So, today, and every dayto shop easily and conveniently for top-qualit
merchandise and quick deliveries to you at low coots from one of America'
finest storesshop at Burdine's with Lou Glud.
ANCON
r.o.
a
%
Shop at Burdine's with
Lou Glud
around the) corner
from Aneen Post Office
after drawing tramps, and felt be-'
trayed when this finesse unac-
counubly lost to the queen. These
players lost s spsde, a heart, and
a diamond, one trick too many for
the contract.
The proper play was demonstrat-
ed by George C. Foerstner, of
Amsna, Iowa, a comparative new-
comer to expert bridge circles. He
saw no reason to take one bite at
the apple when he was sure to get
two bjtes if he just exercised care.
After ruffing the second heart,
Foerstner drew two rounds of
trumps, ruffed dummy's last heart
and cashed the top diamonds. He
got out with' the diamond that he
was sure to lose sooner or later,
allowing East to win the trick.
East had to lead a spade, of
course, since another heart return
would have given declarer a ruff
and a discard. Foerstner played a
low spade from his hsnd, and
West's queen was trapped. No
further finesse wss necessary. .
The first bite thus turned out to
be enough, but Foerstner wasn't
completely dependent on catching
the aueen of spades in this way.
If only the ten of spades bad ap-
peared on the Ifrst round, he would
have won with dummy's king of
spades and would still have been
in position to try the normal fi-
nesse for the queen.
Colon Rotary
Meen Tomorrow
The Cristobal-colon Itetarj
Club will bold their regular
weekly luncheon meeting at th
Strangers' Club tomorrow.
Mrs.' Diana Chlari de amber
will be the gueat speaker and
her subject will be Panamanian
Natirt Art and Crafts.
oseos a* 1 may.
The regular monthly meeting
of the Morning Guild of St.
Luke's Cathedral will-take placa
Friday t t am. In the Bianop'a
residence.
Member are requested a
SS%^*^'******
Unity Ledge "
To Elect Officers
Unity Lodge No. 1(04 of the
IB P.O. Elks of W., win convene
Friday for a special session to
nominate and elect officers for
the January-Jane 1056 term at
the Paraso Lodge Hall begin-
ning at 7:80 p.m.
All Officers and members art
urged to attend.
See Lanolin Plus Liquid
Do Wonders
For Your Skin
Overnight!
pOUBLE-JOINTE&^Thls half cant stand by Itself, because it
has ave legs. The "extra" leg of the animal, born on the Frank
Veldheer farm near Holland, Mich., separates from the right hind
leg about halfway down and appears to end in two hoofs. The
calf also has a double hip joint Veldheer says the caV seems to
_ba perfectly healthy.
?
S
I
r

t
t
t
El Estudiante Street
=>J
jLcdo. vifpip tejada Juina
and family-

Are profoundly grateful to the Medical Staff of the
Panam Hospital particularly to Dr. Manuel Gonsales Ruts,
Dr. Samuel Velarde and Dr. Adolfo Malo I., to the Nurse
Staff, to all the office personnel, to Archbishop Francisco
Beekman, to the Rev. fathers Manuel Maguregui, Xavier
Villanueva, Manuel Prada, Gabriel Di Luaio and Marino
Morlin, Director of Don Boscd School; to the National Col-
lege of Lawyfers; to those Newspapermen who were true to
their cause; to Dr. Lula A. Carrasco M., to Mr. Cecilio Mo-
reno C, and to Mr. Cecilio Moreno Jr., as well aa to all their
friends from Panama, Coln, from all parts, of the Repub-
lic and foreign countries, for the sincere expression of
friendship and good will thoy have received.on account of
the recent sad incident they had experienced.
Panam, November, 1955.
Scout News
Scouts Camp At-PL Sherman
Despite Misiy Skies
Undaunted by tpe slight miss
over the long week-end, M Boy
Scouts and Explorers. of the Bal-
boa Lions Club Troop 7 nd Post
7, Curundu. accompanied-by their
scoutmaster and advisor, camped
for three days at Fort Sherman.
Despite the lack of sunshine,
the boys worked oa advancement
with nine completing their sec-
oni class requirements, and ma-
ny completing first class require-
ments on measuring, map sketch-
ling, and Camp Malting. A;scouts'
pace relay was enjoyed, a trip
i to Fort San Lorenza, a six-mile
jnignt nike with signalling and
other scoutcraft g a m 0 a filling
th elisure moments.
Sunday, Catholic Church enr-
ices wore attended at Margarita,
asd Protestant Church services -at
Fort Davis.
Boy Scouts making the trip
wet. John Blakealee, John' Mc-
Carragker, Raj Underwood, Ken-
neth Major, George OH a at a,
Frank Baggot, George Garcia,
Earl Griggs, Freddie Huddleetoh,
Expedito Sheppard, Eddie giarez,
Joe Suarez, Harry Colbert and
Paul Underwood.
Explorers attending were Era
Friershaus. John Bisset, James
Benson, Tom Sheffiedl, L e e J.
Spauiding, Jr. Bill Le Blanc,
John Hernandez, Juan Vecchloni,
and Manuel Borowiec. Scoutmas-
ter Wealey M. Kennedy and Ex-
plorer advisor Fred Huddleston-
accompanled the boya.
A board of review was held
Monday and a troop court of soar*
or will be. held in the near, fu-,
ture. ,
hone Psmh
2-2*7*
lanolin Plus Liquid it lbs patented
t concentrated lanolin that ptn-
I roar tkin. Used ti a rlrarucr
before reiiria|-tha ale more drop*
ssskklr saasuf ed in, and yoall awaken
next morning to discover that a very
dofinite miracle has happened. No
feeling of skin drine* at illand aa
ixtrm sorfeo aad asfra smoothness
that it aew. Bat more!
A* year skin becomes softer sad
softer and smoother and smoother,
those disturbing, premature, dry-skin
row'a-leot and wrinkles really fad*.
Got yaar haul* of Lanolin Plus
Liasisd today. Um it tonight. You'll
Its a happier ornan tomorrow
ntorning.
Liquid
aa
Ask for Hmm Skor
> ioti n*s
toasoSa Plus Hand looea
tan Wt Shampoo
lasMla NaiaiMWr
AGS.K i>o \MIJIH.ANAS
joaneSo > Ca, Una.
tV. Bra 211 tai. 1-SSS4
09
>J. -, u
Homemade NeKl'loIl House Cooktes
-yum! See how Nestle'* Semi-Sweet ^Wttittt*
Morsels stay whole, peck every bite with,
chocolate delight! See how exutschy^ead]
crisp they(k>oac. Taste how rich
aad delicious they mtt Piel
up NeaKl'i Semi-Sweet,
Chocolate at your
grocer's tooy. The
reoiwtoo.sjjs^pji^iv^ i
9
40
WTTMiyrttlFAMOUS
Ljzm
KK.5JLIV


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30. 195S
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE NINE
Social and \Jth
erwie
CfOntiniitm
'LL LEAD FICHT ON POLIOMeet five-year-old Tommy Woodward, who has been named
oster Boy for the 1956 March of Dimes. He'i shown here as he looks today and as he looked in
1952. At left, he offers some of the peanuts which will be sold to raise funds in the campaign
against polio, Jan. 3 to 31. At right, the Baltimore, Md., youngster Is shown when he was two
years old. Tommy was stricken with polio when he was 14 months old. Although he'll have
to use crutches and wear his braces and body corset for years to come, he smiles readily. Ti~.art
vhy his freckled face will appear on millions of posters and collection boxes during the drive. ,
CotllMea Daaea Saturday
The Atlantic Side Cotillion
Club has engaged the Royal Sul-
tans to play for a semi-formal
dance on Saturday evening.
There will be dancing from :30
until 12:30 a.m.
Johnstons Back Prom Leave
Mr. and Mrs. Calvin H. John-
ston of Curundu Heights re-
turned Sunday from a four-week
vacation spent In Acapulco and
Mexico City.
Flower Shew Monday
Ends Morgan Class
A flower show on Monday, at
8 p.m., will bring Mrs- Pat Mor-
gan's current flower arrange-
ment class to an end. Mrs. Lou-
ise Morris is chairman of the
flower show.
Mrs. J. 8, Seybold, wife of the
Governor of the Canal Zone will
be the honored guest and will
cut the ribbon which opens the
show to the public
A portion of the show will be
devoted to Christmas arrange-
ments with each student sub-
mitting an entry In the special
field.
Students will also compete for
awards In arrangements of cut
flowers, dried and exotic mate-
rials, fruits an dvegetables. Ar-
rangements will be judged on
the basis of originality, condi-
tion of material. Interest, color
harmony, relation of material to
container.
There is no charge for admis-
sion to the flower show Monday.
Evening sn 'Mexico'
Tonight at D8O-JWB
An evening In "Meylco" has
been planned at the TJSO-JWB
Armed Forces Service Center,
this evening at 8:00.
The country, colorful and
rich In culture, which has be-
come a tourist's delight, will b?
seen via colored films loaned *
Pan American Airways for the
occasion. Other special features
have been planned for the eve-
ning.
This program has been plan-
ned for the forthcoming trip
1 which has been arranged to
1 Mexico from Dec. 24 to Jan. 2 In
'cooperation with Fldanque
I Travel Service of Panama.
A cordial invitation is extend-
ed to all to-attend the evening
in "Mexico."
Wilma Miles Clab
Elects Officers
The Wilma Miles Navv Wives
Club has elected the following
officers:
President, Flo Bernard: vice-
president, Marge Woodburn; re-
cording secretary. Eleanor Fel-
tenberger corresponding secre-
tary, Wanda Splndler: treasur-
er, Marge Bunch: and parlia-
mentarian. Stella Brown.
An installation dinner will be
held Dec. 19 at the CPO Wives
Club, Rodman.
Tarietv Nlghf Sunday
At JWB To Include
Dances, Songs
The monthly "Variety Night.",
a nrogram of entertainment,
will be presented at the USO-
JWB Armed Forces service Cen- '
ter on Sunday at 8:00 n.m. Mas
ter of Ceremonies Is Pvt. John-
ny McTaggert, 23rd Medical Bn.
Fort Clayton.
The program will present nov- ,
elty dances bv Ellen Rlellv. Ga-
ry Brockway. Nancv Huldtoui't.
Randy Brockway. Glendy Rielly.
Aharon Hochspabp, and Lany
Hudson, all pupils of Ann Lat-
tin; the George Oodoy Tr,
Pfc George Oodoy, Pfc Jim Nes-
bltt, both of Fort Clayton and
8fc George Schock of Fort Am-
ador; Plano Novelties by Pfc
Bob Stephenson of Fort Ama-
dor: quartet music bv the "Mocl-
ernalres"; and Vocal Selections
by Miss Icyln Smythe, accom-
annled by Miss Emily Butcher.,
Director of Music for the Latin
American Schools In the Canal
Zone. v
A cordial invitation Is extend-1
ed to military personnel, their
families and friends, and to the
public both of the Canal Zone
and the Republic of Panama to
attend.
MODERN MIRACLE"Stop, Mildred. I can see you." Those six simple words marked the
most joyous thrill in the 74 years of Robert Brown's lifetime. Totally blinded in a coal mino
explosion 40 years ago, his sight partially returped recently as his wife stepped across the
threshold of their Johnstown, Pa., home. "She looked Just like a paper doll standing there," Brown
recalls. He has no explanation of the miracle, except that he had never given up faith that his sight
vould come back. Brown and his wife, alio blind from a horse's kick when sbe was five, years
14, were married 21 year. ago. [] |,j | [j | j|jj| {| j f j } { fff \

1
;

"MOUTH-PAINTED BY MERLE"Two years ago, Merle Chisholm, pretty, 28-year-old St. Paul
wife and mother, was a eommercial artist Today she is polio-paralyzed from the neck down. But I
she has wasted no time In self-pity. She set about to learn to draw and paint again with a pencil '
or brush clenched in her teeth. She won that battle and has built a new artistic career with a
collection of exclusive "mouth-painted-by-Merle" Christmas cards and personal note paper. Her '
husband, Robert, is also an artist. Here their four-year-old son, Gary, watches in fascination as
his mother draws a picture.
Churchill To Gel
Williamsburg
Colonial Award
Union Official
To Be Cited
For Contempt
WASHNGTON, Nov. 30 (UP)
A Senate labor subcommittee vot-
ed unanimously today to cite An-' NEW YORK, Now. 90 (UP) A
voune mother and her two slee-
hud-
Inciso failed to appear before died today on a train in the sub-
the subcommittee Monday in re- way which had been their home
Destitute Family
Train For 3 Days
Lives On Subway
ttttif unrif Arir Nov tn ea unanimously loaay to cite An- in.w iuhk, inow. so (urj a
frtpi flftaArM Scfeiler wiU el ^e'0' Chicago union offi- young mother and her two alee-
2rd~the fhT Colonial wVk^jor contempt of the Senate, py/.ughters were found *
liamsburg award to Sir Winston
Churchill in London next week.
Rockefeller Who 1 chairman oi'^ptrnt to a subpena seeking tes- for three days.
th hoard or t^teVwtoh re-Simony and records about his During that time the bedrag-
ferMil Srmstr V?, union insurance program. gled Wy ^ have traveled
<,ini will in sirs the award at a1 v more tn,n 10O mue tnrOUgn
banquet n 7 at Drapers Inciso is president o Local 216,the city's subways.
Ha^in the EMlish'citv of the AFL AutomobUe Workers' A transit policeman loc a ted
rw. R?vVlns of Morrllton tand chairman of the board of the Mrs. Amelia Perez, 24, and her
a number of boardo^American Continental Insurance children, Veralla. 6 and Maria.
toas id the award Is to be pre- Co.. which carried insurance poll- 1 months, after being notified by
who makes an outstanding contri- cat.
bution to the prestrvation of
peace and justice, tn recognition
of the outstanding contribution of ;
the leaders of colonial Williams- ,J
burg.
Also present at the banquet
Dec. 7 will be General George
< Marshall. General Omar
Bradley, Bernard Baruch and a
representative of Queen Eliza-
beth.
Premier-Designate
Of Morocco Tries
To Form Government
RABAT, Morocco. Nov. 30 -
(UP Premier designate Si
Bekkai scheduled a meeting with
the Sultan today to report prog-
ress of his'efforts to form a gov-
ernment which observers thought
would probably continue to the
end of thjs week
The one-legged former French
Army colonelhas spent four days
already tn bis consultations, and
informed sources said today be
would not teach : definite deci-
sion until after the Istiqlal con-
ference which opens here Friday.
Si Bekkai's great problem at
the moment is to decide on the
.TBmber of minister* he aims to
have in ^forocco'i first represen-
tative goveinsjt. and how he
will parcel out the portfolios.
DOCTOR LOSES
CARTHAGE, S. D. (UP -
Eves a rwtor can t beat the -
A son was bote to Di and
Karl
recently as ihev wi -ni 'M
a Huron, s D., hos, '
//
FLOTA MERCANTE
GRANC0L0MBIANA, S. A.
ANNOUNCES
THE ARRIVAL AND SAILING OF THE
M/N Ciudad de Bogot
ON DECEMBER 4th, 1155.
GENERAL CARGO WILL BE ACCEPTED FOR:
VANCOUVER TAMPICO
HOUSTON and NEW ORLEANS
APPLY:
WILFORD & McKAY, Inc.
Masonic BuUdjng, Cristobal, C. Z.
TELEPHONES: CRISTOBAL: 2998 1760 2535
TOMATO TOPPER Unn
Fleeniir is mighty proud of his
tomato plant The Bristol,
Term., home gardener has rea-
son to be. for the plant is 14
feet high U's produced sav-
..- < rw tomato s meas-
uring abuut 17 inches in cir
cumfcrence.
seen the little family three times
since Saturday at the Coney Is-
land end of the the line.
Mrs. Perez told the transit offi-
cer she had fed her children
since Saturday with candy bars
and food purchased at newsstands
with coins begged from fellow
passengers ss the train rattled
back and forth from Brooklyn to
the Bronx.
At a police station officers
chipped in for sandwiches and
milk before taking the family to
the city shelter.
Mrs. Perez toM police she lost
her job two months sgo. She ap-
plied" for relief, but when no j
check came, she was evicted
from her furnished room.
The dispatcher said he first no-
ticed the family Saturday night
when they did not get off at the
end of the line. After seeing them
again on Sunday and this morn-
ing, he notified trsnslt police.
1 In their three nights and two
days on the clattering trains,
they could have made about 27
round trips on the 2M-mUe line,
subway officials said
TREAT AS EQUAL
CONCORD, Mass. (UP) A
Lincoln won an. about to go away
for a week, left her dog at a kennel
here with written instructions ss
i to diet and general care. "And still
more important,'* she concluded,
"please avoid all patronizing tones
sad. anything that smacks of
(Mndescenafon."
Sound travels faster in water
than in air.
Ohdi y mm
COLD CASH
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (UP) It
was really cold cash somebody
stole from James Reaten. Roa un
Ct Si,000 in cash in his deepfreeze
safekeeping. It was gone when
he went to look at it.
11 : '
(f rmerly at Salon Tony. 4th of July Ave.)
above Rhode's, takes pleasure
Now at Justo Arosemena Ave. No. 4*15

.....^
' >4 **

"Famous Italian Hair Stylist?*

Srta. Gladysin Strum Jlmenes
"Tony's Exclusive Hair Do"'
Specializes In tints, cuts, permanfnts
and all beauty aids.
We announce the Italian guaranteed permanent
"Toque-Mgico" from $10.00
Make your appointment. Phone 3-1302, where TONY and BRUNO
will be at your service.
Excjuslve Italian and French products used.
i I
JonyA



Ave. Jusio Arosemena Ne. 4-15 Phone 3-13M

ENJOY A WEEKEND AT EL PANAMA
FOR ONLY 15.'!!
Far C. Z. ano
R. P. rttiant* ak-t
lirias laaftfisariM)
The VACATION t EL PANAMA,
MAN! TRAVEL THOUSANDS of MILES forIS TOURS at a "GET
ACQUAINTED' PRICE DURING NOVEMBER smi DECEMBER.
(Week-end Flan is in tfleet altar hoick Saturday unft I p.m.
Sui.uay, but tee cordially invite you to cheek tn any time Saturday
to njov cur many facuities, at no extra cott. Special price tor
ii-e day before or after MUek-end.
. $ IS. per person includes:
-

OAfV
at
v
The P A. Printing Press
57 "H" Street Te. 24)740
ROOM Mi ri... t.-.ic. mi fcttr). far 2 i ,ni I ar|ht.
C.mrlHM.tfrr II ttmtm, COCKTAIL f*4 say aw Mtlrt rsM>.
Dining m4 dancing $5.50 i<**u < ibamu ItHa Vk4a lalM
by caaelaHta* a tr print* tarract.
A *n* H Mm Csti-iii-rlM-Sh.
SUNDAY BRUNCH it. tumpMmeMtty cacktarll, eaaciaf t* (he
aMMtc' i> 1Mb* Atcarraffa'i Tria.
OSI . II Rar.aaa'i MANY FACILITIIS Ok.-. aal Tawlt Cktl.
-. tliaNraiware. pMtrafl
YOU CAN BRINC tt>i CHILDRIH1 one or two under 12 yean of age
accommodated free in your room, and '4 price lor children's porfo-'
m ella Vista Salon. Baby sitter available at moderate charge.
NO
ROOtHINC ITI THIS IS A LUXURY WIIK-INB!
Thk is e*i El Panama's participation in the J Reservations ceeRtsd for mnimum of two
"Kno# Your Local Hpttj Patttr prtrani concrad I adults per rcom. moat be made in advene*
by mo Kottl aiiociation. I directly with hotel. Tel. S-IMP.



f>

\
.
*> .
MGE TEN
-

THE EANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 39, IMS

-
'



V, 4
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1 1 'X 1 ;. j |
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9
RCA VICTOR RADIO
Now in fantastic
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From # / 3 ^#Weekly

CTADV When Scott Wilon vi'*in2 Public Relation Counsel for New Orleans, aaid he would like to
FISHY JlUKY try Panama fishing, Muriel Mykland, Panama's publicity gal, arranged an all-day trip. At the
11th hour Wilson found that a date with a Panama government official prevented his going on. the trip. Other
members of the party caught 70 fish in one afternoon, and he has been chagrined ever since. Shown here with
some of their catch are Muriel Mykland, her sister Mrs. Thora Smith and Myke Smith.
*.
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You may also have the opportunity to win
$1.450.00 in Merchandise, that wo are
giving for Christmas. For each dollar
that you pay, you will receive a free
ticket.
=
jfa#//fiyefimt7fiiy4

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CRAWFORD AGENCIES
is offering the best for Christmas*
Flelschmann H. 0. electric trains
Planes
Cars in different styles
Pianos
Drums
Cristmas wrapping paper
e Ribbons
Angels
Santa Clauses
>. . and many other items to sparkle up your home for the coming holidays.
COME W TODAY AND SELECT AHEAD OF TIME
CRAWFORD AGENCIES
J" St. No. 13-A-30
Tels. 2-2386 2-3265 2-2142
BAllBCOA U/Ulair nikir Don RauI Aran*'0' right-.chief of *" P*n*i Bomberos rebuffs' big party
BOMBERO WnllvVl-UINu marking their annual day of celebration. At left is Ambassador of Francs Lionel
Vasse.
V



WHACK THAT
PIRATA /
Soon after this picture was
taken, the deter mined
young miss Whacked the
piata so hard that it fell
apart, dropping gifts and
favors for everyone at the
birthday party given for s
the young daughter of the*
Rodrigo Arias family.


WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBFR W, 1M5
PANAMA autocar am
nDEPENDnrr dart j*iwwatkb

CAUTA IC UCDC B't ai a bui,dklE and J0"* M a tov tor,i Krit-Kringl*himtlf dominate th tcent fonf
SANTA 15 HcKC Panama's shopping thorofare Central Avenue where he welcomes all-comers.
J&AW* QhSlAASlA
Jjoa Biq dioiidaqA...
j L.
Do have a good time, this holiday season and look your sparkling beat...
in festive dresees for all occasions, in silk and cottons!

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No
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22-06 <
. Central Ave.
next to Manhattan Chase Bank
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Opp. Aneon P. O.
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ASK YOUR FRTENDS
THEY WILL RECOMMEND US
.
Jewellers
next to the Central Theater



i
y
\q^jKj^red
\ir\W DTl Rotaran Bob Worsley (white shirt) joins in the square dancing at the Thanks-
SWING YOUR PARTNfcKj giving Meeting of the Panama Rotary Club. The meeting was also the annual
"wives-day" for the civic organization. The dance troupe consisted of Jean Kelley, Phyllis Allen, Charlotte
Kilbey, Nancy Clarke, Elsa Lomedlco, Wayne Brown, Herbert Hebel and John Doftnan.
QUALIFIED
TO HELP
Ladies of the graduating
claes in beginners'first ait
receive their completion of
course certificates. T h s
class, which ran approxim-
ately six weeks is a part
of the Panama Area Dis-
aster Control Prog ram.
Presenting Mrs. Earl Gip-
son with her cerifcate is
Col. L. C. Pittman, USA
left) while (I to r) Mrs.
Tony, Dramer, Mrs. Ellis
W o o d b urtiT Mrs. 0. t>.
Spindler, Mrs. Cene Rosen.
Mrs. Karl Kalkofen, Cap-
tain Cecrge D. Roullard,
USN. and Mrs. Wallace A.
Fite look on. -The ceremony
waa held at the Army Serv-
ice Club, Ford Arr> ~r.
(Official U. S. Navy Photo-
graph).
A^festindiouse
ELECTRICAL..
APPLIANCHES
NO DOWN PAYMENT LOW PRICES!
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through our easy Club System
CASA sport; s. a.
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mueblera "EL DIABLO''
Wree
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16-26 Central A vs., Panama


.
A
PAGE TWELTE
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, IMS
1
Vieja Will Field A Strong, Well Balanced Team/ Says Al Kubski*
ti
Auburn, Vanderbilt Agree Basilio Solid
On Dec. 31 Gator Bowl Date 8-5 Favorite
Over DeMarco
Qualifying Rounds For Esso
Tourney To Start This Week
By DAWSON OPPENUEIMER
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Nov. 30
(UP) Auburn ind Vanderbilt
agreed yesterday to a D e c. 31
date in the Gator Bowl that
won't make them rich but will
provide balm for their disappoint-
ment over not going to
howls.
members have been matched in
any bowl, Georgia Tech and
Mississippi having met in the
1953 Sugar Bowl.
The Gator bowl seats 35,612
fans small-size as the bowls go
but if it is a sell-out this year
hiBepr each team is expected to get
"c about $70,000 compared with the
For Auburn it will make a'*55000 .toP '" the PMt- The in-
third straight trip to the Jackson-1"ease. fa/Vy "P"1"1 from
viUe festivities where the Plains- |the.,sa ? of ** rights and
men from Alabama dropped their Pa*ly because the competing
opener to Texas Tech but gained schools do not have to allot as
revenge last year against Baylor. mufn * *ft cut t0 * So^'
For Vanderbilt if will be thelea"ern Conference as m the
first excursion to a bowl any-|Past-
where and the climzx of a s u c-! .. ,
cess atory that just missed being lVTn* J > ,the J'th 8?me. ">
a real thrltr when Ar Guepe's th- G,tor B?} series although it
Commodores succumbed to Ten- wasn founded until Jan. 1, 1946.;
nessee in the final quarter lasti 8ame was shlfte Saturday. Had Vandy won thatYearsi ?ve m 19M' W!th theLef"'
one, the Sugar Bowl was theirs.,feet of having two games that
Auburn at the same time was tear.
Auburn was tied
left at the doorstep twice when
"first the Sugar Bowl then t h e
Cotton Bowl passed up the
Plainsmen in favor of Georgia
Tech and Mississippi, the South-
eastern Conference champ, re-
spectively.
First resentful reaction of Au-
burn players and coaches was
not to go to any bowl, it was
bv Kentucky
and fell flat on its face before!
Tulane in New Orleans, which
was believed the main reason the
Plainsmen were not palatable for
the Sugar Bowl Otherwise they
had an all-winning season, num-
bering Georgia Tech among their
victims.
Vanderbilt lost early season
Tomorrow Is Deadline
To Buy Tickets For
Marlin Club Banquet
learned,' but the players thought pames to Georgia and Mississippi
it over during the weekened and|but had a five-win streak going
the senior members, led by the I when it bowed to Teni
brilliant Fob James Jr., and Joe the finale.
Childress, decided they would
like one more game together.
At a? vote yesterday, the au-
burn players showed they "want-
ed very badly to go to Jackson-
ville," said Coach Ralph Jordan,
who directed the Plainsmen to
an 8-1-1 record and second place
In the Southeastern Conference
this season.
"The hospitality of the Gator
Bowl committee and the people
in Jacksonville makes the Au-
burn team and coaches feel as if
they are spending the holidays at
home.'' added Athletic
Jeff Beard.
BOSTON, Not. 30 (UP).
Rugged, hard-hitting Carmen
Basilio today was a solid X-to-5
favorite to retain his world
welterweight championship in
his defense against former
champion Tony DeMarco on
the latter's home grounds in
the Boston Garden.
This will be Basilio* first
defense of the 147-pound
crown he lifted from DeMar-
co's head by a 12th round TKO
on June 10 of this year. That
also was DeMarco first defense
after taking the title from
Johnny Sax ion.
A capacity crowd of 13,000 is
expected to pay $190.000 to
watch what promises to be
another slugfest between these
two punchers.
The champion's record is 47-
11-7, including 21 knockouts
and he has never been stop-
ped. DeMarco has won 41, lost
five, drew once, including 26
KO'g but has been stopped
three times.
DeMarco, the shorter of the
two, is 23 years old while the
champion is 28.
/ /. AaAAiAon h.
SIXTEEN Carta Vieja Yankees
breezed in by plane from Miami
yesterday afternoon. The team,
under the supervision of man-
ager Al Kubskl, had been train-
ing under the Florida sun ior
nearly two weeks.
SHORTS
Panama Marlin Club will hold
s annual banquet at the Hotel '
1 Panama at 7 p.m. Friday,
SENIOR BACKFIELD
Providence, R. I. (NEA)
Brown graduates its entire two-
deep backfield and a total of lr
BANDAID BOWL
labeled the Bears'
at Rice as the Bandaid
finale
Bowl
Those planning to attend are
cautiosedI that tickets for the f- "2*PlJe?; T.(NEA. ,~ Be"
fair cannot be purchased t h a t ;fau,fc of_ thf clubs multiple in-
night but must be obtained be-.:$j"-. SHfe Publicist George
Director!fore tomorrow. Frank Violette,! *
Col. Burkahart, Velma Burkhart.j
The Oator Bowl was "delight- Ken Middleton and Eddie Ken-,'11"11
ed" to come up with the game'nard have tickets for sale,
between two Southeastern Confer-
In order to properly cater for
the banquet, the hotel must know
how many wiU be attending, for
this reason tickets must be pur-
chased by tomorrow. The custom-
ary system of reservations f o 1-
lowed in the past will not obtain
ence prowers. said Sam B Ut z,
chairman of the selection c o m-
mittee, and is "looking forward
to seeing one of the best bowl
games in the country."
It to t be first time the SEC
bad had two teams in one bowl
and the second time two of its- for this year.

Open Nightly from
8:00 p.m.
ROULETTE
21 (BLACKJACK)
CRAP TABLE
POKER
CHUCK-A-LUCK
SLOT MACHINES
BAR SERVICE
*ir-Comittlonrd Halar
TROYS WORKABLE 17
Los Angeles (NEA) For-
rest Twogood pared the Southern
California basketball squad to
what he calls a workable 17.
THREE LADIES, Mrs. Kub-
ski, Mrs. GUford Dickens, and
Mrs. Ray Dabek, accompanied
Uie team to Panama. Mrs. Da-
bek is the former M'ss Joan
Ardelle Reed, who was a Cris-
tobal girl before getting mar-
ried and moving to Buffalo,
V.Y, where her husb and
makes his home.
THE PLANE TRIP was un-
eventful, thev said, with the ex-
ception of the last hour and one-
half of the flight, when some
rough weather was encountered.
According to Kubskl, the most
composed traveler throughout
was Master Gil Kubskl, Al's 13-
month-old son. Little OH was
named after his godfather. Gil
Morland of Cristobal, who Is the
dominant behind the scenes
figure of the Yankees' front o-
fice.
FOR THE TIME being, at least,
the group is housed at the Ho-
tel Colombia, on Fourth Street
near the Presidencia.
In a quiet neighborhood, the
hotel is far away from the en-
ticing sounds and stimulating
beverages of the city's night
clubs and beer gardens.
Special arrangements have
been made for the party to have
meals at the Union Club which
Is Just a stone's throw from the
hostelry.
got back from the club where
they had supper.
A frantic Mrs. Kubski made
a disconcerting disc overy:
There was no suitable bed for
Master Gil.
Seems that Al had asked that
a special child's bed be furnish-
ed for his "energetic" heir. Mas-
ter Gil is a very lively boy and
If adequate barriers are not
placed around his bed to keep
him in, the tireless young man
Is prone to leap, or tumble out,
much to the consternation o
his young mother.
A bed was provided for th
youngster, which by no means
met the approval of Mrs. Kub-
skl. When this scrivener left th
hotel last night, the problem was
as yet unsolved, but ft Is belle vet1
that Kubskl, Ingenious man
that he to, probably found a way
to keep the mischievous Oil in
bed through the night.
FIRST CRISIS developed ear-
ly last night, when the visitors
FUERZA Y LUZ CRUMPLES
STEMPEL INSURANCEMEN IN
MAJOR KEGLING LEAGUE;
WELCH HITS 631
Strike the
right note
The "Ready Kilowatts" (bet- with 29301.
ter known in Sapnish as "K.
Listo Kilovoltio") from the Fuer-
za y Luz. who previously had
won only 9 points in 9 weeks
smashed the Max R. Stem pel
and Son Insurancemen for four
Points last Tuesday night as To-
(The 2978 series by Fuerza y
Luz also smashed the 3-game
series record thus far
1956 season held by
in the
Stempel
y Luttenberger, with aj>ig 245
Klumpp
Granata .
Pue .
Woodcock .
McGarvey .
Agencia Glud
. 147 158
. 144
165
187
179
191
175
186
204
124
170
176
160
178
429
505
516
533
561
REMEMBER Clem (Scooter
Koshorek, the pint-sized short-
stop who played in the Canal
Zone League before coming to
the Panama P-" League with the
Cartq vieja club?
Well, the Scooter Is runn'ng
a team in Venezuela's Occi-
dental League at present.
Clem's club, Esnadon. Is not
doing so well. They are run-
nine a far last in the loop,
and with one team, Gavilanes,
threatening to run away and
hide from the opposition, the
circuit seems to be fold ne. be-
cause of poor attendance.
Gipp Dickens had been work-
ing for Clem, but because of fi-
nancial difficulties, he and other
high salaried players have been
released from the team.
On his way home Olpp stop-
ped in Miami and contacted
Kubskl about coming to Pana-
ma. By this time Al was in a
spot for an outfielder because
Bob Rles announced he would
not accompany the club to Pan-
ama, when his mother fell 111.
Kubskl grabbed at the oppor-
tunity of signing up Olpp. And
tnats the storv of how Dickens
Is in Panama today.
The good host strikes the right
note by serving Black & White "; it
is the drink most appreciated by his
guests. Every drop of this famous
whisky is distilled and bottled in
Scotland.
Distilled and Bottled in Scotland
BLACK'WHITE
SCOTCH WHISKY
TL'IcUa-n
*

ItMII BUCHANAN 4
^
CO. LTD.. LASOOW, ICOTlANl
Kunkel
Jacober
hieh game, coupled with a 193
Ml 188, bowled a big 826 while
Pllacnowski added to the fuel .Jamison
with aTig 221. 150 and a 196 to Bowen
sXre 861'to bring in the bacon Anderson
with Welch as anchor with 225.
I82 and 224 for 631. bttifttj
I evening. Stephens and Thomas,
members of the team for 15
San and usually the Mgh scor-
ers, had to be satisfied with
mere 573 and 581, respectively^
The Stempeleers bowled games
of 935 and 922 the first two
games, which would have won
all but two of all the MM
games bowled but the addition
al load of Luttenberg and PiU-
rhowski was too much and trie
Stempecers capitulated weakly.Lyons
in the third game. Bill Coltey Almeda
scored a fine 613 for the insur- Nelson
ancemen. followed by Bob Boy-Lowande
er with 554.
On adjacent alleys, the Sum-
mit Hills Golf Club swung back,
from the previous week s down-
833 914 808 2544
Summit Hills Golf Club
160 223 190 573
174
201
176
200
166
180
203
185
201
239
169
184
911 957 983 2351
Schlrmer
Burgis .
Pedsaul .
zeietes
Glelchman
Colonial Insurance
167
145
139
160
187
170
173
155
177
183
193
182
201
190
171
798 858 937 2593
H. I. Horn Co.
. 176 165 159
158 157 167
187 168 179
178 148 176
199 199 182
541
620
548
569
500
482
514
502
580
878 837 863 2578
fall to score a four-point vlcto-
Seymour Agency
Hammer
Rogers .
Colbert .
156
194
214
158
206
Hermann
Snellbaker
Albritton .
Lane . .
Larrabee .
928 921
Tahiti Jewelers
200
187
175
183
182
5 over the Agencia Glud team gta
as Dewey Anderson scored a fat I
620 with games of 201. 180 and
239 followed by Bill Jamison
with 573 and Jacober with 569
McGarvey led for Glud with 561
The win put the Golf Club back
into second place
The Seymour Agency insur-
ance boys staved on top of the
heap In the Major League, how-
ever, with a three point win over
the Tahiti Jewelers as all men
except one scored over 550 for a
nice 2771 three-game total. For
Tnhiti. Lane scored a fine 572.
followed bv Hermann with 554.
In the final match, the Colon-
ial insurancemen went into,
third place with a three-point Team
vlctorv over the H.I Homa Co Seymour Avency
tllesettlers. Glelchman led for Summit Hills
Colonial with 541. Bud Balcer Colonial Ins
Tahiti Jewelry
"tempel *nd Pon
H. I Homi Co.
Agencia Glud
508 Fuerza v Luz
524
189
176
204
204
148
187
188
148
199
200
532
558
566
561
554
922 2771
176
156
194
224
176
178
168
173
165
183
554
SU
542
572
541
927 926 867 2720
JNUSUAL PITCH -M.kt
-raren keeps his pitching eye
harp and arm in shape operat-
ng a sewing machine Its part
)f the work involved in operat-
ng the Indian pitcher's dry
leaning shop in Cleveland
Sports Shorts
COLUMBU8, O(UP lThe
Havana Sugar Kings of the In-
ternational League will operate
under a new curfew law next
season in which night games
can continue until 12:50 a.m.
local time.
The Esso Tournament qualify-
ing rounds started this week.
The tournament will be play-
ed at the Panama Golf course
and all members are invited to
participate. Play will be in two
flights. Members with handi-
caps of 10 or less will play In the
first flight and members with
handicaps of 11 through 24 will
play in the second flight. Handi-
caps as of Dec. 1 will be used
throughout the tournament and
maximum handicap allowed will
be 24. Full handicap will be used
in medal play qualifying round
and seven-eighths of the differ-
ence in handicap will be used in
match play rounds.
The qualifying rounds of 18
holes medal play may be plaved
between Nov. 29 through Dec. 4,
both dates Inclusive. Match play
rounds will start on Dec. 4. Dur-
ing the qualifying rounds play
may be in two. three or four ba'll
matches. U.8.G.A. rules as modi-
fied by local rules will govern all
plays. All cards must be dated,
attested and marked "Esso Qual-
ifying Round."
The 32 players having lowest
net scores will qualify In each
flight. Ties for last position will
be decided by Tournament Com-
mittee by draw.
Match play rounds will be
played as follows with all
matches to be completed on or
before the date shown. Official
starting time, -unless mutually
changed, will be 9 a.m. on the
date shown. Matches will be
played ahead of time, but under
no e'reumstances will thev be
scheduled for later date than
shown. A'l matches will he 18
hoi rounds except the finals
which will be 36 holes.
First round on or before Dec.
11, second round on or before
Dec. 18. third round on or before
Dec. 25. fourth round on or be-
fore Jan. 1. Finals on or before
Jan. 8.
The 16 olayers In each flight
who are defeated in first rmmd
match will he nalred in two "De-
feated 16" flights and will con-
tinue play on the following
schedule:
First round on or before De-
cember 18.
Second round on or before
Deomber 25.
Third round on or before
January 1.
Finals on or before Janua-
ry 8.
Matches finishing all even
will continue play gg per sched-
ule for ties as posted on the Bul-
letin Board.
Prizes of 10 beautiful sterling
silver are to be dlsplaved at the
Club and will be awarded to the
following winners:
Low net medalist in each
flight.
Winner in each flight.
Punner-up in each flieht.
Winner In each '"Defeated 16"
flight.
Runner-up In each "Defeated
16" flipht.
The Eso Standard Oil voices
the hooe tht pverv olfer, mem-
ber of the Club. wIP enter thto
tournament and at least tr" to
nuallfv for one of the flights.
Everyone has a chance of win-
nine one >f the beautiful and
valuable y'lver nrlzes which 'e
to be dlsniawH very soon at the
Panama Golf Club.
Locally Unbeaten Manager
Expects Tough, 3-Cornered
Battle Throughout Season
0
By J. J. HARRISON, JR.
"The Yankees will field a strong:, well balanced
team this season, but I expect a tough, three-corner-
ed battle all the way because, on paper at least, the
opposition appears greatly improved."
Those were the words of manager Al Kubski of
the Carta Vieja Yankees as he sat in the lobby of
the Hotel Colombia last night after the team had
returned from supper at the nearby Union Club.
The Yankees flew in from Mi-
ami yesterday at 2:30 p.m., Kub-
skl, looking hale and hearty and
with his usual affability, added:
"Last year Spur Cola's main
problem was pitching. Clarke
(Vlbert) had a bad year. So-
cha (George) was a complete
disappointment. The bulk of
the hurling duties was carried
by little Stanley Arthurs, who
did an excellent job, but cer-
tanly couldn't carry the load
alone.
This time the situation seems
to be different," went on Kub-
ski. "Clarke, who always has
great potential, is back with the
Spurs. Then there's Bob Trice, a
real solid moundsman; Jim Tu-
gerson had a fine season with
Dallas; the boy from San Diego,
Bill Thomasoh, is a right good
lunger; and Arthurs can alwava
be counted on for effective re-
lief work."
Kubski also believes the Ches-
terfield squad will be a hard nut
to crack and spoke particularly
of an improved Humberto Rob-
inson and a more experienced
Tommy Hughes on the hill for
the Smokers.
"That Robby certainly gaye
us a rough time last year,"
said Kubski, "and he seems to
be getting better all the time "
The Yankee skipper alao said
that he felt that Hugheg could
develop lno one "helluva" of a
pitcher one day. "That kid can
certainly burn them across."
Kubski is undecided as to who
he will start against the Smok-
ers in the opener tomorrow
night at the Olympic Stadium.
He said he would "very much"
like to use Bill Harris, who was
the Smokers' nemesis last year,
but added he would leave the
decision up to Harris himself.
"I will ask Bill how he feels
The standings of the
League teams:
*evep'een flows
Earn Grid biters
Seventeen football p l a yers
earned letters at CHS. aftei the
close of a most successful sea-
son. Having the smallest team
In football history, thev made
up for their shortcomings in
team spirit, cooperation and
fight. Only-two points separated
them from a tie with the mighty
Bulldogs as the two eames that
ended In 6-6 ties with JC. and
Balboa meant the difference.
Many of the mainstay will be
missing from the 1956 roster as
seven starting seniors graduate
but Coaches Palumbo and Mo-
ser are hopeful that as the
youngsters move up they will
take charge next year as this
group did In 1955.
The seniors leaving are Louis
Taber. Captain and tackle lead-
ing the rghtlng; Tigers. Kaiser
Bazan, the hardest charelng
hack In Canal Zone history,
Char'es Fears. all-Can"! Zone
guard who never knew the word
oult; Luke Pa'umbo. ail-C*"!
Zone center who made his Dad
nroud to have him on his team:
Ricardo Lorences, all-Canal
Zone euard: Allen Robinette,
National Distillers
Sponsor Ringer
Al Summit Hills
AL KUBSKI
Thursday morning, "saM the
CV pilot, "and if he says he's
okay, Hi gJve him the assign-
ment."
If Harris does not go, Kubskl
will use either Ed Monahan, a
locally-signed serviceman who
Is the property of the Kansas,
City Athletics, or Cookie stem-
pel, who lives In Panama.
Monahan has been playing
regularly in Canal Zone service
games and Stempel has report-
edly been going through stren-
uous workouts.
Kubski would not commit
himself in furnishing the press
a final lineup but agreed that
the following team could take
the field tomorrow night.
TonT Bartirome, lb
Billy Shants, 2b
Corky Glamp, Sb
Spider Wilhelm, as
Johnny Kropf, cf
Eddie Phillips, rf
Ray Dabek, c
Bill Harris, p
Game time tomorrow night,
weather permitting, is 7: SO.
.0)
That Is the same curfew rule
Ma lor which u in effect in all of the |Jd7 whm'ssed~one Vamedue
|ftner league cities But because to an lniured leg and wg handi-
WLPinoi a local ordinance which had capped but plaved excellent b"":
Z. V, -'. V- been ln eifect Prevlouslv Ha-,F)0V(i McDermltt. 160 lb. tackle
7?* 906 vana, gameg there ended at who ln the last two games show
with 581 was unable to win but
th first came.
Scores for the play:
Max R. Stenioel and Son
23 17 .517 903 \ midnight local time regardless
23 17 .575 900 of whether they had been com-
Wtlber .
Feger .
Bover .
Winoulst
Coffey .
173
181
210
168
203
183
170
174
180
235
152
173
170
156
175
23 17 .575 90
18 22 .450 g"1!
16 74 *<*) 875
15 25 375 857
13 27 .325 877
pleted
HEIDELBERG, Germany _
The U.S. Army announced to-
day It will build eight golf
courses in France and oerma-
ed what he could dn when he
set. his heart to It. These boys
will be surelv missed next sea-
son but p* a'l ffood tMnos m-.igt
end we wish them luck wherever
thev go.
The other Tiger lettermen are
Junlorg: Barrv Davlaon. center:
554 The ten hieh average bowieig ny at a cost of $420,000. But It MUton Orover. tackle- David
484 after 10 weeks of the 28-week [said none of the money will Hawthorne back- Bill Rankln
613 f"Mn: come out of the taxpayers pock-back; Mmolne Verleln, back
' Nme Gam-s Ave. ett. ind nd: Ray Croft, back. Pooh-
DISTRIBLTORS
AGENCIAS W. H. DOEL, S. A.
CENTRAL AVE. 8-28
TEL 2-2771
Stephens
Thomas .
[Luttenberger
iPilachowsk 1
'Welch . .
935 922 826 2683 Coffey........ 80
Jacober........ 90
Fuerza y Las Ralcer.......... 30
171 212 190 573 3chlrmer........ 30
193 194 14 581 McGarvey ...... 31
193 188 3S 626'Cc'f-ert........ ?0
221 150 196 567 Ze'.etes........ SI
225 182 224 Sll'-fn* ....... ? -----------------------------, Olelchman...... 30
1003 936 1049 2978 Kaelin........ 30
23 Five of the courses will be rmres: John Forrest, end; wjn-
B built in France and three in dy Basso hack: Jack Willoughby,
guard; Bill Gibson, end.
204
195
195+ 8, Germany
189 + 15 An Army spokesman said fl-
187-9 nanclng of the courses will be
lM-t-14 done "entirely" from non-ap-
!*6-i-10 propriated funds. These crc' Dayton. O.
l"5-'.'7 .rirc'pglhjr profits mide ty the raDtsin snd end
THERE FOR KICKOFF
(VEA) Co-
Jimmv Ksteav-
lfS+14 Army's post exchange system In age started every Dayton foot-
184+15 i Europe. ball game for three years.
The National Distillers are
sponsoring a ringer at the Sum-
mit Hills Golf Club. This tour-
nament Is known as the "Royal
Mounted Whiskey Ringer," and
will continue through January
14.
A total of 18 bottles of Royal
Mounted will be awarded as
prizes, in addition a bottle will
be given each week to the low-
est gross and net scores. This Is
a handicap affair with, the
handicaps of Jan. 1, 1956, being
used to determine the net spores.
Low scores for the first week
of play are as follows:
1st Tied
Leo Eberenz ............ 76
Ben Willlamg ........... 76
2nd Tied
R. Larrahee ........... 81
H. Tettenburn .......... 81
3rd
H. Colbert .............. 82
Ben Williams took home the
flrgt two bottles for the low
gross and low net prizes of the
week.
Jerry Waring Has
Inside Track On <3M
Job For Macon Club
COLUMBUS, Ohio, Nov 30
(UP) Jerry Wsrtng, who was
general manger at Elmira, NY,
in the Eastern League, was re-
ported tonight to be in line for
the general managership of the
Macon, Ga., club of the Sally
League.
Fresco Thompson, vice pres-
ident of the Brooklyn Dodgers
nd ln charge of their farm oper-
ations, said no general manager
or field manager for the Macog
club would be announced "until
next week."
"I'll only say that both of them
will come from within our orga-
nization," Thompson added.
However, it wag learned that
Waring, who stands high with the
parent Dodger officials, had the
inside track for the general man-
agership while Pete Reiger, for-
mer centerifelder for the Dodg-
ers, waa the leading candidate as
field manager.
It wag pointed out that Waring
would only be ahifting clubs, and
not league classifications for Ma-
con. like Elmira, is a member of
Class A minor league team.
The Dodgers dropped their El-
mira franchise two weeks ago
and added Macon. Maron had a
working agreement with the Chi-
cago Cubs ln 1955.
SHOWING AT YOUR SERVICE CENTER
THEATERS TONIGHT!_______
BALBOA 6:15 7:55
AIR-CONDITIONED
DIABLO HTS. 6:15 7:5
e Maureen O'HARA
e Micdoruld CAREY
FIRE OVER AFRICA"
Thur. CALAMITY JAW
GAMBOA 7:06
"Man from Bitter Ridge"
"Yellow to at Tim"
MARGARITA 6:15 7:50
-CELL 3455, DEATH ROW"
"atory of Thf Lovee"
CRISTOBAL 6:15 3:25
Alr-< inrilllnned
e Glenn FORD
e Eleanor PARKER
"Interrupted Melody"
Supericope Color
aim showim Thursday;
LA BOCA
"FINGER MAN"
7:1
6:15 8:2*
JONES"
O
<


F'.,^*!* ^**^
"\
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER SO, 1*55
nfl

*
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
. .
PAOS THISTEER
l/fr/e League /s Far Off Base When O if Volunteer Basis'
Robinson Doesn't Believe \
Olson Has Changed Much )
Five Challenge West Virginia
In Southern Conference Race
Bv HARRY GRAT80N
LITTLE LEAGUE Baseball
Third of aine college basket-
ball roundups written by famous
coaches for NEA Service
By FRED SCHAUS
West Virginia Coach
MORGANTOWN, W. Va.
(NEA) As defending Southern
Conference champion, West V i r-
ginia could not feel shakier about
the coming season has the Moun-
taineers finished in the cellar last
time out.
George Washington and Rich-
mond have real power basketball.
started in 1939 with a few boys
from 8 to 12 running the bases In
Williamsport, Pa.
It has become a nightmarish
affair costing socle to $300,000 an-
nually to administer. There are
30 on the national headquarters'
a fine scorei and combined with conference's top All-America pros-1 payroll alone and some of them
Joe Petcavich, -5, can create a
strong underneath problem for
any defense.
Richmond was third in the con-
ference last season, behind West
Virginia and George Washington.
This year. Les Hooker sends out
a veteran team of twin figure
scorers. Walt Lysaght and Ken
Daniel, both 6-5; Bob Witt, 8-2;
and Ed Harrison, 5-10, return and
they hit from all over.
Rod Hund-
feel will
West Virginia has
Darrell Floyd, "probably the best ley geared for -what I
be his finest season. He Roa,
as he is known, has all the shots.
shot in the college ranks, automa-
tically makes Furman as tough
as can be found.
Bill Reinhart at George Wash-
ington has lost Corky Devlin, but
Joe Holup 6-6, comes back. He is
pect. I are not on speaking terms.
With a scorer of his caliber we I For a large corporation, this
naturally pin a lot of our offense' would be fine, save for the fact
on him. Willie Bergincs, 6-6, and I that big business would not stand
Clyde Kishbr.ugh, 6-1, mean a lot for dissension. For an organl*
to us, too. We're hoping either1 ation promoting the summer
Lloyd Sharrer, 6-9, or Paul Wat-activities of fuzzy-based young-
ting, G-7 fill the bill for some sters, the present Little League
needed height. | situation is an atrocity.
For this reason, Carl E. Stot,
It would be a mistake to over-'who foundei Little League be-
look Washington and Lee. Lee cause his pint-sized nephews had
Marshall, 6-5: Barry Storick, 6-3; no piace to play, wound up in *
Barclay Smith, 6-5; and Don Flora wrangle with Little League Base-
6-2, have had solid seasoning. In
experience hurt last season, when
Washington and Lee was fourth.
The Generals could surprise.
Furmaa's Floyd helps his club
by
Hot Rod needed experienceand I
the settling down wnich comes
with itand I feel e has it now. run up telephone number scores
You would have to rate him the every time. out. In the past, de-
fensive shortcomings hav hurt,
most of them stemming from lack
of height. BUI Hanks, 6-8, and
Bob Thomas^ the 6-7 center, arc
Dan Daniel
ball, Inc., which put the kids'
sports on the news wires in an
unsavory light. Things are com-
pletely out of hand with the de-
posed commissioner suing an or-
ganization conducting the play of
children for $300,000 for breach
of contract.
Little League got off base when
it went uff a voluntary basis.
Stotz required money as Little
. Ballots lor the 1st annual Coach of the Tear competition
sponsored bv the New York World-Telegram andJhDa J tM
rest of the Scripps-Howard newspaper family, having gone out
with a Dec. 6 deadline, the early trend In the voting should re-
^imfSSXtSbm*- Footba.1 Coaches Asarlas
been extended the invitation to weigh the nM eWma to
high distinction of those who qualify on six *B*2JSJF
merit" lniluer.ee on players, generalship, and organizing abil-
Uy" There Is no regulation barring a winner from"WBUW But
the list of selections, beginlnng with Pappy ^Waldori In IMS..x
poses a striking ant.pathy among the voters to naming a coach
^WSS S stand out again, with the possibility of
precedent-smashing election not to be brushedi aside areRed
Sanders UC'-A, 1954' Jim Tatum, Maryland, 1953, Charley Gaid-
weil .Princeton. 1950: Bud Wilkinson, Oklahoma 1949; Bennie
osterbaan, Michigan. 1948, and Red Blalk, Army. 1946. .
Recent seuttlebut among the coaching fraternity has play-
ed up the chances o quite a few fresh contenders, one of whom
is Hugh (Duffy) Daugherty of Michigan State, which goes into
the Rose Bo-.vl for a second time with UCLA or Jan. 2
Although Duffy's Spartans were beaten by Michigan, 14-v.
In the second game of the season, his record as a sophomore
head coach was phenomenal. Last year, when Daugherty suc-
ceeded Biggie Munn, whose assistant he had been for eight year
Michigan Slate won only S and lost 6.
/ AmonK other qualities, Duffy pos_
their only players with size. But I League fashioned after his orlg-
on a hot night, Floyd can turn .mi, sprcad across the country,
any game around. |A rubber company came to the
William and Mary has four rescue and with the necessary
sevlee returnees and could ere- monev came Little League Base-
ate troble. Dick Savage, 6-4; Bob 1 ball, Inc., and a board of directors
Hovtsma. 6-3; Paul Furlong. 6-2:;composed largely of imposing
and Jim Kaplan, 6-1, form a good names.
club which could use more stotz waa ulckly pushed Into
height. the background, although the pay
remitted good$14,000 a year
Davidson, with Hobby Cobb,,p|u $7,500 expenses. The rub-
Virginia Military, Virginia Tech
and The Citadel complete our
conference and although not
ranked highly in pre-season polls,
I've yet to see a team consistent-
ly breeze past them.
NEXT: Adolph Rupp look
the Southeast Conference.
at
Enthusiasm Grows
For Atlantic Side
Softball League
ber company installed Peter J.
McGovern, one-time Pennsyl-
vania oarsman, as chairman of
the board and president.
The Canadian-American League
of professional baseball having
folded, director Thomas H. Rich-
ardson installed its president, Al-
bert E. Houghtnn, as secrctary-
tr-asurer of LLB, Inc., at $10,000
a year, plus $3,0000000 for present
as organizational setup. Tommy
Richardson, long-time president
of the Eastern League, was tak-
ing care of an old pal. Mickey
HIS BOY___Leiter Patrick congratulates Coach Phil Watson "f
the Rangers on MadisOn Square Garden ice. Patrick. 71. served as
the New York hockey club s head man (or 23 years. Watson broke
in as a National Leaguer under the retired veteran in 1935
By HARRY GRAYSON
GREENWOOD LAKE. N. Y-
(NEA)Off his performance a-
gainst Tiger Jones, Ray Robinson
did not belong in the ring.
Off Jiis effort against Rocky
CaKtcllanl, Sugar Hay Robinson
did not belong in the same battle
pit with the Bobo Olson who came
to Yankee Stadium to be knocked
out by Arcfiie Moore.
But off the form Robinson is
showing at Greenwood Lake, the
notion is that the Harlem land-
lord now not only belongs in the
same enclosure with Olson at the
Chicago Stadium, Dec. 9. but he
also is the best-looking 3-1 under-
dog we've seen since the last big
upset in the beak-busting business.
That is, Robinson is a good
longshot against the post-Moore
[Olson, who. in addition to his
1 marital difficulties, was anything
I but a ball of fire against Jimmy
Martinc and Joey Giambra.
In both of the latter fights, OI-!
son was considerably heavier'
than 160 pounds, which he must'
make in defense of the middle,
weight championship. Robinson,
has no such problem.
OUT OF DOORS with
FINE TROUT STREAM
IN MONTANA
By Al, McCLANE
Fishing Editor
The Madison River, in
McConnell came from the Brook-:na, is one of the finest
lyn farm system at close to $10,-
000 per and expenses, etc.
Robinson points out that he Is
boxing well for the first time I
since financial shorts in his busi-!
ness enterprises froccd him to
come back 14 months ago after
having been a song and dance
man for two years and seven!
months.
"Against Jones, Castellani and
those guys, I had to club fight,''
explains the 35-year-old who not
a few considered the finest fight-
er of his inches. "I must have
of July, before water is released )S^.*0JS*^fh!!t^, b,uthJ
for irrigation. With the damcoul.dnt do an>'thlng clse nad
closed, the river is not hard to no../'!* t .. ., .__,
wa#ie Now I run five miles every
Dry flies work far better than,** ?nd .,'Ll*0r;JHJ"***'
wet flies in the lower Madison. runnln* eas,er- l g?1 up on
aMfttettrosum
streams I have ever fished. Be-
low Hebgcn Dam, the Madison is
a large, turbulent river. Round,
Basically, Slots beef Is that theigUssy-smooth boulders coupled
volunteer field personnel no long- wth Uie fast current make wad-
ing difficult, for neither felt soles
By TREVOR SIMONS
.*!. nnnnneoment er l,a Ever since the annour cernent, decjsions m- hobnai[s ho|(J
two weeks a?o that the doimam j He ci),ed ( mwtlng of approx. sm00t|) rocks
... o.-. Ww- ...:i ------- ,,_ ,._.. .. u... Atlantic Softball B"eJJgJ"" innately 100 field directors in About July 12. when irrigation easily sten.
Among other qualities, MXr2fjMJ%"A B t^^A-J^?^SLSS& Pittsburgh, Dec. .10-11, when he watc;. is needed n tne valleys, ad- Pattern does
my
about toes ""the rin* *nd move. I'm
._-.; just starting to find as much of '
,bout! myself as there is left."
Robinson is making three spar-
ring partnersJoe and Lee Wil-
face h rough and flecked with!an" and Ricco K'?fcome Hn
foam in oFder to keep your dry |,"' '* IT^L ImJL.
flv under observation vou nee I 1,e Plcked off and sidestepped
"owning that will float "h i "iptmches. countered with d.m.g-
and light enough in color to be '"& Hurries.
Monta- The big fish lie in water
trout three feet deep, moving
three miles an hour.
Btcause of the boulders that
pave the bed of the river, the sur
him open up, so I could take him *.
out. The second time 1 took it fot:.'.'
granted and when I had to win in
the last five rounds, I just stepj"1?
ped cut and did it.
"I don't believe he's changed'
Robinson's only concern now ismd
going 15 rounds. And to g i v e'-1
Sugar Ray that problem, Olson!
must carry the trouble and not ":
let liim iet '% Sugar Kay is talking like the>"
old Robinson.
continuous
Addressing an alumni gathering recently, he said, ^|sUsm hag been on a conuco..cts w win lmportant
1954 team was mine. It lost much more often than It won. This | swlng untll now lt sefmf t
not
matter much
oe-jditional water is rcaleascd from in water as heavy as this; good
.'cisin. Hebgen Dam. The heavy flow con-,floating is the important factor.
1955 eleven, beaten only once uncoubtedly is youM jj,, *S?bod,fd*S r.thn-ms' Stotz wisely wants to return'tinucs int0 September, except for! Fishing with dry flies in rough
Ohio SU'te. undeieated in six Western Conference games,At,antic side of the Isthmus UMe Leafue Ba*ebaD to volun- brief and unpredictable periods water will seem ill-advised to
'with a smasnlrg 17-0 finale against Michigan, but outscored by u, be taking part In the VW tear organizers and sponsors. He wnen the wtter may ^ snut off. those accustomed to smaller,
Stanford and Duke, believes lt has a good chance to repeat in loop srheduled to start; short'y|wQuM at onee redUce the national; DUrine the period of high water more placid streams. The tech,
the coaches' ooll with Woody Hayes. The Buckeyes won in 1**.after the beginning of the rear, headquaters" staff to .not more t it poiibie u make good catch- nique mighube described as wet
with Carrol! Widdces. ..... 4 J _,_ ____0j>#|.| In addition to the ma.ny,_..*,?j than two-thirds. The rubber com-;es Dy working along close to fly fishing with a dry fly, be-,
pany is withdrawing its sole sup-jsnort using wet flies except when cause all you do is keep'casting 1
He was asked if he had learned' -.
If Robinson is right physically, anything watching Moore flatten -
he is twice as hgh mentally. 01*.n nm w,- n.v "#
I fought Olson twice," he re- "Me learn from Moore? Ray
calls -and he didn't hurt me Robinson sputtered. N
once The only thing tough about "Heck, man, you mean what-
him the first time was making Moore learned from me.
If Eddie E>-delatz of Navy makes it five out of six over Red nmns""and veterans of the old
Blalk at Philadelphia on Saturday, the onetimeSt- Maxy s end Atlantic Softball League, thjs. re-
will move into the contention despite the 21-7 defeat
Midshipmen by Notre Dame.
TERRY BRENNAN IN RUNNING
of the
erouplng of the leaeue will fea-
ture the young and the old a-
llke. The lid Is almost, tlghtlv
shut on the "wind-mill" pitch
The purpose of this ruling Is
to allow a maximum erouo of
nlayers In all ace classes to par-
ticipate. Also seeking entry Into continued.
Terry Brennar. second-yea; pilot of the Fighting Irish. Is wltn rurther bans on sneedball
another fomldable entry. Teiry's charges lost to Michigan. pitchlne likely tn be put Into ef-
State, 21-7, but If thev overcome USC at Los Angeles there may | iect before the league gets un-
be a noweri'ul swing toward the popular Terry. derway in January.
Off Co'umMa's 1 and 8 recoid, the veteran Lou Little, never
a Coach of dw Year winner, certainly does not qualify on the
basis of his team's achievements. But Columbia men leel that
Lou definltoiy is a standout in the five other points listed
Does the winner have to be from a major university? De-
finitely NO. Amos Alonzo Stagg was elected in 1943 when he
was at the College of the pacific, and Lafayette provided the
1937 choice 'n Hooks Mylln.
Unbeaten candidates from the minor company Include Dan
Jessee, Trinity of Hartford; Ara Parseghlan, of Ohio s Miami, and
Bill Hicks, of Juniata. Hicks, who came to Juniata In 1953, has an extent that several prosDec-
won 23 straight. The little team from Huntingdln, Pa., repre- five players hve been seeking
seating an enrollment of 800, hasn't lost a football game since | to become enrolled on one of the
the 1953 finale with Lebanon Valley, 13-. 1 tepn"\ AH who Unir to n!ay
Also to 1 e reckoned with In this competition are Bobby Dodd, 1 and have not yet been contact-
of Georgia Tech; Abe Martin, TCU, and Johnny Mlchelosen, whoi ed by a team manager re nrced
this year shifted from the pros to Pittsburgh. to pHend next Monday nleht's
If as appears almost certain. Howard cassady. Ohio State I meeting at the Marearita gym- tno ,lm f,
back, lands fhe Heisman Trophy and Hayes, his coach, gets the|naslum. Everyone will be placed " Jim r
ScrlnDs-Hov.ard award, the Les Horvath-Widdoes triumph of on a team and if there p too1
port of the program effective Dec.
31, but will continue co-sponsor-
ship. Peter McGovern says LLB
inc.. could be operated "very
modestly" on franchise money a-
lone
fish happen to be surface-feeding, until a fish takes the flv with no|
The spinning rod angler is well particular regard to delicacy or
equ.ppcd to reach deep water accuracy of cast,
from a spot close to the bank. But just one three-pound rain-
Late fall fishing is good in the bow in water like this will keep
lower Madison, although the best,you alert for hours after the fish
There are 3,977 f r a n c s i S e d time 0f ^e vcar s tn iast week,is landed,
leagues in the United States and|or s0 ln June and thc first part (Distributed by NEA Service)
15 foreign countries. Every state------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
is represented with 250,000 lads[
participating. I
Thc only thing of importance is
that Little League baseball bei
the league will be the .Tigers
Cluh from nolon which wll! be
led by an old-time baseball and
softbll favorite, Lloyd Alberga.
Enthus'awi has erown to such
If thev keep it mainly on a gra-1
tuitous basis, there will be on;
fighting about jobs.
And thc bulk of the program on
a local level.
STILL AROUND
Minneapolis (NEA) Vern
Mikkelsen Is the only remaining
member of thc Minneapolis Lak
ers'
Army Closes Books On Season
Made Glorious By Upset Win
By JOHN GRIFFIN
Overjoyed Army
Looks today on a
ence title. It will be the fifth
, straight bowl apearance in as
closed the many years for the Engineers,
1955 college and they'll be looking for their
MStfSTCUS football season made glorious! fifth straight victory.
men. George Mikan
ollard retired.
Scrlpps-Howard award
1944 will be duplicated.
In 1939 Dr. Eddie Anderson and Nlles Klnnick of Iowa took
the double, and ln 1949 it was achieved by Blalk and Glenn
Davis of Army.
Meanwhile, the votes for the Coach of the Year are coming
ln, and not matter who wins, 1955 will produce a fine, represen-
tative addition to the gallant and brilliant list.
many ".xtras" pn additional the 1955 Atlantic Softball League
team will be admitted into the a success.
lePTtie. I .ah opinions and suggestions
Monday night's meHn at will be welcome Inasmuch as-thc 1 drarnat|C
the .Margarita gvni will heeln at loop Intends to Impose certain philadelDhia returned
7 o'clock All interested parties rules and restrictions n~*
for the Cadets bv their Inspired 1
upset victory over Navy, but
there will be still another chap-,
ter for bowl-bound Georgia
Tech and Mississippi.
The Cadets, triumphant by
14-6 over Navy in Saturday's'
gridiron classic at
to tbej
Texas Tech got the Sun
Bowl berth along with the
Border Conference champ'on-
''iip when Arizona State of
Tempe, which had been lead-
ing the league, lost to Arizona,
7-6.
wed to attend and suhm.lt tifplly contained
their proposals towards making book.
In the rule
UNITED FRUII COMPANY
New" Orleans Service
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Cristobal
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S.S. "TELDE"' ....................................Dec. 1
S.S. *VAQUE" ....................................Dec. 4
S.S. "MABNA" ...................................Dec. I
S.S. "MORAZAN" ....................,...........Dee. 11
S.8. "SIXAOI.A" ..................................Dee. It
S.S. "AGGERSBORG" ............................Dee. ?
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S.S. "MORAZAN" ...........................Jam. 1,1956
Handling Refrigerated Ollied and General Cargo
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8.8. "JUNIOR'^ .^,.............^LL.........Jan. t, 1W
Weekly tailings of twelve passenger gtiiot to New
York. New Orleans. I o* Andeles. San Francisco
_________________and Seattle._________________
Special round trip tares (rom Cristobal to New
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To Los Angelas and San Francisco ....$270.00
To Seattle .......................$361.00
r
Farley Granger and Anthony Quinn two hoods in
violent gangster story...
"THE NAKED STREET"
Release tomorrow at the "CENTRAL" Theatre!
TELEPHONES:
CR grOBAL 2121
PANAMA 2-2904
not speci- Mtiitary Academy at West Point Southern California didn't Ret
* yesterday for a tumultuous eel- any bowl bid, but It gaineo
ebration. sweet revenge when It walloocd
Notre Dame. 42-20. at Los An-
Gcorgla Tech quickly accept- celes as Jon Arnctt scored
ed a bid to the Sugar Bowl and three touchdowns. Two T-D.
'Mis'sisslpl accepted a beith In,passes by Jim contratto broke
ihe Cotton Bowl after each!the game open ln the closing
wound up Us regular season minutes.
; with an impressive victorv on |
I Saturday. That completed the I Oklahoma, the Nation's No 1
following lineup for the major j team, completed a perfect sea-
: bowls on Jan. 2: i8on w|th the expected 53-0 vlc-
Rose Bowl at Pasadena. tory over Oklahoma A. and M.
1 Calif UCLA vs. Michigan Nine different Sooners scored n
! sute. tne teams 29th straight victory
Orange Bowl at Miami. Fla. _____^__^^_^^^_
Oklahoma vs. Maryland.
iiMTi.-rtiy quiln, as a racneieer wno mSkea and brei.-
a punk gangster, gives a performance of Academy Award
calibre In the exciting drama, "THE NAKED STREET."
Quinn, a Brooklyn-mobster with big-shot connections,
learns that his sister, played by Anne Bancroft, is in love
with a punk gangster, played by Fai.ey Granger, who is
slated te go to the chair. By bribing and strong-arming wit-
nesses info lying or disappearing, Quinn gets Granger ae-
Iultted for lack of evidence at a new trial. Then when
ranger tarns out te be ungrateful, wrly and causing Miss
Bancroft (now his wife) a great deal of unhappiness, Quinn
displays an eoaal amount of diligence in framing him back
Into the hot seat. It Is a story rife with drama, suspense
and excitement a gangster picture with an off-beat
script and seas very much en-beat characterisations
the top one ef which la the aforementioned Anthonv
Qulnn's. Peter Graves Is fine as a crusading newspaper i-
porter who falls In love with Misa Bancroft. Advt.
f IAI pckagc with Tipa.
A bul bit dot* tlw job.
MIND lara pattern wrta
Tpc It'* IrtHpuati -. .
Distributors: CIA. ATLAS. S. A.
'Scotch" brand colored tapes are printed In Panam
with user's name and specifications by Cu.
Atlas S. A-, Telephone 2-3458.
P. O. Box 1057
Sugar Bowl at New Orleans
Georgia Tern vs. Plttsburr;h.
Cotton Bowl at Dallas. Tex.
Texas Christian vs. Mfas's-
slopl,
The Gator Bowl at Jackson-
ville, Fla., was scheduled to hold
a meeting today at which the
two teems would be selected It
was believed that three South-
eastern Conference teams were
the ones from which the choice
would be madeAuburn, Ten-
!nes/ee, and Vanderbllt.
The Sun Bowl at El Paso Tex.,
filled one berth with Texas
Tech. but did not expect t an-
nounce the other for "several
days."
Mlsslssllp clinched Its K'cond
straight Southeastern Confer-
ence championship with a 20-0
1 rcut of Mississippi State as Earl
iBIair scored two touchdown.;.
rtnd finished with a 9-1 record.
Texas Christian, which already
1 had clinched the other Cotton
(Bowl berth, made lt a battv of
champions by taking the South-
west conference crown with a
?0-l3 victory over Southern
Methodist In which Jim Swink
cored two touchdowns, also fin-
ishing with a 9-1 mark.
Oeorgla Tech landed the Sug-
ar Bowl berth by ripping Or.it- J
g.e. 21-3. although missing out
on the Southeastern Confer-
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&






AN INDEPENDENT
Manama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe'* Abraham Lincoln.
Harry Truman
Nets $80,000
For Library
SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. 30
(UP) Former President Harry
S. Truman eft today aboard a
private plane for Kansas City, 3Ut YEAR
winding up a Pacific Coast speak- _____
n tour to raise funds for the
Truman library at Independence,
Mo.
The frequently exploiive %
President was a model of decor-
um last night as he singled out
two ranking Republicans for
high praise at a $100 a-p late
bipartisan dinner.
Mr. Truman called Chief Jus-
tice Earl Warren "perhaps one of
the greatest the country ever
had," and said former President West's*Vsoiated" outpistin Berlin man law by having a radio
Herbert Hoover had done "won- hraccd itself for new Com- transmitter in their U.S. ARmy
derful work for me" in gathering J essure
funds for the library which will _. DrKospect 0f eastern actions
house some 3,500,0000 documents of instK Wcgt Bcrlm was raised
tte Truman administration >* a Soviet statement that East
Warren was honorary chairman > sovereign and East
Of the dinner and Hoover was a b , occupie,|
sponsor, but neither was present. """ B
Earlier in the day, however s sU(emenli , effect, nul-
Truman indicated he hoped to rf ^ t observance of four-
help write the Democratic plat- " regarding the city.
form next year. ;aows de*pite &, spiit of lin no longer is occupied because
. ,. the city In Eastern and Western East Germany is a sovereign
"I hope to be there next year '"/rts Berlin had a special sta- state now.
at he convention. Maybe as a *"*_** ated by four power Dasher cautioned the Russian
delegate-you never can tell, f reguiaica oy action "quite possibly opens the
be said, adding he hoped to put ;'"*?, Rprljn not a part of door to other incidents" involving
.orne -fun" into the campaign. l*%\*tjlZn federa. Repub- the Western allies in the divided
But at the dinner which lie and East Barik Ml ** *"&+* said he told Dibrova
brought in an estimated $80.000 gaily a part of the East German ^lmnerjai^ ^^ tny
for the memorial library, Tru- state. __._j. change in the four-power rulei
man spoke on "the great docu-! However. Soviet com.nvandan, chge ^ e i po
mm, that is the U.S. Constitu- P. A. Dibrova t O Id America tar gonun ^^
ion." commandant Maj. Gen. Cbaries "" " t recoRIlij,ed ,he
. ,,uman noted he w.nted_ toL. Dasher hat "he Ge rm an ^^^German Democrat-


DAILY
.">
NEWSPAPER
PANAMA, R. P., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER SO, 1955
FIVE CENTS
West Berlin Braces Itself
For New East German Pressure
BERLIN Nov, 30 (UP) The,cans had violated an East Ger- viet headquarters.
& * \______ i___._ i___l ti a i. n ^ ,* ** <* *i t a il4chap vauavi aau
automobile.
Dibrova's statement appeared
ot mean that the Soviets no
longer would enforce such four-
power laws as the Welter
state recognized by the
Read story on page 12
Dungeons Lie Bpneath Ft. San Lorenzo,
RP Historian, US Colonel Believe
Dasher reported Dibrova was Union and East Berlin is its ca-
affable and courteous and said pital.''
radio-telephones could be used Dibrova told Dasher the "East
in vehicles for emergencies. | Germans were a sovereign people
Dasher protested that the arrest but he would act as an intermc-
of the congressional party was a diary since the West does not rc-
"lawless action' and "ruffian- j cognize East Germany."
Prof. Ernesto Castillero, chair-
man of the University of Pana-
ma's History department, added
fuel to the fire this week when
he verified suspicions that unj
derground tunnels exist some-
where beneath the ruins of cen-
tury old Fort San Lorenzo.
Visiting the former Spanish
stronghold as guest of Col. John
J. Davis, USARCARIB School
commandant, Castillero confirm-
ed beliefs when he declared
"There Is no doubt in my mind
that dungeons do exist some-
where below the Fort."
An expert in Panam history
and author of "Grandeur and
Fall of Fort San Lorenzo" Cas-
tillero based his belief on "the
habit of Spaniards in those days
to make life as miserable as pos-
sible for their prisoners,"
"Seldom." Panama's former
Soviet director general of education
rights of free movement in the 'ism."
city and possibly free move- "I expect you to take immedl-\mj*aa i_ 1UI_ ._
m.-nt to Berlin. ate measures to prevent a repe- HflllfII JPI n||l I16r
Dasher said he was "amazed":titio'n of such incidents. *
when Dibrova told him East Ber-
the:
PrDa6sheraisid Dibrova "made it F|fiS 3300 Mlfif
very clear that the German Dem-
ocratlc Republic is a sovereign
Sunday Accident
Victim Remains
On 'Serious' List
Mrs. Flora Norguelra, who suf-
i fered severe head injuries in an
what they have" - ""' automoblle accident Sunday was
'V/ithtfut referring directly to cupied sector of _the city/' ,;"'''his"w"s, s"nd "Army
President Eisenhower Truman Dibrova madeth. **"* J (R NYX his gf u,.
speke extensively on the powers rejecting an America nprotest i
"siend the rest of my life going democratic Republic is a sover B
svrund to tell people e x a c t I 5 clgn state recogntaed by the So- '^German peoples poli
z&tt/z** aatr-v- s
ruDied sector of tne cuy. :_.,,, u._ ..,; ,a Armv
spcke extensively on me puwcia rejecting =..*- -r----- .. ~ .. h v
and problems of the Presidency gainst the detention of tow A- InS.C WM i
an I that people "ought to have mericans by Communist police in them m ^Army
was escorting
evcrv svmpathv in the world for'East Berlin Sunday,
the President." adding, "I know
I was there."
day at Oorgas Hospital in
changed" condition.
Army Sgt. Joe A. Hanson, who
was a passenger In the car which
s e d a n on a crashed into the one Mrs. Nor-
tour of Kast Berlin Sunday guelrCa husband was driving.
They were arrested and held was taken off the seriously ill
Earlier Truman told report-
ers, "I am not here lo criti-
cise the President. I have been
President and I have taken a
great deal of criticism."
The Communists said the Amer- ^-^ ^ pjslo,8 on groun(isi]~ ^y
they had a radio telephone in i Two others. Isidoro Norguelra
I their Army sedan In violation of;and Pfc Joae g Wright were
East German laws. Four hours|Stm in the hospital, but their
Bondsman Carrying
$110,000, Pistols
Interests FBI
1 later they were released at So-
On the subject of foreign poll-
cv, the former Chief Executive
stressed that the President alone
"is responsible for foreign policy OMAHA. Neb.. Nov. 30 tUP>
He savs what the policy will be Federai agents tried to fleure
an v ;cn the foreign policy is oul todav how bondsman Ralph
esf bushed by the President no James KinR happened to be
an change it except him- traVellinB about with $110,000 in
lei"" Ca^h ) v, nld Council No"vT3"(UP> Northern Ireland
King, a 37-vear-oid jnai ,_Ui____, ,,, ,rnriHr fnriliv a.
t his aftcrsoon press ^corner- E
en
man
th._
Kefauver and Adlai Stevenson
1 like them all."
injuries were not considered se-
rious.
The four people were hospi-
talized following a head-on col-
lision of two cars Sunday night
on Gaillard Highway opposite
Fort Clayton. Mrs. Norguelra, a
iewelry saleswoman In Panama
City, underwent emergency sur-
gery for head Injuries.
Canal Zone police were still
Investigating the accident. Both ed to be in
BELFAST Northern Ireland, soldiers are from Fort Kobbe. 11958.
Northern Ireland
Tightens Frontier
4gainst Raiders
In 7 hrs. 22 mins.
LONDON. Nov. 30 (UP) Brit-
ain's jlnxed Comet jet airliner
has just made a "significant"
test flight which may signal a
change in its fortunes, the head
of the British Overseas Airwasy
Corporation said yesterday.
Sir M'les Thomas, chairman of
BOAC. said that a recent test
flight by a Mark III Coment had
been .'most significant."
The plane flew 3300 miles in
seven ours 22 minutes and land-
ed with enough fuel for another
hour and a half's flying, Thomas
said.
Comets have not flown on reg-
ularly scheduled air services In
Britain since three mysterious
crashes within a year forced
BOAC to withdraw them from
service.
a total of 89 persons were kill-
ed In the three crashes which
an lsvestigating body found to be
caused by metal fatigue.
Structural modifications s u g-
gested by that body have been
incorporated in the Comet III
which has been testing at the De
Haviland Aircraft C o m p an y's
works at Hatfield for over six
months.
The Comet III is the prototype
of the Comet IV which is expect-
full production by
continued, "did Spaniards allow
Krlsoners the comfort of being
oused in cells located above the
ground." -i
Davis has been working on the
premise for the last four months
that tunnels do exist. He Invit-
ed Castillero and John Erhman,
member of Panama's Justice de-
partment, to discuss the theory
and, at the same time, to visit
the Fort.
Work first began on 8an Lo-
renzo in April. Since that time,
the historical site has been
cleaned up and several discov-
eries made.
The latest find by Capt. Hans
O. Ruthe, construction supervi-
sor, was a set of stairs believed
Italian Government
Stands Firm Against
Threatened Strike
ROME, Nov. 30 (UP).Premier
Antonio Segnls government stood
firm today against a threaten-
ed strike of more than 91,600
Italian secondary school teach-
ers, scheduled for three days
starting tomorrow (Thursday)..
Segnls summoned education
minister Paolo Rossi back from
an official visit to the U.S.. after
a cabinet meeting yesterday.
But after the cabinet meeting,
a communique said the govern-
ment would not discuss the mat- d tl
ter further while under pressure ?." Iore and "ler tne In(lulsl-
of a strike threat. uon'
"We are certain." Davis stat-
ed, "that a great number of men
were Imprisoned at San Loren-
zo, particularly during the In-
quisition of the 'Nueva Grana-
da', which Is now Panam Co-
lombia and EcuaJor, and Peru.
COL. JO0N J. DAVIS, USARCARIB School commandant, polnta
out new excavations at Fort San Lorenzo to Prof. Ernesto Cas-
tillero, head of the University of Panama's History department
Davis invited the author and former director general of educa-
tion to San Lorenzo to discuss and verify his beliefs that under-
ground Jungeons exist at the historic site.
to have been sealed off 200 years "I agree wholeheartedly with
- Professor Castillero
ago. Descending Into the dry
moat. There, USARCARIB School
personnel dug-down to a drain-
age ditch which is cut Into na-
tive rock. The ditch was used to
keep the moat free of water.
Despite the new discoveries,
Davis Is seeking still another fa-
cility of the Fort underground
dungeons used to house prlson-
A communist led half-day
strike of Some 10,000 food, metal-
lurgical, wood, glass and textile
workers In Rome province yes-
terday was rated a failure by
most observers, despite extreme
leftwlng claims of success.
that the
Spaniards must have kept the
prisoners in dungeons below the
Fort. And furthermore,*; he con-
cluded, "I'm going to find them
If they exist." f
Work Is continuing on the Fort
with the top priority going to
search for underground pair
sages. ^> I
If, and when, they are found,
restoration of the historic land-
mark will be complete.
"They have all been to sec
an-, discussed the situation with
me, and I like them all."
m5 found about $30,000 crammed
into Kln-.'s pockets, mostly In
S100 and $500 bills. His car was
10,000 Russians
See British Play
Hamlet'In Moscow
when the Republic of Ireland
was neutral.
J. B. Henna, Northern Ireland
^ISSSS 'that's wUhn Sne
with
ts motor runnlne and, a frontier will be lim-
paper .ek on the floor contain- i| ,J ff on hour
in- $80.000.
FBI.
Secre
Ited to 10 miles an hour.
Hntemal Revenue, and J?*J^uc^V.so
t Service agenta were call-,m' P" ptn to kepp Irlsn _
f .will be erected to keen
3W ed In to check on i^.ource oL from e,caD,n flcross
Kings money. The bondman' ,nP border after any attacks in
los- meanwhile, protested that ne at- tj|ster
hat ways carries from $20.000 to ThVnrtlon was orovoked bv p
The action was orov
aid Saturday bv members of
LONDON, Nov 30 (UP' Mos-
cow Radio reported today t
more than 10.000 people have S30.000.
seen the current British prrriuc The pruna, he said, were sfcur- -- ou"tiwed" Irish Republican
tion of "Hamlet" In Moscow It Itv on a loan. Police had found wMch b)ew a ho,e ,n thp
is the iirst time a British com- the guns in the locker earlier,^ of R Do](ce gt(ltlon at Ros-
panv has performed In Moscow and were standing by in nope ]pa and trjp(1 to rapturf police
since the revolution. the owner would return. I arms. The raiders fled acrnt.s the
_ border after woundlne critically
la Northern Ireland constable.
WILD BILL HICKOK
By Russ Winterbctham and Ralph Lane
I
SPECIAL RELEASE!
A "different" picture, wherein your emotions will
be in open conflict with the suspense... The story of
the battle against international drug traffic!
| I TODAY X U X
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
SHOWS:
3:08 4:57 6:43
8:49 p.m.
II I
T
IFORBIDEN
i.JO^f* earring
Nitel PATMCR Elizabeth SELLARS
a Tmk MOItM'lriU 6YHT y Jack WAMEI
I American Schools
I Failing To Teach
|Southern Educator
I MIAMI BEACH. Nov. 30 (UP)
A prominent Southern educa-
tor charged today that the A-
Imerican education systemfrom
I parents through collegeIs fall-
ling to teach the fundamental of
I1 obedience, the three R's and
genuine scholarship.
W. S. Milburn. president, of
I the Southern Association of Col-
leges and Secondary Schools
now convening here, called on
I teachers to learn the facts of
I living and begin to produce a
satisfactory return for the mon-
R ey sDent on education.
"Increaslne complaints are
coming from Industrial leaders
I that they find It harder and
harder to get workers who can
| write legibly, do accurate math-
Iematlcal work or provide trained
'minds." Milburn reported.
The Louisville, Ky.. high
school principal said that "under
the mistaken democratic idea
that extended education should
I be offered everyone, we have
made scholastic standards pro-
?re*slvelv lower.
t''We should can a halt to this
pretense of educating.. when
we are broadening our base and
offerlns too manv sublects while
XPRKIDENTE/o"
THEATRE -----
Per Ave. No. t
TONIGHT
AT 8:30 P. M.
PRICES: ----------- .75 .40
GALA PREMIERE
The Unbelievable
Puccini's magnificient!
WjCLdcurm
BUTTERFLY
with
KAORU
YACHIGUSA
The Miracle
of the
Century!
and
I
failing to lav a firm found*tlon
on elementary matters such as
reading, writing and arithme-
tic."
English or Puronean children
easily sun** the American
voun^ster In the three R's. Uius
American cohetes todav are
tearhln snelMn and red(ng
when- thev should be givlnr
c--es in advanced subjects, he.
said. I

10 more
Japanese
stars!
The Taku.;usa Ballet
and the voices of
ORIETTA MOSCUCCI
GUISEPPE CAMPORA
ANA Mo. CANALE
and ni'nv other Opera S'.ars!
T Tecnnicolor!
Messerschmiff
To Make Warplanes
In Germany Again
PARIS, Nov. 30 (UP) ^-French
manufacturers have sold West
Germany licenses to build a jet
French training plane for the new
Luftwaffe and art negotiating two
other contracts for piston engine
craft, air sources reported today.
A contract signed last week
with the German Messerscbmitt
company gave it permission to
build on license the French twin-
jet, two-seater Fouga Magister
i training plane, the sources said.
The Fouga was recommended
by the North Atlantic treaty Or-
Iganiation to its members for the
I training of jet pilots.
Mcsserschmltt was reported to
have accepted the French con-
tract as a "stop gap" until it can
sun producing jet planes of its
own.

BELLA VISTA
^ M-G-M's Exciting Adventure of
the Virgin West...
and Its Most
Impatient Maiden!
TODAY
PRICES: -------------- .75 .41
1:30, 3:05, 5:00, 7:0*. 9:00 p.m.