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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/00931
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:00931
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text


AN INDEPENDENT ^/fHE\^, DAItY NEWSPAPER
Panama American
"Lh the people know the truth and the country is tufe" - Abraham Lincoln,
SeagrausYO,
CANADIAN
WHWKV I |J_

31st YEAR
PANAMA, R. P., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER Xt, ItSS
FTVE CENTS
WINS $25,000 Mrs. Myra
Shirk, who was in the Rus-
tan Army during World War
II. presses her fingers to her
after winning $25,000 on a New
York television show. Mrs.
Shirk, who now lives In York,
Pa., had won $50,000 but she
lost half of it when the tried
for the $100,000 prise and mis-
Popes Vision
Makes Sainthood
More Likely
VATICAN CITY, Nov. 22 (UP)Pop* Piux Xll's vision
of Christ today increased the likelihood that he -/ill some
day bo proclaimed a taint of the Roman Catholic Churoh.
The unprecedented vision of Jesus was the second
vision of the Roman-born pontiff, now 79 years old and
in the 17th year of his reign.
Vatican quarters said the visions would weigh im-
portantly in the eventual cause to beatify and later to
sanctify Pius XII. ,
Bus Concerns
May Protest
CZ Insurance
A Panama transportation
company declared today that
small and Independent opera-
tors of passenger-carrying vehi-
cles will not be able to operate
on the Canal Zone If a new ca-
nal Zone government regulation
governing accident Insurance is
put Into effect.
Meanwhile, the National For-
eign Relations Council, an-
nounced today that it had been
passenger-carrying vehicles op-
erating In the canal Zone.
Balboa Heights said at press
time that no such regulation*
has been issued. A check is
being made there to see
whether the plan is under
study.
In a communique issued today,
the Bio Abajo Transport Asso-
ciation said the proposed regu-
lation change was brought to
Its attention at a meeting of
representatives of transp o r t
companies, cooperatives and In-
dependent operators held at the
Panama Traffic Police head-
quarters.
The communique said It was
observed at the meeting that:
1) The requirement of $10,000
Insurance per person and $100,-
000 each for accident was ex-
orbitant, and the costs of such
(Continued on Page 6, Col. 6)
Bids Hade For Work
On Atlantic Side
Sewage System
Isthmian Construe tori. Inc.
made a low bid of $3,418 for the
Installation of a 444-foot sanitary
sewer force main which will con-
nect the Margarita sewage sys-
tem with the Rainbow City Se-
wage treatment plant. Bids were
opened Monday morning in the
Balboa Heights Administration
Building.
Three other contractors made
offers on the work, which when
completed, will connect all of
Margarita, Mount Hope. Rainbow
City, Old Cristobal and the Cris-
tobal Dock area with the Rain-
bow City Plant.
The Rainbow City sewage treat-
ment plant, one of the most mod-
ern of its kind, was built at a cost
of approximately C160.0O0 and was
put in operation in July.
This is the second "supernat-
ural" event far the Pope in the
past five years. Such visions by
the spiritual" leader of 450,000,-
000 Roman Catholics could be
expected to lend speed to the
cause of sainthood.
With many feeling that the
eventual cause of beatification
and sainthood of Pope Pius XII
would be speeded by his super,
pahiral vision, there came a new
report today of a "miracle" at-
tributed to him.
The Rome afternoon newspa-
per Qlornale d'ltaUa quoted ex-
cerpts from a letter written be-
fore his death by the Italian
composer Pletro Mascagni. The
letter credited the Pope with the
recovery from tuberculosis of his
young niece.
Italy's leading newspaper re-
ported today that Pope Pius
heard the "true and distinct"
voice of Christ when he saw a
vision of Christ last winter.
The Corriere della Sera of Mi-
lan, the nation's Influential and
biggest circulation newspaper,
said the Pope had told this to a
group of 20 'qualified ecclesi.
asta."
There was no immediate con-
firmation of the report in au-
thoritative^ Vatipan_ quartern
, Cel.
Pern, RP Govt
{Silent On Move
To Extradite Him
Both the Panamanian gov-
ernment and former Argentine
President Juan D. Peron hi exile
in the Hotel Washington, de-
clined to speculate today on the
likely result of any Argentine
request to Panama for extradi-
tion of the ousted strongman.
A Panamanian foreign min-
istry spokesman said the im-
plications of any such request
would ba considered when it
arrived. Until such time, he
had no comment to make.
From Buenos Aires it was re-
ported that the new Argentine
government was considering a
penal court request today to ask
the extradition of peron to face
charges of treason.
Judge Luis Botet of the fed-
eral penal court recommended
extradition of Peron from exile
along with Peron's minister of
interior, Angel Borlenghl, who
fled to Cuba after the Peron re-
gime fell last September.
Botet issued formal orders
for the arrest ef Peron, Bor-
lenghl and former Peronist
deputy (congressman) Saul
Sosales Ruis who took refuge
the Paraguayan embassy m
Buenos A'res.
They would be held Incommu-
nicado pending trial for treason
and unlawful association.
Botet's court Issued formal in-
dictments of former vice presi-
dent Rear Adm. Alberto Teisaire
and the former secretaries-gen-
eral of the General Labor Con-
federation (COT), Eduardo Vul-
etich and Jose Espejo, on the
charge of "treason and unlaw-
ful association.''
Teisaire and Vuletich are
prisoners. Espejo was reported
arrested last week.
Money, Money
Everywhere,
Such As Balboa
Money could be had for pick-
ing-up in Balboa yesterday. For
a while, that is, after the rain.
First to see it was young Doug,
las F. Feeney. 8, who spotted a
{20 bill lying in Balboa Road as
pedaled his bicycle toward
his parents' home In Gaviln
Area.
Pretty soon he-rushed into the
house, brandishing the money
and shouting to his older broth-
er, Harold:
"There's a lot more there."
Forthwith the two sons of Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Feeney went
back to comb the streets and
grass near the National city
Bank.
As an ardent helper they had
a young friend. David Dunlap.
Pretty -soon the yjp
hjAjcofnid^B^BiaMb
Ike Summons
A SILVER MEDAL commemorating the sesqulcentennlal of the birth of Count Ferdinand De
Lessens was presented to Gov. John S. Beybold yesterday by Count Pierre de Lesseps great-
grandson of the French engineering genius and canal-builder. Left to right are French Am-
bassador Lionel Vase, the Count, the Governor, Jeer. Marie, president of the French Line and
Dominique de Grleges, deputy director of the Suez Canal Company.
?
Bust Of CcHint Ferdinand de Lesseps
Top US Officials
Helicopter To
Mountaintop Meet
THURMON7. Md., Nov. 22 (UP) President Eisen-
hower summoned his cabinet to a meeting today in th*
dining hall of the Presidential retreat high in Maryland's
Catoctin mountains.
The meeting was Mrs. Eisenhower's first with his full
cabinet since before his heart attack Sept. 24.
The government's highest officials flew in by heli-
copter for the session, landing on a muddy clearing atop
an 1800-foot mountain dotted with patches of snow.
Eager Mommas, Pappas Wait
For Law, Bad Legs Course
"All dressed up, but no way to
get adopted," was the predica-
ment faced this morning by two
little blonde girls. One was lap-
els, the other a little older.
Cuddled and comforted by
their equally eager would-be
mommas and pappas, they todd-
led and skipped about the
porches of the VS. District Court
in Ancon. They looked as so
pretty in their Sunday best that
hordec of people were making
pleaeent noises in their direc-
tion.
Assured that "everything
would be all right," the young
ladles didn't seem toe upset by
the fact that attorney William
J. Sheridan, Jr., was confined to
bed with an abceased leg, so
could not petition the court to
make them "Daddy's little girls."
Unrer treatment for several
days by a Gorgaa doctor, Sheri-
dan had informed the Marshal's
office late yesterday that he
hoped to make it Into court for
the "baby docket." But the anti-
biotics didn't work fast enough.
When this became known to-
day, the would-be parents looked
as c.estfalien as any engaged
couple who had been refused a
marriage license. One pappa was
downright outraged.
Court attaches assured them
that sessions are held almost
dally and a new setting of their
can probably be arranged
wenTTo tufo it in to the Capa
Zone police at Balboa, the desk
sergeant totted it at $124.
Meanwhile. Enrique Lapelra,
retired translator for the Pana-
ma Canal Co., had had a nasty
lolt when he reached home. The
$324 he'd stuffed in his hip
pocket after cashing a check at
the bank was gone.
Lapelra poked about in his
car. found three $20 bills. He
headed back fast to the Nation-
al City. Bv that time, word of
the boys* find had gotten about,
so the bank sent him to the Bal-
boa station.
The police, too, had not been
idle. A cop sent to the area had
come up with another $20 bill.
At that point, all that was
needed was an auditor. The a-
mount found came to the exact
sum of $104 which Lapelra had
lost.
But conscientious Lapelra was
not sure the money was his. The
funds he received after cashing
a check at the bank, he recalled,
were entirely in $20 bills, except
for four $1 bills. Mysteriously,
among the wet bills picked out
of the roadway there were two
$10 bills.
Finally the puzzle was solved
when Lapelra remembered the
name of the teller who cashed
the check and the teller remem-
bered that he had Included two
$10's in the total.
After that everybody vas
happy.
Copper Screen Wire
(oflvkfs Peffv Thief
A neat seven-pound roll of
copper screen cut from a Pedro
Miguel building assigned to the
Canal Zone Fire Division wss
Dresented in evidence In Bal-
boa Magistrate's Court this
morning.
Valued at $1, It helped con-
vict Rafael Calar, a 25-year-old
Panamanian, on a charge of at-
tempted petit larceny.
He was fined $15.
The building is one of those
marked for demolition..
Police had received a report
of screen cutting in the area.
An officer sent to investigate
Intercepted Cajar.
The dedication ceremony for
the bust of Count Ferdinand de
Lesseps presented by the Sues
Canal Co., will be held at 8 o'-
clock* tomorrow morning in the
rotunda of the Administration
Building at Balboa Heights.
Representatives of the Panama
government, the diplomatic corps,
and officials of various branches
of the U.S. Government en the
Isthmus wil? attend the cremony.
Heading this list will be P r e s i-
dent Ricardo Arias E. and Alber-
to Boyd, Minister of Foreign Re-
lations.
Jean Marie, president of the
France-Amerique Committee of
France and head of the French
mission here for the sesquicenten-
nial celebration of the birth of
Count de Lesseps, will give a
brief address. This will immedi-
ately preceded the formal present-
ation of the bust to the Panana
Canal Co.-Canal Zone government
by Dominique de Grleges, depu-
ty director general of the Suez
Canal Zo.
The guests will be welcomed by
Gov. Seybold following an invo-
cation by th. Rev. Joseph F. Ko-
nen, CM. of St. Mary's Church.
The bronze bust which stands in
niche of the rotunda Will be'
unveiled by Count Pierre de Les-,
seps, great-grandson of the Suez
Cpnal builder who is now a mem-
ber* Ikf the board of the Suez Ca-
nal Co.
Acceptance of the bust in be-
half of the company-ggovernment
will be expressed by Gov. Sey-
bold. This will be followed by the
playing of the national anthems
of France, Panam, and the Unit-
ed States by the Balboa School
Band.
The dedication ceremony will be
closed by the benediction pro-
nounced by Bishop Regln'id He-
ber Gooden.
Owing to the limited space in
the rotunda, seats will be plsced
for those participating in the pro-
grahi and the invited guests. The
program will be broadcast by a
public address system from the
front of the Administration Build-
ing facing the Prado.
Employes at the Administration
Building will be excused from
work during the cremonies which
will be preceded by a selection by
the high school band. The general
Eubllc is welcomed to attend and
ear the program from the
front of the building.
Following the dedication, mem-
bers of the mission will go to Mi-
raflores Locks and will then
make a trip through Galllard Cut.
They will be entertained at a
luncheon at the Hotel Tivoli giv-
en by Gov. Seybold.
French Canal Co.
Display On View
At PC Library
A special display of French
construction day pictures and co-
pies of the French Casal Co. Bul-
letin are being exhibited this
week In the Panama Canal Li-
brary Museum in honor of the
sesquicentennial of the* birth of
Count Ferdinand de Lesseps.
The pictures are part of an o-
riginal collection of Freeh con-
struction day picture from 1880
to 1887 presented to the Library
by Melvin L. Booz, former resi-
dent of Cristobal. The pictures
were collected by Luis Charles
Bochard, French Canal Co. offi-
cial, who was the father of Mrs.
Booz.
The Bulletin is complete and
covers the period from 1879 to
1888.
In addition to the display of
pictures and books in the lighted
cases on the ground floor, the
main Library is featuring a col-
lection of bcoks on the life of
Count de Lesseps.
-------------------f---------------
Five cabinet members vice
president Richard M. Nixon,
secretary of state John Foster
Dulles, defense secretary Chas.
Wilson, treasury secretary Oeo.
Humphrey, and attorney general
Herbert Brownell, Jr. arrived
yesterday.
They and 13 other helicopter-
borne administration officials
attended a one-hour and 45-
mlnute meeting of the National
Security Council over which the
president presided after driving
here from his Gettysburg, Pa.,
farm 22 miles away.
Uaenhewer and the eab-
members arriving j aster
stayed overn'ght in Caaap
David's heavily g u a r ded,
rough board cottages. The re-
maining cabinet memb e r s
whirred in by helicopter this
morning. '
The National Security Coun-
cil and cabinet meetings, drama-
tized by helicopter airlift, mark-
ed the return of Mr. Elsenhower
to personally active leadership
of government affairs.
After yesterday's Security
Council meeting, the President
conferred separately for half an
hour In his own quarters with
Dulles.
press secretary James Hager-
ty said he did not know the sub-
ject of their discussion.
Last night the President play-
ed bridge with Dulles, Humphrey
and Wilson.
Immediately after today's cab-
inet session, the president plan-
ned to drive back to his Gettys-
burg farm to continue his rou-
tine work and recuperation
from his heart attack.
Mrs. Eisenhower was in Wash-
ington today to catch up on
some of her work at the White
House.
Many of the high govern-
ment oficiis, including Nix-
on, had never before visited
this mountain h i d e a way,
which the late President
Franklin D. Roosevelt origi-
nally named "Shangri-La."
One feature they likely ..
to remember was the chill winds
which swept the mountain-top
camp, 12 degrees colder than in
the valley below.
The lodge In which the offi-
cials met scarcely looked the
part of the meeting place of the
nation's top leaders. It is an un-
impressive, single-storied frame
building made of rough pin*
boards, painted a faded, rusta
green, its largest room measur-
ed only 30 by 15 feet.
Hardly 30 yards lrom it, how-
ever, roe*-!"
Canal Employes 6
During This Month
Six permanent employee, a 11
of whom were hired locally, join-
ed the Canal organization during
the first two weeks in November,
according to information f r o m
the Personnel Bureau.
The new permanent employes
and their positions are as fol-
lows:
Health Bureau Sylvia L. W.
Beachara. nurse at Gorges Hospi-
tal, and Sara P. Arnold, nurse at
Coco Solo Hospital.
Office of the Comptroller Lucil-
le B. Oliver, elerk-typlst, and
Charles A. McArthur. accountant
Schools Divi*loa-M artos B. Tay-
lor, clerk-typist.
Msmteaanie Divisin Theuna
U. ftssso, clerk-typist.
porters ana paetograpners
kept away from ahem.
Khaki Santa's Work
Al Spreading Cheer
Santa Claus will be laden with
toys during his visit to local or-
phanages once again this Christ-
mss season as the result of the
second annual USARCARIB Ar-
my Post toy collection currently
in progress. The drive is sponsor*
ed by the 536 Engineer plstooa.
Freighting, Fort Clayton.
First of the Army echelons to
get the drive underway was the
Post of Fort Kobbe under the su-
pervision of Set. Dsve Coving-
ton, company chief. To date; twjf
wagons, six tricycles, a rockisj
horse, baby carriage, scoots**
station wagon and jeep are a-
mong the numerous items contra
buted during weekly collections.
The collections will continues era.'
ery Monday through the first
week of December.
A fire truck has been touring
various districts of Fort Kobtaft
collecting the toys that were
placed on door steps. A crew of
19 Post firemen are repairing and
painting the toys on their off-do-
ty hours.
Seven posts are taking part in
the campaignthree on the At-
lantic side and four on the Paci-
fic side. In charge of the drive is
Lt. Robert J. Ellis, platoon lead-
er of the 536th Engineer platoon.
The toys will be distributed in
time for Christmas to the needy
children.
LT. COL. WELDON PITTING. TJSAP, is shown with his 'harem' In a scene from "AI Legretto." a three act musical comedy a be
presented at *ht AWrook Air Force Base Theatre the nights o Dec. 1, 2, and 3. The harem *s composed of: left to right, Jr-
rame Alhean. MolUe Pettlt, Peggy Wudeck. Janet Miller, and Arm Balpas. Reservations for "Al Legretto" may be made any
morning at the Adarook Base Exchange or by calling 86-4301, a-2SS1, or 86-7246. Ad tickets are reserved and one dollar each.
Proceeds will be used for "Operstlonc Christmas" an Albrook project for bringing Christmas cheer to underprivileged chil-
dren in the Panam area. Ofieaal USAF Pheto
Zone Local Raters
To AM Blood Bank
The Civic Councils of various
local-rate communities have pledg-
ed their support and active as-
sistance in obtaining volant e e r s
for the Canal Zone blood bank
now being organized jointly by
th Red Cross and the Health
Bureau..
Blood donor cards are being dis-
tributed this week to all local-rate
employees of the Canal organiza-
tion with the paychecks. Donor
cards were distributed to U.S.-rate
employees who received their
pay checks last week.
Arrangements have basa made
by Civic Councils to have repre-
sentatives stationed at the local-
rate Commissaries during this
week to accept blood donor cards
from employes snd to solicit vo-
lunteers from other Canal Zone
residents.
Donor cards may also be coa-
Iple'ed and returned direct to the
Red Cross offices in person or by
mail to Balboa or Cristobal.
Approximately 400 cards asea
already been received and these
are being tabulated by volunteer
Red Cross woekrs.
It waa announced Tuesday that
the volunteers en the Atlantis sida
are working under the chairman-
ship o Mrs. George farieka,


V
MOB TWO
PANAMA AMERICAN AN sTIDEPENDFNT DAttT MEW8PAPEB
TCBSDAT, NOVEMBER U, IBM
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
reuNoto t muo ounvnt m
HMMCIO AMA*, um*
T M TMIT I. O OK IS*. MMA. . ?.
TslfPHON t-0740 IB UMl
CAILI ADO.M.. PAfMHBaiCAN. PNAXA ,_..,.
*4B HWIMN Avt. NiW YO. t7l N. T.
Mr Mohtm. m BVIIIM
POM IX MONTH. IN SVANM.
PON ONI 'A, IN AOVAN**.
9 I.TO
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la.BO
9.0O
14.00
THIS IS YOU* FOBUM THI MADWS OWN COiUMH
Labor News
And
Comment
UHtn am ***** v*HMh < * headW *** s*****'*1
Tvee cNitMi BHei '? B B**tBwt aleeesrt
Mit ii Umr. .r. pvklteB*. hi * * received.
flMM tip to Bis ft* *. BariM MM ,MB,
la MMn ties ftori.
THE MAIL BOX
ELEVEN O'CLOCK BLUES
I you happen to feel as big a* a whale.
And you want to lose weight without fail,
There la a tonic that ii guaranteed
It ii supersonicmade for peed.
A few weeka and you'll disintegrate.
You'll even try to get back your weight,
This remedy will peel off all your fat,
You'll be as skinny as a baseball bat.
You won't feel like eating Juicv steaks.
You'll give up all delicious cakes.
You'll cut out all kinds of sweets.
You'll have no taste for any meats.
Yest, I'm sorry to say, you won t eat food, mooo.
Cause you'll feel In a very bad mood.
You'll gradually itarve and go hungry
Once you start playing the Lottery.
You wl be aVreckwon't sleep at night.
It will wring your neck- then squeeze you tight.
Somebody, hits first prize and then
Spends everything trying to hit again.
A wifa who lost her gold locket,
Found It In her husband's pocket.
Do you suppose he wanted to hock it?
She yapped at her husband until it hurt.
No wonder he never bought a new shirt!
Officials of the National Lottery seem to go through great
pains to assure everyone that there is no dishonestly connecwa
with the drawing of numbers, alnce It la held openly for the
PUbYeft.foWial, go only half way toward making tW,
occasion a success. They are making no effort to improve the
lottery. So they are not only being unfair to the customer*
they are also hurting their Government'! possibilities of more
"it Is well-known fact that many people can't get the chance
numbers they want toward the weekend. Why not print more
chance tlekeia. so that people can freely buy such hidden num-
bs like 00-01 ani 10? Those numbers are no better than otner
numbers, and with the public getting the numbers they want,
more tickets will be sold.
If the vendors refuse to sell certain special numbers to the
general public, then why not have one building outlet In every
city or town where ticket* are sold, to accommodate the person
who wants to buy a special dream number or Saturday'morning
knowing that his chance number at least U available and not
After a trial period, I'm sure the officials would have an
idea as to what amount of tickets would be needed for these ex-
tra buildings, and could adjust the printing accordingly.
When there is a special Holiday Lottery, why not sell chance
tickets lor a Quarter, and pay off at twelve, six and three dol-
^Zl'St^r^ttoffirV Poamveiy ridiculous. ^
nobody will deny it. A perln missing firs* prize by one digit
should get a hundred, not'ten dollars.
A second prize winner should get at least half the amount
of a first prize ($500) likewise third prize should be at least, *0.
People play the lottery to hit money, not pins,so let s do
away with that one dollar for the last digit, and If the third
prize approximation cant be ratoed any higher, then throw that
I'm'mire an official committee could make a study of the
Lottery defects, and come up with the unanlmoui decision that
the only stimulant needed is better payoffsand leascompli-
cated prizes.
Next Mall Box letter: Phones.
KJ.lv.
i_et's Get On With the Sole, Boys. Make Me on Offer
By VICTOB RIESEL
The crime combine Inside labor
has suddenly become deeply con-
cerned over civil rights. Mostly,
let me hasten to add. because the
Syndicate has suddenly discovered
that t committee it thought would
concern itself chiefly with hooded
men now plans to go after the
hoods.
Word has seeped out of labor's
inner sanctum thst the standing
Committee on Civil Rights in the
new AFL-CO will take on the
racketeers as well as the night-
riders.
This comes as a surprise to the
mobs who are feeling shsrp pain
over the fact that committee
they believe to be merely a gum-
beattog retreat for specialists in
ethical society will be used actu-
ally to go after the unethical prac-
tices inside labor.
The committee, which wfll be
headed by the CIO's Jim Carey,
will have within it a permanent
Civil Rights Department run by
two adminlstratora-both courag-
eous men. They are the AFLs
Boris Shiskln, new director of the
depsrtmeot, and George Weaver
of CIO, who will be secretary.
Jim Carey apparently has the
quixotic ides that s fight can
be mad. for civil right, for.the
majority as well as for minorities.
By simply broadening the inter-
pretation of civil right* Carey and
his collesgues plan to protect un-
ionist* from exploitation by any-
one including the mobs who have
mujcled in on some unions.
Carey believes t*&,M_S
moeracy can be made inside labor
it well as outside. As he put it in
eloYed session of the CIO high
commend last July :..
-We of the CIO are Irreconcil-
ably opposed to bringing back into
tie labor movement the tofamous
racketeering Influences that were
thrum out and the Communist
vermin which we have almost erad-
icated."
But more than the mob combine
is involved. There are hundreds
of thousands of unions who hay* Mt. The BrtlUi,n to-d o o d 1 e
no right to vote in "a""-,10"1!; was staged by the Communist Psr-
^e Washington
Merry-Go-Round
WalterWinchelllnNewYorK
MIMOS OF A GIRL FRIDAY
AN ASSIST POR LEN HALL
' Now that Adlal Stevenson has announced that he 1 a can-
didate for the Democratic nomination for President of the Unit-
ed States, the following comment of Leonard Hall, Republican
National Chairman, Is, at leaat interesting.
"Adlal Stevenson,' Hall says, "is one man we know we can
beat. He'* very clever and funny and his rhetoric is brmiant...
but he has yet to come up with a suitable quip for the results
In 1052. Only one Democrat candidate since 1872 won fewer
states. Adlal won only nine..." -.*,.,._ ,..
It is lust possible that there is material for a "suitable quip
In the fact, overlooked or Ignored by Mr. Hall, that Republican
candidate Alfred Landon carried only two states In the election
In which he ran for President. You can't beat the Republicans,
ven when it comes to losing. .
Naturally it would not have been "suitable" for Mr. Hall to
have added that In the election in which Adlal Stevenson won
only "nine states'." he received over 27,000,000 popular votes,
which, according to the New York Times, was more than any
other Presidential candidate excepting President aUsenhower,
and Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1936, ever received. Nice little
nMt egg for an "egg head," and a lot of people who voted
against Stevenson have been sorry for quite some time.
Mr. Hall also says that he knows a lot of people who are
going to work very hard to make his (Stevenson's) "defeat even
Sore complete." Naturally as Chairman of the Republican Na-
tional Committee. Mr. Hall ought to know a lot of people who
erenot going to work for Adlal Stevenson. But. if Mr. HaU stays
a* dXirman It will make the try to elect Mr. Stevenson a lot
MM* for eJl concerned. ^ Ctih#BB
no riant w .">,- R
These dues-payers are In Classi b
locsls or are kept In special ap-
prentice groups and provistonau-
nits for years. They have virtual-
ly no civil rights in their organ!-
"Furthermore, fully half the con-
titutlons of this country s tonal
eount have blanket clauses
whlcn give the officer, the right to
expel members for sny or rea
"Lpulsfon fro. such a union
-**i|irom a trade at
riffles k,ult*jrfet
WderhsTbeeT working alFjU
bef. Bread Bnd butter comes hard
"Me" national union constitu-
tions there are clauses which per-
? voiced expel him for some
trifling action which can be label
edTcrime. This is ex post facto
^example, score, eegjr
tions list a serte M^crtoaee
tost the unions for which the
ffity an be a fine, suspension
ot expulsion from the local. .
rTnen there to P^m wUeh
ssvi a member can be P*"J
tor -all other' such breach of
tylargest In the Western-Hemis-
Ehere. Nearly 100,000 members,
sides scsds of fellow-travelers
and Reds without cards. It* propa-
ganda machine is compared to the end of an affair. So I heir
those eommy groups to IUly sndlthst is ... One of our topi polticos, The "Fanny troupe is backing
France. They control 5 daily gaz-:ls looking for nasty headlines, pretty thrush Judy Foster (of the
ettes fin Brazil), about 24 week- Openly consorts with underworld- show) for the next Miss America
lies and a book firm . They'ers to Greenwich Village .. .J)tto contest. She won_l beauty con-
practically elected the new Prez
and Veep . Luiz Carlos Prestes
1* the Gen. Sec'y of the Com my
Party and C-in-C of the only Red
guerrilla army on this side of the
Atlantic ... Marjoriwi Pfl* <-
wife of Ambassador to RTOiaf JW
Davles) sold her fabulous ship,
"Sea Cloud," recently to a man
named Geo. Gibbs. It sailed Oct.
7th to Santo Domingo with a Yank-
ee crew. In mid-voyage the Amer-
icans were changed to navy men
ot tne Dominican Republic. Later
the ship became a gift for one of
Trujillo's dghtrs.
but it siso become, the trial board
to public with important men. I Roxy soon ... Msrla Riva (Mar-
have to keep my name to the lenan's dghth) has played a Girl
Dear WW: You know the source pspers." Behind the Ivan Curtain 49 times
------- on teevee ..-. Think showbiz is
Neil Ates of "Fanny" gets a easy? Lovely Barbara Jef-
bokay of yellow roses (dally) ford stands still (for almost 40
from Texas cattleman Slim Hen- minutes on stage) to "Tiger" 11s-
derson. In France (and other Eu- tening to two men chatter away,
ropean places) yellow roses mean -------
Preminger closed a big deal. Thea- tests to Cal. and Fla. Also reject-
ter and film rights to the best- ed a Hollywood contract to get her
seller "Bonjour Tristesse" by 18- training on Bway ... Connie Rus-
year-oid authoress Francois Sagan.'geii, the lark, and Dr. Richard
PreJaBieK&id fJ0O,0O0 and a per- winter are inseparable ... Joe E.
^aJiE* nS 111 first be a Bway Lewis is disillusioned. One of his
oTBrHeYtrying get Ingrid and'eJc.wiv(is and an ingrate he sup-
WASHINGTON-Adl! Steven-
son's tossing of his hat Into the
ring for the Democratic nomina-
tion came alter some extreme-
ly careful thought and prep-
aration. He has talked to all sorts
of triends, already built up a
sm joth-workinf organization. His
approach is completely opposite
to his semtoponUneous draft of
1952.
Among those to whom be has
talked is ex-Gov. James Cox,
grand old man of the Democratic
party and the Democratic nomi-
nee for President in 1920. Cox waa
a young fellow to Washington
when Adiis grandfather was vice
president under Grover Cleveland.
"You could fire a cannon be-
tween his legs," aid Cox, "and
he'd, never ba* an eye."
"Am I a fool for wanting to be
President?' Adlal asked the elder
statesman.
"I didn't think I was a fool when
1 wanted to be President in 1920,
Cox replied. "But now I think I
ought to have had my sanity
tested:"
Cox ran against Warren Hard-
tog Immediately after World
War I, when the drift to Repub-
licans was so strong that proba-
bly no Democrat could have been
elected.
Stevenson told friends privately
as esrly as last spring that he In-
tended to run for President. He
made this decision when moat poli-
ticians were sure Eisenhower was
going to run again and when many
Democrat, thought no one could
beat him. Stevenson argued that
the decision to run should not be
based on whether he could win.
"Sometime* the most Important
fights are the ones you lose," he
said.
FARM EXPERT
In preparation for the race, he's
done s lot of studying, has con-
ducted a sort of seminar for him-
self with various experts.
At one of his brsto-trust meet-
ings on the question of farm prob-
lems Stevenson recalled thtt his
father had been a professional
farm manager, made his living
operating several thousand acres
in Central Illinois.
"I haven't learned farming out
of a book," he said. "I grew up
with it.
"When I first went to Washing-
ton. I went to work to the Agricul-
ture Department because I though
It was the moat challenging prob-
lem facing the nation.
Henry Wallac , who, Incidental-
ly, has now veered over to Eisen-
hower, was then secretary of ag-
riculture, and Stevenson got a job
under Jerome Frank, then chief
counsel of the AAA, now Circuit
Court Judge to New York, and
one of the leading Jews of the
United Sutes.
Peck for the movie.
Jack Benny's dghtr (estranged
from her husband) is getting bo-
ksys from sn under-prof at Har-
vard ... Aline Mosby (of United
Eoretd (for over 25 years) demand
ifty chunks to permit being men-
itioned in the film version of his
You're invited to the Macfadden book. The former wants $40,000
Memorisl meeting Sundsy at 2:30. . Joe keeps shaking his hesd
The dsy you have to fill the holes.,,, j told him: "Just write them
to your radio continuity. If no out of the script!" ... (What some
can do they will appreciate an friends won't do for a fast buck.)
item. The scene: Community
Church Auditorium at 35th and
deep freeze scandals of Truman'i
day, Adlal leaned toward the south-
ern wing of the party, kept the big
city bosses aloof. Even when Jim
Flnnegsn of Philadelphia was pro-
posed by Harry Truman as Demo-
cratic chairman in New Orleans
as late as last winter, Stevenson
opposed himand won. He put hlg
old man, Paul Butler of Indiana,
in the chairmanship Instead. ,
All that will be officially chang-
ed. Stevenson has announed the
appointment of Jim Finnegan at
his campagn manager, W1 If
son Wyatt, ex-payor of Louisville,
of the seml-stouthem wing
of the party and campaign
m a n a g e r in '52, wi 11 not
serve again. Hell be strong for
Stevenson and will help to many
other ways. Bu* both he and Adlal
recognize the Importance of hav-
ing a big city boss in their corner.
Too many of the big city Bosses
already are to Harriman's corner.
Barry Bingham, owner'of the
Louisville Courier-Journal, a south
ern liberal and one of the out-
standing editors of the nation, will
head the citizens for Stevenson
committee, with Harry Ashmore,
editor of the Little Rock Gazette
a* Adiis chief brain-truster
and speechwriter. Ashmore is a
Southerner who wrote a broad-
gauge book on the Negro problem
and achoo! segregation.
Stevenson forces have not Deen
saying much about it, but already
they have been out corraltog dele-
gates, have n.ade important in-
roads on the old Kefauver strength
to California once overwhelmingly
for the senator from Tenneuee.
Behind this advance work is the
quiet, indefatigable Jack Arvey.
who. though sometlmea on the sid-
lines in 1952. never ceased to be
Stevenson's devoted friend and at
time father-confessor.
One thing thst has worriedAvery
and all of Stevenson s friends is
Adlai's divorce and the fact that
his w!fc.has taken bitter cracks
"'Whs't you need." Arvey advised
Adlai at one family c.?.nietrnncerrn
the Steven-on home, "is to ansrrv
rich widow with three smaU
boya, each with freckles on his
DOSyou see what you've got to doT
A im danghwr-in-lw. a bride of only
Sree mwths. "You've got to^ pro-
duce three randsons for me. all-
wUh freckle, on their nose^.nd
do it to less than nine months.
SANTA
DePinnas' Store on 5th la the
first to decorate windows with hol-
ly wreaths ... Locsl deejays throw
Park ... Limelight editor Chet
Whitehorn and Warner starlet Hol-
ly Brook woomance st Gransons
.. John Hodlak's state was only l, poddy Sunday at Le Cupidon.
vard ... Aline Mosby (of United $25,000. Paltry for a star. >fW|Proceeds to Runyon Cancer Fund.
Press) will go to press with Roger lnve*tments dwindles his fortune. (Sech Dollmgs ... Barbara Brit-
HatoeS t --- . t <.;.< rannrt . inn th* t>veful (on the 64U
Keim
True Life Adventures
ITudge^TrT-to b. . ac-
^.-uupotouonwbich
S'.SSSW S&& SB
S^TfSSaSfflfS
union.
WbS combine doe.
control osme ^t. ^ r.dy
, ""SE new Committee Civu
* well as minorities.
Grange Resolution
Asks For Proposal
On Union Trust Law
CLEVELAND. O., Nov. M (UP)
The welfare committee of the
national grange today gavun-
animous apprornl to a proposal
that would ptoce **.?$l
onder the Sherman Anti-Trust
Act
The resolution, which must be
..adopted by floor vote at the
Orange's Wth annual convention
to become policy, said that
round after round" of wage in^
creases since IB* *"J*J,f
the blame for rising farm costs.
but lower lneome.
The dominant purpose of la-
bor contract to to eliminate
competition as to wages and
quality and Quantity of product*
of labor." the reaoluUon Mid.
"The major purpose of the Sher-
man AntJ-Tru*t Act was to pre-
vent airreetnenU and conspira-
cies which had for their object-
ive either the flxtat of price* or
iontrelttng the quantity and
quail of production."
show. They are dittoing off-stage.
Nature imitating art? ... Recov-
ered Carmine DeSapio holds a
press conference today ... Bob
Hope wilted me with his tv quip:
"In England 'I Love Lucy' ia call-
ed, 'Daphne, You're a Brick'."
Music hath charma to soothe
Garbo, judging from her reaction
at the Viennese Room, where Aris-
totle Onessis (the wealthy Greek
shipping msn) spend many hours
cooing Greek fishermen ditties into
her best ear. The pianist enjoyed
it, too. Onaasis tipped him $500
... Clendenin Ryan, the rich gran-
dad (and his wife), are having
another of their own ... Those
who hope Dr. Milton Elsenhower
will run for Prez apparently do
not know he made himself avail-
able for ten presidency of another
Pennsy college. Now proxy at
Penn State.
were trained here . Celeste st Eddie Norris, ex-husband
Holm (oft-itemed as marrying su-^ Ann Sheridan, has a new ro-
thor Leo Rsoetn) is getting scads mince. Evelyn Pryor, an Arthur
of posies from Phillip Reed. Murray dance-tutor ... Howard
'Hughes' TWA people called. What's
with the teevee time he told you
Betty Compson. one-time movie-
glamour-gal. Is now to the ash-
tray business with her husband in
Cal Buff Cobb's dating pianist
Hamish Menzies, former room of
Unore Lemmon Kirk Douglas
ex-wife Dins and Wm. Drris bsve
St tt lade -Helen. Graham
(of the Journal-American s sports-
man) got the ring from Wm.Gur-
nee Jr... Jennifer Jones in Good
Morning, Miss Dove" comes to the
Horse experts say the three top
choices to the Kentucky Derby
Winter book will be Hails. Prince
John and Career Boy .. That tt
bettors should remember: Nails
two big stake wins have been on
loppy tracksbut he runs aa well
on a fast track ... An Industrialist
forgot himself and Jumped on stage
at a night club and started danc-
ing with a comedienne while she
wss doing her act ... Next day
(sober) he sent a note apologizing.
Enclosed was $500 in cash ...
Guess which mueh-colyum'd play-
girl-about-town broke a date with
a not toe well known comic, say-
tog: "Sorry, I've got to be seen
to shop for? (Nothing available at
) ^____
Mutsul called. Seld radio listen-
ing at 9 p.m. Sabbaths has taken
a big dive31 percent ... You are
still 3rd in Greater New York ...
First cross the board (and na-
tion) is the Sunday 6 P-m-slot. .
It's a son for the Robert M.
Browns of Woodstown, N.J.
(Grandma wondered do you use
sucb items bout the unfamoua?)
. Harold Macomber and Mary
Cuici (both with Life) wed in
May ... Mack Gordons dghtr Ra-
quel and the groom end It this
week ... Wealthy" parents with
children might appreciate know-
ing that tobacco heir (and insur-
ance man) Leon Schlanasl has ft
new twist on trust funds f*
quor firms -re now column-con-
scious. Paying ianUatte fee. to
pre-genta to crck them, (nut
not here, huh?) ... Sudden Thawt:
Ever see a tray cat on elegant
5th Avenue? ... I heard a rea
honest announcer say: And 11, ai
ter purchasing our product. >ou
are not completely satisfied, re-
turn the unused portion, and we
ill return the unused portton of
your money" ... IOMoeny: Why
do programs designed to w.ke you
up in the morning do so much
dsmb yspplng? Puts me back to
deep!-!
"Jerry Frank' had a house in
Georgetown," recalled Stevenson,
"and we used to go out there and
burn the midnight oil trying to
solve the problem of surplus corn,
surplus wheat, and especially at
that time, too meny pfgs.
"One night it was scorching. Jer-
ry Frank w: tripped to the wrist,
working under a hot electric light
bulb, the moths and June bugs
zooming round it. Suddenly Jerry
put his head down on the table
and I thought for a minute he had
fainted from exhaustion.
"Then he Came to. 'I've got It,"
he said. 'All we've got to do to
lick the -)ig problem is persuade
the Jews to eat pork.'"
Most Washlngtonians have for-
gotten the days when Adlai Ste-
venson was a young lawyer in
Washington, Just as they have for-
gotten the days when Milton Ei-
senhower, brother of the Presi-
dent, worked with him in. the
ssme Aericulture Department un-
der Wallace.
BIG CRT BOSSES
Stevensons preparation* for the
'SB campaign are more prac-
tical than In 1852. In that cam-
paign he proceeded to snub the big
city bosses who nominated him.
Even Jack Arvey, leader of Chi-
cago, who had largely made Adlai
Governor of Illinois, found his old
political enemy, Steve Mitchell,
running Adlai's campaign
Democratic national chairman.
Fearful of the mink coat and
DIAMONDS
is
COMING
to
HOG
Tune in!
Keep
listening!
SIDE GLANCES
By Colbraith
T. M It I rv M
fe... 1H4 * -.
Ho' the boto' tool He eamt up through the rank
worked two week* m the) shipping: room!"


/"
TtmSPAY, NOVEMBER 4*. 1955

PANAMA AMERICAN -1 AN fNDEPENOENT OAIL NEWSPAPER
PAGE THREB
reme Court Agrees To Decide
On Non-Sensitive Security Firings
WASHINGTON, Nov. 22 (UP)-
The Supreme Court yesterday a-
reed to decide whether the fed-
eral government may fire an em-
ploye at a security risk even
thought he has nothing to do with
defense secrets.
The case was brought by Ken-
riek' M. Cole, former New York
food and drug inspector, who was
c-sted as a security risk from
Ithe Department of Health, Educa-
Uui and Welfare in 1953.
The court's d e c 1 s i o n.t o be
rtianded down after arguments are
heard later this- term, may have
a far-reaching impact on the fed-
rertl employe security proeram.
All government workers were
blanketed Into the security pro-
gram by an executive order is-
sued by President Eisenhower in
1953.
EVV SMELLThe smell of oil now mingles with the odors from
e barnyard on the farm of Frank Hoge, In Denver Township,
ich: The wall is worth $74.50 a day to the struggling farmer,
ISis share of the $596 a day the well's 200 barrels a day produce.
(Klondike Petroleum Company, of Muskegon, plans to drill two
/more wells on Hoge's land and another 40 or 50 in the area.
Nportad one of the richest oil fields found in Michigan in years


Economic Council Will Aid
Defense Of Baghdad Pact
The provision of the original
1950 law covered only certain spe-
roecificd government agencies,
such as the department of state,
treasury, justice, commerce and
defense and the Atomic Energy
Commission.
The Cole case is the first to
rcch the Supreme Court posing
the issue of dismissals from
"non-sensitive" government jobs.
Other eases have focused on the
employe's right to confront wit-
nesses who gave derogatory infor-
mation about him.
Cole was accused of associating
with Communists and belonging
to the Nature Friends of Ameri-
ca, an organisation on the attor-
ney general's subversive list.
The Court of Appeals last July
dismissed Cole's suit to regain
his job on grounds President Ei-
senhower was within his authori-
ty when he issued his 1953 blan-
keting in order.
The law gave the President the
power to extend the security pro-
gram to "any department or a-
gency when in his opinion the na~
tional security requires it."'
Cole argued the government can
now virtually cashier any civil
service worker for unstated rea-
sons having nothing to do with
national security.
A security risk under present
definitions may be a drunkard, a
loose talker, a sexual pervert a
any other person who might re-
veal secret information through
carelessness or under pressure of
blackmail.
The court also ruled 5-4 when
a lighthouse beacon goes out, the
government is liable for resulting
accidents.
The decision was won by the
Indian Towing Co., owner of the
tug Navajo, which went aground
in 1951 on Chandeleur Island,
near the mouth of the Mississip-
pi, due to the failure of the light-
house on the island.
SANTA
BAGHDAD, Nov. 22 (UP)-The
Council of-Ministers of the B a g d-
dad Pact today decided to aet up
an economic committee to supple-
ment the pact's defense alliance.
The two-day meeting of the
"northern tier'* defense alliance
ends today.
At today's morning session, the
ministers of the five pact nations
Iraq, Iran, Pakistan, Britain
and Turkeydecided to form the
economic committee. The date for
its tsUbiishmerit, however, has
not. been decided.
A'.Tnintary- committee was set
up yesterday and went immidi-
ately to work. The committee is
composed of Iran's Chief of Staff
Mai.-Gen. Rafia Arif, Britain's
Field Marshal Sir Gerald- Ten-
pier; Turkey's Chief of Staff Gen-
eral ftmail Hakki Tunaboylu; Pa-
kistan's Array General Mo-
hammed Ayub Khan and Iran's
Chief of Staff Gen. Abdullah Hi-
dayat.
The United States was urged to-
day to become a full member of
the five-nation Baghdad Pact a
gainst Communist aggression.
Delegates of Greet Britian, Tur-
key, Iran, Pakistan and Iraq
joined iff expressing the hope the
United States would strengthen
their alliance by king actual
part in it instead of maintaining
its present role of friendly observ-
er. _
British Foreign Secretary Ha-
rold MacMillan said the deal by
which Communist Czechoslovakia
is sending weapons to Egypt was
not, as had been suggested, a re-
ply to the signing of the B a g h-
dad Pact.
"The truth is that this deal had
been prepared for a long time
and the Baghdad Pact came a-
long just in time," Macmillan
said.



IS
k


COMING
to

HOG
June n!
Keep
listening!
t> iiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinimilmilii
MB 1*14 191 |4 1* IM4 l3 1*44 1*4* 14
VVE REALLY PRODUCE NOWADAYS-When farmer and
non-farm worker work for an hour today, they produce about three
times as much as their counterparts did 45 years ago. The graph
above, from National Industrial Conference Board data, shows
steady growth of our gross national product in terms.of dollar out-
put per man-hour. For example, in 1909. an hour's work by a non-
farm worker resulted in a product worth about 98 cents. In 1954,
the same hour's work produced about $2.38 worth of goods or
services. From 1909 to 1954. factory end other non-farm workers
increased their hourly output almost 150 per cent. During the same
period farm output rose more than 140 per cent. Inset chart
shows that in recent years, farm productivity has outpaced non-
farm output per hour. Since 1939 the former has advanced at an
annual rate 3.6 per cent, while non-farm output per man-hour
has risen only 2.5. per cent a year. In contrast, farm output rose at
the rate ol only 12 per cent from 1909 to 1939, while factory out-
put per man advanced at the rale of 1.9 per cent a year

^Choose a RALEIGH the world's.
Champion Cycle
j ytm wtof ** Im 4, Haldeta fats
dicmaU. Tte Rale ah you bur ii built briba
uac cra/iMnen wbo dengnea World Own-
pioa Rag Harrii'i aucfajna.
LMfc f tht Mti that man quality
A ftaata 4 Jtalrfra l**umm Umi-i. Nmii^ktm, Bflmtd
RADIO
7110 B6lfvar Tal. 04, C*Mir
itehiiHIBf.4ftlf \ r4-laa-SaaraM|Ma
4

WHEELBARROW GOES MODERN- Among the products dis-
iMayed at a recent exhibition in Paris was this mechanized wheel-
varrow. Powered by a two-horse-power motor, its manufacturers
ay.H can oasily cprry loads of over 1200 pounds. The exhibition
features handling and packaging devices.
(>t More For Old
Furnishings With
a Want Ad
Yoa'd wiptan< bow Many folki
fa laeklaa for whatever- ye* bin to
ti. Ya* mb feh 'tin akkK
ad cheaply wirb Panamo Africa
Wm* Ad.
ha Waae
AANAM A
\MERiCAN
JS 'Forces' Pushed
oack At Sagebrush;
Army In River Stand
FOKi POLK, La., Nov. 22
(UP) Retreating U. S. iorces
today faced the aggressors across
the Red River anu prepared to
make a desperate last-ditch stand.
A heavy air and ground auack
drove major elements of the U.S.
9th Army across the river in fin-i
.ial stages oi the first combat
phase of Exercise Sagebrush yes
teraay.
Meanwhile, the 1st Armored
Division oi the U. S. forces'
screened the crossing of the 3rd
Imatry Divisionss me hit and
run infantry-men deployed on both
sides of the river into prepared
defenseiv positions.
Some 140 sorties were flown by
the ggressor Air Force which al-j
ready nad knocked out several
U. S. air bases with lightning-
like atomic strikes. Most of the
.iluhts were close air support o-
perations.
t~u.biaua State police were
called Into unsnarl tralifc wiicn
weekend sightseers jammed the
maneuver area.-
Eight F-100's swept over Vicks- j
burg and Greenville, Miss., Baton
Rouge and Lake Charles, L ,
and four B-VT'i attacked U. S.
air fields with atomic bombs.
Aggressor air forces moved to
resupply paratroop unit that al-
ready were strongly entrenched,
[.while aggressor ground forces
strived to check the withdrawal of
U. S. troops. The aggressor units
were the 4th Armored D i v i-
sion from Fort Hood, Tex., and
the element* of the 82nd A i r
Borne Division.
Aggressor forces attempted to
cut off the "U. S. supply line
which stretched from Manv, La.,
east to Montrose, Aloha and south
of elma.
TAKING OVERNew president of the National Future Farmers,
of America is Don Dunham, left The 19-year-old from Lakeview.
Ore., is shown receiving the gavel and a handshake from retiring
President William D. Gunther, Jr., of Live OaK, Fla. Dunham was
elected at the group's 28th convention in Kansas City, Mo.

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T


FACE rOUB
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER , INS
TERRY AND THE PIBA1
Py GEORGE WT7NPI
THE MARQUEE
BY DICK KLEINER
HSttlE
The Record Shop: Recording
artists aren't too often logical. But
Hfeaaioa Bolin, the talented gal
who appears in "Damn Yankees,"
and her musical director husband,
Milton Kaye, applied logic to rec-
ords and came out with a winner.
Miss Bolin was signed to record!
an album for Vanguard. She and
Kaye realized her name wasn't big
enough to sell many records, so
they decided to feature the songs.
The dug through thousands of
'long-lost" tunes by top composers!
like Gershwin, Kent, Rodgers,'
Biblical Bit
Answer to rr*viou$ PUim
frT
ACROSS
1------the
Baptist
5 Hi wife
59 Indian
weights
DOWN
Uoke
turned to salt Mountain
I Wife of Boa* (comb. i0rm)
12 Great Lake 3 Allude
1J Compass point 4 Gained
uuurjLiJBarjuuMiiu
[MiaiziHBOB
obi 1.-. uauizi. ?ui 'Ulj
arjt-ja^juuu'-c1"' >
Mils! MasM Eddie Fisher
lite uersawin, avern, Koogrri, ... ~"""
and came up with 12 which they Now that they re a little older,
eaH "Rare Wine." Some have!fes back and doing fineher
never been recorded before. All i "# release for MGM, "Bring Me
are lovely !a Bluebird,' is doing very well.
_____ Sos Mitti.
Eddie Fisher's last few records 1 ----- ,. ,
havent sold so weU, which is sort: g to mambo king Joe
of like ssying General Motors Is ^oco, Saata Clans will mambo 1
fat trouble. Even when Fisher ant "Jf" ,D* chimney and Prancer
selling well, he's still doing better;*' prance the cha-cha-cha. He'aj
than n per cent of the singers. u recorded two Columbia all
Bat farts are facts, and the fact bunie-^ae Includes niambo ver-
Is hi* last three rwonls aren't un ataja mehuun M JIngle
to par and ne has*/ had a million.jBells and "While Christmas,'
srllrr since "I Need You Now." * h" melodies like "I Saw
V.hy? What's happened? Mommy Baring Santa (lause
Eddie Fisher do.snl know. Hc!M*rengue; and -The Winter Won-
Just figures he hasn't had the right derland Chs-Cha-Cha. Santa, ule!
combinationthe right song at the _,.. ...v... -.,, . ti, !. *
right moment-and he'll go along M" *** Two of the top
just doing the best he can. He isn't male groups have good new
worried, although he wishes he ^-Mostly Martha" by The
knew the answer. Crew-Cuts (Mercury, and "The
14 Assam
silkworm
15 Dispatched
It Consumed
17 Fragment
18 Waver
20 Skirmish
21 Sea eagle
J2The-----
Command-
ments
23 Requires
26 Capernaum
' apostle
30-----
Testament
31 Vehicle
32 Age
33PeerGynt's
mother
34 Mineral rock
35 Slight bow
36 Drovers
39 Antiquated
41 Individual
42 Operated
43 African
antelope
4CAII
30 Biblical name
51 Tree fluid
93 False god
54 Chair
66 Fish
56 Bivalve
mollusk
57 Essential
being
68 Unit of
reluctance
5 Acquire
knowledge
6 Hops' kiln
7 Golf mound
8 Be contrite
24 Otherwise 40 Capers
25 German river 42 Drive off
26 Red planet 43 Gaelic
27 Fowls 44 Dregs
Russian range28God of love 45Arabian
10 Weary 28 Walk in water garments
11 Detest 31 Apple center 47 Unoccupied]
19 Bitter vetch 37 Give 48 Bellow
20 Encountered 3 Conclusion 49 Shade ti
22 Biblical weed 39 Cooking
23 Ark builder utensil
51 Courtesy tltla
52 Fruit drink
I
r
w

5Z
n
B HBW?
NOWWHCREWASI?..
OM.YES.'XJuRUNLAPy-
LIKE BEHAVIOR HAS
A4APE ME SEEM...
SEEM...
...SCCMS TO ME, A LOVELY VOUWS-
LAPY LIKE YOU SHOULPNT SE UN-
ESCORTEP. MAY I HAVE THE HONOR?
FLI CHeCKtt! I* THIS
TO K VOUK LIFE
SO RSHING FOR SA1L-
B*H ANP COME NOME
WITH A FLOUN17ER
PRECKI.CS AND m PR!
Sad Ending
r MatKRIIX BLOI
lAwfltfERTO
YESn*o*t'5
Ptule;
Aki.'
I DneAMED I
PROPOSED lb
-you, ANO "R>U
SAIP, '60 AHO
Se* PAPPY'/
"ftes, ANO
WHAT DIP
HE
V/ELL.TMAT
PART'S A
LITTt HA
ALL 1 KNOW THAT
l woke UP ANP FOUMP
MY5B1.F ON THE
ALLET OOP
Here We Go!
7 f. T. UAMUN
wonder about it, but there s"" "" _-.:.-" --gj-rn-
point in losing sleep over it- Wing); 'Hands Off (Nan Wynn,
it doesn't help." A and *? M_dd?. Dot?.
no
that doesn't help. .;:.::'_J
Be thinks maybe his next record Teenagers, Wail
will break the apell. That's a
bouncy little Item called "Dun-
garee Doll,'' something a little
different. If it turns out u be the
right moment for bouncy little
items, bet In. If it isn't, hell try
again.
Grouche Marx ("You Bet Your
Life,'' NBC-TV): You're a mor-
tician? WeU, at least you don't
have to worry about those do-it-
yourtelf fellowe. -
(Joe Loco, Co
lumbial"; "A Dangerous Age"'
(Dakota Staton Capitol) "Au-
tumn Rhapsody' (Hugo Winter-
halter, RCA).
Interesting vocal albumsEpic
wants you to "Meet Robert Clary"
and that's fun; Columbia ahs re-
Issued some of Frank Sinatra's
standards on "The Voice;" Angel
has a lovely collection featuring
Les Compagnons de la Chanson;
Sammy Davis. Jr., aings "Just for
Lovers" on Decca; Robert Q.
Lewis and his TV-radio gang have
Meanwhile, he has solace in *"rUn"n,t lUr25
sales figures. Hia last three rcc-jthin Smith and the Redheads
ords averaged around 350,000;perform nicely on Epic
each, which would be tremendous! Jwojto operaticlug^trec
for moat artists. He's sold ordson1 Angel Mattlwllda DoMs
2u!ooo!oOfl records in six years, and Rolando Panera! sing anas
which Is pretty good for a young-
ter So nobody's thinking of can-
celing his contract.
. "And remember,'' he says, "Its _-----
not jut meall record sales are Leonard warren,
off. The only tiling that's uoing-
F.ddie says' aw 'factor wjKug
rut him may be his lack of
to go around and plug his
rcords as personally as be
**I used to visit dozens of disc
jjekies." he says. "Now I do radio
and TV and everythingand. on,
I'forgot the most importantI'm
married. I don't have timo to 0
around so much. I do all I tanI
tap^-record Interviews sod station
biesks for the disc jockies.'
-How to make marriage and
and dueu from "Rigoletto' and
on RCA arevgreat moments from
"La Forza De) Destino," featuring
Zinka Milanov, Jan Peerce and
usic mix Mitsl Mason, MGM s
elodioua miss, started as a radio
ausger. Then she quit the business
1 msrry and have three children
air**"
NEVER MINP,
THEREUBE
NO TIME
FOR TWCT-
CMON NOW,
LET&QD!
BOOTS AND HER BUDDHbf
Sad Story
I EDGAR MARTIN
\VS*t\VMCni
SMsowrov)
OWTOMOOV
moos
"Oh, h can support ma all rio;ht! Ht hat a paptr routt
DJuajbody. flsaddi. tflaAAifhdjL
HE STORT Or MARTHA WAT NE
Pat Takes a Walk
By WILSON SCRUGGS
:
Cano that twt mi rr V wia.F^l Meawwhut
iTr*C.'EVlN THOUUH VKJ NOTHUS
SWEAES PUSH r>rnia/BJtFLAH
WAS DeMNG.SHES v\WAS REVEALED
SETTING BLAMED )\ MCTftuE
FOR EVEWmKW.'
COLORS.'
we' 1 i
..
CAPTAD)) RARV
Impatient
LESLIE TURNE
PRISCILLA'S POP
Troubles of Her Own
By AL TtRMEEB
si^r^r
II-
AT ANY
MOMENT THE 1/DON'T
WOOLD COULD] I KNOW
EXPLODE->-f W
MM YOUR
FACE!
US
Z)
41a ^
'I MAD
rNO IDEA "rOU
r DID SO MUCH ,
[THINKING ABOUT)AwHO?
sTHE ATOMIC r'VMET.
(SITUATION
"
C- 1Ht . < IM
BUGS BUNNE
Just a Few of Ua
Like Thatf
VIC PUNT
Street Brawl
By JAE HCAVIUB
DUN HO.tHIIIRO MM.-4V
MAJUM mutrt.t
')U Oil WAf
J. R. WUXtaMR
MARTHA.MY DEAR,TvAl5
\\, MR M0RRI55&>: AN
EXECUTIVE AT TH& '
JWMP 6D1LDIN16 VMcRE-
1'M EMPLOyeD.'
I'VE. TOLD MIW MUCH ABOUT YOU
HE' %B^ EA66I2
TO- MEET
YOU/
i&
HOV< DOJ
YOU DO,
MR.
M0RRi55Ey.^
r THi$ 15 AM
ElCSCTl^E?
FIRST O6
X EVER MET
\NEARlM6
A CAP/
(5LAD TO MEET
VO.MK5. 4
HO0PLE/ I'LL
tier Vou THiNk
k1'M AN ODD
EX6CUTIME
VJEARtM<5
A CI\Pf
7
"><">
7h\nk:
THAT
OVEK,
MARTHA'


TUMQAY, NOVEMBER 1S5I
PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE FIVE
Social and \Jth
erwiae
Box 5037, ^J,
neon
or
$ Staff.
Box 134, Pc
anana
tip jew*. W-t+ &** ?** -J 3~u L **u f~+l*u v*""" **""
J. tlL ~*Jlf J+t~ ~* P~~ ***'- w;^{tt too J to *-J*
7/ie/Ptafae fkmt
BY MRS .MURIEL LAWRENCE; trouble 1{ people with queer ideas
of "progress" hadr.'t confused us.
miss dokis V. RIDER ELECTED 8ECBBTAKY
ofwStiiki glass Abides college
Mis. Deris V. Ehrman of Gameea. Canal Zane,was elect-
e & fiu ! Trenton. New Jeraey. lasl;*jby th. ore
SUaU of the el*-. As.lste.nt Dean Btaera.an V. N.
^TK^r^Mr. .M Mrs. RUnr, Enrasan. grad.aU
-f n.ihir Hirh School, is enrolled In the college's Journalism
in ttTuniUd SUts. for the first time. In ", the
beinr nd te ela. office, she earlier ws. Mktftcd *lr*P'-
55St"TS.I7 HoSper nil .V, .nd hold. .eab.rablF
in tht colleges Newmnn Clab hapter. ,____
First Ln4y'.Mohr
Return. From Enroee
Mrs. Ana Teres* Vallarino de
Art**, mother of Panama s first
lady Mr*. turned from Europe. Durtne: her
visit to the continent she niann
an extensive tour and saw many
points of interest.
Former Floride Edward.
Rere On Brief Visit
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Clement
from Summitt, New Jersey, ar-
rived here today to spend a lew
days at the Hotel Bl Panama.
Mrs. Clement, the former Hprtde
Edwards, spent her girlhood
days in the Canal Zone.
The visiting couple win be en-
tertained for Thanksgiving din-
ner at the home of Mrs. bmnia
Siarlow In Balboa. On s'rlday
hey plan to make a trip to Ta-
boc* Saturday, they will saU in,
the SS Panama to their home
in Summitt, New Jersey.
Art Leaf u. To Held
uftet Supper
The Canal Zone Art League
Will ive buffet supper at tne
Tivolt ballroom, Sunday night,
th. last night of the isthmian
Art show.-wmch they are spon-
soring together with the Canal
Zone Branch of the National
League of American Pen Wom-
en.
Members should phone in res-
ervations t Balboa 2-1300 before Friday.
Members of the Canal Zone
Branch.of the National League
of American Pen women have
received Invitations to attend,
and many uf them plan to be
present,
Mrs. Vera Belek
Attending Conference
Th* Department President of
th. American. Legion Auxiliary,
Mrs. Vera Bolek Is in th. states
attending, the Dgaartment Pres-
ldents*Sfcrtt*n3r* Coni.renee
at Indianapolis, Indiana It wag
announced by the Department
Secretary taaay.
This annual conference Is hela
at the National Headquarters
where the plans for the year arc
further discussed and all De-
partments' Presidents and Sec-
retaries gathered there, hear the
National chairmen's reports and
plan! for th. many activities A
meeting will be held sometime
in December of the Executive
committee o fthe Department of
the American Legion Auxiliary
at which time the National Ex-
ecutive Committeewomari's re-
port will he given by the Alter-
nate Mrs. Honis Griffon and the
Department P r e s Idem, Mr.
Stanley BOiek will tell of the De-
partment Presidents' Confer-
ence. .,,4,
Caribbean Girls Stale
Applications for Junior Coun-
sellors and Staff members are
being accepted for the planned
1956 session of Caribbean Girls
State. It will be appreciated if
former citizens of any Caribbean
Girls State sessions will address
their applications to: Mrs. Lou-
ise Griffon, Department Secre-
tary, American Legion Auxiliary,
Box No. 2404, Cristobal, or Mrs.
M. Eleanor Becker, Department
Girl State Chairman. Box No.
18S2, Balboa, Canal Zone. Pitas
are underway, and it is hoped
to have an announcement in the
The motif was carried to; neac future of those selected for
green and yellow. The center- the 1956 staff. The assistance
piece wa. a cak* in the shape
of a bootie and was surrounded
by candy filled, crepe paper
booties which were given to the
guests as favors.
Mrs. Guillermo Das presided
at the tea table and Mrs. Doug-
las Smith served the punch,
Those present were: Mrs. Ken-
neth Brassel. Mrs. Louis Palmer,
Mrs. Howard Clarke. Mr. Doug-
las Smith, Mrs. Vincetn -Cana-
mas. Mrs. Pedro Martin, Mrs.
Thomas Drohan, Mrs. Richard
Patton, Mrs. Eugene Buonvirl,
Mrs. Martin Nickel, Mrs. Guiller-
mo Diaz, Mrs. Peter Ender, Mrs.
Carl Ender, Mrs. Josephine Hil-
ty. Mrs. Charles Swisher, Mrs.
Alvin Lim, Mrs. James Snell,
Mrs. Perry Washabaugh, Mrs.
Arthur Logan, and Mrs. Harry
Seaman.
Date Changed
Por Dance Class
Due to the Thanksgiving Hol-
iday, the Carnival Dance class
usually held on Thursday eve-
nings at the USO-JWB Armed
Forces Service Center will take
Dlace tomorrow at 7:30 p.m.
Thereafter, the classes Wajl,. be
resumed on Thursdays. '
instruction is riven by Mr.
Aniceto Moscoso of the National
School of Dance in Panama
A cordial invitation is extend-
ed to all to attend.
and cooperation shown by the
girls that have attended former
sessions has been greatly appre-
ciated bv the American Legion
Auxiliary.
MRS. SALLY A.'S problem:
"My husband and I both work.
Five months ago when I became
pregnant, his mother who lives
near us offered to give dally care
to th. baby after it came so I
could return to my job. Until re-
cently, I accepted this plan with-
out thinking about it. Now I real-
ise that It give, me no chance to
nurre my baby at all. fve begun
to wonder if we shouldn't try- to
get by on what my husband makes
so that I can breast feed my
baby...- !
What a brave thought to have
had How urgent must be Mrs.
As wish to mother her baby her-
self to push up like this out of the
weight of other people's wishes.
I hope she "respects it. Even
when we can't nurse our babies,
it's fine to know we want to. We'd
all know it without the slightest
MEETINGS
Mfc Mile* far liiclusl.n In thta
laaaa iiMHid sabeartta. hi iJM_
Jrtilee. tan. . msIIC teen. (
Ska tes mumhm llMW .alb In "Sa-
? IS uMlct. Nettaa M
flea* caaaal ka aereplU tala-
2L
American Society
To Honor Ambassador
Members of the American So?
clety1 of Panama will hold a buf-
fet dinner dance in honor of the
U.S. Ambassador and Mrs. Julian
Harrington, at the Panama Golf
Club, Friday. '
-.' All member.of the society and
their wives are asked to be pres-
ent. There will be no official in*
vitatlon list, but members art at
UtejrgE toarla*, guests if they so
The purpose of th party U'to
enable the membership to meet
the new Ambassador and Mrs.
Harrington, and for them .to
meet, the members. Some 300 are
expected to attend. .
Mr* John Drey
Hen.red At Shower
Mrs. John W.'utey was the
guest of honor at a tea and sil-
ver dollar shower, given by Mr.
Ralph J. Dugas. at the Elks Club
in Brazos Heights, on Saturday
afternoon. ,
Satholic Society , "/
. Held Cake Sale
The St. Anthony Independent
Catheolic United Society No. 1,
will sponsor a cake sale on Fri-
day night' at their' meeting
place, the Corinthian Temple
from 6 p.m.
All members are urged to at-
tend and invite their friend as
it will be a public meeting. There
will be ho admission fee.
Balboa Woman's Cl.b T
Card Group *
Mr*. W. C Merchant and Mrs.
J. T. Barrett will be hostesses on
Friday for dessert and cards at
the home of Mrs. Merchant 05M
Bayano St. Members of the Bal-
boa Woman's club Card Group
are asked to call 2-2317 or 2-CS17
for reservations. Guests are" In-
vited. ,
ROTARY MEETS TOMORROW
The Cristobal Colon Rotary
Club meeting: has been put for
ward one day and will be held at
the Stranger's Club tomorrow at
12:30 p.m. Instead of Thursday.
l. A.*?Slvlng Day talk will
be given by the Rev. Paul Oland-
er of the Margarita Union
Church.
Pert Anudar Wive..
Meet At Army Navy Cl.b
The Fort Amador Officers'
Wives' Club will hold its regul-
sr monthly business meeting and
coffee on Wednesday at 9:30 a.
m. at the Army-Navy Club. Fort
Amador. Reservations are not
necessary and newcomer* a r.
invited to atend his Informal get-
together.
Hostesses for the coffee will be
Mrs. Walter Williams and Mrs.
John Olow.
Executive Committee
Of American Legit* AnxiHary
The regular monthly Executive
Committee Meeting of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary, UnlfcWo. 1
will be held tonight at'7:3a at the
American Legion Club, rt. Ama-
dor.
Ail committee members are
ple.se asked to attend., .j ''
.
Dr. Eric Osterberg
Will Address Tewtr Clab
Dr. Erie R. Osterberg.. Chief,
Dvision of Preventive Medicine
and Quarantine of Gorja* Hospi-
tal, will address the Tower Club
on the subject of the Salk Polio
Vaccine on Monday, at 6:30 p.m.,
in Blsho Morris Hall,
-------# *
St. Lake's Cathedral W
Altar GaSd
A meeting of St. Luke* Ca-
theral Altar OniM will tale place
tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Guild
Room of St. Lukes.
i PROFIT BY THREE RULES
FORMULATED IN 111 YEARS
Want to know the recipe for hap-
piness subscribed to by a woman
who asked for just one candle on
her 101st birthday cake because
she wanted that one candle to
represent "a new start"?
Her recipe is: "Take things easy.
Don't rusk. And see some good in
everyone."
That's about as good advice as
ae women will ever get in this
age when because so much is ex-
pected of u; we come to expect
too much of ourslves.
"Take thing easy."*
No use getting upset over trifles,
or fretting over spilt milk, or
I striving for perfection in every-
i thing we do when perfection can
so rarely be attained.
"Don't rush."
Hurrying, hurrying, hurrying,
day after day, so fast we can't
enjoy the little Jleasures along the
way is one of the biggest mistakes
medern women make. We cant
say "no'' aad so w. are always
taking on more than we can* do
aad then rushing around franti-
cally trying to get it all done
despite the odds against it.
A HAPPY UFE D? NOT A LONG
ONE

"See some good in everyone."'
How often women reverse that
motto and instead look for the
little flaw in everyone they meet.
T can't understand Mary." Th.
trouble with Jane is." "If Su. only
wouldnt ... And to it goes,
picking at the flaws instead of
looking hard and
thing, to like nd-
person it should be
know and to- try
Borrowing those three .
rules and making them a part of
our own philosophy of living may
not make us live to see a second
lone candle on a birthday eake.
But they are sure' to make the
years we do have happier and
more fruitful ones.
BALBOA SERVICE
CENTER
BEAUTY SHOP.
SPECIAL
COLD WAVE
$7.50
Mandar Thru Tkaraiay
For appointment .
Balboa 2-if5 f
Fee U.S. nersenael 1
and their families only.

$3.50
Weekly
RADIO CENTER
7lie Bolivar Avenns
COLON
INDEED, there may be some
connection found one day between
our popular revulsion from breast-
feeding and the trouble we have
in putting physical control on
young children.
It appears like a most reasona-
ble connection to me. For breast-
feeding fosters in us a wonderful,
rleeply centered sureness of our
value to our baby. It is a discipline
forcing us to slacken both mental
and physical activity, requiring us
to "let go" emotional tensions just
as tension Is released from the
breast
So our nursing time makes a
space for a knitting together of
our baby and us, building an easy,
relaxed intimacy between our
body and his that I am sure is an
important step in our later control
of his body.
Certainly, our grandmothers
who breast-fed their babies as a
matter of course, had much less
trouble with discipline than we
have.
THEY needed no child training
books to tell them how to treat
their children's tantrums. Out of
their old nursing intimacy with a
small son, they could give his
[tantrum "kind firmness" sponta-
I neoulsly, unhampered by our slck-
I ty modern fear of his rejecting it.
Having shared breast-feeding's
physical give-and-take with him,
later bodily contact with their chil-
dren came easyand our grand-
mothers could minister as confi-
dently to the rage in their little
child's three-year-old bodyas they
had once ministered to hunger in
his three-month-old one.
By bringing her wish to nurse,
her unborn baby into clear aware-
ness, Mrs. A. is already beginning
to mother him.
In a world Where so many things
from the bread wc eat to the
music we hear ar abstracted
from their origins by complex
machine processes, it's lovely!
when a mother and baby can be
together without glass and rubber j
nipples between them.
"WOW WATTA WASH"That's Tony Granada's comment as
he tiecorarcs a clothesline with $120. He found the money In th.
pockets of pants left by a patron of his automatic' laundry in
Cleveland, Ohio. Grnn.d. says in seven years of business hes
returned over $10ll0, some in wallets, to absent-minded customers.
These 1Q an>i 20-dollar bills hadn't even been missed by their
owner, Tony i'arage, until Granada notified him. Farage is a
sew.r digger. ,
YEAR'S "BEST'-Mr* Ear a".
Taft Bensbn, wife of the S.'
reiary of Agriculture anil moth-
er of ix children, is 19S0 s
' Romemaker of the Veer A
ceptlng- the .ward in Washing-
ion, DC'.,, from National orn
Fashions League. Inc. she said
mothers and bomema^crs hm
n "important obligation and..-
sacred trust;"
ii ii. i. i ' 'ti.
MAMIE'S RECIPE SCORESThis pumpkin chiffon pie, made
tro a Kcipa sent in by Mrs. Dwight P. Eisenhower, the First
Lady really hit the spot with 11-year-old Gary Smith of Clay
City Ind. Displaying the pie is Mrs. Buth Fisher Holbrook, food
consultant at Chicago's 195S International Dairy 8how.
PHILCO
For the Grand Philco Raffle on Dec. 25 _
lit PRIZE- :2W; PRIZE Ud
)* PHILCO ^w
JHILCO Ajr^^moninav ?
Refrigerator
Ittditiomttf
R/4 H.P. -
''" Unit --M H.P.
- Model 84-K
-A-Matic
PHILCO
Model 1I5T 11 e. ft. Med*J M-K WasMr Mode 153t
Ask for your fr#a ticket for tv.ry ca*h purchasa of $1,00,
or for very 11.00 yoU pay as do\vn payment.*
.
NOW yw can just ssy: "CHARiiE IT"
>1 ii' !l
1 '
' '
21-02. 7th Central Avt.
Tels. 2-1830 2-1833
oLots of Uxiiigs
at
Ca/a fa/tHch
CAiHOY-CAT.'-WeU. who wouldn't be, srith king eofaca.
hood taring, in front of you in striking position? Of course, this
teen, is all in fun, the man at right being Dr. C. B. Wildes, a re-
tired veterinary and snake expert. He found the cobra, .{ all
places, near his home outside McAHert, Tex. It's th* first known
eaera catch in Xexas. and it is believed the make is one of those
reiff in Texan .ad Florida a few year* age to combat rene.ts.
Molding the' king cobra is Terrv Hurley, an asslsUflt veterinary.
MikosAMtlf
9t if crMky ktotl
tet.eval*ky*
SKIM IMITATION!
fMt MIDIC ATID way I
Ne muntMetd aoawar eu re-
lieve yaur baby's Masar Xa*.
Ditptr Chtt, Urim 5caM aad
frkUy Mm Bart a*
For Aanaaaa h MMahSy nuV
aattd ta wars*, area** and hdp
aenf irritated dun. AaaarW a*
awaadsifeai andiasaan
. nroasotaa hcabng by .
iag baky'a tasM nun
farther irataaa*. CM
WrSSTry Ammmt at a a.
KI Fat Ida} ah. ea. aaae- I
bf.jmC c poaeaid nnS *
Jr aaaataa. atfereai te DaaC
SANTA
is
COMING
N j. (/rev aares lee. >l.
tm./
HOG
Tune in!
Keep
listening!
ENJOY A WEEKEND AT EL PANAMA
.. FOR. ONLY. $15.-!!

The VACATION st EL PANAMA,
MANI TRAVEL THOUSANDS ef MI ..ES for18 TOLES at a "GET
ACQUAINTED" FRICE DURING NOVEMBER and DECEMBER.
(Week-tnt Plan U tn effect after lunch Saturday until 9 p.m.
Sur.lay, but we cordially invite you to check in any time Saturday
to at*, day befora or after Week-end.
115. par person includes:


ROOM .Mi grirtf. terraae and bath, far 2 days sad t nlht.
Ciw.naia.tonr II Paaama COCKTAIL (gaad say af aar aeUic rat**).
a DINING ana1 DANCINfi. $5,50 dhaar ia fl<*rt.i galla VM* Sala.
ai by caittflalifht aa ***r ativata tanaca.
A vk* t. rk. CasiM-H^Hw-Sky.
. SUNDAY MUNCH (wMl Hi camaliaitMary cecktaH', saacag H rila
nfMlc rt larba Aicarra.a' Tn
USt at II araa, MANY FACILITIIS CakaSa ami T.aan Club.
rm.-saat. ilwWIabiias, Banis* (mm, chileWi .laygraand.
YOU CAH Mlr-C rta CHILStSN! one or. tuo under J .yeart a) aat
accommodated free in pour room, aid H price for children's vortior. ^>^
ns tila Vista Salon. Baby $Uttr available e* meder.f charge. ^^^
NO
HtUr, available i
SOU4HIN IT! TMS A LUXURY WCEK-lNS!
WUK-I
Thk H a*rt ef El Panama's participation In tn
"Knew Your Lacal Hotel Batter" prsfram apomored
by the hotel assaciatror.
Reservations accepted for minimum of two*
adults per rooni. must be made In advance
directly with hotel. Tel. 3-1 wo.




r




.
PAGE S
'

.
.



TO PANAMA AMERICAN AN INPETENDBNT DAILY NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER W, INS
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Want Ads BringQuick Results I
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MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
LIBRERA PRECIADO
t limt n.. u
Agencias Internal, da Publicacin*
(.. 1 Lottery Plain
CASA ZALDO
teatral Ave. U
LOURDES PHARMACY
IV U CanaegolMa
FARMACIA LOMBARDO
o. U "W Mrait
MORRISON
4m ( im\j * i at
P

LEWIS SERVICE
Ave. Tlvell No. 4
FARMACIA E8TAD0S UNIDOS
14) teatral *OH
FARMACIA LUX
,*. Central Avenue
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANGE
J, Pee a. la Otea At. No 41
FOTO DOMY
Juete Aliiwiil A* ulSH
FARMACIA VAN-DER-DIJS
s street n. n
FARMACIA EL BATURRO
l**rM Lefevre 7 mi
FARMACIA "8AS"
Via r-orras 111
NOVEDADES ATHIS
v.* Bapeaa At*.
m
MINIMUM
FOR
12 WORDS
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
,NE POLTCUNIC
MEDICAL
i'm~&Lvmi rename.
RETIREMENT. LIFE
EDUCATION INSURANCE
', jm NDGE
Phone PUWR^MW
trsHoov.
PANAMA 10*
3 to 5 *
, dew
$-279
a* W'W*1-
Ho ee
^
YOU with
CHIROPRACTORS
R M0XAC
(Palmer Graduates) .
. Liu! "- a-saow
(1 block
Aveaoe
from Lu* Theatre I
a Yea PtflV*"
^DtVEEDUCWO
, f.mou. McU.y g"""-
gsvrsHsh Massage * 9*t*
aRTEPEWA NACIONAL
O. *>
M ium iHMM*l ****"
Meetings
Srtsury l>* >
teta TaWadJa* f^. -..,
FOR SALE
Household
FOR SALI: Mahogany living
rMM set. Call 5-4113 er m
M 251-A. Diablo Terrace, Cere-
lal.
FOR SALI: Sacrif.ce 2
foam rubber living room charra.
I modib coffee tabla fa ma
all $105. OWIee: Sal be a
hem. Panama 3-6728.
mate,
1771.
FOR SALI: Typewriter $15,
inaorsprinf mattress, single, $20.
from I ta 1 a.m. Haute 754-i,
Balboa Road.
FOR SALE: Din in, ,am tat.
cheat a* drawers, bed. various
chain. Can be ian after 7 a.m.
Calle 43 No. 52. Phone 3-3969.
FOR SALI: Servel ice maker
refrigerator, twin been, ingle
bee1, many ether items at a bar-
gain. 75 VU Argentina. Apt. 4,
II Cangreja. Ph.na 3-5752.
FOR SALI: Simmer. three-
quarter Beautyrost spring and
mattreai with detachable lepe.
15-2114. 83-5290.
Wile Wanls Family,
Unaware Of Tragedy
DULUTH. inn.. Nov. 22 (UP)
A 28-year-old housewife, in cri-
tical condition from bun ovar
most of her body, asked for her
family yesterday.
But Mrs. Elizabeth Ellefson was
not aware that her husband, Wal-
lace. 30. and three children;
Douglas, 4V Patricia 5, and Ar-
ietta. 7, died, in a fire which level-
led their home Saturday night.
Mary's Hospital
telling
Doctors at. St.
said they would hold off
Mrs. Ellefson of the tragedy un-
til her own condition improves.
Firemen, who said escaping gaa
may have caused the-blaze, con-
tinued to sift throu
daring ruina of
frame house in
igh the irnos*
the two-story
search for the
tilly wiU hold f*^-!S
fcef?M -?tf S^WIJWE of-"the ViemTYtTmTgh?
fiSr tt wwe. of all RotaWana,'take day. toflad them, they said.
ES members are quested to.
bring their wl**- There will be
rtalnment.
Scheme Ne. a
mama Vro^taitt Bur-
la) Scheme No, 3 will convene
sit the French Society's Hall on
TJhursday at 7 p.m.
Followina; tf mnf a
" fight of Fun" wlO be held, a
v iriety of games including, prise
t bias will be featured.
All, members ate aafced to at-
tend and the $ubUe la Invited.
I Requiem Mosf
A reejuiem msti will, be held
omorrow aneentea; at St. P*t-
Afa Cbuwh far the repase f<
be aeal of Mra. MsutyJNaSass,
. Race resident who Had Last
"aeaday.
The masa will begi at 6:5*
4*- ^^
aw.
v~
' Mrs. EUefibn, appacafltly wait
ened by the flash fire, managed
to escape by leaping from a sec-
ond story window, with her night
clothes afire and barefoot, she
ran 100 yards In lO^degree weath-
er to a neighbor far help.
fly. the time firemen srrived,
the house waa enveloped by
flames.
'- i tt --
St. Anthony Church
Services Are Staled
The St. Anthony's Orthodox
SDiritual church nt No. 33. 10th
Street Parque Lefevre will cele-
brate its annual Thpnkselvirc
with' services on Sunday, Nov. 27,
at S p.m. I
There will-also he special serv-
ices* thrc-uahout. the day. Mom-
ln; worshln will he held at T
am., rhureh school at 9 a.m.,
special harvest program at 3
n.rn., and evening; service at
7:10.
FOR SALE
Automobile*
FOR SALI:1950 Oldimebile-
91 dlua 4 door eaelea, radia,
haeter. tara lenali, hyaVamatk.
peed ceaaMiaa. May he sean at
5720-D MahU Place. OtaWe.
"FOR SALI: 1954 Fh/meath
ceaivartlhle, tubalata w.a.w. tires,
radio, laathar upholitery, by-
drive; paaraateea* for 60 days.
Price $1500. Apenciai Cecmee,
Auta Raw Na. 29. Pbene. 2-
4721.
FOR SALI: 1941 Stadahakar
Champian, Economical, duty aaid
.$300. Pbana Peeey, Panama 3-
M5. '.
MISCELLANEOUS
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
IOX 2031. AHCON. CX
BOX 1211. CRISTOSAL. CX
FOR SALI:A 1941 Ford tour-
door Seed mechanical condition,
pood tirae. Phono 2-0770 Pana-
ma, 5 ta 7 p.m.
FOR SALI: 1947 Chevrolet
Tader Sedan. Seed meter, radia,
fair tirae. Heed, frill and radia-
tor damaged. Rest arfar. Call
Curundu 5292 after 4 p.m.
WANTED
Automobiles
WANTIO: Will pay cash lor
Chevrolet er Fard aick-ua. Dial
2-3204 anytime.
PARENTS: Salve the problems ef
your children'! care by visiting
the Iliac Private Narsery. Your
children will b wall taken care
of. Colon Street Ne. 13-49, ap-
steir. Phane 2-3345 Penama.
l>eert reweeWng. dona on all
types.of material, cigarette burnt,
teen, etc Phone 3-3331.
^m^mrS Tap eueKty
Beauty Service offered you at
Cocoli Clubhouse Beauty Shop.
Experienced Stateside licenaa ep-
Navy 3812.
FOR RENT
Apartments
ATTENTION O. 1.1 Jut built
modera luraiihed aaartments. 1,
2 bedrooms, bat, cold water.
Phone Faaame 3-4941.
FOR RINT. Farnrabed apart-
ment an iam Francisca Hipbwey
Ne. 120. betide Roosevelt The-
ater, overlooking S. A. S.
rmiiary. Phone 3-5024.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
-i-----------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE: Shewcases. tumi
rata, ether household foods, dis-
plays. Alte riehti to keys. Cen-
tral Avenue 115.

IS
COMING
to
HOG
Tune in!
Keep
listening!
Evangelist Mathlson Smith
ill sneak at the evening serv-
ice. Sari Clark is chairman.
The public Is cordially Invited.
14 College Students
Will Appear in Farce
At Diablo Heights
Three of the 14 college stu-
dents appearing In the forth-
coming production of "She For-
got to Remember" will be well
remembered by the theater-go-
ers of the Isthmus. The three
have appeared in various and
different stage shows given by
the collage, and all appear to
advantage in the slap-stick,
farce-comedy early In Decem-
*er.
Beth Hatchett, Jerry Fox,
and Louis Hasemann are all ex-
perienced in college theatricals
Miss Hatchett will be remember-
ed best for her most recent role
as the leading lady In "A Mur-
der Has Been Arranged," given
last spring. Her role In the cur-
rant comedy Is totally different,
but it promises to be equally en-
tertaining.
Fox appeared before he enter-
ed the military service of his
country in the college's produc-
tion of James Hilton's "Lost Ho-
rizon. He la again cast at the
"heavy" In this comedy, but a
totally different villain it Is,
since everything In the show is
strictly for laughs.
Hasemann was In the cast of
three different stage shows giv-
en bv the local college last year.
He la one of the various "leads"
in the forthcoming fun show,
which play does not treat a love
story in a romantic fashion, but
tends to the slap-stick type of
treatment, "for laughing pur-
pose."
Subert TurbyflU of the college
faculty, will present "She Forgot
to Remember" at the Dlaoio
Heights Theater on Wednesday,
Dec. 7.
FURNISH
YOUR HOME
THE EASY WAY '
BUY on CLUB at
ffii/ippw Rattan
fft/'ture
*- rvimp *m All*
w*...~- ... w^-
1 CLUB PLAN iL
"SYLVANIA"
v, RAPIOS
HI-FI PHONOGRAPHS
1
No. 1 Via Espaa
Tel. 3-93*3
FOR SALE y
Two newly constructed up-
to-date chalets located on
the highest spot of la
Crests, overlooking; t h e
Psctttc Ocean, le Univer-
sity,
AMA
and Hotel
{rounds.
a
PAN-
J
These 3 and 4 bedroom
chalate of the high a at
quality tjonatructlon have
everything needed for gra-
cioua living. f
Tarrna: $15.000 caah, bal-
ance In 120 monthly in-
stallmenta at 6% intaraat.
Pho-e: 2-vM4 Panama,
Jlr. Booker Haywood.
FOR SALE:Bogaa OB-10 am-
plifier. 25-cycle, 2" trieaiel
speaker and Karlson cabinet.
Phone Balboa 2-3233.
FOR SALI:High fidelity pho-
nograph. ecellent condition and
a vary peed buy. 0B39-J Acacia
Place, Balboa
FOR RENT: Madam two-bed-
room apartment, parch, Irvsaf-
dining ream, kitchen, maid's and
laundry roam. Screened, hot wa-
ter. For further particulars tele-
phone 3-4946 or 3-6737.
FOR RENT: Furnished apart-
ment, 2 bedrooms, maid's room,
Bella Vista, all screened, $130.-
00. Tel. 3-1646.__________f
FOR RENT:2-bedroom apart-
ment, maid's room, garage, bet
water, Campo Alegra. Just built.
Phone 2-0421.
FOR RENT
Houses
FOR RINT:3-bedroom chalet,
2 bathrooms, parch, garage and
gaadea, $100. Via Porras Na.
Bl. Keys at IBth Street Na. B.
San Francisca.
FOR RENT. Chalet: living
room, daniag room, 2 bedrooms,
maid's room, garage, garden.
50th Street Ne. 50. Phone 3-
3377.
WANTED
Miscellaneous
WANTED i One beby crib.
Phone Navy 251$.
Wanted Position
EXPERIENCED Spanish woman
seeks housekeeping work, Good
relerence. Phone Pname 3-
2334. Maria.
FOR SALE: Heater and de-
fraster for 1955 Chevrolet or
Pontiac. Used one month. $25.
Margarita 8217-A, Pbene 3-
2372.
SACRIFICE SALE: New 12-
bais accordion. Phone 2-3989
Panama.
Choke selection of U.S. and Eu-
ropean Christmas Tree orna-
ments. Also Christmas decep-
tions and lights for hamos, stores,
clubs and organiiatient. AMER-
ICAN SUPPLY CO., "J" Street
Ne. 13-06.
FOR SALI: Beautiful Latin
American Parrot of different col-
ors. Sha san apeak. A pretty an-
imal of very much attraction to
any person, aapocially to children
S30. Pbene Penama 3-1533. Via
Fernanda da Cordoba Ne. 45
during night.
FOR SALE:An attractive, com-
plete "MONTUNO" outfit, beau-
tifully embroidered in its \ack
tide with the "RUINS OP OLD
PANAMA" $50. Phono Pena-
ma 3-1533. Vis Fernanda do
Cordoba Ne. 45. during night.
.
LESSONS
"
AMATEUR PIANIST: Start play-
ing songa right ewey! Amasingly
simplified course. Piano Teacher,
Bennett. Pbene 2-1282.
Popes' Vision
(Continued tram rage 1)
skm was the first which added
any purported details to those
disclosed In the Italian weekly
magazine Ophi. The Vatican con-
firmed the Dppi version yester-
day.
The semiofficial Vatican or-
gan Osservatore Romano still
had not mentioned the vision.
A 36-word announcement from
the Press Office said It was "au-
thorized to confirm" the article
in. last Saturday's issue of the
magazine Oggi that the pontiff
had seen the vision.
Lulgl Cavtcchioli. 33-vear-old
author of the article in the gen-
erally respected magatine. said
today his "unimpeachable"
source had provided him this
description of the vision.
The Pope lay alone In his sim-
ple iron bed on the fourth floor
of his palace, reclttne; the praver
"Anima Christl (Soul of Christ)."
While.whispering the word*
"in the hour of my death; call
me," Christ appeared at his
bedtide. standing fu.lenoth
in -traditional iorm."
It was understood "tradition-
al form" meant bearded and
clad in a robe as he usually is
depicted In religious.paintings.
At that moment, the Pope hs-
gan to recover from his internal
ailments that seemed to be tax-
ing his life,
Vatican officials said thev
could not wovid* any details
of the vision, which was re-
ported to have lasted teveral
seconds.
Sources said it was the first
time in church hlstorv a respon-
sible person reported seeing; a
vision of Christ himself, al-
though others before Pius XII
have seen visions of the Virgin
Mary, the Holy Eucharist and
the'bleeding heart of Jesus.
It was the second supernal",
ral event announced in the life
of the Rome-born Pope, and v it
strengthened a growing belief he
eventually would be canonized a
saint after his death.
The first such event was the
Pope's vision of the run rotat-
ing in the heavens for three
dans durinn October and Nov-
ember, 1950, a church holy
year.
That vision was reported by
WANTED
Apartments
Y0UN6 U.S. couple dosirue lu>-
ury, furnished, screened apart-
ment, 2 er J bedrooms, 2 bath-
room, beginning January. W.ll
net consider less than 4 months
occupancy, but prefer I year.
Faene: Business hours 3-5471,
3-6707. Other times 3-2144.
RESORTS
FOR RENT
Kooms
FOR RINT: Beautifully fur-
nished room, kitchen privileges.
Bella Vitta. Meaice Ave. 69.
war 43rd Street. Pbene 3-0553.
FOR RENT
rVlWeilaneous
La Boca Alumni Choir
To Present Program
The Atlantic Aimy Mothers will
present the La Boca A1 u m n i
Choir, under the direction of Emi-
ly E. Butcher, at the Rainbow Ci-
ty gymnasium on November 27.
The progrrm. with funds going
to aid the area's needy, will begin
at 4 p.m. Accompanist will be
Hugh Ad mas.
The benefit concert chair man
invites both military and civilian
personnel and their dependents to
attend.
FOR RENT:Far afric* Aveni-
da Caba-29th Street. Mrs. Arias
3-629$.
BEACH NOUSES Lew ratea.
Phone POSIY, Panama 3-6115.
GENILL BLISS Santa Clara H.ma
and Guest House overlooking
ocean. Private etapa ta beach
(2 mia. warn). Sas rangos, refri-
gerate, ping gong, punir,
green, etc. Call Navy 3112 l-
fica hours aad Navy 3121 eve-
nings.
Baldwin's furnished apartments
at Santa Clara Beach. Telephone
Proback, Balboa 1224.
PHILLIPS Oceeaiide Cetra,.,,
Unte Clara. Bes 435, Bornea.
Pbana Panama 3-1177. Criero-
bol 3-1673. ,
Former Zonian Here
As Guest Preacher
Elder Edna .Niles Carter, a
former resident of the Isthmus,!
Was the featured speaker here!
last night at the Pentecostal Faith!
Chunh of God of Chorrillo.
Gramlkh'i Santa Clara Beach
Cartages. Modern conveniences.
moderara ratas. Faene Gamboa
Shrapnel's furnished houses >
baoeh at Santa Clare. Teleohane
Thempaoar, Balboa 1772
FOSTER'S COTTAGES. Otto ntBo
peat Casino. Low rateo
B.Ik.. 1866.
Tropical Paint Co.
Wins Contracts
For Zone Jobs
, Contracts for the interior paint-
ing of four houses and three a*
partments In Balboa District; one
house and two apartments in
'Margarita: and the exterior
Bus Concerns
(Continued from Page 1>
policies "are not within reach of
many prprietors!,,
2) Vehicles using the "corri-
dor" would be exempt from
meeting this requirement, but
would not be able to take or
leave passengers in the Canal
Zbhe.
3) Insurance companies do
not have special rates for the
Canal Zone, and polices (Issued
by them) cover the entire terri-
tory of the Republic.
The communique said a meet,
lng of bus line operators will be
held Thursday night in Pueblo.
Nuevo to discuss the matter fur-
ther.
The announcement made by
the Foreign Relations Council
said that considering the Im-
portance of the matter it is re-
ceiving Its "best attention."
Foreign Minister Alberto Boyd
sent the text of the amendment
to the council for consideration,
the announcement said.
Elder Carter, who now lives
Monday by the Panama Canal
Co. te the Tropical Paint Cor -
She was a resident 32 years ago.
During her stay'here, she will
apeak at many local churches-un-
der the auspicies of the Uai ted
Missionaries of Panama, under
the direction of Rev. A. Victor.
Federico Cardinal Tedeschin!, a
prince of the church, to a group
of pilgrims at the shrine of Fat-
lma in Portugal.
Vatican sources explained the
pontiff's two visions are not
classified as miracles, but would
be taken into account in the
cause of his sainthood sure to be
raised by his admirers after his
death.
Ordinarily, two proven mira-
cles which occurred during the
candidate's lifetime or after
death are required before beati-
fication, the first step toward
sainthood. hum
Many New Faces
To Be In GuHd's
Latest Production
When the curtain goes up on
tie Theatre Guild's production of
"Rope" on Dee. 5 new faces on
stage will outnumber the old.
The only familiar faces will he
those of John Ma vies, whose per-
formances in "Dial M For
Murder" am* '"Remains to be
Seen" will be remembered with
delight by local theatre go era;
Bruce Carpenter,. last seen in
"Boy Meets Girls''; and Edith
Stssb, whose previous appearanc-
es include 'Kiss and Tell'* and
"Accent on Youth." Newcomers
to the Theatre Guild's stage ar
H. Russell Carter, Isaac Hit-
rouche, issac Russell. Nancy Ac-
ly and A. J. Carothers.
The play Is directed by Frank
Plencner, who will be remember-
ed in the role of Joe Ferguson in
the Guilds recent production of
the Guild's recent production of
The Tropical Paint, which made
a low offer on all three, projects,
bid $690 for the interior p a in t
work on the Pacific Side, $208 for
the' interior paint work in Mar-
garita, and $319 for the exterior
painting at the Tivoli Guest
House.
Houses scheduled for painting on
the Pacific Side include House
Nos. 3220, 9820 and 2488 in Bal-
boa;. House No. 6424 in Diablo;
Apartment 0530-A in Ancpn, A-
partmont 1550-1 in Balboa, and
Apartment 343e-C in Diablo.
Scheduled for interior painting
in Margarita are House No. $51,
and Apartment Nog. 8045-D and
8180-A.
Bulganin Called
'Hypocrite'
By British
LONDON, Nov. 22 (UP)' The
British Foreign Office tfday
called Soviet premier Nikolai
Bulganin a hypocrite.
He is being "thoroughly hypo-
critical in claiming Russia
Dursues a policy of non-interfer-
ence in Oerman affairs, an of-
ficial foreign office spokesman
said.
A foreign office statement aaid
that the continued division of
Germany vu '"exclusively due
to Soviet interference In the af-
fairs of Germany."
The British statement, cama
In response to Bulganin's speech
before India's parliament in New
Delhi yesterday.
FIREMAN OF THE TEAR,
Panama City fireman Orlan-
do de la Guardia, a former
Canal Zone resident, haa been
named "Fireman of the Year"
by the Panama Fire Depart-
ment, after being chosen from
a list of candidates whose
names and service record were
submitted to a board of offi-
cers. He will be presented with
a gold medal awarded by the
Panama Insurance Co. at an
official ceremony on Monday,
the 134th anniversary of Pan-
ama's independence from
Spain which is also observed
as Fireman's Day.
'THOR"
Washing Machines 1
SALES SERVICE ,
P/ttTS 1
MUEBLERA
CASA
SPARTON
Central 26-79
entrance Encanta Theatre
1st prize
2nd PRIZE
NOVEMBER 20
yd PRIZE
i
i
L
Present your tickets before Friday.
Your tickets are valid for a whole year. Keep them carefully.
j


TUESDAY. NOVrMBKR 22 1955
i' "in ia
tit r AN AM A AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
1
PAGE SEVEN
CAUTO Lip
'fe---------------1 lie.
BANK! I:M p.m.
AGAINST ALL
FLAG*
. Also: -
GYPSY CULT .
T IVOLI
iSc.. > tic.
Double In Technicolor
SON OF SlNBAtf
- Ah: "
THE TIGER AND
THE FLAME
CENTRAL Theatre
75r i ---------------- 4*c
' i:lt, 3:M, f :M, :M. : P-
Sensational Release In Technicolor;
MAUREEN O'HARA
GEORGE NADER, In
LADY GODIVA
with VICTOR McLAGLEN
LUX THEATRE
Mc. -------------------------------------------------- Mc.
Bl'RT LANCASTER
EDWARD G. ROBINSON
In
ALL MY SONS
DRIVE-IN Theatre
60c. ------------------------------------ 30c.
3:05 5:00 7:00 1:55 p.m.
ONE DAY ATTRACTION!
Barry SULLIVAN VELITA
In
GANGSTER
CECILIA THEATRE
50c
tie.
IOHN WAYNE, la
RED RIVER*
-.Also:-
top of the World
.V
ft 10
UkS, i- n-Mfi*
THE ASSASSIN
-AlsoL-
MR. UNIVERSE
VIC TOtlA*
lie.
Ttf
THE FIGHTING
KENTL'CKIAN
THE DIAMOND OP
THE DEATH
GERALD1NE

.
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aleaos 'a tfce paper plates, ea which yea serr tac snacks. Inn
holders for the plates are decorative and utilitaria for Informal,
eatartasaiat; tlve sauacaers a seed tras o the situation.
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JACOT OH MIDI
By OSWALD JACOBY
Written tar NBA Service
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Openins lead4t J
Witnesses Accuse
6M Of Attempting
To Kill Competition '
Washington, Nov. 22 (up>-
Two witnesses accused General
Motors yesterday of trying to kill
competition in tne auto parts and
repair business. A jnutor prompt-
ly raised" threat df possible con.
greesioaal action.
G. C. Marries, executive direct-
or :ol the Automotive Wholesalers
o Texas, charged GR Is using
"an economic gun-rthe a t o-
mach" to turn its auto agencies
Into parts wholesalers'. He said
this eliminates the "right to com-
pote" o Independent jobbers.
Albert Holzwasser, president of
Aero Armature Co., Boston, ac-
cused GM of using -high pres-
sure and discriminatory price tac-
tics" to wipe out competition and
gain a monopoly in the .auto re-
pair, industry.
Chairman Joseph C. O'Mahoney
(D-Wyo.) of a Senate judiciary
subcommittee on anti-trust and
monopoly, promptly declared it
Is time for Congress to act if
General Motors is starting to
monopoliza the 2' i billion dollars
a year auto' parts industry.
The subcommittee is digging in-
to GM'a intricate corporate setup
In. a case study of big business.
Morris charged General Motors
is" "deliberately, systematically
and -purposely seeking to capture
for itself a principal share of the
wholesale parts market" by forc-
ing their dealers to do business
with them.
'tJnee Independent dealers no
longer are able to stay in busi-
ness, he said, GM and other ma-
jbr auto manufacturers will be
free te "exploit'', the public by
making more expensive and less
dursble auto parts.
Morris said GjM,uys many of
Ha sorcalled "genuine' parts from
the same source as indenpendent
wholesalers, but puts them,in GM
boxes. He said the Federal Trade
Commission gave him a "brush-
off' when h objected to gen-
otato parta" advertising
Plea For Grounded
Oily Ducks Issued
MICHIGAN CITY, Ind., Nov. 22
(UP) Hundreds of wild ducks
were "grounded'' on the shores of
Lake Michigan today by a crude
oil slick which washed ashore.
Some of them froze to death
and others were reported to have
been kUlerf)kr;ra|t jod gnUa*
they tried WrTfy but were prevent-
ed by a coating of heavy oils on
their wings.
James Schefdel, president of
the La Porte" County Council of
Conservation Clubs, urged shore-
line residents to save as many of
the ducks.as possible by washing
off the oil with ether or a mild
detergent and keeping the birds
indoors for 24 hours until the na-
tural oils in their bodies were re-
stored.
Spanish Guilarrisl
Punches Chorus Girl
During Bar Quarrel
BELOIT, Wis., Nov. 22 (UP
An attorney for Mrs. Horace E.
Dodge I said today he would
file a $200,000 damage, suit a-
"sin.it a Spanish musician who
allegedly punched her in the nose
at a Belolt bar.
Attorney Donald Dobson said
the suit would be filed in Bock
Country circuit court at Janes-
ville He said the suit was for
$100,000 actual damages to bis
wealthy client, snd $100,000 for
punitive damages.
Mrs. Dodge, the former chorus
girl Gregg Sherwood, said she
w.-s injured when Mario Escude-
ro, a guitarist with the Jose Gre-
co dancing troupe, knocked her
down during an argument a t the
Corral, a Belolt night spot. The
incident occurred Friday night
after the- dancing troupe had giv-
en a performance at Beloit Col-
lege..
Escudero told police he struck
the 29-year-old blonde after she
'insulted me in French." He does
not speak' English, but told hi s
side of the story through an in-
terpreter.
Twenty years ago, most of
America's fine bridge players lived
in New York or Philadelphia, and
few players in the Midwest had
ever seen a bridge tournament.
Today there are good bridge play-
ers all over the country, and
hundreds of experienced tourna-
ment players will turn up In Sioux
Falls, S.D. this week end to play
in a Canadian-American regional
tournament!
Many of these players are strong
enough tonglve a good account of
themselves in any tournament. For
example, take today's hand, played
example, take today's hand, played
by Cuff Manderscheid of Sioux
Falls.
Most good partnerships would
manage to reach a contract of six
hearts on the North-South carda.
Mandrsc.heid was interested in a
grand slam until his partner
showed only one king by bidding
six dianunds in response to five
no-trump. (North would have bid
six hearts with two kings, under
the Blackwood Convention, and
then South would have bid seven.)
The trick was to make the small
slam. Most players would lead the
first trump from dummy to finesse
the queen. This finesse would lose
to the singleton king, as the cards
lie, and South would later lose a
second trump trick.
Manderscheid won the first trick
with the ace of spades and imd
mediately led the ace of trumps.
When the king fell, there was no
further problem. Declarer had to
give up one trum? trick, but his
slam was safe.
The play of the ace of trumps
was a safety play. Tf the king
didn't drop, Manderscheid planned
to enter dummy with a diamond
and lead a heart towards the
fueen. This would make the she
queen. This would make the slan
if he slam could possibly be made,
and it would prevent the loss of a
trick to . singleton king.
Yvonne De Carlo
Weds Bob Morgan
In Surprise Rite
HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 22 (UP)
Actress Yvonne de Carlo, one 01
Hollywood's most jr 1 a morous
spinsters, married actor Robert
Morgan in a surprise ceremony
at Reno, .Nev., yesterday, her
studio announced.
The 38-year-old globe-trotting
film queen and Morgan, a stunt
man and supporting plaver
whom she's known for five
years, eloped to the gambling
cltv after finishing a picture at
Uriiversal-Iriternattonal Studio.
"I'm getting married because
now I know what I want, from
life from a man who wHl be a
life-lona- partner," Yvonne said
before the ceremony.

M I


v
By ERSKINE JOHNSON
NEA Staff Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD and Dolls: Mario Lanza's warbling
in the two-hour "Serenade'' adds
up to a big SO minutes but Direc-
tor Tony Mann isn't worried about
the plot gcttirig-los on the high
C.
"There was just as much singing
in his biggest bit, "The Great Ca-
ruso," says Tony. "We have the
same type of story a story that
can be told with music. Our story
never stops for one minute."
Tony about the supposedly ter-
Irible-tempered Mr. Lanza:
"He's a nice gay with a world
of charm on this set. I think his
.voice is richer than ever."
increasing use of automatic devic
on Americas way of living
hasn't yet beer, felt In Hollywood,
although I suspect some people
will argue:
"Oh, yeah? What about Marilyn
Monroe's hips? That's the best au-
tomatic device I've ever seen."
Maybe, so, but compared to push-
button industry and warfare de-
velopments, Hollywood's way be-
hind the times except for Its new
wide screen and sterophonic sound.
-A world of artistic creation, Hol-
lywood may never succumb to the
push-button age. But I'm betting
I on Movie town to startle the world
,when it does embrace automation.
Something sensational lick having
movies produced by perforated
cards.,-
, ..: i
TAPE BREAKS JET BOTTLENECK A revolutionary new
machino has now broken a tremendous bottleneck In. jet engine
production. It uses an electronic "brain" to turn a blueprint into
a complex finished product. The product is an intricate cam, the
heart of a jet engine's fuel control system. The machine accom-
plishes in two to four hours a technical operation that previously
required about 400 man-hours or five to 10 weeks. It was developed
by Bendix Aviation Corp. engineers and recently unveiled at the
Terre Haute, Ind., plant. Coded information, taken from the blue-
print is punched on a plastic tape and the electronic "brain" then
"reads" the data, and sends instructions to the tool that does the
actual cutting of the cam- Above, a Bendix technician looks at the
punched tape on the "cam machine/"]
There will be no time for thumb-
twiddling in Lizabelh Scott's movie
.future. There will be a solid pro-
'gram of emoting for her after she
completes her first movie in more
than a year. Before she left Holly-
wood for "The Weapon'' opposite
Steve Cochran in London, she told
me:
"I just couldn't do another bad
picture. I've lost count of the
scripts I've turned down. But this
new film is what I've been wait-
ing for. I play a wonderful, sym-
' pathetic woman with a lot of
heart instead of those brash cha-
racters they gave me for so
long."
A confession from Liz:
"I've made some mistakes, too.
I turned down a role in 'The Rose
Tattoo' because 1 thought it was
too small. Virginia Grey'played it
and I hear she's wonderful.'
SALLY FORREST'S dance num-
Iber in the costume thst almost
wasn't there, clipred by U.S. cen-
sors from "Son of Sinbad," was
left In the movie for European
showings. One letter in garbled
'English from a theater owner in
Spain advised Sally:
"Thanks to you people are stand-
ing hi droves in front of my
theater." '
Off-the-sound track: Bob Wagner
swinging over French Alp cliff
on the end of a rope for a scene
in "The Mountain," was admon-
ished by a studio photographer:
"Hold It for a still.'
DALE EVANS' "Angel Unaware"
Is near the half-million mark in
sales. Retail Bookseller lists It
third among nonfiction best sellers
for October. More than $45.000 in
royalties have been turned over to
,the National Association for Re-
tarded Children.
'Only HoUywpod, I'm sure, wlff;
'add a Hollywood touch,
The perforated cards, like the;
human producers they replaced,'
will have ulcers.
FILMING OF SCENES.for Bet;
Davis-"Storm Center In the San
jRosa. Calif, City-Library was an?
assistant director's dream-act.-The
walls were plastered with sign
reading:' "Quiet, Please"
, : :
Dorothy Dandridge said "No,'.
thanks" U> a songwriter who sub-'
emitted a new ditty to her for her
; night-club act. The title was proof
that Mambo'nine-smiths have he-
conic desperate. This one was tl*
Sed: "'.Tha War and Peac.*
ambo."
The Impact of automation the
TAKES THE PRIZEThis picture of a collie in a field of daisies
'won the top prize of $500 in a recent dog photo contest. Taken -by
George Sura of Worthington. Ohio, the picture was judged for- '
; human appeal as well aa photographic quality. Contest was spon-
sored by Gaines Dog Research rvntw. r^f-% r j
TODAY
CENTRAL
l I*. ar
Woman Who Slew 3
Sentenced To life
PERU. Ind.. Nov. 22 (UP)
Flora M. Barnett. 23. was sen.
tenced to life Imprisonment to-
day on a second degree murder
charue in the death of three of
her four, sons,
Miss Bamett pleaded guilty to
charges she strangled and burn-
ed three sons shortly after their
births in 1951. 1953, and 1954.
The unmarried mother was
comoosed when sentenced hut
later broke down and wept !n
the arms of her mother.
STARTLING RELEASE!
The Story of The Hide That Made History Blush!
vNwaui-oinatunoNM
... whose daring
could end only in
infamy... or 'jlory!
SURVIVE PLANE CRASH Tommy McGrath (left, and his
brother, Richard, re3t in a hospital at Seattle, Wash., after
escaping death m tne cras'i of a DC-4 airliner. The boys'
mother and sister a.o lived through the harrowing expeiience
but their father died.
SCREEN RETURN Myrna
Loy, who won worldwide film
fame as "the perfect wife.'' is
coming back to the screen after
a five-year absence. She's in
Paris for filming of "The Am-
bassador's Daughter," in which
she plays a senator's wife.
-^hnicohr
GEORGE NADER
L
VWWMclJt3LEN HEX REASON
TOSJN THATCHU eOUAHO HANZ ASTHUt SrUtlDS
BALBOA
WEDNtSDAY J
6:75 8:25 i
Thursday confmuov: shw!J;00, 4:10, 6:20, j.;*\j
M-O-M'a QRAMATrC L*OVC STOYl
Interrupted Melody
IN COLO* ** CINEMA!COPE
Glenn Ford-Eleanor Parker
SHOWING AT YOtiR SERVICE CENTER \
THEATERS TONIGHT!
DIABLO HTS. 8:15 7:50
0 William CAMPBELL
-CELL 2455'. DEATH
ROW"
Wed. "Starr ' Three Lavn'1
GAMBOA V.H
"MART V.rS "!. vv Olll.v Thr KM"
GATN '1:*e
CANYON CROS8ROADS'
1hnr.. "DRUMS I TAIIIII '
BALBOA Air-Condii,ofied 6.15 7:55
MARGARITA 6: IS 7:5
DtnnW O'KEITC .
O Patricia MEDINA
'DRUMS OF TAHITI"
Color
Wrd. "Canyon CroaareaoV'
UISTOHAL 1:15 7:5f
Ir-Canallloord
Kdward G. ROBINSON
Ger(f RATT
"A BULLET FOR JOEY"
HVannaay "FOXriaV."
PARASO 6
"THE BIG COMBO
SANTA CRUZ 8:15 -
"Case of The Red Monkey
%:4\ ItA.l
key"| I-Li
MP BIIBD 8:15 1:1
La Vida No Vale Nada"
i
aMPOKTANTi Be adro you get tho
.tear, Look for and insist on
'"Scotch" Brand in the coavto-
taot rod aad ama bolder.
IIAt apim with Tape
to hold in Fraahnaaa and
l\outmi
SCOTCH
^SW MAM
CELLULOSP
TAPE
COVMerockod window with AHH4 i
Taa*>swaaasaaaB7iataa*. teattraeth*
Distributora: ClA. ATLAS. S. A.
"Scotch" brand colored Upea are printed la Panaai
wtth as*ra name and aajecificatkms by Csa.
Atlas 8. A., Tesaaawne 1-345.
P. O. Box 1067


PAGE FIGHT


p. i
I
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDFEENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
I*"
TUE8DAT, NOVEMBER 28, 1MB
arta
nnounce
i
Former Pirate Bartirome
Bolsters Champs' Infield

Angel Grimas' champion Carra Vija Yanktes, usual
j ly "the fuirest with the mostest," tnis morning announced
"its full rostir which will ploy in the Panam Professional
League, scheduled to get underway at the Panam Olym-
pic Stadium Dec. 1.
! Now going through workout
-at their Miami "spring training"
'camp, under the guidance of
- -Tnanager Al Kubski, the CV team
--Is expected to reach Panama
""next Tuesday to be on hand
for inaugural ceremonies.
One of the aeveral new faces
on the club this season Is in-
""flelder Tony Bartirome, who
- was with the Pittsburgh Pirates
to 1953. i "
Complete Information on the
players who will be seen In ac-
tion here follow:
~'\ Al Kubski. manager, Winni-
peg, Class C Northern League;
6' 2", 185 pounds, bats right,
throw* right, hit .320 last sea-
son.
St. Jean, Cas C Provincial
League; 5' S", 105 pounds, bats
right, throws right, hit 220 last
season.
Spider Wilhelm, shortstop, Co-
lumbus, Class AAA Internation-
al League; 5' 9>/2", 168 pounds,
bats right, throws right, nit .235
last season.
Dan Porter, left field, Chat-
tanooga, Class AA Southern As-
sociation; 5' ll'/z", 160 pounds,
bate left, throws left, bit .264
last season.
Johnny Kropf, center fielder,
Charleston, Class AAA American
Association; V 10 twitch hitter, throws right, hit
.230 last season.
Eddie Phillips, right fielder,
Omaha, Class AAA American
Association; 6', 185 pounds, bats
right, throws right, hit .245 last
season.
Bill Harris, pitcher, Fort
Worth, class AA Texas League;
,5' 8", 189 pounds, bats left,
throws right, 13-9 last season.
Bobo Hlggins, pitcher, Bls-
.rnark, semi-pro; 1V4", 204
1 pounds, bats right, throws right,
19-3 last season.
I Bill Hockenbury, pitcher, Bls-
,mark, semi-pro; 6' 2", 200 lbs.,
bats right, throws right, 7-3 last
season.
Ed Monahan. pitcher, U.S. Ar-
my; 6' 3". bats right throws
right.
Cookie Stempel, pitcher, Inac-
tive; 6', 165 pounds, bats right,
throws right.
Billy Shants, catcher, Kansas
ity, American League; 6' W.
poundi, bate right, throws
", hit ,260 last season.
y Dahei!, catcher. Mtanea-
.s, class AAA American Asso-
atlon; 5' 10", 186 pounds, bats
lit, throws right, hit .242 last
son*.
Tent patten; catcher. Peor.
'Class B Three-I League- K 10V"
180 pounds, bata rlghk^throws
lght, hit .283 last seai
Tony BM^NlpjY fl
an,' Burlington, cas* C Caro-
! League; 5' 10", 165 pounds,
left, throw left, hit .328
season, .^,j., tii_|
\i> BOBO HIGGINS lit.
Bob Rles, second baseman,
* Houston, Class AA Texas League;
, I' 11", 180 pounds, bats right,
1 -throws right, hit .274 last sea-
,' son.
Corky Olamp, third baseman,

By UNITED PRESS
BASEBALL ft
The New York Yankees have a
good report from the west coast,
outfielder Irv Noren has under-
Sone a successful knee opcra-
on at a Santa Monica, Califor-
nia, hospital.
A hospital spokesman says
Noren will walk tomorrow and
will be home In time for thanks-
giving dinner. The spokesman
ah says Noren "will be good as
new" next season.
TOM PATTEN
Vic Stryska, pitcher. Faribault,
semi-pro; 6', 175'pounds, switch-
hitter, throws right, 12-3 last
season.
Ronald Unke. pitcher, Winni-
peg, Class O Northern League;
5' 11", 180 pounds, bats right,
throws right, 5-5 last season.
Gators' Don Gagnon
Cops Cross-Counlry
Race In Near Record
[ ATLANTA, Not. 22 (UP)
Florida's Don Gagnon won the
Southeastern Conference cross-
country meet here yesterday,
but the Oators were forced to
share the team title with Au-
burn.
Florida and Auburn both
cored 46 points to create the
first tie for the SEC crass
country title In conference
history.
Georgia Tech, the defending
champion, finished third with
75 points, Tennessee fourth with
79 points, Alabama fifth with
127 points and Mississippi State
was sixth with 139 points. Geor-
gia entered the meet but did not
finish a full team.
Gagnon ran the 4.4 mile
coarse in near record time.
His time of 21 minutes 37.3
seeonds was only ten seconds
over the record held by Au-
burn's John Barton.
Ed Murphy of Tennessee fin-
ished second, Bill Adams of Flor-
ida finished third and Dick
Rlchter of Auburn finished
fourth.
TRACK
*
F
A spokesman for the Missouri
Valley A.A.u. says there Is a
"good chance" that some one
will appeal the group's decision
on track star Wes Santee. The
Ejup cleared Santee of charges
had accepted too much mon-
ey la expense allowances.
Vine* Martines
RETURNS -Msnsgeris! trou-
ble behind him, Vines Martinez,
high-ranking Parterson, N.J.,
welterweight, returns to the na-,
tlon's television sets when he
meets Chris Christensen of Den-
murk in St. Louis, Nov. 23. Looks
like good fight.
Along The Fairways
WLNG
BIO MATCH APPROVED Battlin' Byron Cumberbatch, left, and Toto Ibarra, right, are all
smiles as they congratulate each other after th elr 10-round 120-pound feature bout was ap-
proved by the Panama Boxing Commission. The match, already being billed as "the flght-of-
the-year," will take place at the National Gym Dec. 18. Sidney Arias, president o Caras Nue-
vas. S.A., promoters of the program, looks on approvingly.__________^____________________
HADLEY WISE WN RODMAN
TURKEY RINGER
The 'Hadley family continued
their winning ways during the
month of November. Liz Hadley
la usually the one who brings
home the bacon but this time it
was her husband "Sparky" who
put the mast on the table. In
the '"A" flight for 0-16 handi-
cap Sparky shot a gross 65 with
a % handicap of 11 for a whi-
ning net of 54. In shooting the
65 he had 11 pars. 6 birdies and
only one bogey on the tough No.
15.
George Wise got the bird In
the "B" flight which was made
up*>f 17-36 handicappers. George
also had a gross 65 with a 34
handicap of 12 for a net of 53.
He picked up five birdies and 13
pars for his gross 65. AmonR the"
five birds two were made on 228
yard" pan f holes. AH the mem-
bers are wondering what bache,
lor George is going to do with a
16-Dound- turkey.
The Holiday Ringer which be-
gan Monday will afford an op-
portunity for the members who
didn't win a Thanksgiving tur-
key to,at least win one for
Christmas. This Holiday Rlnaer
ends on Dec. 23 so you members
who have not signed up so far
had better hurry If you intend
to plav. As usual two flights will
be used and a % handicap al-
lowed.
On Sunday afternoon the 12th
of November. Dirk Goodman and
Mai. 'Stowall of Fort Amador
Oolf Club conducted a cllrric at
the Rodman course. Despite
threatentn* skies a ood crowd
was Ion hand to watch these two
excellent Bblfers show the cor-
rect wav to play golf. Thanks
aesin to Dick Goodman and
Mai. Stovall for a very pleasant
and Informative afternoon.
SHORT REIGN
Boston (NEA) Tony T)e
Marco, who tries to regain the
title from Carmen Bisilio here.
Nov. 30. had eae of the shortest
147-pound reigns in history. Tony
held the championship 40 days.
_ . . -- --------------------------------------------------- --------------------
Al Cor sale TakesGamboaClub
Championship Tourney Lead

Rene Estripeaut Upsets
Rey Valdes in Dunlop
Tourney's Second Round
<
FOOTBALL
PA8ADBNA, California Op-
ponents for the 10th annual
Junior Rose Bowl Game on De-
cember 10 will be named next
{weak.
Three non-Canfornla teams
are being considered as the
Eastern representative. They are
Jones county Junior College of
Mississippi... Wenatchee Valley
; Junior College of Washington...
and Cameron state Agricultural
; College of Oklahoma.
The Western candidates sue
Compton College, Taft College
and Menlo Junior College.
The games board of manage-
ment wMl make the selections
Tiofwnbfr 38,
Auburn's Jordan
Denies Receiving
Offer From Florida
AUBURN, Ala.. Nov. 22 (UPi
Auburn Coach Ralph "8hug"
Jordan, who said he is "mighty
happy" at Auburn, denied be
has received an offer to replace
Bob Woodruff at Florida.
Jordan, now In his sixth year
of a seven-year contract at his
alma mater, denied a report by
Birmingham News Sports Editor
Zlpp Newman that Florida a-
lumnl officials had offered hhn
the post at $21,000 a year.
He told Naylor Stone, sports
editor of the Scrlpps Howard
Birmingham Post Herald, "I
have not been contacted." He
added, "naturally I have read
the newspapers and have been
questioned by newspaper fel-
lows. However, I have not been
contacted."
STAY IN BLACK
New York (NEA) Onlv
three major college teams have
,had no losing football seasons
since World War II. Thev are Peon
Sute. Oklahoma and Kentucky. ,
SANTA
is
COMING


to
HOG
Tune in!
Keep
listening!
The axe continued to swing in
the Dunlop tournament at the
Panama Golf Club this week
with Rey Valdes. co-medallst in
the first flight, being eliminated
by Rene Estripeaut in the big-
gest upset of the second round.
First flight winners in addi-
tion to Bstrlpeaut were Paul Mo-
ran over Ernesto de la Guardia
Jr., one-up; Al Saarinen over
Luis Chandeck. 2 and 1; Erasmo
de la Guardia over Maurice MoL
ler, one-up; President Ricardo
M. Artas E. over Al Corsale, one-
up and Gordon Ralton beat Bill
Schmitt. 2 and 1.
There are several matches yet
to be played in the first flight.
Anibal Gallndo has yet to meet
"Negro" Arias and LuT Arango
and Dick DehUnger Will play
early this week.
First flight pairings are Estri-
peaut vs. Moran. Saarinen vs.
the winner of Arango vs. Den-
linger. Martinz plays the winner
of the Gallndo vs. Arias match
and President Arias plays Dal-
ton.
In the second flight Torres
beat Howen, Medinger edged
Matheney. Dr. Arias beat Gleich-
man. Differ ousted Purdy. Col.
Donovan defeated Rodriguez,
Diaz eliminated Elick, Ridge
edged Gerhardt and Alemn
beat Moses. This week's second
Hight schedule is Torres vs. Me.
dlnger, Dr. Arias vs. Dilfer. Don-
ovan vs. Diaz and Ridge vs. Ale-
man.
The third flieht matches for
this week are Boyd vs. A. Orte-
ga. Dr. Massot vs. J. B. Carde-
nas. Duran vs. Dr. Tapia and
Nelson vs. Banks.
Beverly Dilfer and Ernesto d*
la Guardia Jr. won the .Invita-
tional mixed foursome at the
Club Sunday afternoon by a Ion?
stroke over Mrs. J. B. Call and
M. Frottear and Sylva Carpenter
and Ma]. StobeL
Mrs. Dilfer, and Don Ernesto,
hitting alternate shots, finished
with-a gross 87 to win top hon-
ors in the tournament which
drew a total of 26 teams from
the various Isthmian golf Clubs.
Other low scores were Fearl
Trim.Jack Smith 90. Mrs. Heit-
er-Gordon Dalton 92. Grace
Dehllnger-Capt. Green 3, Helen
Howell-Cmdr. Fish 91, B. .Teals-
Col. Schull 9.
Winners in the ball sweep-
stakes Saturday afternoon were
George Boyd (67). Lou Chandeck
(78). Paul Moran (71), Rey Val.
des (75). President Arias. Dick
Dehlinger and Jim Ridge (78).
Don't forget the ESSO tourna-
ment starting next week. PJ'aV
will be In two flights, with those
losing their first round matches
in each flight forming "Defeat-
ed" flights.
Full handicap will be allowed
for qualifying (there have been
some changes made in the han-
dlcans) and you are requested to
check your handicap before
playing. Eighteen holes for the
qualifying round.
The 64 guys and dolls who
turned out for the invitational
Sunday afternoon had a won-
derful time. They enioyed the
tournament and buffet dinner
and dance and the tournament
committee is planning similar
events for the near future.
SHORT YARDAGE MAN
Durham, N. C. (NEA) Bob
Pascsl, Duke halfback, special-
izes in getting short yardage when
it is needed.
Al Corsale, putting Gamboa's
greens like he was born there,
defeated both the elements and
the remainder of the field to
lead the way into the finals ol
the Gamboa Golf Club cham-
pionship with rounds of 70-67
137.
Bill Dickens the first round
leader with a 69 could do no bet-
ter than 73, dropping five
strokes behind Corsale, and one
stroke ahead of Peavely who
had a fine 67 to move into third
place.
Courvllle continued his steady
play to take the lead in the Sen-
ior's Division with his fine 72,
giving him a 148 total for 36
holes and a three stroke lead
over VanGsider who is in the
runner-up spot.
The final 36 holes of the 72
hole medal play tournament will
be played Saturday and Sunday,
Nov. 26 and 27 with pairings and
starting times as follows:
8EYMOUR INSURANCEMEN
SMASH STEMPEL KEGLERS
TO HOLD LEAD IN MAJOR
BOWLING LEAGUE
The Seymour Agency Inaur-
ancemen repelled the Max R
Stempel and Son team last
Tuesday night at the Diablo
Heights alleys taking three
games and pinfall, thus increas-
ing its lead in the Major Bowl-
ing League after nine weeks of
the 28 week season.
Both teams scored poorly with
all games being In the 800-group
except one scored by Seymour.
Hammer was high for Seymour
with 550 followed by Rogers with
"? Sifey WM 'Wh for Stem
pel with 577.
On alleys 1 and 2, the Tahiti
Jewelers scored a four-point win
over the Summit Hills Golf
Club as Larrabee scored a 595
followed by Lane with 578, while
for Summit, Jacober also scored
a DD.
Meanwhile, Colonial scored a
three-to-one victory over the
last-place Fuerza y Luz whose
lead-off, Nubern Stephens re-
turned after a vacation. For Co-
-. ole,chman was high with
%k S'?"."1 * clete5 *"h 560.
and Welch was high for Fuerza
y Luz with 583 followed by Ste-
phens with 551.
?a ^ Lnal match- Agenda
Glud and the H.I. Homa Co. tile-
setters split the four points when
A^n* dud took the second
and third games, and Homa the
first game and plnfalL Harry
Klumpp was high for Glud with
567, followed by Woodcock with
559. For Homa, Balcer was high
with 553 followed by Almeda
with 552.
The team standings after nine
weeks:
9:00 a.m.

UPSETS APPLECART DISCARDS GLAMOR...
THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER"
Release at the "LUX'' Theatre, next THURSDAY!
W. Rogers, R. L. Cofiey, c.
Peavley.
9:18 a.m.
T. Kirby, Mae Askew, T- Jacks,
R. Dugan.
9:28 a.m.
R. Johns, Stuart, R. Zornes,
W. Coffey.
9:39 a.m.
Balcer. P. Bell, W. K. McCue.
9:49 a.m.
Chi McCue, Harley, Wheeler.
9:58 a.m.
Courville, VanGelder, W. D.
Hardle, E. Jones.
16:88 a.m.
Al corsale, B. Dickens, N. Lew-
ter.
Second round results:
CHAMPIONSHIP FLIGHT
Al Corsale........70-67137
Bill Dickens .. .... 69-73142
C. Peavley........76-67143
W. Rogers........77-67144
N. Lewter........71-78149
R- Coffey........70-79149
SENIOR'S FLIGHT
Courville .. ... .. .. 76-72148
VanGelder........77-74151
W. D. Hardie......86-78184
K. C.Jones........79-87186
FIRST FLIGHT
T. A. Kirby ..
Mae Askew .. ,.
T. Jacks .. ..
R. Dugan ....
R: Johns .. ..
Stuart......
R. ornes ., ,,
W. Cofiey
.. 78-74152
.. 74-78182
., 74-80154
.. 76-80156
.. 77-80157
.. 76-81-157
.. 77-82159
.. 82-77159
Shelley Winters made history!
he lodged a protest with Director Charles Langhton
and Producer Paul Greeory, who were encaged In making
'THE NIGHT OP THE HUNTER." in which she is co-star
red with Robert Mite hum anl Lillian Gtah.
The pneteet arose cut eg the fact that Shelley wanti
to leek as nnglamorous as passible, and she thought the
halr-de which hid been fashioned far her made her Unk
too attractive aa Wtlla, the downtrodden wKe of Fraaetac*
Harry PeweM. _- --
Villa is a lUtiess. obedient wife. wh. hat been -
by the tragic events of her personal Hfe. Adit
8ECOND FLIGHT
!*}..........M-tl-164
Si?1..... .. 84-82186
W. K. McCue......74-96170
Harley..........79-99178
Wheeler........90-100-190
OuOf Bounds 1$
Out Of Country
At Calexico Club
CALEXICO. Calif.(N E A) -
Mortie Dutrs. world senior PGA
champion, is back at the Interna-
tional Country Club here.
The nine-hole Calexico course has
an out-of-bounds maker st the
fitfh sod sixth holes which siso
serves as the boundary line of the
United States and Mexico. Balls
ait over fences go out of the coun-
try end there i. no retrieving. The
towering fences topped by barbed
were are to prohibit illegal entry
from one country to the other.
Team
Seymour Agency .
Tahiti Jewelry ,
Colonial Ins. .
Summit Hills G.C.
Stempel and Son
H. I. Homa Co. .
Agencia Glud .
Fuerza y Lus ."
Won Lost Pet.
. 26 10 .722
. 22 14 .611
. 20 16 .558
. 19 17 .528
. 18 18 .500
. 15 21 .417
IS 21 J17
17
The 10 high average bowlers
after the nine weeks are:
Name Teem Games Ave.
Coffey, Stempel ... 27 204+22
Jacober, Summit .. 27 197+3
Balcer, Homa .....27 195+13
8chlrmer, Colonial .27 190+25
Zeletes, Colonial .. 27 187+14
McOarvey, Glud ... 18 187+9
Colbert, Seymour ..27 186+18
Gleichman. Colonial 27 186+1
Lane, Tahiti ....... 27 185+0
Kunkle, Summit ..\ 27 184+15
The scores of the play were:
Sumnvt HHls Golf Club
Jamison 192 183. 119 504
Bowen ... 187 187 176 489
Anderson 135 177 154 468
Kunkle . 195 ITS 174-801
Jacober . 214 189 192 898)
843 "89 ~834 2W8
Tahiti Jewelry
Hermann . 181 169 189 819
Snel?baker 178 220 170 918
Albrittdn 171 162 180 511
Lane ..... 177 193 208 878
Larrabee . S m KB 5M
"y ~915 l 2741
Colonial Insurance ,
Rchirmer . 207 158 M3
Burgia 182 .184 193
AUen ... .171 173 148 491
Zeletes \W m m 5J
Glelchmajj > 11 207 171 M9
"47 "94 ~8*
Fnatan y tji.
Stephens . igh 187 im 591
ThomM ... 179 172 156 507
Luttenberser 182 187 1.1* 507
Pllachowskl 144 162 158 464
Welch 189 202 192 888
1 1m ~M8 26fl
-
Seymour Agency
Bates .... 174 182 166 IHH
Kaelin . r 189 188 .4*0
Hammer . 1S7 201 192 5ft
Roeers .,. .198 212 1*7 5*7
Colbert ... 198 158 181 529


848 953 874 2875
Max R. Stemnel and Son
Wilber ... 178 14S 121 444
Feger .... 145" 16 161 74
Boyer .... 14. 143 211 .Vfl
Winoulst 191 2tJ- 138 st*
Coffer .... 191 207 189 977
1 -
Agencia Glud
- -
Klumpp ... 199 195 17 567
Pue.....189' 158 137 463
Woodcock . 166 17 2W 55
Kutsch ... 178 187 143 5*8
Bedsaul .'. * 122 146 279
) .Vld9 -- 199
*89i 9h:r8 29
Hi II Homa Co.
Lyons.... 179 184 19T 527
Almeda . 249' 156 ISO 552
Nelson ... 149 ft9 149 418
Lowande 198 174 173 545
lalcer . 195 ITS 190 593
"94 "i 915 2590
U.P. Survey Shows 22
Unbeaten, Untie
t-
Teams On Perfect List
NEW YORK. Nov. 22 (UP) Coach Duffy Daugherty of
A United Press survey shows Michigan State has kind words
there are 22 unbeaten-untied foot- for two other Big l teamsOhio
" SUte and Illinois. Daugherty sedt
telegrams to corches Woody
Hayes of Ohio SUte and Ray E-
hot of Illinois saying "T h a n k
you for your kind assist.'" Ohio
SUte anr> Illinois both best Mich-
igan this season to keep the Wol-
verines oat of the Rose Bowl.
Dsugherty siso ssys he doesn't
understand why people sre con-
Oklahoma leads the perfect rsc-igtatulating him. Says the Michi-
ball teamsi nd 18 of them are
home free.
Maryland, which has complet-
ed iU season, and Oklahoma are
the only major teams with a per-
fect record. Oklahoma winds up
against the Oklahoma Aggies on
Saturday, a. ami of Ohio, Whit-
worth and Albany SUU of Geor-
gia have one game left.
ord teams in scoring with 312
points in nine games. College of
Emporia had the tightest defen-
sive, giving up only 13 points in
nine games.
Maryland and Oklahoma will
clash In the Orange Bowl. The
Rose Lague scheduled to face
Michigan Sute of the Big 10. Tex-
as Christian qualified to become
Cotton Bowl representative of the
Southwest Conference.
That leaves three vscsnt berths
in major bowlsthe visiting team
in the Cotton Bowl and both op-
ponents for the Sugar Bowl. The
winner of the Army-Navy game
on Saturday may get one of the
bids. Others being considered are
Mississippi, Georgia Tech, and
abara.
gan SUU coach''I didn't play
a single minute all season."
Also in football, writer Gene
Ward of the New York Daily
News has strirred up a atorra
with his story morning about Big
10 football. Ward says the Ohio'
Sta-e-Michigan game offered
"two of the moat dull and unima-
ginative offenses ever seen on one
gridiron."
Commissioner Tug Wilson of the
Big 16 replies "Ohio. States
r ethods may be old-fashioned, bat
it's good football." And Ohio
SUU athletic director Richard
Lar kins say" "Buckeye foot-
ball Is just like spinachOne per-
son likes it and another ddesn t. '
f

PANAMA AMERICAN
WANT ADf
CAJS FILL YOUR NEEDS!


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER tt, ItSS
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE NINE'
'Unbecoming An Of f icer' Sometimes Doein't Count
>r to COMEBill Morgan knew what was coming when
, ooubled up over fumbledbell at Auburn. The Mississippi,
SUte back reaUsed that .econd later ^^te at tte bottom rf
pile of thrashing arn* and_ l^jla wasn't a bit dlssppointed.
he dou
JOE
by
WILLIAMS
When Herb Score began firing part Ml ^fer Uut jprtag
la Ariaona they naked If he were faatcr than Feller. After Cleje-
land rookie left-hand pitcher led the American League wltn
244 strikeouts, they asked who is faster than Score.
ThV answer could be nobody, past or present The young
fellow may have superior strikeout skill to Feller. Vance, John-
ton, Mathewson, Grove, Waddell and Marquard.
Hb hasn't proved that yet; but there is a. speculatorhint
which you will not find in the records. He is the only pitch
the flgger filberts can uncover, down the year through all the
'treats*' who averaged better thin a strikeout per inning for
ore than 200 innings. It was 244 in 227 innings.
It's easy, to see what that means-how much work ean
Score handle? Is he one of those very rare 3M-lanta|jritehMiT
Mm, he could reach for the all-time Feller record of M* strlke-
outs In 371 innings in 1946. ., -
The Indian phee-nom. will begin to learn how far he can er example, Navy
,? ^^beiause his staff seniors, are widrlng down. __ -ibis year.^or "nroMjh. J
Not When Army
Meets Navy 11
Ir. Football
By JIMMY BRESLIN
PHILADELH1A (NEA) On
Nov. 29,1890, the southwest corner
of the < arado ground at West
Point %dg marked off for a foot-
ball field.
About 400 officers and cadets,
along with wives and sweethearts,
whose long skirts dragged over
froxen ground, watched Army and
Navy play football for the first
time.
Annapolis had been playing for
11 years. But this was the first
Sime in West Point history. So
te Midshipmen, banging forward
from their V formation, scored a
24-0 victory over an Army team
which hardly knew the funda-
mentals.
la fact, Taurus Murphy, 200-
pound Cadet tackle, experienced
considerable difficulty remember-
ing which side of the line to push.
He wound up belting his team-
mates as often as he charged at
Navy.
You don't need a calendar to re-
alize how far the service clash
has advanced.
On Nov. 26, Philadelphia's Mu-
nicipal Stadium will again bulge
With a capacity crowd of 102.000
watching the well-drilled Cadets
and Middles meet in the 56th
game of the series.
They'll see a contest which, yesr
in and yerar out, is the most po-
pular on a national basisand the
most fiercely fought.
IT'S AN ENTIRELY differ-
ent gsme todayexcept in one-
respect. In 1890, as a West Point
chronicler put it, "The Cadet be-
came indignant at one Navy play.
The fullback dropped back to kick
and when he got the ball. Instead
of kicking it as he had clearly pro-
mised us, he ran the whole length
of the field with it and mad a
touchdown.
"It was clearly a false state-
ment for an ouicer and a genue-
man to announce he was goins w
kick a ball and then do souieu.ing
else with it. To our surprise and
disgust, the olflcial let it stand.
'liungs haven t changed a bit,
for th* modern sevice clasn has
been one where the unexpecid
comes before anytning eise. Be-
cause of thi, y"" ieeve recoros
and advance dope sheets in the
office when figuring out ho winn
Pros Seek Football Men
Who Remain In One Piace
SERVICE VETERANSQssirterheek Den Holleser, left, and fulls** Pal TJefceL esatfet, of .We*
Point and AnaapeU* T agtcian George Welsh ead their oollege careers kt the Amy-Navy

0 next season, because his staff
Of course, pitchers get smart, and learn to pace thanes ves.
and apply the strikeout mustard only when urgent. But that
savvy dbesnt come in a hurry. Most strikeout ^t^owutaO*
youthful enthusiasm ot the first few big league seasons, and
Score has started better than any.
For comparison, lets work out Herb's strikeouts on a per
game basis. The mathematics say it is MJoievtry nine In-
nings. Digging in the files, the next best is Hal Newhouser with
845in iris. In that year Feller had (U4 for Ms record1 total
Waddell registered 8.33 in "OS, VanderMeer 8.04 in 41, Mar-
ouard 7.74 in '11, Turley 7.67 last season, Vance 7.63 in -24, John-
son 7 52 in '10. and Matty, a chap noted for pace, was away down
with 6.55 in '03.
figures to have a look on the
tair. ueorge Welsh, smooth am.
smart, ha directed the bailor
JnVi attack through a season
wnich saw only powerful Notre
Dame aiuo to.turn tnem ack.
Army, on the other hand, has
hadTu muer.es. Michigan S;,ra-
cuse and Yale repulsed Ked Blades
team tor iu three losses. In con-
rast to the Middies. Array, with
Uon Hoileuer at quatei-Dac*. n"
had trouble moving th ball
ugnt situations.
THIS WOULD SEEM to be the
HOW ABOUT STAMINA AND ENDURANCE? .'"f^wfen SEy, * ***
won a ame, stormed to a 14-2 vlc-
wry over a fine Cadet ciutwhich
wa, undefeated and rated the ns-
Son-s best. Or IMS'*. 21 H tta.
when Navy wasn't given a chance
amst another unueieated Army
club. Or in 1954, when Navy clear-
ed out the left side of the favor-
,ed Cadets' line in a 27-20 triumph,
wim m ouitwuui ' **i"'"B"i Ti ",V 10qg i The best example perhaps,
Before he went to war, Feller led the AL four years. 1938-41,, ine ^^ Amy.f UMtt>p.
with 1027 in 1238 Innings, an average of 255! ..M...Jnahle Blanchard Davis power-
Few great pitchers broke in with the dramatic effectiveness f^ J^J,,'-.mst a weaker Na-
of Score. Orover Cleveland Alexander fanned 227 u & rooUe to hose^moveo j ^^ ^
1911, but he worked 367 innings. In his first full season Mathew-
son had 215 In 336 innings. But Johnson was still struggling in
his second season, with 160 in 257 frames, and Grove had a sec-
ond-year total of 194 In 258. v.
Score starts with an unmatched record. Feller wrote the
original Cleveland "Strikeout Story," and Herb may be ready to
author a revised version pretty oon. ,
A nice thought here la that strikeout Pitchers don't worry
about the lively ball. Score and Turley in 55 did as wen putung
it past the batsman as Waddell and Johnson did with the old
dead cat they threw. But how about stamina and endurance?
Waddell ied the American League In strikeouts six tralght
years, 1902-7. with 1575 in 1840 Innings, an average of 263 a
""johnson topped the AL six of seven years from 1910 through
16, with 1724 strikeouts in 2490 innings, an average of 246!
\
m his last game for Southern California against owe
Kb?, at A KTAMpta. CoUeum,PNov. 26. Hafiback ^}^^^\ C^i fS ^A
with Miami of Coral Gables deploying against Florida in toe Orange Bowl. tap, ay *sw
has hi* last whirl at tackle for the Irish in their big one with the Trojan. '
OUT OF DOORS with
Tennessee Good Fishing Sena
By AL McCLANE
Fishing Editor
glers to remove the fishwhich
frequently results in over-stocking,
loauing the streams with more
fish than they can feed.
About 20 years ago, Tennessee In the Telllco region of Ton-
fishing waters mesnt creeks and nessee, on the other hand, the
rivers snd a few small lakes. But Tellico Cooperative Wildlife Man-
with the 1930s the Tennessee Val- agement Area made a scientific
ley Authority csme into being. | survey a number of years ago to
The difference is not only that ascertain the carrying capacity of
the fishing in those waters has the streams and controlled their
been improved, but that Tennes- stocking policies to supplement
see now offers the angler more the native fish, with the result
than 20 reservoirsall large. that about half of the fish taken
These add up to about 5,000 by anglers are natives,
miles of fishing shoreline and
the
bear about three-quarters of
fishing load In the state.
Whats in the water? Tennes-
see is predominantly
Joe Williams is ill- Other staff men are subbing.
vy teaman
21-18 battle *a th Middies turned
largemouth, smallmouth, rock
bass. It also offers muskellunge,
wall-eyed pike, pickerel, sauger,
sunfish, crappie, bluegill, channel
catfish, white and yellow bass.
And just to round the picture out,
there are siso troutbrown, rain-
bow, and brook.
The state ha* worked carefully
to conserve and develop its trout
While this eastern trout fishing
was natural to the Tennessee ter-
ritory and has simply been pro-
I bass state moted by good conservation pol-
icy, the state over-all Is an ex-
ample of what can result when
man utilizes natural resources
wisely.
(Distributed by NEA Service)
Miirlnl Stadium into a mad- fishing. In 1950 a survey con-
hnuM ducted by the Fl8h ,nd G,me
On paper Navy has a decided i commission resulted in the state-
,-. Iment: "We were pleasantly sur-
Tliis is of couse, a typical set-1 prised to find, trout fishing to be
' Army victory Which is excellent In msny streams of
AIRBORNEIndiana fullback George Crowe hung onto the ball
as he went flying after being tripped by Michigan's Jim Maddeck
at Ann Arbor. Jim Bates of the Wolverine appeared to be
waiting for Crowe's landing with pained anticipation.
ting for a Army victory won.-
one reason why It U th nations
NSpi'Tou' we, can help a foot-
ball take crasy bounces.
SANTA
is
COMING
to
HOG
Tune in!
Keep
listening!
Foes Clad Hoppy
Is Hopping Along
COLUMBUS, ?.-(NEA)-How-
ard Caasady. who had just demo-
lished Indiana's hopes against O-
bio State for the fourth consecuti-
ve time, met Bernie Crimmins on
Another of a aerie written
_ for NEA Service
By GARY KEREORIAN
Colts' Quarterback
East Tennessee and more pleased th? field,
to find, even late in the season, | Hopalong Cassady congratulat-
streams producing good fishing, i ed Coach Crimmins on the caliber
without stocking, to a large num-'of hte Hooaier team.
ber of fishermen.
The Important words in that
statement are "without stocking.
A number of states hsve a poli-
cy of simply stocking their trout
Crimmins thanked the Buckey-
es' star, threw an arm around
Hoppy* shoulder ,nd gsve him a
hu.
Boy!" said Bernie. "Am I glad
streams and depending on an-'to see you gone!"
The Pacific Steam Navination Comoany
INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER ltd*
Royal Mail Lines Lid.
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AB Sailings Subject to Change WTthett Notice
PACITIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO, Cristobal TeL: ltM/S
irAA'AMAAto. Pera #5. TeL t-iatt/l
fOstD GO. OtC. iaULLavOATosm gUdg. Toa s-ltM
. r i i
wm? f0 bacJt to f 152 Rose
Bowl Game and wonder if may-
J* the result wouldn't have been
We went into the third period
feadi?l lre,t H1"01* team77-#.
we didn't know whether the lead
would hold up, were really shop-
ping for point early In the quar-
SUnford bad the ball in mid
field. It was third down and
three. I caUed for a fake trap
piay with a pass to Bill Strum,
our fine end, on a "Z-out" pai-
te We faked the trap and I
dropped back to pass.
As I let the ball go, I realised
that Stan Wallace, Illinois' out-
standing halfback who was draft-
ed by the Chicago Bears, wasn't
drawn up by th fake.
Wallace, fairly deep, converged
on our receiver picked the ball
off a Storum got ready to catch
it.
Wallace stormed back up field
and got to our seven yard line
before he was tackled. Prom
there, the mini went- hi to score
and break the agama.widc opea,
rolling te 0-7 victory.
I was too much of a gambler
oa that pasa.
If I could call that one over.
I would send fullback Bob Ma-
thias off tackle. I know end Bill
McCoU and tackle Jim Vlck
would open the hole
By FARRY GEAY80N
.NEW YORK (NEA)-Wellington
Mara was looking over scouts re-
ports on college seniors recom-
mended to the New York Giants.
A kt o then' will not be on-
Au-Ameriea teams.
"ine plsyer coming into the
provisional ranks must have size
speud and talent, of course," said
Mara, the man in charge of the
fc -ba 1 1 t-j Grounders person-
ne .
"But the first thing pro clubs
consider is his durability. That
ha been the secret of Paul
Brown's sustained success with
the Clevelsnd Browns. He orga-
nized the club with players who
could go the route and has had
singular good fortune fj replacing
them.
"ome player; bruise easier
thru others, you know. Some heal
quicker than others and are not
handicapped by relatively minor
injuries which keep less hardy
men on the bench. And when, in
this rugged gsme, you're limited
to SI men, you eant afford to
have too many hurt.
"While he may be plattoned to
s somewhat greater extent, the
player play twice as much
football in th National League
than be did In school. With the
exhibitions, a team getting in the
play-off gets in 11 gamos?'
STABS OF THREE so-called
"small'' schools are high in the
pro draft. They are John J a n-
kans, a 215-pound center of Ari-
zona State at Tempe; six-foot-one,
195-pound Gary Gllck of Colorado
A. and M.; and Charley Sticka,
Trinity's 200-pound fullback.
"Ordinarily,' points out Mara,
"pro club like to have recruits
battle-proven in big-time competi-
tion, "but h nkani, G11 e k and
Sicks were wheelhorse of their
teams and we are assured that
they will stand up in any compa-
ny. Gllck did positively everything
both way in the backfield.
The first three rounds and too
bonus pick of the draft will be
held Nov. 28. Previously, the clubs
made their selections in connec-
tion with the league meeting in
January, but the crack at the
choicer athletes was moved up
because of competition with the
Canadian League.
When operatives from acros
the border got there first, it was
troublesome and costlier for the
NFL. The other tl rounds of
th) draft will bo hold in January,
' "V'''- '
Playground Sports
INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL
At the conclusion of the first
week of play In the "C" and "B"
Leagues, the Dona and the
Chiefs were tied for first In the
"C." and the Celtics and War.
rlors were tied for th top In the
B" League.
Two forfeits marred the com-
petition In the "C" League and
also hurt the Individual statis-
tics of the players involved.
Raul Barbara scored a hlsh-
frame total of M points and leads
the "B" League acorlna; with a
two-game total of 42 points.
Close behind hi mis Alex Ruiz
with a two-game total of 0
points.
Willie (The Machn) Kngelke
with a single-earne total of 23
points leads the "C" League
scorers despite losing a chance
to improve his total when his
team forfeited their a econd
Rme. Robert Rathgeber with a
o-game total of 21 points is
second high In this league.
At this early stage there Is
some unevenness among th
eight team in each league, but
this will be adjusted after this
week of plav by shuffling some
of the players.
with a total of
claimed.
Ml combatants)
COACH AM TRIMBLE of the
Philadelphia Eagles was quoted
as saying that thf was a rather
ordinary class of seniors, but Ma-
ra disagree*. He considers it a)
ven fi.ic one.
The upcoming group is long ea
tackles, who are the backbone*
clubs because tt\v nullify the Mr
dtion's power. Mara lists Sam
[ and Bruce Bosley of West
Virginia, Auburn's Frank D'Asjfjr-
tino and M. L. Brackett. MlexV
gaa State's Norm Masters and.
southern Methodist's For re It
Grsgg. _____
PREFERRED CENTERS lachad
Pellegrini of Msrylsnd, Texas
Christian's Hugh Pitts and Oxhthw-
ms's Jerry Tubos. Liked as guares
are Calvin Jones of lows and UC-
LA's Hardiman Cureton. End Ha-
rold Burnine hop from Missouri
to. the Giants ss a previous pick.
Other well-regarded ends are Big
Thunder Lewis of Michigsn State
and Kentucky's Howie Sehfleuen-
berger.
There are a number of accom-
plished backs, and Earl Morrsll
of Michigan Bute is the number
one choice a a quarterback be-
cause Notre Dame's Paul Hor-
nung Is a junior.
Everybody likes Don HoBeder,
but Army service intervene.
"HoBeder would be an offensive
end or defensive halfback in the
pro game," stress the coaches.
"He would catch psstes, a. t
throw them.'*
THB WAT Speaking at. *
luncheon, Otto Graham uses s
bread basket to demonstrate ball
handling. The Cleveland Browns'.
great quarterback Insists that he
is definitely retiring, after Bus
season.
Today Encanto .25 .7$
WAHOO! 115.0
Tony Curtis, to
"HOUDINI"
Charlton Heston, to
SECRET OF THE INCAS"
Today IDEAL .20 10
"ADV. OF BUFFALO BILL"
Chapter 14 and IS
"TOKYO JOE"
Rough Riding Jmrike-
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
New Priesas Scrric*
Great Walt* Fleet
Arrive
Cristobal
The UBI Rom Bowl game
might have had different o/i
ing had I gone for the fWt vant-
age and toe first down instead
of "going tor broke."
NEXT: BeMry Graysesu'
A "SIXAOLA" ..................................Not. ff
S.S. "TELDE" ..................................NOT. M -'
8.S. "YAQUE"..............y.......*............Ja. <
8.8. "MARNA" ...................................ge*. ?
9A. "MOaUaiN".................................g** H
............
,*.<
SB. "HIBUERAS" ................................* _
8,8. "AGGERSBORG" ............................i** 2?
8.8. "YAQUE"....................................Doe. 28
HaadMBg Refrigerated Chined am General Can
New York Service
BB. "CHOLUTECA"
8.8. "HEREDIA" ..
SB. "PARI8M1NA" .
BB. "OTTA" ......
A Steamer .........
Arrive*
Cristobal
.. .Not.
.-..-...................IWC. i
Dec
.Dee
:M
Weekly sufcafS el twelve sesseater skits to New
Yerk, New Orleans, Los Anieles, San Francisca
and Seattle.
Special reaas trip fares from Cristobal to New
York, Los Anieles, Saa Francisco aae Seattle.
Te New York......................$240.00
To Loe Angeles and tan Francisco ....9270.00
To Seattle .......................$365.00
, i a ii ------------------ -^
TELEPHONES:
CWS3TOAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2904


18 Foofba/I Teams End Perfect Season
Read story on page 8
OUGHT Joseph T. Gale
"(above) 1b being sought by
police for questioning In the
slaying of his estranged wife,
Mrs. Viola Gale. Her body was
discovered In her home at
White Oaks, Pa.
AN INDEPENDENT ^/^fti^g^" NEWSPAPER
Panama American
...
"Let the people know the truth and the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
list YEAS
PANAMA, B. P., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER W, IMS
FTVE CENTS
Alert In Rio; Senate
Rules Cafe Unfit To Govern
RIO DE JANEIRO, Nov. 22
(UP)The lower house early to-
day declared ailing president
Joao Cafe Fllho unfit to resume
jaaJM

DAUGHTER FINDS MOTHER SLAINMrs. Viola Gale (left),
principal of Coulter Public School, was found slain In her
home in White OaKi a suburb of McKeesport, Pa. Her body
was discovered by her daughter, Abble (right).
office and state troops were a-
lerted for any emergency in
Brazil's second major crisis in
two weeks.
Cafe was under virtual house
arrest In his swank apartment
In the copacabana sector of Rio
de Janeiro.
Troops surrounded his house
waiting for him to leave so he
could be "Invited" to go to the
war ministry for questioning.
The National Assembly passed
by a vote of 179 to 94 a bill by
opposition parties declaring Ca-
le physically unfit to hold office
and sent It to the senate.
Cafe, under treatment for a
mild heart attack for several
weeks, precipitated the crisis
yesterday when be announced
his intention to take back his
Job.
Troops bolstered by tanks and
guns took up strategic positions
throughout the capital. Two
heavy cruisers, the Admiral Bar-
roso and Admiral Tamandare,
moved into Guanabara Bay and
anchored just offshore without
explanation.
Army leaders were said to
have vetoed Cafe's return to
power because they feel he is
too close to the navy, the air
force and the National Demo-
crat' c Union party groups
which the Army believes are
trying to prevent President-
elect Juscelino Kubitsc h e k
from beinr inaugurated Jan.
The Brazilian crisis two weeks
ago stemmed from the same
thing.
The Army ousted acting pres-
ident'Carlos Luza friend of
Cafe'sand replaced him with
Nereu Ramos, president of the
Senate.
Ramos was confirmed by con-
gress and the army said it was
acting to prevent a coup against
Kubitochek.
Lua fled aboard the cruiser
Tamandare but returned.
The streets were almost de-
serted. Troops controlled city
traffic and forced all vehicles
except small buses off all main
thoroughfares.
Censorship was relmposed as
it had been during the previous
crisis.
Tanks, light guns and anti-
aircraft artillerv were set up at
important intersections. Troops
dug trenches and piled up sand-
bag fortifications.
Cafe left the St. Vincent clin-
ic at 8:30 last night and disap-
peared for several hours.
Shortly afterwards a plane
from Sao Paulo a Cafe
strongholdarrived and was Im-
pounded. Cafe then turned up
at his apartment.
There was speculation the
plane had been sent by Sao
Paulo governor Janio Quadros
to fly Cafe to Sao Paulo.
WILD BILL HICKOK
Un< fkt miiiwi
By Russ Winterbotham and Ralph Lane
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TODAY
PRICES: .75 & .40
SHOWS:
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BELLA VISTA

20ih Conlury.fok capturo all the
boauty and rapture
lory as Oh*
unforge*-
20th Contury-Fox
pr#9#ftts
LOVE
IS A MANY-SPLENDORED THING
WILLIAM JENNIFER
HOLDEN! JONES
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COLO ky DC UJXK mm re
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ALSO: TUNA CUPPER SHir A CINEMASCOPE SHORT?
$
Cafe acted swiftly when he
was released from the hospital.
He conferred with Jaime Cardi-
nal Cmara, archbishop of Rio
de Janeiro, and then informen
Oen. Flores Cunha, speaker of
the house, of his plans to re-
sume office. The cardinal also
conferred with Ramos.
He defiantly appointed Briff.
Oen. Eduardo Oomes as minis-
ter of air and Adm. Amorln do
Vale as minister of the navy.
Both are bitter foes of Ku-
bltschek and his opponents
said the appointments made
his intentions clear. Both were
ousted when the Los caretak-
er government was over-
thrown.
He also announced he was ap-
pointing former president Mar-
shal Eurico Gaspar Dutra as
minister of war, replacing oen.
Henrique Telxeler Lott, head of
the group which ousted Luz.
In the presidential paioce,
Ramos hurriedly conferred with
his own cabinet ministers ana
the cardinal who apparently was
trying to find a way out of tne
crisis, and with army leaders.
Though Rio was tense, Sao
Paulo and other cities of Braza
were reported nearly normal and
there was no censorship of com-
munications.
Bildon Enters Bid
For Thatcher Ferry
Ramp Repairs
AtoULbld * f*' w **-
ed by Bildon Inc. for an extensive
Panama Canal marine fender re-
pair project, bids for which were
opened Monday morning in the
Balboa Heights Administration
Building.
Biidon Inc., was the only con-
tractor to enter a bid on the work,
which will Include repairs to the
fender system of the Thatcher
Ferry ramps and to the fenders
of several Panama Caal piers,
and reconstruction of the concrete
dock between Piers and 9 in
Cristobal
Nearly $40,000 of the total bid
was proposed for repairs on the
Thatcher Ferry ramps and slips,
the work includes repairs to the
floor system of the west side ferry
ramp, repairs to the fender sys-
tem of both the east and west
side ferry slips, and removal of
dolphins on the west aide ferry
slip.
Pier repair work includes re-
placing and reconditioning the
fender system of Pier 14 and Pier
15 in Balboa; repairs to the fend-
er system of the Dredging Divi-
sion Pier at Diablo Heights, and
repairs to the fender system of
Piers 7 and 8 in Cristobal.
High School Seniors
May Capture Awards
Balboa and Cristobal High
School senior students are being
offered an opportunity to compete
in the General Motors National
Scholarship Plan, according to
Harold J. Zlerten, assistant prin-
cipal of Balboa High School.
The plan, initiated early in 1955
provides for 100 four-year schol-
arships, at least one in every
sute and 50 at large, at any col-
lege or university of the success-
ful contestant's choice and in any
held of study he may select.
Registration for the second year
of the plan is under way now
Eligible to participate are h i g h
school seniors, both boys and
girls, who are United Stales citi-
zens, and who plan to take the
College Entrance Board examina-
tiin for admission to a scikoI of
their rhoice or who arrant to
take the examination in order to
enter the competition for a Gen-
eral Motors scholarship award.
Selecion of award winners m
the General Motors plan will be
the responsibility of a group of
leading educaotrs representing va-
rious parts of the country.
Full details about the General
Motors plan, ucludug registra-
ti-a dates for the examinations
are available to interested stu-
dents from Mr Ziertea-s office, at
Balboa High School or Mr. Maedd
at Cristobal High School
BALHOA TTOES
WIDNOOAY. NOVIMHR J
52 ,.. isg w
mVf^MiM.^ n.lt ^"AL-Rusatan Communist Party chief Nikita Khrushchex, Soviet Pre-
mier Nikolai Bulganin and Indians escorting them, gather for a tour of India's famous Taj
Mahal near New Delhi.
* *
/
Six Beria Police Officials Are Executed;
Fresh Purge Spikes Red Tranquility Rumors
| THE MOST FAMOUS RIDE IN HISTORY!
LONDON, Nov. 32 CUP) Rus-
sia disclosed today that six Beria
men have been shot in the big-
gest known blood purge of the
supposedly tranquil Bulganin-
Khrushchev regime.
Tiflis radio announced the six
former police officials in Lavren-
tl P. Beria's home state of Geor-
gia were executed for carrying
out Beria's plots, covering up
his misdeeds and framing his ene-
mies.
In addition two others were sen-
tenced to prison, said the broad-
cast from Tiflis, Capital of Geor-
gia.
It was the biggest purge since
Beria himself was fired as Soviet
secret police chief early in the
reign of Georgi Malenkov and
shot In December of 1958 for al-
legedly plotting against M a 1 e n-
kov's government and the Soviet
Communist system.
Last December four Beria ac-
complices were shot In a follow-
up purge sweeping Georgia-hot-
bed of Beria men and home of
Beria and the late Joseph Stalin.
But after Malenkov resigned In
February a new era of bloodless
tranquility seemed to d a w n in
Russia under Premier N i c o 1 a 1
Bulganin and Party Chief Nikita
Khruschev. Today's Tiflis broad-
cast abruptly squashed any theo-
ries that blood purges went out
with the Malenkov administration.
Rather the new Georgia trials
served clear notice that Bulganin
and Khrushchev Join Malenkov in
Now Its Official
Thursday, Nor. 94, has been
set aside as Thanksgiving Day
and will be celebrated as a legal
holiday in the United States and
In the Canal Zone, it was dis-
closed at Balboa Heights today.
considering conspiracy with Ba-
ria to be a shooting offense.
The
Judge's Bench
Alfred Roy Dickens, 19, a Pan-
amanian found without legiti-
mate business In Ancon was
fined $10 today in Balboa Ma-
gistrate's Court.
For trespassing on the Navy
reservation Felipe Romero, 30,
also Panamanian- was fined $5.
Trespassing in Tivoli Commis-
sary brought a $10 fine for
Deusdedid Rosarlo Ollvardla, 26,
Panamanian.
Four others charged with com-
missary trespass were luckier.
Two Ecuadoreans found guilty
were put on probation for a
year. Charges against two Pan-
amanians women were with-
drawn.
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Through the
streets of
shuttered
windows
...an
TECHNICOLOR
SIAIHNO
MAIMEN OHARA 6E0K6E NADER
~~ VKm MclAGlN l^EASON
TOR1N THATCHER EDUARD FRANZ ARTHUR SHIELDS
*w b, ARTHUR LUBW. ***, OSCAR BRODNEY d HAWW WJSK1N Fdud, ROBERT ARTHUR
9fr
75
.40
Sensational Release
Starting TODAY NOV. 22
CENTR AL