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The Panama American
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010883/00168
 Material Information
Title: The Panama American
Portion of title: Weekend American
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Donor: Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher: Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication: Panama City, Panama
Publication Date: 1925-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Panama -- Panama
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note: On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: AA00010883:00168
 Related Items
Related Items: Panama America

Full Text
'

*BRANIFF



Panama American
Let the people know the truth and the country is safe1* Abraham Lincoln.
Sca-gramsVO. :
< A\ 11)1 IV UlllSkV
r
Now... 6 Years Old!
PANAMA. R. P., TUESDAY. OCTOBER 14, 1952.
FIVE CENTS
3.000.000-Ton Record
GRIM ACTO DEATHThe body of Ralph Sherman of Hartford, Conn., lies In the charred
rick seat of his aufomoblle after he wm burned to death by flaming gasoline when It
container exploded near Bloomfield, Conn. Police said Sheftnan apparently> took htai own
life after a beserk killing spree In which his wife and anoQier man died and two others
were wounded.
CASUALTIESHaggard, battle-wearied soldiers of the 9th Republic of Korea Infantry Divi-
sion await their turn at a mobile surgical hospital for treatment of Injuries suffered during
a clash with attacking Chinese Reds for possession of White Horse Mountain. The strategic
crest Is the object of fierce see-saw battles be tween South. Korean infantrymen and Coin-
. muhist .Troops.
Ma-In-Law
PanCanaVs
New Target
The Panama Canal Line has
now made mothers-in-law less
mobile.
What effect this is expected
to have on the morale of Pan-
Canal employes, already wrought
up over rents, was not revealed
at Balboa Heights this morning.
Actually, the Canal Company
has not exactly Immobilized
mothers-in-law, but has made
It more expensive to ship them
back to the States for overhaul
and so forth.
What with the higher rents
to pay. and the unrelenting
obligation to buy lottery tick-
ets, many' Zone families are
likely to have insufficient left
to ship Ma-in-law north, even
at freight rates, and uninsured.
The new state of affairs has
prevailed since Oct. 1.
Mothers-in-law have, of course,
prevailed rather longer than
this, and are believed capable
of going right on prevailing, Pa-
nama Canal Company regard-
less.
Details of this latest felonious
assault on the inalienable rights
and privileges of mothers-in-law
living in a free democracy are
contained In printed copies of
the revised schedule of pas-
senger fares of the Panama Line
which have now been distribut-
ed to Panama Line ticket of-
fices and to various U. S. Gov-
ernment agencies on the Isth-
mus.
The new rates, which became
effective the first of this month,
were announced several weeks
ago.
Generally, the new schedule
provides for three classes of
fares, which are commercial,
Company Government, and a
discount rate for certain classes,
including welfare or religious
workers in the Canal Zone.
Only one change of Import-
ance was made in tariff rates
affecting Company-Government
employes. The 50 per cent dis-
count formerly allowed for de-
pendents of employes, other
than their immediate families,
has been discontinued.
The printed schedule shows
the various categories hi which
the employe rate of $120 Is
granted.
These include certain Com-
pany Government concession-
aires and several other cate-
gories which are defined In the
schedule.
The rate of $120 Is charged
on all fares of Company-Gov-
ernment employes and their
families, although the 'differ-
ence between it and the old $40
rate is paid by the employing
bureau or unit of the Canal
organization.
UN Launches
Year's Biggest
Land Attack
SEOUL, Oct. 14 (UP) United
Nations Infantrymen captured
one of two Chinese Communist
mountains on the central front
today in the biggest Allied attack
since the bloody "Heartbreak
Ridge" battle a year ago.
Ground soldiers, tanks, artille-
ry and Air Force fighter-bomb-
ers teamed up In the dawn as-
sault on Triangle Hill, located
north of Kumhwa. the eastern
base of the "Old Iron Triangle"
and on Sniper Ridge across the
valley to the east
Triumphant United Nations
soldiers battled their way to the
crest of Sniper Ridge about noon
and reported that the height now
belongs to the Allies.
Heavy fighting still continues
at the Triangle. After seven
hours. United Nations troops
gained the crest of knobs on the
northeastern corner of the hill.
At 1:00 p.m. yesterday they were
inching their way toward the top
of the main peak.
Eighth Army headquarters did
not disclose the size of the at-
tacking force or the number of
Chinese believed to be on the
mountains.
I APA Group Urges Constant Fight
Against Threats To Press Freedom
Army Cuts
Back Auto
Shipping
Privately-owned utomobll e s
of civilian employes of the De-
partment of Defense will no
longer be shipped to the States
on a space-available basis at the
end of the owner's tour of duty
unless the vehicles were shipped
overseas in the same status.
An Army source confirmed this
morning that new regulations
governing transportation back to
the States of automobiles pri-
vately owned by civilian em-
ployes were issued to Army per-
sonnel in this area on Sept. 26.
Cars which cannot travel
"space available" will pay $11
per measurement ton plus $29
for hadling if they go via MSTS
to New York. Thus an average
car would cost $172 to $180.
The new regulations also
state that under no circums-
tances will an automobile
which has been purchased
overseas by a civilian em-
ploye be returned to the Unit-
ed States at government ex-
pense.
Though the Sept. 26 order was
an Army document, it specifical-
ly covered privately-owned vehi-
cles belonging to "civilian em-
ployes of the Department of De-
fense."
The regulation states that ve-
hicles belonging to those em-
ployed in overseas areas on Sept.
1, 1952 which had been author-
ised "space available, non-re-
imburslble" ocean transport
Erlor to that date would be re-
traed to the United States on
the same basis without charge
to the individual owner, regard-
less of the date of the return of
the employe.
In effect, a civilian employe
said today, this means that a
man whose car was brought
down at government expense
when he came last year, can go
back free.
But" the people who have been
here longer, if they have bought
their cars locally, will have to
f.ay commercial rates to get
hem home when they retire, or
resign, pr get reduction of force.
The employe pointed out that
the longer an employe has been
here at the more likely he is to
have purchased his car in Pa-
nama.
He predicted that the new re-
gulation would be apt to cut in-
to the sales of vehicles by Pa-
nama automobile dealers.
The
Judge's Bench
A 84-year-old Army lieutenant.
Earl Maxwell Gatewood. was
fined $25 in Balboa Magistrate's
Court yesterday on a charge of
reckless driving.
He was involved in a single-car
accident on Blgrow Street, Fort
Kobbe, at 3 a.m. last Saturday.
Bartenio Navarro, 21-year-old
Panamanian, was sentenced to
30 days in Jail for loitering un-
der Quarters 2212 in Curundu.
Lawyer May
Survey Rents
For Employes
Civic Council officials are In
active correspondence with sev-
eral Washington attorneys, one
of whom may be hired to press
the fight against rent raises and
for a general review of the Pan-
ama Canal's operations.
Charles W. Hammond, presi-
dent of the General civic Coun-
cils, said that one potential le-
gal representative wanted to vis-
it the Canal Zono and make an
on-the-spot survey of the situa-
tion before entering the picture
on a retainer basis.
In reply to a question as to
whether Howard Munro could
accomplish much in Washington
now, with almost all legislators
back in their home-States for the
elections. Hammond said:
"Indeed he can."
September Tolls
Total $2,635,989
For 615 Transits
For the first time in the Panam Canal's history, net
tonnage of vessels transiting the waterway during a single
month exceeded 3,000,000 tons.
Statistics for September released yesterday at Bal-
boa Heights also show that a new high of $2,635,989.46
was collected on ocean-going commercial vessels, 615 of
which passed from ocean to ocean.
The former record for tolls was $2,512,008.70 set
last March. September's transits took in $123,980.76
more than the previous top.
Community Chest Agencies (7)
Scouting is a whole lot more
than helping old ladies across
the street. It's learning how to
live and how to keep others liv-
ing, how to be good citizens, hot
to follow Scout laws which, if
everyone followed them, would
get rid of a lot of trouble in the
world.
In line with the business of
keeping people alive and dealing
with emergencies, Scouts cons-
tantly practice such things as
artificial respiration The group
above was at work en this pro-
blem the other night at the A-
mador Road Boy Scout shack.
Like the three other groups in
the Canal Zone, the membership
of the Boy Scouts of America has
mushroomed In the oast year.
Early last month thre were 386
Cub Scouts in 15 Cub Scout
Packs, 281 Boy Scouts in 13 Scout
troops, and 58 Explorer Scouts
(the oldest group) in six Explorer
units, such as Ships, Posts and
Squadrons.
Working with the boys are 320
volunteer leaders.
The Boy scout membership is
the highest it has ever been in
the 33-year-old history of the
Council. By next January, there
will be Scout Troops and Cub
Scout packs in every Canal Zone
civilian community and in most
of the military reservations.
Boy Scout troops were organiz-
ed in the Canal Zone as early
as 1910 in some of the construc-
tion towns. In 1919 the Boy
Scout council was formed to
coordinate their activities.
The Boy Scout camp at El Vol-
can In western Panama is com-
paratively new although Boy
Scouts have been camping here-
abouts for many years.
The Boy Scout quota of the
Community Chest is $4,895.
Though new records were set
last month in both the net ton-
nage of vessels using the Canal
and in the amount of tolls col-
lected on ocean-going ships, com-
plete figures on the total amount
of cargo shipped through the
Canal in September have not
been compiled.
The net tonnage of commercial
vessels last month was reported
at 3,029,335 tons. The former re-
cord of 2,872,628 net tons was al-
so set last March when there
were 613 transits by ocean-going
commercial vessels.
Last month's transit record of
heavy ships fell seven short of
the 622 record established in May
of this year.
In addition to the tolls collect-
ed on the ocean-going commer-
cial traffic in September, a total
of $5,064 66 was collected on the
100 small craft in transit and a
tolls credit of $432.301.32 was re-
ported on U.S. Government-own-
ed or operated vessels.
There were 82 large and 34
small Government vessels on the
transit lists for last month.
The daily average of transits
by ocean-going commercial ves-
sels last month was 20.5 ships.
This was slightly higher aver-
age than that for last May when
the existing record was estab-
lished, since May has one day
more than the month of Sep-
tember.
Commercial traffic for the first
nine months of this calendar
year are far higher than the
comparable period in 1951.
There were 5,136 transits by
large commercial vessels, as com-
pa-ed with 4,272 In the first nine
months of 1951.
Tolls collected this calendar
year are near $3.500.000 higher
than those for last year.
BALBOA TIDES W |
Wednesday, Oct. 15 I
HIGH LOW
1:20 a. m. 7:37 a. m.
1:40 p. m.
7:51 p. m.
CHICAGO, 111., Oct. 14 (UP)
Members of the Inter-American
Press Association were warned
today that freedom of the press
in many areas of the western
hemisphere is in danger.
The committee investigating
press freedom In the Americas
called on the association to car-
ry on a continuous fight in an
effort to keep public opinion In-
formed about violations.
A report released by the IAPA
Eress freedom committee said
hat in cases where the inde-
pendent press has launched an
Immediate and vigorous cam-
paign against encroachments a-
?alnst freedom of expression,
avorable results have been ob-
tained.
The report also said that
"there Is increasing sensitivity
towards the actions and reports
of this association regarding the
state of freedom of Information
in many countries. It is Indica-
tive that we are making progress
in our fight for this freedom."
The report was presented this
morning to the IAPA assembly
by Jules Dubois, chief Latin-
American correspondent for the
Chicago Tribune and chairman
of the press freedom committee.
It was also mentioned In the
report that there Is freedom of
the press In the United States
but that a ceaseless struggle
must be carried on to break
down the "barriers to the free
flow of information."
The committee cited an April
17 news conference held by Pre-
sident Truman at which he in-
timated he had authority to seize
all VS. newspapers and radio
stations In a national emergen-
cy. Without commenting upon
the President's remarks, the
committee said that the Su-
preme Court dispelled the threat
of seizure of the press and ra-
dio stations when it upheld the
decision of federal Judge Pine in
the steel mill seizure case.
The commltee also called for a
thorough Investigation of news-
paper seizures in Colombia and
said that the "aggression" a-
gatnst El Tiempo and El Espec-
tador dailies was premeditated
and unwarranted. The editorial
and printing plants of both of
these papers were attacked on
Sept. 6 and burned by civilian
rioters.
The report said that the Co-
lombian government made no
move to furnish additional pro-
tection when the employes of
the paper called for assistance
to halt the mob. Photographs of
the mob show uniformed police
standing idly by while the news-
paper plants were wrecked.
The committee said no free-
dom of the press exists in Ar-
gentina. It noted the expropia-
non of the newspaper La Pren-
sa and the imprisonment of Da-
vid Michel Torino, editor and
publisher of El Intransigente as
evidence of a lack of freedom of
the press.
The report said that "when
the judge were about to order
the release of Torino, the au-
thorities gave them 24 hours
to reserve their decision or be
removed."
It was also reported that exe-
cutives from Latin-American
and the United States last night
urged for new sources of news-
print. Guillermo Martinez Mer-
quez, chairman of the Inter-
American Press Association's
newsprint committee, delivered
the report advocating expanded
production as a basis for the so-
lution of the newsprint shortage
problem.
Merquez. speaking to the IAPA
convention meeting here, direct-
ed attention to bagasse, a re-
sidual product of sugar cane aa
a possible solution to the news-
print shortage. He said that the
fuel cost of the newly developed
bagasse process is only $6 to $8
per ton far below the present
rate for wood pulp.
World's Greatest Flagpole Sitter
Lies Dead, Unclaimed In NY Morgue
NEW YORK, Oct. 14 (UP;
Alvln "Shipwreck" Kelly, the
greatest flagpole sitter of them
all, lay dead and unclaimed in
the city morgue today, his dar-
in feats of the 1920s all but for-
otten by the one-time mara-
hon dancers and tin lizzie ad-
dicts whose cheers he drew.
Kelly once earned as much as
$500 a day by sitting on preca-
rious perches, and he stirred the
Imaginations of fans throughout
the country.
He even set the nation's small
fry to clambering up backyard
Cles in a daredevil fad that col-
>sed only with the Wall Street
stock market crash In 1929.
When the nation turned to
more serious thoughts, the man
who billed himself as "the lucki-
est fool In the world" lost his
luck.
He was almost pernnlless when
a policeman found his body on
a west Side Manhattan sidewalk
Saturday night, not far from his
birthplace.
It took police many hours to
identify the dead man as Alvln
Shipwreck" Kelly.
A scrapbook telling of his 13,-
000 hours standing and sitting on
poles in rain, snow, sleet and
hall was clutched under his arm.
His furnished room was strewn
with tackles and ropes, things he
probably had used in his long
stints atop poles.
The longest was 49 days 1 hour
on an Atlantic City, N. J., porch.
Kelly was born Aleyslus An-
thony Kelly In New York's old
Hell's Kitchen, a West Side tene-
ment district.
His father died before he was
born, and bis mother died at his
birth.
He was adopted by a family
friend, and at 13 ran away to
sea, changing his name to Alvln.
When he was only seven, Kel-
ly climbed his first pole. He per-
formed the feat to escape the
wrath of an old man he had
been annoying.
Two years later, he did a "hu-
man fly" routine up the side of
a building.
But Kelly did not come into
his own as a daredevil until 15
years later.
In the meantime, he was a
seaman, a structural steel work-
er, a steeplejack, a high diver,
a licensed pilot who performed
aerial stunts, a boxer and a mo-
vie double.
He fought in the ring as "Sai-
lor Kelly" and won the nick-
name "Shipwreck" because he
was knocked out so many times.
It was while in Hollywood that
Kelly's career finally took shape.
In January. 1924, Kelly sat on
a flagpole there for 15 hours and
13 minutes, to advertise a movie,
and he kept right on shinnylng
up poles for the next six years.
Kelly made a lot of money by
charging admission to persons
who wanted to stand on roof-
stops and watch him perch on
his poles, from books about his
life, from endorsements and
from personal appearances.
After his Hollywood debut,
Kelly toured 28 cities, sitting on
poles In each one.
In New Orleans, he perched for
100 hours, and in 1927. he sat
on a pole atop Newark's St.
Francis Hotel for 312 hours. In
1929, he lasted 23 days and seven
hours on a pole In Baltimore's
Carlins' Park, and It wasn't long
before the city's teen-agers were
giving him competition.
He made $6.000 during his
Newark stint, and later, in Dal-
las, he married an elevator oper.
ator to whom he was introduced
when she was boosted up to the
top of a pole to shake hands with
him. They had one son, Alvln, Jr.
In 1929, KeUy's bubble burst.
The depression hit with its full
force, and people were not in-
terested in spending money to
watch men sit on poles any
more.
Once In a while, Kelly tried
his old stunts, but they did not
draw much attention, and he
vanished from sight.
In 1934, he was found working
as a gigolo in a Broadway dance
hall, and during the war, he ap-
plied to resume his career as a
merchant seaman.
More recently, the grizzled old
man had been seen in his old
boyhood neighborhood.
His scrapbook usually was
tucked under his arm, and ha
liked to reminisce about the
boom days of the 1920s when Al-
vln Kelly was the daringes
daredevil of them alL


f AGE TWO
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DART NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1952.
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
INC.
OWNIO ND eu.Ll.MIO .Y TMI MNAM IMHICAN P
o >y NLTON OUNHVILL IN ..!
HARMOOIO ARIA*. IOITO
1 M c-hiit O. BOI 134. PNMA. H OF P.
TuIhonI P.n.m. NO 2-0740 <9 LlNIt)
C..LI ADD. PANAMimCAN. PNM
,-, mm nreiee, II 17 Cintiwi. Av.nu eiTW.iN 12im no IStm Stm.t
*" mS.hiMmm --SHVU* ,!"v'' INC'
343 MAOIiON Avt. N.W YORK. (17. N. V. .,,.
*" 1,70 I 2.90
I* MONTH. IN AOVANCt--------------------------------------... 13 00
fOK ' MONTH. IN ADVANC _------------------------ 24 00
re* ON VIA. IN AOVANC..----_^________ZJ._______________--------
Labor News
And
Comment
THIS IS YOUR BUM ' MADIM 1WN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Th. Moil Bo > on open forum tor reeder. 0 The Poriomo Am.r-
Icea. Letter era received gratefully ond or. h.ndled in a wholly conf.-
dentlol ^^^ t unu ,,., b, impati, ,..,, .pp.., th.
next d.y. letter, are publilhed m the order received.
Pleat, try to k.ep the letter, limited to one poe length.
Identity of letter writer, i. held in etricte.t confidence.
Thl. newtpoper ...um.i no re.pon.ibility or rtetementj 01 opinion.
aprcued in letter, from readers.
SPECIAL BREED?
Sir:
Inasmuch as the 'future looks perilously gloomy Jor MM
Whole world today, and that we *m drunken and nodding on
the brink o a woeful universal precipice. I could*S*S&
emotion of lauding the writer of the letter captloned Special
Breed," (Mall Box. Oct. 11 and signed Equality ^^
'i tribute your fairness in printing the anti-American vitu-
peration of your contributor 'Equality," knowing you do so in
th same spirit vou print the tirades of Vlshinskys. Oromykos,
and other enemies of our Democratic system. _f.
Though thev may stupidly believe they gain adherents
through their invective, they merely serve to remind us tne
enemy Is ever present, and all too frequently in our midst,;
boring from within. .. ...i ;
The struggle for freedom and rights Is an American neri-
tage as we all know, and should we complacently permit any
Administration to trample us we would be undeserving of tne
^"acceptance of the deceit and chicanery that Is now be-:
lng perpetrated on the Zonians would but lead to greater ob- j
noxious measures destined to wipe Americanism from the zone, i
and to replace It with a cringing subservience.
America is the America we all know because her citizens
struggled always upward to make It so. Detractor "Equality i
will not deter us from continuing that struggle.
We Zonians will remember our heritage and carry on the
Rood fight, and will also remember that even the American
Eagle can have parasite lice on It.
E. Plurlbus Unum.
Sir*
' I read your -Equality's" lengthy letter In the Mall Box. and
It gave me a warm feeling inside. I always like to see a lellow
American get something off his chest.
I served a stint in Uncle Sam's Army a few years back,
and I know that for a while I made the same mistake Equality
must have been making In the past.
I was terribly unhappy with the way they were running
that man's Army; I could hardly stand straight under the
weight of the chip I was carrying on my shoulder, but, I said
nothing and 1 scowled at my fellow soldiers who were griping
their heads off .-..
Then, a good buddy of mine (much smarter than I) said
to me one day. "Look. I don't like the Army and I don't mind
saying so. I'm an American and I rebel at being pushed
around. In fact, that is the reason we are fighting this war
co we won't have to live under a dictatorship or any other tota-
litarian type of government.
"Sure, I* admit that the Army is totalitarian, but it has to
be that way. Just remember; you won't always be In the Army.
And when you get out no one can ahoye you around without
getting a fight out o it."
And then he gave me some good advice. He said: "When
you are feeling low. start griping. Gripe about everythingIt'll
make vou feel good."
So that's the feason I got a warm feeling In my heart
when I read your letter, Equality. I knew that someone else
had learned the secret ot "bearing up" under a totalitarian
State (like the Panam Canal Company).
It doesnt make much difference that what you were grip-
ing about doesn't make senseyou'll get the hang of it. And
when you do I know that we Zonians will have gained a good,
fighting companion.
Now, pal. we could be foolish and do like the sergeant sug-
gested In the Mail Box the other nightyou know, take the
boat home. I was there not too long ago, and I see by the news-
papers that they do a little griping there now and then, too.
I wonder if the sergeant ever stopped to think why the
coal miners, steel workers, and so on, don't Just turn tall when
they get unhappy with their working conditions.
Nope, it doesn't work that way any more. Organized labor
has made it possible for vou and I to stay where we are and
fight lor what la right.
So buddy, let's nut our shoulders together and push. The
good Lord knows there's plenty of pushing needs done here.
Seriously, I for one Intend to let the Pan Canal know that
I didn't come here to be pushed around like a raw recruit; and
I Intend to let plenty folks at home know that their own gov-
ernment Is using some of the same deceitful tactics here that
our boys are fighting against in Korea.
And before anyone criticizes too strongly our griping here,
he should consider the fact that the only "breed'; who does not
let out a yelp when someone Intentionally steps on his toes is
the Communist breed. In Russia they have "equality," and it
takes a small governing body of "servants of the people," train-
ed In lying and underhanded tactics, to keep the rest of them
"equal."
If yo'i really want ''quality," you'll find It there, but if you
want Democracy, pitch in and help right that monster that la
growing in Washington and has already spread one of its ten-
tacles, to the Canal Zone.
Homo SapiensU.S.A.
"The Route of the Qood Neighbor"
BOEING 4-enjjine planes
NO INCREASE IN PRICES!
FREE MEALS COCKTAILS!
REGULAR FLIGHTS WEEKLY
TO ONE WAT ROUND TRIP
MIAMI ........... $ 67.- $120.60
NEW YORK....... 101.- 208.60
GUAYAQUIL ...... 75.- 135.-
QU1TO........... 96.- 154.80
FOR MORE DETAILS SEE

PANAMA DISPATCH SERVICE
Opposite Ancn Busstop Telephone 2-1655
By Victor Riesel
Half a billion dollars a year Is
spent by the mysterious Central
Intelligence Agency. But appa-
rently there is not 25 cents to
spare for one of its cloak and
dagger couriers to taxi down a
Washington street to a man who
knows more than anyone in the
nation about the anti-U.S. cam-
paign of characters like Jose-
phine (I Love The Perons, Dead
and Alive i Baker.
There aren't many more con-
tinents we can afford to lose. Yet
we're losing Central and South
America, too, because of a weird
CIA allergy to contacting in-
formed anti-Communists who
are under constant attack by the
Soviet propaganda apparatus.
A bitter wave of antl-t'nit-
ed States sentiment is hurting
our defense, endangering the
big canal and driving Ameri-
can businessman bankrupt be-
low the Rio Grande. Still our
Latin American friends are
not contacted by our govern-
ment agencies, not informed,
not alerted.
Thus it Is that singer Josephine
Baker, of the famous Stork Club
fury, can float down all of Latin
America fsom Mexico City to
Rio. speaking against us at a
series of anti-U.S. rallies, arous-
ing the colored millions of Latin
America, while the $500,000.000
Central Intelligence Agency does
little to counteract or neutralize
her propaganda.
Then she'wlnds up in Argen-
tina, Joining forces with the Fas-
cist government of the Peronis-
tas, which has smashed free la-
bor as well as the free press and
the U.S. Is pilloried and friend-
less.
Yet. Just a few streets form
the central Intelligence Agency
headouarters sits Seraflno Ro-
maudi. Latin American expert
for the American Federation of
Labor. But not once has he ever
had a note, a telephone query or
a visit from Central Intelligence.
But then, why should he be
different from the scores of oth-
er Informed anti-Soviet special-
ists who are Ignored?
Had Central Intelligence gone
to such experts It would have
known that Josephine Baker was
heading south for a series of
antl-U.8. rallies such as the re-
cent one In the ABI building In
Rio De Janeiro, at which she
tried to turn all Brazil against
us.
They would have known that
he planned to eulogize the la-
bor hating Peronista govern-
ment, one border south, and
charge that "lynchlngs" and un-
warranted "electrocutions were
the order of the day" here.
She then could have been neu-
tralized. But apparently we're got
getting that for our half a bil-
lion a year.
Typical of the failure of our
foreign counter intelligence Is an
Incident which rippled quietly
through one of the private din-
ing rooms at the Hotel Mayflow-
er in Washington the other day.
Six Nicaraguan labor people,
who had been invited to the
U.S. as a good will gesture,
were being dined by State
Dept. The Nicaraguan Ambas-
sador, one of this country's
good friends, was there natur-
ally. Suddenly one of the Ni-
caraguan workers took a leaf-
let from his pocket and show-
ed It to Romauldl. It was hair-
raising antl U.S. propaganda
officiaUy distributed by the
Argentine embassy, mind you,
throughout Nicaragua.
Following the line of attack
used by the sulking singer. Jose-
phine Baker, the leaflet was
titled "This Is American Demo-
cracy." On the cover was a
sketch of the Statue of Liberty
with a ghastly caricature of
President Truman's face drawn
in. The outstretched hand, which
symbolically holds the torch of
liberty, had instead in this car-
toon a rope from which hung a
Negro.
The leaflet was passed or to
the Nicaraguan ambassador by
the outraged visitor from his
homeland. The ambassador was
horrified.
The State Dept. and Central
Intelligence must have known of
this damaging antl U.S. prop-
aganda, or they were criminally
negligent. Yet no contact was
made with the Nlcarguan am-
bassador.
But he is a friend of ours
and we have so few.
With Just one cable he could
have stopped circulation of
this brutal attack on ua in a
land which may tome day have
to supply a second oath across
Central America if the Pan-
ama Canal Is sabotaged or
bombed. But he knew nothing
of itend back in his home
country thev hesrd nothing of
any resentment in Washing-
ton.

It took a visitor to tip off an
ambassador. ,
The AFL's Latin expert, Sera-
flno Romauldl. has for years
tried futllely to get action from
our agencies to counteract this
sort of propaganda. That Is the
core of global Intelligence work.
Still he has failed. Just as he
has been brushed off when he
tried to get the Voice of America
to expose Josephine Baker,
dahling" of the dllletantes.
What are we getting for our
half a billion bucks a stock
Dile of cloaks and daggers for
future war surplus?
The Time Is Bound to Come
Disclosures
By BOB RUARK
NEW YORK.I iiave been reading the papers
every day, as thoroughly as the Seriea would al-
low, and must confess that I am more than
slightly addled by Adlal and harassed by Harry,
over the subject of Gen. Elsenhower. Let us be
patient while we evaluate Ike according to his
critics' estimation.
We always knew, of course, that Ute was a
ayphold carrier, but I had forgotten until Just
the other day that he served as a member of
the German General Staff in World War II, and
was directly responsible for Germany's defeat
of the Allies.
That he beats Mamie dally Is common knowl-
edge, but 1 had forgotten that when Germany
won the -war. Use deserted to Russia and be-
came Josef Stalin. A. i ,
Elsenhower, is actually pseudonym. His real
name Is Charles (Lucky) Luciano and his rec-
ord Includes several successful well poisonings.
He hates dogs, abhors cats, and sticks up fill-
ing stations for fun.
As a member of the German General Staff,
Ike was directly responsible for Dachau and
Belsen. His pet name among his Intimates Is
Beast."
He Invented the quick-burning oven in his
spare time, perfecting the invention Just In time
to celebrate the march on Poland. His long
fangs are filed daily with an emery wheel. The
hole In his pants is for the tail.
The boy Elsenhower too* nis unger out of the
dike one day and created the Johnstown flood.
His early experiments with matches led to the
Chicago fire, of which you may have heard.
He was the head machine-gunner in the St.
Valentine's Day massacre, in the same city. He
was feeling a bit pettish that day.
It has never been proven, but it Is hinted
around in arsonical circles that Elsenhower
touched a torch to the Hlndenburg, and that
his was the hand that sent the Morro Castle to
her grave.
I disremember whether this was before or
alter he kidnaped the Lindbergh baby. But it
was his Iceberg that sank the Titanic.
Ike was directly responsible for the drought
that sent the Okies to California, and has been
a member in good standing of the Ku Klux
Klan since earliest childhood. His half-brother,
Klaus Fuchs, is in Jail, for atom-stealing. A
half-sister. Lizzie Borden, chopped up the fam-
ily with an axe.
While playing college football, Ike ran the
wrong way wider the assumed name of Roy
Riegels. While playing baseball for the Yankees,
he stole Babe Ruth's watch.
It was in his postwar days as head man at
Columbia that he masterminded the fixing of
basketball games. This was a natural step for
him to take, since he had previously rigged the
Chicago Black Sox scandal.
During his tenure as Chief of Staff, EJsen-
iower conducted a thriving business in hot Ice-
boxes, illicit mink coats, grain futures, and In-
come-tax fixes. He was directly responsible for
demobilizing the armed forces and for the in-
vention of the yo-yo. A cousin, Mickey Jellte, Is
currently In trouble on a vice rap.
Ike's eldest brother, who was known as Al
Capone, Is dead. His maternal great-grandfath-
er was Benedict Arnold.
Gossip around the saloons has it, too, that he
once denied a second serving of champagne to
Josephine Baker in the Stork Club, and that
he also slew Cock Robin, using the alias of
Sparrow.
I made a mistake the other day when I said
he ate up Little Red Riding Hood's grandmoth-
er. It was the biggest mistake I ever made in
a man, but I still wouldn't put that grandma-
devouring business past him. He's got a mean,
cruel face, and he always looks hungry.
This Is about as far as I have gotten with
President Truman's appraisal of Gen. Ike. I am
sure there must be many more, and worse
things lurking In Ike's character, and yon can
depend on Harry, the selfless servant of right
and truth, to smoke them out.
Give hi mhell, Harry, and don't forget to tell
about the time Bee ate up Jonah, while he was
masquerading as a whale.
WalterWinchelllnNewYork
MEMOS OF A GIRL FRIDAY
Dear WW: Eleanor Holm's barristers asked the
phone pholks to check the wires in "their" home
since she moved back. They were tipped they
were tapped during her absence. "An Eve'g With
Beatrice Llllie" (at the Booth) is sold out for its
planned 4 week run. It'll be extended lndef. Only
available seats (besides brokerages) are four
(down front) given to the Runyon Cancer Fund
in the Hotel Astor.. ."My Pal Joey" members re-
port that one of the cast brings the Commy
Dally Worker (backstage) and rants about you
and "InJustice"...Five premieres in a row next
week...Town breathless over Robert Ruark's
blast at Josephine Baker (in the N. Y. WorM-
Tel-Sun) for the reported libel on the U. 8., be-
fore her premiere at Buenos Aires. The N. Y.
Dally News had the exclusive Wed., confirming
many of the revelations we offered a year ago.
Odear. teh old Wlnchelluck!
WMCA. (How many of our skewps can get con-
firmed so soon?).. Nice editorial In the Oct. 4th
Polish-American Journal. Title: "Welcome Back
WW." Have a quote; "We agree with the author
of The Communist Trail In America' (J. 8polan-
sky. the F.B.I. hero) who says: 'Winchell's return
is a severe blow to the American Reds'and we
add that his return is also a timely and powerful
aid to the forces of freedom".. .Next Sunday
when you get to the No. 2 Commy fugitive (and
the $7,000 Reward for the convicted fugitive 7
Red chiefs) punchline It with: "Here's a chance
to become a Capitalist by oatchlng a Commu-
nist!"
Before a N. Y. Pooat columnist (not Doris Flee-
son) went on a tv program (the other day) she
asked them not to mention the name of her pa-
per! To use one from her syndicate. The pub-
louselty has her ashamed!. F. M. of that rag
demands a retraction (and apology) for saying
what you skid about her Big Mouf! That'll be the
day! Oh, how I love it the way they don't like It.
The new Esquire Girl cslendar is on the stands.
Such figgera.. .Mollie Bern memos that the
Heart Ass'n Benefit will be at "81" on the l*th
.. .The only thing holding up Chesterfield's spon-
sorship of the Stork Club sustanlng program It
the sponsor demands at least 40 stations.. Mall
on our first teevycast is too big for one little girl,
mister. I quit...We have threats to picket the
station (Sunday) during your program Any-
how, Louisville Is your 17th teevy city.. ABC had
31 stations ready but Groen is way overboard on
you now. They signed for 26 weeks (as an alter-
nate) and when they took it all onthe budget
was more than double. It costs the sponsor over
S2.000.000 (instead of 1 million) to get a MM
minute show. If ABC gets an alternate. It can't
use you during this holiday season... Nearly
every letter asks: "Hope yen didn't break your
specs."
Well, dean bwoy, hold onto your rockln' chair.
Howard Fast (the Communist-writer denied per-
mission to go abroad by the Dept. of State) will
soon begin ten b'casts for Borey Pink's station
^e WSHIMTOH
i ., muoi
MERRY-GO-ROUND
y DRIW MAKSON
I Juit went into the file, on La Baker and
found thai darling memo Just before she opened
st Cepa City In Miami Beach. It was a briefs talk
with Ned Scbayler. co-boss there. Bald Sehuyler:
"Walter. I can get Josephine Baker over here for
abesit 70s a week. She's been abroad S7 years.
Only thing betiding up her decision Is her con-
cern abesit What would Walter Wlnchell say
about see giving ap my American citlsenshlp?
There H Is. what can I tell hert" "Oh. nuts." yew
told hht, "Bow's Her Act??.".. And then von
raved abent It On the air. too! Short I v after,
she earn te N. T. (at the Strand at S10.000 a
week) where the only hilling (on a banner a-
roend the marqaee) wee: Joseohlne Baker. Wal-
ter Wlnchell ays: 'A Real Starr"...Her next
stop: The H**y at 20.000 per week plu percent-
age. She made 120.000 that week...The rest Is
history. Oh, those Bed, red faces new. (Paces?)
Here's one for Omen's ad chief. Hank Dorff:
Thev need clocks In the new hospital being built
at St. Le (France) with money donated by vete-
rans of the 1st Division. That wonderful outfit
leveled the town In World War II...Saddest
honeynooners In town: N. Y. Times reoorter-aee,
Alfred Clark, snd his bride. Pwances. Thev were
set to Pan-Am (to Ynrrop) on a 2-month trip.
They must stay here, however, because Alf Is a
key witness In a (100.000 libel action due soon
The reds trapped tome girls who smuggled geld
Into the U. S... They hid It (In the form of old-
leaf) In their bras and G-strlngs.. Llddul Boxee
seess dot Robert Sylvester found out hew It feels
to have your stuff cribbed mltont credit. Life
meg, he says, grabbed manv of his he-bop gags
(the bopportunlst.) mldoud crediting the con-
tributors Bob credited. Hi, sweetyl
Drew Pearson says: Russians have trick Korean peace pro-
posal up their sleeve;'Stevenson will give down-to-
earth speeches; Kefauver is only candidate to file pri-
mary campaign expenses.
WASHINGTON. Two proposals to solve the most Important
foreign-relations problem of the day peace in Korea will
be aired In the United Nations Assembly this week. But there's
little chance that the peace talks will ever get beyond the pro-
paganda stage.
No. 1Russian foreign ministry Vlshlnsky Is expected to
make a spectacular but phony peace offer, calling for the with-
drawal of Chinese troops from Korea, the return of .the Kurlls
Islands to Japan, and the withdrawal of American troops from
Japan thus leaving Japan unprotected and ripe for Commun-
ist Invasion.
No. 2Secretary Acheson will counter the Russian proposal
with a dramatic appeal to Communist China and North Korea
to end the fighting in Korea. This will be signed by a majority
o U.N. members.
A rough outline of the appeal has already been drafted and
agreed upon by Britain, France and the United States, plus most
of the smaller nations.
It will be a direct plea to Peiplng and Pyongyang to accept
the OJt, truce terms at Panmunjom, endorsing the principle that
no prisoner should be forced to return home against his will.
Since this Is the last reamalnlng stumble-block In the war of a
military truce, the appeal will offer a face-saving formula for
ending the war.
It Is always possible that the Russian and American dele-
gates might be able to sit down behind closed doors and settle
the Korean war In New York City a long way from Panmun-
jom.
However, the American estimate Is that Russia wants to pro-
long the war and talk about peace only for propaganda purposes.
ADLAI DOWN TO EART
Adlal Stevenson will bring his lofty phrases down to earth
and try out a few "give 'am hell" speeches on a barnstorming,
whistle-stop swing through the populated East, beginning
shortly.
The Democratic candidate decided to adopt, in part, Presi-
dent Truman's strategy in order to put some fife into the party
and bring out the Democratic vote in the big cities.
Stevenson agreed to roll up his sleeves and come out slug-
ging after reports of party apathy from the big Democratic
strongholds in the East.
His campaign managers, Including top adviser.Wilson Wyatt,
argued that Stevenson had already made a strong impression on
the independent voters and had better concentrate for a while
on rank-and-flle Democrats. If they stay at home in November,
Wyatt argued, It will mean that the East's big electoral-vote
states will go to Eisenhower.
As a result, Stevenson agreed to a Truman-type, whistle-
stop tour, complete with off-the-cuff, back-platform speeches.
IKE'S CAMPAIGN EXPENSES
The Senate Elections Committee has been unable to get an
accounting from General Elsenhower on how much he spent to
win the Presidential nomination.
Last August, the committee asked all the Presidential can-
didates to submit a financial report. The only one who reported
was Senator Kefauver.
All the others, except Elsenhower, promised an accounting
as soon as they got their words audited. But Elsenhower ignor-
ed the request.
The committee then sent a second request by registered mall
to Elsenhower aboard his campaign train. The letter was signed
for but still no reply.
FLYING SAUCER RINGS
The Navy is ss.vlng the scoop for Life magazine, but Navy
scientists have photographed "phantom" flying saucers In the
Artie. They believe this will explain, In part, the flying saucer
mystery.
The Navy saucers were produced during experiments in cos-
mic-ray research, but went kept secret because of the project's
highly classified nature. However, the Navy has finally decided
to declassify the pictures and slip them first to Life magazine. I
The pictures show rings resembling flying saucers, which]
the Navy scientists say were caused by firing small guided mts-i
siles through cold air masses. The missiles are fired from bal-
loons high in the Arctic stratosphere as part of the cosmic-ray
experiments.-
The missiles, themselves, do not look like flying saucers. But
as they penetrate the cold air masses, they produce rings of
light, which are nothing more than a natural phenomena caus-
ed by the atmospheric conditions.
The rings are plainly visible and could be seen in some parta
of the United States.
POLITICO-GO-ROUND
The Republican national committee has made a secret ana-
lysis of the fight for the Senate. As of today, "here's how It looks
to the Republicans they think they'll lose Senate seats In
Montana, Washington, Indiana and Missouri, but will keep Sen-
ate seats In New York, Ui ah and Wisconsin.
Their closest races the ones they're most worried about
are Ohio, Connecticut, Massachusetts and New Jersey.
A Democratic research crew has been assigned to run down
all of General Elsenhower's past statements on foreign policy.
Some OOP strategists now fear Ike has gone too reactionary.
In his,attempt to make peace with the Taft forces the experts
say he's become so right wing that he's In serious danger of
losing the Important middle-of-the-road independents.
The Ted Braun public relations firm has prepared a special
S'litical course for business executives. The idea is to encourage
p executives to take an active part in politics, even run for
office. Safeway stores has bought the course, is teaching it to
more than 5,000 Safeway manaver across the country.
BOSS OF OPS
Price boss Tlghe Woods has been In office less than six weeks,
but already his superiors are talking about dumping him.
The man who got him the Job. economic stabilizer Roger
Putnam, is now under pressure to ease Woods out as gracefully
as possible.
Woods has been under fire by Sen. Willis Smith, North Caro-
lina Democrat, and also lnnide his own agency over decentraliz-
ing price-control activities.
Woods has been working on a plan to turn price control over
to local boards In all cities of more than 100,000 population. This
was the way he controlled rents when he was rent stabiliser.
Though he did a good Job of cracking down on rent violators,
many of his division heads fear that decentralizing nrice control
would wreck the stabilization program. What It would do la turn
over the mechanics of price control to local stabilization boards.
The Consumer Advisory Committee, which has tried to re-
present the consumers before the price agencv, has threatened
to resign if Woods carries out his plan. But Woods may be the
one to leave.
NOTEEconomic stabilizer Putnam will recommend a six-
month extension of price controls past the April 31 deadline,
regardless of the outcome of the November 4 election.
THE BEST fOR
- ALL 0CCAS10HS
0eWfcS

DISTILLED AND BOTTLED
IN
CANADA
^^y^^^c^^w^
WAlKlftVIUI
CANADA
ISTAIUIMID tOSO


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1952.
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE TRREf
iciett
ff/ri. (^.arroll O. J\ochtr
Bo, 17, Balloa Pkon* Batloa 352/
' FAREWELL DINNER HELD AT UNION CLUB
The Secretary of the Brazilian Legation and Mrs. Oswal-
do Barreto e Silva, who re Ravin* soon for Europe, were
the guests of honor at a farewell dinner given Sunday eve-
ning at the Union Club by a group of their friends.
The Ambassador of Honduras to Panama and Mrs. Mar-
co A. Raudales-F lanas were hosts to the group for cocktails
at the Embassy preceding the dinner.
Brazil-Panama Cultural
Society Entertains
The Members of the Brazil-
Panama Cultural 8oclety en-
rtained last evening with a
farewell party given at the
home of Mrs. Abbie de Linares
In Bella Vista in honor of the
Secretary of the Brazilian Le-
gation and Mrs. Oswaldo Barre -
'.o E. Silva.
Dr. And Mrs. Arias
To Vacation In Peru
Dr. and Mrs. Adolfo Arias P.
left the Isthmus by plane this
morning for Lima, Peru where
they will vacation with relatives
Xor several weeks.
Farewell Dinner At
Costa Rican Embassy
The Ambassador of Costa Ri-
ca to Panama and Mrs. Alfon-
so Guzman Leon were hosts at
a dinner given Saturday eve-
ning at the Embassy in fare-
well to the Secretary of the
Brazilian Legation and Mrs. Os-
waldo Barreto e Silva, who
plan to leave the Isthmus soon
for his new post in Belgium.
Visitors Leave Por Peru
Mr. and Mrs: Enrique Miro
Quesada left Panama recently
to return to Lima, Per*. They
were accompanied by her mo-
ther, Mrs. Francisco Arias P.
who will vacation for several
weeks in Peru.
Mr. Miro Quesada was the
Special Mission Ambassador
from Peru to the Inauguration.
Mrs. Vlelblg Is Visitor Here
Mrs. Joseph F. Vlelbig, a for-
mer Isthmian resident, arrived
by plane on Saturday night
from San Francisco, California,
en route to Santiago, Chile, and
is the house guest, for a brief
visit, of Mr. and Mrs. J. Walter
Young.
Mr. and Mrs. Young were
hosts on Sunday afternoon at
an "At Home" given in honor
of their guest at their quarters
on the Naval Reservation in
Balboa.
Mrs. Heurtematte Honors
Inaugural Visitors
Mrs. Elisa Heurtematte en-
tertained a group of her friends
recently at a buffet supper giv-
en at her home In Bella Vista
In honor of the Special Mission
Ambassador of Peru to the
Inauguration and Mrs. Enrique
Miro Quesada, who have been
visitors on the Isthmus for the
past two weeks.
Ambassador Heurtematte
Leaves Por Washington
The Ambassador of Panama
to the United States. Mr. Ro-
berto Heurtematte, left Panama
by plane on Saturday for
Washington, D. C. after having
attended the Inauguration of
His Excellency, the President
of the Republic of Panama, Jo-
se Antonio Remon.
Mr. Fisher Returns From
California
Mr. Myron Fisher of Bella
Vista returned recently by
plane from a vacation of two
months spent in California.
"Stork Club" Greets
Rita Isabel Scott
Mr. and Mrs. Barton Pettls
Scott of Balboa announce the
birth of a daughter, Rita Isabel,
on October 12, In Oorgas Hos-
pital. Rita Isabel is their fifth
child and only girl.
The maternal grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J.
Marine of Panama City, and the
paternal grandparents are Mr.
and Mrs. Jamie E. Scott of Ca-
llstoga, California.
Reception To Honor
Mrs. Eula Ewlng
The Pedro Miguel Woman's
Club will entertain with a re-
ception at the Pedro Miguel
Union Church Parlors on Mon-
day, October 20, at 7:30 p.m. in
honor of Mrs. Eula Ewing, who
has served as Past President and
Treasurer of the Woman's Club.
Mrs. Ewing will retire at the
end of this month from the
service of the Panama Canal
Company and plans to leave
the Isthmus in the near future
for the United States where she
will make her home In West
Virginia..
A cordial Invitation is extend-
ed to all Past Presidents and
former Members of the Club and
to all old friends of "Jo."
Those planning to attend are
requested to contact Mrs. Taht
at 0-196 Mrs. Hoenke at 4-577:
or Mrs. Dombrowsky at 4-519.
Christmas charity. The public
is invited to come and enoy an
afternoon.
Concert Sunday At USO-JWB
The Felnland Trio will pres-
ent a Mendelsohn program at
the USO-JWB Armed Forces
Service Center, on Sunday, Oc-
tober 19, at 3:30 p\m.
The public is invited.
Wallersteln To Speak
On Thursday
Colored slides will be shown
and a talk on Africa will be
given by Pic. Immanuel Wall-
ersteln on Thursday, at 7:3 p.
m. in the USO-JWB Armed
Forces Service Center.
Pfc. Wallersteln recently re-
turned from the orld Assem-
bly of Youth Conference held
in Dakar, French West Africa.
The public is cordially invit-
ed.
Pedro Miguel
Woman's Club Notice
At a recent meeting of the
Pedro Miguel Woman's Club,
President, Mrs. Jean Dom-
browsky resigned her position
and Mrs. Betsy Hoenke was
elected President to serve the
1952-53 term. .
Rummage Sale
To Be Held Thursday
The League of Lutheran
Women will hold a. rummage
sale at the Salvation Army Hall
in La Boca on Thursday, Octo-
ber 16, at 9:00 ajn.
US Supreme Court To Rule
On $50 Gambler Tax Stamp
WASHINGTON, Oct. 14 (UP)
The Supreme Court agreed
today to rule on the constitu-
tionality on the 1951 law requir-
ing bookmakers and other gam-
blers to buy a $50 federal tax
stamp and disclose details of
their operations.
District Judge George A. Welsh
of Philadelphia ruled last May
that the law was unconstitution-
al. He held the statute infringed
on the police powers of the states
and was a penalty In the guise
of a tax law.
The Justice Department asked
the Supreme Court to set aside
Welsh's decision. It said the law
is a "proper exercise of the tax-
ing power" of the government
and its background shows the
main purpose Is to "obtain re-
venue.
The high court will schedule
arguments soon and hand down
a written opinion later.
The act requires bookmakers
and numbers operators to buy
$50 "use" tax stamps' before they
5o into business, and to pay a
0 per cent levy on all bets or
The law has been before the
court once before, but there was
no ruling on its constitutionality.
The tribunal ruled last March
that Hayes L. Combs, a Wash-
ington news vendor, had no right
to challenge the statute because
he was engaged in an illegal en-
terprise and thus had no right
to sue for an injunction to pro-
tect himself.
Today, however, the court a-
greed to let 11 persons convicted
under the law in Wllkesbore, N.
C, to file a brief in the Kah-
rlger case as "friends of the
court."
Internal Revenue officials ac-
^/ftlantic *2)c
ocie
ielvi****
Wr, Willon J Ya
tbox 195, (jatun Jtliplutrx, Calun 378
ATLANTIC NEEDLEWORK GUILD ORGANIZING
FOR ANNUAL TEA
All chairmen of the Atlantic Needlework Guild will meet
at the Inter-American Women's Club at 3:30 p.m. on Satur-
day, to formulate plans for the annual charity tea.
The group chairmen are:
Mrs. Perclval Alberga, Mrs. Ol-
medo Alfaro, Mrs. J. L. Byrd,
Mrs. Agustn Cedeo, Mrs. En-
rique Cotes, Mrs. Julia Emilia-
ni, Mrs. Esilda Endara, Mrs Pe-
ter Ender, Mrs. Hiplito Fernn-
dez, Mrs. Ivo Forgnoni, Mrs. Da-
rlo Gonzalez, Mrs. Charles
Strangers Club Get-Together
The first ol Monthly Get-to-
gethers, to be arranged by the
Board of the Strangers Club,
Curtis, Bobble Kurz, Laura Col-
bert, Llndsey Graham, Chiefli
White, Ricardo Sanchez, and
the brothers and sister of tht
honoree, Jimmy, John and Jan
Hipson.
Guaragna, Miss Thelma God-
win, Mrs. Stanley Hamilton,
Mrs. Raul Herrera, Mrs. Gun-
gambling tax has failed to brine
in anywhere near the revenue
Congress predicted. They also
said many gamblers no longer
fear the law and have failed to
renew their stamps.
Some members of Congress es-
timated when the act was pas-
sed that it would mean addi-
tional revenues of about $400,-
000,000 a year.
In selling a total of 22,400
money handled. The percentage, stamps between last Nov. 1 when
tax is not at issue in the current the law went into effect, and
knowledged recently that the ther HIrschfeld, Mrs. Herman
"Mind Reading On Main Street"
Will Be Presented Tonight
Four members of the Ameri-
can Legion Auxiliary will pres-
ent a short dramatic discussion
"Mind Reading on Main Street"
this evening at 7:45 on Station
H O O.
Those taking part in this
question and answer discussion
will be Mrs. Frances Carroll,
Mrs. Joan Cartotto, Mrs. Mar-
garet Spreadbury and Mrs.
Dorothy Loehr.
AU Star Circle
Card And Bingo Party
The All Star Circle of Bal-
boa will hold a card and bingo
party on Wednesday, from 1:00
to 3:30 p.m. at the N.C.O. Club
at Corozal. Refreshments will
be served.
Admission is fifty cents per
person and proceeds will go to
Evening Guild
To Meet Tonight
The Evening Guild of the
Cathedral of St. Luke will meet
at 7:30 p.m. at the Nurses
Quarters in Ancon.
The program will be a joint
talk by Dean Ferris and Mr. J.
Palmer Smith about the Gen-
eral Convention of the Episco-
palian Church.
Cotillion Class Opens Tonight
The opening of Liona Sears
Cotillion Class will be held this
evening at 7:00 in the Wash-
ington Salon of the Hotel El
Panama with Mr. and Mrs.
John R. Smith serving as pa-
trons and their son, John Jr.
as host for this informal meet-
ing.
It Is still possible for eight
additional couples to Join this
class by contacting Liona Sears
at 28-3-1565.
June 30, the bureau collected
$600,000. The 10 per cent tax
yielded only $4,600,000 for a total
of $5,200,000.
Collections for the first two
Henriquez, Mrs. Walter Hunni-
case.
The stamps section of the law
requires gamblers to disclose
their names and places of busi-
ness and to state whether they
are in business for themselves or
working for someone else. If run-
ning i'business themselves, they
must Identify all employes.
Judge Welsh held that listing
the names of employes was ob-
jectionable because it makes
gamblers Inform the state of law
violations. He asked whether
Congress had intended to "create
revenue" or set up a "host of in-
formers."
While lauding the "high pur-
poses of the act, he warned that,
if declared constitutional, it sented in the parish hall of 8t. talned with a surprise
Circus Birthday Party
Lieutenant and Mrs. L. A.
?E? i&LJSPSfil enfD!JS\8rmi, of the Coco Solo Naval
vpr h^nlfi the CiUb' Wlt5 8tatlon. entertained with a clr-
?h"r ladiL nresenT &n, Wrthda?; party at the"
nSKi home, Saturday, to honor theii
Goodenough," Mrs. Oswaldo mtSSSVJSSm. lS cfoor g} j^Zf "C0Bd bl^
i- prize was won by Mr. Herman '"
Lemm. Mrs. Arnold Hamberg A carousei cake and three clr.
to?befng^^esrwalL'eV^ CU* traTnTto^V^cen^al
Mrbeljnagmehse sIlterTa^'wa in^^ffVfff^Si 2?
cutt. Miss' Susana Jan, Mrs.charge of the arrangements tor.fg *or hi youna guests'
Lrtenar^' 5F Robert Letaht *'* entertalnment' S held candleTa'nd a'nlma)
Kf^'fcrt^^O Ladies' Day aTToTt Davis ISnfc^rTtlX^Ot
Nino, Mrs. Isaac Osorio, Mrs. I Thursday mornings have beer. DaJ100ns carrled out tne moUf
' isT^amUtorTrXh'n,& S^?SJSgbmS?
Billy Netro, Tommy Durham,
Sallie McKay, David
Frank Scott, Mrs. Henry Simons,
Mrs. Herbert Toledano, Mrs.
Maria Constantakls, Miss Finita
Correa and Mrs. Philip Havener.
Plans for the forthcoming
meeting were made by the of-
ficers at a recent meeting at
the home of Mrs. Fabian Pinto.
The president, Mrs. Stanley
Hamilton, presided at the meet-
ing. The other officers present
months of the current fiscal were: Mrs. Julio Salas, 1st-
year totaled .#48*616.93 from vice-president, Mrs. Raul He-
stamps and from rrera 2nd-vlce-presldent; Mrs.
Isaac Osorio 3rd-vlce-president;
Mrs. Agustn Cedeo-treasurer;
Mrs. Adela Joly-Spanish secre-
tary and Mrs. Pinto-English
secretary.
invited to join the fun.
the 10 per cent levy.
Talent Review
To Be Presented
At La Boca Church
Sgt. and Mrs. D'Augusta
Celebrate Wedding Anniversary
Sergeant and Mrs. Warren
A talent review will be pre- Waite, of Fort Sherman, enter-
mlght lead to other legislation Peter's church, La Boca, tomor-
row night at 7:30 under the
sponsorship of the Young Peo-
ple's Fellowship.
Among the artists listed are
Cyril Bracey, Walter Thomas,
which would "regulate our lives
from the cradle to the grave."
The government countered
that Welsh's ruling was "clearly
erroneous." It said Information
such as that required by the
law has been held valid in other
tax statutes.
The case came before Welsh
when the government moved a-
galnst Joseph Kahrlger. of Phila-
aelphla, for non-payment of the
tax.
buffet
supper, party at their home.
Saturday evening, to honor Ser-
geant and Mrs. Dominic D'Au-
gusta on their eighteenth wed-
ding anniversary.
The friends who celebrated
Florence Jordan. Robert Bushelliwith the honorees presented
them a gift of glasses and a
maple hors d'oevres tray.
Following the supper party
the group attended the dance
The chief feature on the pro-at the Fort Gullck N.C.O. Club,
gram is a square dance exhib- where the orchestra played the
and Violet Proverbs In vocal so-
lo 3 A piano selection will be
rendered by Sydney Jackman.
tlon by a group of experts.
Bazaar To Be November 19
On Wednesday, November 19,
the League of Lutheran Women
will hold their Bazaar at the
Lutheran Service Center on
Balboa Road.
NOTICE
Frederick J. Brady s no longer connected
with Wilford & McKay, Inc., effective
October 13, 1952.
Color Slides, Talk
On Africa To Be
Given At USO-JWB
Colored slides and a talk on
Africa will be given by Pfc Im-
manuel Wallersteln of the 33rd
Inf., Fort Kobbe. at the USO-
JWB Armed Forces Service Cen-
ter, Balboa, on Thursday at 7:30
p.m.
In addition, Wallersteln will
relate his experiences at the
World Assembly Youth confer-
ence recently held in Dakar,
French West Africa.
Wallersteln is a former mem-
ber of the executive committee
of the World Assembly of Youth
and former chairman of the
Young Adult Council, an affiliate
organization.
Military personnel and their
families and tlw public, both of
the Canal Zone and the Republic
of Panama are welcome to attend
the lecture.
Tandem Driving
DETROIT (UP) Traffic
Judge George T. Murphy said
two drivers are too many for
one car and gave 10-day jail
sentences to Horace Glllam, 27.
and his brother William. 28.
Thev were srjeedlng at 60 miles
an hour, with Horace operating
the brake and clutch pedals
and William sitting in his lap.
steering. Williams was learning
to drive.
?7.and wharam
yoyr -favorite
CAMPBEU& SOUPS?
You've a wonderful variety to choose
from: smooth, tempting purses...
invigorating meat stock sodps ... soups
blended of luscious, garden-fresh vege-
tables ... yes, soups to satisfy wry
taite! They're all rich in nourishment...
all easy to prepare. Stock your kitchen
shelf with Campbell's Soup today I And
don't forget to select a few you've never
tried before. You're ture to like them/
sure to add them to your list of favorites.
SOUPS
MAN WITH SACN
BACK HAN
sowuon (tsar moth)
CMCKSN (WITH IKS)
CMCMNOUMSO
CWCXSN NOOOll
a AM CMOWDlt
CONSOMMI
CHAM J AVAIAOUS
CMAM O CtUlY
CIIAM Of CHICK tN
CMAM Or MU1MOOM
MSM MA
MOCK TMrfll
OX IAA
SCOTCH MOTH
TOMATO
VMfTAUl
VM*TAMJ Mtf
VSTAIIAH VHSTMtl
TAGAROPULOS
INDUSTRIES, S. A.
Phones:
1002-1003
No. 4041 Feo. Boyd Ave.
Coln, R. P.
FRESH MILK
FRESH BUTTER
RICH ICE CREAM
Everything
Inspected by the
Health Department
HOME DELIVERY.
KIDNEYS
ACIDS
MUST
CLEAN
OUT
fOf JMATH VAtUI tOOM W TW WMtUVWIMTI LAKL
Tear body eluni out exteae Acl.
Kpoleonoua waate In your bloo
11 million tiny dellcat Kidney tubei
r fllur Pniaone IB the Kidney e
Bladder may make you ufTr from
trong, cloudy urine, Gettln up Nllhli,
Narvousne, Lc Palna. Circle undae.
Cyaa, Backache, Achina Joint. Acidity
r burning pa me Cyatan, now Im-
ported from th U.S. A-, atari working,
promptly, help make you fee.1 younger,
stronger, better la I way: L Hela
four kidney cleaa out pnlaonou acida
L Combat (arma la the urinary eyeiera
I annthaa and ealma irritated tleauea
eak your riruulft for Cyetea toda
a* >.. -(-wT if * fc.t* nai
"Anniversary Waltz" in honor
of Sergeant and Mrs. D'Augusta.
The other members of the
party were: Sergeant and Mrs.
Patrick Cooper, Sergeant and
Mrs. Cyril Ahmer, Sergeant and
Mrs. Ray Smith, and Sergeant
and Mrs. Andrew Lugo.
Miss Jorstad Active at
niversity of Michigan
Miss Judith Ann Jorstad, a
popular member of the Crist-
obal younger set, is taking an
active part in the extra-curric-
ular activities at. the Univer-
sity of Michigan at Ann Arbor,
where she is a Junior In the
Music Schoo.
She is vice-president of the
Student Council of the Music
School; secretary of the Sigma
Alpha Iota, National, Profes-l
sional, Honorary Music Frater-
nity, and is cellist with the
University Symphony.
During the first week of
school she assisted with the
orientation of the Freshmen
Students and at the Informa-
tion Booth of the school.
Jeff rev Hinsm. |oame Mcruiy, Lmvia Irwin,
Celebrates Birthdav Stevle Hlrsch' Ann Glbbs' JonD
Wt?.?Cn!l of Cap-|nayne- and Danny Gablc-
tain and Mrs. John C. Hlpson.l
of Fort Gulick celebrated hls|~"
sixth birthday anniversary with
anniversary with a party on thef
ground floor of his residence1
yesterday.
A Hallowe'en theme was car-
ried out with the traditional
black and orange decorations.
Each of the individual cup
cakes, which marked the guest's
places, was topped with a letter
of the alphabet, which spelled,
"Happy Birthday, Jeffrey."
The young guests were: Hope
Callis, Paulette Forrest, Janice
Lalsch, Bobby Meeks, Louis Ca-
baza, Napoleon and Sandra Ubl-
llia, Thumper Trotter, Rudy
Noll, Roy and Rene Casas, Poap
and Tete Vale, Emily Quesada.
Jimmy Watson, Preston and
Randy St. Romaine. Bobby and
Rosemary Tuelbalne, Karen
High Blood Pressun
U High fctlooa Pnssur. mukaa
roa dlny. have pain irouna
Mart, headachea, ahort breath. In-
lgetlon. palpitation, and awollea
ankle, you can get almnat Instant
relief from these dangerous aymn-
toma with HTNOX. Aak you,
keaaut for HTNOX today and fea
-aw rraiurer In a law daya.
V
. . the sauce
to excite
the palate
EARRINGS!
EARRINGS!
EARRINGS!
Morning Coffee to Honor
Mrs. Ralph
Mrs. B. B. Gray and Mrs. Jo-
seph Irving will be hostesses for
a morning coffee given at the
Irving residence, tomorrow at
9:30 a.m. for the members of
the Grace Group of the Wom-
an's Auxiliary of the Gatun
Union Church.
The party will honor Mrs.
Raymond Ralph who is leaving
next month to reside in Cali-
fornia.
Recitation of Rosary Tonight
The recitation of the Rosary,
under the direction of Father
William Fynn, CM., pastor of
the Holy Family Church In Mar-
garita, will be held this evening
at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
House 8132-D, 4th St., at 7:
p.m.
"...to make you, Mother, understand that HEINZ
Baby Foods are the beathow pure and naturally
delicious they arehow extra smooth they're
strained. And how they're to carefully prepared from
elected fruits, vegetables and meats, then specially
packed to keep 'em fresh and nourishing right to
your door. I've been getting heinz Baby Foods far
some time nowand I don't know how I'd get along
without them!"
HEINZ
BABY FOODS
Uniform In Qvmlltyl
Progressive Circle Meeting
The luncheon meeting of the
Progressive Circle of the Cris-
tobal Union Church will be held
at the home of Mrs. Howard
Anderson, House 603-A, De Les-
seps. Mrs. B. R. Goodhead will
be co-hostess.
truly
fantastic
choice
from
only $ 1 -
mercuri
Naxt to the Control Theatre
Cotillion Club Announcement
The Washington Cotillion
Club had a large crowd at the
formal dance Saturday evening,
at which time plans for Hal-
lowe'en were made.
The traditional masked Hal-
lowe'en dance will be held in
the ballroom of the Hotel
Washington October 25 from
8:00 to 12:00 p.m.
Chosen by the Board of Di-
rectors to make this one of the
most outstanding dances of the
year were: Mrs. W. T. Wilder,
in charge of decorations, and
Mrs. Henry Blgelow, Jr., in
charge of entertainment and!
prizes.
Members may bring their
friends.
GIRLS/ TAKE A MAN'S
ADVICE ABOUT YOUR
COMPLEXION
eep your skin clear
and smooth with Cuticura f-
Soap and Ointment This
famous combination eases
wot Uacltbaavda. Relieves pimples. Buy!
MAGgaNr. MUDIY MtDICATtO
CUTICURA uNT-MgN.
IN THE AMAZING
BOTTLE!
You'll be tmaziJ by the convenience of
the "Spillpfuf" bottle and tbrillti by the
beauty of this new nail polish! No need to
worry tbout spilling! A revolutionary new
design gives you plenty of time to right
the upset bottle before any damage is
done to your clothing or furniture!
Professional-looking manicures at homel
The sensational "Nail-Measure'' neck
measures out *m%mat:ca\ just the right amount.
of polish to cover one nail perfectly!
New CUTEX Nail Polish contains Enamelon,
the miracle-wear ingredient... outwears and
outshines all other polishes! Ask to see the
season's smartest, fashion-right shades!


page rom
Cargo and Freight-Ships and
i he Pacific Steam Navigation Company
INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER 1840
Royai Mail Lines Ltd.
FAST FREKJHi AND PASSENGER SERVICES
BETWEEN EUROPE AND WEST COAST
OP SOUTH AMERICA__________
~T0" ECU ADOR'," PERU AND CHILE
M.V. -SALINAS" .................Oct. 20th
M.V. "REINA DEL P.U'IEM'O" 118.000 Tuns) ___Oct. 29th
M.V. "SALAMANCA" .. .___.................Nov. 2nd
TO UNITED KINGDOM VIA CARTAGENA, KINGSTON.
HAVANA. NASSAU. BERMUDA. CORUA
SANTANDER and LA PALLICE
M.V. "REINA DEL PACIFICO"* (18,000 Tons) Nov. 22
TO UNITED KINGDOM DIRECT
S.S. "KENl'TA" ..............................Oct. 15th
8.3. "CCZCO" ----Nov. 2nd
ROYAL MAIL"LINES LTD. HOLLAND AMERICA LINE
TO NORTH PACIFIC PORTS
S.S. -rOTARO" .................................Oct. 28th
M.S. "DCRANGO"...............-Nov. 8th
TO UK/CONTINENT
S>\ "LOCH AVON" ...........................I>ct. 24th
M.V. "DIIVKNDVK" ..........................Oct. 2*th
M.V. "DAI.KRDYK" ................... .....Nov. 18th
NOTE:"Nimt' for fhlril rlaw arwmmndalion lo Klneitnn and Havana
i>t M.V "RFINA OH M*1WO" 22nd November 111 be
taken S:00 am. on (In- 2nd October.*1
All Sailings Subject to Change Without Notice.
PACIFIC STEAM NAVIGATION CO.. Cristobal Tel. 1654/5
i m-ii i i> iNr (PANAMAAve. Per 55. Tel. 3-1257/8
i oi.ii i o im ibxI.BOATerm. Bide. Tel. 2-1905

THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, If
Planes-Arrivals and Departures
KRET-
NO EXIT.
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
V
Great While Fleet
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
Arrives
Cristobal
Coffee's Right- Every time
ICED OR HOT HESCAf IS READY INSTANTLY
S.S. CHIRIQl'l"..................................Oct. 19
S.S. "LEON"......................................Oct. 20
S.S. "CHIRIQl'l" ................................Nov. 2
S.S. "AVENIR" ...................................Nov. 5
llandllnt kelrlgerated Chilled and General Cargo
Arrives
NEW YORK SERVICE________________________Criitobl_
S.S. "FRA BERLANGA" ..........................Oct. 14
S.S. "CAPE ANN" ................................Oct 18
S.S. "JAMAICA"..................................Oct. 18
S.S. "L1MON" ....................................Oct. 21
s.s. "TALAMANCA" ..............................Oct. 25
S.S. "CAPE AVINOF" ............................Oct. 27
Frequent freight ailing from Cristobal I*
Weal Coast Central American porla
Passenger Sailings to Sails from
New Orleans via Teh. Honduras________________Crlstobal_
S.S. "CH1RIQUI"..................................Oct. 21
S.S. "CHIRIQITI" ................................Nov. 4
Weekly Sailings on Twelve Pawenger Ship* to New York. Mobile.
Charletlun. I.e* Angele*. San Francisco and Seattle
SPECIAL NOTICE
We wish to announce a new special round trip rate o(
$2*0.00 for passage on our twelve passenger ships sailing
weekly from Balboa to Los Angeles or San Francisco,
returning from Los Angeles, tickets limited to four
months, effective September 15th to May 15tb.
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2804 COLON 20
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIEND!
7St!Pr-nT3t& "E* FOLKS
about The burneo over
10-1____ COATS
Big Stuff Coming

"
MERRILL BI.OS
GOOD EVENING,
FPfcio.es HBY,
HOW COrVIE VDUW
NOT WEARIMO
TDUrtCOATONA
NIGHT UKE THlSf
HAVENT
HEARfc
MR. SMITH f
BEfJNVS
JAtXETS.
and
winobrfak-
ERS ARE
MuseuM-
BAir
NOWADAYS '
:-SOMETHING THAT"
WILL REVOLUTlONIZET
THE ENTIRE7 CLOTH INS-
INDUSTRY
ALLEX OOP
That'll Help

x ?. x.
Add not rarer (pref.
trablr boiling) to I
anupoonlul of Nescafe
for vonit'tul hoi
nfee.
WHAT A BIG DIFFERENCE...
us
'VASELINE* HAIR TONIC MAKES!
-a
For deliciow iced coffee, fw
V eeapoonul o NetcaM
in glass Leave spoon in, add
a little ha water (preferebri
boiling) tad mr. Fill fia
with cold witer and ice.
Fastest cortee you ever served! And so fresh so rich in
flavor! Nescafe* gives you ill the bracing goodness of
freshly-brewed coffee. Thrifty, too! 4-iz. /ar saves at least
20e lb compared with ordinary cofet!
'Vaseline' Hair Tonic makes your hair look handsome
and healthyand keeps it looking that way! Economi-
cal, too .. you need only a few drops a day! Try it
and see for yourself!
VAIKUNI M r!.l*4 Um4 wl .1 MM O ...,,..,, U r. !>.. CiM't
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
Its Awful
BX EDGA RMARl
GO. .DOW ,\Vi\ TWfc COOKRttV
MWfc OT
ft lvjKsSviwarTc v voovt
vepk oto'.tt
~VT
=3?
CAPTAIN EAST
Working Together
BX LESLIE TURNBJ,]
nurs WHY M0*l
PEOPLE DRINK
NESCAFE
THAN LI TMf.H
INSTANT COFFEES
Netcafe ipionounccj fs-OiMYJ u the cicluiise registered ttae mark at The NeHleCompao.
Inc to designare it loluhlt tortee ptoJuct hich n composed al eaual patta ol pure soluble coie
snd added putc cathorndtarei Idotims. aiiltasr and deitrottl added sold to protect the lavat.
&erylooy&a CH
ELKIM Planten
Vane Takes Ove*
BY RUSS WINTERBOTHAM
V
TKEACHCIZV! you
SAW THECB.EW
WOOLC ESCAPE
IN THE PAKE
CRASH... BUT THE
Meanwhile, welkjnz hip &
MILLIONS OtMUUf* fZOM MAZS
BAHNITEZ& CAK60 IS SOMB-
kWHEee IN SPACE,
- J.WEVB GOT
.TO RNP IT'
nCPLINT

Discovered
BX MICHAEL OTCALLE1
Klis( .1.1.A .s fiir
( lothes Make the Man Hungry
X AL VKRMEEK
Tr fwrnMt bnth thb
WHICH THR 6*F*CKA>at*K
OFBCE Itsl
IS AT WORK
^THAT'S A ^-
CSNAPPV SUIT,
YXBOTTS)
HE
IT MAKES YOU
.LOOK THINNER!
^
I WAD TO FV\Y FOR
IT OUT OF MY
LUNCH- MONEY.1
OCR BOARDING BOISE
. With
MAJOR MOOPLE OUT OUR WAX
By J. ft. WILLIAM
lib.'- il:iM
Fixed
HOW ABOUT MRS. WALDO
HACKLEWEM FOR SECRETAR-/,
OF LAgOR, MAJOR
HOOPLC t SME'D
> 8ROOM OUT THAT
OWLS CLUB fslEST OF
gUZZARDS AND POT
PICK5 itsl
THEIR .
HAisJD5'
AV8E
He
COULD
Put mail-
6A6S OH
-fHElR 6HCOLDERS
-^THAT WOULD
kEEP THEM OUT
OF HlOlWss AtslD,
E^RCISE
THEIR
FALLEN) ,
ARCHES/
MY D6AR LADIES/:
X STAnVD FOR
LI&HT AMD TROTH
AhlD iMDOSTRy^
gT LET'6 )
fJOT FOROET )
THAT THIS *-
GREAT rJATlOfsJ
OF HAPPy FACES
MUST BE
SUARAMTEED
AT; FREEDOM /.
AJS\ FROAA \T

lSo65|
ALLf
THE
OWLS
DOfsiT
3FOR
THAT=
- -^ \ .-i _


TUESDAY. OCTOBER 14. 1332.



.WE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE FIV1
Canal Zone School Activities Sprne ^____ ____/ :____________| Uses 3 Cars To Elude Police
CH.S. News
$y James Scheibler
Cristobal beat Junior College
to the tune of 15 to 2. The unu-
sual incident of the game was a
touchback. in- the game played
on Oct. 10.
One might, in passing through
the corridors, wonder why so ma-
ny Seniors were dashing down
the stairs and through the halls
to disappear In a small room
near the office.
Well, let's investigate the sit-
uation. What do you know. The
Seniors had been studying and
reading so much, they became a-
larmed. and feared their eye-
sights were falling them As It
turned out, Nurse Whlteside pro-
Maimed their eyes to be In a mar-
velous condition.
On October 7, the Junior and
Senior High School students were
privileged to witness the films on
"Fire Prevention." The Juniors
and Seniors entered the auditor-
ium during the first period, and
the Freshmen and Sophomores
Invaded the auditorium during
the second period.
With Zonians
In the Service
(Isthmians with f a m 11 y
members or friends in the
U. S. Armed Forces are In-
vited to contribute to this de-
partment by, mailing data to
the Zone Serviceman's Edit-
or, The Panama-American,
Box 134, Panama, R. P. In-
formation as to servicemen's
whereabouts, their promo-
tions and excerpts from their
letters are of particular n-
teres!.)
Photographs -are used, but
none can be returned.
To the delight of the school,
the Cafeteria will be open to
the students until 5 o'clock on
Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednes-
days, and Thursdays.
The Student Council held a
meeting on October 8 and came
to the conclusion that the stu-
dents need to curb their boister-
ous activity and check their con-
duct while traveling by train to
and from both sides of the Isth-
mus. They pointed out, that the
conduct or misconduct of the
students reflects greatly on Cris-
tobal High School more than it
does on any Individual, as a re-
sult of these the members of the
Student Council have therefore
taken It upon themselves to be
monitors on the Friday night's
train.
WITH THE 43d INFANTRY
DIV Germany. Oct. 13 Pvt.
Kenneth E. Atherton, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Cyril C. Atherton of
La Boca, C.Z., now is serving
witn the 43d Infantry Division.
His division, now stationed in
the southern part of the country,
Is receiving constant field train-
ing; as part of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization Army.
Pvt. Atherton entered the Ar-
my last March and arrived In
the European Command In Au-
gust. He Is currently assigned as
a rifleman with the 172d Regi-
ment.
BHS. Notes
By Edna Hart
Right this way, Ladies and Gentlemen! Step right up and
get your tickets for "Glamour Boy." BHS' first stage produc-
tion this year. October 28 and 29 will be the days of the play at
the Diablo Theater, and ticket booths will soon sprout up at
the Clubhouses.
o
And there wc were.. .getting our picture taken. Yes, the
Senior Picture Committee, headed by Elkl Altman, has the big
wheels, (seniors, that It), getting ready to have their pix snap-
ped for the yearbook and for their friends.
o ;
Fire Prevention Week didn't slip by BHS unnoticed. Thurs-
day the students went to a Fire Prevention Program at the
Balboa Theater. They saw movies on "How to Prevent Fires."
and heard a speech by Fred Mole, a well-known fireman from
Balboa.
o
A roll of drums will announce the 1953 Zonian when It Is
published, but until then only the hard working business staff
and editing staff knows what labor is needed for a yearbook.
Mary Jane Sylvestyre. Business Manager, has Allana Lewis, Fita!
Arlas, and Nancv Bateman on their toes selling ads for that;
necessary stuff that doesn't grow on trees.
o
Next Friday BHS will compete with CZJC at Balboa Stad-
ium. The team and Bulldog backers are raring to go for the
first real game since the Jamboree.
o
And...the Friday after that BHS and CHS will clash at
Mount Hope. We have a special reason for wanting to win this
game. Seems about 99.9 per cent of the varsity team has taken
solemn vows not to get a haircut or shave until we beat Cris-
tobal. We'll be yelling for touchdown and a shave. But, how-
ever you yell It, we do want a victory. Hope all the BHS rooters
are at those games backing their team!
CEDAR RAPIDS, la., Oct. 14
I UP)A murder suspect In a
love triangle kept one jump
ahead of his pursuers today by
doubling back on his tracks af-
ter eluding a posse in a corn-
field.
Authories said George Duffey.
23. eluded then by stealing
three cars In quick succession.
They said he abandoned the
first car near the cornfield at
Waukon, la., fled In another
toward Minnesota, then doubled
back to the Waukon area, where
he apparently stole a third car.
Duffey Is wanted In the slay-
ing of Jimmy Hackman. 19. his
rival for the affectitions of 18-
year-old Shirley Arnold.
The girl found Hackman shot
to death in his parked car here
Thursday night, a few hours af-
ter she had broken off her four-
year romance with Duffey.
She and Duffey wer eto have
wed today, but she gave him
back his ring and told him she
would marrv Hackman instead.
A statewide search was begun
for Duffey and police believed
thev had him trapped this
morning in a cornfield eight
miles northheast of Kaukon.
Thev closed In on the corn-
field after finding a stolen car
Duffey reportedly was driving
overturned in a ditch.
But thev abandoned the corn-
field search when another car
! was reported stolen in the im-
1 mediate vicinity, and witnesses
said it headed toward Minne-
sota.
Earlier loday. a woman gaso-
line station operator at Roos-
ville. la., reported that she was
i robbed bv a man who "definlte-
lly" resembled Duffey.
Mrs. Vivian Huffman said the
man drove'into her station and
threatened her with a shotgun.
She he asked about "the Cedar
Rapids murder." and whether
tthe victim had died.
Dufley's former sweetheart
i said he often carried a shotgun
In his car. and had told her
I that someday he would rob a
bank.
The girl broadcast a radio ap-
peal for Duffev to surrender.
but she said she believed he
: would "shoot it out" instead.
When she returned his ring.
she said he told her:
"This will be an evening you'll
always remember."
Shortly afterward, she went
to meet Hackman in front of
her sister's house and found
him slumped in his parked car,
slain by a blast from a shot-
gun.
To give the Tigers a good boost
to win the game last Friday, a
short pep assembly was held at
11 40 in the auditorium.
A whirl of colors a flash of
flesh and the cheerleaders were
off to another flying start in a
pep rally. After the students
' recovered from enjoying, ap-
preciating and sanctioning the
beautiful new outfits they real-
lv began to yell.
The cheerleaders lovely skirts
fell Into soft pleats of a rich
hare of deep blue silk. Their
sweaters were of a bright canary
color, and when the lasses lined
up properly, the matching blue
letters spelled that wonderful
and ever popular name. "Tigers."
One sentence takes care of the
situation. The girls act and look
like real cheerleaders.
The Homecoming Dance will be
on the 25th of October. Nancy
Karlger will be the presiding
queen for the evening. Her at-
tendants will be Leticia Steven-
ion. Dinah Sasso. Lois Scheidesg
and Ann Thomas. Loner live the
new Queen, Nancy the first?
The Varsity and the Girls Var-
sity Club are working on the
preparation for the forthcoming
vent.
Anybody wonder why so many
books are being toted bv those
highly educated Seniors. Don't be
alarmed, for there are more books
left in the library. The 8enlors
are just trying to complete their
assignments before the deadline.
US Postal Deficit
Blamed On Subsidies
To Newspapers, Mags
BOSTON, Oct. 14 (UP)Sen.
Olin D. Johnston (D-S.C.) said
today that postal subsidies for
newspapers and magazines ac-
count for about half of the na-
tion's $500,000.000 Post Office
deficit.
"I think that the next Con-
gress had better take a search-
ing look at'some of the causes
of this deficit," said Johnston,
chairman of the Senate Post
Office and Civil Service Com-
mittee.
Johnston spoke at the open-
ing session of the 48th conven-
tion of the .National Association
of Postmasters of the United
States.
"We in Congress, especially
the Democrats, would ceitainly
not like to be accused of allow-
ing the taxpayers' money to be
used to subsidize the Republican
campaign for the White House,"
he said.
"The Indirect subsldv to the
magazines Time and Life, alone,
amounts to over $15,000,000 an-
nually. No other single business
in history has ever been aided
and assisted in his amount.
"Yet, these are the very same
Deople who seek to control the
White House for the next four
yearsthe Deweys. the Tafts.
the Lodges, the Duces that are
captors of the present Republi-
can standard bearer."
Johnston urged the 2,000 post-
masters to vote for Gov. Adlai
E. Stevenson, the Democratic
presidential nominee.
Pinay Warns France
Won1! Vary Foreign
Policy To Suit US
METZ, France, Oct. 14 (UP)
i Premier Antoine Pinay served
thinly veiled notice yesterday
| that France has no intention
: of changing her foreign policy
to suit the Americans, regard-
less of U. S. aid.
Pinay made an unusually
forthright speech at the open-
' ing of a trade fair here. It
! followed a damaging squabble
! between France and the United
; States over the amount of aid
i the French will get this fiscal
year.
The speech was Pinay s an-
swer to the criticism of his gov-
ernment in general, the way in
which U. S. aid is expended,
and some aspects of French
foreign policy such as the
handling of the North African
protectorates.
"France considers her friend-
ship toward the United States
as ones of the verities of her
history and one of Hie constant
factors of her national senti-
ment," the premier said.
"But France Is a great power
which must accomplish its des-
tiny while conserving its rank."
He said France "no more en-
visages being thrown out of the
African world than she ima-
gines being separated from the
Atlantic community."
The issue of French policy in
Tunisia and Morocco comes be-
fore the United Nations As-
sembly convening In New York
this week. France's precise .posi-
tion, and the U. S. position with
regard to the French attitude,
have been under discussion for
months.
The strain produced by that
the assignments being a 10-page
critical review of classical novels.
If you see some still carrying
their books around, you will know
that they did nqt meet the dead-
line, which was fixed for October
10.
Teenager Shoots
Self Standing
Before Mirror
NEW YORK. Oct. 14 tUPl
A 16-year-old boy told police
today he "stood In front of the
mirror and shot myself" after
he accidentally wounded his
14-year-old girl friend with a
i revolver he found In a vacant
'lot.
Both were reported in crit-
ical condition.
Police said young Umberto
Alvardo, told them he found the
.32 caliber revolver in a lot in
the Bronx. He was showing "it
to Elizabeth Santanda. 14. when
it discharged. She was shot in
the abdomen.
"I went crazy." Alvardo was
quoted by police as saving. "I
went Into my mother's bedroom
and stood In front of the mirror
and shot mvself."
The shot penetrated the bov's
left lung close to the heart.
Police said the gun had been
| reported stolen In a holdup five
. days ago.
i-----------------------------' -----------------------------------
uncertainty was multiplied last
week when Pinay rejected as
"inadmissible" a U. 8. note on
aid to Franee.
Touching n all malor points
'of government policy. Pinay
| warned the Communists that
France would not tolerate sub-
| version of her basic principles,
and promised Indo-Chlna that
France would "fulfill her duty"
there.
"Faithful to her commlt-
iments. France remains faithful
also to her friendship." Pinav
I said. "She has proclaimed her
solidarity with the Atlantic na-
tions, and cannot conceive of
(being separated from them. She
has given evidence of her at-
tachment to the American al-
lliance, and has not forgotten
any of its benefits," he said.
NOTICE
This is to advise that 1 am no longer associated with
Wilford and McKay Steamship Agencv and am operat-
ing as an independent steamship agent as of this dale.
Telephone Panam 2-0485. .
______ FRED J BRADY.
fot
omeone m
uzeve
HAMILTON
Yob can be turt you're giving the finott when you % iva
a Hamilton. For only Hamilton livea up to off the (land-
rd. of fine watchmaking. TeMed accuracy and time-
enduring beauty have earned for Hamilton the title,
"The Aristocrat of Watrhea."
Oenorol Agonfa for Panama: IMF A, S.A.
^lo 403, moma, R. p.
TO-DAY
SPECIAL
ATTRACTION !
SHOWS: 7:00 I 9:15 P.M.
DRIVE IN Theatre
ON TRANSISTHMIAN ROAD,
Behind "Artes y Oficios" School
THE GREATNESS...THE GLORY...THE FURY..
OF THE UNTAMFANORTHWEST FRONTIER!
1ttutU*
JAMES STEWART
ARTHUR KENNEDY.
JULIA ADAMS
ROCK HUDSON
eoweir
It's Movietime TONIGHT!
Ir'anama Lariat cJneafers ----
BALBOA
Alr-Condltioned
fi:l.-. A 8:80
Richard BASEHART a Gene EVANS
"FIXED BAYONETS'
Wednesday 'THE BIG TREKS"_____
DIABLO HTS.
:1S 1:M
____________O_________
Jean KENT a Guv ROLFE
'THE RELUCTANT WIDOW"
Wednesday -ST. BENNY THE ntP"
COCOLI
:15 A 1:3*
Marlon BRANDO a Jean PETERS
"VIVA ZAPATA!"
Wedneday "PIN UP GIRL"____
ppnpn kAICIIFt ld;> LUPINO a Rnbert RYAN
7:h "ON DANGEROUS GROUND"
Thursday "ST. BENNY THE DIP"
GAMBOA
XM
(Wednesday)
'THE CIMARRN KID"
GATUN
tm
"THE HOODLUM" and
'THE MAN FROM PLANET X"
Thursday "THE GUY WHO (AME BACK"
J A nf ADIT A p,ul DOUGLAS Joan BENNF.T
Vis i:h "THE GUY WHO CAME BACK"
a, Wednesday "THE- HOODLUM"
CRISTOBAL
Air-rondltloned
;!! 7:SS
Jane RUSSELL o Groucho MARX
"DOUBLE DYNAMITE"
Wednesday Jk Thursday "AFRICAN QUEEN"
"GUILTY BYSTANDER
Bella Vista Latin Day!
3:00 4:40 6:50 9 p.m.
Delightful latin rhythms in
a zany musical comedy!
Amalla AGUILAR
Lilla PRADO
O
Lilia del VALLE
"US 3
ALEGRES COMADRES
_UX MORE PRIZES!
-MORE MONEY!
MOVIE SWEEPSTAKES
si.in.un IN CASH
and Valuable Prizes!
On the Screen:
PRIDE OF
| ST. LOUIS"
with
DAN DAILEY
Joanne DRU
TROPICAL FROM OUTER
_____^_ SPACE...!
PETER GRAVES -- ANDREA KING, ir
"RED PLANET MARS"
DRIVE-IN
THE GREATNESS!
THE GLORY...!
James STEWART Julia ADAMS, in
'BEND OF THE RIVER'
__________ IN TECHNICOLOR!__________
ENCANTO
WAHOO! At 9:00 p.m.
Margaret Lockwood, In
"High by Dangerous"
. Also: -
"TREASURE OF LOST
CANYON"
CAPITOLIO
BANK NIGHT!
$200.00 to the Public!
"A YANK IN
INDOCHINA"
- Also: -
"GIRLS TIME"
CECILIA THEATRE
THE BEST OF ALL THE JUNGLE
SERIES...!
"QUEEN OF THE JUNGLE"
12 Chapters full of
ACTION... DANGER... EMOTIONS...!
TIV O LI
VICTORIA
"REIGN OF TERROR"
- Alto: .
"NEW ORLEANS"
Richard Widmark, in *
RED SKIES OF
MONTANA"
"HALLS OF MONTEZUMA"
IDEAL SURPRISE NIGHT!
------------------- "SHANGHAI GESTURE" Also:
_^_______________."SAVAGE DRUMS"
Underwood Typewriters,
SUNDSTRAND Adding Machines
Odhner Calculating Machines.
ALMACN SALAS
9th St. and Bolivar Avenue, Coln
OCTOBER SPECIAL
THIS WEEK ONLY
VAN HEUSEN
NYLON DRESS SHIRTS
Sizes 16 and 16'2
ONLY $J.50
The French Bazaar
JUAN PALOMERAS
COLON
LUX-TODAY
Game Cards Are Distributed
Until 9:15 p.m.
t\%mmti^psj33
MANY PRIZES... AND A JACKPOT OF
5 150.00 IN CASH
A Beatutiful Table Lamp
1 Rattan Furniture 1
One "Gillete Aristocrat"
Razor set and 100 Blades
One "Dunlopillo" Pillow
i Agendas Doeli
One Album of Records
Panam Radjo Corp.)
One Desk Lamp
(from Rodelagi
PLUS
One Pyrex Kitchen Set
and a Cake-Plate
One "Temptation"
Perfume set I Vicar I
One Box of Chiante Wine
lAngellni)
One Linoleum I Floor
Cover) El Diablo
One Box 1100) of "Condor"
Washing Soap.
OTHER PRIZES
For the Winners of the First Two Races
and for the Winners of the Third Race.
ON THE SCREEN (STARTING AT 3:00 P.M.)
of that
livable
xp
TOMORROW!
GREAT CARNIVAL OF DISNEY CARTOONS!
TWO HOURS OF GREAT ENTERTAINMENT I
16 REELS OF LAUGHS!
With your favorites: Mickey MOUSE. Donald DUCK.
PLUTO. TOM and JERRV. etc.
THURSDAY!
IS SENSATIONAL!
just ONE
Of THf
ASTOUNDING
AOVfNTUHS
YOU'll
SHAM
WITH
MY
WfcaniBairt
lOCkl '* OKI
Of Its Ufa
they cH en
Cennia s eivil-Mt
talents...
CONVICTS




PAGE SIX
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
==H==a=
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, II
You Sell em...When You Tell em thru P.A. Classifieds!
[ave votir Ad with une of our Agents or our Of fires i-i No. 57
,\o 12.171) Ontraj Ave. Colon
t
H" Street Panama
Lewis Service
#4 Tivoli Ave.Phone 2-2291. ana
Morrison's
Fourth of July AvePhone 2-0441
Saln de Belleza Americano
#55 West 12th Street
Agencia Internacional de Publicaciones
3 Lottery Plaza Phone 2-31W
Carlton Drug Store
10.069 Melendez Ave-Phone 256 Colon
Propaganda, S.A.
"H" Street crner Estudiante 8t
Phone 2-2314 and 2-2798
ZQ
Minimum for 12 words.
3c. each additional word.
FOR SALE
Household
MISCELLANEOUS
fOR SALE:12 tube Silvertcne ro-
dio Consol, 25 end 60 cyclt!
Excellent cond.t.on $80.00. Dining- DR. WENDEHAKf Wm: Dime
FOR SALE
Automobile
room tibie with 4 chair, dinette
table 4 chairs. Qt. butiet. bomboo
3 chairs, settee I table, Vene-
tian blmds. 2 large porch blinds.
5 window blinds, 1 ice box 9 cu ;
ft all porcelom. 752-B. Bolboo
Rd. Balboa______________________I
FCR SALE:Westinghouse relnger-
otcr. procticolly new. ReosonobK
priced. OHice hours, P alo Z de>
Enero No 6
Estudiante strewt No 140 Betwe*
"K ana "J" Street. Ph.-rne 2-
3479 Panama.
FOR SALE:Used tires, possengtr
b commercial ot Agencias Cosmos,
on Automobile Row No. 29, tele-
phone Panamo 2-4721.
FOR SALE: 1951 Pontiac Super
De Luxe Cotolino. Duty Paid. For
Details. Coll Balboa 421 I.
FOR SALEBedroom suite double
bed with spring and mnertpr.ng
Also blonde Ook dinette. New
co-ir'.;ion. 82-8 Coco Solitc. 6th
Street
FC Y
Travel via "AREA rh* Route of I
th* Good Neighbor" NO INCREASE, -
IN PRICES! FREE MEALS AND FOR
COCKTAtLS: One-wov to KM AMI
S6" 00 .. NEW YORK. $101
Guayaquil. 5*5.00.. ..QUITO'
5S6.00 Round trip MIAMI. $'2C f0R SALE: 0ne '51 MG Midget
GUAYSo_^5?9 *- uV -" *<* Pid- '.'00-00
fa ISSa ^^i-JK's?" "** ,53a "" "
pior^e?S For rrorp 44eiOils see PAN-
RESORTS
Gromlich Santa Clara beoch-
cottages. Electric Ice boxes, gat
stoves, moderate rates. Telephone
6-441 Gamboa, 4-567 Pedro Mi-
guel. ,
Phillips. Oceonsida cottogts, Santo
Clara. Box 435. Balboa Phone
Panama 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673.
SALE Best 1950 Buick Ri-
viera m Zone. Only 15,000 miles.
Mwv ex tros. Consider trade. $1.-
795. Coco Slito 82-B. Sixth St.
Houses on IEACH at Santa Clara.
Phona SHRAPNEL Balboa 2820.
Cosino Santa Clara. Dance music by
Casino Aces. No reservations ne-
cessary, Saturday and Sunday.
COMMERCIAL b
PROFESSIONAL
3 ~
SALE:_9 ft.
cycle R5D,
AMA DISPATCH SERVICE, oppo-
site Ancon Busstoo. Telephone 2-
__________________j 655.
G^E. refnoeratcrtcTVhE PUBLIC:E. RubK> wcln
Rousseau. Nov> j |,,f ,0 nn0unce tnot he has ust
received o long beloved shipment
FOR SALE.1949 Chevrolet Con-
vertible. 1947 Studeboker Sedan,
195' Morris Minor; 1949 Ford
Ponel, 1-2 ton; 1946 De Soto. 4
ooor. Better and cheoper used
cors Hosmo S. A. No. 51 Vio Es-
poo. Telephone 3-3022.
Position Offered
FC SALE Fngidoire 12 cu. ft.. I
r.M porcelom. moke me an cfter
couch and chair. *2'-B, Anccn
Phone 2-63C3.
WANTED: Salesman or soleslady,
wanted for large concern. Excel-
lent working condition, good sa-
lary. Write Coso Fostlich, Box 323,
R. of P. stoting age and expe-
rience.
FQR SALE.Baroom: 19-4S West-
mjheuse ref'igerotor. Perfect con-
dition, SI00 00 Reader-: leaving.
Hou:e 20*-A. Phone J-553, R.c
Grj-cr St Pedro Miguel.
FC* S'LE CompleteV set light1
crtrn metol. venetion binds, lor
twelve family corner apartment '
Gfne-oi E ectric reingrrotor. pcrce-
lain 25 cyeie. Frcm 4 00 to 6:00.
__ r m 3c-"S-B. Dioblo Heights.
fC*. SALE: Double bed.-small
woro'-ob*. everything modern.
Cir--q t;blf, 2 chairs. China c'o-.
set E'a'gom. No 77 Apt. 5, Es-
hificrtf street. Tel-phone 2-3058. |
FC SALE16 in.~ 25 cycle fon.!
Westmghou^e refngerotor, 9 ft.
5 cycle. 6 sheets Cel'oiex. 1581-1
of speciol >traberrN baskets whchjFCR SALE:Lote 49. Codillac. Club
will euorontee you. by air, o fresh-1 Coupe, low mileoge. excellent con-
er tostier stroberry. .veor rounc dition. Coll Albrook 6293 or see
treot for delicious strawberry short a' quarters 45-A.
ccKe .ike mother used to make o-|F0R SALE:1942~ Ford 2-deor se-,
,ust p.n old strowberies. sugar don ^ y jn '
ond creom. His berras are sea phonics! cond.tion. Tires foiT
Colon Super Morket. Cano' S285.CO Cosh. Cnstcbol 3-2776 ,
FOR RENT
Houses
one
bouse*
Kmer'
Comm.ssaries ond club-
Army soles stores ond Paul
Morket. Ponoma.
FCR SALE: 1942 Buick
new tires, radio. Phone
2994.
Sedon.
Balboa
A Junle Jim FISHING JAIJNTJ
2 Doys ot Seo! FOR SALE:1940 Buick, good con-
In El Panama's Cruiser "Pescado- dition. Leoving for States. Phone
ra." Novy 3146.
Tour includes: I FOR~
Pociiic Entrance' to Canol
Toboga
Peorl Islonds i
The Coast of Dorien 'olmost to
SALE:1951 Ford with radio,
seot covers. 16.000 miles. Coll
Sec. Noles. 84-2290 or 84-3265
Fort Kobbe.
Colombian border
Fish for soilfish ond marlm. Swim-"
ming on Pearl Islonds.
Leave 7 a. m. Soturday morning Pier
17 Bolboo.
Return 6 p. m. Sunday afternoon
Food catered by Hotel El Panoma
Fishing tackle supplied free, don't
forget your comer.
T: Wollft containing cedulol This oll-cxpense fishing trip $30
and other pc-onal paper, belong-' a passenger!
Horrison Jr. Finder \ For reservations phone Jungle Jim
Ponoma 3-1660 or your travel
agent.
,FOR SALE:39 Chevrolet 2 Door
Transportation $60.00. Bolboo 2-
4220.
FOR RENT: Furnished residence,
office, livingroom, diningroom,
porch, interior patio, 3 bedrooms,
with air conditioned, hot water,
kitchen, moid room, big garden.
Price $275..00. Tel. 3-3444. after
6 p-. m. or phone 3-1477, during
office hours.
FOR RENT: Furnished chalet in
Bella Vista. 3 bedrooms, lots of
conveniences. $200. Apply per-
sonally, Conol Zone Phormacy,
Pona mo.
("OK RENT
Apartment
RATS are
EXPENSIVE GUEST8.
IP YOU REALLY WANT
TO GET RID OF THEM
USE
MAR-FRIN
Rat & Mouse Killer
(contains WAR-FARIN)
GEO F. NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ave. Tel. 3-0140
MODERN FURNITURE
| VISIT OUR SHOW-ROOM
Slipcover
Reupholstery
"HERES"
77 Auto Row
Tel .1-4.31
Eisenhower Flatly Suppon
State Ownership Of Tidelan*
NEW ORLEANS, Oct. 14 (UP) Dwight D. Eisen-I ^T^^ff
hower lost night accused Gov. AdlaJ E. Stevenson and Wyett saidZ!??J ,
President Truman of trying to put over a "shoddy deal" d
on tidelands oil.
In his fourth invasion of the South, the GOP presi-
dential nominee pictured the Democrats as following "a
policy of grab" in denying the individual states control
over their oil-rich coastal lands.
This was Eisenhower's most definite statement of
the campaign on the politically volatile tidelands issue.
He flatly supports "the traditional concept of state own-
ership of these submerged areas."
He ridiculed Stevenson's speech
here last week on the tidelands
controversy.
"As I understand it," Elsen-
hower said, "he would have the
federal government take over
and dole out to the tin cups of
the states whatever part of the
revenues Washington decided
might be good for them.
"This I would call the shoddy
deal."
Elsenhower explained that he
Democratic presidential candi-
date may win the Noy. 4 elec-
tion in a "landslide."
In the most optimistic vein to
?., In the camPa'eTn struggle,
Wilson w. Wyatt, Stevenson's
campaign manager, aid the
Democrats see signs of an elec-
tion 'that could develop in land-
slide proportions o the electoral
vote."
Wyatt said the Democrats are
not relaxing and will fight hard
Transportes Baxter, S A
Shipping, moving, storage.
We pack and crate or move
anything. 'Phone 2-2451,
2-2562, Panama.
A. Govilan Area, Bolboo.
iiM,,\J|)
LC
ng lo John J.
pieos- crntoct Horri.on ot The!
Ponan t American, Tel. 2-0740 I
RcwcrrJ.
Radio Program!
FOR SALE
Miftcellanetuu
"!Jt
Commuriirv Station
HOG-840
*Vher, IC3.000
P.opl, Mart
Presents
Fav o r it e
Today, Tuesday. Sept. 14
P M.
3 30Music for Tuesday
4 00Sunny Days
4 15South of the Border
4 SO-Whafs Your Favorite
5:30News
5 35What's Your
contd)
6'00FADS AND FASHIONS -
'Faith Foster
6 30Hawaii Calls
8'45Lowell Thomas
J'00Ray's A. Laugh (BBC)
7.30-BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:American Legion Auxilia-
ry Feature
FOR SALE:Lionel train transfor-
mers 25 cyl. 60 Cyl. Track,
automatic cors. 16 mm Comer
nd projector. Phone Navy 2302.
wjAOggY ON 1MP
BY OSWALD JACOBY
Written for NEA Serrice
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Two v>4 live room furnished ond
unfurnished apartments; private en-
closed gardens. 8061. 10th Street
New Cristebol. Telephone Colon
1386.
FOR RENT
Roome
FOR RENT: Furnished room to
gentleman. preferobry foreigner.
No. 17, 13th street, Son Francis-
co.
FOR SALE: Snowsuits size 2 ond
7. Girl'i winter coot 5. 2-2104.
579-A. Cacao St.. Govilan.
FOR SALE:German Shepherd (po-
lice l pups, one male and one fe-
male. Phone SHRAPNIL. Bolboo
2120. House 150 Prospect St.,
_one way street to Quarry Heights.
FOR SALE:Singer, large, portable.
Morris Minor, 1951. Apex wosh-
ing mochine. Zenith radio victro-
la. Furniture. Electncol applian-
ces, etc. House 573-C, Curundu
Heights. Phone 2243.
FOR SALE:1947 Chevrolet Pick-up
Duty Poidl. Radio and Toble
(NC-2001. 25 Cycle fon. Bed
springs, choirs, tobies, bureaus.
Refrigerotor 'Kerosene). 623-A
Cocoli after 4 p. m. doily.
NORTH (D) (
AMI
VAtl
? A65
? AQJI3
WBST EAST
4W9762 4SAQ4
V432 J1087
? 10 742 983
*'> *K84
SOUTH
4K83
VKQS
4>KQJ
10972
North-South vul.
Nerth Eaat Soath West
1* Pas 2N.T. Pan
3N.T. Pass Pass Past
Opening lead*, 8
WANTED
MHre>llanenm
WANTED:
American couple de-
sires vocation quarters. Nov. I
or sooner. Call Cpl. Meyers, Cloy-
ton 6166. oher 3 p. m
WANTED: 6 yeor crib without
mattress. Any condition. Phone
Cristobal 3-2700.
CHIROPRACTORS
On. A. and E. OB1LLAC
(Palmer Graduates)
om HOURS:
1 12 and I 8 p.m.
.. 5;l,ird"j: I* noot..
IS Peri Avenue Tel. 3-IJM
(1 block from Lux Theatre)
stood by two congressional acts right up until election day, but
that there is a chance for a land-
slide "unless all the signs we get
are failing, and I don't see how
they could be."
"The only reluctance I have a-
bo.it saying it la that t don't
want it in any way to sound like
over-confidence," he said. "But
we see so many signs on the ho-
rizon and in the various states."
Wyatt raised the possibility of
a landslide at a news conference
which elaborated on earlier as-
sertions that the Democrats see a
significant switch of voters
chiefly independentsfrom Eis-
enhower to Stevenson.
Democratic headqua r t e r s,
Wyatt had said, has noted a
trend toward "disillusionment"
with the Republican nominee
YMCA
BALL ROOM DANCE INST.
WANTED:_Po,i,ion for my mold.
5he is serious, hordworking, ond
extremely willing. Excellent for
housecleoning. co,e children, etc.
Phone Ponamo 3-2242.
|WANTED:-yC1,'On Ouorter, fo7
Ameneon Couple on Nov. 1, 1952
Phone Bolboo 2-3152, offer 7:00
p. m.
FOR SALE:Frigidoire refrigerator,
gas stove, studio couch, stomp al-
bum. Child's movie projector, No
62 Maano Arosemena Street, up-
stairs, Panama.
t^Fre? wTr1n-h0W i.VOA,) FR SALE:_Ch,ld's wordr^eToTi
1 d-_y"r nR and his yPwriter. needs repairs, vdil
Pennsylvanians
tice
repairs, medium
l.r._i,,- *,'" ,lble. 36" couch, battery ra-
0Frankie Masters Enter- _dio. Tel. Balboo 2734.
tains
FOR SALE: -.- 120 Bass Accordion.
Derrick Winch. Hond Op. 2 ton
Cop. Tal. Balboa 4249.
8:45UP. Commentary
8 00Rhythm Rangers
9:30Piano Playhouse (VOA)
10 00Dance Music
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30Variety Bandbox (BBC)
11:00The Owl's Nest
^iirlnightSign Off
.Tomorrow, Wedne-day, Oet. 1*
A.M.
6:00Sign On
00Alarm Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
: 15Morning Varieties
8:30Musical Reveille
8:00 News
8:15Come And Oet It
JC. 00 News
!C5Off the Record
ai:00 News
11:05Off the Record (Contd)
11:30Meet the Band
12:00News
F.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
-1:00News
1:18Personality Parade
1:45Excursions in Science
2.00Three Quarter Time
"2:15It1s Time to Dance
. 2:30Afternoon Melodies
' 2:45Notes on Jazz
3:00All 8tar Concert Hall
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00Music Without Words
4:15Sepia Parade
FOR SALE
Reul Estate
L9TS,r~ Houses, real bargains. Call
3-1069. THOMAS REAL ESTATE
AG|NCIES, Centrol Avenue No.
4:30What's Your Favorite
5:30News
5:35What's Your Favorite
(Contd I
6:00FADS AND FASHIONS
6:30 Ricky's Record Shop
6:45Lowell Thomas
7:00Over To You 7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45French in the Air (RDF)
8:00 Evening Salon
8:45U.P. Commentary
9:00 The Small House at Hal-
Hngton
9:30The Haunting Hour
10:00 THEATER GUILD ON
THE AIR (VOA)
11:00The Owl's Nest
Midnight81gn Off
If I ever write a book called:
"Wnai Every Bridge Player
onould Know," I will surely in-
clude the correct play by East
at the lirst trick in today's
hand. When this hand was ac-
WANTEO:-Colleg Sitale^wl
, 'eon g.rl needs room in Conol
L222f *ide- Phon HcSl
' '"ternocionol, room 3Q8.
I need
FOR IOOR REQUIREMENTS
in
NATIVE LUMBER
CALL
ROY WATSON
Telephone: 3-4963
Avenida Nacional 43
both of which were vetoed by Mr.
Truman, giving the states the re-
venues from offshore oil.
"Twice by substantial ma-
jorities, both houses of Con-
gress have voted to recognize
the traditional concept of state
ownership of these submerged
lands," he said.
"Twice these acts of Congress
have been vetoed by the Presi-
dent.
"I would approve such acts
' of Congress."
Elsenhower was introduced
here by Gov. Robert F. Kennon,
a Democrat who has deserted his
own national ticket to support
the GOP nominee, largely be-
cause of the tidelands issue.
Stevenson spoke here last Fri-
day advocating federal control of
th-. tidelands with a percentage
going to the affected states.
Stevenson also supported Mr.
Truman's veto.
In a strongly worded bid for
Southern support, Eisenhower, j
who moves into Texas later to-
day. attacked the Democratic ad-
ministration for Ignoring South-
em problems in all but election.
years.
He said the Democrats bestow-1
ed a "quadrennial pat" on the
South with a "lofty admonition!
that all the Smith's blessings1
flow from Washington."
dy to spell out Democrat
mlsm In terms of the
which the Illinois governor!
pected to carry.
But in response to i
questions he mentioned th
electoral vote states of New
Pennsylvania and CalifornL.
long with Maryland, Virginia!
the Midwest states of MlchiJ
Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin,
souri and Illinois. >
In these states, he said, he
finitely" expects Stevenson]
win.
Wyatt aid Democrats
"hopeful1' about Iowa, but wo
not make the same deft
claim for it as for the other '.
west states.
President Truman rested
caught up on his official dull
today In anticipation of a seco
whlstlestop tour that will ca.
him through five crucial EastJ
states with 77 electoral votes 1
The White House said Mr.'
man will make four major
dresses and more than 30 shl
talks in his new campaign tour
drum up support for Stevenso
He will speak in Connectlc
Rhode Island, Massachusel
New Hampshire and New Yor
Massachusetts, New Hamd
shire and New York are placej
in the doubtful column by mol
political observers. The Demi
crats are believed to hold tti
edge in Rhode Island while t r.
Republicans appear to be ii
vored in Connecticut.
The President, whose "gi^
em-hell" campaigning stirred
bitter controversy during his
cent 8,500-mile swing across
nation, probably will be hounc
again on his new tour by a
publican "truth squad" whl|
will reply to his attack.
2 Toward th*
sheltered side
3 Contrition
4 Stripped
5 War god of
Greece
6 What the
teacher did
7 Female sheep
8 Name of a
composition
13 Pupils all In" **"
line 10 What pupils
14 Angers shouldn't be
1J First grader H Essential
count to b*'n*
16 Those who 17 Md blnTs
take offense ..J,,B.
18 Rich girl French
>P7
*~ 24 Unbleached
i 2v.^.4 cvlin<,r morme gos
10 HP outboord. Call Kuhn.
Coco "Solo 265.
tually played, East hadn't read later, and the rUfn.. ,. ,
my book and therefore came up,make everv effort -?" s?ould
with the wrong answer. to win the trir ^0rce 8outh
West opened the six of sapdes.! than later Mner ratn"
and East won with the ace. He
didn't see anything wrong With'
Explanation of Symbols:
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish Broadcasting Cor-
poration
RDFRadiodifusin Francaise
this play, since he had been
taught "third hand high," at
his mother's knee.
East continued with the queen
of spades, and South held off.
South won the third spade and
promptly went after the clubs.
East could take the king of
clubs, but there the defense un-
willingly rested. East could not
lead another spade, and South
easily won the rest.
As everybody has noticed by
now. i hope, the correct play
by East at trick one Is the
queen of spades, if East makes
this play naturally and auto-
matically. South will be com-
pelled to take his king im-
mediately.
If he fails to do so. be runs
the risk of winning no spade
contract at all. For all he can
tell. West has the ace of spades,
and this Is his only chance to
ston the suit.
After South wins the first
spade trick, he cannot make hU
contract. He needs at least two
club tricks and he will therefore
oulte naturallv try the' club
finesse East will thereuoon take
his king- of cljibs. lav down the
ace of spades, and lead a third
soade, permitting West of take
thr- rest of the suit.
The whole point Is that East
loses nothing bv olsving the
oueen of spades at the first
contract. If West has the kine
of spades East's oueen will win
the first trick. If South hPS W
king of nodes he Is bound to
win a trick with It sooner or
LEGAL NOTICE
un,pto%d f5t%JJZ& jg
CANAL ZONE
nivl.u* .1 ..**
SavmaiU A. I......
rUlaHff.
FraaWl. Ca. Braaaa.
Meataat,
SUMMONS
Caaa Na. mm
Civil Dacket IS
ACTION FOB DIVORCE
o the havt-aaasael aVfaaaa)t|
yu ara haraby raaulraa ta aapaar
nil aaawar the caaaalaiat 1(1.4 la the
ebeve-eatltlea1 actln erllhla nla.iy aaye
Ii.r The Fire! Date i Puellc.lie*.
la raee el yeur failure ta apear
4 aaawar, judf.ai will ha tahaa
in.i rau hr .Lull lar the rellel
e>meade4 la the reaaeleiet.
WITNESS the Heaarahle Cuthri* F
Crawe, JiHlfe, Ualteel Statee Dlalrici
Cauri lar the DUtrict af Ike Caaal
Zaae, thle OctaWr 14, IM2.
C. T. McCaraatck. It
Clerk
(SEAL)
By Lale E. Harrleea
Daawly Clerk
' Fraakle Caaa Breaaaa:
Tke lereieiag euaiaiaM la aerveS
"pee yeu hr awhile a Hew awraaaat ta
the araer al taw Heaarahle Cuthri. P.
Crawe, Jwe,,. UaltaS State. Di.lrlcl
Caurt far the Dietnri af the Caaal
Zaae, dated Octekrr U, ISS2 aaS .-
<* .-. fil.a la tU. actlaa la the
Ifke al tke Clerk at aaM Ualu4
Statee Dlatrlct Caurt lar the Dlvielaa
I Balhaa, t, Octabar IS. ISS2
C. T. MeCariakh. Jr.
Clerk
By Lei. E. HarrkvM
Daawty Clark
Heiress And Army
Officer Husband
Found Dead In Home
MT. HOLLY. N. J., Oct. 14
(UP)An heiress to part of a
$50,000.000 fortune and, her Ar-
my officer husband were found
shot to death today in what,
police said was a murder and the fullest possible political ad-
suicide. (Vantage of the tidelands issue.
The bodies of Capt. George C.
HORIZONTAL
1 Used in
geography
lessons
4 This one goes
to nursery
school
8 Adhesive
tor cuts at
school recess
"That Is plain bunk," he add- 1> Malt beverage
ed. *
In his prepared text, Eisen-
hower steered fairly clear of
the hot civil rights issue. Stev-
enson said here he supports the
Democratic platform with re-
spect to minority rights.
Elsenhower's only reference to,
the subject was one line in the 2" Make happy ,,i"v2*u*
peroration of his address: "We! 1-Spread to dry ;;,JJ*!
will fight to make equality of j,.t?",Hc
opportunity a living fact for ev- J* gf.v
ery American." 28 Mme entrance
He also promised, if elected, to 2SHL
"reduce the double toll of high | -0, Middle
prices and high taxes" and to JJ J'"
"root out every vestige of disloy- * ffno Prlod
alty from government by fair l Dropsies
American methods." SSimpl0T
Elsenhower challenged thel'-J1"01"
Democratic nominee's claim that | 5*pofe .
the South could thank the Dem- J? *'?tnercoclc
ocratic party for its prosperity. !. I*"'?,*.
"In short, what had been in|42im,Pu~ ___,
his view a poverty-stricken, >di-1., IVL V7^*
sease-ridc-en, uneducated, grovel- SSfftaffiSS
ing mass of Louisiana humanity '
became the miracle of the South,
thanks to a fairy godfather in
Washington." he said.
'That is Just sinister nonsense,"
he added. "The administration1
did none of these things."
In Texas he Is expected to take
Answer to Previous Pulo \
LVlUUUL'lUMIJI 113a |
cirjUBjunu rihaii iun
-oswsw-i kJUWrJH BP n
n.Ukiu aainicjraa
UKU CJUC!. UBUCJ
,Qhhu unn itji ma
?nnfjaaci nciiaucj
ewswl r^r inr J BFaaassswa
nHunp nt3CJ*rar3rj
?aacinLissnmcnr.-:: .>)
?ahaE.aaiac3Uf.iaci.
QBC3C nan luuaui jq !
25 Five-dollar
bills (coll.)
28 Malicious
burning I
27 Mourners
28 Rooms in
harems.
20 Direction
31 Landed
property
33 Waxes
38 Calm
40 Clamps
41 Musical
- eotnp
42 Domestica t
43 Wild r
44Ho*l(
48Unh.V
47 Pen name of 1
Charles Lsmi]
Mature
80Unit of wire'|
measurement
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Gregor. 42. and his wife Al-
loeese. 30. were found by the
couple's daughter Laura, 17, a
high school student.
Mrs. Gregor recently was
named as one of 24 persons to
share in the 350,000,000 estate
of her great-great-grand-fa-
ther. Joshua Edwards, who
amassed the fortune in New
York properties and on Wall
8treet, police said.
The will now is in probate in
New York state. Both Mrs. Gre-
gor and her husband were
natives of Fitzgerald. Ga.
D. Clinton Zellar. chief of
county detectives, said that
Gregor apparently shot his wife
in the left breast, stabbed him-
self in the shoulder, and then
fired a bullet into his own right
temle.
Miss Gregor first found her
mother's body, clad in night
clothes, lying against the front
door of the first floor of the
home.
Oregor's body was found in
front of a dining room fireplace.
A 32 calibre revolver and a
long hunting knife were found
a few Inches from his hand
The girl told Zeller that she
heard her parents quarreling
early this morning.
She told police she slept
through the quarrel and was
unaware of the shootings until
she found the bodies.
Police said the entire first
floor of the home was in disor-
der.
Gregor was on 35-dav leave
after servln 18 months In
Yokohama. Mrs Oreeor operat-
ed a laundry five blocks from
their home.
"State ownership of the lands
end resources beneath inland
and offshore navigable waters Is
a long recognised concept," he
said here.
"It has not weakened America
or Impaired the orderly develop-
ment of such resources In these
areas from the beginning, and
let me point out that this deve-
lopment has been carried on bv
state officials without scandal,
'fraud or corruption.
"The policy of the Washington
oowermongers Is a policy of grab.
I wonder how far a consistent
pursuit of this policy would take
us.
"If they taVe the Louisiana,
Texas and the California tide-
lands, then what about the Great
Lakes? They have been held to
be open sea. A good part of Chi-
cago has been built on land once
submerged bv Lake Michigan."
Meanwhile Stevenson's head-
quarters In Springfield, I'l.,
voiced the possibility that the
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BOAC Sales Chief
Donald J. Cameron
Flying To London
Donald A. Cameron, sales
manager of British Overseas Air-
ways here, left today with his
family for London, where he will
attend an annual BOAC confer-
ence. ,
After the conference he will
proceed to Australia, where he
will spend his vacation. He is ex-
pected to return here on or about
Dec 1.
51 High priest
52 Additional
53 Arrow poison
54 Tear
55 Pieces out
58 For fear that-
57 So (Scot.)
VERTICAL
1 What school
children call
arithmetic
Why So Many People Soy,
BUY INSURANCE FROM
BOYD BROTHERS, INC.
Our clients appreci-
ate friendly service
.. and unbiased
advice on insurance
problems. They
like to deal with an
established agency
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of conditions in this community. Accordingly,
we are proud that so many of our clients say,
withuu^_reBervation, "Buy insurance frum ..
V
WYDiWTHIM.iMC
No. 3 "I" St.. Lessens Park
I Tels.: 2-2088 20M
General Agents United States Fidelity A Guaranty Co.

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rUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1981
>
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
PAGE SEVEN
Pro Grid Commissioner Predicts Good Attendance
Gun Club Notes
.
CRISTOBAL JRS., ED BCDD RIFLE WINNERS
In ft four-position smallbore rifle match fired Sunday at
the Far Pan rangt, the rifle team of the Cristobal Junior Rifle
Club set a record for a new high teem average as they totalled
1441-28x to take first place. The old average record of 357 out
of 400. set bv the Balboa Juniors In 1949 was surpassed by 3.25
points per man. i
This team record was set by purely consistent shooting, as
none of the members of the winning team was In the first five
individual scorers
M/Sgt. Ed Budd, of the 48th Recon. team, fired 378 to take
the Individual gold medal, and had a new record in his grasp
until he dropped a six on his last shot. Although Dick DUiman
had been favored to win. this result wfts not exactly an upset.
Budd had been doing some fine consistent position shooting
during the past year. Dillman finished in second place only
three points behind Budd, with 373.
Ed Coe. flrina for Los Amigos Gun Club, took third with
366. He wa sclosely followed by Chuck Thamalis of the Rod-
man Marines team, another shooter who has been hot lately,
with 365. Earl Mitchell, of Los Amigos, won fifth place award
with 364.
As predicted, the Los Amigos team finished strong, with
1419 point to beat out the Balboa Oun Club for second place.
Except for a weak finish by Jaffray. they might have pushed
the Cristobal Juniors hard for first.
Balboa fired 1414 for. third place, and they also suffered
due to an off day by Joyce and Todd.
Seven teams and a total of 46 shooters took part in the
match, which wws capably handled by Lt. Earl Foster as Range
Officer, assisted bv Ed Budd. An excellent job in the statistical
office was done by Maxlne Dillman and Gene Derr. Detailed
scores follow:
CRISTOBAL JRS. Prone Sit Kneel Stand Total
Staples.................. 100 89 92 82 363
Tagaropulos.............. 94 95 93 79 361
8cheibeler................ 99 97 80 84 360
Constantlne............., 96 93 88 80 357
TEAM TOTAL 1441
LOS AMIGOS Prone Sit Kneel Stand Total
Coe.................... 96 96 87 87 368
Mitchell................ 99 92 89 84 364
Jaffray.................. 99 91 86 74 350
Breeding................ 98 87 79 75 339
BQWL'NG
TEAM TOTAL-
BALBOA SRS.
Dillman, R........ .. .. .
Turner.................. 100'
Ross.................... 98
Todd.................... 7 88
1419
Prone Sit Kneel Stand Total
100 M 31 83 273
93 84 77 354
98 84 5 345
82 76 342
TEAM TOTAL
45TR RECON.
Budd..........
Walker.. .. ..
Stripling.....-
Still..........
TEAM TOTAL-
RODMAN MARINES
Thamalis .. .............
Newton..................
Strus..
Waters .....
1414
Prone Sit Kneel Stand Total
100 97 94 85 976
98 90 81 71 840
96 89 78 81 339
91 92 87 63 333
. 4
Prone Sit Kneel
94 98 95
86
71
81
93
88
89
81
80
74
TEAM TOTAL-
CRISTOBAL SRS. Prona SU Kneel
Lepley.................. 99 85 77
Bingham.................. 98 100 74
Gibson, N. Br.............. .96 92 63
Gibson, N. Jr................ 98 88 71
1388
Stand Total
80 869
68 328
80 319
63 307
1319
Stand Total
76 337
62 334
77 328
53 810
Nash smears Sears while PAA
Flyers win orer Seymour Agen-
cies In Classic Bowling League;
Bates Hit* 639

With Kelly Marabella hitting
the pins with a resounding 617
and Bill Malee knocking out a
597 (his first score in 5 weeks
lower than 600). along with Hod
Jenner'* 676, the Nash-Wlllys
kegllng team temporarily knock-
l ed out the effort to the Sears
quintet to move into first place
In the Classic Bowling League
last Friday night at the Diablo
Heights Clubhouse bowling al-
leys. Marabella had a perfect
night with games of 200, 215 and
202 to lead the automobile boys,
while Howard Engelke, subbing
for Herb Cooley, led the Sears
team with 590. Both Coffey and
NorrlR had sour nights, which
contributed to the lack of
strength In the usually strong
Sears team.
By virtue of their win, Nash-
Wlllys moved out in front of the
league teams by points.
While Nash was taking over
Sears, Elton Todd's PAA Flyers
were knocking over the Seymour
Agencies team for 3 points, des-
pite a ponderous 639 by Bates,
who knocked out the season's
highest Individual game with a
splendid 277. Only a wiggling lu-
pin in the 9th frame stopped
him from a 290 or better. For
the Flyers, Andrews had 200, 213
and 188 for a nice 601 to offset
Bates' score, and Wllber with
209. 199 and 181 for 589 to cover
Lulu Zebrock'S 575 for Seymour.
The Flyers took the first and
third games and pinfall, and
dropped the second game when
Bates scored his 277.
The win for PAA moved them
securely Into second place In the
league four points oehlna the
Nash-Wlllys team.
The league standings after
Friday night's play:
Pin
Team Won Lost Ave.
Nash-Wlllys 15 9 945
PAA Flyers 11 9 921
Sears 8 12 909
Seymour Agen. 6 14 898
The 10 leading keglers of the
Classic League after the play:
Interest Of Fans Expected
To Be Held By Close Races
TEAM TOTAL 1309
BALBOA IRS Prone Sit Kneel Stand Total
Dillman. N.............- .. 96 86 86 70 340
Glassburn................ 93 87 84 66 330
Schmidt.................. 93 93 69 71 326
Eggleston................ 88 87 69 54 298
TEAM TOTAL
INDIVIDUALS
Hatgl.......
Joyce .. i.....
Kennedy .......
Musselwhite.....
Vila ...........
Geyer........
Harris........
Howes........
Tipton........
Clemmons......
Worsham......
Foster........
Mendenhall......
Green........
Manus........
Frear ........

Prone
95
97
97
92
93
88
88
94
81
93
86
90
89.
85
97
93
Sit Kneel
98 84
96 91
90 78
91
89
73
92
75
75
89
69
79
81
69
79
85
87
81
89
81
88
63
81
78
65
81
73
59
98
Stand
79
55
68
62
96
68
48
52
66
29
94
92
29
81
36
19
1294
Total
358
339
333
332
319
318
309
309
294
292
287
286
280
278
271
265
Team Average
Nash 213-12
(Sub) 196- 2
Sears 190-12
Sears 190- 4
PAA 188-11
(Sub) 188- 6
(Sub 188- 2
Nash 187- 3
Nash 187- 3
Sears 186- 8
The resolts of the play Friday
nlght; SEARS
204 212 170 586
218 202 170 590
161 136 181 458
164 148 163 475
155 208 199 562
Name
Malee
Engelke
Balcer
Melanson
Andrews
Zebrock
Eady
Jenner
Marabella
Coffey
Melanson
Engelke
Coffey
Norris
Balcer
By UNITED PRESS
In New York, Commissioner
Bert Bell told a football writ-
ers luncheon yesterday that this
could be the National League's
best attendance year.
"It could be the beat," said
Bell, "If the race stays close. And
lt should, because no team Is go-
ing to win them all. I think nine,
wins and three losses will win
the American Conference. Eight
and four should win, or at least
tie, for the National Conference
lead."
Bell says the new franchise at
Dallas is not doing as well fin-
ancially as expected because it
has failed to "sell" the team.
"They have to get out and
sell the game beyond their
city," says Bell. "The Texans
have concentrated on Dallas
and not done as well as ex-
pected because they need fans
from other cities in the area."
One Texan star halfback
Buddy Young is having trou-
bles of his own. Young, a former
Illinois University star, has been
ordered to appear in a Chicago
court to day on a charge of get-
ting money on false pretenses.
Young is free under a $500
bond after being served with a
warrant Saturday on a com-
plaint by Maceo Ward. Ward
says he loaned Young $300 in A-
prll. 1951 and nas not been re-
paid.
The National Football League
still is trying to find the combl-
nation to stop the San Franciscp
49'ers and the New York Giants. I
The Giants, featuring a hard
charging line thai wrecked:
Cleveland's offense before iti
could get started, had to win the
hard way with a last period
touchdown and field goal for
17-9 margin over the Browns
Cleveland. New York now has
three straight victories and the
leadership of the League's Ame-
rican Conference. All of Cleve-
land's points came on field goals
by Lou Groza, one good for 52
yards. Charlie Conerly pased 70
yards for one Giant touchdown,
and Ray Poole kicked the de-
cisive field goal.
San Francisco made It three
In a row with an eaay 29-8 vic-
tory over the Lions at Detroit
to remain atop the National
Conference. Bill Wilson, Hugh
McElhenny, Prankie Albert
and Don Burke counted touch-
downs for the 49'ers, who held
Detroit to minus one yard In
the first half.
Victory came easily for the
Chicago Bears, who rolled over
Dallas 38-20 at Chicago. It's the
second win against one loss for
the- Bears . and the third
straight setback for Dallas. Bob
Williams connected with 13 pas-
ses out of 15 attempts, three of
them for touchdowns, to pace
the bear win.
For defending champion Los
Angeles, however, things were
anything but easy The Rams
had to come up with three
touchdowns and a field goal In
the last period to shade Green
Bay 30-28. Philadelphia also had
to turn on the late fireworks to
down Pittsburgh 26-21 at Phila-
delphia. Bob Walston kicked two
field goals In the final four mi-
nutes for the win. He booted two
others earlier in the game.
The Chicago Cardinals rolled
to a 17-6wln over the Redskins
in Washington with Charley
Trippi supplying the spark. Trip-
pi scored one touchdownwhich
his passes had set upand pas-
sed to set up Joe Oeii's 3T yard
field goal which iced the game
in the last period.
Totals
902 906 863 2671
N ASH-WILLYS
Marabella 200 215 202 617,
Say Ion 160 199 183 542'
Jenner 184 190 201 575]
Best 218 185 147 530
Malee 193 180 224 597,
Totals
955 959 957 2861
PAA FLYERS
Hermann 199 180 187 546
Van Wle 202 133 180 515
Wllber- 209 199 181 589!
Morton 146 181 192 519
Andrews 200 213 188 601;

introducing
Jlondo
(HtLODY IN SILVtKl
the
newest
pattern
in


W New and right for you, Gorham "Rondo" is a
0 modern expression of the best traditional design
elements of sterling tableware. A rhythmic design
with three repeating movements like a musical
Rondo it rises to a climax in a deep-cut scroll at
the handle tip.
Rondo's cushioned panel casts many lights and
darks, giving it an unusual feeling of richness. Start
your new pattens with a six-pieos place-setting
knife, fork, teaspoon, salad fork, cream soup spoon,
nd butter spreader.
Totals
56 986 988 2770
SEYMOUR AGENCIES
Bates 168 177 194 639
Jamison 190 171 180 541
Zeletes 166 157 171 494
Borup 185 185 162 472
Zebrock 185 189 191 575
Totals
904 929 888 2721
Pacific Divisional
Softball League
Meeting Scheduled
Managers and team represen-
tatives of the Pacific Divisional
Softball League will meet at 5
&m. Thursday, Oct. 16, at the
i Boca Playground to make
plans for the 1953 season.
Last year the following teams
Krticipated in the successfuf
ip which was sponsored by the
Physical Education Branch of
the Division of Schools: Army
Signal, Army Quartermaster, Na-
vy Ordenance, Central Labor Of-
fice, Commissary, Post Office,
Corozal Sales Store. Kobbe Sales
Store, Building Division, and
Electrical Division.
Representatives of new teams
are also Invited to the meeting
at which discussions will be held
on the league constitution, eli-
Slblllty of players, and opening
ate of the new season.
Asthma and
R0NCHITIS
Pilaster To Round
Out International
Stakes Race Field
NEW YORK, Oct. 14 (UP)
Another lineup change is neces-
sary for the first running of the
$50.000 Washington, D-C Inter-
national Stakes this Saturday at
Laurel, Maryland.
Trainer Max Hirsch of King
Ranch announced yesterday the
four-year-old colt "To Market"
will not run in the inaugural.
That's the race pitting three A-
merican horses against six of
the best foreign thoroughbreds.
To Market had been mention-
ed as a possible replacement for
"Crafty Admiral" which was
withdrawn after running poorly
at Jamaica on Oct. 4. With To
Market out of lt, racing men
named Mrs. Henry Straus' "Pil-
aster" to complete the Interna-
tional field..
Other American horses expect-
ed to line up at the track out-
side Baltimore are "Ruhe." from
the Hasty House Farm, and
Brook-Meade Stable's "Greek
Ship." The foreign entries are
"Zucchero" and "Wiiwyn," both
from England, "Worden The Se-
cond" from France, "Niederland-
er" from Germany, and two Ca-
nadian thoroughbreds"Indian
Hemp" and "Castleton."
Bill-Thompson
Winner To Get
I SHver Trophy
An added Incentive for the
winner of Sunday night's ten-
round battle between Black Bill
and Leslie Thompson at the Co-
lon Arena will be a beautiful
silver which will be donated by
Ramon Mndez, president of the
Colon Municipal Council. The
program is slated to begin at 7
p.m. Instead of 8:30 as usual.
The promoters anticipate a
capacity attendance because of
the great interest being shown
by fans in the daily workouts of
*Case* Stengel Signs Contract;
Highest Ever Paid A Manager
Alabama's Perfect Record
On Line Against Tennessee
NEW YORK. Oct. 14 (UP)
Grey haired' Casey Stengel,
with four straight world cham-
pionships under his belt, has
been handed a new wo year
contract by the New York Yan-
kees. Casey won't say exactly
what the new contract calls for,
but he and Club. President Dan
Topping indicate it will reach
the $100,000 per year figurea
base salary of $80,000 and bon-
uses to make up the balance. It
makes him the highest paid
manager in baseball history.
Ol' Casey, who was a flop as
a National League manager with
the DodR^rs and Braves in the
30s ,wlll be shooting for a new
managerial mark next year
five straight world champion-
ships. And he's full of confi-
dence.
"There's no reason," he says,
"why these men who won it this
year can't do it again."
Stengel admits, however, that
hfl would have retired If theIteams
Yankees hadn't won the series
this season.
By BILL FERGUSON
united Press Sports Writer
ATLANTA, Oct.
Slow-starting Alabama will 2
place a perfect record before
Tennessee's uncertain gridiron
machinery this weekend as the
Southeastern Conference splits
down the middle for six big loop
battles.
The Crimson Tide smash-
ed Virginia Tech 3 to Satur-
IM quarterback Dudley Spend
i completed 11 straight passes to
tie an SEC record. Spence paas-
14 (UP) ,ed for three touchdowns and
14 yari
cards.
Florida and Vanderbilt both
npended the experts to set np
one of the loop's top games
this week.
Florida was supposed to take
Clemson in a close one, but thi
Gators didn't think there was
anything close about It. Plori-
The Cleveland Indians were
active yesterday... making a
change in their farm system and
signing a bonus player.
The Indians signed a one year
working agreement with Lan-
caster in the Inter-State League.
The general manager of the
Class B clubFrank Spairsays
the agreement calls for Cleve-
land to work with Lancaster
through the Indians' farm team
at Reading, Pennsylvania in the
Eastern League. Spair says-the
Lancaster team has an option
to renew the agreement after
one year.
The Cleveland bonus goes to
19-year-old Wllmer Morton, a
right-handed pitcher from
Stockton, California. Morton gets
an estimated $65,000 for signing
and is expected to report to the
Class C Bakersfleld team in the
California League next spring.
The Cincinnati Reds have
signed two coaches Buster Mills
and Ford Garrisonfor 1963.
They will replace Phil Page and
Earle Brucker on Manager Ro-
gers Hornsby's staff. Mills, a
day to ring up its fourt straight|da turned three Intercepted
victory, but Coach Red Drew!passes and three Clemson fum-
wlll have to lay everything on i les into six touchdowns to
the line this week against once-1 maul the Southern Conference
beaten Tennessee as the t w o,representative 54 to 13.
meet in their annual[ Vanderbilt wasn't supposed
blood-letting. to have a chance against Miss-
Georgia Tech carries the lsslppl but freshman Quarter-
loop's only other perfect slate back Bill Krletemeyer was Ux
Into battle against Auburn and young to know lt. The 200-
Mississippi's unbeaten but pound youngster set up thre
twice tied, Rebels go against Tu-1 Vandy touchdowns with his ac-
lane. curate passing and plunged ov-
an, ,,cQtf( v.. .., Ier ior eacn oi the cores. Aftei
After upsetting the f 0_rm Krietemeyer's fine performancs
Herhfit UkJT Ftaridif' SSH** ,M0d ****** ** 8 Csb
derbilt takes on Florida. Ken-|ln on a safety the ^^
tucky will seek its first confer- lod 21 21 tie
- victory against Mississippi:penoa t0 eRrn 21 21 tle'
ence
State and Louisiana State
rounds out the schedule with n
try against Georgia.
Alabama fielded a murder-
ous ground game that mesh-
ed for 409 yards against out-
classed Virginia Tech Satur-
day, but Tennessee won't
show up with such a porous
defense.
Corky Tharp, the No. 2 man
behind the sensational Bobby
Marlow, galloped for two Crim-
son Tide touchdowns and Bill
Oliver, normally a defensive!zSSSm
halfback, accounted for vast
yardage and added the final
Alabama touchdown.
Fullback Andy Kozar crashed;7
his way to two touchdowns as
Tennessee routed Chattanooga
26 to 6, but the Vols failed to
Impress many fans. However,
Tennessee's defense platoon
Maryland's undefeated Terra-
pins mashed Georgia 37 to 0 be*
hind Jack Scarbath, and th
Bulldogs have another rough
afternoon coming up against
Louisiana State.
LSU sounded the warning sig-
nal by thumping Kentucky 34
to 7 on the bluegrass gridiron.
Bengal quarterback Norm Stev-
ens started the rout as he com-
pleted a touchdown pass to AI
that was good for
another score and piloted a
backfleld loaded with talent
that rushed for a total of 224
I
VV&'tLXS'tSl Sff Amerl?a" LeaguV'out! stoorout^n^Toul produce
been turnlnaoutdiiiv t*, JXJZ "elder was out of baseball thlsipienty of trouble for Alabama
The^sSSrS, fereis* htaTm?. ??" ^t^T8 **"-*7*M Georgia Tec* cashed in on
inompson xo uirough his tune- League outfielderwas a nlaver- , ..*.? ?*. .ww> ,..-.. ?
ups.
Bill, besides his regular after-
noon sessions, is .xeportediv put-
ting in overtime in secret while
perfecting a defense to accom-
pany his windmill offense.
The popularity of these two
Gold Coast crowd pleasers is al-
so another reason why a good
attendance is assured. Bill has a
legion of backers but Thompson
League outfielderwas a player
coach with Beaumont in that
league this year.
The New York Giants have
taken a step toward rebuildine
for 1953.
The Giants bought right-
hander Frank Hiller from the
Cincinnati Reds. In return, the
Giants sent minor league out-
probably has more admirers. The SSWiSS He,",,ey,? Clnclnnatl
two factions will be in there e 525K. ld * Won. t ve
Sunday rooting their heads off
for their favorite boxer.
Early betting odds indicate
that Thompson is a light choice
to keep Bill, .who dropped close
decisions his last two times out,
on his losing streak.
An excellent supporting card
should assure the success of the
program. All the bouts are be-
tween featherweights.
Bill and Thompson signed to
make 128 pounds for their eight-
round battle. Semiflnallsts Isidro
Martinet and Rodolfo Ampudla
will make 122. Beau Jack II and
Sam Langford II, who clash, in
a six-round special signed to
come in at 111 or leas and Al
Stewart and Joe Sande, who
open activities In the four-round
prelim, are expected to make 126.
The program will get underway
earlier than usual In order to
allow Panama City fans to catch
the 18 p.m. train. General ad-
mission Is only 75 cents.
two "beat the clock" scores to
stretch its undefeated streak
to 18 games. A .hard-charging
Along The Fairways
FORT AMADOR LADIES DAY
The freshly sanded green
Kroved old man par a hard man
) beat. Ernie Wilton and Pau-
line Klevan, 3-down to par, and
Bev Dllfer and Jerry Hughes, 4-
Tulane defense throttled Tech's down, were winners and run-
powerful ground game on seven
long drives, but Tech's Bill
Brlgman passed 44 yards to
Buck Martin for a second rjerl-
od touchdown and fullback
Jimmy Johnson added another
score In the final frame. Both
touchdowns came with less
than a minute remaining on the
clock. Tech. won 14 to 0.
nersup for
gainst par
Thursday.
the match
tournament
play a-
of last
This Thursday, there will be a
string contest. Each player starts
off with 30 Inches of string
which may be used to call a close
missed putt sunk or to shift the
ball from a bad lie etc.. until the
and lost eight for Cincinnati this v.
year. Henley, who signed with Auburn primed for its battle is used. Three-quarters
New York as a bonus player inlwlth Tech by rolling over Wof-! handicap is allowed and low me-
1949, hit .273 for Tulsa In the I ford, 54 to 7. The Tigers unveil- d' co *"*
Texas League.
'ed a dangerous passing attack I ?'* bring scissors.
! YOU MUST GET READY FOR
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NATIONAL RACE FIELD LISTED
.
US Atom Spies
Move Nearer
Electric Chair
WASHINGTON. Oct 14 IUP>
The Supreme Court yesterday
rejected the death sentence
appeal of Julius and Ethel
Rosenberg, leaving the govern-
ment free to execute the New
York husband-wife team as ato-
mic spies.
The tribunal also refused to
hear the appeal of their accom-
plice. Morton Sobell. who was
sentenced to 30 years in prison
for his part in slipping atom
bomb secrets to a Russian spv
ring including Dr. Klaus Fuchs.
convicted British scientist.
Unless the courts reconsider
or the President intervenes
both highly unlikely the
Rosenbergs will be put to
death in New York states
Sing Sing prison electric
chair. They already have
spent 18 months in the death
house there.
The court sealed the doom of
another traitorTomeya Kawa-
kita. an American born Japan-
esebv dellning to reconsider
its decision of last June 2 up-!
holding his conviction.
Kawakita was found guilty of
treason for his brutal treatment
of American prisoners during
World War II
The Rosenbergs and Sobell
were convicted in New York
federal District Court March
29. 1951. on charges of violating I
the 1917 wartime espionage law. I
Mrs. Rosenberg s brother,
iormer Armv sergeant David
Greenglass. testilied at the trial
that he and his wife fed in-1
formation to the Rosenbergs
while he was working at the
Los Alamos atomic project as a
machinist in 1944
l reenglass. who said he was
able to sketch a cross-section
of an assemDled A-bomb like I
that dropped on Japan, was1
sentenced to 15 years
Another witness. Harry Gold
of Pniladelphia. received a 30-
year sentence after confessing
a part in the same plot.
it has been estimated that
information gained bv Russia
from Fuchs and similar es-
pionage rings enabled the So-
viet Union to develop an A-
bomb as much as five years
sooner than it would have
otherwise.
Rosenberg. 33, Is an electrical
engineer. His wife is 36 and they
hf e two young sons.
Sobell, 35, Is an electronics
expert and the father of two
children. He was not as deeply
involved in the conspiracv and
received a lighter sentence.
In another action, the high
court rejected the appeal of
Rep. Walter E. Brehm iR-O.
convicted April 30. 1951. of
illegally accepting campaign
contributions from a member
of his office staff. He had
been fined $5.000 and drew a
suspended jail sentence of from
6 to 15 imonths.
The court agreed to rule, how-
ever, on the constitutionality of
a 1951 law requiring bookmakers
and other gamblers to purchase
a ?50 federal tax stamp and!
disclose details of their opera-.
tlors.
The law. which resulted from i
the Senate Crime Committee i
Investigation, was ruled uncon-
stitutional by federal district
Judge George^A. Walsh of Phi-'
ladelphia.
Treasury officials said his
derision has prompted many
gamblers to defy the law.
In another case the court left!
standing a lower court .judg- '
ment that the International I
Typographical Union iAFL> had I
tried illegally to impose a
"closed shop" in the newspaper
Industry.
The court also finally closed
the books on the seven-vear-
M Dollar Steamship Line
case which almost sent one
cabinet officer and other of-
ficials to jail for contempt.
The government and R. Stan-1
ley Dollar of the shipping firm
settled the case bv agreement I
this summer.
Justice Hugo L. Black dis-
agreed with his colleagues and
thought the Rosenbergs' ap-
peal should be heard.
Defense attorneys promptly
announced plans to seek a stay
of execution and re-argument
before the Supreme Court. The
lawyers promised to use "every
available" legal process to "vin-
dicate" the couple.


DAILY NEWSPAPER
AN INDEPENDENT^
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country is $afe" Abraham Lincoln.

-
1919-Model Unstreamlined Romance
Wins Endorsement From Doris Day
TWENTY-EIGHTH YEAR.
PANAMA. R. P., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1952.
FIVE CENTS
Bedell Smith Still Believes
Communists Can Get Into CIA
PHILADELPHIA. Oct 14 IUP1
Gen. Walter Bedell Smith, head
of the government's Central In-
telligence Agency, testified yes-
terday that "one or two" Com-
munists have been found in his
organization abroad and that
some infiltration is "Inevitable
at some time or other."
But Smith declared before the
House Un American Activities
Committee he had found no pe-
netration by Communists in his
group in this country.
He emphasized he knows of
no Communists now in govern-
ment and said if the next pre-
51 Booked To Sail
Friday on 'Panama'
Only 51 passengers have been
booked to sail Friday for New
York on the Panama liner Pa-
nama, according to the advance
passenger list announced Tues-
day.
Among those sailing are Dr.
and Mrs. Glenn W. Adams, of
Ancon. who are returning to the
States to make their home. Dr.
Adams has been employed In the
Health Bureau for the past 11
years, most of his service hav-
ing been in the Pacific side cli-
nics.
The complete advance pas-
sngeer list of the S.S. Panama
follows:
Dr. and Mrs. Glenn W. Adams;
Row W. Barker; John M. Brown;
Mrs. Kathryne S. Brown and
son: Kenneth A. Brown: Mr. and
Mrs. George W. Carty and
daughter; Mr. and Mrs. Leonard
F. Crouch; Dorothy M. Dudo-
wicz; Mr. and Mrs. William Fit-
Ire-Bender; William L. Gardner;
and Eugenia M. Griffith.
Alice C. Hart; Mr. and Mrs.
Edward G. Haydel Jr.; Mr. and
Mrs. George L. Hay ward; Ger-
trude Hesse; Frank W. Hoh-
mann; William A. Jackson; M.
J. Laiacona; Mr. and Mrs. Irving
R. Lanzner and two sons; Rev.
Raymond Lewis; Hugh Maloney;
and Master James Mara.
Miss Frances E. Newsome; Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas E. Oglesby;
Adele Peale; Mr. and Mrs. Robert
3. Reed; Mr. and Mrs. Ralph D.
tiobtnson; W. Romaln; Gerad K.
Schear; Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Shneider; Mary Schwartz; Mr.
and Mrs. Arthur Siegel; Michael
Simhon; and Mary T. Wiest.
'53 Lincolns To Be
Fastest Passenger
Cars In The U.S.
DETROIT. Oct. 14 (UP)The
1953 model Lincoln automobiles,
to be introduced Nov. 24 will
be the fastest stock cars in the
country with 205-horsepower
engines, Lincoln Mercury divi-
sion of Ford Motor Co. reveal-
ed today.
Tests of the new Lincolns In
August at the Borneville salt
flats in Utah showed the new
engine, most powerful In any
mass-produced passenger car.
will reach straight-away speeds
of 117 miles an hour.
sident Republican or Demo-
crat cooperates with security
agencies as well as President
Truman "the American people
can congratulate each other
will have little to worry over."
The former U.S. ambassador to
Russia was questioned by the
committee to explain the basis
of his statement of Sept. 29 that
he believed Communists could
get into government security or-
ganizations, including his own
agency.
Smith told the committee that
jhis "honest statement" had been
! taken out of context and used
| politically.
He said in view of the "past
I performances of the Commun-
'ists" he could not testify under
,08th that there were none in the
[government.
"If I actually knew of any. I
would point them out." Smith
said.
The CIA head said he had
found "no penetration of Com-
munists in my organization, in
the United States; no American
Communists and none within the
scope of this committee."
"But," he said. "I believe
there are Communists in my
organization outside of the
United States because In the
past we have, from time to
time, discovered one or two in
our ranks."
Smith said he could not ela-
borate or amplify his statements
at the public hearing but offer-
ed to do so at a closed session.
Members said he may be call-
ed for further testimony If the
committee holds executive ses-
sions later in Washington.
"It is Inevitable that at some-
time or another there has been
Infiltration," he testified.
"I have observed what they
have done elsewhere in Canada,
In the United States, in Japan
and in Germany, and It Is fool-
ish for us to assume that there is
no infiltration here.
"I believe there are Commun-
ists infiltrated into security
agencies because we" have dis-
covered them in the past and I
believe we will in the future.
"You are all familiar with
Algor Hiss." he said. "Also,
about five years ago, a miner
employe of the State Depart-
ment was exposed as a Com-
munist. The case was handled,
and I cannot elaborate on it
in open session."
Rep. Francois E. Walter (D-
Pa.) said the committee was en-
titled to knew why Smith made
his statement about Communists
In government while giving a de-
position in a $2.000.000 libel suit
brought by Sen. Joseph R. Mc-
Carthy (R-Wls.) against Sen.
William Benton (D-Conn.)
Smith explained he was testi-
fying under oath and that he
could not positively say that the
State Department was free of
Communist infiltration in view
of the success of the Communist
infiltration in other countries.
The general indicated his
statement would not have start-
led the nation if his complete
deposition had been emphasized
as much as "the part lifted for
political purposes."
He said he had received a let-
ter from President Truman later
warning him that "this Is a po-
litical year and what is said can
be lifted from the transcript for
political purposes."
HOLLYWOOD,' Oct. 14 (UP)
Winsome Doris Day said today
she's convinced that the mo-
dern male could learn a lot
about romancing a young lady
from his 1919 counterpart.
"Everything today la too
streamlined and that includes
the art of courting a girl," said
Miss Day who plays a belle of
1919 In Warner Brothers' "By
Summer Recreation
Representatives
To Be Presented
Representatives from each Ca-
nal Zone U.8.-rate community
to the Summer Recreation Board
will be selected Wednesday even-
ing at a meeting to be held in
the lobby of the Civil Affairs
Building (old airport building)
on Gaillard Highway.
Residents of each of the civi-
lian communities and of Army,
Navy and Air Force residential
areas are asked to attend the
meeting, which wUl begin at 7:30
p.m.
Organizational plans will be
discussed to enable the Summer
Recreation Program to meet the
requirements for membership as
a Community Cheat Agency.
Spruille Braden Declares US
Non-intervention Impossible
CHICAGO. Qct. 14 (UP) well as those who suffer its
the Light of the Silvery Moon."
"In this atomic age with
planes zooming through space
at 600 miles an hour, some men
adopt the attitude that they
should be equally fast in ro-
mance."
Miss Day said men "seem to
be out. to break a speed record"
in kissing a girl on their very
first date.
"It's flattering to a girl's ego
if a man at least pretends to
be so awed by the girl's beauty
and personality that he is a-
frald to rush her too quickly,"
she pointed -out.
The slower courtship approach
of the 1919 male may seem more
diffident, but actually It was
a lot more Interesting than 1952
impetuosity, explained Miss Day.
Patience was a forte of the
1919 beau, she said, and he
would spend a precious half
hour respectfully talking to the
parents before taking his girl
out.
It may have slowed him up
temporarily, but it was wise
diplomacy, the blonde star feels.
It seems as though dinner
and the theater went out with
hlgh-but'on shoes.
Nowadays It's a fast martini
and a girl finds herself putting
up a valiant defense on hs
porch steps.
The gentle art of conversa-^
tlon is gone and even a ktsal
Santed leaves a fellow lonelier
an ever.
"The pleasure of the chase
applies to courtship," according
to Aflss Day.
"Young couples would have a
lot more fun If they didn't fall
so readily Into each other's!
arms.
"Most things may be Improved
by streamlining, but love isn't
one of them."
Movie Starlet
To Become Bride
Of Guy Mitchell
RENO, Nev., Oet. 14 (UP)
Singer Guy Mitchell today an-i
nounced his engagement to
Jackie Loughery, 21-year-old
movie starlet and the "Miss
United States" entry in the re-
cent Miss Universe beauty
pageant.
Mitchell, 25, said he plans to]
marry Miss Loughery within
three of four weeks, probably I
at Tarzana, Calif., the home of|
his parents.
However, as soon as the high
court's order reaches the fed-
eral District Court perhaps
in a week the federal gov-
ernment will go into the lower
court and ask It to set a new
execution date.
Spruille Braden, former ambas-
sador to Argentina, said today
it is impossible for the United
States to follow a course of
strict non-intervention in the
affairs of other nations.
Braden. former assistant sec-
retary of state and now chair-
man of the New York City anti-
crime committee, noted that
Secretary of State Dean Ache-
son claimed recently that this
country abides by both the
"letter and spirit" of "absolute |
non intervention" in other
countries' domestic affairs.
He said there are times when
"the attempt to do so" would
be "unwise and immoral."
Actually, he said, "the United
States continuously, both wit-
tingly and unwittingly, inter-
venes in the affairs of other
states."
Braden spoke before a lun-
cheon attended Jointly by mem-
bers of the Inland Daily Press
Association and the Inter-Ame-
rican Press Association. Both
newspaper groups are now hold-
ing meetings here.
"Interventions, be they by
propaganda... diplomatic or
economic pressures, intimida-
tions or force are likely to en-
dure until human nature radi-
cally changes," Braden said.
He pointed out that many
small countries Intervene in
this nation's domestic affairs
through "lobbyists and propa-
ganda" and also by working
through their national blocks
in this country.
He warned, however, that in-
tervention is a two-edged sword
which must be employed only
with caution and Justice lest
it injure those who wield it as
blows.'
In the choice between inter-
vention and non-interventions,
he said, "we must ever be guid-
ed by the Golden Rule."
EISENHOWER WAVESGen. Dwlght Elsenhower waves from a
platform at San Francisco's Cow Palace to an overflow audi-
ence. Standing next to the Republican presidential nominee Is
Californias Gov. Earl Warren, who introduced the General.
SIGNAL SIGNERDemocratic presidential candidate Gov. Ad-
lai Stevenson (right) signs his name for a plaque to be added
to those already placed on the wall of the Milwaukee, Wis.,
press club. Looking on Is Everett Swingle, club president.

A FIRM JAWPresident Harry Truman looks grim as he
speaks of "Republican Hokum" at Indianapolis, Ind. With him
before the crowd is Indiana Gov. Henry F. Schrlcker who is
holding the text of the President's speech. ,Mr. Truman has
been carrying his blistering attacks against the Republicans
across the nation, speaking at both Urge cities and at whistle
stops.
THE HELL BOMB-7
By JAY HEAVILIN and RALPH LANE
Biggest
in H-bomb man-
ufacture is likely
to be the fact
rhot hydrogen is
difficult to li-
quefy. It must be
cooled in liquid
air at 313.96 de
rees below zero
oh renhcrt under
pressure of 7700
pounds par
square inch.
As liquid tritium and deuterium revert to gas at a tempera-
ture hundreds of degrees below xero, it is probable the bomb
will be constructed along the lines of a thermos bottle. One
way of solving the storage problem might be to fill the bombs
at a liquefying plant just before their dreadful i
TRITIUM DECAY CHART
"
lib.
*
Another problem: tritium, a radio-
activa element, releases energy
and becomes helium at such a rate
that it decays rapidly, as shown by
chart. Rather than attempt to
store tritium, authorities would
probaWy keep the
facilities for manu-
facturing tritium
from lithium ready
to produce at any
instant.
*H>
ftlbJ
*jy
1952 195ft 19*34 1976 1955
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