The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:00937

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America

Full Text
one plane-all the way
m
atiama Morican
"ef the people know the truth and the country is saff -r Abraham Lincoln.
31st YEAR
PANAMA, *. r TUESDAY, NOVEMBER t, 1M5
FIVE CENTS
Gets
Letter
ABGENTINE MINISTER OF INTERIOR under the Pern re-
glme, Angel Borlenghl, la shown at left sharing a Joke with
hi* ousted chief during a brief visit Sunday. Borlenghl ar-
rived here from Havana, Cuba and returned several hours
later. Borlenghl is the first former member of Pern's cabjnet
to visit him personally here aince the ex-President establish-
ed residence at Hotel Washington. (Photo: Hindi Diamond)
* ?
Peronista Minister
Visits Former Boss
HAVANA. Nov. 29 (TJP)-State-
ments by former Argentine Min-
ister of the Interior Angel Bor-
lenghl Indicate the possibility
that deposed Argentine Presi-
dent Juan D. Peron could come
to Cuba. -j ...
Borlenghl made a short visit
to P"""i It the week end to
talk wraiPeionTSu vlsH lasted
almost 24 hours.- .
Borlenghl tttrad l*******
to Havana and said be, found
Peton in the best-of Mrlte and
in excellent physical condition.
"We discussed In detail the in-
cidents and the changing mili-
tary situation which has taken
over in Argentina," he said.
Asked if Peron was consider-
ing a return to power. Borlenghl
flatly indicated that during his
visit with Peron only the pres-
ent Argentine situation was dis-
cussed.
He added: "Peron has lust fin-
ished his book on the causes
whkh (determined his downfall.
Several printing houses have
made offers to print the book,
lncludlnic some American firms
Prom this interview United
Press arrived at the conclusion
that Peron is considering: the
Sisslbility of coming to live in
avana, even though, when ask-
ed about it Borlenghi declined
to give a direct answer.
In any event it is believed that
if Peron comes to Havana he
will surely stay at BorienghTs
home.
Peron and his former Interior
Minister had net seen, each oth-
er since last July, when Borlen-
ghl said farewell to his boss and
smiled for Uruguay, leaving a
rof primary importance in
internal setup ef Argentina
under pressure from the mili-
tary.
Peron has been invited by sev-
eral American and European
countries to take up residence
there. .
However, the fact that Bor-
lenghl lives in Cuba with his
family and the fact that Peron
considers him as his closest ad-
viser leads to the opinion that
Peron will eventually come to
Havana.
In addition, Borlenghl has giv-
en no Indication that he plans
to leave the Cuban capital, at
least for the time being.
Radio Moscow
Offers To End
H-Bomb Tests
LONDON. Nov. 29 CUP)-
Russla offered today to discon-
tinue testing nuclear weapons
"right here and now if the oth-
er powers possessing such weap-
ons agree to the same."
The offer was made in an
English language broadcast by
Moscow radio beamed to Nortn
America and followed the re-
cent explosion in the Soviet Un-
ion of Its "biggest ever" nuclear
device.
"We cannot discontinue the
production and testing of nu-
clear weapons so long as both
the U.S.A. and Britain rpanu fac-
ture such weapons and test
them," Moscow radio commen-
tator Andreyev aid.
The proposals which the
U.8-S.R. put before the United
Nations stipulate a total ban on
nuclear weapons and their re-
moval from national arma-
ments.
"And as one of the first moves
to disarm the USSR, suggests
that the countries which possess
nuclear weapons pledge to dis-
continue their testing. We are
ready to do so right here, and
now if the other powers posses-
sing such weapons agree to the
same."
"The USA continues to
stock and improve nuclear
weapons, and It is claimed that
this is needed to keep a bal-
ance," Radio Moscow said.
"We should like to compete
with the USA. in P*J***j,
Srffofnvlnr. "Sot fuWn?out
A-bombs and H-bombs.
"But for that both sides musk
be willing and a concrete agree-
ment for disarmament must be
reached."
Panama Railroad Selling
Last Steam Locomotives
The Panama Railroad's last
two steam locomotives, a loco-
motive steam crane, four lower
guard locks gates, 2000 net
tons of ferrous scrap metal and
several hundred standard items
of steel and cast iron stock are
among the items now being ad-
vertised for sale by the Panama
Canal Company.
The two engines, the crane,
the gates and part for the'en-
gines are Included on one invita-
tion and the ferrous metal items
are offered on the other two.
Bids on the thre Invitations
will be opened Dec. 2 by the
Procurement Officer in New
York, and on the same date by
the Superintendent of Store-
houses in Balboa.
The two engines being sola
are Nos. 803 and 804, built by
the H. K. Porter Locomotive
Companv In 1942 and brought to
the Isthmus shortly after.
They were in constant use
during the war years when war
time freight Increased by almost
500 per cent over the pre-war
years. Boths engines are now
located in the Balboa Round-
house. ___.
Decree Returning La Prensa
To Owners Expected Today
Jap Calculates .
Big Bang Was
In Gobi Desert
TOKYO, Nov. 29 (UP) A
Japanese university scientists
said today Soviet Russia explod-
ed its latest hydrogen bomb in
the vast Gobi desert of Outer
Mongolia.
Prof. Tadao Klyokawa of Kyo-
to Unlversitv estimated from
scientific Instruments placed at
three points in Japan that the
Russian test explosion occurred
at about 12:30 a.m. on Nov. 22.
He based his report on atmos-
pheric shock waves.
Klyokawa, head of the spe-
cial meteorological laboratory of
Kyoto University's section of ter-
restrial physics, placed the site
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina,
Nov. 29 (UP) President Pedro
E. Aramburu is expected to issue
today a formal decree-law re-
turning the newspaper La Pren-
sa to its rightful owners and
correcting an "outrage'' perpe-
trated by ousted dictator Juan
D. Pern.
Aramburu told a press confer-
ence last night his government
had decided to return the world-
famous newspaper which was
confiscated in 1961 by the Pern
regime and that details would
be made public in a formal de-
cree.
Authoritative sources said A-
ramburu already had signed the
decree-law and that, it was be-
ing copied for distribution, thus
ending one of the greatest cases
involving freedom of the press
and one that brought world-
wide protests. It was understood
the action was based on the
fact Pern's seisure of the news-
paper was unconstitutional.
"The government has resolv-
ed the situation of the dally La
Prensa," Aramburu told the press
conference. "By doing it, it does
no more than to repair the out-
rage against this great newspa-
per. The details will be known in
. DA
nu c.;istmav
READ THE ADS
Thefts Of Wrenches,
Books In Los Rios
Net Jail Terms
Books, wrenches and groceries
figured in a series of petit lar-
trled thU morning in the
agM
thefts were resolved today wRen
two of the Panamanian defend-
ants were given Jail sentences
and fined, while a third defend-
ant was found to be not guilty.
Charged Jointly for stealing a
Sirdboard carton full of books
ere Antonio Qulros. 20, and Fa-
Ibio Gonzalez. 18. The books, es-
timated to be worth about $15
were the property of Francis A.
Castles of quarters 6S62-A in Los
Rios. Qulros was fined $15 and,
given a 30-day Jail sentence
while his younger companion
netted a five-day jail term.
Gonzalez was also found anility
of stealing three boxes of
wrenches worth $175 from ie
adjacent house. 6382-B. Charles
B. Douglas was the complainant
in this case. Oonzalez was fined
$15 and given 30 days In Jail. He
had a police record dating back
to when he was 14.
Both thefts occurred shortly
after midnight last Sunday.
In addition to the petit lar-
cenies, both men were found
guilty of loitering in that area,
each fined $10 and each given
an additional 15-day sentence.
Qulros will have to serve a total
of 45 davs while Oonzalez was
Other item* Included In this
invitation are spar parts for
the two engines; a -% ton
capacity, steam operated rail-
road crane; and the four metal
lower guard gates weighing 300
tons each. ;* .v_.
Ferrous scrap metal advertised
for sale Includes 975 net tons
of heavy melting steel. 75 tons
of steel axles. 400 tons of rail-
road tails. 150 tons of railroad
wheels, 60 tons of malleable iron
and steel, 385 tons of cast iron
of various types, 205 tons of
various types of busheling, 25
tons of frogs and switches and
15 tons of manganese steel.
SoW 270 Items of steel bars,
billets, blooms, plates, sheets
and rolled sections, and 30 items
of cast iron offered on the third
invitation. The items include
both structural and carbon steel
and alloys of various kinds.
US Army Shoots
Honest John Rocket
Despite Protests
Ike Talks
With Hall,
Eases Work
m
a decree to be issued by the exe-
cutive power."
Newsmen present applauded
the statement.
Dr. Alberto Oainza Pas. for-
mer editor and publisher of La
Prensa who has waged a fight
for its return from his exile in
New York, hailed Aramburu's
announcement as "wonderful
news."
Oainza Pas was preparing to
leave New York by' plane
Wednesday afternoon and re-
turn to Buenos Aires sometime
Thursday his first visit to the
Argentine capital since he went
to. Uruguay and then to the
United States after seizure of the
paper.
Aramburu's press conference
was the first he has held since
he took office two weeks ago. He
did not submit to questioning
but brought up the subject of
La Prensa himself In a ten-min-
ute speech that was broadcast
and televised throughout Argen-
tina.
The president was flanked by
Vice President Isaac Rojas and
bis press secretary, Adolfo La-
nus, formerly an editorial writer
for La Prensa.
Aramburu said his government
is not worried about any Intern-
al problems because it has the
backing of the armed forces
whose goals and ideals are the
same as those of the Argentine
people Democracy.
He said the economic situs-'
tion was grim but no hopeless'
and expressed full confidence
that Argentina will resume its
economic expansion in the atar
future as already shown in the
past few days.
Industrial output must be in-
creased, he said in his brief mes-
sage, and "if the industrialists
want to make more money the
workers must earn more too."
where in the Gobi desert.
The Gobi desert is mostly de-
void of trees and supports only
grass, thorns and scrub. It Is a-
bout 600 miles from north to
south and 1000 miles from east
to west.
resi/imi pii,yo*vo, |iwvcu **c -*- 4 w uavo w****c ww..,...... ...
of the hydrogen explosion some- sentenced to a total of 50 days
TOKYO. Nov. 29 (UP) The
US. Army's Honest John rocket
today thundered across the Shi-
mamatsu firing range drowning
out the shouts and singing of
500 Japanese demonstrators. K,y-
odo news agency reported.
The labor unionists mobilised
early thls.mprnlng at the Ameri-
can flrini range between Sap-
airt-Chitase pn Japan*
northern Island to chaT-
. the U.s: Army's right to
fire the rocket.
Porty Japanese poltaemen
were on hand to prevent vio-
lence but none so far had been
The demonstrators chanted,
"we will not permit the atomic
bomb."
GETTYSBURG, Pa., NOV. 29
(UP).President Elsenhower to-
day began four days of routine
work mixed with rest and re-
creation.
The President, after a busy
Monday that marked another
milestone on his road to recov-
ery, planned a short stint of pa-
per work at his downtown Get-
tysburg office. He had no sched-
uled callers. For much of the
day he was to loaf around his
farm home, taking it easy.
Press secretary James C. Hag-
erty indicated Mr. Eisenhower
will follow pretty much that
same routine through Friday.
Official business will pick up
again Saturday when the Presi-
dent confers separately with
Republican leaders of House and
Senate, Rep. Joseph W. Martin,
Jr., (Mass.) and Sen. William F.
Knowland (Calif).
Yesterday the President talk-
ed for 45 minutes with Repub-
lican National Chairman Leo-
nard W. Hall but failed to an-
swer the question uppermost in
Republican minds: Will he con-
sent to be nominated for another
term in the White House? <
It was the President's first
frankly political activity since
his heart attack in Denver on
Sept. 24. Hall came away with
no information on the Presi-
dent's plans but with fresh op-
timism that Mr. Eisenhower will
run.
in jail. The fines for each to-
talled $25.
Meanwhile Carlos Francis. 20.
was found not guilty of stealing
a bag of groceries worth $3.26
from a car parked at the Tivoli
Commissary on Nov. 25.
Exiled Dictator
Stays Close To
Hotel Washington
Deposed strongman Juan D. Pern, in exile in thn
Hotel Washington, received a letter last week warning
him to be careful. Col. Bolivar Vallarino commandant of
Panamas National Guard, revealed today.
The letter is believed to have come from Argentina.
Since receiving it Pern and his party have been keep-
ing themselves more to their hotel than they did previously.
They cancelled a scheduled trip to Lar Tablas over
the weekend.
' Members of the party have linked the letter with the
arrival of an Argentine military plane at Albrook last
week. However, as far as can be ascertained from Albrook
sources, the Argentine plane neither picked up nor set
down any passengers during its stopover here.
CONFESS DEGREEQueen, Mother Elizabeth (left), follow-
lag her installation as Chancellor of the University of London
in London, confers an honorary degree upon the Indian High
Commissioner, Vljaya lakshia Pandit, a sister of India's
" Hahru.
They locked arms and swayed
back and forth in a demonstra-
tion calculated more to embar-
rass the UJB. military and add
fuel to the leftist demand that
all .S. forces leave Japan than
to actually stop the test firing.
A U.S. Army spokesman at
Army Forces Far East rear head-
quarters in Camp Zama .neasK
Tokyo said they had received no
reports from the firing range
yet.
Socialists, Communists and
other leftists have waged a na-
tion-wide campaign against A-
raerlca's possession of the Hon-
est John rocket In Japan ever
since it arrived last summer.
.8. Army statements that the
weapon with a range of 20 miles
was defensive and that no atom-
ic warheads were brought to
Japan for use by the Honest
John rocket launcher did not
check the campaign.
In Hokkaido. Gov. Toshlfuml
Tanaka called on the Ninth VS.
Corps headquarters yesterday in
an attempt to stop the firing,
according to a Mainichl newspa-
per story.
West Berliner Shot
By Communist
People's Police
BERLIN. Nov. 29 (UP).The
British commandant in Berlin
today protested to the Soviet
commandant against the border
shooting and wounding of a
West Berliner by Communist
' People's Police Sunday.
British commandant Maj. Gen.
R c Cottrell-Hill asked Soviet
commandant Maj. Gen. P. A. Di-
brov "for adequate and urgent
action to ensure that such Inci-
dents are not repeated, a Brit-
ish announcement said.
"The letter called attention to
the reckless use of firearms
which constitutes a serious dan-
ger to the safety of persons
within the British sector," the
announcement said. J_-_Z
On Sunday a West Berliner
.was shot in the abdomen at a
Communist checkpoint on the
border of West Berlin and the
surrounding Soviet zone of Ger-
many.
The Communists said the man
was wantedin East Oermahy for
theft and was shot when he
tried to avoid a border control.
Another West BerUner was
shot and killed on the last-West
city border Nov. 21. The Com-
munist* said he was a scrap me-
tal smuggler who refused to halt
when doted to do so by police.
Newspapers, Radio
Censor Selves
In Brazil Crisis
RIO DE JANERO, Nov. 2
(UP) Brazilian newspapers and
radio stations operated today un-
der a self-censorship code impos-
ed to curb political unrest while
the nation is under a modified
state of martial law.
The code forbids criticism of
the legality of the present gov-
ernment and acts of congress.
General criticism of government
is permitted as long as it is not
is permitted ss long as it is mot
aimed at subverting public order
or weakening public institutions,.
Gen. Antonie Jose Be Lima C-
mara issued the regulations to
newspaper publishers and radio
station managers ss his first act
as executor of the state of siege.
Lima Cmara told the publish-
ers and broadcasters at a meet-
ing last night that they would be
responsible for their own censor-
ship. But be warned that violat-
ors of the code would have a gov-
ernment blue pencil applied to
their news before publication. '
The General promised that be
and his staff would be available
to resolve any doubtful cases.
The code bans any mention of
imprisonments or other acts re-
sulting form the state ef siege, or
modified marital law, unless the
news Is distributed or approved
by military ministries, the nato*., HI
al news agency or Lima Cmara 3:27
himself.
Vallarino said that security
arrangements for Peron's protec-
tion at the Hotel Washington
had been rechecked after the
letter came to his attention. The
existing guard systemtwo Pan-
ama National Guardsmen on
duty during the day and three
at nighthad been found ade-
quate.
_ the case of a man and
woman who demanded to see Pe-
ron, but whom the guards turn-
ed back. National Guardsmen
took them to be tourists.
Meanwhile Saturday night the
leader of the forces which over-
threw Peron, Gen. Eduardo Lo-
nardl, passed through Tocumen
as a transit passenger en route
for the United 8tates. He is to
undergo medical treat m e n t
Stateside.
After taking over the govern-
ment from Peron, Lonardl was
later eased out of the presidency,
and replaced by Gen Pedro E.
Aramburu.
The Argentine DC-4, bound for
Mexico arrived at Albrook Mon-
day night last week, tried to get
to Mexico Thursday but returned
with engine trouble, finally took
off northward Sunday.
Peron's former Minister of the
Interior, Angel Borlenghl, flew
down from Havana to visit his
former president over the week-
end.
Clothes Une
VIENNA, Nov. tS (UP)
Austrian police chased an
American soldier through the
streets ef Clenna yesterday
and caught him in the very
act ef committing an offense.
The offense: Wearing an
Army uniform, forbidden un-
der the Austrian state treaty
which came Into force last
month.
Much Surprised, CpL Gilbert
Mitven-Berg changed to civil-
ian clothes.
BALBOA TIDES
WIDNtSOAY, NOVIMMR 30
HIGH tOW
a.m. 10:01 t.m.
4:04 ML '0:** "
Four Hospital
After Head on Crash
Near Ft. Clayton
Four people were still hospital-
ized today two of them, seri-
ously injured, as a result of a
head-on automobile colusin
which occurred Sunday night on
Galllard Highway opposite Fort
Clayton.
Mrs. Flora Nortegua, 37, under-
went emergency surgery for head
Injuries sustained in the acci-
dent. Today she was considered
to be still seriously 111 A pas-
senger in the other car, Sgt. Joe
A. ttenson, received severe face
lacerations and was also on the
serious list today at Gorges Hos-
pital.
Mrs. Noriega's husband Isidore
and Pfc. Jose 8. Wright were
both hospitalized for treatment
of injuries, but were not con-
sidered to be In serious condi-
tion.
Canal Zone Police were still
Investigating the collision which
occurred at 6:05 p.m. Sunday
when Noriegua'a Chevrolet sedea
northbound on the highway wag
struck by a Mercury sedan going
in the opposite direction. The
two soldiers were in the Mercury.
Police said their car apparently
went completely out of control
and skidded before it crashed In-
to the Panamanian's automobile.
Mrs. Nortegua Is employed as
a Jewelry saleswoman by Fast-
lich. Her husband's occupation
is not known. Both soldiers are
attached to "F" Co. of the 33rd
Infantry at Ft. Kobbe.
DOWN ON TBE F ABM-President Eisenhower strokes the heed of e pon^"^.FS^Sr i
dren David Susan and Barbara (left to sight), start out for a ride at the Presidenta farm in
Gettysburg Pa Looking on is the children's father. Maj. John Elsenhower.


MOB TWO
/
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDTOT DAILY NEW8PAFE
------------ .....
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1955
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
TNI AN fUaUfHM .V THK **"*" JfSS"
retlKDID ir MIUON MOUNSI fW I
n.
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IN
KM
HAUkMOO ANUS. HITO
M emier p. o Bex '34. Panama.
TiiiPHOKi -O740 If Linis)
C*l DDIIH. PAN.IMBNICAN. PANANA
Orne* 11.17 Cnti Avinui tvhin itm ah itn
FHIIIN NtMICINTATIVU. JOIHUA POWtR. INC.
141 MADISON AVfc NtW Yomt. 7> N. V.
tOMt
MNTN. M AVAN i ''*
P IX MONTM. IN ADVANC .",2
rN N YtAB. IN AOVANC ,. ______]*
2:5
THW IS YOU 0UM THI MAPKt OWN OQUIMM
THE MAR BOX
RADEGL1A STORY
Sir:

Some of our priests have already called on you and you art
wareof our leeflngs in the mutter of Radeglla's article whleh
rSaW WSffl.^'SSStln. the article which
Labor News
And
Comment
might know what nrovoked Radeglla's seiirillous attack
We are confident In view of your statement, 'contrary opln-
lona are equally entitled to publicity," that this article will be
brought to the attention of your readers.
Sincerely youre,
(Rev.) Joseph F. Konen, CM.
Pastor of St. Mary'a Mission-
PERON: A CATHOLIC IN DOCTRINE?
71 Prioste la Jail
Panama u an open highway for Jdeas from all sources.The
latest eventi have demonstrate,, thla thla once more, since the "EK
arrival of the depoaed General Juan Domingo Peron. now plain
If he had arrived in Panama during the days In which he
imprisoned others at his pleasure .then perhaps members of our
University would not have "hailed" him as they did on the mW
when they w eagerly arranged for him to peak at the Aima
^*rvePrThTWnce her*'of the father of "Justlciaham"
ha worked as an effective charm to change feelings, although
S change may very well be only temporary. (Trena, note: "Jus-
tielallsm" ia the name of Peron's doctrine'.
But for us the capricious affirmations of Mr. Peron are not
convincing, tor everywhere he goes he repeats the earn eong .
"I am a convinced Catholic" even if the very shadow of priests
be ior him an accusing finger of his pretended Catholicism.
* to^Swersu the local presa* which will eertalnly have
more repercussions than he can expect right now, he emphasiz-
ed the one referring to the "Conflict with the Catholic Church,
of whleh he la now a "dead member" because of the penalty of
"excommunication" weighing upon him. y.j.__
"I am a doctrinary Catholic" was the answer we have picked
up as a summary of all those affirmations concerning his Cathol-
icism.
No doubt, Mr. Peron will understand that this is not what
the catholics it Panama and the rest of thei world expect. What
does he mean when he asserts thet he U a "doctrinary Catholic ?
What does lie know about catholic doctrine?
This has. not been asked, although we doubt that he even
knows the children's catechism. The explanation of the works
of mercy requires a complete treatise on Christian sociology,
which should be known by all rulers to the application of their
state's social principles.
It is very possible that what Mr. Peron pretends to affirm
by his definition of his Catholicism refers to a new way of un-
derstanding the Gospel according to hU system of his popular
Justlcialiam; and slr.ee he considers himself, and his followers
so recognise him, as the founder of a party of social gains, he
needed to model a new concept of Catholicism in agreement with
hi* desires of the moment.
From this it feUaenjthai at the beginning when he
that the Catholic dKprewWabe a great force to main!
lnbower he did not Hesitate in asking lor her hsuad or wa:
We have seen photographs In whleh the astute politician
reverently kisses the hand o Cardinal Copello, receives Holy
Communion, practice* other religious devotions and fulfills other
dunes of conscience. At that time his policy told him that this
wh necessary to win the crowds. We note tnat he he* not been
the only one to use such tactics. Evidently the systemls ef f iciet.
But the hour o change arrived. Catholicism is not only a
doctrine of prayev and devotion, it is a great deal more than
that. Catholicism penetrates the entire life of man, not only his
relations with God but also with other men; some of these rela-
tions whleh are influenced by Catholicism accompany us in all
our activities
Perhaps this is what Peron did not understand, and possibly
in this misunderstanding was born the clash between his school
and the doctrine which the Pope's took from the Gospels.
Having achieved the zenith of control over the masses with
a part of Catholicism, with Confessions and Communions, he be-
lieved ht would lose this control by the appldation of a social
Justice which was that of the Catholic Church and not his own.
We repeat, here is the clash between opposing doctrines. Re
Kg to make a choice, and he had to choose his own system,
:ause with it he could more easily stay in power. However
this danger did not go unnoticed by the Church since it meant
a materialistic concept o the state as owner and Judge of con-
sciences and was therefore an injury to Divine Interests.
And now we have what Peron qualified as "clerical Inter-
ference" to his speech to the Governors as published Nov. 11,
IBM by his mouthpiece "Democracia."
By VICTOR RIESEL
The general staff of many i
national union headquarters has
been poring over maps, target
sreas end msnpower figures-
preparing for so offensive which
will sena csisvsns onto the high-
ways, faat boats up the rivera
ana squads even into cities where
pickets hav been as rare as
horse end wagon drivers in the
Teamsters Union.
The target aress have been
selected with military precision.
Every section of the country,
every Industry, every businessman
and every worker will feel the
impact of the new era of organ-
isation which will follow the
AFL-CIO merger.
I could tell you the details of
a drive by AFL vaudevillians,
headed by Joe E. Lewis and
Jsckie Bright, to unionize county
fairs, carnivals, circuses and their
winter grounds. With Gypsy Rose
Le as one of the organizers, this
would be a more colorful story
than other drivesout the leas
spectacular ones will shake the
nation.
There Is, for example, a blue-
print for a drive on the netlot
4.000 000 department store snd
The fact that the Church organised Catholic syndicates on
different basis from those of Peronlsra is "surreptitious of
some ecclesiastics," In "an open violation of their religious du-
ties" and therefore they are the inspire or authors of man-
euvers absolutely contrary to the national Interest and deserv-
ing of punishment.
Here we have the complete explanation which we needed in
connection with Peron'a ''Doctrinary Catholicism." And this
man is today guest of Panama.
.We can well understand now the reason for the widespread
arrests of more than seventy priests, leaders of Argentine's
Catholic Action; the insults uttered against His Eminence Car-
dinal Copello in person; against the great Biahop Miguel de An-
m, the father and treat organizer of the best works of social
welfare which were later attributed to Peron's wife, Eva DUarte
de Peron. We now understand the order for the exile of Bishops
Tato and Novoa. ,
Wa also now realize his interest to denying the^xUtence ot
a religious conflict between the Church and the government of
peron; it does not work to his advantage for the world to be In-
formed from the heights of the presidential chair of the hap-
penings during the last ten months of his regrettable "lack of
Eownment.' And it is common knowledge In all America that
e wished to perpetuate himself to the presidential office.
Mannel Prade, CJHJ.
"Emepe"
msy get priority
from the new AFL-CIO even over
a projected campaign la the
chemical and atomic and hydro-
gen fields. Why? Because there
are only 503,500 union members
in a retail field of more than
4,000,000. This is a vast ana ex-
panding industry.
Much of the retail field has
gone suburben. Just recall all the
'^Miracle Miles" of modernistic
stores you've driven through from
New York's Westchester to Holly-
woods Wilshlre Blvd. America is
Suing suburban, the stores are ao-
ig suburban-and so will the
union organizing committees about
to be launched by the CIO Re-
tail. Wholesale and Depsrtment
Store Union, headed by Mas
Greenberg.
There also is a new super-
market near your home. In 1M0
there were few such food empo-
riums. At the last count, in ItSf,
there were 13,300. There are thou-
sands more nowand they em-
ploy live workers-despite euto-
ma'tion. ,
The CIO's Retell Employees
Union wants to sign up many of
these. For a preview of things
to come, tot* take a look at this
union's technique. For month*
now, Greenberg has had research
men analysing the field, picking
target areas, counting the num-
ber of store in a city and the
number of clerk* employed. Not
ia just fw communitiea but
ell cities to a massive aqusre
in 1i*HIi f York t0
go dowflWPlB^avand over
laFAtlante. \ff.
Being bright strategists, mete
men have also analysed labors
strength in these eitles so the pow-
erful unions in the areaa can be
approached and asked for help,
political influence, money and
manpower.
All this is now down on paper-
targets to be taken, potential
membership and the money re-
quired to re-awsken "the spirit of
UT organizing days."
Within a few weeks these plana
will be put before the eight-man
high command of the AFL-CIO-
consisting of George Meany, Bill
S-.hnitzier, three men from the,
olJ AFL and three from the old
CIO The signal to move up will
come from this high Command-
and presumably the money, too
Not ell of the AFL-ClOs 140
International unions hsve their
battle plsns on paper-but a good
many are aa ready aa this retail
union. ._.,
Watch especieUy the AFLs
State, County sad Municipal Em-
ployees. They're preperea. They
envision a mass drive on the
nation* government and pUnuc
wekers. Reports from their head-
quartera reveal that the "ground-
work" has been aet for campaigns
in upstate New York, Michigan,
Texas, Oklahoma and Florid
among othera.
How will thia work? Just keep
your eyes on Detroit where spe-
cial activity is centered. There's
a labor town. Its powerful unions
will be used .is a base for signing
up city workers and those em
ployed by public institutions.
-en.- imla'i alnernvt fill
Ah! Success!
One Washington
Merry-Go-Round
a, PWSIW PSLRWSiOII,
Nostalgia To Order
BOB RUARK
ROME Not since Humph-
rey Bogart asked a colored man
named Sam to play "As Time
Goes By" in the movie, "Casa-
blanca," have seen a singing
piano man pick up an audience
and hold it as I have seen a man
named Stuart Hart do It in Rome.
Hart is a handsome blond fel-
low in his early thirties, snd he
works for my old friend Brick-
top, who has been running saloons
in Europe since Cole Porter was
a choir boy. Brick, whose square
name is Ads Smith and who cornea
from West Virginia, is possibly the
best saloonkeeper to the world. She
knows whst the customers buy,
and usually manages to find it.
Mr. Hart has got the Roman
ladies and the tourists firmly by
the heart st this moment. He
looks- like a slightly handsomer
version of Richard Widmark, the
acto Th vorice 1 sbaritone with
Sinatra timing, but stronger on
the hesvy notes, and bis pisno
is very pleasant.
Stuart leans back and singa over
his shoulder to the ladies, and af-
ter the first few bare you can aee
the damea kicking their shoes off.
As any old roue knows, when a
lady takes off her shoes without
reslizing it, she's lostand they're
all barefooted la Bricktop's these
days.
Riviera
silence
One of these days I am going to
be making a movie that will have
a couple of important love scenes
keyed to nostalgia, and the MCA
boys might Just as well sign up
Mr. Hart now, because he is my
man for the piano.
He deals in the elder stuff, and
when he reels off a few linea of
"I Cried Por You" or "Some-
one To Watch Over Me,'' you
can literally see the ladies squirm.
This I ain't seen since the early
days of Frankie boy, and brother
Hart isn't dealing with bobby-sox-
ers. He can make a matron
wriggle add kick off her shoes,
I have ever really underatood
what makes an artist dig deeply
into an audience, but I know what
it la when I aee it. There are
several other turns st Brick's,
including Brick, but there ia gen-
erally noise from the late-bloom-
ing drunks. When Hart come on,
the silence ia so great you can
hear the snick of a match striking.
This is one of the sure signa of
great and gripping entertainment!script,
the kind of thing that make* named
my gal Lena Horn greatbe-
cause at four o'clock people you
find in night clubs are nearly all
fried, and, aa a rule, insensitive.
But I have seen Lena, and Sin-
atra, too, play a late show at the body goofed-
and command complete
from an audience of a
thousand people. Hart haa the
same magic.
Stuart ia singing more or leas by
accident In Rome, since he came
back with his charming wife, Adri
ana, to visit her family here. But
a pro is a pro, and after a few
nights of singing for fun he signed
on for the brief stay with Brick
which has turned into a saga. You
can't find a seat in the' place now,
and I never knew a pro to quit
when he was packing them in.
Hart singa 30-year nostalgiathe
songs of Cole Porter, Johnny
Mercer, Harold Arlen, all the
eld greetand the traveling world
seesifjto be to a mood for nos-
talgia. He works on the same tech-
nique as Bina and Sinatra, which
is that anything you stilt remem-
ber from your young-love days is
5Ding to hit the Kids as well as
le middi-ageri
The funny thing about my run-
ning into Stuart is that a few
wccks ago I wrote him into a
out of pure imagination
his songs, and then won-
dered where I'd find him, or some-
ne like him, for the purpose 1 had
in mid.
Now I knew, and if this kid
isn't a star inside of a year, some-
WASHINGTON With Ameri-
can foreign policy fighting- a losing
game in As a, Africa, and .o some
extent Europe, it might pay Eis-
enhower planners to give more
attention to the Pan American
Union and the man who will guide
its destinies during the next few
years.
Sitting serenely Just s few blocks
from the State Department, the
sometimes neglected Pan Ameri-
can Union can be a great force for
the type of peaceful cooperation so
badly needed in the world but not
overly prevalent today.
The man who takes the place of
the late Carlos Davila, much-loved,
late director-general of the Pan
American Union, can play sn all
important part in molding a close-
knit alliance against Communism
and for better underatandtog in
the Americas.
Among the possibilities for this
post are dynamic Eduerdo Zuleta-
Angel, ex-ambassador of Colombia
who, however, is not too anxious
to serve; snd ex-President Gslo
Plaa of Ecuador on of the few
Latin American presidents bor in
the United States.
Galo Plszs not only wss born in
Greenwich Village, New York City,
but studied at the Univ eraity of
Maryland, played football at the
University of Californai, served as
ambasssdor in Washington and is
one of the most consistent and
faithful followers of the Dem-
ocratic progress in Latin America.
While some other Latin govern-
ment have closed down the press,
Galo laughed at the gibes against
him In the Ecuadorian press,
never Imposed martial law, and,
mot important of all, held free
and fair elections at the end of
hi four-year term. He wss, in-
cidentally, the only Ecuadorian
I President ever to finish out a full
term. The others were either as-
sassinated or deposed.
Those elections resulted in a
victory for his opposition, and
though he could probably have
started a revolution against the
oresent regime, he has lived quiet-
ly in Ecuador under his political
opponents.
Gslo Plazs was ambassador in
Washington during th war, when
the Pan American defenae pact
was negotiated. He was one of the
m ist effective arcbteicts
agreement, also helped
late the charter of th United
Nations at San Francisco.
As director-general of the Pan
American Union he would give
powerful impetus to closer unity
between the Americas at a time
when the United States appears to
be losing friends in other parta of
he world.
WOT,W. njpslin, she replied that
they had just moved into a new
house and she was terribly busy
getting settled.
"Every once to a while Estes
says, 'We must talk about th
future.' But," said Mrs. Kefauver,
'we just haven't gotten around to
It was quite dear, however,
that Estes is putting off the con-
versation because he knows what
Nancy will say.
BOMBS I NBAGGAGE
A system whereby airplane bag-
gage can be inspected for ex-
plosives is now under discussion at
the Civil Aeronautics Administra-
tion, but the prospects don't look
good
Last week CAA chief Fred Lee
conferred with J. Edgar Hoover
over the use of various magnetic
machines which detect metal con-
cealed in clothing of prison
visitors. However, an explosive in-
strument concealed in airplane
baggage coean't hav to be made
of metal and therefore could not
be detected by a magnetic ma-
chine. Furthermore, enough ex-
Elosive to blow up an airplane ean
i concealed to a fountain pen.
This appears to rule out detection
devices used in prisons.
Another, though expensive, solu-
tion might be s gsdget eaUed the
"inspectoacop" teatea by the U.8.
Bureau of Prisons, which works
on the principle of an x-ray and
can search out almost anything.
However, the gadgets cost over
$3,000 each' snd there's been fear
of radiation in using them on
human beings. They can be used
on suitcases and packages, how-
lever, without danger. The prob-
lem of installing ttiem to several
thousand baggage counters
throughout the United States of
America is one the experts hate
to tackle.
Wsskiagtoe Pipeline
lnflation?-Or Deflation?
By PETER EDS0N
The union's slogan will be
Mmke workers out of public m
Soyees." to other words, glv
*-m the right and privileges
not of civil servantsbut of fac
tory worker as in Ford and GM.
In this field, there sre 5,000,000,
perhaps more, who can be union-
These are but two unions, with
a potential of close to 10,000,000.
There ar other labor headquar-
ters, with potentials in the mil-
lions. The labor movement haa
doe* to 16,000,0000 member.
WASHNGTON (NEA) -Sec-
retary of the Treasury Oeo. M.
Humphrey ha a favorite asytog tt
the effect of "Nobody csn tell
what* going to happen six months
from now.'
The Cleveland Industrialists rea-
soning ia that If anyone oould see
that far ahead, he'd end upfwith all
the money. Nobody haa ever been
that smart, and nobody ever will
be.
This aage opinion may be ap-
propriate now aa the U.S. economy
balances on the tight wire of high
proaperity. -
Falling one way means inflation.
Falling the other way means de-
flation.
The winds of economic pressure,
not incidentally, blow strong to
both directions.
An inflationary pressure be-
gan last spring.
Granting of wage Increases in
the new steel, auto, coal and other
major induatry labor contracts re-
sulted in price increases in their
products.
There is plenty of opinion that
the jumps to steel, coal and autos
were too greet nd wer not Justi-
fied If nigh prosperity is to be
maintained In a blanaced economy.
On the other hand, it is pointed
eut that if the steel industry bsd
refused to follow th wage Ul-
erease pattern aet earlier in au-
toa, today's inflation might be
even wore than It is.
A steel strike might have stopped
production for as much as three
month* A blaek market might
have developed with even higher
steal price*. ,
It recognised that a continuing
series of wge end prie increases
would threaten further Inflation,
That may be what's ahead, as the
big labor union snap their 1*H
eentrsct demanda.
The busineas situation today is
analyzed in Washington as one in
which ti.s great majority o the
people b*v inert money than they
reaaire for th necessities of life.
Se they are spending morebuying
more clothes, bigger cars, color
TV new houses.
It ia the competition of goods in
the market piece that is ssld to
keep prices down. Shoes sre in
corapettilon with ieeboxee or what-
ever it U the cxmeuaaer wants. In
exchange for his surplus dollars.
The remedy for inflation Is there-
fore said to be the production of
more goods to compete for dollar.
The availability of consumer ere
ate It and the cost, or interest
charged for borrowed money ar*
recognized to have an important
bearing on this situation. The eas-
ier it Is for consumers to buy on
time, th more they'll buy.
If credit is too easy, there is
too much consumer demand for
new goods. This pressure to itself
is inflationary. And thia ia the eco-
nomic situation said to exist to-
day-
Some corrective
have already begun
plied.
adjustmens
to ce ap-
NANCY SAYS "NO
If Senator Kefauver decides to
run for President, he'll face revolt
at homenot only from his beau-
tiful wife Nancy, but from his four
children.
The senator from Tennessee was
being interviewed on college
press conference and afterward
was asked by Ruth Hagy why he
hadn't admitted that be was going
to run for President when in his
private conversstion he seemed to
be quite definite that be would
run.
Mrs. Kefauver, who campsigned
for her husband up and down the
United States in 32 was to the
group, and she answered the que*
tlon.
"The children are looking at the
show,'' she said, "and if he runs
for President they're going te
leave home.''
When Nancy waa aaked if she
In a private policy huddle, Pres-
ident Eisenhower snd Secretary of
Labor Mitchell agreed not to esk
Congress to amend the Taft-
Hartly law next session. They
decided, however, to push five ad
ministration labor bills ... Most
SJ, important would be legislation re-
form' quiring overtime pay for workmen
'" oa government projects whose
work week exceeds 40 hours in five
eight-hour days ... Dr. Arthur
Bums, the President's chief econ-
omist, is counting on the $1 min-
imum wage to keep the economy
booming next year. The new
wag floor, which goes Into effect
March 1, will add $30,000,000 to
the pay checka of 2,000,000 work-
ers. More important, in Dr. Burns'
private opinion, this will set off
an econorr chato reaction, caus-
ing other wage boosts snd stimu-
lating the economy.
Ironically, the full $1 minimum
wage waa passed by th Dem-
ocrats Democratic chairman
Mike Prendergaatia pulling
p o 1 i t i cal strinf* to keep the
state's senior Democrat,
Sea. Herbert Lehman, from head-
ing the New York delegation at
the IBM convention. Reason: Leh-
man 1 for Adlai Stevenson, not
Governor Harriman ... In case of
war in the Middle East, Army
strategists admit privately that
American armored equipment
won't measure up to Soviet tanks
in desert warfare ... The Glenn
Martin Company has started work
on a new 5,000-mile-rings guided
missile, a companion weapon to.
the much-publicized Atlas tote-
continent! ballUties missile.
Last August the Federal Reserve
Board raiaed its interest rate on
borrowings by member banks. In
October New York banks raised
their interest rate to three big
borrowers.
In the next three or four months
a further gradual eightening of
credit 1 expected. Its effect would
be to reduce borrowing snd buy
ing. thus lessening inflationary
threats.
If the deflation goes too far,
restrictions ran be eaaed. Or, taxes
might be cut to put more money in
the hands of Investors for produc
tlve expansion and consumers'for
spending.
Handling the insistent demand
from business for corporate tax
i reductions and from politicians for
Individual tax reductions will be
'the most severe strain the adminis-
tration fiscal policy will have to
'face next year.
COLLECTIVE CORNCOB-
Corn pops all over this eir
grown in Russia's Kharkov re-
gion. It was developed by
Agronomist Molebny, director
of the region* Lenin State
Farm, te see how many "satel-
lites" could be grown around
th main ear By selection and
creation of conditions, he says
he has increased the number of
(boots round the main axis to
from eight to 12. An official
Soviet source says at least 73
per cent of the special seed he
developed have produced plants
with many cobs.
few
f
Heirloom
quality Gift$!-\
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enduring charm
they are inexpen-
iively priced!
See our complete
telection.
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FREE S,LVER CENTER
STORE 161 CENTRAL AVENUI. PANAAA*
unAifbodif fisadu laAfi&d


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1955
TEE fANAMA AMERICAN AH INDEPBNDE1IT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE TBRB
(Book (BrUh
X
By Ualted Pre
WE DIE ALONE by David Ho-
ward! (Macmillan) tells of the
wartime adventures o a remark-
able Man Jan Baalsrud, who Is
as nearly indestructible as any-
i! who ever lived.
Baalsrud, now an instrument
tnaker and importer in Oslo, was
the only survivor of a party of
Sierrillas smuggled to occupied
orway in 1943 in a fishing boat,
They were betrayed before'they
ever got ashore. He escaped
through heavy fire, but a bullet
took off half his right big toe.
Daring the two months it took
him to travel 90 miles across the
Norwegian Arctic to neutral
Sweden, Baalsrud survived perils
that would have killed a, dozen
lesser men. He swam through icy
fjords, wandered barefoot in the
Arctic old, was swept away by an
avalanche, and for a week was
buried alive in sub-zero snow.
He was given up for dead several
time*eveh by himselfbut even
an attempt at suicide in a despond-
ent moment dldnt kill him. (His
hands were too weak to cock his
pistol.)
Ultimately the experience cost
him about 100 pounds of flesh-
more than half his weight at the
startand nine toes, which he cut
off himself when they were made
gangrenous by frostbite.
Howarth, a Briton who helped
smuggle guerrillas into Norway
during the war, tells Baalsruds
story with a sort of understated
excitement.
He went over the ground with
, Baalsrud before writing the book
to see for himself how rugged it
was and to meet some of the Nor-
wegians who risked their lives to
aid the escape. .
(Compiled by Publishers' Weekly)
Plction
MARJORIE MORNINGSTAR
Herman Wouk
AUNTIE MAMEPatrick Dennis
THE MAN IN THE GRAY
FLANNEL SUIT-Sloan Wilson
THE TONTINE Thomas B.
Costaln
SOMEHING OF VALUE-Robert
Ruark
Noa-Ptethm
GIFT FROM THE SEA Anne
Morrow Lindbergh
INSIDE AFRICAJohn Gunther
THE. POWER OF POSITIVE
THNKING Norman Vincent
Peale
HOW TO LVE 365 DAYS A YEAR
John A. Schindler
A MAN CLLED PETER
Catherine Marshall
tragic story of the knife from
itformation furnished by Peter
f'reuchen, the famed explorer, who
got the story from Meksak himself
and from independent research
into 19th century Eskimo life. It
makes an unusual and interesting
book. .
THE KNIFE, by Theon Wright.
(Gilbert):
"The Knife wasnt really much
of a weaponjust something a
sailor pulled off his belt and tossed
to an Eskimo in trade for three
beaiskins.-To the simple tribesmen
of Agpat island, though, It was a
wonderful and tragic implement
that introduced murder to a com-
munity where crime had never
been known.
Wrights story of the knifes im-
Sact as) Agpat, based on legends
anded down by the old men of the
tribe, is a fascinating acount, by
turns touching and terrifying, of
life among the Eskimos of Green-
land a century ago.
Karangak, who got the knife
from the sailor, was a half-mad
giant who ascribed all manner of
mystic significance to his prize
which certainly was more useful
than the bits of crude iron, em-
bedded in a seals jawbone, that
his fellow-Eskimos used for- cat-
ena Well of communal living on
Agpat. Karangak could not stand
competition, either from Amorok,
who owned a rusty old homemade
knife that had once belonged to a
tribal hero, or from Meksak, who
risked his life one winter to get a
knife of his own from the whalers
who visited Greenland every
Wright, newsman and world
traveler, has pieced together the
Allan Keller, a well-known New
York newspaper reporter, has tak-
en time out from the big stories of
the day to write a gentle, leisurely
p- ced book of reminiscences
which he calls GRANDMAS
COOKING (A prentice-Hall).
The book Is divided between
anecdotes remembered by a small
boy who was lucky enough to live
in his Grandma's house and eat at
her abundant table, and her reci-
pes for more than 200 traditional
New England dishes.
Keller writes: "My grandmother
was the best cook in the whole
wide world. There may be other
ways of starting a story about
Yankee cooking, but I think the
truth is best. That Is why I make
a statement with which no one can
quarrel. Grandpa stayed in love
with her until he was ninety-two,
and that's proof enough. I don't
mean he left her then. He just
died. ..." .
Church suppers, strawberry fes-
tivals, Fourth of July parades and
sleigh races make fine nostalgic
reading to acompany the mouth-
watering recipes. .
Asthma Mucus
Dissolved Easy Wav
Don't cough and rough, strang-le. P
and choke io bad that you can hardly
breath* or slsepdon't utter another
day from Bronchitis or Asthma without
trying Msndace. This great Internal
medicina, recently developed by a
aoientlflc American laboratory, works
through the blood, thus reaching your
lung and bronchial tube. That why
Mendaco woraa so fast to help you three
ways. 1. Helps nature dissolve and re-
move thick strangling mucus. 1, Pro-
motes free easy breathing and sound
sleep BO you soon feel O.K. S. Quickly
alleviates coughing, wheeling, sneez-
ing. Get Mendsce from your druggint
today. See how much batter jou may
sleep tonight and how much better you
soay tsal tomorrow
WATERPROOF WATCHES
17 JEWELS
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INTER-SrELLAR SPACE TRIP PROVES COSTLY...
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It rost rniversal-Intrrnational more than S115.M* te
send Jeff Morrow, Faith nomergue and Bex Reason to an-
other plane! ior the studio's. Technicolor science-fiction
thriller. "TIHS MIAMI r .RTH."
M'sji Dom, r-ue and Reason, cast as nuclear scientists,
find tl'enieves abducted from the earth b Morrow, and
transported by space snip to MeUluua, millions of light
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Matching Chair FfiEE with Tip-Toe-Mafic
KENMORE IRONER
e Full 26 inch roll handles all clothes easily
e Visi-Cords efep by step ironing method-,
e Adjustable clothes bar, Exclusive light
WHAT SEARS SELLS-
SEARS SERVICES TOO!
i
Shop both Store* Panama and Colon
'Uto 5*orj foiy r*oymenf Plan"
COLON Mflrnde* Aye. & 10 St. Phone Colon 1137

I



\
PAGE FOUR
THJ? PANAMA AMERICA* AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER ItSf
jTACOfT OH BRIDO
By Oswald Jaeoky
Written far NEA Service
WEST
4 10 5 3 2
T3
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NORTH A
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Neither side vu!.
Beei Seat* West
Paes 1A Pan
Pan 1 NT. Ptae
Pan

Opening lead*J
.
In moat no-trump contracta you
have a clear Idea of which suit you
niist develop to brmg in the right
nimber of tricks. Sometime you
have a choice of auita. and you
must look them over carefully to
cMose the right auit.
Tn today's hand, for example,
South had three suit to consider.
Hi might go after spades, hearts
oil diamonds. On what basis should
he make a choice? .
feouth speedily eliminated spades.
The odds were against catching
th|te. W>!Lfi!52*2g
School Pupils Show
Slock In Railroads
As Reward For Care
HAMMOND, Ind. (UP)- Elev-
en-year-old Ronnie Cutshall is
proudly showing playmates his
shares of stock in the Nickel Plate
Railroad.
Eight other Hammond grade
school pupils also are boasting part
ownership in the railroads serving
this area, thanks to Ronnie's letter
to Mayor Vernon C. Anderson.
Ronnie told the mayor be had
seen "where another city had been
given steam engines, so why not
Hammond?'*
The Hammond Times picked up
the idea in an open letter to L. L.
White, chairman of the board of
the Nickel Plate, and the railroad
presented a retired steam locomo-
tive to the city as a permanent
memorial.
The Calumet District Railroad
Community Committee voted Ron-
nie a share of Nickel Plat* aa
special award. Then it decided, In
coopeatlon with public and paro-
chial school officials, to give snares
of atosk in eight other rail com-
panies to eight additional young-
sters to interest youth in the
railroad industry.
More than 15.000 Hammond
grade school children registered
for the stock. Names of the lucky
winners were drawn from the 15,-
000 by lot, and they got their stock
certificates at a luncheon in their
honor.
SIDE GLANCES
By Caibraith
tea OI soauea, < uw- -
ajo ase that he would have trouble
Sitting from one hand to the otner.
The main choice was between
haVrts and diamonds. The< hearts
were aomewhatartrouger. but South
nevertheless decided m favor of
diamonds. Even if South coud de-
velop four heart tneks be would
till have only three clubs and a
Sde and would therefore still
need an additional trick in spades
or dM to fulfill the ame
zsss?- nPA
nfl-six top cards in the side aujta.
ForthU reason South won the
first trick with dummy ace of
cud and immediately led a low
diamond from hte dummy. East
Xudtak. the Queer, of diamond
and return a club, but South was
.J: kinc and returned the jack oi
Se. diamonds, two heart, three
clubs, anC a spade.
Kids Learn Traffic
Rules In Tiny Cars
NEWTON, Kan. UP "Driver.
trainisg" for children begins at
the age o fsix under an experimen-
tal program here.
First and second-graders use Kid-
die cars and small pedal-propelled
tractors, donated by local mer-
chants, to learn the traffic safety
rules In an area marked off into
vehicle and pedestrian lanes. The
stop light is about the only traffic
safely device missing from the
equipment.
TERRY AND THE PIRA1
Pit GEORGE erUNDBB

\>v.<' -
i
t. m >( u rm b.
,...?.... --
PRECKIES AND 1 PRTaTNI*t
Cool Cats
THE WILES OF TWr
KOPfOSOP SEX/
The, civ defenee moating are greatI uaed to have
to bowl to get out for an evening!'
ear .
Familiar Folks
to Prevloua
MEttRILI. flLOSSRB
PA66 43ST,OUR LAST
LIME WAS/ALAOC/
THBHC LIES MO*
PERIL INTHtNEtYeS
THAN TvvBNTY OF
TWEHC SVrOROS/-*
LET US RCAP SIUMUY
% THE EUD OF Te*
CMApreat/
"man,t*atsa
Mcyy wtf of
| GETTING TOUR
klcKS/
' f/-i
IS N
allct nor
No Can Do?
V. T. BAMUN
Glands Made Touno
-Vigour Renewed
Without Operation
If you feel old before your time or
uffer from nerve, brain and phyalca!
weakness, you will find new happiness
and health In an American medical
diacovery which restores youthful
? Ifour and vitality quicker than
land operation*. It la a simple home
treatment in tablet form, discovered
tar an American Doctor. Absolutely
harmless and easy to take, but the
newest and x*t powewhil mvJNura-
tor known to science. It acta directly
en your "lands, nerves, and vital or-
fana, builds new, pur* blood, and
works so fast that you can see and
fsel new body power and vifour. Be-
cause of Its natural action on (lands
and nerve, your brain power, mem-
ory aad ayeslcht often improve amas-
lna-ly.....
And this amaslna* new aland and
vigour restorer, called VI-Tabs, has
been tested and proved by thoussnds
and is now available at all chemlits
here. Get Vl-Tsbs today. Pur*lt to the
teat. See the blf, quick Improvement.
Take the full bottle, which lasts ellit
days. It wli) make rou full of
virour, energy and vitality, and
feel years roonaer. A special
bottle of 41 Vi.Tsbe cost little.
VlsjTll|lf from your
" asiPresP obemsjt today
aoerorss Masases' asi Vltmltty
ACROSS
1 Actress,
------West
4"------Marie,
I Love You"
8 War vehicle
12 Sea eagle
13 Mimicker
14 Actress,------
Lancaster
15 Pose -
16 Recurring
18 Small fish
20 Follow
21 Assist
22 Prying
DOWN
1 Disorder
2 Operatic solo
3 Rapt
4 Speedy
5 Unclosed
6 Calm
7 Before. .
8 Singer,
--------Lind
9 Greek I -
division
10 Brother of
Jacob (Bib.)
11 Wan
17 Centaur
19 Pullman car
U 1 L-A N E E t| w E o 1 1
1 A T A NJ A A N T E
<> A X E C A 13 | E B: N
rr L [A 1 N N f O 1 1 A
L- o N A N T M A T A L. E
N I t O N H rF e. -r A \u
1 t-i T W O O C o P i N 1 I
D <-' O R E X r O F=
I J T M N E o 6 -r N A
'- Li 1 2. T Pt B f= *.
26 Cooking device 41 Corridor
27 Turtles 42 Love god
B
24 Philadelphia's 28 Water
founder, mammal
William ------ 24 Ago
26 Places 25 Italian city
27 Musical
syllable
30 Rise
32 Soup vessel
34 Hard {prefix)
40 Rye
medication
36 Boston Red
Sox ball
28 Portuguese
money
^29 Britain's
princess
31 Tidier
33 Staggers
88 Masters of
ceremony
40 Gaie fixedly
43 Jacob's son
(Bib.)
44 Imitated
46 Check
47 Pen name of
Charles Lamb
48 Depend
50 Definite ,
i article
W
37 State-
positively
31 Gaelic.
40 Plant pact ,
4lWinglike part
42 Cheer
45 Drier
49 Witty
conversfc^ons
51 rrench island 13^^^
52 Above _
SB--------Hitler" \n
54 Nothing
50 Lateral part
56 Anglo-Saxon
slave
57 Speak
BOOTS AND BXR BUDDIE
BE EDGAR MARTIN
Bkb. KQWfvK wM&CAJtfc,
H' W? W&Vv.. rv*4PWi
M*fe VWo'SYvG.'Wt'D V.VO
"SCMT 'vX.VSMMvW
v^OVKftVtV
issffl
r>
RPXTAb^i^
BEZZUNc.
1/ .....

//-?

CAPTAIN EAtl

By LESLIE TLRNBB
v.
.
HIE tTORt O atABTHA WAENE
At Hie Lawyer's
8 WILSON SHlUGOn
W.' rmV,feLfEr^rVBAD.'CMOrJl MOM'S]
GOKSHOPPr4GAN0VCWE
SPPO8E07OBED*r '
l^kWEB AT ELEVENi
.OMX,
\je^Pm,>*K. Yvou c*>n bc.a gel
EIAAmTJaCCUSEOOF KMrJSVrH
fMBM" ^OUTAUCENwf.SfWONS,
BOSBETS. =L AND FADslfi TO STOP AND >
eefrjBTAM l,
ACClOrWT
^SHOODUOOe
LIKE A
0LLN5B?
WUJ
y
HUH?
quit; *guAwKiM',
WILL VA* ME AND,
orce DECDEP IT
WA5 8B*T TO C5CT
WJ EARLY *TARTi
AP1EJK0^?Wy?AMC>
WH6N DID YOU 4TART A*BAP-
IDS WITHOUT fiLA5? YOU
COULD NEVER SMI AOTrHw.&
raTWUT^-THAT, MV
NHATWWlr
M6AN ti THAT
CKACK? BUT
5Wprr...ir
POtrrBATTfE
BOB WAT WU
9fiCTlJ
K
'.- "7-J-.-?? *^ UJk "**"
VIC rtINT
Nuncio Canrht On
Bv JAT HEAVUIN

PRISCTLIA-S POP
He's Got a Point
By AL TCRMERR
HE JUST
WALKED aVI ANDl
PLUNKED HIMSELP
" tAT THE SUPPEPi
\TA8LE.' r-r'-'r
T ^^3^
a
HE CLBrMJK? OUT IN
A HUBBt; BUT HB R-
fiOT OTABTHsVI6.TAKBd
A LOOK *T TH6/,
1

BOOB BURNT
Opportenity
Like That?
WELL, VA fn,LV FtUKII,
WUT VA OT r
rer svtsttr
KlCANWTtK-iOUTINlJOLLAa
FOT IT, BUT NOTAX4*TWfim
Dint BOARDING HOUSE
E6AD.' WHY DIDN'T IT
ST(?IK6 M& 6O0HtR %
THK CHAP MORR156EV _
OFFERS THE P&RFECT
CEA^ON FOR METO *
eea\6n FROM THAT
INFERNAL
ELEVATOR.
JOB/
MAJOM BOOPIsl
OliTODB BAB
T 1. R> WllXjai
IT 6M0ULD BE
EASY TO COi-
lV|NCE MARTHA
THAT I'M
GOlhJ6 TO
MANA6E HIM
Ori A <5RAND .
INTERNATIONAL
^MlKlD-READiN
i TOUR/
LlM/MORRISStV
MAY KALk AT 4
THE IDEA
BLrr AFTER
iwe aorr
TWE DIE
WILL BE
CA*T/^


TC1MAY, NOVEMBER IMS
PANAMA AMERICAN -i. AN INDEFWDINT DAM OTtWSPAP^
Fewer GIs Go Over Hill
WASHINGTON, Nov. N (UP>-
'ewer servicemen art foinf orer
he hill.
The big drop in AWOL't and
lesertions was attrlbated by the
Tha Air Fore* found in a 1*54
study that' "the typical AWOL or
deserter is a young man recent-
ly come Into the Air Force who
baa a lower. mental ability and
irmed iervicei today to educa- a leas than average education; he
ional rpograms. help on the CI's generally has few hobbies or in-
personal and family problems teresta that can be satisfieid on
ind suffer penalties authorized baae, ht la not particularly happy
by President Eiaenhower. in his work, and after Teaching
a certain point he simply takes
The, Army reported it baa cut of.1
its monthly AWOL rate from.15.2j Many of (the AWOL'a and de-
o^r 1000 enlisted men in lMt to serter are from broken homes
pi.- 1O00 this year. In 1S*2, th[th eAir Force aaid.
Navy had 2,t0 "absence" of-
fenses of more than three daya,
including desertaions.
Last year the number waa cut
to 11,542, and in the first eight
months of this year only 41
isilors have gone over the hill
for three- days or more.
The Air; Force which had a
Ten Of One Family
Sick With Jaundice
Florida Governor
Boasts Thai Slate
Is Fastest-Growing
NEW YORK, Nov. 29 (UP>
The governor of Florida boasted
today that his state is the fast-
est growing area in the nation.
Gov. LeSoy Collins told a lunch
lathering of 0 editors that at
east 3,000 families are moving to
Florida every week to live.
Last year, he aald 5 million
visitors spent 1 billion dollars in
the state.
Many of them went to Florida
for vacations,and stayed to live,
he said, making Florida's popula-
tion today more than twice the
1930 figure.
To cope with its gorwlng pains.
Collins said, Florida has started
Its greatset road building pro-
turnpike
MINNEAPOLIS. Nov. 2 (UP)
monthly'WOL rate of 7. per Ten members of a Frontenac
1000 me in 150 and 5.13 1000 Minn., family arrived here today.
in 1W2, has cut the number tolfor tfiry ,t tBe Unlveraity of *rm J"p' Bn,'5*
l.M per D00 thia year. The rate,Minne,t/ to cure one ., %he|straight through the heart of the
of Air Force deaertions has drop- biggest hereditary family-type lUte-
ped from .348 per 1000 last year^,,,,, of jaundice in medical hia-
to .225 per 1000 thia year. t,,ry. ^
u k J D"- WilUrd Akins of Red Wing.
The marine Corps said it nao tie family docto.r said it is the
5849 'administrative desertions !iar,est known number of persons
in 1952 and cut that to 4882 '"Min one fajnily ever to become ill
year. For the first seven montiwta the 1^,^, He said tt is
this year, the number was l*5- expected the apleens of all 10 will
AWOL'a and desertions reached; ^ removeo- m,jor type of o-
their peak during Kf. e f 'peration but not rare."
war. The Army in 19531 adopted Tht Umily group include Roy
a policy of sending AWOLs >;steffenhagen, 37; his children,
combat duty in Korea. After the Gerandl steveni 7 jinice g,
Korean war, the rate continued and Dtvid, 4; Roy's brother, Rob-
high, and President Eisenhower,ert nd hig children Darrell, ft,
on Sept. 28, 1954, authorlied stiff- B-'Dara Norman, 6, and Lin-
da, IVi.
Roy and Robert's mother died
of hie same disease in 1949.
er maximum penalties.
The Navy reported that despite
A policy of rigid inspection of
hotels, motels and restaurants has
been established to protect viai-
Itors and residents, he said. And
i in the last two years, 100 million
'dollars has beeni nvested In new
school construction to serve a
school population that is growing
by more than 50,000 a year, he
aaid. '
"We are not deceived by the
material appearances of our new
homes, by our increased indus-
trial activity and by our bounti-
ful crops and harvests,'' Co'l'ns
sa.U.
itj cut in AWOLs and desertions,
unauthorized absente "continues
to be a major disciplinary prob-
lem." It said "a continuous edu-
cational program is in effect and
all commands are being kep in-
formed of the seriousness of the
problem."
The services reported that fam-
ily problems e a big factor in-
fluencing a man to go absent
without leave.
"The majority of courts-martial
cases and unauthorized absence
esurlt from the Marine being
confrontad witr a domestic cri-
sis er difficulty and an impulsiva .
departure from his duty in an
endeavor to solve this personal I
problem," t)ie Marine Corps said \
Leather neck commanders have,
been directed to devote more at-
tention to the problem, and an at-1
mpt is being made "to indoctri-
nate Marines in the premise
that the Marine Corps is in a su-
perlor position toa ssist through |
financial, moral and legal assist-,
anee."_________________________
Adenauer's Chief
Coalition Allies
Discuss Ultimatum
BONN, Germany, Nov. 29 (UP)
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer's
chief coalition allies were locked
in debate today on his ultimatum
. pledge loyal support for hi s
pro-western policies or get out,
of the cabinet.
The rebellious Free Democrats
the Adenauer cabinet, met in the
white parliament building beside
the Rhine River only 48 hours
before Adenauers.ultimatum ex-
pires. _
In two shsrply-worded letters
Ust week, the Chancellor asked
for straight "y>s" of "no" an-
swer to these twe questions,
support her Psris treaties with-
l) Does, ihe FDP continue to
ou. change''
) Doe? the FDP intend to re-
main inside- the Adenauer cabi-
net until' the neit general elec-
tions aome time in 1958?
Adenauer.demanded a reply by
Dec 1 when the Bundestag (low-
er house) begins a two-day full
dress .foreign policy debate on
the results of the,;recent Geneva
Big Four conference.
N. Y. Herald Tribune
Columnist Dies
Of Heart Attack
WASHINGTON, No*. 29 (UP>
WtUam Chapman White, uthor
and columnist for the New York
Herald Tribune, died of a heart
attack here yeeusrday at she age
of 52.
JVhite, a native of Reading. Pa.,
wa the author of several booka
including These Russians,
Lenin, The Pale Bond of
Sands Street" and -'Adirondack!
Country." I
He has msde his home in Sara-'
nac Lake, NY, for the past
five years from where he wrote i
his column. Just About Even-
thing." three timeylreekly for
th Herald Trlbunej *
He is survived by his w 11 e,
the former Ruth Morris, and '-n
William M. White, both of 8a-
ranac Lake. '
Guided Missile
Plant Slated
For-Denver
DENVER. Nov. 29 (UP) -Th'
Glenn L. MsrOn Aircraft Co. will
build a multi-million-doll< piani
here commencing within tne next
few months presumably to pro-
duce guided missiles, it- was an-
nounced today.
The announcement by the Den-
ve. Chamber of Commerce
the plant site would be located
a tract t a- acres about 15 miles aputhm
Denver a* the edge of the Rock)
Mountains.
Revival Services
At Rainbow City
Weeklong- revival services will
begin tonight at the Four
Square Gospel Church of Rain-
bow city under the direction of
Rev. and Mrs. Carl Thompson
of Los Angeles, Cal., where they
served as directors of Christian
Education at ngelus Temple.
"Floridisns know that there
must be, underlying sM the spar-
kles, a support which is indis-
pensible to permanent propserity.
We must have giod schools. We
must have good government .
government that will be honest
by moral and legal standards.
Florida must- bsve spiritual
growth."
He pledged there would be no
"harum scarum" methods of eas-
ing Florida's growing pains, "lest
the subdivisions wt hurid today
become-the alums of the. future.
RECORD CLUB
20 Weeks for $20.00 Worth of Records
YOU CANNOT LOSE!!
Large Selection. .
AH Brands:
Capitol Columbfa-.e'Dsjcca
London MOW' RCA
Victor Westmineter
arid'many mor*.
No. 1 "via Espaa
Tel. 3-0383
Federal Reserve Chairman Warns
Against Expanding Credit Levels
WASHINGTON, Nov. 28 (UP)
Federal Reserve Chairman W i 1-
liam McC. Martin Jr., warned to.
da" that' further expansion of
present, rceord credit levels
"would invite dangerous Inflation-
ary repercussions."
He and other officials strongly-
Indicated thai the administration
will reject demands by some
Democrats and leaders that re-
cent federal restrictions on hous-
ing credit be lifted.
Martin told the Senate housing
subcommittee that demands for
credit "are 'running far ahead of
the supply of savings." To meet
these demands by easing govern-
ment credit and money policies
would raise a definite inflationa-
ry threat, he said.
Federal economsts have been
growing increasingly uneasy ever
the rate at which Americans are
going into debt to buy homes,
automobiles, home appliances and
other goods. They r e g s r d the
credit situation as, a factor that
might upset the economic boom.
The Federsl Reserve Board re-
ported on Nov. 1 that consumer
credit st the end of September
btotaled $34,293.000,000. highest in
history and the eighth straight
monthly oncrease. In the second
quarter of the year, Americans
borrowed 500 million dollars more
thsn they saved or invested.
The government has taken some
braking action by raising the in-
terest rate charged by reserve
bsnks snd by stiffening down
payments snd repayment periods
on federally-insured home mort-
age loans.
Martin told the subcommittee
that "in-a prosperous, expanding
economy, funds for. .financing
I home ownership, as well ss fi-
nancing ownership, of other long-
lasting capital goods, .should
come as far as possible from sav-
ings."
Treasury Undersecsfctary Ran-
dolph Burgees alao.-warned of in-
flationary dangers in; the home
mortgage field.
'
"In times like these, with busi-
ness activity -straining' at capaci-
ty, we cannot run the inflationa-
ry risks of manufacturing money
through bank credit to encourage
a' level of housing starts that
Krobably could not be sustained
ec.use of shortages' of labor
and materials,'' he aaid.
Burgess said there has been
"mounting evidence this year that
the volume of home building has
been outrunning the mortgage
' credit available from normal
.soucres snd the supply of labor
and building m?terials."
I The'CIO lest month criticized
the administration for t-aking
steps to restrict bousing credit. It
'said "the national housing policy
is moving tragically in the wrong
i direction'' at a time when at
'least one out of every three fam-
ilies still needs a "decent home.''
... ..---------
DIVORCE COMPLAINT
SOUTH BEND, Ind. (UP) -
Mrs. Imogene V. Lowe testified in
a divorce petition that her do-it-'
yourself husband trimmed the toe-'
nails on her pet parakeet and the
bird lost so much blood it almost
died.
imoeamL
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cmne/e bug;
''(jewel
n the
Setting f


f
your alome,
^./afa/ttch
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~
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ALDARA SANDRA GONZALEZ
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DON HUGHES
DORA DE MORALES
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THIS WEEK'S WINNERS:
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MARTA VALDES
ROSAURA GONDOLA
Dr. ERNESTO BYNOE
. MARIA DE DIAZ
VICTORIA PAZMIO
MARIA GALVEZ

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9


PAGE SIX
TUB PANAMA AMERICAN AM INDEPENDENT DA1LI NEWSPAPER!
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER M. 1S5I
YOU CAN PLACE YOUR AD AT 14 DIFFERENT LOCALITIES IN THE CITY
inexpensive Want Ads Bring Quick Results!
LEAVE YOUR AD WITH ONE OF OUR AGENTES OR OUR OFFICES AT 57 "H" STREET, PANAMA
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
LIBRERA preciado
1 ttttt No. U
Agencias Internal. d Publiciciont
Ne I Leilerj Ptaaa
CASA ZALDO
(.calral Ave. tt
LOURDES PHARMACY
1UU Cunwllli
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
Ke. M "" Street
MORRISON
41b at July A vt J It
LEWIS SERVICE
Ave Tlvoll Na. 4
FARMACIA ESTADOS UNIDOS
U) teatral Aveaue
FARMACIA LUX
it Control Avenue
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
J In FOTO DOMY
Jaata Aroisoaoaa Ava. eag M W.
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS
II lreet Na. U
FARMACIA EL BATURRO
ra:a Ufavta 7 lreet
FARMACIA "SAS"
tie rerras III
NOVEDADES ATHIS
V a Eeaeaa Ava.
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
Commercial &
N professional
CANAL ZONC POLYCLINIC
DENTAL MEDICAL
Di.C a-rtfafi -***!$%&
D.l-S. IGeersetowa Uaivaraltj
Tlvall t/m,* '"LfTaJSaaaaaS
(p. Tal. 1-tMl raau.
RETIREMENT, LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
jm RWGE
phene Fanaina t-tSU
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALE
Automobiles
FOR SAL I: Sea-springs $15;
kcroiana sieves $9.95; ward-
robe* $25; eeuble mabegany
bees with naw maHran $49;
maul bureaus $22.10; liaa-
board $39; living ana dining
reom luifai verv cheap. Many
ether Bargain* in Naw ana Usee
furniture. Ha Dawn fayiat.
Wa Deliver, HOUSEHOLD IX-
CHANGI. 41 National Avenue
Auto Raw), "bone 3-4911.
FOR SAL:1950 Packard se-
dan, naw point, new tirai, per-
act ceeeViee, $770, out paid.
J-5IS45.
FOR SALE:1952 ltele Rivie-
ra by War Steeri.e. $1000. Tel-
ephone 3-5713.
FOR SALI:2 twin baa.
arm, and innerspring rearrreee,
$130 pair. Ram Avaaaa Na.
35-19, around floor, lafl.
FOR SALI: 1950 tour-deer
Buick Special, dynsllow, excel-
lent cendirien, law mileage. Di-
plomat leaving Panama. Phene
4973.
Position Offered
TRANSPORTF.S BAXTIR. S A.
Peckers Shipper M.WIJ
Rben. 2-2451 -
L *?** R i-lint a*
PANAMA RIDING SCHOOL
Ridi.tJ-iMclJ**
3 la 5 p.m- *" }M7,
ar by aM'"!"""'-
Wi on help YOU wltk
cklropracllo
CHIROPRACTORS
FOR SALI:60-eyeU rlgleaiee
7.4 cu. ff., large freeser aeran
lap. like naw, $150. Phene 2-
4449. _________________
FOR SALEGai range, hat wa-
ter tank, 60-cycla Frigiaaira. Or
will traeJe er heretene refriger-
ator. Relkee ISS6.
WANTED: Spanish English
ttenagraphar. Excellent opportu-
nity far right portea. Wrirg lax
1297, Panama, R.P.
Or
w
_ OIUAC
(Palmer Gradale
Aveaae
13
Wet*
Lira Theatre)
lHARNETT & DUNN
Ba>l 1 Studio El Panawi Hotel I
TYPEWRITER
REPAIR S-fOP
CVRUNDU POST BESTADRANT
BUILDING
. fat Canina 3114^
IXPUT KKPAIB SUTICB
G. 1. KtXLEY, ,Maa<*r
far VS. Patnaatl and laelr
" i only
Playground Sports
INTRAMURAL BASKtllALL
The conclusion of the 2nd
week of play established 1W"!
in both the "C" and B
Leagues. In the "C" League the
Chief led by Fred Roe are out
in front with 3 wins and no loss-
es. Alex Ruiz la keeping the
Warriors on top of the B
League with 3 wins and no loa-
**ln the matter of Individual
statistics, Johnny Morris pump-
ed in 22 points for Individual
high game total last week Jack-
ie Pearson with 52 points in 4
games lr the leading scorer In
the "C League.
The "B" League scoring is a
one rnin show as Alex Ruiz had
a single game high of 24 points,
and leads all scoring with 64
points in 3 games.
Here are the box summaries
of the outstanding game of the
past week In each league:
Chief f *
Roe, P......12?
Pajak, D...........S 2 1
Morris, R....... ..2 2-0
Crook, D.........,.0
Raymond, H.........1 0 0
Wlte, A.....,. .h .-.10 0
IF YOU have had ana ar more
yean at activa TV service and
installation eiperience. wa a/e
interested la) talking ta you.
Preient occupation ar military
atatui aa handicap to aur oiler.
Call Pan. 3-1215 far interview
appointment.
Panama Line
Sailings
MISCELLANEOUS
ALCOHOIIC$ ANONYMOUS
OX 2031. ANCN. CX
BOX 1211. CRISTOBAL. C.Z.
FOR SALE
Miseellaiieoiif
FOR RENT
Apartments
CLEARANCE SALI! 40% off
an all aur starling tirv4r flat anal
hallewera. wall known brands.
Tike advantage o( this oiler and
shop early far Xraai. PORRAS,
Plasa 5 da Maya.
MAMIE: Meet a Cristobal Ifkl
at nina, Saturday, Cat. 3rd, fa
Ireikfast in Hallywwd." Par
$1.50 wa get braahfaet and may
win a lovely pr ttt Sigma Phis, all the money
goes to aha blind. Make yeur
rasarvatian naw.Linie.
FOR SALE:Winchafr 52 tar-
ge* rifle $65; amara a acces-
sories, aba spotting caga B t> L
$45 with stand adjustable grana.
sitting, standing, sleeping bag
$11 value half arica; 2 5-eyelo
matar 1/l-bg. $2.50. Phae 2-
4455 Balbea.
Choice selection ef U.S. and Eu-
ropean Christmas Tree orna-
ments. Also Christmas decora-
tions and light* far ham**, stares,
clubs and arganiiatiens AMER-
ICAN SUPPLY CO., "J" $'*
Na. H-06.
ATTENTION C I.I Jutt built
modern furnished apartments. I,
2 bedrooms, hat, cold water,
1-4*41.
FOR RENT: Completely fur-
nished apartment at El Cangrejo,
in a 2 staey house: living-dining
roam, two bedrooms, bathreem,
hot water, telephone, kitchen,
maid's reom, garage and lawn.
Independent entrance to apart-
ment, near Natal II Panama
CaR, fat information, 3-6796
Panama.
FOR RENT: 2-bedroom apart-
ment, private and cael, garage,
maid's auarters. at La Cresta.
Call 3-ISM.
FUR RINT: Apartment, 9th
Street, lie Abajo, Na. 2612.
FOR RINT: Larga beautiful
apartment* in Ria Abaja an main
highway Na. 5010-A. Phone 3-
207a. _______________________
FOR RENT:2-badraant aft-
meat with hat water heater.
Avenida Oiba Na. 51. Rhone 2-
1227. 3-3329.
FOR RENT
MirwellaueouB
FOR RINT: Cammercial tita*
in front af Natal U Panama.
Apply Fata Halcn 9-12 noon,
2- p.m. Phene 1-1179..
FOR RENT
Rooms'
FOB RINT I Furnished bed
ream, private entrance, private
bath. Sena Vista. $45. Phene 3-
1641.
FOR RINT:
upstair. Stud
Avenue No. 7.
Furnished ream,
4th July
Help Wanted
WANTED:Maid, general. II-
areund. Na. 1B-64 Tivali Ava.,
Apt. Ne. 12.
FOR RINT: Furnished apart-
ment, sitting-dining reom, two
bedrooms, refrigerator, gas stove.
Na. 64 43rd Street, Bella Vista.
"Wo oil relieve Tour"
rOOT-TKOUBLE
come, laJNuaase. nails
CfflROFODJST
(Dr. Scsmtkr rained)
0RTEPEWA NACIONAL
ste Areeeaoeaa Ph. 1-BIT
LIQUIDATION SALE
of
"LWHT0L1ERS" LAMPS
We are elllnir aU these
laanfja far *wlew
Ow Ceet.
Take advantage ef this
opportunity
50% discount
PANAMA RADIO CORP.
Central A*e. f-13
Tela. 2-3SM 2-2566
Totals
Chassln, D.
Lau, R.....
Bettis, R. ..
Bettsak-, M. .
Amato, R. ..
Btesh, D. ..
VenceM, J. .
Totals
Dena
li s a
2
2
,.".. .. 2
e e a %
e e *
......0
. .. .. 0
11 0 n
U.8. Rep. 'William T. Grana-
han, (D-Pa.i who la arriving on
the Isthmus Thursday aboard
the Panama Liner. Ancon, la a-
mong the 32 passengers booked
to sail Saturday aboard the
same ship for New'York. He Is
'accompanied by his wife.
Three passengers are sched-
uled to sail from Cristobal for
Port-au-Prince, Haiti. They aro
Hubert ostlne and Mr. and Mrs.
Kurt Schleslnger.
The Ancon sailed from New
York Friday, No. 25. one day
behind schedule because of the
Thanksgiving holiday and Is ar-
riving: n Cratobal Thursday In-
stead of Wednesday.
The complete advance passen-
ger, list for New York follows:
Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Belknap;
Mr- and Mrs. Gregory O. Cartot-
to and 2 children: Miss Marie
Dlebold; Rep. and Mrs. William
T Granaban: Jack Hudson;
Mrs. Joyce C. Hudson: Miss Vio-
la Huelette; Mr. and Mrs. John
H. Housley and son; and Mr. and
Mrs. J. Robert Hunter and 3
children;
Mr. and Mrt. Harry H. Kerr:
Miss Esther Morton; Mr. and
Mrs. Wllford Ratzan; Mrs. Ruth
L. Turner; Miss Rita Vogelman:
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Ward and
son; and Mr. and Mrs. Vernon
Wnarton.
FOR SALI: Gibaan roans air
conditioner, Va-fen. window type
110-v. 60-cy. Used IVa months
in States, Call Curundu 7225
Sunday or fter 5 p.m. *-
day*. $25. .....
FOR SALI: 2 air condition
SyKania /-bp. 110 *. hf
perfect condition. Good for at-
rio or bedroom. Reduced ta
SI50 each far euich tala. Orig-
inal price $400. Call Panama 3-
0226 -12 noon, 2-5 p.m.
FOR SALI: New model 12
Winchester pomp gun} boy bi-
cycle. Balboa 1581. _
BALBOA SERVICE
CENTER
BEAUTY SHOP.
SPECIAL
COLD WAVE
$7.50
Monday Thru Thursday
Por apivelatineat
Balboa 2-295
Fee U.S. merseanel
their faaalliea enly.
'V LKAGDS
Hoesiera ff ft ->f
Barbara, R.........6 3 S
Eastman. L.........2 0 1
Hadley, B...........0 3 1
Hatting, B.........0 0 1
Rodriguez, A.......on 1
Hartley, D.......,.l 1 1
Total 17 8
Globe Trotter*
Herrera. 0.........0 0 1
Vales, E. ........ ..432
Allen, &...........o 0 2
Brenner, R.........2 0 1
Scott, G...........2 0-1
Herrera, B.........0 0 0
Harris, M.........2 0 3
Tottala 10 3 10
Game won in sudden death
overtime by Dan Hartley tn his
only basket of the game.-
SLIGHT OVERSIGHT
HASTINGS. Neb. (UP) An
enthusiastic boatman bought a frne
new anchor, attached it to a heavy
rope when he got out into the deep
nart of the Harland County Dam,
then threw th anchor overboard
Then he discovered he had
neglected to tie the rope to hi*
boat
LIZZIE: Wouldn't mm Beta
Sigma Phi'i "BreaklaH I" HeUy-
w.od." Da*. 3. at 9. Cristobal
Elks. Made a "real gooe" bat to
wear. SJo are to make rotorva-
tiant telephones 5-577. 3-1202,
3-1.970. Hape V huge mecen
ea School af the Blind will have
Merry Christmas.Mamie.
FOR RINT: Furnished apart
pjseat on San Francisco Highway
No. 120. batido Roosevelt The-
ater, overlooking S. A. S. Com-
missary. Phone 3-3024._________
FOR RENT:Cool, quiet two-
bedroom apartment. Magnificent
view. Censor 47th Street. Call
3-0434.
FOR RENT
Houses*
FOR RINT:Furnished I-bed-
room chalet, living-dining room,
bafhroem, kitchen. Lovely largo
lew*. Situated at A It a mira loa.
franco to old Golf Club). Per la-
formation contact Mrs. Lao. next
4*000 neighbor. Phene 3-4339,
Panama.
RESORTS
Baldwin'* furnished apartments
at Santa Clara Baach. Telephone
Ptobach. Balboa 1234.__________
PHILLIPS Oceaashie Cottage*.
Santa Clare. Baa 435. Soibeo.
Phone Panamo 3-IS77. Crioro-
bel 3-IS73.
WANTED
Apartments
AMERICAN wants 1-2 bedroom
apartment in Bata Vista aros far
S95-S100 a month. Matt have
screens, hot water, 0-cycle ent-
reat. OH 3253 or 21043 (attar
6 p.m. I. Pott Kebbe. ___
Gramllcht Santa Clara Reach
Cottage*. Modern conveniences.'
moderate retas. Phone Game**
-441,
Shrapnel* furnished hcuses ea
beech el Sent Clero. Telephone
Thompson. Balboa 1772.
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. One mile
past Casino. Low rotes. Phone
Bolee. U6.
POR RENT: Furnished apart-
ment, all utilities. Army inspect-
ed. Vie Espaia, house before
Juan France.
FOR -RINT:-4Jnvsjrniihed twe-
bedreom apartment, hot-cold wa-
ter Call Clayton 110, office
hours.
FOR RINT:Nice furnished 4-
partment, two bedrooms, hot end
cold water, all services, cool end
with Miami window*. House 27.
43rd Street, Bella Viola. Phane
3.497*1*.
FOR SALI: DelnieHan pure-
brad female. 8 months old.
Baeutiferl dog. $50 cash. Cristo-
bel 3-1716
GARRARD
Record-changers
Sales Service
Parts
25-Cyclej Motora
Mueblera
CASA
SPART0N
cnrntAL a-rs
Entrance to Eacsuste Theater
'Al legretto' Will
Draw Audience From
Panama, (anal Zone
Arrangements have been com-
pleted for "Visitors" passes to
be Issued to off-base residents
attending; "AlLearetto" at Al-
brook Air Force Base Theater
the nights of'Dec. 1, 2. and 3.
A cordial Invitation has been
extended by the Albrook Wives'
Clubs to al] residents of the
Panama area who would like to
attend this rollicking musical
comedy.
Curtain time each night la
promptly at 8. and tickets will
be available at the Theater Box
Office starting at 8 the evening
of each performance. The bene-
fit show will run for approxi-
mately two and a half hours.
and It Is being given In order to
raise funds for Albrook's Oper-
ation Christmas program which
contributes help to the under-
privileged children In the Pan-
ama area each- year. All seats
are $1.
THOR"
Washing Machines
SALES SERVICE
PARTS
MUEBLERA
CASA
SFARW
Central M-1t
entrance Encante) Theatre
FOR RINT;furpkhod 1-bod-
room apartment, excellent loca-
tion Faderice Boyd No. 1. Tele-
phone 3-15 IS.
FOR RINT: Furnished apart-
ment, twe bedroom*, story cool.
ella Vista, two bathrooms. De-
cember I. $1 sa.net S-IS34S.
POR RINT: Furnished epert,-
ment, military inspected. Vie
Perras Ne. 9*. Phono 3-20S8.
FOR RENT:One-bedroom fur-
nished apartment. Auto Row.
Phono Balboa 2S70.
FOR RINT:Modern two-bed-
room apartment, perch, living-
a.aiao room, kitchen, maid'* and
laundry room. Screened, hot wa-
ter. For further particulars tele-
phone 3-4946 or 3-6737.
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
TAT
SPEEVAK WAINBERG
Batteries
Tire* Tunea
Ne. 11
Automobile Row
Tee. t-4t4
NEW TIRES
TUBELESS
Quaraateed 12 Months
1st Line
100 Level
Stee Black White Wall Stos
600x16 15.50 18.50 670x16
670x15 I5J5 18.05 710x15
710x15 |.95 10.05 760x15
760x15 18.05 22.05 800x15
00x15 23.05 25.05 820x15
820x15 24.05 20.05
Black White Wan
18.95 21.95
10.05
21.95
23.95
27.45
23.45
20.45
29.95
30.95
With Old lires No Mountin*- Charge
Octiit If Dcsirrd.______________
1
FURNISH
YOUR HOME
HE EASY WAY !
BUYo CLUBat
fhiltpfiie Rattan
Furniture
FOR SALI: 10-hp. Johnson
outboard meter. S74 Morgan
Ave. ialbea 15SB.
Contracts Awarded
Tropical Paint,
Servicio Brouwer
Contracts for the interior
painting of glx houses and six
apartments located In Ancon,
Balboa, Gamboa and Diablo
were awarded this week to the
Tropical Paint Company and
Servicio Brouwer.
Scheduled for interior paint-,
lng on the contract awarded the
Tropical Paint company are
houses No. 141 In Gamboa. and
No. 640 in Ancon; and apart-
ments Nos. 160-A in Gamboa,
0589-C in Ancon and 0759-E in
Balboa.
The Brouwer bid of $648 was]
low for the work of painting the I
Interior of three apartments and,
four houses. The.Tropical Paint
Company made a low bid of
$515 for the interior painting of
two houses and three apart- [
ments.
Medical Magazine
Urges Campaign
Against Smoking
EL PASO, Tex.. Nov. B(UP>-
i Southwestern Medicine, the offi-
cial Journal of the Southwestern
Medical Assn., urged the medical
profession today to campaign a-
gainst smoking.
It was believed to be the first
time that an official medical jour-
nal has suggested that the medi-
cal profession try to stop smok-
ing, though individual physicians
have done sc previously.
"We know that tobacco undoubt-
edly causes many symptoms, es-
pecially those which have to do
With the lung and cardiovascular
system; and we know that smok-
ing is a factor in cough, hoarse-
ness, sore throat, nasal discharg-
es, dizziness, deafness, visual dis-
turbances and a host of other
complaints,'' an editorial prepar-
1 for the journal's December is-
sue said.
". It has been adequately
proven that tobacco can really do
us no good from a physical stand-
point, and that tobacco produces
S-D Proclamation Reveals
Concern Over Road Safety
President EUenhower, In pro-iparlson was made between tha
&c* 1 h2 SmpSffiS two" on the same day of the prev.cu,
&Vfc?S "aln8t tra?weaYa edarifSr^t
cfr.t that iirh an urgent In traffic deaths, according to
J^^^^S^'.^jp^S9 comra,ttee iot
er of the U.S. to drive safely, Traffic Safety,
reveals not only national con-
cern over traffic problems but
also the belief that the solution
lies In a strong Appeal to u-.ass
sentiment and action.
Second, such a prealdentlal
appeal voices the conviction that
traffic exoMente CAN be pre-
vented by organised mass at-
tack.
Last year there were 38,000
people killed and 1,250.000
Sound Proofing
To Start In Diablo
Elementary School
Bids for the installation
,n* solnd proof material on
of
people B.U1CU oinuwiireoi soina prvm nim.es~ r tne
Jured in traffic acoldents m the floor, stairways and ceilings or
U.S.. The total cost of these ac- the Di,Di0 Heights Elementary
cldents amounted to $4.400,000,- gcbool are now being advertised
000. |bv the Panama Canal Compa-
The causes of traffic accl- Ujy.
dents, while usually recognized. .
as a'complexity of factors each The project, which "";
aiding and abatting the other. periment to determine whas
are drunk driving, speed, traffic can be don to reduce .ne a-
violattons in general, those mount of noise in *ov*rl Canal
driving mannerisms grouped in 1 Zone schools, was first tJiseiirwea
general heading of "reckless or at a recent U.S. Rate tmnlovt
careless driving." conference With Governor J. .
While the cure of- traffic Sevbold. '
death rate has shown spurts up-1 During the October cpnrer-
wardas in prewar Jitters and.ence, it was announced tria*
the postwar jubilation of World 'ound proofing would be start en
War II-it has shown a down- > the Diablo Heights 8chool
ward trend during the past ten first as an experiment
years. The U.S. death rate for; Th work will consist of trie
last year, despite increases in i installation f, ousticnl^mtr>-
ouplation, travel and motorists trial on all ceilings in the first
was the lowest on record: 84!and second floor corridors, t
persons for every 100 millions
miles of travel.
On 8-D Day last year a com-
onl harmful effects. It is time
'hat the medical profession be-
comes at least consistent and be
installation of linoleum with a
felt underlayment on the floors,
corridors and stair tendings of
the first and second floors and
the use of vinyl tile moulded
treads on the Interior stairs. As-
ohalt tile reducing strips are to
comes at least consistent ana be- d doors where tne
$&***?. mmSSSff I th.
Specification call for ths
compleiton of most of the work
abolition in the use of tobacco.'
ENGLISH SPOKEN
MEXICO CITY (UP) Tour-
durihg the chool Christmas
holidays which fall between Dec.
-. 34 and Jan. 1. Work on the stair
fer English- treads Is to be comoleted with-
,Po\kiSpXm.n in'Mexico itV I roUce ta *,Ven
have it" easy. The Mexico City
police department has ordered al)
policemen who can pek Engilah
to wear a small American flag on
their breast pocket.
to proceed.
Bids on the work will be open-
ed the mornlngf o Dec. 5 In th
Balboa Height Administration
Building.
Gamble:: ou
i CLUB PLAN!
NOVEMBER 27
1st PRIZE 2nd PRIZE 3* PRIZE
UPHOLSTESUNG
SUP COVEBS
taKOSPBEADS
I
I
L
Present your tickets before Friday.
Your tickets ore valid for a whole year. Keep them carefully.


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 89, 1988
TBE PANAMA AMERICAN
ah-i
AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEN
C AP1TOLIO
tie. ----------------- 5-
BANK CM p.m.
SEALED CARGO
-Alto: .
THE CHAMPION
TIVOLI
JSc.------------------- *tc.
Maureen O'Hara. In
FIEE OVER
AFRICA
- Also: -
It Came From
Beneath The Sea
CENTRAL Theatre
.75c.
1:
40c.
M, 1:51. 4:4. :1, 8:45 p.m.
SPECTACULAR RELEASE!
Faith DOMERGIE Jell MORROW
in
THIS ISLAND EARTH
In TECHNICOLOR!
LUX THEATRE
9 a*. 4#e.
-----------
111. 3:88, 5:94, 7:09. 9:92 p.m.
DRAMATIC RELEASE!
Robert Mitehum Shelley Winter*
in
THE NIGH! OF THE HUNTER
DRIVE-IN Theatre
69c.
30c.
SPECIAL ATTRACTION!
Errol FLTNN Dean 8TOCKWELL
in
KIM OF INDIA
In TECHNICOLOR!
CECILIA THEATRE
Mc.
25c.
SENSATIONAL DOUBLE!
Joan Crawford, In
FEMALE ON THE BEACH
Plus:
RED BALL EXPRESS
36c.
'r1 :.'v*l*i
Double in Technicolor
SON OF S1NBAD
- Also: -
THE LIVING
DESERT
VIC TORI A
JJe. -----------
BELOW THE
DEATH LINE
THE MARKSMAN
GUNNING FOR
JUSTICE

HOLLY
AiOV/fS TV KADIO
by Erskino Johnson
HOLLYWOOD (NEA) Guys'clothes on visited the set all the
and Dells: Jack Benny's turn-down men in the company gave her
of "Time out for Ginger" as a won* whistlse.
movie doesn't mean he's no longer
interested in celluloid emoting. VANESSA BROWN is blushing
'I'm not anxious to do Just an-j about the fan mall her nightgowns
other movie," he told me. "It will and bedroom scenes are bringing
have to be something I can't re- since she teamed up with Barry
aiet." 'Nelson on TVs "My favorite Hue-
Jack's secretary, Jeanette Eye- band.".
man, is celebrating 10 years of
calling him The Boss." Jack still; "Most of them sre from mea,"
marvels over her memory when she says. "They doa't write about
one of his radio scripts was lost'my acting er my comedy Just
at NBC. There were penciled-in my nightgowns. I never dreamed
changes in almost every line, dele-1 anea weer to interested in what
tions and added dialogue. women wear when they go to bed.
Jeanette consulted her script con i think I'll tell Professor Khuey
ference notes and her memory and about it."
came up overnight with an exact' --------
replica of the lost script. Danc Director Nick Csstle was
'She's a* appreciative, toe,": assigned to rehearse Bob Hope and
grins Jack. "Even a 19-cent raise Pearl Bsiley in three song-and-
in salary leaves her ecstatic." dance numbers for "That Certain
-------- Feeling." The front office instruc-
Gary Crosby, confirming papa;tions to him read:
Bing's memory of his laugh-getting -But they will have to look
as just a kid: like they're NOT rehearsed. This
"I don't remember always being s a MUST."
s .mm. but I guess I was. My

mother's favorite story about me- .% PJ..^^#
was taking comedy falla to *ttrBct }Q|||||Qrn tOUColOlJ
Discuss Delinquency,
Desegregation
HOLLYWOOD'S Miss Hal (Caste
Rita Moreno is Miss High
Casto these days. She's playing;
Toptim in the filmusical version of |
'The King and I" and beaming
over the switch from wildcat to! ,,,_. ._.
nobility: MIAMI. Nov. 29 fflPrgg
"It's a relief not to he gnashing, 1.500 educators from H a"1"""
my teeth and flaring my nostrilscm states began registering,
for a change." Here todav for a. four-day con-|
Rita landed in the film after ciave which will feature iqe
Dorothy Dandridge walked out of problems of juvenile delinquen-
the role. cy and desegregation in schools,
-------- and colleges.
A now-lt-ean-be-told story from '
Edmond O'Brien about MGMs pro-, The educators gathered for,
duction of "Julius Caesar.' Before the 60th annual convention o j
filming, smarted. Producer John the goutheijn Association of Col
Housemar. catted in the high-pow- ^ms and Secondary Schools,
ered cast, Marlon Brando, John, A pijji to accredit entire.
Gielgud, O'Brien, Deborah Kerr.$cno0ls iy8tem. rather than U7|
and Greer Garson, for a first ne pregent method of accredit-
reading of the script. jn_ schools individually, will bel
Says O'Brien: "It. was the fun- considtred by the group which,
niest thing I've ever seen. Every- reDrefenta all higher education
one was so self-conscious about ._***. couth,
reading Shakespeare in front of'in tM am-
such distinguished company that D j0hns0n, University of
it lurned out to be a whispering Carolina sociology profea-,
and mumbling contest mth heads. u, take u -integration In
buried in scripts. At the conclu- Southern Institutions of
s.s;s^^^:f*w"'u""' H,*"r
jjfe Learning.
OLD MOVIES that no longer diej The public ***%$&
but go to television have given Vin- s*n Jn one JiffjSr
centric., "whole new audience" groups. The action ts.U U
branches which will hold sepa-
rate sessions.
At the final session Thursday,
noted author and lecturer Philip
oice
of M
USIC
a-
p:
*1t6blI!Save/
tel. 40 colon
V-M 1250 with famous V-M Siesta Switch
"Champagne for Caesar' a
Baron of Arixonnr wind
home screens.
"I've never hsd so much
up on
fan
nu," be'told me on the set "of Wylie of Miami will address u
'Serenade'' !general session on Decisions by
Mario Lanza sings IS operatic the Uneducated."
numbers in
is laughing:
the fflm and Price
"People won't have
Juvenile delinquency pron-
to go to the opera "for three years lems is the discussion subject
after seeing this one." for the commission on secondary
Price about working la "Son ef schools.
Sinbad" in which scanty cost untes ; Teacher recruitment also is. a
on the dells ran afoul of the cen-. field that will be covered dur-
sors: "Everj, time a girl with,ins; the meeting.
" SHINING ARMOR GUARDS

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THE MARQUEE
BY DICK KLEIN ER
3T?T,,*H **?#*
?IGGEST EVERHorace R. Hincklcy of Augusta bagged near
oncord what Maine game officials believe to be the heaviest
whitetail deer ever shot anywhere. Without heart and liver the
12-point buck weighed 355 pounds. It was estimated to have tipped
the scales at 482 poundsnearly a quarter of a tonwhen slie
" 5m*
The' Record Shop: An exciting
project is Columbia's idea to join
r'raakie Laine and Ths Pour Lads
in an album of spirituals .
BUI Haley and His Comets are
motion-picture-bound. The rock-'n-
ioilers will be featured in a Co-
lumbia musical, with Haley getting
a big part This seems to be
the year for Philadelphia house-
wives to write hit songs. Vickie
Silvers, a Philadelphia housewife,
wrote Frank Sinatra's vLearnin-
the Blues," sad new Gwen Dahlin,
a P.H. his written Joe Loco's
up and coming "Teenagers' Wail."
Kitty Kallen is. now a movie star.
She records for Dacca, which is a
corporate affiliate f Universal-
International Pictures. The two
have been swapping talentfirst
movie star Jeff Chandler made
some records and now l.'-l cast
Kitty in a big musical, "The Sec-
ond Greatest Sex."
For a gal whose background Is,
j mostly nightclubs snd records, plus
I a smattering of theater, this has
been an exciting experience.
"Its hard physical work," she
says, "but actually the easiest
thing Tve ver dope. You just
have to listen to the director and
do what its says. He tells you to
raise your arm, yon raise your
arm. And the singing is just the
same as making a recordyou do
It In a studio and then just mouth
the words while you're acting."
So Kitty Kallen the movie star
is born. She should be successful
at it, too. She's a cute little thing
with a pixie-like quality. And her
sinking style is a cinematic nat-
ural.
1---------------,.- ---------,
TV TOPPERS
Tennessee Ernie (CBS-Radio):
An optimist is a man who thinks]
his wife has stopped smoking ciga-
rets when he finds cigar butts
around the house.
This style is only a year and a
half old. She'd been singing along;
(or years, with a strong quota of;
fans but never a big smash record. I
"I decided 1 simply hadn't keptj
up with the times," she says. "II
refused to use an eeho chamber|
I thought it wasnt' the right thing'
to do. But I realized I was wrong.
so I set about to create a new
style, more modern."
The success ef "Little Things
Mean a Let" attest* to her tri-
umph. In May 54 site played the
Chicago Theater. In August '54 she
again played the Chicago Theater
after "Little Things" had cense
out. In these three months, her
fee went up five times the previous
amount.
That's what a hit record means.
It also brought her TV and. the
movie. And it meant that her bus
band. Budd Ganroff, who had been
a presa.agent, quit the business
I to devote his full time to managing
her.
It's all a little frightening," says
Kitty. "Fame can come in three
minutes in the record business I'm
just glad I had all those years
behind me."
Edith Pial Denies
Stealing Song; She
Wrote It Herself
NEW YORK. Nov. 29 (UP) -
Chanteuse Edith Piaf denied to-
day in Brooklyn federal court
tint she stole a song from a
red-haired grandmother who is
suing for $5000.000 damages.
She wrote the controversial
song. 'Cause I Love You'' her-
self, Miss Pisf told Judge Morti-
mer W. Byers.
"I was reclining" in a bath
tub in Paris when I wrote it in
1950." Miss Piaf said In her
strongest French accent. "I've
written more than 100 songs, you
know.':
The plaintiff, Mrs Frances
L a ni p e r t of Queens, said
" 'Cause I Love You' was real-
ly a song she composed the sane
year entitled "Annabella." In adi-
ditlon to Miss Piaf, her suit nara-
ec RCA Vistor and Columbia
R-cords, songstress Dinal Shore,
band leader Ted Straeter. and
others responsible for performing
and recording the song. -
Frankie Laine jt^nlV
More and mere, TV Is producing
hit songs. Latest to crack the bent*
selling lists is "Love and Mar-
raige," the delightful Sammy Caha
Jimmy Van Heus.-n tune from the
NBCTV "Our Town.'1
This will be the fifth top song
from TVthe others were "Drag-
net." "Let Me, Go Lover," "Ballad
of Davy Crockett" and Gisele Mac-
Kenzies "Hard to Get."
Dick's Picks: One of the most
unusualand happiestrecords in
a Rag time is "The Singing Doge"
on RtA. This Don Chaes presen-
tation features dogs barking in
tune to things like "Jingle ells.
Others: "Take the time" (Pat
Boom:, Dot); "Sweet Lorena"
(The Norman Luboff Choir, Colum-
bia ); "Siboney' (Dick Duane, ABC
Paramount); "The Tender Trap"
(Fian Sinatra, Capitol); "me
Great Pretender" (The Platers,
Mercury); "Lovely Lies" (Nick Ne
hie, Wing i; "Everybody's Got a
Home" (Roy Hamilton, Epic);
"Calico Cathy" (Billy Vaughn,
Dot); "Come to Me" (The Rover
Boys, ABC-Paramount i.
Pleasant listening Roger Wil-
liams' deft piano on "It's a Big
Wide Wonderful World'' (Kapp);
Joe Reisnsaa's orchestra snd ene-
ras with the "Walt Disney Song
Carousel" (RCA); trombonists J.J.
Johnson and Kai Winding with
"Trombone for Two" (Columbia);
Florlan ZaBach's "Dream f Ro-
mance" (Decca).
Two fine new operas on record-
Angel's "Madame Butterfly" with
Callas and Gedda is a purr de-
light- Epic's "Don Giovanni" with
Londoi, HHd Zadek and Sena
Jurinac is a fine addition to any
collection.
Y,
ou can use your
Towti.Sterling .
at every meal, on
every day and
the Sterling will grow more beauti-
ful with Oso'every year -because It
Is selki-silver, end btoaus Towlc
patterns will never .gp.qut. pf date.
Yet a single teaspoon costs as little
as fz.ZV, six-piece place settings
begin st 127,^7 We cn help you
collect your TOWLE Sterling on our ""
easy budget plan.
THE
DUTY
Co/a fa/tlkh
SILVER CENTER
STOEEJ 161 CENTRAL VINU!, PANAM
.
.
uiybodif fsuacL ClaA^isid^

Per InsVmunte* nd inservsnlnes, phnnnt
rtM j-iesT 3.IS9J
Bl I'ANAMA KM1I. P.n.
y *W 3-1(44
OR CONSULT YOUR LOCAL TRAVEL ACEMT
L0VERBL00M
IBUTTER
FRESH ^
ttf all outdoors^
4
PioDua o
Inf ZIALAND



PAOS EIGHT
-
I

PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER t, lfH
Mli'n '
"THE SLEEPING TIGER"
Outstanding psychological drama release Friday
at the "LUX" Theatre.
KUff -%
Social and Kytk
envide
Sox 5037, ^4,
'neon
r>
Box m, P<
anarna
2, Suffer*
J, JfyL **J i, -uLfU* Mr Pm*m. 3.0J40 m 2-U74I
U~- 900 *J
Selected by the yeonger female movie fan recently as
the meet popular man in the world, after the Duke of
Edinburs, Dirk Bogarde. taU, dark and extremely band-
fmf. hold hi portion of the number one actor of the
British creen in his excellent performance in "THE SLEEP-
ING TIGER."' outstanding, psychological drama to be re-
' leased on December 1st at the LUX Theatre.
' "THE SLEEPING TIGER" besides Dirk Boarde. fea-
tures Alexander Knox and Alexis Smith in one of the most
; oktraerdjBSfy and gripping stories ever filmed, which in-
! volves a psychiatrist, a habitual criminal whom-the doctor
, trymf t reform, and the doctor's wife, giving air entire-
ly new slant to the lore trian fie which is moat interestingly .
portrayed in this production. Advt.
..''...... ee
COMDB. W. N. TATLOR IS HONORED
AT r. S. POWER SQUADRON DINNER
Comdr. William N. Taylor, United States Power Ssuadren,
was honored at the Annual Commanders Dinner by Canal
Zone Pacific Sooadron on Saturday evening at the Skychef In
Panama. '
Comdr. Taylor awarded glfti to those who had helped with
the training courses during; the past year. Lt. Comdr. Ed
Chandler In turn, presented Comdr. Taylor with a palm tree,
a la "Mr. Robert.''
and Mrs. W. F. Bartholomew, St.,
o Balboa.
Meetings
Lead MEETINGS...v.....
Caribbean Stamp Clab
Meets Tenlf ht
The next regular meeting of
the Caribbean Stamp Club will
be held at the Tlvoli Hotel to-
night at 7:30.
China's Enroy Giving
Dinner Tonight for Boyds
The Ambassador of National- City.
1st China and Mrs. Wang Teh
Yu are giving a dinner at the
embassy -this evening In honor
of the Minister of Foreign Rela-
tions and Mrs. Alberto Boyd.
Harvard Archaeologist
Speaks Tomorrow
Charles R. McGlmsey. who Is
engaged in archaeological re-
search work in Panama, will
present an illustrated talk at the
meeting of the Panama Canal
Natural History Society tomor-
row at 8:00 p.m. hi the Gorges
I Memorial Laboratory In Panama


....... 68.00
....... 96.00
THE IDEAL GIFT FOR CHRISTMAS
> ,.",*
Beautiful 4 Living-Room Suites
Choice of Colors...........-------. ..-.... .130.00
| Mahogany Double Beds with New Mattress .. 69.00
Modern Mahogany Dining Room Suites ....... 79.00
Mahogany Wardrobes (Mirrors Inside) ...... 79.00
China Cloieti (Licoreras)
Vanities with Large Mirror
' Modern Mahogany Sideboards............ 39.00
ALSO: Kitchen Cabinets, Folding Beds. Youth Beds,
Kerosene Stoves, Sofa-camas, Bureaus,
Metal Ming Cabinets, etc., etc.
'.
'any article delivered to you
without down payment
Ha COSIGNER EASIEST Terms
YQU* DOL^sR GOES FURTHER AT [ .
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
The members, students of the
piloting class and guests includ-
ed:
Mrs. Taylor, Lt. Comdr. and
Mrs. E. V. Chandler, past Comdr.
and Mrs. Charles R. Bowen, Past
Comdr. and Mrs. William C.
Clark, Jr., Past Comdr. B. J.
Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Phillip
Green, Mr. and Mrs. Allen K.
Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Wells D.
Wright, Mr. William D. Taylor,
Mr. and Mrs. Winton A. Webb,
Miss Lydia Caapek, Mr. and Mrs.
H. O. Frederick, Mr. R. A. Berry,
Lt. Col. and Mrs. Robert Peder -
son, Mr. and Mrs. George M. Hall,
the united States, Dr. J. J. Valla-
rino, has returned to Washing-
ton, after a visit home.
John MacMurray Coming
Home On Visit
Mr. John MacMurray, a long-
time Isthmian, is due in Pan-
ama City bv air on Dec. 7 for a
visit with his mother, Mrs. C. F.
MacMurray of La Cresta.
Humbles Leave Isthmus
Mr. and Mrs. Ken Humble of
the Canal Zone were among the
passengers sailing Saturday on
Mrs. Mercedes Malek, Mrs. W. L.j the Cristobal for New York. They
Phillips, Mr. and M". James L. rtll make their home in the
Whitmore, Miss Elizabeth Ken-'
nedy, Lt. J. E. Heady and Flag
Lt. Lloyd G. Grigor. ,
Dr. Vallarlno Goes
Back To Washington
SUtes.

Persons Here On
Visit To Smiths
Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Smith
Bartholomew Family
Welcomes Son
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Bar-
tholomew. Jr., of Milwaukee,
The Ambassador of Panama to: via., announce the birth there
Ion Friday of their second child,
' first eon. Their little daughter
is now three years old.
Mr. Martholomew, who Is now
a mechanical engineer employed
by the Allls-Chalmers Company,
was born and reared on the Ca-1 their golden wedding
nal Zone. He Is the son of Mr.'sary during this time.
41 National Ave. (Auto Rcw)
tel.3-4911
No-Host Luncheon Honors
Mrs. Byers and Miss Lynch
Mrs. Myrette Byers and her
daughter Miss Nannette Lynch lyear
were honorees on Saturday at a Aguadulce whUe "engaged do-
large no-host luncheon given at[lng turvey work and test excava-
the Army and Navy Club by a,t|0na ln Cocje veraguas, ano
Mr. McGlmsey, a member of
the staff of Peabody Museum of
Harvard University, first came
to Panama ln 1932 with Dr. Gor-
don Willy who directed an ex-
cavation project on early shell
mounds in the Azuero Peninsula
ln Herrera Province.
From January to June of this
Mr. McGlmsey lived in
School Building Problem
Local Matter-Eisenhower
WASHINGTON, Nov. 29 (UP)
President Eisenhower said tonight
the responsibility fof, school
building is "primary local'' al-
though the federal government
must be prepared to give help
where necessary.
.The.chief executive game his
views on the controversial ques-
tion of federal school.aid in' a
filmed address to the opening ses-
group of friends,
laid for 70.
Covers were
Both honorees were presented
Chiriqui. His work Is being spon-
sored by the Peabody Museum
'of Harvard University, the
American Academy of Arts and
with corsages and a bowl of sil- sciences, and the American Phil-
was a gift to Miss
ver dollars
Lynch.
Mrs. Earl Best and Mrs. Albert
Joyce were in charge of arrange-
ments.
Early in December, Miss Lynch
and Mrs. Byers are leaving the
Zone to make their home in
Akron, Ohio.
osophical Society ln cooperation
with the National Museum of
Panama.
The speaker received a B.A.
degree from the University of
New Mexico, a M.A. degree from
Harvard University, and is cur-
rently working on his doctorate
at Harvard.
He considers Panama a rich
and fertile area for the study of
archaeology. In his work he is
attempting to outline the pre-
of El cangrejo have as their Srjanlsh Culture of Panama and
guests Mrs. Smiths parents. Mr. already has found evidence of
and Mrs. Charles L. Persons, the earliest known inhabitants
longtime Isthmians who now of Panama in the Santa Maria
make their home ln Florida. VaJiey in the Cocle Province.
The Persons will soend two) Members may bring auests ana
months here and will observe | nevcomers to the Isthmus are
anniver-: Invited to attend the lecture.
congerence on education.
His remark on the responsibi-
lity of locsl communities m over-
coming the nation's critical class-
room shortage apparently means
that the administration bas n o f
altered its opposition to a mas-
sive government aid program.
Bat the PresMeat said be rec-
ognized that saeny area "can-
not afford to baiM the schools
to provide the facilities that the
populados of that particular a-
rea need."
H the federal government
"doesn't step in with leadership
and with providing credit and
money where necessary, there
will be a lack of schools in cer-
tain important anas," Presiden
Eisennower said.
"And this cannot be allowed."
The federal aid issue boiled up
as a hat topic st the unpreceaehV-
ed conference even before the
1,800 delegates from 53 states
and territories sat down for their
first formal meeting.
Conference Chairman Neil Mc-
elroy, a Cincinnati, O., so ay
alon of the four-day White House' company executive, denied charg-
ed at a news conference thst the
assenbly had been stacked with
foes of federal aid. He aaid the
diverse methods of choosing dele-
gates "precludes any possibility
of stacking'' in favor of any point
of view.
Labor delegates, who raised the
stacking chasges along with Rep.
Augustine B. Keeley (D-Pa.), were
reported to have evolved a plan
to change the conference proce-
dure to permit.floor debate on
the question. Present rules pro-
vide for no overall debates or
voting.
Asked what he would de if a
ersolutien endorsing federal aid
is offered, McEh-oy sal d "I
doa'i anticipate it will come up.
I'm aot looking for any trou-
ble.'
At the last session of Congress,
President Eisenhower r e c o m-
mended a $1,120,000.000 federal
aid program, mostly in loans, to
spur school construction. D e m o-
crats denounced It as lnsdequate
and introduced a number of oth-
er measures providing direct fed*
eral aid. None received final ap-
proval.
The administration recently was
Lawmaker Predicts
Big 4 Ministers
To Meet Again Soon
GAINESVrTiLE. G., Nov. 2 -
(UP) Sen. Walter F. George
predicts the Big Four Foreign
ministers will meet again' By
summer.
The Chairman of the Senate reoorted considering some re-
BOXED LOCKS-Four-year-
old Christine Marie Duval of
Detroit, Mich., takes some of
Her bair out of a washing ma-
china gear box after doctors
separated her from the appa-
ratus. Christine was "helping*
her mother with the washing
when her hair was caught in
the uncovered gears. Firemen
took the machine apart and
rushed Christine and gear box
to the hospital. Bandage cov-
ers two stitrhjsa S} tsjajay[p.
Farley Granger and Anthony Quinn return in
"THE NAKED STREET
Exciting crime drama, release at the "CENTRAL"
Theatre next Thursday.
First Prize
Second Prize
Third Prize
Two Hollywood expatriates mark their return to the fold
In "THE NAKED STREET.' United Artists gangster thril-
ler. They are Anthony Quinn and Farley Granger, both of
whom haVe been absent from Hollywood for two years, both
of whom have been making films in Italy, and both of
whom play tough hoodlums In "THE NAKED STREET." Also
co-starred in the picture are Peter Graves and Anne Ban-
croft. Advt.
If you ufTer from Cettuif lp
Night. Backache, Les Pain, Lom
of vigour. Xerrooineae or weak-
ness you ihouM help your Prstata
(land immediately with ROGENA.
Thii wonder, medicine make
you feel younger, stronger and
leep without Interruption. Get
ROOEXA from yourcberolet today.
Eatiifaction guaranteed.
Foreign Relations Committee said
another foriegn rhmisters' confer-
ence is desirable even if it results
in' failure. .:.-,'
The'Georgia Democrat encersed
last Summer's summit meeting.
He said "the struggle for some
sort of stability or order in the
visions in Its program. However,
fipal recommendations will not be
drafted until after the conference
submitsi ts report to the Pros*
ident.
The President told the delegates
he is confident they can find a
sensible'' solution to the prob-
... v. -i world-' is the greatest goal to.be le-> that. wiL be good for tbe
sought.
George, speaking at a lunch in
his honor., said yesterday Ameri-
can foreign policy should re-
main non-partisan. "We've got e-
nough disagreement on domestic
matters to keep as busy,'*' he
said. .
George warned that If .the
Communists continue p e H r I a g
arms to the Arabs, the United
States "will be forced to do the
same for the other side."
He demanded passage of a
farm policy to set quotas that
will prevent the "ominous" de-
cline of the small farmer. .
George said the squeeze on the
small landowners "is reflecting
a lower economic picture.'
To help small farmers, he urg-
ed a five-acre exemption from
crop allotments to help ease
them. out of their economic
squeeze.
nation.
"We don't: have crackpot 1-
deas." he aaid. "We don't have
doctrinnaire opinions or solu-
tions. So we want a solution that
is good for all.'
The President warned that If lo-
cal communities depend too muoh
on outside help and federal aid
"we will lose our independence
and initiative."

Connecticut
Governor Gets
Surprise Check
HARTFORD. CfflMt.' Nov. 29-<
(UP)
Gov. Abraham RibicofTA
mail today included a 1300 sur-
prise.
A check for thst amount, made
out to Air Forc Cspt. Irving E.
George predicted the Eisenhow-1 Tulia. was returned bv him. Tulin,
er administration, would pass
revised social security act lower-
ing the age to "55 or even 50"
at which. totally or permanently
diabled persons may receive
payments.
He also predicted passage of a
sis to 125 billion interstate hlgh-
wa act.
stationed .at Ft. Williams, ex-
plained he bad received two Con-
necticut vettrans bonus checks
and realized that cashing both of
them would be .illegal.
"\lthoueh the extra cash would
come in handy. I'm afraid 1
might add t the, burden of
stste police,' Tulin wrote.
1 .
p-"
OFFICIAL LIST OF THE NATIONAL LOTTERY Of BENEFICENCE
PANAMA. REPUBLIC OP PANAMA
Complete Prize-winning Numbers in the Ordinary Drawing No. 1916, Sunday, November 27, 1955
The whole ticket has 44 pieces divided in two series "A" A "B" of 2? pieces each.
1631
2846
2321

$
44,000.00
13,2 00 0 0
6,600 00
Priaea Xe 132.H
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13!.* 31 mas
ISMS Ml mas
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met Ml mat
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Ne.
Mil
fill
1231
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SC31
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1*31
St
Mae. i N.
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132 e 131
132 a* I (23t
mat! 331
H2.ee
132 M
2.2 M
I32.ee
112 M
mat
431
331
(31
J31
Ml
Ml
Approximations Derived From First Prize
Priiae N Priaea Ne PrUea Ne Prtaa
t t 1 1
132 tt 7t31 mat am I32.M tesi 132.00
132-tt 2111 IX2.M 131 mat till 132.00
mat 71 issat 231 mat 231 132.00
I32.M 7331 IStJt 311 mat 331 mat
7*31 mat 431 132.00 Mil 132.00
132.tt 7S31 I32.M ill I32.M till 132.00
2.2tt.tt ;3i 2.2*8. SSSI .'.2*t.M ttll xaotet
l>2.tt 77SI mat 731 met 711 met
112 ee 7SSI mat SSSI i.tt ten 132.00
132 N 1 rtSI 132.** 1*31 7 31.00 ten 132.00
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Approximations Derived From Second Prize
ISM
I
22t.M
2S4S
2S47
II0.M
U0.M
I
2MM
2JUH
28M
llt.M
met
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t
mat
an
2317
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ait
MM
seat
121
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112 M
321
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232
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2323
2324
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33 OLD BOND STREET LONDOr*
PrlW'Winnlinr Numbers of yesterday's Lottery Drawing were 1st in Veraguas; 2nd ln Colon; Srd in Panama
The Nine Hundred whole tickets In 1 and not Included id the above list win Forty-Fear Dollar. (SUM) each.
The whole ticket has 44 pieces which comprise the two series "A" and "B"
ShrBN by: ALBERTO ALEMN. Governor of the Province of Panama Cad. 47-12155
Vho Representative Of The Treasury RICARDO A. alELENDtz
Established 1893
Highland
Queen
scotch Whisky
A* S
WITNESSES: Fernando Rodriguez Ced. No 47-4235
Antonio Camarena. Cd. No. 4-25e
1 ---------------------------
JOSB DOMINGO SOTO
Notary Public Panama
PABLO A. PINEL
Secretary
MACDONALD
MUM LIMITS*, ttMtilM^LM*


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, IMS
THE
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDEN! DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE NINE
Social and \Jlk
erwiJe
I
Conlinnta
c
Chinese Ambassador's
W/ife Entertained In Colon
Mrs. Wang Teh Tu, wife o the
Ambassador of China, was the
honor guest on Saturday at a tea
given In Colon by Mrs. Era Lu-
que, wife of Deputy Maximo A.
stressed .that reservations must
be made for breakfast and ask-
ed the sorority to stress this
point in selling tickets. An in-
teresting discussion followed on
hats to be worn to the breakfast.
Each woman guest must wear a
Luque. President of the National I hat that she has created herself.
Assembly.
Boomer Family Return
For Visit In Margarita
Capt. and Mrs. George
Boomer, retired Isthmians
At the conclusion of the busi-
ness meeting, Doris Leeser pro-
firam chairman for the evening
ntroduced Diana Chlarl de
nj '. Gruber as guest speaker. Diana,
as she is known professionally,
H.
MEETINGS
each aotlrt for ladilla* t a*
caluain itwuld (uhwillcd In tae-
mrlMta fatal and Bailee to on al
ifee kvx awaken Uie dali> i.. ka-
dal and Othru:-p," ai rl'urH
y aaad la Ih* olllea. NaMraa'a*
tlUut ctawt he acraalcd by I la-
All
S; w. rWt^f Several P1" oi native crafts and arts,
S^.'nJR iTrristote? whei "rst Prf l the Al* show soon-present.
Port Captain in Cristobal when i ^ the Cana, Zone*Art served.
he left active service League and the Penwomans Club.
They are the guests he/^Pf rwitftr(!r, th. ,,,. BPtl
Pea- Women's
Business Meeting
i meeting of all members Ca-
na. Zone Branch of the National
League of American Pen Women
will be held at the Tivoli Guest
House, Thursday evening at 7:30
p.m.
members are asked to
Refreshments will
their daughter. Mrs.
Taylor of Margarita, and are
Currently occupying Capt. C. W.
Lewis' quarters on Fourtr Street
In that community.
Marian > Diana has restored the lost arts
and has given this gift to the
Women's Activity club
veung people of Panama and th! Meets Tomorrow
Canal Zone. Through the fas- A meeting of the Women's Ac
cinating hobby of batea painting tlvlty Club wlH be held tomor-
she has given the terminal cities
of Panama an industry, the
manufacture of bateas. She left
her audience with a better un-
Balboa Club Announces
Craft Exhibit Friday
Painted ^ tabJ*i?h,f' demanding of her beloved Pan-
hfti5t WTiX^S^iihti*"1*and the many natural re-
will be objecU of interest t the,8Qurces fe haye on]
Balboa Women's Club craft group scr_tched
exhibit on Friday at the home
of Mrs. Helen Wentworth, 67o
San Juan Place from 10 a.m.
until 6 p.m.
The public is Invited to attend
th exhibition.
Anniversary Luncheon
The members oresent for the
meeting were Nancy Ramsey,
President, Marion Greene, Soror-
ity Sponsor, Peggy Johnson,
Mary Danielson, Kathleen Huff-
man. Glenna Thomas, Clyde
Parker, Eva Harte. Jean Judge,
"Sylvia" of the PhUupp ne Norma ^ Vo ^^ styles
Rattan Company has issued in-
vitations for a buffet luncheon
at noon on Sunday to mark the
firm's anniversary.
The party will be at the store
at the corner of "H" and Dsrlen
Streets in Panama city.
Jean Coffey Kv Klo"M. Doris
Leeser and Betty slaughter.
Pledges attending were Dorothy
Clausnitzer. Alice McGann, Anna
May Butcher, Diane Dare,
Joanne Recela. Barbara Egolf,
and Bettv Allen. The next meet-
ing will be held in the home of
Miss Alfaro Honored Diane Dare. The meeting ad-
Miss Marltza Alfaro. whose 1ourned wlth p^ta Sigma Phi's
wedding to Mr. Carlos Zarak is Ci08inK Ritual.
set for Saturday, has been the'
recipient of many pre-nuptial
honors.
On Saturday she wa the
guest of honor at a luncheon
given by Noemi A. de Eskildsen
and Mrs. Edna A. de Alemn at
th eformer's residence.
on
Ruth Morris Hostess
To Beta Chapter. BSP
Ruth Morris was hostess
Wednesday evening for the reg-
ular'bl-mbnthly meeting of Beta
Chapter, Beta Sigma Phi Soror-
ity.
Credit Union
Issued Reminded
To Xmas Clubbers
raw night at the home of the
president. Mrs. Alberta Farley,
to make final arrangements for
delivery of the club's Christmas
offering to the Children's Home.
Al! members are urged to at*
tend.
Gamroa Women's Club
December Meeting
The Annual Christmas partv
with gift exchange of the Gam
bor Women's Club will be held
Thursday at the Civ'c renter
- ith a short business meeting at
7 ?0 p.m.
For' phllanthrothv. members
are also reminded that at this
!*jeftrag contributions will or.
taken for the "Christmas Basket'
which is being prepara by Mrs.
L E. Bates and Mrs. H. H. Ta-
bert;
The Gamboa Federal Credit
Union today reminded members
of its Christmas Club that Dec.
9 is the deadline for making de-
posits.
Louis G. -Small, the credit
union's treasurer said the total
Nancy Ramsey, President pre-,amount of depo8jt, win be
aided over the meeting and n-| refunded on r^ ^ However,
nounced a Christmas Party. De- the equivalent of one week's de-
cember 16, at her homei in Mar- .^^ W{U be deducted ,r a to.
garita forthe Sorority, husbands, ta, 50 weekg have not b^n
and friends.- Kathleen Huffman reacned by Dec. 9
You'll Low
Ifo flavor
ofthiscoffe!
gave an interesting resume on
Tipa*'on/-Parliamentary Proce-
dures. Mary Danielson, General
Chairman-of the "Breakfast in
Hollywood" to be given Dec. 3,
at nine a.m. at the Elks Home in
Brazos Heights, reported that the
merchants of Colon had been
most generous with lovely gifts
for prices; the ticket sales were
progressing nicely and a lively
program had been planned. She
"
...... .

QSjmdc a. mol
trill K9S AII 6 IS
t .f cranky btiittl
f .
Relieve lab/'
SKIN IRRITATIONS
hSis MEDICATED way I
Ne unmedkiid powder aa ra.
btva your haby\ Diaptr Rifk,
Differ Chafe, Urint Sanli U
Pclf Him Kvk as mese
Powder dow!
For Ammtni is letcially mesV
- awed to toorhe. frotentod kelp )
heal irritated ik in. Absorb moie-
km woadarfyDyad u w Ma\
a) Bromotai bcaliag by cuabioa-
lag baby's chafad akin agaiosi
furtbef irriutioa. Get Aaaaai
Medicated Powder today,
"ail Try Aauneas st our at*
MUMt Fo: tria' tize eaa abo-
laMy fraa, aarn: ; poatcard with
our saaWaaV addren to Dtpt
^riijLrtwMC.uHMMi
N.j. tO'lttr txtxre* Uw. *4.
19S.J
IT PAY8 TO ADVERTISEAt least, that seems to be the firm conviction of Jacob Heymann.
owner of this butcher shop in New York's Greenwich Village. Windowsand even the doorsare
[to smothered with price signs that Mrs. Frank Goldwater and her one-year-old daughter have tt
'attain to see what's going on inside. *
WHAT'S HER LINE?-Ch-cas rtrong lady? DonVtjefooKtl b*
the "strength" of sculptrers Anity Wescbler a; rhc WU"lbis large
statue In her Greenwich ViHagc slurlio in'r/ov VbrK. Marie of new
sculpluring material, fiber glass teinforcerl plastic, it >ve.iglis only
M pounds. And that's not all. Material for "Trip Humanist," which
in bronze, would weigh lOO pounds and cost $2500. costs only S93.
It was developed by n Toledo, Ohio, glass manufacturer for use in
sports car bodies and boat hulls.

a^l
SEARS>
OPEN TONIGHT
&(&
and every night 'till Christmas
^fM.li ,
VOU DON'T NEED CASH FOR CHRISTMAS GIFTS... USE SEARS EAST PAYMENT PUN

No Tell-Tale
i
w!ber!Sp
bickuei IT 15
ioo% vuti comt
2. MAOiC
COHVtNitHU
N0?0T-N0c*l0UltD5
KEAty IN AN INSTANT
3.1WBFTV, TOO.'
USE15 SMJ'HOn CUPS
1HM A FOUND OF 01OUHV
<70fTtt:ANI)THEI5
NO WASTE
i it aoitBtMa, it r Taacaeat!
tgiOOX PURl
HCQFri'f
'%, *-*
nt i
'
RUST
HOMART
ELECTRIC
HEATERS
Can Ever Stain Your Hot Water
ARE
v^>
r/>
-dtaxraa^

I
y
INSTANT
COFFE*
Regular 129.50
Special 99,95
5.00 a month on SEARS
Easy Payment Plan
Provides wofer that's "piping ho"... pure
enough to drink. Twin Therm-O-Band, wrap-
around type, elements heat water fast, stay
more efficient longer. It's fully automatic
and fully nsufated to economize on electric-
ity. Get the fact on Homart todayl

,


>

I
11
.
MM
7!
t
1 i
I




^
Homart

'/
Gas Heaters Provide Plenty
of Clean Pure Hot Water
AUTOMATICALLY
20 gallon glass Regular 129.50
fi"""*1 Special 99.95
5.00 a Month on SEARS
Easy Payment Plan
New ThamvO-Slide temperature elector mokas tmperotvre adjust-
ment easier ortd toiler. Therm-O-Channel Hue gives up to 38% more
heating surface for faster, more efficient healing. Fully automatic oper-
ation. Heavy Fiberglos' intuiatipg blanket gives greotett economy.
PHONl Panama 2-0931 for Information
or an appointment with a Sears
Plumbing Consultant.
Sears Carries a Full Line of
Gas and Electric Water Heaters!
ft
Shop Sears Catalog for 124,000 Xmas Gilt Ilrma
lariifoinen G**rrnr*>ed o' Your Money Bock
PANAMA Tivoli Are. Phone Pan 2-C931
Shop both Stores Pr.nama and Colon

COLON Melndex Avt. & lOth St. Phone Cal 1137



PAGE TEN
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER tf, l>Sj|
Nelson-Bell Advance In Mido Multifort Tourney

'
Comparative Newcomers
Beat Engelke-Finnegan
0
Bill Nelson and Elton Bell, who only took up the
game of golf this year, teamed up as an entry'in the
Mido Multifort Watch Tournament at the Brazos
Brook Country Club and aided by an appreciable
handicap have won their first two matches and now
find themselves in the third round of the tourney.
Know Your
CV Yankees
Their latest victim were Geo.
4S Engelke and Howard pinnegan
> who gave them a struggle but
succumbed on the 17th green to
lose 2 and 1.
Unfortunately, the match be-
tween Mathleson Zazzalll and
i Ider-WUder, which was expect-
ed to be quite a battle, did not
materialize owing to the illness
j of Eddie Eder.
4 The rules of this tournament
^ permitted Eder to designate a
substitute but this procedure
was not followed accordingly.
The Mathleson-Zazzalli team
find themselves In the third
round by default.
The complete results of the
second round follow:
Savreau Hoverson defeated
Morris-Kemp, 3 and 1.
Day-Hamlin over Melshiger-
Nordstrom, 2 and 1.
Mathleson-Zazzalli over E-
der-Wllder by default.
Nelson-Elton Bell defeated
Engelke-Finnegan, 2 and 1.
Rlchmond-8taats over DuU-
Ruthe, 3 and 2.
Compton-DeRapps won over
Sulllvan-Armltage by default.
Noonan-Cipolat beat Kan
drin-Huldtqulst, 5 and 3.
French-Davis defeated Puller-
Dave Bell.
Isidro Martinez To Workout
At Mara on Gym Tomorrow To Depend On Pitchers
For 55-56 Flag Chase
'j:
Ft. Kobbe Lifeliners Retain
Panama Area Armed Forces
Team Boxing Championship
AL KDBSKI, manager, Winni-
peg, Class C Northern League;
6' 2", 185 pounds, bats right,
throws right, hit .320 last sea-
son.
By CONRADO

5 The Kobbe Lifeliners Satur-
: day night retained their Pana-
ma Area- Armed Forces team ti-
tie with six wins on the ten-
I bout card bfore a capacity 3,-
600 crowd at Albrook's Hanger
No. 3- Ft. Clayton won three ti-
tles and Albrook took one.
. The champions are scheduled
to leave for Puerto Rico Dec 7
to compete against the Antilles
finalists for the Caribbean area
championship. The competition
will get underway Dec. 10 at
1 Henry Barracks.
Bob George, normally a light
heavy but this year's runnerup
i In the Panama Area heavy-
weight class, has been selected
' by the boxing coaches to replaee
light hevv champ Eddie Button
of Kobbe on the traveling team.
-Button wili-be unavailable to
make the trip.
Geoff* was the victim or
one of two questionable deci-
tone Saturday night. The
stocky 180-pounder, at least
*P me tache shorter than his
opponent, BUI Byrd, gave the
192-pound Byrd a boxing les-
, son in two of the three rounds
bat was deprived of victory
by two of the three judges.
Byrd repeatedly fanned the
air with his ponderous wild
swings while George cleverly
moved inside and outjabbed his
opponent. Byrd managed to
land a solid right to the chin In
the second that buckled
George's knees. The effects of
the blow lasted to the end of
the round because George re-
fodov Encanto .25 -
WAHOO! $115.00
In Cinemascope!
Kirk Douglas. In
'THE RACER"
Van Heflln, In
"THE RAID"
15
Toc/ay IDEAL .25 .75
"TRADER TOM OF CHINA
SEAS" Chap. 5-6
"OUT OF THE STORM"
'John VV.H. and Younger Bros.'
turned to his corner on wobbly
legs.
The final round, however, was
easily George's as he outboxed
his rival while keeping himself
well covered.
The decision was loudly pro-
tested by the fans, post-fight
comments on this verdict were
not complimentary to the Judg-
es, to say the least. This writer
wonders whether the Braille
system or some other heretofore
unused system was employed.
Many cons der that the ref-
eree's hastiness In halting the
Williams-Priest bout was an-
other boner. Priest was on the
receiving end of a barrage of
blows and turning away when
the contest was summarily
stopped in the opening round.
Desiipe the barrage he was
apparently unhurt.
The complete resultar
Flyweight: Jose Rosa-Guzman
(11114) TKOed Kobbe teammate
Andy Buffaloe (105V2i at 2:41
seconds with a consistent at-
tacking. Rosa-Guzman Is the
defending area and Caribbean
Command champ. The referee
stopped the match.
Bantamweight: Defending a-
rea and command champ Raul
Caldern (119) of Clayton won
a solid decision over Albrook's
Les Christian (119). Caldern
attacked at will. Christian bled
profusely from the second on.
Featherweight: Sy Bradley,
(124'/2) who lost the Kobbe post
finals, gained revenge by a split
decision over Raul Arroyo-To-
rres, (12414), 1954 finalist a-
mong the flyweights. He had
one knockdown and scored fre-
quently while carrying the at-
tack through most of fight.
Lightweight: George Ross
(131% K repeated his Kobbe post
final win over Walt 8tephnney
(132) on a solid decision. Ross'
hard-hitting offset the reach
advantage of southpaw Stepha-
ney.
Light Welterweight: Roland
Poindexter (138) of Kobbe, last
year's finalist, moved cleverly
to keep out of range of slugging
Pat Cornell (139) of Clayton. He
won the decision.
Weltewelght: Way land Mc-
Mullen (14514) split declsloncd
Bill Leahy of Kobbe (147) In a
JOHNNY KROPF, center field-
er, Charleston, Class AAA
American Association; 5' 1014".
180 pounds, switch nitter,
throws right, hit .230 last sea-
son.
BACK IN HOSPITAL Babe Dldrlckson Zaharias mustered a
big smile as .-he packed her bag In her Tampa, Fla., home. The
famed woman athlete was returning to Oalveston, Texas, to
enter a hccoital for the third time In her bout with cancer.
"*
Mufti Beats Mossadeq
In Bomberos' Classic
... ,____ti
RAY DABEK. catcher, Min-
Seapolls Class AAA American
ssoclation; 5' 10", 185 lbs.,
bat right, throws right, hit
.242 last season. '
Grid Champions Of
Major Conferences
NEW YORK. Nov. 28(UP)
Here are the 1955 football cham-
pions of the major college con-
ferences:
Conference Winner C. Rec.
Ivy League Princeton 8-1-0
Southern West Virginia 4-0-0
Southeastern Mississippi 5-1-0
Big Ten Ohio 8tate 8-0-0
Big Seven Oklahoma 8-0-0
Souhwest Texas Christians 5-1-0
Rockv Mountain Idaho St. 8-O-0
Paclfle Coast U.C.L.A. 1-0-0
Border Texas Tech 3-0-1
Uxw


GRACE LINE
!!*
28 modem "Santa" ships uniting the
Americas with fast and frequent
service,
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM NEW YORK
TO WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA
J.S. "SANTA LUISA"....... Due Cristobal, C. Z.. Nov. 38
WEEKLY SERVICE FROM THE
WEST COAST OF SOUTH AMERICA TO NEW YORK
8.S. "SANTA MARIA" ......Balls Cristobal, C. Z., Nov. 29
S.S. "SANTA OLIVIA"......Sails Cristobal, C. Z., Nov. 38
FROM U. S PACIFIC & WEST COAST
CENTRAL AMERICA
TO BALBOA AND CRISTOBAL. C. Z.
S.S. "SANTA CRUZ" ..........Dm Balboa. C. &, Dec. 11
S.S. "SANTA FE".............Dae Balboa. C. Z Jan. 7
FROM CRISTOBAL AND BALBOA, C. Z. TO THE
*FST CUST CENTRAL AMFRICA 4 U. S PACIFIC
S.8. "SANTA/ ANUA" ......Sails Cristobal, C. Z., Nov. 28
Balboa l*i)
PANAMA AGENCIES CO
(KIMOBAL: SI' MM PANAMA: 2 S44* 457
Sports Shorts
PASADENA, Calif.. Nov. 29
(UP) Secretary o Defense
Charles E. Wilson today was
named grand marshal of the
Tournament of Roses Parade
preceding the Rose Bowl foot-
ball game between Michigan
State and UCLA Jan. 2.
The secretary and Mrs. Wil-
son will head the parade and
also will be In the honor box at
the game. Their parade car will
be decorated with 3,000 roses.

Luis H. Farrugia's classy C h i-
lean-bred four-year-old colt Mufti
yesterday made it 2 straight oven
stablemate Mossadeq and seven
consecutive victories at the Jusn
Franco oval when he scored by
three-quarters of length in the
$2,000 added "Cuerpo de Bombe-
roes" (Firerqen's Corps) Classic
Over a distance of one mile and
five-sixteenths.
The entry went off the odds-on
favoritie in the mutuels snd justi-
fied the bettors' faith in them.
Albatross set the early pace
with Quematodos and Mufti in
closest pursuit. Mossadeq. mean-
while, was close behind. Turning
into the backstretch the second
time around, Mufti and Mossadeq
made their moves simultaneously
and rushed by the lesders as
though they were standing.
From there on in they steadily
increased their margin over the
rest of the field in a two-horse
battle until their Were fully eight
lengths In front of third place
finisher Don Cuto at the finish.
Mossadeq entered the h o m e-
stretch with a neck margin over
his stout-hearted stablemate but
could not hold off the courageous
little grey. Mufti appeared to be
full of run at the end.
Alfredo Vasquez rode the win-
ner while King Flores hsd the
leg up on the second place horse.
Don Cuto came up from the ruck
to outlast Albatross for third
money. Quematodos, Barlyon, Hi-
pocrates and Maria Stuardo trail-
ed in that order.
The entry returned $3.40, $3,80
and $2.20a far cry from the
si 31.20 win payoff registered by
Wlnsaba in the first race. Winsa-
ba coupled with Julie in the sec-
ond or a $300 doubles combina-
tiontops for the day.
Jockey Carlos Lino had his
bert day In many a moon when
he scored with Prudencio Pinillo's
Don Psitor snd Newbrlghton to
be the only rider with more than
on.- win.
The dividends:
FIRST RACE
1Wlnsaba $13120, 15.20, 8.40.
2Sbtaloa $180, 8,40.
3Avispa $480.
SECOND RACE
1-Julie $8:20, 3.40, 2.60.
2FTu Fru $3.20. 2.40.
3Jachalin $2.40.
Double: $388.28.
THIRD RACE
1Don Pastor $5.40, 4.
2Llborla $4.80.
One-Two: $28.28.
FOURTH RACE
1Lady Edna $3, 2.80.
2Arranquin 83 40.
Quiniela: $8.28.
FIFTH RACE
1Miss Marta $3.40. 2.20.
2Golden Fun $2 20.
SIXTH RACE
1Vedette $10.20, 5.60. 3.
2Cadrlno $1040. 3-20.
3Grey Juan $2.40.
SEVENTH RACE
1Greco $14. 8. 380.
2Ponton $440, 2.80.
3Ralustlo $3.
Second Double: 8118.88.
EIGHTH RACE
1Newbrighton $820, 320, 2.80
2Chic's Ned 811, 3.40.
3Paris Midi $4.
Qunela: 825.48.
NINTH RACE
1Mufti ie> 83.40, 3.80, 2.20.
2Mossadeq ie).
3non Cuto $2.20.
One-Two: (Mnftl-Don Cnlo)
$16.20.
TENTH RACE
1Elko 83.80. 2.40. 220.
2Alo Alo $3. 2.40.
3Tony $2.40.
Colon's scrappy boxer-punch-
er Isidro Martinez, who takes on
former featherweight champ
Federico Plummer in a 134-
pound 10-round feature bout at
the Colon Arena Dec. 11, will go
through a workout at the Ma-
ra fton Gym tomorrow afternoon
at 4, for the benefit of capital
fans.
Mastines, who reportedly has
been Impressive In drills a-
gainst welterweight Jose Ed-
win, will be making his first
r'ng appearance next month,
since he defeated U.S. battler
Dave; Moore early this year.
In that match the colonite
suffered a slight brain Injury
and had been under the obser-
vation of the commission for
several months.
He got the medicos' green
light nearly two months ago and
Insiders claim he appears as
good as new.
Three other encounters round
out the card sponsored by co-
lon's promoting brothers, "Cu-
rro" and Nicanor Dosman.
In the semifinal, tough vet-
teran Sammy Medina tackles
promising Rafael (Bull) Brath-
walte in an eight-round return
match.
Medina gained a split decl-
r'on over his younger, rival re-
cently in six rounds! In that
match Sammy was the aggres-
sor all the way and although
Brathwaite landed tome good
wallops he couldn't or wouldn't
double up on any of his shots.
The Bull's camp claims the
strategy will be different this
time.
The main prelim brings to-
gether lightweights Franklyn
McClean and Al Stewart In a
four-rounder.
The curtain raiser pits 135-
pounders Al Rodrigues and
Hanking Barrows III in s Joust
also set for four heats.
. General admission is $1.
Carta Vieja Yankees
Pro Grid
Standings
hi
Cleveland 7 2 1
Washington 7 8 0
New York 4 5 1
Chicago Cards 4 5 1
Pittsburgh 4 6 0
Philadelphia 3 6 1
Pet Pts OP
.778 284 187
.700 198 178
.444 216 184
.444 197 190
.400 171 127
.333 171 127
Manager Al Kubski and his
champion Carta Vieja Yankees
were scheduled to arrive at Tocu-
men Airport at 2:30 this afternoon
from Miami, where they have
been going through "spring train-
ing" for the 1955-56 Panama Pro
League season which gets under-
way Dec. 1.
CV president Angel Grimas
and vice president Clay Randel
were busy this morning making
Western Conference-
Los -Angeles 6 3 1 .867 209 200
Chica. Bears 6 4 0 .600 256 221
Baltimore S 4 1 .556 176 184
Green Bay 5 5 0 .500 213 238
San relaco 3 7 0 .300 174 24
Detroit 3 7 0 .300 191 230
BALBOA: 1881-2158
good slugging match. Southpaw
Leahy and McMullen had a real
fist-throwing session after slow
opening two rounds.
Light Middleweight: Former
Detroit boxer, Jim Williams
(154%) of Albrook. and defend-
ing champ Billy Priest (152*41
squared off in one of the high-
lights of the card. Williams,
taller, scored first-round knock-
down to move him ahead. Then
during a second-round flurry
he had Priest shielding himself
near the ropes and turning away
from Williams' assault. The ref-
eree called the match at 45 sec-
onds, but Priest disputed that
he hadn't been beaten.
Middleweight: Louis Long
(165> and Bob Smith USD, both
of Clayton, battled toe-to-toe
until Long connected solidly to
send Smith to the canvas at the
2-minute mark. Smith managed
to get to his feet, but appeared
glasay-eyed and unavailable for
more combat. Called at 2:13 1st,
TKO.
Light Heavy: A wearying f.
fair saw firat-round reolace-
ment. Eddie Sutton (176) of
Kobbe. gain the decision over
Sylvester Rlggens (176'4) of Ar-
my Atlantic. Sutton caught Riv-
gens In the first with a right
uppemit to chin that sent him
sprawling sharply to his back
Heavyweight: Bill Byrd of
Kobbe. now a 3-time winner,
'192%) split declsloned Bob
George- U80'> of Albrook, in a
reseat of last year's final.
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
New Orleans Servic
Great White Fleet
Arrive
Cristobal
.1.
S.8. "TELDE"
S.S. "YAQUE".......
8.8. "MARNA" .....
S.S. "MORAZAN" ..
8.8. "SIXAOLA"____
S.S. "AGGERSBOBG*
S.S. 2YAQUE" ......
S.S. "MORAZAN** ...
.....>...
.- >
. .
.................Dec 1
................Dec 4
.................Dec 8
................Dec II
.................Doc 18
................'.Doe. 28
.................Dec. S5
...........Jan. 1, 1*88
Handling Refrigerated Chilled and General Cargo
New York Service Arrive
Cristobal
S.S. TARISMINA" ..............................Dte. 5
SS. "OTtA" ................................... Dec 11
S.S. "BRRLANGA"............................... d. ij
S.8. "LIMON" ....................................nee. 18
SJS. "ESPARTA" .................................te. 26
S.S. "JUNIOR"..............................Ja*, t, im
Weekly sailings of twelve passenger ships to New
York, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco
and Seattle.
Special round trip fares from Cristobal to New
York, Los Anieles, San Francisco and Seattle.
To New York......................$240.00
To Loe Angela and San Francisco ... .$270.00
To Seattle .......................$365.00
TELEPHONES:
CMtTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2904
Sunday's Resalta
Los Angeles 23, Philadelphia 9i
Baltimore 26, San Francisco 14
Chicago Cards 53, Chicago Mears
14
New York 35, Cleveland 35 (tie)
Washington 23, Pittsburgh 14
IL To Increase
Visiting Clubs
Television Share
COLUMBUS. O., Nov. 29 (UP)
The International League vot-
ed today to Increase the visiting
club's guarantee from televised
games from 8200 to 8500 and
President Frank Shaughnessy
said the league was "all set for
1958 without any franchise
shifts."
There had been talk that the
International League might take
on Miami, Fla.. as a new mem-
ber with Columbus, O.. switch-
Ins from the International to
the American Association. That
proposal stemmed from the at-
tempts of the Milwaukee Braves
to shift their Toledo, O., fran-
chise to Miami.
Shaughnessy said he knew
"nothing of the proposal."
''I know nothing about the
Columbus situation.", Be said.
"The Association has not ap-
proached us on It. I know noth-
ing but what I read in the pa-
pers."
Columbus general manager
Harold Cooper proposed the in-
crease In the visiting club's
guarantee for televised games.
Non-televised games will remain
at 8300.
The league decided Its season
will run a week longer In 1956.
The season will open April 18
and close Sept. 9. Last season,
the campaign started on April
19 and close don Labor Day.
The league directors officially
accepted the new owners at
Richmond and Buffalo and re-
elected Hector Racine, president
of the Montreal Royals, as the
league's vice president.
The opening day schedule will
have Rochester at Richmond.
Toronto at Columbus, Syracuse
at Havana and Montreal at Buf-
falo.
The league passed a motion
that makes the president's deci-
sion on protested games final,
and not subject to review by the
heard of directors.
Babe Zaharias
Reenlers Hospital
OALVESTON, Tex., Nov. 29
(UP) Famed woman golfer
Mrs. Babe Zaharias was ready
today to begin her third round
against cancer.
Mrs. Zaharias arrived In Hous-
ton Saturday by nlane from her
home in Tampa, Fla., and
came to Oalveston almost Imme-
diately. But she had not check-
ed In to John Sealy Hosital by
early afternon although the
hospital said she was expected
momentarily.
She said sne was "feeling
fair" when she arrived in Hous-
ton Saturday, but was limping
noticeably. She was met by her
wrestler husband, George, who
had been on a trio to Denver in
connection with the Babe Dld-
rlkson Zaharias cancer Fund.
The coup]e, accompanied by
Babe's golfing companion. Betty
Dodd. came to Oalveston from
the Houston airport.
The Babe waved and smiled
for newsmen and photograph-
ers, but looked tired- Asked if
42 is her correct age, she an-
swered :
"That's right, not the Babe of
oldI'm the old Bab* now."
The former basketball star
and Olympic track heroine who
turned to golf said she had been
In constant naln since she left
John Sealy Hospital after her
second operation for oancer, last
September 14.
"It got rea] bad a couple of
weeks ago." she said. She had
some X-rays made and was ad-
vised to return to the hospital.
last minute arrangements for the
receiving of the tesm which will
stay at the Hotel Colombia in
P/nama Citv.
Aeeordiag te lafermatie fur-
nished the Yankee treat efflee
by Kubski, the team "trained
well" la Miami, and the aly
training camp "raiualty" up to
aew seems te be righthander
Vic Stryska who is snfferiag
from s sere am.
During the last week in Miami I
the team rounded into shape by
playing squad games and they
also had a few encounters with
local (Miami) talent. '
Kubski reports that his most
impressive hitters have been
pitchers Big BUI Hockenbury and
roly poly Bill Harris.
According to Kubski, "If we
are to win this year, It seems it
wHl be through our pitchers,
who have been terrors at the
plate all through the training pe-
riod.'"
Another Kubski coming in on
the players' plane this afternoon
will be Gil, age 13 months,. Al's
son, snd godson of CV veep Gil
Morladd.
The future manager-first base-
men was christened in Cristobal
last season.
The Yankees will probably
workout tomorrow morning at
the Olympic Stadium which
would be their finsl drill before
they play the Chesterfield Smok-
e rs la the league opener Thurs-
day sight.
Logical hurling choice of the
Yankees would be Harris who
was tie Smokers' nemesis last
season, but Ed Monahan may
get the starting nod.
Chesterfield manager Joe Na-
chto ssid this morning he would
nsme his starting pitcher after
the club's final workout tomor-
row.
Two of the key men on Na-
chio'a mound satff are ailing. Ma-
jor Leaguer Humberto Robinson
has a buster on the thumb of his
pitching hsnd, snd fireballer Tom-
my Hughes is down with a sore
wing.
The second game of the season
will be played st the stadium
Saturday night when the Yan-
kees clash with Leon Reliman
Spur Cola Sods men.
Game time for ull games is
1:30.
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1848
Royal Mall Lines Lid.
FAST FREIGHT AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OF SOUTH AMERICA
TO COLOMBIA, ECUADOR, PERU AND CHILE
M.V. "SAMANCO"
S.S. "CUECO" ....
e*ae*** -?-
M
1
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, HAVANA,
NASSAU. BERMUDA. CORUfiA, AND LA PALLICE
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
ROYAL MAIL LINES LTD./HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. "BERBICE"..................................NT.
TO UK/CONTINENT
S.S. "ARNEDYK"................................Her. 88
AD Sailings Sahjeet to Change vTltboat Netiee
PACIFIC STEAM nktWMiO W^OjMtJtL^UW
Bldf, Tel 2 -roe*
irANAMAAve. Peri #85. TeL 8-1881/8
PORO CO. INC. i BALBOAT
FLOTA MERCANTE
GRANCOLOMBIANA, S. A.
ANNOUNCES
THE ARRIVAL OF THE
S.S. "Ciudad de Santa Marta"
At Balboa, Canal Zone on Dcmber 5, 1955 from
U. S. A. Wet Coast Ports and Central American
Porte, and sailing for BUENAVENTURA. MANTA
and GUAYAQUIL.
ALSO ANNOUNCES THE ARRIVAL OF THE
S.S. "GEORGE RUSS"
On December 8. 1955 from Montreal. Canadian
Porte and Boston, Bailing for ST. JOHN (N. B.),
HALIFAX and BOSTON.
Flota Mercante Grancolombiana, S.A. also maintaine
a regular ervioe every ten daye from Cristobal.
Canal Zone, to Houeton and New Orleane. -
GENERAL CARGO ACCEPTED
APPLY:
Wilfordfr McKay, Inc.
MasoHle Building. Cristobal, C Z.
mmom crutosu*,: m$ nee uu


TUESDAY, NOVEMBEB INS
mm
TO PANAMA AMlElCAJt -m Alt WPITOTOEMT PAVH.T WgWtPAW y^
PAGE ELEVE
Hopa long Cassidy, Cal Jones Repeat On UP. All-America
Panama's Carlos Rodriguez Sweeps
Florida Senior, Junior Snipe Races
Csrles Bedrigues to the sea of
Mr. ud Mr. Francisco i.
Bodrigaes of rum.
Thl if hi* fourth year m a
.resident atudent at Graham-.
Eekes School, Palaa Beach,
Florida. Carlo, ii the Stadeat
President of the Boya' School
aad ia the Stadeat Cenmodere
of Grahana-Eekes Sailtog Clan.
Ho if a Stath Form stadeat,
CUaa of MM, aad to preparing
for Harvard University.
Carioa to a aalitog eathasiast,
belonging te the Graham-Echo
Sallhtg Oak, which to a mom-
her of the North A m e r I c a a
Yacht Baetog Ualoa (Sail),
Snipe Baetog Association aad
Comet Baetog Aaeeetottoa. A11
Graham-Eches hoati are regto-
tend uilStU lor State
ud Nattoaal regatta. HfjtaUe
his own beet "Make Way- to
the .chool ftoot, which aamher.
IS hoatt. tatratnaral compel -
ttoa. are held each Swday aft-
Ctah compettog.
(Reprmted horn Nmr. M
MUml Herald)
17-year old
Spanish yeuth'who un
itfi
,rloe Bodriguet, k
i ago didn't tact w ad
of a Snipe boat from the other,
tuned in
one of the neateit till-
rw i.i mnortance not only to the baseball Giant bat to
&&lftSi Ssrtt SSizAJ^TJ
bC ^e^bBraa,rSt*Ull organtonUonj, wm shift to
Yankee stadium. Negotiations looking ^.n^betwSnlto
^Sthoue? to Yankee, no longer own their &*?&&
retain full control over lta uae; the TukiwtwWI deUght-
ed to fubleaaf their arena to Stoneham and the Mara*.
"I ot Stoneham at the Giants' football game on Sunday
and we arranged to have a meeting In the near future." Top-
pln^vcmW W^ #f ^ ^ ^ "L*SB
would present no bindraneea to oar ow noperation. and I INK
if It weald, etpeetolly .lnce we never haveany Reduje n-
filete. I don't see wtar it would not ho a gaoi idea to weleomo
^Ka^Sly^anTilu; to me that ^S^tZ
SeX^isr^rG^vsi a^Jiusa g
but the Coogaw would be glad to cancel that document any time
in the Interim, and forego financial demnlty.
Robert Motet, federal slum-clearance chief #in ^
eager to take the Polo Grounda real estate off *he Coogana
Sude, for a reported $1.200.000. Steel wrecker. ready to W
the Oante a handsome sum for the metal rafters through which
havTe&oed both the chee. for thf ball club's mnybrllUant
achievements an tthe groant o*er its failureslitote Ml*. The
old wooden stands burned to the ground in April, 1911.
Moses wants to convert the Polo Grounds area into a public
park to be surrounded by additional low-rent housing
P Among the many important factor, which feraethe PUntl
out to the pgrlting problem. The fans, and possibly the basebou
Md ootBa cSbi, as well, are inclined to blame the police for
Sue*waenient ofthe customers. And the PoUee jootnttothe
tapfife^i$U which >ave developed with tfce growing
habitof coming.to baaeban and football games Uy er.
SB
NO NEED TO DELAY JUMP TO STADIUM
For year*. Jt wat lelt that the Olanto would P"tP",1r
as long as possible, a shift to the Stadium, because it would tos-
p their Individuality and hurt their preetlge. After all^ the
Giants were doing business at the Polo Grounda long before the
AnSan Uaaue was yrgantoed in 1901 and the Yanhoes invaded
^ntanouUnat thto impediment to tranafer of the Olanto
10 *%S%S SSZ7& gS to with the Yankee.
U *^u'oS^ oeatod arena to
which our patron* doubtleea would be happier, an*.to Uah,
with bettor parking faeOltie. we coold BegT*?**_***'
anee. One cf theae day. Topplnr and I will get together.
The Pol) Ground, dates buck to 1890 as a basebaL fie.Id.
That year the Ptoyera' League, or Brotherhood. *bteh Mted.for
only one season, used the present bal1 ground white the Olanto
played neat door on ancient Manhattan Field, now a parking
In 1891 the Giant moved into the plant which had been
abandon"?by^Brotherhood. In July MM. John J. McGraw
left Baltimore and the struggling, new American League to be-
come manager of the Giants.
The Polo Grounds appeared to be certain to itnd there
"forever." Now inexorable Time, waves the Olanto across the
Harlem, and the razor-blade makers cut eovetoua eytf en the
Polo Grounds' steel girders.

Oom Nlehriv
1:00 f.m.
ROULETTE
21 (BLACKJACK)
CRAP TABLE
POKER
CHUCK-A-LUCK
SLOT MACHINES
big performances ever seta on
Biicayn Bay Sunday at the
eighth annual Coconut Grove
Sailing Club regatta came to a
successful conclusion.
Carlos, who only Saturday
mads a clean weep, of the Ju-
ior Snipe championship to retire
the trophy he won three years
in a row, continuad hit mastery
of the clsss Sunday as he dupli-
cated the feat, sweeping the Sen
lor Snipe clsss.
OMUsaon were searching
their memories following Car-
loa' apoetacalar accomplish-
meat, trying bat falliag to
recall If anyone aad aver
scored ato straight firm to a
ajar regatta oa Btocayaa Bay,
Carlos' schoolmate from Gr-
htm-Icket to West Palm Beach,
Lucia Guest of Greensboro, N.C.,
wat second in the race with a-4-
*
Another Graham Eckea' atu
dent. Mtrcit Hsrutone of Beaton,
wt. third with J-8. Clint Himfl
ton of Miami wound up fourth
<*-4).
In contrast to the first morn
tas'j deed calm, a choppy ttt.
frothed with white caps whipped
up by an 18-mil wind, greeted
the record 1(1 shipper who turn-
ed out for the two final spins
Sunday morning.
In the Pram race, a yeaag
mis. from the Mia mi Yacht
Ctafe, Susan Ottansky, celebrat-
ed her 14th birthday by mad-
ly trouncing rivals from all
Krts of Soath Florida to wia
s BIO Streeter Memorial Tre-
Susan, the first feminine skip-
per to win the snnual event, was
second to the opening hest, third
in the second spin and first to
the flntlt.
In second place and the early
pacesetter wat Stevie Griffin Of
the Miami Yacht Club. Stevie
won both of the opening heat
but faded to sixth to the final
test. Sandra Lacey. another MYC
younster, wat third.
In the open Pram race, tailed
as sort of a consolation event,
Mike Ware defeated a doten ri-
vals to schieve his most impor-
tant victory to date. Patty Mc-
Laughlin was second and Patty
Twitchell third.
Cteaa sweeps to the regatta
were registered to the Natoaal
One-deagn, Pelicaa. Sal Area
and Comet classes by Harold
Hogaett, Forest Lee, BUI Broth-
era aad Peter Camp, rosase-
tivcly.
The Lightning race, a thriller
found Dick Bertram coming from
behind to take the trophy from
Favorite Howard Foht.
Font won the opening event
Saturday. But Sunday, Bertram,
two-time International champion,
took the second snd third heats
to triumph, Foht trailed Bert-
ram's Leslie to the finish line
in both of the final tests. Otear
Nelson wst third.
As expected, Jerry Qwyaa
continued to dominate the Sai-
cide fleet aad Victor Cribb eon-
ttoaed ato -mastery of the
Cricket. '
Former North Americio ebam-
Sion T. W. McGlamry won the
loth race while Frank Kerdyks
and Bob Hslsey emerged the vic-
tors to the Bantams and Buili-
eyes.
In the B division of the Cruis-
ing class race. Bill Chandler
sailed bit Sprite to victory with
Jack Ingle second In the Rsmb-
ter.
(Reprinted from Nov. M
Miami Daily Newt)
RODRIGUEZ SAILS TO THIRD
STRAIGHT JUNIOR SNIPE
CROWN
Msrcls HarUtoae Ruaaer-np
Again
Talented Carlos Rodriguez will
celebrate his 18th birthday June
18 snd practically every teen-ag
Snipe skipper in the state e a a
hardly waft to i
Birthday."
The curly-haired Spanish youth,
who was born to Madrid ana
make his home in Panama and
"- ns rare everywhere, captured
hit thud straight State J a n 1 o
kmpe Championship Saturday to
the eighth annual Coconut Grovs
Sailing Club regatta off Dinner
Kev.
You can't blame Cartee' rivals
for their sentiment. The young
skipper has beaten them to con-
stotontly during the past three
^^- ^^^mm VSfsBBBM
Oklahoma's Bolinger
Maryland's Pellegrini
Also Make Dream Team
By NORMAN MILLER
United Prese Saertt Writer
NEW YORK (UP) Howsrd
Hopalong Cassady, Ohio State's
dynamic 172-pound halfback, and
Calvin? ones, rugged 220 pound
Iowa guard, today were chosen
on the United Press All-America
football team for the aeeoad
straight year.
The 1958 "dream team," a*
lectod to a nationwide poll of
804 sports writers snd radia
broadcasters, was comprised of:
ENDS Ron Beagle, Navy,
and Ron Kramer, Michigan
TACKLES Bruce B o 1 e y,
West Virginia, and Norman Mas-
ters, Michigan State.
GUARDS Bo Bolinger, Ikla-
homa and Calvin Jones, Iowa.
CENTER Bob Pellegrini,
Maryland.
backs Howard Catted?,
Ohio State- Jim Swtok, Teta a
Christian; Paul Hornung, Noire
Dame, and Jon Arnett, Southern
California. ,
The Midwest tha
of the hoaer, pise lag five mea;
the Souther and Soatawett each
had two repreieatativea, aad
-the Pacific Coat aad Eatt oae
each.
Cassdy, the superb runner
who furnished the spark and the
drive which ted Ohio State to
the Big Ten championship, was
by far the biggest vote-getter on
thto year's mythical tea. He waa
a first or a second team choice
of all but 30 who east ballots.
Oa a point baais, Casaady re-
ceived 2,979 out of a possible
1,344 total. **
Beagle, who at 188 pound waa
the lightest lineman Honored, waa
the second most popular choice
with a total of 2,738 poiatt,
whlei Kramer, a 218-pounder who
handled Michigan' punting and
place-kicking in addtion to his
end duties, waa next with 2,843
points.
Bolinger, captain of undefeated
and untiled Oklahoma, gave the
United Press Ail-American team
for the sixth year in a row.
This year's team waa aaatatl
to thst ti included four j a a-
iora Swtok, Horneag, Arn-
ett, aad Kramer. The se vea
ether players are seniors.
Besides Csssady snd Jones,
one other collegian waa eligible
to repeat for All-America honors
thto season. He wat Don Holte-
der of Arqy, *** won an e n d
berth in. 19S4. Holleder waa shift-
ed to quarterback thto season,
however, and won only honora-
ble mention.
Nine of the positions were de-
cided by clear-cut margins, but
Arnett snd Masters won berth
in close ballots. Arnett wat chos-
en for the backfield by a margin
of 141 points over George Welsr
of Navy, while Masters was e-
lected by a 193-point edge over
Mike Sandutky of Maryland.
Even with Bghtwelght B r-
gle, the All-America Baa aver-
aged 218 poned. Bestoy. Mas-
ters aad Pellegrini ware the
"heavlet" at 224 penad each.
Maryland, which swept through
undefeated and un-
irylan .
schedule
reprei
n the
"Happy
its _
tied, wss represented by fou
lrayers on the first three team*,
a addition to Pelleglnri, the
Terrapin placed Mike Sandutky
snd end BUI Waker On the sec-
ond team, and halfback Ed Ver.
ed on the third team.
Oklahoma, Notre Dame, UCLA
and Ohio State each had theer
playe ron the first three team.
By sections, the Midwest waa
ops in All-America honors for
the sixth year in a ow, plracing
total of 12 playera on the there
teams.
FOUB FLORIDIANS GAIN
HONORABLE MENTION
Four players f om Florida
schools were- listed on the United
Press All-America honorable men-
tion They are halfback Whitey
Rouvier aad fullback Don Boas*
ler of the University of Mismi;
center Steve DeLaTorre of the
University of Flolrda, and end
Tom Feamster of Florida State
Univeraity.
If you want Bourbon at its best call for
"GREEN RIVER/' Americas smoothest
whisky.
Sold at all leading bodegas and bars.
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE FEW
PRE-CHRISTMAS
SALE DAYS LEFT
25/<
D IS C O U N T
Mahogany
Furniture
20/<
Foreign
Merchandise
We accept year Christmas Savings Fund Depos Booklets forjfour purchases _
Mahogany Set (Bamboo Style)
hieing Room "Hero
I
Befori $ 299.50 NOW$224.62 j Before $ 199,50 NOW$125.W
bbbi aaaa mata bbb saw am aw m am au aaa aaa'tat tata aa am ana ama ah tarn am bbi bbm
For An Elegant Dining Room "3-D" Style Set
Before
$425.00
Marlin Club Holds
Banquet Friday
; At Hotel El Panama
The Panama Marlin Club
w... iic.u u annual baneuet
Friday nilht at the Batel W
Panama. Trophiea aad arista
won In the recent 4th later-
natteaal Marlin Toarnament
will he presented en that oe-
eaelen.
It It necesaary for all mem
ben to call to snake reaerva-
tloas in advance. Mrs. elm
Burkhart, aeer e t a r y, an-1
Frank Vlolette, president will
take reservat'ena by hone.
yeara that they win be glad to
see him move up into the Senior
clsss and stay there.
However, the Senior Snipe pi-
Iota don't relish the Idea of hav-
ing to compete with Bodriguat
en.ier. For in addition to winning
the Junior title Saturday, Carlea
also moved up to the elas (or
older skipper and beat them just
mr handily to the opening best.
The second two senior spins will
be contested thto morning
Saturday Carlos didn't give his
rivals s chance He made a clean
twees of all three heats to weath-
er which rsnged from a virtual
dead calm in the morning to fus-
ty breesea to the afternoon. And
each tme be won going awsy.
Kunner-up in the title race for
the second year to a raw was
17-year-old Mareia Hartatone of
Boston. Lucia Guest-of Greenbo-
ro, N. C. was third. Fifth place
went to Loretta Bobinson of Lon-
-- Joyce Bamel at Bausa
City tilth.
/ui aie students at Palm
Beach's Graham-Eckes school.
NOW
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Remember our Grand CHRISTMAS PfflLCO PRIZE
Ask for your troa ticket for the Grand Phiko Raffle whieh will rako place on December 25rh, 1933 tKeordmo, to tty
National Lottery. For every cash amount of $1.00 that you spend, or for every $1.00 you pay at down paymaat, yea
will receive a free ticket.
let PRIZE
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Phones: 2-1830 2-1833



UP.
-Mm enea
Read story on page 11
.Long-Handled
Weather Chills
United States
CHICAGO, Nov. 89 (UP) -Long
underwear weather spread a-
cross the nation front the Roc-
kies to the Atlantic Coast last
aljt.
' Icy westerly sales up to 30
mph accompanied by snow flur-
ries,' swept the cold wave out of
the Midwest into the East.
Forecasts called lor the temper-
atures to reach the low 20's a-
4ont the Atlantic Coast and 15
in some New York and New Jer-
aey counties. Philadelphia expect-
ed low of'IS.
At Pittsburgh the mercury sank
to 12 degrees and was expected
to go to 5 degrees. The wind pil-
ed up snowdrifts a foot deep In
the Pennsylvania mountinas.
At least three heart deaths
were recorded In the Pittsburgh
rea, including a highway work-
er who died while shoveling
cinders and a steelworker who
! was spreading *** on ***-
way.
The cold also pushed southward
" Into central Texas Tennessee,
;. Louisiana and Mississippi. Fort
. Worth, Tex., had a low of 25 de-
'.. grees.
Chicago shivered is a low of S
.degrees, coldest for the date
B since 1887 and expected more
near-zero temperatures. A light
but slippery snow caused more
the 1,000 minor auto accidents
f* Iff the windy city.
la Michigan hundred of
* homebonnd deer hunters were
, forced to spend the n i g h t in
' their auto at the Straits of
Mackinac. Lines of traffic piles
up five and ata saltea teag on
the slippery highways
Blowing snow cut visibility al-
most to zero in western M1 c h i-
gan, producing a rash of minor
traffic accidents.
\ Deep sub-zero cold gripped the
north, where the-lowest reported
,tempersture wu 15 below at
"p BE: Wia., hsd 11 below.
-'Unusually lew temperatures and
"Ken snow were .forecast in ma-
ny parts of Dixie.
The weatherman said that Mid-
die Tennessee should record, 14
degree reading and the mercury
was expected to dip even lower
to East Tennessee. .
In the mountains of South
Carolina, North Carolina and
Georgia the prediction was for
scattered snow flurries sed tem-
perature raagbn from 18 in
the swrth to 38 degrees to ex-
treme southern portions.
Florida was warned of frost or
freezing temperatures, snd be
csuse of strong winds storm
warnings were displayed along
the Atlantic Coast from Florida
. North Carolina,
'^ttost of the South was already
feeling the first effect* of the
old wave and temperatures were
skidding to whst wss expected to
be the sesson's low in most spots.
Army Asks Bids
For Furnishing
Tires And Tubes
The Purchasing and Contract-
ing Officer, USARCARIB, Ord-
nance Section, today solicited
bids for the furnishing of 21
classes of pneumatic tire and
tobes.
Sealed bids, in duplicate, will
be received until 10 a.m., Dec.
9, at the Ordnance Receiving
flection, Building 540, Corozal.
The tires and tubes range In
from bicycle, lawn mower, case
tractor, light sedan, ambulance
and bus.


#:
Manama American
i
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.

31st TEAR
PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1955
PITE CENTS
Protest Ready For Reds Who Grabbed
2 Radio-Equipped US Congressmen
BERLIN, Nov. 28 (UP) Two
U.S. congressmen, the wife of
one and their Army escort offi-
cer were arrested by Communist
policemen at gunpoint in East
Berlin snd held for four hours in
sn incident touching on the
rights of the Western Allies In
the divided city, it was revealed
yesterday.
A ','vlgorons" protest was be-
ing drawn np for presentation
to the Soviet commandant lat-
ter today by the American
eossmsndsnt, MsJ. Gen.
Charles i* Dasher Jr.
The Army announced that Reps.
Edward P. Boland (D-Mass.) and
Harold C. Ostertag (R-N.Y.) and
hij wife, along with Army Lt.
James T. McQueen of Mulllns,
S. C, were arrested because the
car they were using to tour East
Berlin had a radiotelephone In
violation of the laws of the- "ger-
man Democratic Republic."
They were turned over to So-
viet authorities and released at
Soviet headquarters to the U. S.
provost marshal.
The Army and State Depart-
ment took a particularly serious
view of tre incident because it
touched on the rights of the West-
ern Allies, which do not recog-
nise the East Germsn Republic,
as Russia does.
In effect, the West was being
told It was bound by the laws of
the Communist government
Army sedans used in the city
generally carry radio telephone
equioment.
When Dasher goes to see So-
viet MaJ. Gen. P. A. Dibrova
today, he will ride In a sedan
equipped with radio-telephone.
Ostertag, who flewon to Frank-
furt with tils wife yesterday, said
"there's probably more meaning
to it than would appear on the
surface.
The 59-yesr-old Attica, N. Y.,
lawmaker said the fact that he
and Boland were congressmen
"seemed to matter little to the
peoples (East German) police."
Mrs. Ostertag said she wss
'definitely afraid" during the in-
cld?nt which occurred as the par-
ty was leaving the Soviet war
memorial, a favorite tourist at-
traction.
They sat in the sedan through-
out the four hours of detention.
The Communists forbade Mc-
Queen to notify his headquar-
ters of the arrest. But when
they weren't looking, be used
5 PanCanal Employes Retire This Month
Five employes of the Pana-
ma Canal organization, two with
more than 30 years of service,
retire from service in November.
Those retiring, their positions
and length of service follow:
Mrs. Alvina Freeman Tread-
well, Balboa Elementary School
teacher; 80 years and 12 days.
James L. Williams, foreman
crlbtender,, Marine Bunkering
Section; 19 years, six months
and 8 days.
Floyd Wlnchell, cash account-
ing clerk, Division of Store-
houses; 11 years, 1 month and
29 days.
Alfred T. Velt, chief towboat
engineer, Dredging Division; 20
years and 12 days.
Stanley F. Yost, supervisory
marine traffic controller, Port
Captain's Office, Balboa; 32
years, 2 months and 10 days.
Mrs. Treadwell is a native of
Stratford, Wisconsin, and taught
school for several years in the
State of Washington before
coming; to the Isthmus In 1924.
She taught fourth and fifth
grades in Pedro Miguel for a
year before being transferred to
Balboa. Since 1925 she has been
fifth grade teacher in Balboa.
Mr. and Mrs. Treadwell expect
to make a trip around the world
before going to Florida to make
their future home.
A native of Washington, D.C..
Williams came to the Isthmus
In 1935 and was employed with
the U.S. Army Engineers at Co-
rozal for a year before Joining
the Canal organization. He was
first employed as a signalman
with the Marine Bureau and
later transferred to the Balboa
Oil Handling Plant as a gauger.
Since 1953 he has been a fore-
man crlbtender with the Marine
Bunkering Section.
Mr. and Mrs. Williams have
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f"^ THEATRE ------
Per Ave. No. 2
Tomorrow at 8:30 p.m.
GALA PREMIERE
The Unbelievable
Puccini's magnificient!
Wiidcum
BUTTERFLY
with
KAORU
YACHIGUSA
, 5fbe Miracle
f the
Century!
and
Prowler In Case *
Of Woodward j
Pleads Innocent
MINELA, N.Y., NOV. 29 (UP)
Paul W. Wlrths, 23-year-old
German refugee who figured as
the prowler In the Woodward
case, pleaded Innocent today to
burglary and larceny charges in
Minela County court.
Judge Norman Lent remand-
ed the husky blonde bricklayer
to Jail to await trial. As a sec-
ond offender, Wlrths faces a
maximum of 20 years In prison
if convicted of the theft of $175
worth of cameras from a Hemp-
stead, N.Y., home and $33 worth
of Jewelry from a Valley Stream,
N.Y., home.
made plans to go to Florence,
Alabama, after his retirement.
Wlnchell was born in Vancou-
ver, Washington, and came to
the Canal Zone In 1914 as a
clerk with Section E of the Divi-
sion of Storehouses. He was em-
ployed for a short time with the
Commissary Division at Mount
Hope and since 1951 has been
cash accounting clerk in the Di-
vision of Storehouses.
The
Judge's Bench
Three charges were lodged -
gainst an 18-year-old Panama-
nian today In the Balboa Mag-
istrate's Court.l Alfredo Hernan-
dez was found guilty of taking
a vehicle for temporary use and
given a suspended sentence for
a period of one year on the con-
dition that he should not be-
come involved In any other vio-
lation of law.
Hernandez was fined 5 for
driving without a license.
However on the third charge,
of falling to have proper regis-
tration for the vehicle he "bor-
rowed" he was found not guilty.
The car belonged to Isaas Gon-
zalez.
For having marijuana in his
possession Roman Garzn, 39,
was sentenced to spend 15 days
In jail. He was picked up in
Balboa.
After his retirement, Wlnchell
plans to make his home in Los
Angeles, California.
Veit was born in Erie, Penn-
sylvania, and from 1919 to 1935
was marine engineer and later
chief engineer on Grace Line
vessels sailing out of New York.
In 1935 he came to the Isthmus
and for a short time was engi-
neer on the MB. General Mor-
gan Lewis, the ferry then run-
ning between Fort Sherman and
Cristobal.
He Joined the Canal organi-
zation the same year as steam
engineer with the Dredging Di-
vision and since 1953 has been
chief towboat engineer.
Mr. and Mrs. Velt are plan-
ning to make their home m St.
Petersburg, Florida, after his re-
tirement.
A native of Merlden, Connec-
ticut, Yost served with the U.8.
Army during the first World
War and a short time as a cadet
and marine engineer with the
US. Shipping Board.
He was with the United Fruit
Company for two years in Costa
Rica before coming to the Isth-
mus in 1923 as a foreman with
the Cristobal Commissary and
later as a clerk with the Ac-
counting Department. In. 1924,
he was transferred to the Ma-
rine Division in Balboa as a dis-
patcher in the Balboa Port Cap-
tain's office where he remained
up ^to the time of his retire-
ment.
After leaving the Isthmus, Mr.
and Mrs. Yost plan to visit their
daughter in California and later
expect to make their home in
Gloucester, Massachusetts.
the radio-telephone to notify the
provost marshal, Lt. Col. Ver-
non Hammonds of Henrietta,
Tex. ,_
The East Germans turned the
party over to a, Russian officer
who appeared nonchalant about
the entire affair, it was stated.
"It was a harrowing experi-
enct,'' Ostertag said.
"It caught us completely by
surprise. As time went on we be-
came more and more alarmed as
to what might happen to us ulti-
mately.
"Particularly disturbing was
the delay in getting through the
East German police chain of
command to Soviet authorities.
"My wife was rather nervous,'
he added.
The arrest raised the point
whether American, British and
French troops In the city come
under East German law now that
Russia has recognized the East
German regime as a sovereign
nation. ,
Charles Owsley, State Depart-
ment political affair chief and
Dasher's political advisor said
they do not. _____
Former PRR Employe
Thomas C. Madison
Dies At Coco Solo
Thomas C. Madison, retired
Panama Railroad employe ana
longtime resident of the Isth-
mus, died Monday night at Coco
Solo Hospital where he had been
a patient since Nov. 25. He was
86 years old. .
Born in Norton, Mississippi, he
came to the Isthmus in April,
1909, as a foreman with the Pan-
ama Railroad. He worked con-
tinuously with the Railroad until
his retirement in April, 1932, and
had served as track foreman and
yard foreman through most of
his period.
Mr. Madison made his home
with a son, Dave J. Madison of
Margarita. Another son, Allan
lives in Ancon.
He is also survived by a son,
Thomas C. Madison, former Ca-
nal employe now living in Jack-
son, Michigan, and by two
daughters, Mrs. Pauline Daly, of
Jackson Heights, Long Island-,
and Mrs. Carrie Murwin, of Jack-
sonville, Florida, and by several
grandchildren and one great
grandchild.
Funeral services will be an-
nounced later.
THE LORD'S SHEPHERD-Soroe sheep graze nearby as Pope Plus XTI takes a morning troll
in the gardens of his summer residence at Cast el Gandolfo, Italy. Although Vatican sources)
confirmed the report that the Pope had a vision of Christ while ravely ill recently, a mem-
S2U2!i ^e. can ?*crei Consregatton of Rites said he could recall no record of such a re-
Son in^Rnme^1106 aPI*"" *> St. Peter, the first Pope, when he was fleeing persecu-
---------------------1-------------------
-----
Mississippi Governor Fears Federal Trouble
If Negro's Assailants Are Not Tracked Down
Japanese
start!
The Takwitusa Ballet
and the vaieea af
ORIETTA MOSCUCCI
GUISEPPE CAMPORA
ANA Mo CANALE
M naany ether Open Stars!
3a"Techl3o*o7T
LEGAL HUDDLEJohn Gilbert Graham, left. Is shown In Denver. Colo., talking
court-appointed attorneys. Graham is charged with placing a time-bomb in his m gage. It exploded on a plane, causing the deaths of his mother and 43 others. The
are, left to right: John Gibbons; Charles Vigil, and Paul Weadlck.
with his
her's lug-
attorneys
BelLZONI, Miss., Nov. 29 (UP)
Gov. Hugh White today demand-
ed a thorough local-level investi-
gation of the shooting of a Negro
civil rights leader to avo: "se-
rious trouble" with the ederal
government.
White dramatically interven-
ed in the wounding of Negro
storekeeper Gus Coarta with a
warning that unless local au-
thorities made every effort to
apprehend Courts' assailants
Mississippi faced possible feder-
al action.
It was a move that White de-
scribed as "all the court could
do" short of declaring martial
and he said he had no intentions
or taking mat step.
Courts, OS, was wounded Friday
night by two blasts fired through
the window of nis store here.
He was reported recovering
satisfactorily today as FBI a-
gents joined in toe search for
tne parties responsible,
the parties responsible.
Write wired Humphreys County
Sheriff iKe fcineiton to "do every-
thing in your power'' to Una tne
guilty parties.
"I very much fear federal ac-
tion against us. White told the
snerili wno pleogea to conuuet a
complete investigation.
White, at r. news conference in
Jackson, said a recent series of
violent acts against negroes in
the state, including three unsolv-
ed layings, tnretens "serious
lederai trouble.
"ii tuey can say the state
law has broken oown, there's
o teiiuig wnst is going to nap-
pen," Wuite said..
Me warned tuat the stste'sec-
onomy has been "severely injur-
ed' uecause oi the suoodng of
Courts, the slaying of another Ne-
gro leader in tei^am, toe c e 1 e-
brated kidnap-siaying of Chicago
iNegro teenager tinmen T ill
ana the muruer oi a Negro poli-
tical iigure in Brookhaven.
Dist. Atty. Stanny Sanders also
was urgea .to "uo everytning pos-
sible' involsing the shooting of
courts.
White said he .had notified Roy
Wilkuns, extusiive secretary of
the National Association for the
Advancement oi L noreti i'eopie,
that he had called on local au-
tnorities to matte every eiiort to
bring the guilty parties to justice.
Tne NAaCP in New York con-
firmed the receipt of White's tel-
egram to Wilklns.
"That's about all the governor
can do unless we declare martial
law." White said, "snd we are
not going to do that."
"We don't know if the guilty
parties are white or black," the
governor said. "We can't accuse
on race any more than another,
because we don't know who'a
doing it. But we do know it
ought to stop."
White reasoned that an can-
trolled crime would give the
state a bad name in the sesrch
for new industries.
The wounding of Courts, a for-
mer county-level NAACP head,
was the latest in a series of in-
cidents whichh touched off
worldwide indignation and de-
mands for federal intervention to
protect the civil right of Negroes
in Mississippi.
Rev. George Lee, a Belzoni Ne-
gro leader, was shot to death
nere last May. Negro Limar
Smith, active in county politics,
ws slain on the Lincoln County
courthouse square In Brookhaven
last August but a grand jury re-
ported it could find no witnesses
to the slaying.
Young Till was snatched from
a Negro tenant hack some 70
miles north of here Ag. 28. Two
Two white men were tried snd
freed of charges that they ab-
ducted and killed him for a "wolf
whistle" at a white woman.
Courts, who changed his stories
about the identity of his attack-
ers, was confined to a hospital in
Mound* Bayou, an all-Negro town
about 75 miles north of here. FBI
agents started a preliminary in-
vestigation Sunday and continued
their probe today.
Courts, in his latest version of
the srooting, said he wasn't sure
who the attackers were.
At first he said a car contain-
ing "three or four white men''
stopped in front of the store and
en? man fired at him.
Little League
Boys 6, Girls 5
Eleven babies were born In
Coco Solo Hospital during the
week ending at midnight Wed-
nesday, Nov. 23, according to the
regular hospital report. During
that time 86 patients were ad-
mitted and 99 were discharged.
Babies were born to the follow,
lng American citizens: CPO and
Mrs. Ernest White, of Coco Sqlo,
daughter; Lt. and Mrs. Michael
J. Taylor of Fort Gullck, daugh-
ter; SP-3 and Mrs. Angel Bur-
gos, of Coco Slito, daughter;
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Coffin, of
Gatun, son; and Mrs. Ronald
Murphy, of Coco Slito, daugh-
ter.
Babies were born to the fol-
lowing parents of Panamanian
nationality: Mr. and Mrs. Julian
Ardines, pf Colon, son; Mr. and
Mra Arnold O. Hudson, of Rain-
bow City, son; Mr. and Mrs. Ran-
dolph Brown, of Colon, daugh-
ter; Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Guz-
man, of Colon, son; Mr. and Mrs.
Daniel Glen, of Colon, son, and
Mr. and Mrs. Belario Myles, of
Rainbow City, son.
55:Year-Old Wins
Prize For Young
French Novelist
PARIS, Nov. 2 (UP) A 55-
year-old French author today won
the coveted prlx femina, a major
literary award established for the
benefit of young novelists.
Andre Dhctel won the prize for
nis latest book, "Le Pays Oou
I On n'Arrive Jamis" (The Coun-
try in Which One Never Get
Anywhere.)
The whole or his voluminous
work was taken into consideration
by the ll-member prix femina ju-
Dhotel never before won public
fame, although he is regsrded as
one of France's best* novelists.
For this reason, the- jury ignored
ths age factor and awarded him
Ui2 prize.
LAST DAY! .75 .40
3:00 4:40 6:40 9:05 p.m.
JMk CMtaryFaa
MUA! JOillfa
TOLDEN JONES
"LOVE IS A
MANY
SPLENDORED
THING"
ClNtu*s:oPt
Also: TUNA CLIPPER SHOT
A Cinemascope Short!
mwmmmammmm

TOMORROWBELLA VISTA
WILD BILL HICKOK
By Russ Winterbotham and Ralph Lane
Hitkot olu, nod* iMm. "re
t yog u>, Uf." mU IK)
TkoMpM*. n nctornM fmklm,
* tH< morshol oritrad km
SHE'S THE MOST IMPATIENT
MAIDEN IN THE VIRGIN WEST..
BUT HE'S NOT THE
MARRYING KIND!
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with VJCTOR McLAGLEN RUSS TAMW.YN JEFF RICHARDS