The Panama American

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Panama American
Portion of title:
Weekend American
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Donor:
Scott Family Library Fund ( donor )
Publisher:
Panama Times, Ltd.
Place of Publication:
Panama City, Panama
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except saturday and sunday)[may 12, 1973-]
daily[ former oct. 7, 1925-dec. 4, 1966]
daily (except saturday)[ former dec. 10, 1966-may 5, 1973]
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Panama (Panama)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Panama -- Panama

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Oct. 7, 1925-
General Note:
On Saturday published as: Weekend American, Dec. 10, 1966-May 5, 1973.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 18709335
lccn - sn 88088495
ocm18709335
Classification:
lcc - Newspaper
System ID:
AA00010883:00162

Related Items

Related Items:
Panama America


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
'BRANIFF
x tKwmmtn^
HUEJSOS AIRES
ROUND T|
IRST CLAM $732.80
TOURIST $60*50
DAILY HIWSPA
Panama American
"Let the people know the truth and the country U aafe" Abraham Lincoln.
Seagrams \ 0.
< l\ till *\ UlllSkl
Now... 6 Years Old!
TWENTY-EIGHTH TEAR.
PANAMA, R. P.. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER I, 1951.
NVE CENTS
Zonians Want Whole Setup
(NEA Telephoto)
it *Tv,aM i. t\ni man mi for the Yankees In the sixth game of the 1982
t'NDER WAY
World Serles L.
tow; down as hU team holds one game edge
catcher Is Campaneila.
Bloody Train
Wreck Kills
82 In Britain
/
HARROW, England, Oct. g
(UP) A three-train collision
today tore the Harrow station
to splinters, telescoped coaches
SO feet In the air and left at
least 82 persons dead ad mora
than 100 hospitalized In Bri-
tain's worst rail disaster since
World War I.
Ships Stacked
As PC Traffic
At Capacity'
Facing what was unofficially
termed "the first big tie-up of
transiting ships In seven years.
due to overload," the Canal was
At noon today ^more than three struggling today with a problem
ie to gladden the heart of any en-
and one-half hours after
disaster, rescue workers said i trepreneur to much business,
they feared nearly 100 persons j&a.goin* ships in cargo and
are still trapped In the wreck- ballast tugged at their anchor
age and It was evident that the Wi, lnsi(je the .Cristbal jetties
death toll might rise above the an(j tn the outer Balboa road-
100 mark. Bodies are being car-!steati
Not Just Rents,
But RP Annuity
Local Rate Jobs
The British National Railways
said it feared the casualties persons
would be even higher.
rled from the scene by the mi-
nute.
Hundreds of passengers and
standing on the plat-
PRR Cuts, Reverses Schedules
To 3 Passenger Trains Daily
While the increased rentals remain the No. 1 target,
Canal Zone Civic Councils want the Congressional in-
vestigation they are seeking to probe every facet of Pan-
ama Canal operations.
President of the General Civic Councils, Charles W.
Hammond, said today: Some people have the wrong idea
maximm'of 8 ships. 19 squees-: that we are just out for ourselves.
form suffered less severe lnjur- d through yesterday. hi.i.__/__ .. ..,
ic- I B It s not only housing we want investigated, but the
The crash occurred at the | No official figures were ;*"*"" whole Canal setop, from the bottom up.
peak of the morn ing rush hour able on traffic for the last few: r> r
In the first fog of autumn, days, but It was unofficially re-1 We wont Congressmen to investigate the Cartels
when the fast express trin.,porfed: that,41 ships p;^"1"1! obligation to the local raters as well as to US raters.
Though the southbound capa-
city of the waterway under the
present operation of shifts Is a|
the Night Scot, came speeding | themselves for transit yesterday,
through the station at Harrow,
ten miles north of London.
The Night Boot crashed
Pilota were
a tight schedule:
Into i signalmen and other staffs
doubling back" on
lock e
re* s.
ffa di-
the rear of a local commuters |rect'y c0"rf S *--.hE2 in congressman drive has been who have rer-lved
A rearrangement of Panama
Railroad train schedules to pro-
vide three passenger-train runs
a day will become effective on
October 19.
me rear ui h iuvbi uuhiiiiui^ioi -- ,___*!< i
products to ttH retail stores of train standing, in the station, werereported as "operating in
the Commissary Division slnee|v/lth some 800 passengers Jarn-:veranve.
Panam wants the annuity reviewed, and we don't
blame her. That's another thing we want investigated.
Hammond said the wrlte-your Nor has he heard of any Zonlane
an answer
pose in reversing the run Is to
This" action Is mad> necessary,permit the locomotive to be rerv-
by the diminishing revenue pas-Iced on the Pacific side where the
they are delivered by the night I ming the aisles and others still
freight train. The principal pur- boarding.
The last big tlenp was at the
\ end of World War II when scores
slightly impeded by the fact some from their Senator or Congress-
people did not know jvho or man. or President Truman, to a
where to. write at this tlnv. when rent-protest letter.
si' Congressmen are eat of There has hardly been time, he
A AID FOR VICTORY Duke Snider blast* hie second homer
of the day in the Brooklyn half of the eighth Inning in 1652
World Series. Although Snider tied Lou Gehrig's record for
Series homers, this blast left the Dodgers pne run abort. They
i ue with
Camp Meettag
sengr traffic on certain sched-principal round-house operations mMhl the overnead lfceel
uled runs. This has resulted in'are to be centered. bridge and throwing screaming
heavy operating loases beyond I It la expected that considerable men Rmj women own fr0m
the capacity Of the Railroad bud- economies can be effected by the ^ foot crosaing.
oet to absorb change In train schedules with- ,
The principal changes In the out serious Inconvenience to the Other- MM reared **:> grapevine at
himt train .schedules will be public. The change will Ffrmlt Pled "ldeways Into the Pralle ful, At their
a shortening of opar a tl n g; tracks_rigtilnto 1J* ."^now J>eMLtb.ere
There was an ear-splitting ex- TAl^l^M^*,"^ campaigning or va- feels.
ploslon-Uke c.aah. coaches were ed at the Canal,
hurled crazily into the air

THE WINNING RUNMickey Mantle (7) trots into the dugout
after his eighth inning homer which gave the Yankees an
even tie witn the Dockers 3-3 in the 1952 World Series. The
Yan'e. wn It S-*. T"' torrent are G'l McDougald. mapager
Casey Stengel, Bill Miller (23) and Loren Babe (38),
Ex-la Prensa (hil
Receives Minnesota
Journalistic Award
CHICAGO. Oct. 8 (UP). Dr.
Alberto Gainza Paz, ex-edltoi
and publisher of the expropriat-
ed Argentine newspaper La
Prensa, was today named the
1952 winner of the Minnesota
award for "distinguished ser-
rtinllem '
na a
morning run from Colon will gonriel
be ellmlruued.
The earl* morning train from
Panama will make a round trip
to Colon. leaving th- Atlantic
gld* at 9:40 a.m. Instead of 7 a.m.
as at present. This train will
leave Panama at 7 a.m., ten min-
utes earlier than the present
schedule.
The passenger train run at
night will be discontinued on
we^k days, but will be operated
on the present schedule on Sat-
urdays. Sundays and holidays.
The mid-day train will not be
operated under the new schedule
on Saturdays, Sundays and holi-
days. It will be operated dally on
vvjek days but will leave Colon at
12:30 p.m. and Panama at 12:40
afewSMSnasfffl!*: "&*
into the path of
Man
Balboa magistrate K.I P Ta- He further announced that any
telman can provide the home money remaining from the fund
addresses of all Congressmen and collected to send Howard Munro.
PELEHATCHIE, Mis. (UP)- Senators.Jlammond reports. "LMJ.C"(;V.U. to.^shlnJ^_I? *t
One hundred and 24 year, tfol Hammcmd suggest, writer, also ^ ?tohtm//he rn^r^1
a child was killed swinging on mvlte their Congre-wmea to groups "bMng the rent lncreas
nearby Bhllohcome down to the Zone on an un- will be used to hire and retain
recant meeting;oi/|Ci,i visit. gj ,DreresenUt,v*
The'
child
/ed no reply.
The new sehedule will result
In a force reduction of about It
H.S.-rale and t local-rale em-
ployes. These reductions will be
made over a neriod of several
months. It Is expected that
practically all will be offered
employment elsewhere In the
Canal arganliatlon. (
The firat force reduction will wreckage ana fr0m the burled
There was a second tremen
dous crash. Wreckage and glass
flew across tie platform until
the scene resembled a battle-
field.
There waa a moment or si-
lence.
Then the stunned, dazed pas-
sengers crawled from the
be 10 local-rate helpers In the
Crbtobal railroad shops. Elht of
these have already heen placed
elwwhere and the other two de-
clined offers of transfers to oth-
er units.
In addition to these, 12 brake-
men and switchmen Jobs and
three locomotive firemen Jobs
wi'l be eliminated on the local-
m., ten minutes later than the rate rolls. These reductions will
present schedule. | not become fulls effective for
A change In achedule Is also several months been use of vaca-
beln made In the round-trip run tlon schedules and trw need for
of the local freight train, which
Is a mixed passenger and freight.
The train will leave Diablo
Crossing at 8:15 a.m., and will
leave Mt. Hope on the return trip
at 9:55 a.m. The local freight
oresentlv makes a round trio
from th. Atlantic to the Pacific
side leaving Mt. Hope at
special train service during th.e
comlne tourist season.
Although 10 positions will he
abolished on the UB.-rat rolls
as a result of the change, pend-
ing retirements among the OP-
US ArmV EnqineerSam and leaving Diablo Crossing
_ .. *_ at 8:50 a.m. on the return trip.
Pave Korean Roads
With Cold; Rush On
SEOUL. Korea, Oct. 8 'UP'
Korean prospectors" chipped
The change In the local freight
schedule will not affect deliver-
ies of cold storage and bakery
number of force reductions re
5:45 quired.
Public notices of the change In
train schedule have been print-
ed and will be given wide distri-
bution.
The new schedule follows:
coaches began the screamini
and shouting of the trapped
and Injuredgirls on their way
to work In London's financial
district, soldiers on the Night
Scot, children on their way to
school at Wembley, and busi-
nessmen in striped trousers and
black Jackets.
A doll carriage stuck but of a
window of one car and blood
seeped out of the doorway and
dripped onto the tracks.
Those not severely Injured
began dragging the dead and
injured from the wreckage
which was piled 30 feet In the
air. Frantic calls went out for
aid. Police cars with loud-
Community Chest Agencies (2)
DAILY EXCEPT SATURDAYS, 8UNDAY8 AND HOLIDAY8
Train No.
away at roads in the area of no. 2
vice In Journalism.
Gainza Paz will
award medall on and o
at the annual meeting o >iie
Inland Dally Press Association
here on Oct. 13.
Pyongtack today after it was dis-
covered the highway were sur-
faced with refined gold ore.
"The gold rush Is on," said an
army officer who explained how
engineers had coated the roads
Dr. Ralph D. Casey, director
of the Minnesota School of
Journalism, said: "Gainza Paz'
magnificent fight to maintain
freedom and independence of
his newspaper and courage in
combatting the forces of a
dictatorship made him the sym-
bol of struggle for democracy
all over the world."
receive the a year ago had been surfaced by
"gravel" from an abandoned slag
pile. -
But Instead of gravel, the en-
"'aeers actually had used gold
t.e valued at $60,000.
No. 3
No. 5
No. 6
No. 7
No. 8
leave Panam 7:00 a.m.
leave Coln 9:40 a.m.
leave Coln 12:30 p.m.
leave Panam 12:40 p.m.
leave Coln 4:S0 p.m.
leave Panama 4:40 p.m.
arrive Coln 8:25 a.m.
arrive Panam 11:05 a.m.
arrive Panam 1:55 p.m.
arrive Coln
arrive Panam
arrive Coln
2:05 p.m.
5:55 p.m.
6:05 p'.m.
borhood summoning all doctors
and nurses to the scene.
Within a short time there
were approximately 500 rescue
workers on hand Including
doctors and nurses from hospi-
taU ten miles around. Ambu-
lances from all parts of London
whipped constantly to ana
from the station.
At 1.45 ajn the police an-
nounced the death toll as 82
and 11 injured. 41 of whom had
left the hospital after treat-
ment.
SATURDAYS, SUNDAY \ND HOLIDAYS
The mistake was discovered
orlv recently when a Korean
Bl'Jie owner demanded that sum
tor the loss of his gold. The ar-
my was reported to have settled
for $20.000.
He said Gainza Paz was se-
lected by the journalism faculty
from nominations made by the
Inland membership.
A bulletin sent to 50 Inland
members said La Prensa, under ... th voar
his leadership, "was consistent-?; 5?.Ze^T
ly rated among the worlds ten
best newspapers."
Hurricane 'Easy*
Gets Rolling
No. ?.
No. 3
/No. 7
No. 8
NO. 9
No.10
leave Panam
leave Coln
leave Coln
leave Panam
leave Coln
7:00 a.m.
9:40 a.m.
4:30 p,m,
4:40 p.m.
10:00 p.m.
fast night an? wholehe
supported the moves .o far made
bv Pacific sWers to fight the rent
increases.
Atlantic .Id.* communities will
get fully into the fight at a big
meeting In the Margarita club-
house 7:30 p.m. Friday
Meanwhile, Rufus M. Lovelady.
national vice-president of the
American Federation of Govern-
ment Employs, directed a letter
to James A. Campbell, national
nresident. in Washington, enclos-
ing copies of recent newspaper
clippings on the rent question
and a copv of the letter sent
President Truman.
Campbell was asked to join in
the rent fight.
Lovelady's letter to AFGE pres-
ident Campbell said in part:
"Here Is our problem: On Sep-
tember 25 the Governor of the
Cannl Zone. Brigadier General J.
S Seyhold announced to a
group of employe representative,
that hour." rentals for United
ates citizen employes of the
Canal Zone Government and the
Panama Canal Company would"
be Increased. It was l*ter learn-
ed the inerease. would be from
about 14 to as much as 140% ef-
fective October 26. 1952. The av-
erace Increase amounts to about
t40%. Well. Jim. the emploves
;here have hit the celling, as the
inclosed newspner clinpinga will
eIoqivnt.lv testify. I have been
one of the leaders In the opposi-
tion to the rent increase as you
wtl' no doubt cather from the
clipping. It was I who called the
mass meetin-? referred tn in the
. Panama American clipping nt
the JWB-USO auditorium. And,j0ctor. 4 and th, ,,,. and Hr.
of courae, so may her husband',H rllppini of October 5 The
and their civilian friends. meetin-r was a hues ..irces* from
leave Panam 10:10 p.m.
arrive Coln 8:25 am.
arrive Panam 11:05 a.m.
arrive Panam 5:55 p.m.,
arrive Coln 6:05 p.m. I
arrive Panam 11:25 p.m.
arrive Coln 11:3$ p.m.
Local Freifht Trsin
DAILY EXCEPT SATURDAYS, SUNDAY8 AND HOLIDAYS
No.31 leave Mt. Hope 9:55 a.m.
No 32 leave Diablo 6:15 a.m.
Tro-
HA.I.BOA .\W.b
"Thursday, Oct. 9
HIGI. I ow
7:26 a. m. 1:19 a. m.
1.01 p m. 1:43 p. in.
MIAMI. Oct. 8 (UP).
pical storm "Easy" the fifth
whirled at 50 to
55 miles per hour today as It
formed In the Atlantic east of
the Br.tlsh West Indies, or 2,000
miles southeast of Miami.
The San Juan. P. R weather
bureau said the new s m de-
veloped a "well de.'ir csnter
lox.est pressure at 29.38
Inches of mercury.
2 Nigs Buzz USAF C-47 Mercy Plane
Mauser Ammo
Leaving Mexico
For Colombia
VERACRUZ. Mexico, Oct. *
(If? i Unofficial re nor
maritime sources
day that more
rounds of ammun
ser rifles have left
Colombia.
BERLIN. Oct. 8 (UP)Two 190
Soviet Mlg-15 fighters buazed a
U. 8. Air Force mercy plane
In the Berlin air corridor today
and fired warning machine
fun shots without hitting It or
wounding any of the five crew-
men.
The mercy plane waa a U.S.
Air Force C-47 medical eva-
cuation plane making a rout-
ine flight from Frankfurt to
Berlin to pick up patients.
It w?s bu^ed by Soviet Jet
fighters near Koennern. about .warning."
miles southwest of Berlin
in the southernmost part of
the 300-mile wide corridor link-
ing the city with West Ger-
many.
First reports indicated one
of the Migs tried actually to
shoot at the hospital plane,
but later an Air Force state-
ment said several machine gun
bullets were fired "not lnme-
dlately directed at the plane,
but apparently Intended to at-
tract attention or serve as a
when a soldier needs a friend:
when he's bringing hi* wife
and family to the Isthmus is
one of them.
Maybe he can't get quarters;
certainly he doesn't know some
of the local waya of doing
things.
At the Jewish Welfare Board Caribbean Stamp Club the Or- M
sSvFeJzsxl--"iSRSsSa
the Unitarian Society and sf' rnoon October 9
USO he-finds just such a friend
In Rabbi Nathan Witkin above,
working out plans with a lo-
.w1*^^01?;.,^'. wi' flnd l,ha our viewpoint and the rmxmst
the JWB-USO U the rneetlng to our sr,frhM WM spontaneous
place for some of the Canal .. ,lnrfr,
Zone organizations in which "n1 slncer-
she becomes interested .The Art] Jlnl h wh8, T tah
League, the College Club, the vn) wM ^ for u.. Howr!l
Reoreerta-
The shipments,
made by a war materials
tory in Mexico City for the Co-
lombian army, left aboard the
vessels Shledyk and Ambyk
with another shipment schedul-
ed to go on the Abbedyk.
The shipments were Uken
fae- fared by the JWB-USO.
$3.500. This will aid in provid- la this: Munro will verv HAely
It doesn't matter a whit to.ing many services for the 8,000 contact you^on Friri-*" or Mort-
Rabbi Witkin or his assistant!military and 4,000 civilian men;dav and ask your esl.tenee in
director. Miss Dorothy Brick-1 and women who use the cen- wUng our *Wt bet
man, what may be the man's ters facilities each month President for hi. immediate *c-
faith Organized in the Canal Zone'tlon on our request for a rrc
And when the serviceman's during World War I. the JWB or postnonemen' of t*e efte-ti
wife gets setlled, she may at-:has been In its present build- date of the rent mere*, I wi
directly to New Orleans where'tend a cooking class, learn cer- Ing alnce 1940. vou would loin with him.
they were reshipped to Barran- amlcs, practice her dancing iand| It has been headed by Rabbi Hushing, Tom Walters, anf
qulila. ilearn some new Latin American Witkin since 1937. with the ex-!one else he may recrvli
'steps while she practices) all ception of one year, 194$-44, mission and do your yery ben
Informante could not specify JWB-USO activities. when he was away from the with DoneW Dawrop John St
the total coat of the aale or the Or she may go to a music ap- Isthmus serving as Overs*. Di- man. or other
conditions under which It was preclatlon cle. and att?nd some rector of the JWB Armed Ser- thorltv to see that cmr Msjvaat le
carried out .o Uva many concert* given to vice* Div>* i granted."


tkcr. two
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 195*.
l
THE PANAMA AMERICAN
OWNED AND PUM.KHCB T
rouNOto v NJ
INC.
17
THI PANAMA AMERICAN PH
N rtOUNSEVKVL IN
HAHMOOIO ARIAS, IDITO*
H Turei r O Bo 134. Panama. R. or p
Ttl CPHON PANAM NO 2 0740 'S LINr)
Cii.E Adobe* panamephcan. Panama
coion OfficCi It ^7* Central Avenuf etTWfrer* 14th and 13th Strmt
FOAION P.EPPE41NTAT.VE1 JOSHUA Fl POWERS INC
3AB MADISON AVI NW VO IITI N Y
lOC. ? Nlt
PIP MONTH. IN ADV.NCA-------------------------------------- '-JO 2.80
AOVANCS ________________
FOB IX MONTHt.
FOB
ONI TAB. IN 0VANC-
IUO
t* oo
THIS IS YOUK FOKUM THE MAOERS WN COLUMN
THE MAIL BOX
Tka MeH lax H on pn toium for raadan ? The Panama Amar-
kR. Utttra are received fratafaHy nd art h.ndled in a whaHy caefi-
lantial RiaaRar.
If yaa catitribata i Uffct don be imaaien if it eat* t ipaeor he
ti dy. Lattar* ara pyklished id fha ordtr received.
PKr.it Ity fa kaea fha laffar limited fa apa paae hmftk.
Identity f laftar fritara is hld hi itrictast confidence.
Tfch newspaper atturrei no responsibility for tatemen al opinions
aiaramd in ratten from readen
EX-ARMY OFFICERS
Sir:
So the local-rate quarters are handled under a separate
financial arrangement, or so the Governor says.
Well, that Is just ducky. Let's handle ours under the same
system. In other words we done care how the hell they are
handled as Ion* as the increase Is not put into effect.
But what can you expect. As long as we are governed by
cast-off Army officers we will never Ret any better deal.
A civilian to any Army officer is Just another person to
be exploited. Soak the civilians. I'm living off the fat of the
land. ._*..
-Civilian.
MR. GOVERNOR. SIR
Pear Mr. Governor:
Man to man, I need help. I've ought advise from my fel-
low employes, but I find them in the same boatwe all need
You see, Mr. Governor, sir, we got wife troubles. It's gotten
to the point that it's interfering with the sort of work we do on
your big ditchso we need help bad.
It eencenu you too, General, air, because you are supposed
to be running the big ditch; and. like they used to tell us in the
Army, you cant order a bunch of men to charge nnlee* they got
good morale. That's what we want, airgood moral.
Bat to get back to our wife troubles which are ruining our
morales. Our wivea, air, have struck. Yes sir, they've struck
plenty.
I come home from my work, tired and hot, expecting a cool-
ing glass of lemonade from the refrigerator and a few minutes
of relaxation In front of the fan before sitting down to a good
home cooked meal.
But, alas! (I saw that In a book I read once) the old ice box
hasn't been touched for a week; the floor Is cluttered with Old
newspaper clippings; I can't find my slippers; the kids have all
gone off begging for something to eat; and my wife, poor girl,
is sitting at the kitchen table with a devilish gleam in her eye-
like a wild woman.
Bating? I should say not. She hasn't eaten for days. She
is pounding away madly at the old typewriter. Letters are every-
where. Letters to senators, columnists, detective agencies, poli-
tlclana galorethere's one for everyone (have you gotten yours
yet?).
Por the hundredth time I repeat to her: "Dear, They have
us by the horns; they don't care about us; they're nothing but
a bunch of"
"Nor" she Shouts. "This Is the last straw. We women will
fight this. It's an outrage! We won't quit."
So I start looking for the can openerand thus ends another
tad day of toil.
But, Mr. Governor, sir. please don't get me wrong. It's not
that I don't sympathize with her; In fact, I know that she Is
right.
And, sir, a little Hatch Act here and there doesn't mean much
to a woman; so I'm positive your board is In fot* a tough fight.
Now, I've lived with the little woman for a good many years and
I know that there is only one way to stop her.
So, please Mr. Governor, sir, give in quickly so that we men
can all get our morales back.
Love These W'
romen.
Sir:
SHOPPING NOTES
Now is the time for all good Panamanian Merchants to get
aren with the Canal Zone Commissaries. More and more the
Zonites have been going over into Panam City and Into Colon
to do their shopping. And now with the big rent squabble on, I
wont be surprised If the Zonlans start swarming Into your
stores as fast as they can find out the right places to go. I sure
hope you are ready for them. Treat 'em right and you might
keep 'em a long time.
In Com in.
C.Z. DRAFT
Sir:
In regards to the proposed letter to the President demand-
ing that increases In rental rates be postponed pending Inves-
tigation I suggest that the following paragraphs be Inserted:
"We of the Canal Zone also request that the selective
service system be thoroughly Investigated. It appears that
the quotas that have been established for this area are in-
adequate as they have been filled every month almost com-
pletely by Panamanian volunteers.
"It is evident that if the present situation continues,
It will be several years before any of the young American
citizens here in the Zone will have an opportunity to serve
his country and thereby share the obligations of a citizen
as wall as the advantages.
"80 far. not a single American residing in the Zone has
been called, and no doubt they feel that they have been
grossly mistreated by not being allowed to march with the
ether youth ot the nation."
I have no doubt that if this paragraph were to be added
corrective action would be taken almost immediately.
I have been wondering for some time why it Is that the I
people of the C.Z. are so anxious to let the authorities in the
US. know about certain of the conditions that exist down here,
while other irregularities such as the draft situation are never
rationed?
Could it be that the Zonites are aware of only the advan-
tages of being an American citizen and have forgotten the
responsibilities and obligations?
Another question that I have Is why do all these people
continue to stay and work for the Pan Canal if they could do
so much better back- in the States?
Why don't they Just catch the next boat? I wish one of
C Pan Canal employes would answer that question for me in
column.
Can fused Army Sgt.
Insurance Rates
Make Road Crashes
Expensive luxury
BY WADS JONSS
Automobile accidents like
steaks, mink coats and fix suits
in the closetare getting priced
rl ly the well-heeled can atroro
to have them.
Steadily rising accident fig-
ures, boosting the already ap-
palling trafile toll are sky-
rocketing both collision and lia-
bility insurance costs almost to
the prohibitive level.
Hardest hit by the more ex-
pensive insurance probably will
be the hot-rod boys, with the
, flying foxtails and the clip-
on, metal white sldewalls, who
buy their gas by the quart.
The cost of adequate insur-
ance to these lads Is a good-
sized chunk of the total cost
of their cars.
But optimists In the vehicu-
lar traffic field believe the ris-
ing costs of insurance may
eventually impart to the hot-
rodders an idea which traffic
safety experts have been trying
vainly to get acrogs for years.
The idea Is that only by each
individual driver equipping
himself with a new, safe-and-
sane set of driving habits are
we ever going to curb a splral-
lng accident rate which already
Is claiming 37,300 lives a year,
injuring 1,300.000 others, and
causing untold millions In pro-
perty damage.
While the hot-rod boys, with
their speeding and swerving
and general daredevlltry, are
obvious targets in any traffic
safety reform, many of the rest
of us are dangerous drivers
various ways.
And we, tow, unless we own
more automobile stock than we
do automobiles, will feel In-
creasingly the pinch of rlilng
insurance coats.
For Instance, the Associa-
tion of Casualty and Surety
Companies points out that stock
insurance companies have had
to request boosts in their lia-
bility rates twice, by substan-
tial sums, since the spring of
1951.
This was the result, the
ACSC says, of $100 million los-
ses by stock insurance com-
panies on their automobile lia-
bility business In 1051. In the
last six years the same com-
panies say they have lost ap-
proximately $200 million on .this
type of business.
On top of this must be con-
sidered the big increases In
colusin insurance.
Bad driving habits are prob-
ably the biggest canse of the
high Insurance ratea But there
are other factors Involved.
One, of course, is the general
inflation which has upped gar-
age repair and replacement
costs.
Insurance companies also
claim that sympathetic juries
in certain parts of the country
are awarding too much In ac-
cident damage claims, and that
this Is upplng insurance costs.
Gosh! Real, Old-Fashioned Melodrama Stuff
cHie WSIHNGTOH
MERRY- GO-ROilMD
_________T BMW MaHQW
Poll Tax
By Pete Eilson
WASHINGTON (NBA) The National Con-
ference on Citizenship which held its seventh
annual convention in Washington made a great
point about the need for getting out the vote In
the November election.
Little was said, however, about the real reas-
on why the percentage of Americans taking
part in national elections Is much smaller than
!n European countries.
In 1048, only 48 million voters, or S3 per cent
of the 01 million people of voting age went to
the polls to elect the U. S. president. Compar-
able records for recent European elections are:
BelgiumMarch. 1050................... 90%
ItalyApril, 1048.........,..............89%
EnglandOctober, iM.................. 83%
CanadaJune, 1949..................... 75%
SwedenSeptember, 1051................ 80%
FranceOctober, 1945................... 76%
What pulls the U. S. percentage down con-
sistently hSthe low wjte in Southern states. The
poll tax Is a big factor here. Thlfc Is the way
they line up:
I960 Population Percentage
Over 21 Vote in Voting in '48
So. Carolina
Alabama
Mississippi
Arkansas
Virginia
Texas
1.150.000
1,748,000
1,208,000
1,113,000
2,025,000
4,738,000
142,500
215,000
192.000
242,000
419.300
1,147,000
13.8
1S.7
16.6
22.0
23.2
26.3
In other U. S. states the percentages are much
better. Utah was high In 1948 with a turnout of
nearly 75 per cent. Delaware and Colorado came
next with 71 per cent, Montana with 70.
Thirty U. S. states had a vote higher than the
rational average of S3 per cent. But the below-
average votes of 14 Southern states and Maine
1*7 per cent), Oregon (47 per cent), ahd Ver-
mont (52 per cent) cut down the national aver-
But certainly the greatest
field for reducing accident
damage costs is by having few-
be "gjjconrtlfijd*'imuro^edI A *r0UD of De*naic polticos were gathered
driving haw" improvM around a television set recently, watching Re-
publican presidential candidate Dwight Elsen-
hower deliver a speech in New York. The gen-
eral made a reference to the similarity of his
"New Crusade" with that of Oliver Cromwell,
England's 17th centurv scourge Of the Cavaliers.
Ike has used this comparison several times.
"That ought to lose him the Boston Irish
vote," commented one of the Democratic lead-
ers. Cromwell was also a persecutor of the Irish
Catholics.
Charles P. TaftSenator Bob's brotherwho
is GOP candidate for governor of Ohio this year.
driving habits.
There may. Indeed, come a
happy day when public censure
springing from a pocketbook
conscience, if nothing else
will force the road hogs, the
daredevils and the generally In-
competent drivers either to obey
the rules or stop driving.
Sir:
FIGHTING LEVY
Don't
read this
if you're
pulled a nifty by offering to co-operate with
his opponent, the Incumbent Democratic Gov.
Frank J. Lausche, in arranging community wel-
fare services for the new atomic energy plant
In southeastern Ohio.
During World War n. Brother Charlie served
In Washington as director of community serv-
ices, so he had some experience to offer. But
the otter put Governor Lausche on the spot.
He couldn't say yes and he couldn't say no.
Then on the same day that he made this of-
fer, Mr. Taft added insult to injury by Issuing
a blast on how the governor "Lausched up"
southeastern Ohio resources.
a
Another of the great riddles political seers
would like an answer to In this election year is
what the women's vote will do. Census bureau
estimates this year that there are potentially
5G million women over 21, as compared to only
ef million, men of votshg age. Women could
swing it. it they voted 1ft a bloc, Which they
don't.
' You can pick up expert opinion on both sides
of this women-vote question. Democrats say the
women like Stevenson, his puckish smile, and
they feel sorry for him because of his divorce.
But Nixon made 'em cry. And according to
the old "My Sister, Eileen," explanation of fem-
inine psychology, "No tears, no good."
a a
All this Is a far cry from the early days of
women's suffrage. There is living In Washington
today a woman 106 years old, Mrs. Adelaide
Johnson. She is the sculptress who made the
statue of the three women leaders, Lucretla
Mott, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady
Stanton, now in the captol.
The first "Council of Women" met in Mrs.
Johnson's home in Washington to launch the
American suffrage movement. But being a D. C.
resident today, she can't vote.
a a a
Ben. Robert S. Kerr of Oklahoma, who was a
candidate for the Democratic nomination for
(he presidencyremember?Is back in circula-
tion af><::- a vacation in which he put back
some of the 30 pounds he took off for appear-
ance's sake and because the doctors told him
to do it before he started his campaign.
"I read in the papers," cracked Kerr, "that
Kefauver said he couldn't sleep at night after
the convention was over, for thinking of what
might have been. As for me, I couldnt think of
what might have been, on account of sleeping
so much."
I attended the rent meeting held at the Balboa Stadium,
Saturday morning and am very glad that I did.
The stadium was two-thirds filled: it should have been
jtfrwflowing. The meeting was conducted excellently and all
representatives of the various units deserve more than praise
In the way matters were handled.
I do think the chairman sllpped-up on one thing, in'not
Inviting comment and suggestion. A microphone was placed on
he floor and I presumed It was for that purposeit was
jiever used.
Some said It would take all day. Perhaps It would take all
ay but if the suggestion Is the right one. it Is worth all day.
From our past experiencethe Income tax lawwe must
understand bv his time that we cannot accomplish our aim
without paying and being properly represented. The cash is
*hat speaks
The suggestion that I have to offer Is this: Collect $10
from every person that pays rent. (I think Mr" Lovelady said
that there were 4200 rent payers) which will be approximately
Hire the firm of King and King or other firm of equal
caliber in Washington to represent us with a $20,000 retainer fee.
Send our representatives to Washington with this firm and
Jsg our representative familiarize them with the set-up here
nd let them work right through. I venture to say that If his I
had been done on be Income Tex that we would be still tax I Every Mente
Jree as we should be.
The old saving: "No taxation without representation
salon ey down here, but would have certainly had a
fnrenlnf if we were properly represented.
So. let's not make the same mistake and be sorry for
afterwards. I. for one. nominate Charles Wir cms *g treasurer dsilv
t thh new move and all fundsminimum of $10 shot'Id b --...
Sent to him. i"**1
rich
You wouldn't be
interested
BUT If you're a wide-awake
businessman concerned with
the advertising and sales pro-
motion ot your progressive
ouslness. you 11 want to know
that our CLASSIFIED
COLUMNS ofier you the fast-
est, most economical most
convenient way to reach cus-
tomers!
eeery week
every slayTIE PANAMA
rent 1 AMERICAN carries MOsU:
I( ] WANT AIM tatas all other
papen Panas** cees-

WalterWinchelllnNewYork
ATTN FBI: MEET THE PRESSTITUTES
(PART HID
Joe Lash: Self-confessed ex-com. Indexed 40
times between 1939-47 by the House Committee
on Un-American Activities. Fact Finoing Com-
mittee of California Senate (1948) cited him as
associated editor of Student Advocate, a Com-
munist publication. Memo dated Feb. 14th. 1942.
from otflce of Chief of Army Air Forces:
"Fredertok Vanderbilt Field's connections were
unfavorable; that his contacts with Japanese
In New York, with Mr. Joseph Lash and with
the Communist party were such as to render
his employment in Intelligence activities un-
favorable."
Lash was national committeeman for the Red-
front American League Against War and
Fascism. After Pearl Harbor, Lash was urged
by the House Un-American Activities Committee
(o help expose Communist-front outfits. Alter
huffing he was not before them In the role of
"stool-pigeon." Lash's response to the request
was an emphatic nyet and he luriously Gro-
myko'd out of the room.
New York Post editor James Wechsler (on July
15th. 1952) aeoosed under oath: "Joe Lash, who
happens to be a very strong anti-Communist, is
a member of the New York Post assigned to
the United Nations. I know him well. I have
known him for vears and I know the whole
course of his personal and political history."
End Quotes.
James Glaser: Casey was his alias while
operating as managing redltor of the Scum-
munlst Daily Worker. Currently employed as
New York Post copy reader. (Moscow papers,
please copy.)
Arthur Schleslnger. Jr.: Indexed 10 times by
Houre Un-American Activities Comm. between
TS9-47. cited as a member of the Red-front
American Student Union. Now speech writer tor
Gov. Stevenson If he's responsible for Adlai's
quipsStalin must be chuckling.
Frank Kingdon: Official report of California
Fact Finding Comm. on Un-American Activities
i Vol. 4. 1948) Includes the following revelations:
K ng-dcu. submitted a paper July 9-13. 1947
at a conference in Beverly Hills Hotel on "stra-
tegy wid tactics" in fighting governmental In-
vestigative agencies. Conference sponsored by
Red-rront Progressive Citizens of America. De-
scribed as "connecting link" between American
Fr.ends of Czechoslovakia and "other alien
Communist fronts." Affiliated with the Red-
Front American Students Union. Supporter of
Communist-front American Youth Congress.
Usted In 1945 as director of Independent Citi-
zens Committee of Arts. Scientists and Profes-
sions, another Fed-F. Indexed 18 times 1939-
1942 by House Un-Amer.can Activities Com-
mittee.
Kingdon (at this broadcaster's suggestion)
served as one of our radio summer replacements
in conjunction with Quentin Reynolds. Firmer
Bant and others l so that all sides el the
paliUcal fence would be represented.
^M.ax lfTDa: Th* Fct Finding Committee of
California Legislature (1948) Vol. 4 discloses
Lerner was a member of the following Com-
munlst-front: Citizens Committee to Free Earl
Browcer. American Committee for Protection of
the Fo.eiBn-Born. American League for Peace
and Democracy, League of American Writers,
National Emergency Council for Democratic
Rights. lerner was Indexed 12 times by the
House Committee on Un-American Activities
oetween 1939-1941. He signed an open letter
calling for closer cooperation with the Soviet
Union Aug. 14. 1939 directly after the Nazi-
nasslan alliance was made public. Lerner signed
a statement defending the Communist party in
the March 5, 1041. Daily Worker during the
Hi'.lev-Stalin pact. (Oh Maxxli
Drew Pearson jays: Judjje Bone posas a question "in visw
of the Nixon precedent"; Senator's voting record and
business interests' of donors to his expense fund re-
vealed.
SAN FRANCISCO. Judge Homer Bone of the US. Court
of Appeals was lunching with friends In San Francisco. The ques-
tion of the Nixon "expense" fund came up.
"There's been a lot of sickness In my family," remarked the
Judge, "and I've had a hard time living on my salary. Perhaps
I should take a thousand dollars from the Santa Fe Railroad,
another from the American Presidents Line, and another thou-
sand from the Dollar Line.
"I suppose, in view of the Nixon precedent," continued Judge
Bone, keeping a straight face, "it wouldn't make any difference
would It?" '
"They'd run you off the bench," snorted stanch Republican
Louis Lurlc
IMPORTANT QUESTION
jij Thefe'a been a lot of discussion over whether Senator Nixon
did or did not use his expense fund for personal matters and
now he was able to buy two houses at oncey one of them requir-
ing $21,000 down payment. ~
However, the really important question is: "Did the million-
aires club who put up the expense money, get value returned
through the Senator's vote?"
The answer lies In the Senator's voting record and the busi-
ness interests of his donors. Here are both: /
Eleven of the Nixon donors are big real-estate men. includ-
ing such powerful operators as:
Fred H. Blxby whose family own tremendous areas In
Long Beach; president of Alamitos Land Co.; director Security-
First National Bank; Founders Fire and Marine Insurance;
Jotham Blxby Co., and A. M. E. Blxby Co.
V. Ben.ton Van Nuys president of the Van Nuys Building
Co. Van Nuys Investment Co., La Hacienda Co., First Safe De-
posit Co., director Tojon Co., and Farmers and Merchants Na-
tional Bank.
The real-estate men who donated to Nixon's secret fund were
active m trying to obtain the removal of rent controls and block-
ing Taft public housing for slum clearance in Los Angeles,
Here Is how their man, Senator Nixon, voted on these ques-
tions:
June 20, 1061 Nixon voted to out public housing from BO,.
000 to 5,000 units. On June 4, 1052 he voted to shorten rent con-
trols by four months, on June 5 he voted for Benator Cain's
amendment to give localities the say-so oh Imposing rent con-
trol In critical areas.
On June 12 he and Senator Knowland Introduced an amend*
nient to the defense bill aimed at sidetracking public houslg.
SECRET DONORS
Fifteen of Senator Nixon's secret donors were also oilmen
or oil-equipment manufacturers, Including some with govern-
ment contracts:
Herbert Hoover Jr., one of the largest donors, Is president of
United Geophysical, a director of Union Oil and of Southern
California Edison.
His company has an important contract with the Navy for
exploring and drilling oil in Northern Alaska, reputedly rich In
oil.
Others are Earle M. Jorgensen chairman of the Jorgensen
Oil Co., director of the Citizens National Trust Co.; Rodney 6.
Burkee, president of the Lane-Wells Co., Petro-Tech Service Co.,
Lane-Wells Canadian Co.; also director of Petroleum Equipment
Suppliers Association and of Sells Surveys Inc.
Earl B. Gllmorp, president of the A. F. Gllmore Co., Kerman '
Cattle Co., director of Technical Crafts Co., and Gllmore and
Nolan, Inc.; William B. Hubbard, president Anselma Oil Co., Rea-
lltos Oil Co., director of Cherry Rivet Co.
Thomas P Pike, president of Pike Drilling Co., and Casualty
Insurance Co.; Frank Seaver, president of Hydril Co., Doheny
8tone Drill Co., and Texford Manf. Co.; Leland K. Whlttler, vice
president Belridge Oil, Rodeo Land and Water; Director Western
Oil and Gas Assn.; Farmers and Merchants National Bank.
Edward R. Valentine, vice pres. Fullerton Oil, director Cali-
fornia Portland Cement; J. W. Robinson Co.; Security-First Na-
tional Bank;
Arthur Crites, who has both oil and real-estate Interests at
Bakersfield; R. R. Bush, a Pasadena oilman.
Senator Nixon's record in regard to oil follows: on Aug. $1,
1951 Me voted for the basing-potnt bill which the oil companfti
favored.
In September 1061 he voted Against cutting the oll-depletlon
allowance from 27% per cent to 14 per cent. But his most active
work for oil companies was his vigorous, consistent champion-
ship of tldelands oil.
Nixon even sent copies of tldelands oil literature out under
his own frank, despite the fact that he claimed he used the
secret expense fund to mall letters and thus save the taxpayers
expense.
VOTES FAVORED CONTRIBUTORS
Another group of Nixon subsidizers were milk-products exe-
cutives, including Thorklld Knudsen, president of the Knudsen
creamery; Alford Ghormley, vice president of Carnation Milk
and president of the Camaco Equipment Co., a subsidiary; J. W.
McKenzle or Arden's Milk and,Valley Maid; together with the
Bixby family which has big miik-products Investments.
When the question of restricting cheese and dairy products
from France and other NATO countries came up for a vote in
the Senate, Nixon voted with the dairy Interests.
The amount of cheese coming In from Western Europe was
relatively small, and the State Department pleaded that to or-
der to combat Communism we had to buy something from Europe
or else continue to subsidize the battle against Communism
in cash.
, 4BuA Nixon voted wlth the milk-products men who contribut-
ed to his fund.
In doing so he voted against California orange growers. For
France had worked out a deal to buy 400 tons of California
oranges using dollars exchange from the sale of blue cheese to
finance the deal Wb-n the sale of blue cheese was restricted by
the senate. horc\ or, thi purchase of California oranges went
by the board.
. Ty*,5 only a P"1 of {iit voting record of the Junior Senator
from California who m. y become lust one heartbeat removed
from the Presidency.
, J"}??.0 thls iecord'C.nd the legislative interests of the Nixon
club will follow icon.
SIDE GLANCES
By Calbroith
Younc people font teem to take an interest in their
jobs nowadaysthat new man doean ieven rule at
the bysss favorite atone." _
Kb*,




VmNKSBAT. OCTOBER I, 1*51,
THE FAN AM A AMERICAN -AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
rmv tma
Quiet' Memphis Sounds Like "J M fMie
r ,. Of Murder Against
Busy Factory To Speaahst ^^ DMflWw
MEMPHIS, Tenn., Oct. 8 (UP> 'tires on Its delivery wagons and:
Memphis may be the quietest; rubber shoes on its horses,
city in the United States" to! Political candidates were or-
the National Noise Abatement, dered to turn down the volume
Council, but it sounds like a on their loud-speaker systems,
"moderately busy factory" to a I The ordinance made one taxi
noted ear specialist. driver fear he was in ior a fight.
The city of 396,000, which was Cab drivers are not permitted
awarded its 11th ftoise abate-to blow their horns for fares,
ment plaque yesterday, cracked They have to go up to the door
down in 1940 with an ordinance and knock,
that made it a violation for I A driver knocked at a door
even a frog to croak In a fish! and a voice screamed out for
pond. I him to quit pounding on the
City officials, rightly proud j door or he'd get his block knock-
of their achievement, were left ed off.
without; a comeback when Dr. | The cabbie replied In kind.
Charles E. Klnney hinted that .using the same, choice-words
ambulance, drivers and firemen hurled out by, his unseen foe.
were uninformed as to the law. I Then a young lady's voice
The Cleveland, O., specialist! broke the sudden silence, t was
was awakened at 3 a. m. by her parrot, she said, and he. al^
blaring sirens on a recent, v|slt ways acted like that when anyr
to the city. 8o he set up an
instrument to measure, the
Memphis noise.
"It registered 70 decibels-
noise one would, expect from a
moderately tfusy factory," Kln-
ney reported.
The doctor, could have add-
ed that the sound penetrated
all the way to hi 19th floor
hotel room.
one knocked.
No matter what the law and
how rigidly it is enforced, there
are awaya ways to get around It.
One canny truck driver let
off steam in an irritating traf-
fic Jam without breaking the
law. HI* truck was a sound
truck and he shouted "honk,
honk," Into the microphone.
Sirens afenot all that shatter .nrrtWl.v IU Ruilffc
the nerves of the hotel guest. | PrOWnSVme DUIIS
One Weary-eyed man called the n .. C-.*.lifc
desk to complain that he Defter raCllmeS
couldn't sleep because of the D *
not the garbage man made TOf JflNITip DOQTS
TOKYO, Oct. I (UP)The U.
S. Army filed a formal charge
of murder today against Mrs.
Dorothy Smith, 39-year-old
daughter of retired Gen. Walter
Krueger. World War II Pacific
combat commander.
Mrs. Smith was charged with
stabbing to death her husband,
Ool. Aubrey Smith, 45, an of-
ficer on the staff of Gen. Mark
W. Clark's Far Bast Headquar-
ters command. Smith died of a
knife wound in Tokyo Army
haspltaj Saturday morning, six
hours Uter he was stabbed.
The announcement, made by
Lt. Col. D. R. Nugent, Clrk's
public Information officer, was
devoid of details. It said:
"A charge of murder has been
Kreferred. This case will be
andled In accordance with
normal procedure. The charge
is now being Investigated as re-
quired by statute Article 39 of
the uniform code of military
justice.
"Should the investigation
establish that trial is warranted,
the charge would be referred to
an appropriate military court
for trial."
Mrs. -Smith was placed under
observation In an Army hospital
eychlatrlc ward at 1:30 a. m.
turday, an hour and a half
after the colonel was found
bleeding from wounds In their
Washington Heights home.
knocking around the thrash
car.
The drive to "resist the grow-
ing problem of excessive noise"
began here when newsmen and
radio engineers turned "decibel
detectives" to track down and
measure sound waves.
Their findings ranged from
zero on the noise meter at an
Elmwood Cemetery tombstone
BROWNSVILLE. Tex. (UP>
This shrimp capital has started
construction of a new fishing in-
stallation which will he one of
the best on the Gulf of Mexico.
It will be an entirely separate
1500 by 1O0 foot landlocked har-
bor Jo afford dockage for more
than 500 fishing craft with
drafts up to, 15 feet. Allied busl-
to" better tharY'lio'ln downtown I "eases of net factories, canneries
traffic. A steel-producing fac- houses, freezing plants and
troy may go lightly above 115.'packaging firms are expected to
Cristobal Chapter
To Hold Another
CIO Mass Meeting
The Cristobal Chapter. Local
900, has planned another open
air meeting for Friday evening
at 5 p. m. In the vicinity of the
Boys Scout Shack, Silver City
HelghU.
International representative
Ed K. Welsh and president Ed
Gaskln of Local 900, will be the
principal speakers.
All workers and their families
are especially urged to attend.
Moving pictures on Labor,
obtained through the courtesy
of the American Embassy, will
be shown Immediately follow-
ing the meeting.
Five US Warships
Going To Navios
Of Turkey, Norway
WASHINGTON. Oct. > Five United States naval ves-
sels were scheduled for transfer
to the navies of Norway and
Turkey In New York today,
marking the third annlverkary
of the signing of the Mutual
Defense Assistance Act.
The ship*, all (landing ship,
medium 1 of World War n
manufacture, will be given over
to the two countries In cere-
monies at the New York Naval
Shipyard, Brooklyn, New York.
Three off the amphibious
vessels will be transferred to
the Turkish Navy and two to
Retired Employes
Meeting Tonight
Chapter No. 34, Retired <
Employes, NARCE, will hold and
Important meeting tonight at 1
p. m. at the Pacific Clubhouse.
Norway. Thus, the two North
Atlantic Treaty Organisation
nations which border the Soviet
Union will receive benefits on
the third anniversary of the
signing of the MDAP act.
During the three years' since
l President Truman signed the
1 act, free world nations have re-
ceived 15,000 tank* and combat
vehicles, over 40 naval vasela
and more than 200 aircraft from
'the U. S. government to build
up their defense against any
possible Communist aggression.
^
CRASHES SIGNThe sign on the door of the maternity ward in
St Thomas' Hospital, Nashville, Tenn.. read: "Children under 14
not admitted." But the lS-year-old youngster above got In. She's
Mrs. Eugehe King and she's pictured with her eight-pound, two-
ounce daughter, born there September 14,
That convinced city officials.
They passed an'antl-nolse or-
dinance and the drive was on.
Motorists were fined for
honking horns, a pilot, was jail-
ed for cruising over the city and
sounding off over a loud-speak-
er, and a newsboy was picked up
for shouting out the headlines
near a hospital.
Trainmen were ordered to
stop blowing their whistles
when entering and leaving the
city except at crossings design-
ated by state law. Trolley opera-
tors found the ban extended to
their clanging bells.
Olover Parm Dairy out rubber
locate near the harbor.
Shrimp production through the
Port of Brownsville Increased
from 895,000 pounds In 1947 to
13,000,000 In 1951. The 1952 fig-
ures may top the record catch of
last year.
The shrimp fleet of Browns-
ville, with some 300 boats. Is the
largest In this hemisphere. The
boats travel far down the Gulf
of Mexico coast to campeche Bay
In the tropics, netting the huge
Brazilian jumbo shrimp. These,
quick-frozen and marketed all
over the United States, have
made a major addition to the
nation's eating habits.
Colon Vice Consul
Raised To Consul
Julio Salas, Swedish vice con-
sul in Colon for the last 23 years,
has been raised to Consul by the
King of Sweden.
Salas, a popular Colon busi-
nessman, also has been Consul
for the Netherlands for the last
20 years.
White Rose Square
Dancers To Hold
Practice Session
The White Rose Square Dane-
ing Club of Gamboa, win hold
its regular monthly practice at
the Paraso Auditorium on Fri-
day.
Tom and his Melody Boys will
furnish the music. AH square
dancers are welcome.
FOR THE MOST CHARMING GIRL YOU KNOW
$6.95 up
ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL Gold Charms Reduced 59%
TAHITI
ni f w ( t v no u
117 < n t r l Otv*. 1*7
Heres Good News
We have been "lucky9 in obtaining five (5) extra
CADILLACS which we can deliver AT ONCE in
the STATES or DIRECT SHIPMENT TO THE
CANAL ZONE ...
4 Series 62, model 6219 Four-Door Sedans
1 Series 62, model 6237 Sport Coupe
THIS IS THE FIRST TIME WE HAVE EVER BEEN IN
POSITION TO OFFER IMMEDIATE DELIVERY ON
CADILLACS.
SEE US TODAY!
LIBERAL TERMS HIGHEST TRADE-IN ALLOWANCES
CIV A, S. A.
Your PONTIAC CADILLAC Dealer
Panam Tel. 2-0870 Coln Tel. 1369
Sale
1952 Model
1952 Model

Deluxe & Super Catalinas
Deluxe Convertible Coupe
/*
The Most Beautiful Models In The Line
V-
HIGHEST TRADE-IN ALLOWANCES FINANCE AVAILABLE LONGEST TERMS
SEE US TODAY!
CIV A, S.A.
YOUR PONT I AC-CADILLAC DEALER

PANAMA Tel. 2-0870
COLON-Tel. 1369

i



PAGE pour
UK PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER i, IBS*.
Cargo and Freight-Ships and Planes- Arrivals and Departures
Shippi. g & AirLine News
TBIT-
GRAND ENTRANCE
Lt. Col. Joseph T. Ware Jr.,
commanding oflicer o the 1st
Air Rescue Squadron, address-
ing airline officials this morn-
ing on the purposes and pro-
cesses of his squadron in this
area.
Fldanque Firm Purchases
Agencias Americanas
Tt-. firm of Fldanque Herma-
nos y Hijos (Fldanque Brothers
and Sons) of Panama, long-time
agents for the panam* Line
ships, have added two airlines to
their representation with the
purchase of Agencias America-
nas agents for BOAC and Bran-
iff Airways.
Ttv! purchase is still subject to
fir-\l amJroval by the Interna-
tional Air Trrnsport Association.
jAfter the purchase Is completed.
Fldanque expects to apply for
Other representations.
The travel agency will be con-
duced at Fidsnqve's headquar-
ters No. 1, B Street, at the cor-
ner of Central Avenue. Stanley
nd Fenry Fldanque v.ill be In
'charge.
Norwegian Cargo Liner
Cn Route to Far Fost
The Taiwan, a !).000-ton Nor-
toe->1an carpo ll'v rived in
fcrlstobPl esterc'py. but was de-
layed until tod8v in her transit
JthroiiRh th" Canal due to heavy
farffic in the Cartel.
'"he ship, handled locallv by
afe.-itn anri Combanv carr'es a
crew of 4ft. she arrived from New
Yc-'c and Ik bound for trv ^ar
mm' _____
C'nmmernial Airlines Meet
WHh Search and Rescue
Representatives from commer-
cial airlines operating in thia a-
rea met today with the Carib-
bean Air Command anri 1st Air
Rwiir Squadron at Albroolc to
tfisruss search and rescut mat-
ters
Following a welcoming address
bsv Col. William R. Grohs. chief
Of statf of the Caribbean Air
Command. Lt. Col. Joseph T.
Ware Jr.. commanding officer
1st Air Rescue Squadron, spoke
or the history of the Air Rescue
Service. A briefing of Air Traffic
Control In this area was given by
Mai. John W. Hotf, chief con-
tro'ter at Albrook
' Although a mllitarv activity.
approximately 80% of all flights
controlled by Panama Air Traf-
fic Control are non-military.
Lt. Col. Walter F. Derek, op-
erations officer for 1st Air Res-
era gave a briefing of rescue fa-
cilities and procedures In this
area. ,
A forum period provided offi-
cials with an opportunity to ask
questions and discuss mutual
problems.
The afternoon session included
displays of rescue equipment and
aircraft. Officials were invited to
inspect ihe new Grumman Alba-
tross, the helicopter, and the Fly-
ing Boxcar.
Rescue personnel demonstra-
ted the Albatross in a Jet assist-
ed talv) off and short field rer
verse pitch landing. The Flying
Boxcar and an Albatross dropped
pararescue personnel and a hell-
copter demonstrated the dydrau-
11c hoist pick-up In which a "sur-
vivor" Is evacuated from a re-
mote ama without requiring the
'copter to land. \
H.M.S. Sheffield
Docked at Rodman
With 876 Aboard
The H.M.S. Sheffield arrived
,at Rodman Monday from San
Diego with a complement of 876
. men aboard.
The warship, which is headed
,for Valparaiso, is scheduled to
leave Oct. 13. While in Panama
trw men will be given shore leave
Lightest Load This Tear;
44 Passengers To Sail
Friday For New York
Only 44 passengers are sched-
uled to sail for New York Friday
on the Panama liner Cristobal,
according to the advance passen-
ger list. This is the llghtast pas-
senger load of the Panama Line
vessels northbound since early
this year.
J. Wendell Greene, who retired
p.t fhrt end of September as
Treasurer of the Panama Canal
Company, accompanied by Mrs.
Greene, will be among those sail-
in" Friday. Mr. and Mrs. Greene
will make their future home In
Hendersonvlllrt, North Carolina.
The complete advance passen-
ger list of the S.S. Cristobal fol-
lows:
Lyman J. Benthall; Mr. and
Mrs. Charles G. Boyes and son;
i Mrs. Elinor Browne and three
'children; James P. Clarendon;
Mr and Mrs. F. Corr.; Mrs. Lls-
if Daniels: Mrs. Dora de Motta;
Mr. and Mrs. Philip A. Downs,
Miss Marguerite Flynn; Mr. and
Mrs. J. Wendell Greene; Mr.
and Mrs. Wm. S. Hall and son;
Mrs. Dorothy K. Hamlin; Mr.
and Mr. Sidney Hsares; Martin
*S. Ives; Mrs. Charlotte Jenson
and Miss June Jensen.
Mrs. Inez M. Maduro; Mr.
and Mrs. Osmond Maduro; Mrs.
Anna M. Milter; Ross E. Murray:
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Picket;
John S. Skinner, Jr.; Mrs. Eliza-
beth Sudron; Mr. and Mrs. Hen-
ry Topper; Miss Dora Welch;
Mrs Joel J. White and Mr. and
Mrs. James O. Williams.
fjui mckiuhtkk atawvii t mmncKM
biKOK AND NORTH AND SOUTH PACD/IC CO A SIS
(A Limitad Number of Passenger Berthsl
M.S. Chill ............................................ October II
rU i l-l OMBIV KCUADOK. PBMj CHILI:: _^. #j
S.S. Port En Benin ................................... October 14
TO CKNTBAL AMKKICA A WEST COAST U.S.A.:
MS yashlngton ...................................... October 1__
PASSINGr-H SKKVICk tram NEW *OKK lo PLYMOUTH A I.. HAVrtfc:
S.S. He D France .................................... October 2!
PASSLM-KK HKKVH t Cram CARTAGENA to EUROPE:
S.S. De Grane .......................'................ October II
Crniuoai. r Kl NLH UNA. K.O Be* MM lei .-Ml Mia
Pneme: LINDO MADURO. B A. Boi It
Tel Pneme -IBS *-l3
UNITED FRUIT COMPANY
Great While Fleet
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
Arrives
Cristobal

S.S. "BYFJORD"..................................Oct. J
S.S. "AVENIR"....................................Oct. 9
S.S. CHIRIQUI"..................................Oct. 19
S.S. "LEVERS BEND .............................Oct. 24
"S.S. "CHIRIQUI" ................................Not. f
Hanollnt kefrlgeraled Chilled end General Cargo
Arrives
NEW YORK SERVICE_____________________ Cristobal
S.S. "HEREDIA"...................................Oct. 7
S.S. "VERAGUA"..................................Oct. 11
S.S. "COPAN".....................................Oct. 12
S.S. "FRA BERLANGA" ..........................Oct. 14
S.S. "CAPE ANN" ................................Oct 18
S.S. "JAMAICA" ..................................Oct. 18
Frequent freight railings from Cristbal I'
Weal Coast Central American ports
Passenger Sailings U Sails from
New Orleans via Tela. Hondaras _____________Cristobal__
S.S. "CHntlQUI"..................................Oct. 7
S.S. "CHIRIQUI"..................................Oct. 21
S.S. "CHIRIQUI" ................................Nov. 4
WeeklT Sailing* Twelve Passenger Sale M New Tork, Mobile.
Charleston. Loa Angeles. Sea Francisco and Seattle
SPECIAL NOTICE
We wish to announce a new special round trip rate ot
S270.M for passage on our twelve passenger ships sailing
weekly from Balboa to Los Angeles or San Francisco.
returning from Los Angeles, tickets limited to four
mouths, effective September 1Mb to May 15th.
TELEPHONES:
CRISTOBAL 2121 PANAMA 2-2W4 COLON 20
FRECKLES AND HIa FrUENU
Spurned
BT MERRILL BLOBnaeH
mZe gikls have aecoME BORED wih me
ANVCS OF "MANNOl-HAPW WHIOCLBS-'
IF "lOU ALL DONT MWD M6 CAUIN' VOU MISS
RUTH AH D8CLARES MOST WORSHIPFUU-Y
tou au. b see-numruL/
YOU DONT MIND
IF 1 READ WHILE
U TALK?
DUTY CALLS.' ,
EXCUSE MB, MORTON.'
Hurry, ruth/ were Mavims am
EMERGENCY MEETING/
illex uor
Vos Are?
tW'Te *
WHEW.' BY sADFRY.fiENIE, I DON11>
KNOrVHOrVrDEVERAFCXJNO /ah.VESJ
|yOU IF VOUHADNT TURNED UP! ( SOI
, HERE, t BROUGHT YOU BACK \ SEE.'
YOUR MAGIC CARPET/
_
1
BOOTS AND BER BDDDW
Very Clear
BIIDGAIMAKia
\JWV VKV\., W XOOCMSfT
OfcVWW* ftV* M0l
9fr?ttM>,. *VS* \
COV^NtU VOWR
00WVOM ,Vf\d voo AN o
OtYX.V'6 WtVVM't WR svrti
p*' MVtXX. V\V% VAWX*.
tOO -WNTA wvwv o
PKOOti' Wi'WA'.
CAPTAIN EAST
Cathy li Proud
BY LESLIE TURNKI
And A Few Letters
PLANTERSVLLLE, Miss. (UP)
Sam J. Gunter retired recent-
ly after carrying the mail on
a rural route here for ,47 years.
During that time, he said he
"delivered horned toads, pup-
pies, bees and even a baby."
Samuel Smug!
Samuel Smug is smart. 'Us true
if von were be. vou would be too:
Sam can always find good baya,
lis secret Is to advertise!
I MEET TH- RISG5
THRU CATHY...
BUT ITU TAXE
TIME TO LEARN
TH' LWOIT OF
THgR MOUSE!
CHRIS WELKI.N rianteet
Ready to Blast Off
BV KLSS WLNTERBOTBAM
rIF lOU WI4H TO
POLOH& YOUE.
yov'u. VO WHAT
BMNfrTEB. AHO
nc rLiNT
Let's Get Going
BX MICHAEL OTWALLE1
PRISCILLA'S PUT
Smashing Triumph
X AL VERMEFK
WHY DON'T
VOU TOSS
FOR IT?
f-/r
c-. ittt. Mlleasal a

ArJV lIMP\A>JV KPJC? LJ
IN BUTTIC- )THn" WU
ULAaT? /aWOlAKTWB
A*ONCrOrJV
HUGS BUNWT
Business With Pleasure
t HIKEP ClCEKO
T'K*Ka> UP- Ts't'
UEAsVB*/ 60UN0*.
LIKE HE'*
PLAC-tIN' v,
SIT TH' PO**m,
SHERIFF. ..THery
WeTNT THeXT-
^
^Hi-mS*
J
*ss~ *

tiftftm*
MAJOR HOOPLB OUT OUR WAI
By J. R vVILLlAJrt


WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER I. 195.
/BE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER
rAGE PIT!
pacific ^Docietu

/r/Vi. Cwtf C. J\ockf
Bo 17, Baflom PkoH* BJU 3521
on Monday by plane for Paris,
France.
New All-Time High Plans Move Ahead
Of Loans Reported For Bigger Show
By Chase National During 'Art Weeks'
Defecate Returns to Washington I, A new all-time high total of
Colonel Angel Mend osa, a ' member of the Spanish delega- statement date was reported by
TV .. _. _.. .T.-l-i ._.. ._ th rhflta Maflnnat Rant in H
Uon to the Presidential Inaugur-
ation, left Panama by plane on
Bunday to return to his post as
Military Attache to the Spanish
Embassy In Washington, DC.
the Chase National Bank In Its
Sept. 30 statement of condition
Issued for publication today.
Loans outstanding on Sept. 30
totalled $2.200.120.840 compared
with $1.953.537.210 a year ago and
$2.186.047,008 on June 30 of this
year. Deposits wore $4,897,132,010
Mrs. Turner is Visitor Here
paMF!lorJ|daiearrlvedUo"n"the Isth-compared with 4,747,283.338 and
mus Monday aboard the S. 8.1 $5236,752.882 on the respective
Ancon from New York. During dates. Total resources on Sept
her stay Mrs. Turner will be the!30 were $5.375.886.120 compared
house guest of Mr. and Mrs, A.
C. Medlnger.
Colonel Blltch Returns
From U.S.
Colonel Clifford O. Blltch of
Ancon, returned to Panama Mon-
day by plane following a vaca-
tion Of several weeks spent In
Tallahassee, Florida.
Mr. and Mrs. Martins
Are at Home
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Martlnz of
Golf Heights returned by plane
on Mondav from a brtef vacation
rpent at their country horro; In
Cerro Punta.
Vacationers Return ,
From Santa Clara
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham OrtL=..-= r -------
and their daughters, Vllma and'Federal and state taxes for the
Mildred, returned to their home first nine months of 1952 were
with $5.174,410,239 a year ago and
$5,897,633,277 on June 30.
Cash In the bank's vaults and
on deposit with trw Federal Re-
serve Bank and other banks to-
talled $1,343,682.828 compared
with $1,378.828,483 a year ago and
$1,477,139,774 on June 30. Invest-
ments In United States Govern-
ment securities amounted to $1,-
119,655,727 compared with $1,-
199,967.856 and $1,232,757,394 re-
spectively.
Net earnings and profits for
the first nine months of 1952
were $18.553.000, or $2.51 per
share, compared with net earn-
ings and profits for the same pe-
riod in 1951 amounting to $15,-
071,000 or $2.04 per share, includ-
ing profits on Mcurltles of four
cents per share. Reserves for
MR. AND MRS. RICHARD PAUL EDWARDS, following their
marriage at the Fort Amador Chapel bn Beptember 29. Mrs.
Edwards Is the former .Margaret Elisabeth Straus.
RECEPTION HONORS AMBASSADOR
AND MRS. ORTIZ DE ZEVALLOS
A farewell reception was given on Monday evening by
the members of the Diplomatic Corps accredited to Panam
and their wives at the Union Club In honor of the Ambassa-
dor of Per to Panam and Dean of the Diplomatic Corps
and Mrs. Emilio Ortis de Zevallos.
Ambassador and Mrs. Ortic de' Zevallos will leave this
evening at 6:00 by special scooter from the Balboa Railroad
Station for Colon where they will sail aboard the S.S. "Santa
Barbara" for Peni.
In Mlraflores on Monday from a
vacation spent at Santa Clara.
Mrs. Fenton Leaves
for New Orleans
Mrs. Hugh Fenton of Campo
Alegre left the Isthmus recently
by plane for New Orleans, Loui-
siana, where she will be joined
In three weeks by Mr. Fenton.
Prior to Mrs. Fenton's depart-
ure she was the guest of honor at
a cocktail party given by a group
of her friends.
day evening were: 1st, Mrs. V.
Pollak and Mr. E. Koref; 2nd.
Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Norria; 3rd,
Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Robinson.
4th, Mr. Tom Orr and Mr. R.
Torres; and 5th, Mr. and Mrs. F.
Brady.
Ramadan Caldron
News of Former Residents ^ Meet Tonight
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph C. Har-, Hamadon Caldron, No. 73, will
vey, former reshldnts of the Ca- :meet this evening at 7:30 at the
nal Zone and now of Tlgard.;Glri gcout House in Pedro Mi-
n-..MM nnn,,Mrtn tUa KlrfV. nf *,..ii-_ -Ml..-. _I11 W.
$22,629,000, or $3.05 per share,
compared with $18,126,000, or
$2.45 per share, for the same pe-
riod of 1951, an lncrtase of more
than 24 per cent. '
Ambassador and Mrs. Arosemena
Leave for Spain
The Ambassador of Panama to
Spain and former President of
th Republic of Panama and Mrs.
Alcibtades Arosemena left the
Isthmus on Monday by plane for
the V.8. en route to Madrid,
Spam.
Mr. Adler Returns From U.S.
Mr. Lawrence Adler of Campo
Alegre returned to the Isthmus
recently by plane from a short
business trip 'to the United
State*.
Monthly Tea at Spanish Embassy
Postponed
The Countess de Rabago, wife
of the Ambassador of Spain to
Panama, has postponed the
monthly tea usually held the first
Monday of every month at the
Embassy for the auxiliary mem-
bers of the Panama Red Cross,
until Monday afternoon, October
13.
Oregon, announce the birth of
their second* child and first son,
Phillip Carlyle Harvey on Oct. 1.
Mrs. Harvey is the former
Pauline Engler, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Walter Engler of Tig-
ard. Oregon. The paternal grand-
parents are Mr. and Mrs. Rob-
ert Harvey of Balboa.
Alfaros Hosts for Farewell
Cocktail Party
Mr. and Mrs. Rogelio Alfaro of
Bella Vista were boats to a group
of their friends on Monday even-
ing at a cocktail party given at
their home in farewell to the
Ambassador of Peru to Panama
and Dean of the Diplomatic
Corps and Mrs. EmlUo Ortiz de
Zevallos.
guel. Election of officers will be
held at this Important meeting
at which all members are re-
quested to be present.
Attention Is called to the
change in meeting place.
Ingrams Piano Recital Tonight
A benefit concert for the Cole-
gio San Vicente will be given
this evening at 8:30 at the Lux
In a meeting of the canal
Zone Art League Sunday after-
noon In the library of the JWB,
arrangements were made for the
Annual Community Art Exhibi-
tion to be held from Nov. 2 to
Nov 16 at the Hotel Tlvoll In ce-
lebration of American Art Week,
This exhibition has in past
years been held in the basement
gallery of the YMCA, but due to
the ilncreased number of paint-
ings submitted each year, a larg-
er space was needed. Also the
number of entries from each ar-
tist has heretofore been curtail-
ed.
Since the League accepts oil
paintings, watercolors, graphics,
ceramics, carving and sculpture,
It has decided that an artist
might have the privilege of en-
tering six pieces with not more
than four in one class. There is
no Jury of admissions. Addition-
al lighting has been planned.
The work at the exhibition will
be Insured. There will be prizes.
All work should be brought to
the Hotel Tlvoll on Oct. 2, 30, 31.
from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Oil paint-
ings should be framed, have
screw eyes and wire ready for
hanging. Watercolors and gra-
phics will be accepted matted but
the artist should not complain of
the use of thumbtacks and scotch
tape. Large ceramics and wood-
carvings are preferred. Pastels
should be under glass. The work
will be arranged In the ballroom,
the lobby and the writing room.
The Ar* League acquired sev-
eral new members. It passed a
resolution of regret at the loss of
Robert Dwelle, who is leaving for
Venezuela. Dwelle has served the
Art League for ten years having
filled the offices of e"*1*/*'
president, chairman of the At-
lantic Side Group, chairman of
the Annual Exhibition. His land-
scape architecture and use of
nature has been enjoyed by
thore in the group as well as
those outside the league.
Following the business meet-
ing Harry Dunn showed one
hundred beautiful slides of Pan-
ama orchids. This was only part
of a collection of 300 which Dunn
has taken, and which has been
used by universities in the States.
" Those Interested In learning of
the activities of the Canal Zone
Ar> League or in helping with
the Art Week Exhibition may call
Miss B. S. Gardner 2-1457.
Youth Delegate
Chosen As Guest
Speaker By Rotary
The Panama Rotary Club
will have Pfc. I. M. Wallersteln. i
a member of the U. 8. Armed
Forces, as its guest speaker to-'
morrow.
"Atllersteln was one of the'
nine delegates from the United
States to the Congress of World
Assembly of Youths recently
held In Dakar, Africa.
The meeting will be held at
the El Panama Hotel at 12:15
p. m with acting president
Luis Martlnz presiding.
American Explorer
Of Orinoco Valley
Dies In New Haven
NEW HAVEN. Conn.. Oct. 8
'U8I8ILeo Miller, 5 year-old
explorer who accompanied Pres-
ident Theodore Roosevelt on
South American explorations
and who has associated with
the American Museum of Na-
tural history, has died here.
In 1911 Miller, as a member
of an expedition to Colombia,
succeeded at the risk of his life
in finding the race cock-of-the-
rock bird, the ruplcola. and
brought back 18 specimens.
After heading a subsequent
museum expedition to the Ori-
noco Valley In 1912 Miller ac-
companied President Roosevelt |
on the latter's South American
expedition. A later expedition
for the museum financed by!
Roosevelt and Miller collected
zoological specimens in Pana-
ma, Bolvla. Per and Chie.
by th* makers of
radio equipment
for fho famid
K0N -TIKI
Expedition
Amazing
measures ttnly 11* x 7' x T
TUNES MO ADC AST AND 4 SHORTWAVE IANDSI
Hear a symphony from Paris, a news
flash from England, a tango or samba
from South America! Eavesdrop on radio
amateurs, ships' operators! No other ra-
dio offers so much for ths money! Corns
In for a frs* demonstration
TROPICAL ELECTRONICS
No. 3, 45th Street Bella Vista 3-12*5
Everybody fead* Classified'
Mf. and Mrs. Edwards
to Reside in Cristobal Theater by Nelly and Jaime lh-'. UV^JaJ
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Paul Ed- Kram< TnP program Includes *" ACtOUnidlliS RGvQCU
works of Mozart. Schubert, Rach-1*
wards Will be at home to their
friends after October 14, at house
11719-1 in Old Cristobal.
Ambassador Hacera
Leaves for New Post
Mr. Oflllo Hazera. the newly
appointed Ambassador of Pana-
ma to France, left the Isthmus
ATTENTION!
REX BEAUTY' SALON
take* pleasure in offering the service of the.
massage, specialist MR. HENAO BLANCO.
If you want to reduce your weight or if you
want to gain some pounds, or to have a
perfect, cutis, come, in for a consultation and
you'U be satisfied.
MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY
Phone 2-3346 No. 5, 4th of July Ave.
College Club Tea
Has Large Attendance-
The annual fall tea o^ the Ca-
nal Eone college Club" was held
on Mondav afternoon at the
Jewish Welfare Board Center in
Balboa with a large group in at-
tendance to honor the new mem-
bers and to bid farewell to Mrs.
;J. Wendell Greene, a charter
member of the club who plans to
i leave soon for the United States.
Prior to the tea Mrs. Greene
iwas presented a corsage of or-
Chinese Legation to Observe
41st Proclamation of Republic
The Chinese legation will be
wan picacineu a .- hosts to a reception celebrating
chlds and later in the afternoon tns 41st Anniversary of the Re-
manlnoff, Debussy, Mlchaud and
Webber. Tickets ate $1.50 and
$100. ______ /
"Glamor Boy" to be Presented
hv Baloo* High ,
The Balboa High School's Lit-
tle Thedter will present Olson's
thre/;-act comedy. "Glamor Boy.''
On Oct. 28 and 20. as the open-
ing activity of its nineteenth
consecutive season.
! Mrs. Lewis MoOre gave a farewell
address to Mrs. Oreene and gave
her a bouquet of wood roses
which was also a gift from the
club members.
Mrs. Elizabeth McNevin an-
publlc to be held Friday from 5
to 7 p.m.
The reception will take place
at the Chinese Legation at No. 6,
Avenida General San Martin.
mm. r.ii/.nL iii ihi,i,v-,.. f------------
nounced the Study Group Lead- p.nama Students Heads
i rs who are; Miss Gladys Elkins, junior Class at Culver
Music Group; Mrs. Hope Benor I cadet Miguel Brostella of Pa-
qlta, Know the isthmus Group: Lama was elected president of
Mrs. J. E. Schrlftglesser, Book the Junior class at Culver
Review Group; Miss Dorothy < Military Academy In elections
Moody, Play Reading Group. Ihld here this week.
Mrs. George l*e was chairman Brostella is a cadet First Ser-
in charge of refreshments for the >Keant In Troop A of the famous
'culver Black Horse Troop and
has been active In a variety of
extra-curricular and academic
activities during his three years
on campus.
He is the son of Miguel Bros-
tella Mata, Via Espaa, No. 3.
tea.
Study Group meeting times will
be announced at future dates.
Urgently By Civil
Service Commission
! There Is an rrrgent'need in the
United States General Account-
ing Office for additional quali-
fied accountants at entrance
salaries ranging from $4.205 to
$10.800 a year; the V. S. Civil
Service Commission has an-
nounced.
The positions open are locat-
ed in many of the large cities
throughout the U. S. and in
Juneau, Alaska.
Public accounting type ex-
perience or experience In related
fields of finance and manage-
ment requiring accounting
knowledge comparable to that
acquired in public accounting
Is qualifying.
Full information and applica-
tion forms may be obtained
from the Board of U. 8. Civil
Service Examiners. Room 102,
Admin. Bide.. Balboa Heights,
or from the U. S. Civil Service
Commission, Washington 25, D.
C. Interested persons who can
meet the requirements have
been urged to apply at once.
Enjoy a <*-" u
HOME SHAMPOO
with real egg4
Pacific Civic Council
Meets Tonight
Th regular monthly meeting ,
of the Pacific Civic Council will panam.
be held this evening at 7:30 in
the board room of the Adminis-
tration Building, Balboa Heights.
Bridge Tournament
Winners Announced
The winners of the bridge
tournament played in the Card
Room of the Hotel Tlvoli on Mon-
Beauty
BY PROFESSIONALS
at its best...
(U/&*
#*e
SPECIAL
In Hudnut Shampoo that
makes hair mera manageable.
Home ptrmomnti 'lake' barter:
There's real egg in this superb shampooa liquid", luxury
creme used in the Richard Hudnut Fifth Avenue Salon to
make hair easier to do, more manageable. Ir caresses your
hair into lustrous loveliness, restotes natural beauty, removes
loose dandruff, leaves hair tanglefree, makes home perma-
nent* 'take' better. Try it, to-day. It's concentrated a little
goes a long way! And remember, too, those other delightful
Richard Hudnut hair beauty preparationsQeme Rinse,
Geme Hair Dressing, and the Dandruff Treatment.
^ tGG CREMg SHAMPOO*
$788
on
WHY HAVE A HOME
PERMANENT ?
...with Inadequate facilities.
no certain finished look, and
no guaranteewhen yen run
have a professional one rom-
Slete for only S7.M! ft will
1*1 long..and look better]
MONDAY thru THURSDAY
These can be had
BALBOA
LITTLE L.IX
The best woy for o man to cl inch
on oroument is to toke her in his
orms. -*
talho. CMiMmon. ap*am
Malle/your 7-2959
Appointment **"
BEAUTY SHOP
Mrs. Bate* Wieman Mgr.
Oaaa art* an m urn m
SINGING FOR JOY!
What wonderful out for row canary
* be ltd on Prenchi Bird Seed < French',
hi everything, he aceda and like* teasafca
him happy and keep him healthy. No
ordinary seed thi.! Ery packet ha.
pure, tetted ingredient, ind a .pedal Bird
toot. Tali unique blend make, per-
fectly balanced diet thai keep, yew pel
ookina beaorinal and m. h taca.
"n' ,
JurLj 'he Wallpaper fit of thia
I *^ figure flaturinj dresi.lt
highlights the hipa (a fashion "must"
i his season)with a sudden iwonah
of fabric thai become* a most be-
coming side panel.
\kl:
I the extra aoftaaaa, the
' extra comfort of gentle
Mode*. It's America' luxury nap-
kinvet Modeaa coau no more thas
the others.
New HOUSE COATS
JUST ARRIVED
Feel comfortable
Look so pretty!
Select from our lovelv collection of cheery,
at home clothes.
PANAMA,
UON
<>
Tf r**foiu Trutfc Tira*
WJJj
till
TRANSPORT
Designed for amazingly long
original service and retread
service on smooth highways.
High tensile Gum-Dipped
rayon cord body; Duraf lex
construction.
T*:
HIGH SPEEP
(
Famous the world over for
outstanding performance on
semi-improved and gravel
roads. Tough, wear-resistant
tread; rayon cord body.
ALL TRACTION
For combined On-and-Off-The-
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service. Sturdy shoulder bars
give traction where needed.
Extra thick, deep tread.
COMPLETE LINE OP FIRESTONE DPI
THIS POK TRACTION, DURABILITY
ECONOMY
Tirtstont
AVENIDA J. FRANCISCO DE LA OSSA Na.
Phones J-4MS J-4SH P.O. Box 511
PANAMA. R. P.
1
El


PAGE MX
ti* PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILY NEWSPAPER

i
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER I, IMS,

=**
You Sell em. When You Tell em thru PA. Classifieds!
1 ave vour Ad with une of our Agent or our Office iu No. 57
No. 12,179 Central Ave. Colon
4H" Street Panama

Lewis Service
#4 Tivoll Ave.Phone 2-2291. and
VU.rrison's
Fourth of July Are.Pnone 2-0441
Saln de Belleza Americano
#65 West 12th Street
Agencia Internacional de Publicaciones
#3 Lottery Plaxa Phone 2-319
Carllon Drug Store
10.059 Melendei Ay*.Phone IU Coln
Propaganda, S.A.
"H" 8treet corner Estudiante 8t
Phone* 2-2214 and 2-2781
Minimum for 12 words.
3c. each additional word.
ssss
m
FOR SALE
Household
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE:Westinghouse 9 ft. Re-
trigerotor. Mohogony buffet. Ma-
hogany vanity and bench
Do you heve drkekhte. areelem?
Writ. Aleoholie. Aeieaymoas. let
20JI <>cm. C. Z.
Moho-'DR. WENDEHAKE. Medical Clinic.
gony child's combination. Chest &
wordrobe. Rio Grande St. House
207-A. Phone 4-563, Pedro Mi-
guel. ^______
Estudiante street No. 140. Between
"if." ond "J" Street. Phone 2-
3479. Ponomo.
SPECIAL EXCURSIONS!
FROM PANAMA TO MEXICO
Coffee Tables. 1 Frame choir with
cushion to match couch ''";-
00. 86-6212, Qtrs. 304-A, Al-
broc' _____________
FOrTsALE:-A(l peteelein refriger-
otor 7.8 cu. ft., brond new. $300.
25 or 60 cycle. Tel. 6-32K
day-limit), $160. 'good one yeari
to COS ANGELES, on* way. $149.
15. round trip $252.35. 90 day-
limit) Ponama Dispatch Service,
opposite Ancon bus stop. Tel. Pon-
omo 2-1655.
FOR SALERefrigerator 9 ft West
mgnouse, porcelain, 25 cycle. $90.
00; piano $200, good
Telephone 4-282.
condition.
FOR SALE:Refrigerator, practicilly
new, dining set; Leed's spray
dishes; 525 I-B, Diablo, telephone
2-3343.________________________
FOR SALE: 60 cycle Firestone
washing mochine. 10 months old,
crib with innerspring mattress, cot-
ton mattress for crib, pair maho-
gany night tobies, wooden dresser
metal dresser bedroom lamp. Phone
Kobbe 4193. __________
FOR SALE:60 cycle Kelvinator, 9
cu. ft. Refrigerator with large
freezer compartment, and 4 burn-
er gas stove, both excellent buys
as we must sell at a sacrifice. Call
Ponamo 3-2108 mornings.____
PINAMA CANAL COMPANY
OFFERS YORK REFWGEHAT/3N
EQUIPMENT, PLUMIING FIXTURES
and FITTINGS, ETC.. FOR SALE
Sealed bid?, for opening- in public,
will be received until 10:30 A. M .
November 18. 1952, for York Re-
frigeration Equipment, Plumbing
Fixtures and Fittings, etc., located ot
the Balboa Storehouse. Excess Sole
Circulor No. 24. Part 11, may be
obtained from the office of Super-
intendent of Storehouses, Balboa, te-
lephone 2-2777.
FOR SALE
Automobile
Service Personnel and Civilian
Government Employee
Insist on
Government Employes Finance Co.
When you finance your new
or ueed car.
AGENCY OIHLINGER
No. 43 Automobile Row
Phone 3-4984 1-4985
RESORTS
Gromllch Sonto Clara beach-
cottages. Electric Ice boxes, gas
stoves, moderate rotes. Telephone
6-441 Gamboa. 4-567 Pedro Mi-
guel.
COMMERCIAL &
PROFESSIONAL
Houses on BEACH ot Sant* Clara.
Phone SHRAPNEL Balboa 2820.
FOR SALE;Used tires, passer.ger
commercial at Agencios Cosmos,
on Automobile Row No. 29, tele-
phone Panama 2-4721. ,_____
NEW Hillman Minx convertible. 1,-
800 miles, $1,350, duty paid."
Phone office 83-6103.
roR^ALE^Packard Sedan 1949,
4 door, perfect condition. $925-
00. Eisenman Corros Usados, Pe-
ru Avenue, No. 8. Tel. 2-4516.
Phidias. Oceanside cottages. Santo
Cloro. Box 435. Balboo. Phone
Panama 3-1877, Cristobal 3-1673.
Casino Sonto Clara. Donee music by
Casino Aces. No reservations ne-
cessary, Soturdoy and Sunday.
K)K RENT
Apartment
LAST DAY! 20 inch two wheel bi-
cycle $20. Lorge Rotton table $20.
2 wood kitchen tables, $2.00.
Electric mantle clock $8. Used
womon's, njon's boy's clothes. 216-
A. Darien Ploce. Ancon.
FORSALE:BARGAIN! $25. tokes
13 cubic foot porceloin Kelvinot-
or 25 cycle refrigerator "where is j
osjs" in Canal storehouse Diablo
Heights. Telephone Panama 3-
0943. _____.
FOR SALE
Miscellaneous
POR SALE: Mahogany bedroom
set. 8 pieces $450.00, 6 strond
Rattan living set, consults of sec-
tional sofa, chair, lorge end toble,
coffee toble, $300.00. Kitchen ca-
binet $10.00. Coll 85-4183 or
quorters 251-A, Dioblo Terrace.
POR SALE; Transmitter 100 W
complete. General Electric new
table model rodio sitting room set,
52nd Street 5 Apt. 1. After 6 p.
FOR SALE:2 Frequency Changers,
A-l condition. 1410 ond 1280
HP, 3 phase, 25 cycle, 2300 volt
to 1250 KW & 937.5 KW, 3
phase, 60 cycle, 490 volt, 300
RPM, Westinghouse Units with
Starting Equipment ond Generating
Panels. Also 11000 volt, 25 cycle
transformers to 2300 volt for use
with obove units. For immediate
delivery call Electrical Equipment
Co., Inc., Davenport, Iowa, U.S.A.
3-8059, for inspection and price.
FOR SALE:Plymouth Sedan 1948,
4 door, new tires, perfect mecha-
ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS
Two and five room furnished ond
unfurnished opartments; privte en-
closed gardens. 8061. 10th Street,
New Crlstobol. Telephone Colon
1386.
nicol condition. Duty poid. $925.-1 FOR RENT:2 bedroom oportment,
00. Eisenmon Carros Usados, Pe-
Avenue No. 8. Tel. 2-4516.
FOR SALE: 1947 Plymouth De-
Luxe 4-door sedan, new seat cov-
ers, good tires. Excellent condi-
tion. Phone Kobbe 4193.
FOR SALE:Late 49, Codillac, Club
Coupe, low mileage, excellent con
ditio'n. Call Albrook 6293 or see
at quarters 45-A.
$60.00. No. 12, 6th St.
phone 2-1347, Panama.
Tele-
LOST j FOUND
FOR SALE;Ford Radio, will fit 42
thru 49. Ford or Mercury, Novy
2883.
FOR SALE: Cuban bedroom set.
Frlgidefr* refrigerator. 7 ft. Other
furniture. Bargain. No. 77 Estu-
diante street Apt. 5. Telephone 2-
3058.
FOR SALE:Entire furnishings din-
ing, living, bedrooms, porch, kitch-
en, stove, Frigidoire, silver, China,
silver linen lamps. Phone 3-3319,
Zoffmon.
FOR SALE:14 cu. ft. Deep.Freeie.
0 cycle Coldspot, new. $350-
00. New G. E. radio, clock with
timer, 60 cycle. $25.00. 8 mm
Cinemaster Movie Camera $40.-
00. Sheffield English Silver Tea
Service, $115.00. Record Player!
45 RPM, 60 cycle, $10.00. Phone
86-5106.
FOR SALE:Complete Nikon out-
fit. Camera, all the Nikor lenses,
universol viewtinder, flosh equip-
ment, sunshades and filters, 4 film
magazines. Full price $769.60.
Will sell for $500.00 brond new.
Box 124, Gatun.
FOR SALE:Baby crib, white with
3 drawers at bottom, small size,
handmade. Pillow mattress ond
rubber, sheeting included, $12.00.
Phone 83-2139.
FOR SALE:Fur coot, black skunk,
beautiful styling, very good condi-
tion. $65.00. Phone 83-2139.
FOR SALE:1951, 98 Oldsmobile,
9.000 miles,, nylon upholstery, ra-
dio. Very reasonable. Can be
financed. Call 2-3422 (Balboa).
FOR SALE1952 Ford Club Coupe.
Radio. W. W. tires. Trode cheaper
car. 5564, Diablo.
Help Wanted
WANTED: Cook, preferably one
who worked with European fami-
ly. No. 30, 33rd street ond Justo
Arosemeno Avenue. Panam.
WANTED:Maid for general house-
work, some cooking. Must live in.
Bring references. El Cangrejo, Ca-
lle 5o. caso No. 7, 1st street left,
below Lo Salle school.
Position Offered
WANTED: Lire wire Ml time
talesmen, salary and commiuien.
Excellent opportunity. See Jack
Kerr. Smoot b Peradas. Chevrolet
* Buick.
FOR SALE:2 play suits, ladies size,
13-teifor mode. celanese cloth,
very pretty. $5.00 each. Phone
832I39.
PERSONALS
Attention pupils and Students. Ivy
Harriett will resume Ballroom danc-
ing Instructions, first week in
November. Harriett & Dunn.
FOR SALEOld upright piano, re-
cently repaired an dtuned $95.00.
Large table, sideboard, desk, all
steel, 1 16-A, Jadwin Ave. Gom-
boo.
FOR SALE:Double barrel 12 gouge
shotgun by Sorosqueta Floor with
leather case and shells. One heavy
Herrings combination safe 28 x
33 x 38 inches with wheels. Call
Panama 2-3330 during office
hours.
Swiss Workers
Approximately 60,000 workers
re employed in Switzerland's)
watchmaking trade, or one of ev-1
ety 35 persons engaged in the
nation's industries.
FOR SALE:Radio-phono 25 cycles,
records, 2 drafting tobies, book-
case, file cabinet, Quartermaster
dining table, buffet, desk, chif-
fonier, night table, ice box, etc.,
English racing bike. Balboa 2-
3406 or 0772-F, Williamson
Ploce, anytime after 1 p. m.
Wonted Position
Bilinguol stenogropher with excellent
English experience offers her ser-
vices os Secretory. Would accept
post on triol basis during conve-
nient period. C/O Box 2068, An-
con. C. Z.
REWARD: Block female dog,
white feet long legs, smooth hoir,
named Missie. Lost Friday In
Curundu. Phone 83-2172.
Protect your home from
the danger of mosquitoes
and flies with
: REMOVABLE ALUMINUM
SCREEN FRAMES
Note these money and work
savinr advantages
1. 30% to 40% cheaper than
any other screen
2. Can be removed or re-
Placed in a few seconds.
.3. 3 or 4 pound weight makes
cleaning a light house-
keeping lob.
4. Frame never rusts, rots or
needs painting.
5. Screen easily replaced at
fraction of usual cost.
6. Admits more air and light.
GEol F. NOVEY, INC.
279 Central Ave
Tel. 3-0140
Medicinal Capsule Becomes
t
Time Bomb Fot Curing Ills
LOST:Hunting dog, block ond ton
between Cascadas and Rio Man-
dingo, Sunday, Oct. 5th. Tel. 3-
Imqo, Sur
342T _
ward.
3-3248, Ponama. Re-
FOR SALE
Real Estate
What--you ore going back for. This
place is next to heaven. Buy cheap
lot or house right now. 1,000 pro-
perties for sale, see us.
Thomas Reol Estate Agencies
Central Ave. No. 259, Calidonia
Phone 3-1069, P. O. Box 3404
Ponomo.
Conal Zone authorities raise your
rent? Well here is the solution. Buy
yourself o good proyerty in Pon-
ame, the sofest place to
Invest down south ot your service
Thomas Real Estote Agencies
Central Ave. No. 259, Colidonio
Phone 3-1069. P. O. Its* 3404
Ponama.
MODERN FURNITURE
8VISIT OCR SHOW-ROOM
Sllprever
g-m Reupholstrry
"HERBS"
77 Amo Row
Trl. 3-4628
_
Transportes Baxter, S. A.
Shipping, moving, storage.
We pack and crate- or move
anything. 'Phone 2-2451,
2-2562, Panam.
CHIROPRACTORS
Or*. A. and R. ORIIJ AC
(Palmer Graduates)
OFFICB HOURS:
S It and 1 < p-m.
Saturday: 8 1 noor,.
H Fern Avenue Tel. S-1IM
(] block from Lux Theatre)
FOR SALE
Boats & Motors
FOR SALE:26 ft. lounch cypress 1
hull, Lothrop engine, 79 hp., sleeps!
two, coll Ponomo 2-2930.
Rila Offers To Drop
Divorce If Aly Khan
Will Give Up Yasmin
JOB Wanted typewriter repair mon
well known guaranteed work, im-,
mediante service. Coll Isaacs 3.'divorce suit against Prince Aly
'08.'. Khan if he gives up all claim to
PARIS, Oct. 8 (UP) Rita
(m'; 1 Hayworth has offered to drop her
HX
HOUSEHOLD EXCHANOE
For the best values In both
new and reconditioned fur-
niture.
WE BUY AND SELL
41 Automobile Row
Tel. 3-4911
NEW YORK, Oct. 8 (UP)
The medicinal capsule has been1
made Into a time bomo, it was
revealed toaay.
'inanks to newly developed:
teenmques, it will release 1U
medicine inside of patients a
little, bit at a time. And the
release 01 each nine bit is pre-
ciiciyt imecl.
Tue development was an-
nounced by Dr. Rudolph H.
Blythe, director of pharmaceu-
tical research of the Smith,
Kiin, and Frenen laboratories.
ihe new form of capsule is
called a "spansule.''
lux value is that patients are
able to get a day a or night's
allotment of meaicine by talc-
ing one capsule instead of tax-
ing a hall dozen at stated In-
tervals.
Bo lar the principle has been
applied to oiuy two medicines.
One is ampnetamlne sulfate,
which is used to control seiz-
ures of epileptics. Tne otner is
dextroampnetamine sulfate
which is used to check the ap-
petite of the overweight and to
relieve some types of mental
depression.
But it will be applied to oth-
er medicines as the research
progresses.
Tne way it works is simple,
although difficult to com-
pound. A, "spansule" of dextro-
amphetamine sulfate, for ex-
ample, contains more than
100 tiny pellets. Each one has
a neutral coating and each
coating is of a different thick-
ness. The natural chemicals of
the gastro Intestinal tract
break down the coatings and
release the medicine. But the
pellet with the thinnest coat-
ing is released hours before the:
one with the thickest.
The trick is in the measure-
ments of the coatings. The
spansule" of dextro-ampheta-
mine sulfate will be released
evenly into the gastrointesti-
nal tract for eight to 12 hours,
it was said.
Before releasing "spansules"
for sale by prescription, the
laboratories provided them to
a number of physicians for test-
ing. Dr. H. Houston Merritt of
the New York Institute recent-
ly reported to the American
Neurological Association o n
their use oh epileptics to ward
off night seizures. One capsule
was enough for one night and
the patients did not have to be
awakened to take medicine.
The laboratories pro video
"spansules" containing dextro-
amphetamlne sulfate t o
physicians who used them
treating 92 patients for
On the Silver Screen
Answer to Previous Punt
IAIPMI
lewplwL.
HORIZONTAL S3 Make
melodious
1,6 Screen
character
actor
11 Antenna
13 Continued
story
14 SO (Fr.)
ISOieie acid
ester
18 Distress signal
17 Make into law
IB Crimson
20 Hindu
garments
21 Nautical term
25 Egyptian sun
god
84 Trap
' 55 Cipners
, VERTICAL
1 Felines *
2 Demigod
8 Angers
4 The linden
5 One of bis
.-------roles is
- that of a
clown
Raised stripes
7 Anger
8 Prevaricator
8 Tardy
10 Snow vehicle
rararauua
: Mint
;;
?LRU
tinui irai
aun
IHIie>l IsslrlAlPlsu
18 Regulates 39 Cubic meter]
21 Moslem.
22 Flower
container
23 High cards
24 Chsir
40 Volcano ln Sicily 1 H
41 Dress edge* 1
42Wolfhound'
43 Food Ash
28 Light browns 12Gir,.,
30 Contest of
speed
31 Companion
32 Cry of
Bacchanals
33 Bewildered
34 Abstract being
35 Be borne
36 He is at his
, ------in
western roles
37 Solicitor
general (ab.)
38 Concluded
38 Western cattle
4! Covering for
thebead
44 The silver ,
screen
his
versatility
45 Feminine V-
undergarment
purloined in
colleges
48 Evader (
50 Fastened with
brads
52 Ancestral
halls
name
18 Church
gatheriags
28 Gull-like bird 45 Smear S
27 Eager 46 City in
26 Complication Nevada \
28 Plant 47 Fruit drinks"']
Sllrritstes 48Drone bee tA
96 Substitution 51 Follower "" ^
r-r-rrri i p it n i
r r' t
Is t -Z
E~ 1 p
Lo -
Ul f) B H m
r illrl' ml- -
p ir1 -JZ- ~
*" B WM T1 W/ *
' r
5-rrir r ;
W m W Pi
H W ----
n -A :
pared so that the entire daily
dose is included in a single cap-
sule, its anorexigenic appetite
to that observed when unmodi-
fied dextro-amphetamine sul-
fate is administered in divided
dosage. The advantage o a
preparation which needs to be
taken but once dally is obvious.
"It Is also our Impression
that by maintaining a contin-
uous anor-exigenic effect, such
a preparation is peculiarly val-
36 uable In 'nlbblers.' Such a prob-
inllem exists very frequently in
over-busy housewives, who do not
weight" Their report said: |have time, they say, to eat reg-
"When this medlcatio nis pre- ular meals, but 'nibble' all day."
0&0!
WANTED
MjseflIsrpeoQSj
Responsible Amerlcon, desire* to
rent 2 bedroom chalet, vicinity
Belle Visto. Coll Mr. Di Scolo,
Panama 3-1660.
WANTED: Amerlcon couple de-
sires vocation quarters Nov. 1 or
sooner. Coll Cpl. Meyers, Clayton
6166, between 7 a. m. ond 1 p.
m.'
Will shora apartment in Ponoma
with working lady. Very reason-
able. Box 139,7, Ancon.
WANTfD TO KJY:-C*ee*. lot of
ld with wall at adfc 4 acaaa at
Poifill. am oth.r at Rio Mar. Far
Haaiae Trailer, wrtic t* C V.
Apartado 134. Panama.
^^.n the Fall
and save up to 21%!
It's baom travel year lo
urea* ... eme) mere and mora
peeale Sr* ,.,na Canoed, be-
cause stima there k half the)
an! Se you sheuM baa* NOW
... evea If you're going In if,*
MS, whan there are still chelea
accemmeetetiont In oil Remember, by going Ian* y#u
ave an yaw tick*, aa. ,
Mreaaa teal Phene ua Seatey ...
ur service* are free!
V
SHORTS
Grave Warninr
CHELSEA. Mass. (UP) A
tombstone firm has erected a'
billboard alongside a highway
here bearing a picture of a irrave-
stone and the words, 'Drive
Carefully. We Can Wait."
Good Deed useless
HARTFORD. Conn. (UP)
When William Nash visited a
i ailed friend to give him some
money he wound up behind
bars with him. Nash was spotted
by a detective who recalled that
he was wanted on a year-old
charge.
:p your
I E
LIRE YEW!
aLtt iu prettrv* the
chrome truth oj
your car
with
^Lincoln Mercury
CHROME COATING
Protects chrome against
harrrrful road chemicals.
Helps to prevent costly
rust and corrosion.
Protects chrome against
discoloration.
their daughter Yasmin and
comes to terms on financial sup-
port, her lawyer said today.
Rita had. a much publicized
'reconciliation" with Aly nine
davs ago but walked out three
days later because "he is a play-
boy while I work all year round
in Hollywood." She indicated
then the divorce was on.
Aly struck back last night with i
the accusation, the red-haired!
movie actress was just a "home-
body" who liked to slip into
something comfortable and sit a-
round by the fireside at night.
But he said he hadn't decided a-1
bout the divorce.
The coupte continued to live in
protected domiciles nearly two
miles apart and conducted their
campaign of charge and counter-
charge through lawyers.
Rita has charged she was dis-
I appointed with her visit to Aly in
Paris because the international
sportsman preferred race horses
and night clubs to the quiet at-
mosphere she likes.
Aly told his lawyer Roger Pal-
mleri today that. "At 8 o'clock at
night the only thing she is inter-
ested in is putting on slippers
and sitting by the fireshe ig-
nores night liXe and is not inter-
ested in social life."
Aly said he wanted to "wait
and see'' before taking any ac-
tion on Rita's proposal. Rita's
lawyer. Mme. Susanne Blum, said
Rita had made plenty of money
in Hollywood last year and would
be happy to waive alimony.
All she wants is Princess Yas-
min. Mme. Blum said.
VMCA
BALL ROOM DANCE INST.
Despite Broken ~Ribs, Movie
Hero Fells He Has It Good
HOLLYWOOD. Oct. 8 (UP> 'first. In his career, Ford has
Glenn Ford shrugged off a cou-i broken his arm. lost a couple of
nle of broken ribs and assorted molars, cracked several fingers,
bruises today and admitted he | received numerous sprains and
never had it so goodlumps or
no lumps. .
Ford, who handles villains witn
aplomb on the screen, lost a de-
cision to a tree a few weeks back
while filming a western, "Man
from the Alamo," at Universal-
Radio Programs
Your Community Station
HOG-840
Where 100.000 Peeale Meet
Presents
Today, Wednesday, Oet. |
\
international.
Durin a chase scene. Foras
horse was pushed into a tree,
and he came up with cracked
strains and played cushion for a
falling horse.
While filming "White Tower"
in the French Alps, his company
narrowly missed being engulfed |
in the greatest avalanche in the.
history of the region. f.
"So what are you going to do? 10:00THEATER GUILD on
, n.lriul i'Moiir rlHp o 1-irtreA nr mon ,tn ,..*... v'n
he asked. "Never ride a horse or
shoot a gun or do'a picture about
a mountain? Everybody has to
rita, several black and blue spots take a few chances, and plenty of
* se guys on a setstunt man, rodeo
riders and so forthtake them
FOR YOUR REQUIREMENTS
NATIVE* LIMBER
CALL
ROY WATSON
Telephone: 3-4863
Avenida Nacional 43
and a vacation to recover.
"So what's all the fuss about?
said the wavy-haired actor. "You
are bound to get a few bumps
making action pictures. I never
had it so good."
all the time for less money.
"Understand, you can't be a
darned fool and try to do things
that are too tough for you. I ne-
stunt that would en-
I
Ft. Clayton bam
Wins Fke-Fiflhling
Race From Gulick
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TODAY!
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'.land Immediately with ROGBNA
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""P* 'romyour ctir-mlet toda*
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only
j,
Coipan Motors Inc.
34 Automobile Row
w
When o person thinks he hot
found the goose fhot toy Ihe
golden eggs, it usually turns out
to be a gonder. "
Under the leadership of crew
chief Ralph Ponder, the Fort
Clayton fire fighting team rack-
et up a total of 537 points to
win the Army's 1952 Panama
Area fire drill competition.
They thus earned the right
to represent the Army in the
Inter-Service fire drill competi-
tion during the Curundu fire
fighting show Saturday. In sec-
ond place with 520 points was
the Fort Gulick team, Corozal
finished third with 49.
Clayton's aggreggatlon was
made up of Sgts. Ponder, crew
chief, and Harry Mulford.
nozzieman: Cpis. Gilbert Lan-
genham, driver, and Charles
Alexy. hoseman; Pfc. James
Roulett, hoseman: and Xt.
Charles Goers, plugman.
The contest was run on both
sides of the Isthmus.
Clayton's six-man team post-
ed its high score Monday at
the old Tivoli Engineer area
near the entrance to Curundu
in competition with five other
Pacific side teams: Amador.
Kobbe. Corozal, Madden Wye.
and Quarry Heights.
The Atlantic side teams of
Forts Davis, Sherman, and Gu-
lick ran their trials
S ^.' *.. imiw nrettv ver do a stunt that would t
^ttVtultomvte^l'1*1 anotner p,ayer' and
W J, V,> nirture? so they Idont do anything to throw stunt
pvv ? J th^rrnr^fv'. worth men out of work. When I do a
should get their moneys '*W>i t man
should get
from him.
"Using doubles and taking on-
ly long shots in the tough scenes
and stunts is cheating the pub-
lic he said. "If a guy can't do
the stunts he shouldn't accept
the assignments.'
"He certainly shouldn't go near
a horse." he added significantly.
F.M.
8:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Wednesday
4:00Music Without Word*
4:15-Sapla Parade
4:30What's Your Favorite "
5:30News
5:35What's Your Favorite
fcontd.)
8:00FAD8 AND FA8HIONS -
(Faith Foster)
8:30Ricky's Record 8h0h
6:45Lowell Thomas
7:00Over to You (BBC)
7:30BLUE RIBBON SPORTS
REVIEW
7:45French in the Air (RDF)
8 00Evening salon
8:46UP. Commentary
0Love From Lelghton Bui-
zard (BBC)
9:30The Haunting Hour
gets paid just as If he'd done it
himself.
Ford thinks it's an actor's re-
sponsibility to learn how to ride,
Ught. swim and do all the other
things his pictures might re-
quire.
"The trouble is," he said, "some,
guys get hurt because they try to
Audiences are getting: mart. tnm hen th know tney
pointed out. "You 5" foo'!cant. Believe me, if I didn't be-
he
'err any more.
And remember
thi? There's no such things as ,w0lli fake. Someone has to do the "
stunts and take a few chances.
Someone has to do it, and the
fans are paying to see the star."
The same thing goes for fight
scenes, said Ford. If an actor
can't fight, he shouldn't get him-
lieve I could do those stunts, I
f Twe Pair
PEORA, 111. - na Doyle of Boonesville, Mo,
became a grandmother four
times in a week. Twin boys were
born to her daughter and .a
sel: into fight scenes. If he can,!week later her son, stationed at
he has nothing to worry about. Camp Edwards, Mass became
His recent wound wasn't his the father of twin boys.
!A!r force Br
Is at France'
Tusa*.
No*...*
THE AIR (VOA)
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidnightSign Off
Tomorrow, Thursday, Oct. 9
A.M.
:00-^8ign on The Alarm
Clock Club
7:30Morning Salon
8:15Morning Varieties
8:30Music Makers
8:45Jerry Sears Presents ,
9:00News
9:15Sacred Heart Program
9:30As I See It
10:00News ,
10:05Off the Record
U: 00News
11:05Off the Record" (Contd)
11:30Meet the Band
NoonNews
P.M.
12:05Luncheon Music
12:30Popular Music
1:00News
1:15Personality Parade
1:45Excursions In Science
2:00Call from Lea pajsj
2:15Date for Dancing
2:90Afternoon Melodies
2:45Battle of the Bands
3.00American Debut
3:15The Little Show
3:30Music for Thursday
4:00Great Artiste
4:15Bob Eberly
4:30What's Tour Favorite
5:30News
5:35What's Your Favorito
(contd)
6:00FADS AND FASHIONS
(Faith Foster)
8:15Great Artists
6:30Ricky's Record Oho
(WRUL)
6:45LoweU Thomas
7:00Make Believe B a 11 r o om
(VOA)
7:30BLUB RIBBON PORT
REVIEW
7:45Jam Session
8:00Halls of Ivy (VOA)
8:80Gay Nineties
8:46UJ. Commentary
9:00Paul Temple (BBC)
9:30Opera Concert tVOA)
10:06Dance Music
10:15Musical Interlude
10:30 Moonlight Mood
11:00The Owl's Nest
MidnightSign Off
ExpUaatioa af Symbeas
VOAVoice of America
BBCBritish B r o a d c a sttosf
Corp."


--
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1952.
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILI NEWSPAPER
rAGE SIVE*
nu WiU x.. via
Sot 195, Calun JtUpkcm; Qalun 378
family In KlcFarlond, Califor-
Upon her return the Claytors
were the dinner guests of Mr.
and Mrs. William Saunders o
Oatun.
JACOiY N MiPjf
BE OSWALD JACOB Y
Written for NEA Service
Adlai Alleges Ike More Interested
In Vote-Hunting Than Red-Hunting
NORTH
A J 10 7 6
VS42
JJCQ.T4
1
WEST
f AKM
? 0532
* Q 10 7 I
EAST
432
Q10S
JAJ108
K84
:SOUTH (D)
AAKQ94
VJ73
? None
*AJ52
North-South viil.
Sooth West North
1 Pin 1 ?
1 Pm 2 *
4 4 Pass Pass
Opening leadV K
East
Past
Pass
Pass
MISS MARE FRANCES ALEXAITIS
DR. AND MRS. FRANCIS l- AM*
ANNOUNCE DAUGHTERS ENGAGEMENT
Dr. and Mrs. Francis L. Alexaltis, ol New Cristobal, an-
nounce the engagement of their towhiy.W*'*
Lieutenant Gordon Green, USA., son of Mr George Oreen
and the late Mrs. Green of Toronto, Canada, and Puerto
Rico The wedding is being planned for Novemner.
VssAlexallls is a popular member of the younger set
on th^GoTcoasV She graduated from St. Mary', Academy
and is employed by the Operation-Uiv.sion at lort Clayton.
Lieutenant Green Is a graduate of the university oi
Tuerto Rico and is stationed at Fort William D. Davis.
Mrs. Mllo Klssam returned
from a visit with relatives in
New Jersey. She accompanied
her daughter, Miss Helen Kls-
sam, when she returned to col-
lege.
Miss Sarah and Miss Raquel
Hennquez returned Monday
from a visit In New York City.
ihey went to the States with
their brother, Mr. Herman Hen-
nquez.
Mr. John Hall, of Margarita,
spent a two months' leave In
boston and New York, return-
ing on the "Ancon."
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Hudglns,
ol Uatun, visited her parents,
Captain and Mrs. Floyd r'orrest
at their home In Mathews, Vir-
ginia.
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Sawyer in some hands It's very dlffl-
and daugnter, Susan, of Oatun spent their two months vaca-iom t0 be when you have done
%urroa messrs t ~*
Mr. and Mrs. Caleb-Clement; MWlhJiRve i"Yd h,u"
with Mary and Orrln. of Oatun. se".the> questions before he
spent their short vacation to ;*' 'ar with the obvloui"
New York and New Jersey. They' ""* of, Py-Aj it was, he woke
visited W.O. and Mrs. George "P l nd that he had dropped
Poole, Jr., who were formerly the contract out of the window,
stationed at Fort Davis. Westop-med the king of hearts
-------- and continued the iult when
Mrs. Zane Zlzz and son, Billy, East signaled enthusiastically
of Oatun, spent a two months with the ten of hearts. East won
vacation In Spokane, Washing- the third heart trick and return-
ton, and returned Monday. ed a trump. South winning with
-------- the eight.
Sojourners Meeting Place Without thinking too carefully,
Changed 'South cashed the acw of clubs,
Caribbean Chapter.No. 21, Na- ruffed a club in dummy and
tlonal Sojourners will hold,ruffed a low diamond to return
their October Meeting at the | to his hand. He then ruffed an-
Crlstobal Armed Forces Y.M.C.A. other club ^ dummy, but had to
Thursday at8:30 p.m. wlthruff a diamond with the queen
dinner at lot soades to get back.
DETROIT, Oct. 8 (UP) Goy. Adlai E. Stevenson
last night challenged the sincerity of Dwight D. Eisen-
hower on the Communists-in-government issue and sug-
gested he used it only to get votes in the presidential
election campaign.
The Democratic candidate hurled the challenge at
his Republican opponent in his major campaign talk on
the entire Communist issue.
The address climaxed a day's campaign swing in
Michigan. Earlier at Saginaw, Stevenson accused his GOP
foe of giving comfort to the Communists by saying Amer-
ica's prosperity has been solely a result of war.
The governor said "there is no greater disservice"
Eisenhower could do.
"The general has Joined loud-.en be In his super-secret gen-
ly In the clamor about the Com-
munist menace in Washington,"
Stevenson salo" at Detroit.
"Be Implies that the feder-
al government la deliberately
concealing Communists. But
he has offered only thunder-
ing silence about a cure.
think we are entitled to
ask, Is the Republican candi-
date seriously interested in try-
ing to root Communists out of
the- government, or is he only
interested in scaring the Amer-
ican people tb get votes?
"Dees the general really want
to purge Communists from the
government, or has he simply
for me. I have gone through a
disenchantment, too, In learn-
ing that a man I admired can
change his convictions so quick-
ly and so easily."
The President Intensified his
attacks on Eisenhower in a
speech prepared for delivery at
Colorado Springs, Colo., on the
homeward leg of his 8,500-mile
coast-to-coast campaign trip.
"The Republican candidate
has betrayed his principles, by
the decision to pull troops out
of Korea In tne Jits' place."
The President urged tne elec-
tion of Stevenson because he ii
qualified by cnaracter, coura*
geous and honeet."
Meanwnile the Senate Repub-
that the Democrats otfer ihi
nation's youth only employment
geared to war and jobs thai
mean "wneel chairs and wood-
en legs."
The three-man "team," dog-
publicly endorsing every Re- glng Mr. uuman's neew, also
publican candidate In the coun-ja escribed Stevenson, as Mr
ii-uman* stooge.
Members salu that the chlel
executive has venemenUy de-
lended culprits ... bome.ol
them out ol his government
cy.
But, he said, the whole Is-
sues in this campaign has
been swathed in fog and con-
fusion, some of it created by
the Communists and some by
"political demagogues who
are hunting for votes much
more than they are for Com-
munists."
Stevenson insisted that the
Democratic party during the
last 20 years has done much to
stem the Red menace, a lot of
It over the bitter opposition of
Republicans in Congress.
He referred to social and eco-
nomic gain in the United States
try, regardless of whether that
man Is the blackest of reaction-
aries, a die-hard isolationist, or
even a moral scoundrel," Mr
Truman said.
He declared that if there is now because they are"in jail."
any man to whom Elsenhower
owes "a great of loyalty and Stepping up their nswei
gratitude," It is Oen. George C. back campaign against th
Marshall. rresidenn current wnutie-
But, Mr. Truman said, Elsen- stopping, the Kepuollcans train-
hower has endorsed and "pub-lea uieir guns on Mr. irurnsn,
llcly embraced" two Kepubll-,assertions tnat tala about gov-
jolned the men who use this as and aid to the other free na-
Miss Maxine Swanson and
William Keenan Wed In
Stoui City, Iowa.
After the usual business and:
When he next ruffed out
SrS^CoWwork. ^ "*' ""^A1.!?" .i. ffi" ^J^WestV
h2 fhUinnlne, hvaa man'well0^ tru- South hid only two*
nest Lawrence Swanson. 301 21st the Panama Canal Chapter p t or 8tatl represen. ftnd'atm10"^tan^ntn^ir7/nrb"uand
Street, Sioux City, Iowa, became Daughters of the American tafJ nr th Secretarv. to set up a trump trick for East,
the bride of Charles Marvin Revolution, Will travel to the
Keenan formerly of'Oatun, son | Pacific Side of the Isthmus Sat-
of Mr.and Mrs. William -Henry urday, October 18, to attend he
2...1 .....pi,, Rpnnh- reeular fall meeting of the
Keenan. ot Santa Clara, Repub
He of Panama, in a candle-
at the First
regular
Chapter.
The meeting will be held In
light ceremony at tne rirst "\Tu "7 v t. woi
Methodist Chvuxh in Sioux Cit
iRoad, Balboa, at 2:00 p.m. with
Reverend Charles E. Mason Mrs. Rudolph W. Rubelli, Re-
offlclated at the ceremony be- ^presWlng^ ^ ^ ^ I
noon will be Mrs. Milton Leej
Nash of Oatun, who will discuss;
fore an altar decorated with
baskets of white chrysanthe-
mums. Mrs. Clarence Goodwin -.
ane The Lord's Prayer. the convention of the Children,
The bride? who entered the of the, American Revolution,
church with her father, wore a' All ladles eligible for roem-
Pink saUn Ibalfe'rina "gown with bershlp in the D. A R are cor-
a shoulder length matching veil, dially invited to attend.
She carried a bouquet1 of gar-
denias and stephanotls.
She was attended by Miss
Laura Marulne Forth, maid of
honor, who was dressed in a
ballerina length goffn of blue
organza. Miss Forth carried a
bouquet of asters. Connie Fau-
chald, dressed In yellow, was
flower girl.
William Henry Keenan, of In-
dianapolis. Ind., brother of the
groom, was best man. The ush-
ers were Mr. Arnold Cannon,
and William Hollowell, former-
ly of Gatun, who flew to Sioux
City from New York for the
ceremony.
A reception In the church par-
Bon Voyage Coffee for
Army Ladies
Mrs. W. O. Trotter was hos-
tess for an afternoon coffee giv-
en at her home at Fort Gullck,
Monday to honor Mrs. August
Zilkle and Mrs. Jose Torres who
are leaving soon for the States.
A large cake, topped with a
miniature ship, and inscribed,
in pastel shades, with bon voy-
age greetings to the honorees,
centered the coffee table and
was encircled with canna lilies
and phlledendron.
Junior Orchid Group Meeting
The Junior Group of the Gold
Coast Orchid Society will meet
lore followed the wedding cer- at fl:30 p.m. Wednesday at the
emony. Members of the om- Trefoil House,
en's Association of the church
assisted at the reception. Mrs.
Swanson, mother of the bride
wore a navy blue gown with a
corsage of roses.
Mr. and Mrs. Keenan arrived Sandle,
on the "Ancon" Monday and will
make their home in Curundu.
Mrs. Keenan was formerly a
member of the nursing staff of Episcopal
Returning Vacationers
Reverend and Mrs.
Mainert
BRITAIN'S ATOMIC TEST-
Cross mark off Australia's north-
west coast oo Newsmap shows
the Monte' Bello Islands where
Great Britain will conduct her
first atomic weapons tests. The
Royal Australia* Navy has
moved into positions near the
islands and the tests are ex-
pected to get under way shortly.
If South had counted on his
, fingers and his toes to see how
!mnv trumps he would use up
, In the process of ruffing clubs In
.the dummy and diamonds in his
I own hand, he would have seen
that his plan would'iy>t work
un'.T's the clubs broke -. and
the trumps also broke 2-2. The
odds were about S to 1 against
[such luck.
A far simpler^ plan was avail-
able to make the contract. South
'should have won the trump re-
turn in dummy at trick four. In
.order to lead the king of dla-
'monds. If East boldly ducked,
i South would let th? king of dla<-
monds rlc*.?.
There was a 50 oer cent chance
that East held the ace of dia-
monds, in which case this nlav
would develop detlarer 10th
trick.
Having obtalr.-d a diamond
trick. South could continue with
the crossruff. and would easily
! win the rest of the tricks. To put
It another way, he would win
five trumps in his own hand,
three trumps in the dummv, the
ac> of clubs and one diamond
trick.
a smoke screen for their real
purpose of taking over for their
political ends a government
which has stood for the people
and against some of his new po-
litical friends?"
The reference to Elsenhow-
er's "new political friends" ob-
viously was aimed at the gen-
eral's endorsement of senato-
Jal candidates such as Sen.
oseph R. McCarthy of Wis-
consin.
In reference to McCarthy,
Stevenson said:
"For all his bragging and fear
mongering, the Junior senator
from Wisconsin has yet to pro-
duce evidence leading to the
conviction of one single Com-
munist agent, either In or out
of government.
"The reason for this is clear.
Catching real Communist
agents, like killing poisonous
tlons of the world.
"We have met and destroyed
this disease," he said, "and we
have done it without false ac-
cusation, without the assassi-
nation of honest characters,
without destroying the princi-
ples of freedom upon which this
society is based."
Meanwhile President Tra-
man said he made a mistake
in 1945, when he said Eisen-
hower was qusUfled to be
President.
"The general whose words
read, whose speeches I hear,
can candidates for senator
"two moral pygmies" who
had subjected Marshall to "con-
temptible, Infamous attacks."
The President did not name
the senators, but he appar-
ently referred to William Jen-
ner of Indiana and Joseph R.
McCarthy of Wisconsin, who
have attacked Marshall's re-
cord as wartime chief of staff,
Secretary of State and Sec-
retary of Defense.
Br. Truman said he once be-
lieved Elsennower would "al-
ways stand up for the things
he believed in the things his
whqle career had been dedicat-
ed to achieving."
"This Is now whst I see when
: look at his campaign.' the
ernment by crony is "poppy-
cock,' anu tnat a rtepuDi.cun
administration woula mreaten
an economy now providing Jobs
for youths as they leave scnooL
"The fsct is that Mr. Tra-
man ofiers employment op-
portunities to youth provid-
ed by crises and war,' tuey
told a news conference. "Mr.
Truman offers them Jobs pro-
vided by the draft. -He would
wrench them from whatever
home, occupation, or profes-
sion they hoped to establish.
He weald send them to Ko-
rea to die and be mutilated.
"He offers youth wheel chairs
snd wooden legs.
"He ofiers youth permanent
President said, adding that hel10***10* & psychiatric hoeplt-
thought Elsenhower had been!*1*' ... _
conducting a "deceitful cam-; President Truman offers
paign." youth a continuance of crisis
The 1945 Incident to which!?nd war and all the horrors
Mr. Truman referred took place">" go '
at Potsdam, Germany.
He volunteered to help the
five star general to- become
President, If the Allied com-
mander wanted It.
Elsenhower, In his book "Cru-
wrote that Mr.
based only on blood, death, and
destruction."
The "Truth Team," which la
seeking to answer Mr. Truman's
campaign charges by traveling
closely behind the President's
train, is composed of Senators
snakes or tigers, is not a Job I President, I am convinced that
for amateurs or children, espe-
cially noisy ones. It Is a job for
professionals who know their
business and their adversaries."
Stevenson said that If he was
president he would leave the
job to men like FBI Director J.
Edgar'Hoover and Oen. Walter
Bedell Smith, head of the Cen-
tral Intelligence Agency. And
he pledged:
'If I find In Washington any
disloyal government servant, I
will throw him out, ruthlessly,
regardless of place, position or
party."
Stevenson said he^would not
write off the possibility of Com-
munist Infiltration of the fed-
eral government because It Is
Inherently a movement of sub-
version and espionage. He re-
Is not the general I once knew,"
Mr. Truman said. "Something
has happened to him."
"Finding out what manner of,sade ln EUrope
man he is has been to me -
sad experience.
hbpe you will understand "General," Eisenhower "quo-''ene D. Milllkin, Colo."
ted Mr. Truman, "there is noth-
ing that you may want that
I won't try to help you get.i
That definitely and specifically
* i Truman made the offer during Bourke B. Hickenlooper, la., Ho-
an automobile ride ln Germany, mer Ferguson, Mich., and Eu-
why, although I once thought
the general would make a good
I was absolutely wrong."
the11 XnTsldenli.! lnclud" the *idenc' ln 19"
nominee Mr. Truman accused
Elsenhower of a "moral blind-
LITTLE MX
Elsenhower said this offer
. struck him in his "emotionsl
ness" that;;brands the Republi- vUalg but tnat he regarded u
as a "very splendid Joke."
can candidate as unfit to be
President of the United 8tatea."
He accused Elsenhower of
embracing publicly "two mor-
al pygmies" among the Re-
publican candidates for sena-
tor, of betraying "liberal and
responsible" Republicans and
of betraying his principles and
followers "not only on foreign
policy but on the defense of
the United States."
Elsenhower, he said, has turn-
ed his "great' crusade" Into a
"great disenchantment."
And that hits the nail on
The President charged Elsen-
hower "has tried to win votes
by playing upon the casualties
and sacrifices ln Korea."
Eisenhower talks of "blun-
ders" that got the United
States in the Korean war, Mr.
Truman said, "yet, as Army
chief of staff, he Joined In
"TFT
People from big
MSey've reached the outposts of
civilization when they can't sap
any television antennos. ,*>
called Oeneral" Smith's rccentlthe head," Mr. Truman said,
statement that some might ev- "It has been a sad experience'
New-Fail
COUGH
RELIEF!
If Jrour throat is raw and sore
Gorgas Hospital. 8he Is a grad-
uate of the University of Colo-
rado.
Mr. Keenan was reared In Ga-
tun and educated at Cristobal
High 8chool and Purdue Uni-
versity. He is employed by the an extended vacation with her
*/// Hew Wax discovery!
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Contains no'sticky oils to attract dirt and dust. Eco-
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jomraon-l WAX O/Bo. mnd L*tHeri~. In nV.
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Johnson's PRIDE
* **.*. toy N km .| i+m^f, WmM
No Cooperation
Peterson witl their children, p^a^rnM^eported^ellrm
Sandle, Virginia and Charles! -**!;!,.? hosTake a nar-i '"" "'"-------TV----------
were among the passengers re-iS.^Ti. "f: an auto5< wfnd i from coughing don't delay ..ge
turning Monday. They attended .n?Mtlc. -m ft intn thVBuck,ey'* Cenadlo Mixture nght
the General Convention of the!*!?" and thr0W' tat0 the ** Pour yourself a spoonfulol
Church ln Boston. gutter' uus special medicaUon ... ho d It
In your mouth a minute uien
'lloiclp swallow It. Feel it spread
n, down your throat breaking up
| the thick, choking, germ-laden
Ihlegra ... smoothing a protective
Un over those hot, irritated mem-
oranes ... carrying welcome relief
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1
PAGE glOW
ft PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
..... v., i i .i,, in i. ,
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER I, ITO.
i
'
FC
FC
H
K
K
Yankees Retain World Championship With 4-2 Win
Panama Motorcycle Speedway Series Was One Of Most
Season Gets Underway Oct. 18 Dramatic, Spectacular
- Panama's motorcycle speedway, Rav Magan. Ariel 500 cc; Artie
season is scheduled to get start-, Sherrv. BSA 650 cc: Leon Shar-
ed with a suitable sounding of i pensteen, BSA 850 cc: Jack Wll-
Btadlum Saturday Oct. 18 at 8
topliners
p.m.
Last
The Clincher
neelv. Indian 750 cc.
Turning out for their first |
have public speedway racing will be i NEW YOKK (A)
spent the rainy season cunning-i Bob Blundell, Vincent 10C0 cc;! McDougald, 3b
Lv cramming more speed into|Jack Hllliard. BSA 5O0 cc: Cliff Rlzzuto. as
their racing motors, while sev- Stayton, BSA 500 cc and Donald Mantle, el
Dahl. BSA 500 cc. Mtze. lb
Many of the machines are rac- Collins, lb
ing models, compared to the a- Berra, c
daptations of normal roadster, Woodling. if
machines which made up the Noren, rf
bulk of last season's field. |a-Bauer, rf
The meeting is being organ iz- Martin, 2b
ed and conducted by the Pana- Lopat p
da, p
NEW YORK, Oct 8 (UP)-The Yankee* are
Col. Selee Presents pedro Tesis To Give Boxing
ut^Am Exhibition Tom Night
Colonel Richardson 8elee, Civil
. Affairs Bureau director, will pre-
still the worM baseball champions following their ;sent championship trophies and
ral newcomers to the speedway
scene intend rapidly to oust the
established stars.
Seven races are listed., and
with 10 days to go before the
meeting there are already 13
riders entered.
Coming out for their second
speedwav season are Chpppy
White, riding a Triumph 650 cc:
Jerrv Fox, BSA 500 cc; Bill Hi-
dalgo, Harley-Davidson 1000 cc:
ma Motorcycling Commission Reynolds,
which last season turned a sport b-Houk
previously iittle-known in Pana- Raschi. p
ma into one of the biggest crowd Kuzava, p
Totals
AR
5
4
S
S
0
'4
4
2
1
4
1
1
1
0
1
H PO
4-2 victory over the championship hungry Dodgers .**a^nl^ 'o^fi Leaguea 4^
at Ebbets Field in the seventh and deciding game of p.m. Friday at the La Boca Ban
Park.
The brilliant 1952 season of
one of the best, most dramatic and spectacular
Series within the memory of diamond experts.
Domingo Hinds. Norton 500 cc: i pullers nd thrillers on the list.;
Yesterday\s Heroes
s< tun t
BROOKLYN
Cox, 3b
Reese, ss
Snider, cf
Robinson, 2b
Campanella, c
Hodges, lb
Shuba. If
d-Pafko
Holmes, If
Furlllo. rf
Black. V
Roe, p
c-Nelson
Erktne. p
t -Morgan
Totals
(N)
AB
5
4
4
4
4
4
S
1
0
3
2
'0
1
0
1
H PO
2 2
1 2
1 4
1 0
2 2
0 13
1 1
ii 2 in i
aSafe on error for Noren in
6th.
Unbouned Joy reigned among
the Yankee fans while the whole
borough of Brooklyn was plung-
ed in the darkest gloom after
falling by one game this year to
win the long cherished crown
and by a similar margin to win
the National League pennant
last year when the Giants took
the deciding game of a three-
game playoff series on the
strengnt of Bobby Thomson's
now immortal homer.
The Yankees, thus, for the se-
Vcond time in their history, a-
J! chleved the feat of wihning four
''consecutive world titles and
Manager Casey Stengel stood in
the record books alongside ex-
Yankee Manager Joe McCarthy
as the only managers to pilot
four world champions.
How Stengel, the old master
of manipulation compensated
for his shortmanned pitching
staff by "four piatooning" his
three stars starter Ed Lopat
and relievers Allie Reynolds
and Vic Raschiplus Bob Ku-
aava will be one of the heart-
warming World Series stories
of years to come.
In the sixth Inning when Roy
the nineteen-year old La Boca
softball loop, which is rated the
toughest softball circuit on the
Campanella singled to rlghtfield | isthmus, drew overflow crowds
Reynolds signalled to Stengel to to a series of thrilling
There were the two key In-
bGrounded for Reynolds in nlngsthe fourth and the
7th.
cPopped out or Roe in 7th.
dStruck out for Shuba in
eFiled out for Erskine in 9th.
New York 'A)
Brooklyn (N)
E McDougald
Woodling, Cox.
se-
venth. In the fourth when Lo-
I pat gave up singles to Duke Sni-
der, Jackie Robinson and Roy
Campanella filling the bases
with none out, Stengel made his
. .'' ih"8t Dlf pitching move. He call-
000 111 1004 ed Reynolds to throw the best
003 1100002 ne ht(i wnen the Dodgers were
,. threatening to crack the game
2, Reynolds. ^t open.
Reynolds bailed out the Yan-
RBIMize,.Hodges, Woodling. reM ,t the expense of only one
rSaJMwj
Reese, Mantle^
2BRlzzuto, Cox.
HRWoodling, Mantle.
S -Rizzuto.
DP^-Roblnson, Reese and Hod-
ges; Rlzzuto, Martin and Mize.
LeftNew York 8. Brooklyn 9.
BBBlack 1 (Mize), Erskine 1
(Bauer), Raschi 2 (Furlllo.
Reese).
SOBlack 1 (Mantle), Roe
i Berra i, Lopat 3 Cox. Snider,
Black', Reynolds 2 (Shuba.
Black i, Kuzava 2 (Campanella,
Pafko". .
HOLopat 4 in 3 1 n n I n g s
(none out in 4th i. Black in 5
1-3, Reynolds 3 In 3, Roe 3 in
1 2-3, Raschi 1 in 1-3, Erskine 1
In 2. Kuzava 0 in 2 2-3.
R & ERLopat 1-1. Black 3-3.
Reynolds 1-1, Roe 1-1, Raschi 0-0,'
Erskine 0-0, Kuzava 0-0.
WinnerReynolds.
LoserBlack.
TJLarry Ooetz (N) plate, Bill
McKlnley first base. Babe
Plnelll (N) second base, Art Pas-
sarella (A> third base. Dusty
Boggens iN' left field. Jim Hono-
chlck (Ai right field.
T2:54.
A33,195 (paid).
Receipts$1 09.267.78,
Sports Briefs
By V. P.
BOXING
There's a new challenger for
Rocky Marclano's heavyweight
title.
Harold Johnson, who kayoed
Dodger run. it was Reynolds'
fourth appearance in the Series.
ames.
ptica Sosa and Balboa Ma-
durltos wound up the firm half-
season deadlocked in first place.
In the three-game play-off se- Pnama Gym Sunday night
ries, ptica losa copped the Benty is a full fledged light-
mld-way pennant with two vie-!*8*** h'le Tis is ffather-
weight. These boys should give
the fans more than their mo-
ney's worth of action because it
will be their next to last hard
workout before their respective
fights this weekend.
Tesis is fresh from an eight
warm up another pitcher.
Stengel made his second big
move in the seventh inning. He
brought in Raschi who had
fiitched seven-and-two-l h 1 r d s
nnlngs the day before. Raschi,
like Reynolds was "off" but t ores against one defeat,
struggled through until the Dod- The second half-season was a
gers filled the bases with one splne-tlngler right down to the
out and Snider was the h^ter. ]at day of play. Spur Cola, de-
Then once again. 8tengelfending champions, Jumped off
made a pitching move. This time to a flying start, closely followed
his man was Kuzava, a left- by Special Troops who threaten -
hander of Indifferent success] ed behind the mighty arm of Big ,un.d unanimous decision over
during the season but the per-ljohn Pistroe. : B'acJl Bl" n *n. eight-rounder
feet man to pitch to Snider be-i in the homestretch, the field;* *h Colon Arena. Sunday
cause he had a fast ball to keep narrowed down to Agenda Lam.; night a bout will be the first In
Snider, who had hit four horn-!Balboa Madurltos, and ptica which he Is asked to go ten
rs In the Series, from pulling Sosa Balboa and Lam finally rounds Teals, however. Is built
the ball toward the short right-' wt the wire in a deadlock which along the lines of the late Stan-
field wall at Ebbets Field, t! was broken when Balboa won '. Rocky McKay and fights
Kuzava ran the count to two tne piay-oft game. wlth the **me tire'ess Pwer-
strikes and retired Snider on a jn the five-game champion- punching style,
pop fly to- the infield. Right- snip sreles between Optic Sosa;
hander Robinson popped to Bil- and Balboa Madurltos, the title! Green, a classy boxer, Jumped
ly Martin, retirin
When Martin caug
Stengel leaped out of the Y an- iCa sosa roared back with three
kee dugout and rubbed nisi straight victories,
hands. He was."In" and he knew
Colonel Selee will present a
handsome championship trophy
to ptica Sosa and the runner-
up award to Balboa Madurltos.
Special prize swill be given to
Alfredo Farrell, champion bats-
man: Sidney Tudor, leading pit-
cher; and to the following um-
Pedro Tesis. Colons latest box-'cause of the "tetter's proloncrdl
ing sensation who gets his first Inactivity. "iongeai
bout against a real topnotcher| Popular admisin prices wl bal
Sunday night facing Isthmian charged for this program Gen.
Bantamweight Champ Baby eral admission will Te $1 (bn.
Green, will appear tomorrow dollar) for adults and St cental
night at the Panama Gym dur- for children (and boxers) ftjnr-l
ing the regular weekly Thursday side tickets coat It (twe dollars) I
night amateur program in an
exhibition tuneup for the bene-
fit of Pacific side fans.
Tesis' opponent in the exhib-1
tion will be Frank Benty of Co-1
Inn. who will tackle Calvin Lloyd
in the semifinal bout of the Co-
lon Vs. Panama.fight card at the
.oppetl to BU- m Balboa Madurltos, the title <>reen. a ciassy noxer, jumpeo
!>. thf Me .;was ectded in four games. Baf- to stardom in a similar opportu-
ght the ball.'boj bagged the opener but Op- nity that was granted him when
; of the Yan- u Jf mflrPd hick wlth three he was semifinalist. He whipped
it. It had saved the Yankees' 4-2
lead until the end.
Mickey Mantle, a le-year-
old, earned the highest of
plaudits of the Series. The
Dodgers unanimously agreed
that Mickey more than made
up for the Yankees loss of Joe
DiMaggio. There's no higher
praise.
Mantle drove In the two Win-
ning runs yesterday with a
sixth inning homer batting left-
handed and a seventh inning
single which drove in a run
while batting rtghthanded.
Atlantic Volleyball League
, Opens At Margarita Tonight
pires: Theophilus
ard Roberts, O. Burrowes, L. Cop-
pin; Wilfred Pond, Arnold So-
bers, and Alfred Sobers.
After the presentation cere-
mony, Balboa Madurltos and p-
tica Sosa will hook up in a bit-
ter battle in the special presen-
tation game for which Physical
Director Parchment has donat-
the then bantamweight cham-
pion, Cesar Leal, in a ten-round
over-the-weight match and was
rewarded with a title shot.
Green knocked out Leal to
take the title but has since
dropped a non-title decision to
his nemesis, boxing master Juan
,. Diaz It. After his last loss to
Jones, Leon-! Diaz, Green has been on the
sidelines
The Benty-Lloyd scrap should
turn out to be a real thriller as
both boys seem to be evenly
matched. The experts are pre-
dicting that this one won't go
the limit.
The co-semifinal is another
ed a loving cup which will go six-rounder between up-and-
to the manager of the winning coming Horacio Ottis of^Panama
team of the game.
TEETH IN ITMaureen Con-
nolly appeared to be taking a
big bite out of the ball in exe-
cuting a forehand against Doris
Hart in Los Angeles. Little Mo
once more repelled the Miami,
Fla., missthis time, 6-4, 3-6,
6-1adding the Pacific South-
west title to her Wimbledon and
national championships. (NEA)
The whole Balboa squad Is de-
termined to win the' cup for
i their hustling manager, Larry
RACING
A panel of racing writers has i
and Manuel Pscott of Colon. named three American horses to
These promising 128-pounders run tne WWCl Washington.
"DC., international race on Oct
The annual Wednesday nlghtito attend these games and there' {{h*n- .*?"*ff^'nHhat^ls
im. iriv. o.n T........ 11 rill k* ft irimlnnn rhnroe tica BOSE 18 COnlldent tnat niS
Atlantic Volley BaH League will will be no admission charge
will be aiming for auick knack
outs also.
The faur-round
will be between tough Baby San
1.
The panel, headed by Nelson 1
? IT eJ^'Dunstan, named "Crafty Admlr-
Atlantlc Volley Bail League will Will oe no admission cnarg^ ^" ~^'Vmore show cham- Bias II and hard-hitting AI Hos-
get underway tonight at the This activity 14 sponsored and boys will once m^co7 t^he^-1 (T at a US-pound limit. Hostin
Margarita gym with eight teams i made possible through the ray.iponahip calibre and cop the I *1/oir.,pr s.n Blaa be-
Margarlta gym with eight teams
entered and with promises, not sical Education
ohly of a good season, but of of- Braneh.
flcial recognition by the tJ. 8. -------
Volley-Ball Assn.
Paul M'oser, Phyaiclal Educa-
tion teacher of Cristobal High
School, Monday night received
a letter from a member of thti
Board of Directors of the U.S.
Volley-Bail Assn. advising that
the Gold Coast net loop can ob-'
tain recognition, when the board.
holds it's next meeting which;
should be sometime during, the
month of December.
and Recreation ward for him.
al," "Greek Ship" and "Rhue"|
for the mile and one half fea-|
ture at Laurel.
Series Roundup
STANDINGS
(Best Four of Seven)
W I
New York Brooklyn (NL) 3 4
First Game, Oct. 1
At Ebbets Field.

2
Pet.
.371
.429
U.S. ROY?
New York (AL)
This year's volley ball loop will
have teams representing Army
and Navy units, CHS., Marga-
rita, Cristobal and the C.H.S. fa-
culty. This combination of out-
fits should make for keen com-
petition.
The Cristobal Team, this year
flving the banner of "Gibraltar"
are defending champions, hav-
ing gone through the '51 season! Brg*$" (*L
with only one defeat. With Just' Ra8cnl
BEAravn!LE%y %P^-,B!> Meld ^^Ji^^'theTr taW^not* Vta; S^r
Seldon Splcer Proved" he doesn't. 'Jf'* ^weight f?2n ll WM pa3t *eaSn8' '*
forget a debt when he met _Joe ^w on'Ve P^Tlhla light
mrfjrsi
C. Little recently for the first
time in 48 years. Little had
delivered a aack of mal to
r in 1904 but wasn't paid
in full At their recnet meeting
Little called it square when
Splcer gave him a nickel.
heavyweight saya he can't find
competition in his division.
Johnson picks Rex Layne as the
one he would like to meet next.
In new Orleans, death struck
In the ring monday night for the
second time in three days. Form-
er Bantamweight Champion Ash-
ton Donze collapsed while refer-
eeing and died of a heart attack.
He was 50 years old.
Welterweight Jimmy
was knocked out last
night and died 8unday
1 ing aurgery for brain
rhage and conclusion.
Friday
follow-
hemor-
H E
8 2
Brooklyn (NL) 4 6 0
Reynolds, Scarborough (8> and
Berra; Black and Campanella.
LPReynolds. HRs New York:
McDougald; Brooklyn: Robin-
son, Snider, Reese.
Second Game, Oct. I
At Ebbets Field.
New York (AL) 7 10 0
1 3 1
one or two extra players, they; Lo '. ^hm." '' *S Cmw
hope to repeat thta^yean _Butg Martn" HR-New
^seasons"" 'SSSJSSu^' *
this year'a service team will and' **JS?*%2. ftadlum' s ,,
add plenty of punch and height' 2"?^?k Tl 3 6 2
to tKe.loop, anc.the "spike," Ne^Y^d Gorman (9) and Berra. LPLo.;
pat. HRa New York: Berra
Muse.
Fourth Game, Oct. 4
At Yankee Stadium.
Brooklyn (NL) 0
New York (AD 2
Black, Rutherford i8>
Campanella; Reynolds and
should be coming hard and fre-
quent over the nets.
The following eight teams will
participate:"
Margarita Vincent Ridge,
captain.
Shore Battalion (870 Eng.)
Nowal Smtth, captain.
Gibraltar Life Insurance Co.
Ray Simons, captain. ,
r riatobal High School Faculty Mwe
Taylor LUKe Pslumbo, captain.
4 1
4 1
and
Be-
rra. LP^-Blck. HRNew York:
Navy Coco Solo R. Scott,
manager, and Robert Sparks,
captain.
Battery B 764th AAA, Gun Bn.
(120MM) -r- Lt. Alberto Rohena,
manager, and Juan Fuentea,
captain.
7470 A. V.. Fort OuUck Lt.
Coleman. manager, and Sgt. H.
Gedued, captain. _
Cristobal High School Carl Brooklyn (NL)
Simons, captain.
The general public is invited
Sports Shorties
FOOTBALL
It's a colee tace for punting
honors, according to latest fi-
gures released by the N.C.A.A,
Max McGee of Tulane leads
with a 46.8 yard average, but two
former champions are close be-
hind. Each Jordan of Colorado,
the 1950 punting champion, Is
second with a 46.2 yard average.
Last year'a leader Chuck
Spaulding of Wyoming is third $148,877.61.
FIFTH GAME, Oct. i
At Yankee Stadium.
Brooklyn (NL) 6 10 0
New York (AL) 5 .5 1
Erskine and Campanella;
Black well, Sain <6> and Berra.
LPSain. HRsBrooklyn: Sni-
der; New York: Mize.
SIXTH GAME, Oet. 8
At Ebbets Field
New York 2 8 1
Raschi, Reynolds (8> and Ber-
ra; Loes. Roe (91 and Campa-
nella. WPRaschi. LPLoes.
HRsNew York: Berra, Mantle;
Brooklyn:'8nWer (2).
Seveath Game, Oct. 7
At Ebbets Field.
New York (AL) 4 10 4
Brooklyn NL 2 8 1
Lopat. Reynolds <4), Raschi
(7), Kusava (7' and Berra;
Black, Roe (6), Erskine (8i and
Campanella. WPReynolds. LP
Black. HRsNew York: Man-
tle, Woodling.
Tuesday's Finances
Attendance "33,195.
Receipts (neti 8169.267.78
Commissioner's share $28,-
390.17.
Clubs' and leaguse' share
with 48.3 yards.
Joe McClaran of Drake leads
pass receivers. He was caught
17 pas* good for 333 yards and
four touchdowns Bill Barley of
Washington also haa caught 17
passes but gained only 293 yards
and scored twica
Sevea-Game Figures'
Attendance 340,906.
Receipts (net 81.831.753 01.
Players' pool "first four games
only 8500,003.38.
Commissioner s share 8MI.-
402.98.
Clubs' and leagues' share !
887tJ37h
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Distributers:
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David


Football Takes Full Command Of Sports Scene This Weeliend
THE PANAMA AMERICAN AN INDEPENDENT DAILT NEWSPAPER
PAGE Nil
.....
Plenty Of
Tough Ones
To Dope Out
BQWL'NG]SEC Teams This Week Return
To Own Backyards For Clashes
I
Ami WIDoMok Than Alright
By HARRY GRAYSON
NEA Sports Editor
NEW YORK, Oct. Watch-
ing the saber-toothed Tiger
Weep like a prairie lire to his
22nd straight victory a year
ago, it was rather difficult to
believe that graduation had
swiped 25 of 40 Princeton let-
termen, 10 first-string attack-
ers, six top defenders.
Only the extraordinary Dick
Kazmaler remained of the
Grade A offensive force.
Even the Great Kaz Is gone
now, hitting only the books at
Harvard Business School, de-
parted with nine other regulars
ie annual June house-clean-
ing.
e late last November, the
......ion has been who will re-
L-uce Kazmaler at tailback In
Charlie Caldwells' "old-fashlon-
ea single wing.
The answer now Is Ned Jan-
notta. There were two other
candidatesBill Tryon and Dick
Frye. Tryon throws well, but
doesn't eat up ground like Jan-
notta. Frye, a sophomore, has
time And much to learn. Be-
sides; the Utlca lad was Injured.
So the resourceful Caldwell
moved Jannota from safety
man to the key spot on the
attack.
With him to the offense went
Homer Smith, thei linebacker
who became the fullback.
SCKQOLED DEFENSIVELY
, NEEDED ON ATTACK
lat's the new system which
came In with the platoons-
school backs defensively until
you need them to move the ball.
Princeton's two-year safety
man, Dick Plvlrottc-, swltohed
U> tne ofiense last term, and
didn't exactly hurt his side.
Good football players Just
naturally oome along under
Caldwell, a coach who works at
hU trade. Two years ago they
said Old Nassau couldn't re-
place George Bella, but up pop-
ped Billy Kletnaaaser. Last year
it was George Chandler, and in
stepped George Stevens. Now
it's Japanese for Kaamaler, and
anybody who has seen the stub-
bily-bullt, le-pound senior will
tell you that he'll do consider-
ably better than all right. His
teammates believe so, which is
the most-Important thing.
When they first play defen-
sively, playess are In a better
position to go both ways, which
is how Caldwell Intends to em-
ploy Jannota, Smith and Capt.
Frank MoPhee, the end. Cald-
well isn't the kind to adhere to
the unit principle 100 pet cent,
no matter how palnfjiL The
Idea is to field your II most
formidable young men at all
times, so Jannotta, 8mlth and
McPhee will be In the thick of
things while .the battle Is close
as long as they retain maximum
PRINCETON IS NOT WITHOUT
ITS RUNNING PASS
Caldwejl professed not to be
entirely satisfied With Jannot-
ta's pasting, so Bo Willis, the
new quarterback, shares it. But
Jannotta completed eight of 14


LUX Theatre
TONIGHT only at
8
p.m,
the Fi>st Performance in JPanam
TWO PIANO
CONCERT
by the distinguished pianists
Nelly HIRSH and
Jaime INGRAM
in presentation of the work" for two
pianos by Mozart, Weber, Rachmaninoff.
Debussy and MilhauM-
Along The Fairways
PORT AMADOR LADIES DAT
Despite .the rain, ten girls
competed in the "blind bogey"
event last Thursday. The blind
bogeys drawn by Millie Ham-
mond were 75 and 77 and the
winners were Frances Twomey
and Ernie Wilton.
The tournaments for this
month are:
Oct. 9Match play against
par.
Oct. 16String contest.
Oct. 23Best nine.
Oct. 80Throw-out.
Details and conditions of play
for these tournaments are now
on the bulletin board.
There are a large number of
newcomers to the club and we
hope they will participate in
these Thursday tournaments. It
is not necessary to hate a game
Srevlously arranged. Though the
)urnaments last all day, the
majority of the competitors are
out by 8:30 a.m.
The election of officers for the
new year, a "swat-seat" tourna-
ment and a luncheon re sched-
uled for Dec. 4.
passes as a sophomore, and
chucked the ball when given
the opportunity early last sea-
son. Princeton is not to be with-
out the running pass executed
so well by Kaamaler, and the
nation got an early look at the
Jahnotta version of it, the
Tiger's opener with Columbia
being televised bv the National
Broadcasting Company, spon-
sored by General Motors.
To be sure he would report in
condition, Ned Jannotta de-
voted his Summer "vacation" to
two months of the toughest
kind of workIn an Elgin. HI.,
stone quarry. He topped it off
with a rugged, five-week canoe-
ing expedition Into Canada.
players of ability who take
"ootball that seriously are ex-
tremely difficult to begt.
"
'
ES
SEATS 150 and 1-00
DIRTY 0!L
CAN RUIN
YOUR ENGIN
keep your engine oil free from
harmful abrasives with a...
Oil Filter
Crf>4ge
only
By STEVE SNIDER
United Press Sports Writer
NEW YORK, Oct. 8 Football
takes full command of the sports
scene this weekend and the
scene is loaded with tight, tough
to pick, games in nearly every
section.
The east, for a change, puts
in a claim for the top game of
the week with Penn a' Princeton
so we'll start our tour right
there:
THE EAST
Pennsylvania over Princeton:
A bruising defense halts the Tl-
ge' streak pt ?3 straight.
Navy ever William and Mary:
The l.iddles have depth and de-
fense.
Vlllanova over Wake Forest:
Flllpskl lift -em.
Also: Boston College over
Drake, Miami over Boston U.,
Bucknell over Temple, Colgate
over Rutgers, Columbia over
Yale, Harvard over Washington
of St. Louis, Holy Cross over
NYU, Army over Dartmouth,
Penn State over West Virginia
and Syracuse over Cornell.
THE SOUTH
Maryland over Georgia: Close.
Scarbath the difference.
Duke ever South Carolina: De-
fense will handle Gramlrni's
pasees.
Georgia Tech over Tulane: But
Tech is in for trouble.
Also: Mississippi over Vandar-
bllt, Kentucky over LSU, Florida
over Clemson, Alabama over Vir-
ginia Teflh, Auburn over Wof-
ford, Mississippi State over
North Texas State, Virginia over
Geroge Washington, Washington
and Lee over Richmond, The Ci-
tadel over Newberry, Furman
over Stetson, VMI over Florida
State and Tennessee over Chat-
tanooga.
THE MIDWEST
Wisconsin over Ohio State:
Badgers are solid on attack.
Michigan State over Texas A
Si M: Holds top ranking.
Notre Dame over Pittsburgh:
Irish began the comeback at
Texas.
Missouri over Southern Meth-
odist: A squeaker either way.
Also: Michigan over Indiana,
Minnesota over Northwestern,
Purdue over Iowa, Illinois over
Washington, Marquette over De-
troit, Oklahoma AAiM over Wi-
chita, Kansas over Iowa State
and Nebraska over Kansas State
THE SOUTHWEST
Texas over Oklahoma: Close
and high scoring.
Baylor over Arkansas: Bears
got rolling last week.
Houston over Tulsa: Showed
batter against toucher foe.
Also: Texas Christian over
Trinity, Colorado over Arftona
and Texas Teachers over Texas
Western.
THE FAR WEST
UCLA over Rice: Bruins look
tugged.
Southern Cal. over San Diego
Navy: A Trojan power house
may be in the making.
California otar Oregon: May-
be by 1.
Stanford oxer Oregon State:
But personally, Stanford baffles
And In the Rookies: Utah over
Brlgham Young, Wyoming over
Colorado AAsM, Idaho over Utah
State and Denver over Montana.
LUX TODAY
At 8:30 p.m.
NELLIE and JAIME
INGRAM
For the Benefit qf
SAINT VINCENT COLLEGE
Admission Price:
SUM........Reserved Seat
General
asii -Willys .holds lead In husk
Bowling League; Me|ee again
hits over *0i
With BUI Malee hitting his 4th
consecutive week of having 800-
or-oyer for 3 games, the Nash-
Wlllys keglers engaged Elton
Todd's PAA Flyers last Friday
night at the Diablo Clubhouse
Boiling Alleys and emerged vic-
tors by a score of > to 1. Each
of the three games v.ent into the
final frame before decision, and
any one could have gone the op-
posite direction.
In the first game, PAA went
into the 10th frame 3 marks up, SSL..!
v... .niif. n. *>>, (h> .am. secwonai ioes IBSt I BK, I
only Tennessee fell
By BILL FERGUSON
United Frees Sperts Writer
ATLANTA, Oct. 8 (UP).Af-
t?r bltlrtg oft a huge chunk
of national prestige. Southeast-
ern Conference teams th'fs week-
end return to their own back-
yard for three family squabbles
including a hcadllner between
Georgia Tech and Tulane.
Both Teach and Tulane. along
with Louisiana State, Kentucky
and Alabama ground out im-
pressive victories over lnter-
,ed in every period and a rugged I back, scampared for four scores
but 8 splits cost them the fame
B30 to 910. The Fljers took the
second game, which also went
Into the 10th frame for decision,
1002 to 084, and the third game,
which, as with the first two, also
went Into the 10th frame for the
decision, went to the Nash-Wll-
lys team, 952 to 879. Nash-WUlys
also took pintail, 285 to 2791.
Much of the credit for the vic-
tory went to Dill Malee, who
bowled 238, 1807 and 210 for a
823 series, which is the 4th con-
secutive time he has hit 00 or
more in an evening. He present-
ly leads the league bowlers with
an average of over 317. Along
With Malee, Jenner, Marablla
and Best bowled Sfl7,dflfl andJ85
In that order. For the PAA Fly-
ers, Bill Morton was high
897, followed by Hermann with
571, Andrews with i5 and Van
Wle with 864.
In the second match of the
evening, the Seymour Agencies
team brought out additional
strength to defeat the Sears
team 3 to 1 by taking two games
and pintail. The Insurancemen
won the first game 971 to 013
and the second 949, to 8S8, but
lost the last, which went into
the final frame, 900 to SS4. The
Seymour team won plnfall by
the score of 2797 to 2701. For the
Winners, Borup knocked out a'
884, followed by Lulu Zebrock
with 579 and Cypert with 586
For the vanquished, Balcer was
high with 598, followed by Cdf-
fey with 893.
The ten leading bowlers of the
Classic League are now
Name
Malee
Cofley
Balcer
Melanson
Morton
Van Wle
Jenner
Andrews
Hermann
Marabella
Team
NaSh
Sears
Sears
Seare
PAA
PAA
Nash
PAA
PAA
Nash
Average
217-8
198-0
191-8
188-6
187-10
187-4
188-1
186-10
I83-S
182-10
The standings of the team ate
now: -i
Team Won Lost Ave.
Hash n 5 943
PAA Flyers g 8 924
Today
LAST DAY!
Shows: 7:00 *
9 :15 p.m.
TOMORROW!
Savage passions
and spectacular
adventure in
the White
Jungles
of the
North I

- .. ________________
Tonigftu's performance is dedicates! to the
St. Vincent School of the Mary Knoll Sisters
DRIVE IN Theater
On Transit hmlan Road, be-
hind "Artes y Oficios" Sehoel
A GANGSTER DRAMA I
the NARROW
MARGIN
ALSO:
Special attrac-
tion! Smash hit!
The outstanding
fight of the
Century I
Jersey Joe
WALCOTT
vs.
Rocky
MARCIANO
TOMORROW! L
ANOTHER G PICTURE!
before the
(he SEC featares
battles between LSU and Ken-
tueky, and Mississippi and
Mississippi and VanderbJlt, In
addition to the Telane-Tech
Alabama and Auburn should
have It pretty soft with Vir-
ginia Tech and Wofford coming
up, and Tennessee has a breath-
er with Chattanooga. Mississippi
State meets North Texas 8tate
and Florida goes against Clem-
son. Georgia draws a tough as-
signment undefeated Mary-
land.
Most Texans Improved their
rating of the SEC after Georgia
Tech ran its undefeated streak
to 17 games by beating SMU 20
to 7, and LSU surprised Rio* 27
to 7. Kentucky heaped the final
insult on the Lone Star State
by surprising Texas Add*. 1
to 7.
defense held the Owlswho wete
two touchdown favorites-score-
less for three quarters. Rice
didn't get Its touchdown until
the fourth period against LSU
subs.
Kentucky's Harry Janes
smashed It yards for a third-
Kled Uuahdown to add to
Bassist's field goal and
the combination ave the
"rebuilding" Wildcats a 19 to
7 victory over Texas A*fM.
Tulane's Max McGee ran for
two touchdowns and quarter-
back Pete Clement added two
more through the air as the
Green Wave routed Santa Clara.
Tulane took care of the West
Coast by knocking over Santa
Clara 35 to 0, and twice-beaten
Vanderbllt erased the smug look
from the Bajf*" i by deadlock-
ing Northwestern 20-20. Friday
night Alabama topped Miami 21
to 7, to knock out one of the
leading Southern Independents.
Mississippi powered to three
touchdowns to beat Auburn 30
to 7 in the only toon battle,
and Florida routed Citadel 33
to 0. Georgia barely got a work-
out In running over North Ca-
rolina State 49 to 0. and Missis-
sippi State Jumped all Over
Arkansas State 41 to M.
Duke provided the one mar
on the EEC slate by taking ad-
vantage of a recovered fumble
to beat Tennessee 7 to 0.
All the Southern Conference
Blue Devils needed was a sec-
ond period fumble by Tennessee
on their own 28-yard line to
get things going. Big Jack
Klstler, the Booth's leading
ground-gainer, rammed his 210
pounds through the Voi line
minutes later to score the lone
touchdown. Duke fielded a
tough defense that squelched
the Vols the rest of the way.
Georgia Tech didn't run into
much trouble aa It was looking
for and halfbacks Lech Harde-
man and Bill Teas smashed the
Mustag defenses for three touch-
downs In the first half and
that was the game.
LSU also found an effective
ground game as the Tigers ran
all over Rice. The Bengals scor-
as the Maroons crushed Ar-
kansas State.
Zeko Bratkewskl was the big
offensive gun for Georgia. The
veteran rtfiarterback tossed three
touchdown passes and plunged
for another score to get the
Bulldogs going against North
Carolina State.
Another quarterback fresh-
man Bill Krletemeyer parked
Vanderbllt to come from behind
and tie Northwestern. Krlete-
meyer passed for 154 yards and
added 83 more on the ground.
Mississippi's sputtering of-
fense came through m the
clutches and rolled over Auburn
and Mississippi State's Jack I after the Tigers put up a stab-
Parker, a greenhorn quarter- born battle In the first half.
Sears
Seymour 5 11
The scores of the play:
Marabella
Say Ion
Jenner
Best
Malee
Nash-Willys
191
189
187
140
233
182
103
203
228
180
193
153
107
199
210
930 904 952 8856
Hermann
Van Wle
Wllber
Morton
Andrews
PAA Flyers
187 219
191 193
155 184
302 216
195 190
185
170
165
179
180
91 MM Sr9 8791

COfEY RALSTffil
-*->* MUD J
BLUE YONDER"
Cypert
Jamison
Zeletae
Borup
Zebrock
TJelanson
Coffey
Cooley
Norrls
Balcer
Seymour Arneles
184
202
183
210
192
1S4
M7
230
180
211
200
166
138
204
176
911 94t 84 2797
Seers
184 184
330 194
133 163
178 1*1
191 186
166
1
161
183
231
913 888 999 2791
1 cue Made Baers
Appear T*ie Same
WASHINGTON. Oct. 8 (NEA)
This year's presidential cam-
oaign reminds oldtlmers of the
ttaie the lata Wendell WUttle at-
tended a charity fight in 1040
The Republican nominee got
in the ring and introduced the
contestants. Joe Logia andI Bud-
dy Baer. He Introduced Buddy
WTtat Wttle sat down he w-
celved a note from Buddy s man-
ager.
"This is Buddy Baer. not Max.
It read.
Louis oroceeded to knock P"d-
' down three Mm*. In the first
- *h rrner.
"T dont" see the difference,"
It said.
It's MoYftime TONIGHT!
(P,
anama
Canai of heaters
BALBOA
Alr-ton4lllon*
CIS A 7:IS
HUMPHREY BOGART'i Academy Award
Performance!
"AFRICAN QUEEN"
Abe Plarln Thais**?!
DIABLO HTS.
ii a i
*
Luthar ADUm Patricia KNIGHT
"THE MAGIC FACE"
Ttiimaey TK* PJOUM OP VHMWOM
COCOLI
1:15 a sue
Sunn HAYWARD o M. O- ROBINSON
'THE HOUSE OF STRANGERS"
Thanaay TUB MAN FROM fLANBt X"
GAMBOA
fSM
Raberl MITCHUM Jan RUSSELL
"MACAO"
ThnaSar "JUNGUE MANHUNT"
MARGARITA
*.U 1:1
William HOI.DEN
Stanley CLEMENTS
HOLDEN Stanley CUD
BOOTS MALONE'
ThanSay "LOOK BEFORE TOO LOVE"
CRISTOBAL
Gregory PICK Suaan HAYWARD
DAVD AND BATHSHEiA'
AIM Playtef Thanaay!
THEATRE
A GRAND TWO-PIANO
RECITAL BY
NELLIE and JAIME
INGRAM
POR THE BENEFIT OF
SAINT VINCENT COLLEGE
AT IdS P. M.
Admission Prices:
11.59.....Reserved Seat
1149.....General
SU8REN8E!
THRILLING!
GRAVES ANDREA KING
- in -
"RED PLANET MARS"
DRIVE-IN
Charles McGRAW Marie WINDSOR, la
"THE NARROW MARGIN"
Also: Special Attraction!
WALCOTT vs. MARCIANO
CECILIA
ACTION!... VIOLENCE!.- IN THE PORT OF A
THOUSAND ADVENTURES!
KONG"
"HaNG
(IN TECHNICOLOR)
Ronald Rhonda
REAGAN FLEMING
Danny
CHANG
ijNCANTO
Maareen O'Hara Jeff
Chandler, la
"FLAME OF ARABY
"WOMAN IN
QUESTION
with Jean Kent
T IVOLI
CAPITOLIO
Gary Ceafer, in .
DISTANT
DRUMS
- Also: -
Errel Ftyan, fea
"MARA MARU"
VICTORIA'
Bank! SIMM Bank!
At 5:00 and 9:00 p.m.
"Ml Reino for On Torero
ARRABALERA"
. S pictures!
"Love Honor Goodbye"
"Insurance Inveitttator"
"JPucittve From Seaora"
IDEAL
BANK NIGHT
SATURDAY'S HERO" "BIG GUSHER"


^1
GRIDIRON GRABS SPORTS SPOTLIGHT






McCarthy 'Leak'
Probers Strike
Judicial Block
WASHINGTON. Oct. 8
A federal judge refused today to
open secret grand jury records
for an agency investiga 11 n g
"leaks" to Sen. Joseph R. McCar-
thy about the governments loy-
alty program.
Judge Matthew T. Maguire
rated that a request for the
material by the Civil Service
Commission was not sufficiently
"eatraordinary" to lift the' tra-
ditional and "cealonsly guard-
ed" secrecy of grand Jury min
ntes.
The commission wanted to stii-1
dy testimony given to the grand;
jury by Miriam DeHaas. 52, loy-
alty revtew board examiner.
She was suspended Sept. 15 for
refusing to co-operate in the,1
DAILY NEWSPAPEI
^ _40|fe.....-
Panama American
"Let the people knou the tmih mi the country is safe" Abraham Lincoln.
TWENTY-EIGHTH TEAR.
PANAMA, R. P.. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1952.
FIVE CENTS
UN Halis Futile Truce Talks
As RedsReiect POW Proposals
PANMUWJOM, Oct.
The United Nations today
commissions attempt to find out called a halt to futile Korean
who slipped confidential infor-truce meetings until the Reds
mation on the board's meetings!cept UN proposals for break-
to the Wisconsin Republlcsn. J8 tne prisoner of war dead-
Miss DeHaas. whose $7.400-a-; J<* r. *"' proposal
year Job gave her across to con-itn(SmseiYe*- .
fidentlal minutes of the board. IJS^^^S^Sif^^
refused to tell the commission1.^ '*?.truce *" were ot,.
nvrhtno nhoiit hr testimony terminated. ing, avenging UN soldiers bat-
But the decision to discon-tered Chinese troops with coun-
tinue the meetings indefinitely ter-attacks as 8th Army com-
kllled any lingering hope for mander Gen. James A. Van Fleet
in Korea In the near,congratulated his fighting men
before the grand jury.
The investigation began af-
ter McCarthy said in a Senate
speech that the Civil Serriee
Commission loyalty board had
privately denounced the State
Department for never firing a
ecuritv risk.
(UP>,tiator. declared a recess for an positions late last night and major offensive, but rather a
"indefinite period" at the 63- early today, but the United Na- iimittd eiion such as the ointeu
minute meeting today. tions troops tossed the Reds .Nations launched last year to
The Reds opened tbe meet- .back and counterattacked In an win Bloody R.dge and Heart-
ing by rejecting all three al- effort to rescue two surrounded break Ridge.
tentative proposals made by loutposts. Meanwhile the Wavy announc-
Ihe United Nations for end- I Van Fleet said the UN victor- ed that a Corsair was shot
ing the stalemate on exchang- lies proved once again the super- down by a Mig yesterday, while
ing prisoners of war. jlorlty of his UN troops over ano.her waa lost to Red flak.
Meanwhile, in ground fight- the Communists. The two Corsairs were lost
"The 8rh Army has stopped when planes from the United
all attacks without any pene-|8tates carriers Princeton, Essex
tration of Its main battle post- and Kearsage teamed with Air
tions. IForce fighter-bombers to hit
"The action was limited to Red targets at Yongpyong, 40 \awr Dlllf TrAOlit
(Page I)
THE SOLDIER TAKES A BRIDE (TWICE -Among the ver, few U. S. servicemen to ma
in Korea is Airman 2/C William Wheat, pictured .bove, with his bride, the former Ue S
fL SiS 2* "Tae|:U,,n 5R l" ***'" P""0"* tw month ". after windta through I
the miles of military and civil red Upe, they were m.rried Christmas Day. They had two c<
monies-a Korean one at Yng-Dona-Po and a rivil one at Seoul. They're pictured at left in th?*
home in Newark. N. J, and at right in the Korean costume, the wore for their weddui, tM*
Defense Secretary
peace in Korea In
future. 'for stopping the biggest Red our outposts, and the enemy miles west of Wonsan In east-
Some observers bellvfd It end- drive In 12 months,
ed any hope for a settlement! UN Infantrymen today recap-
at Panmunjom. 'tured two of the seven posi-
Lt. Gen. William K. Harri-; tions they lost in the heavy
Red assault, and
launched fierce counterattacks
on two otber heights.
.Kslnow^^ltat?0ffi "
p'riment allowed persons accus-
ed of Red associations to resign
and get jobs in other agencies.
Miss DeHass denied she had \
Anti-Malaria Film
French and South Korean
troops again shouldered the
passed the information to Mc- Ta Ra DrAmiAPAfi
Carthy but refused to tell her IV DM Pi CU IICICU
employer what she told the grand
Jury about the case.
The commission said there is
no law excusing her for disclos-
ing the testimony.
US Armed Forces
Workers At Colon
Colled To Meeting
All Local-Rate employes of the
Army, Navy, Air Force of the At-
lantic sector are Invited to a
special meeting on Friday, at
:30 p.m. at the club Tropical.
Reports of maior Importance to
Morale has never been high- have appeared near the Korean will ease rotation oi American the workers will be given hv J
was clobbered in that zone.
'Trench troops at Arrow-
head Ridge alone killed or
wounded 1100 Red soldiers.
The South Korean Ninth Divi-
sion at nearby Whitehorse
mountain took another 1100
Reds ont -of action.
Seven Migs, ranging far out- Tj| FaCA IK Dflfjltinn
side their usual battlefield in BR UJ KWlOIIWII
, northwest Korea, pounced on
a flight of Carrier planes and WASHINGTON, Oct. 8 (UP)
downed the Corsair. [Deiense Secretary Robert A.
It was the second time in Lovett said today American-
less than a week that Migs trained South Korean troops
l-ITTLC L.IX
heaviest fighting northwest of er among United Nations troops east coast to destroy a propel- troops but whether tney can
Chorwon and at Whitehorse on;than In these last few days of ler driven warolane from a Unit- ever replace U. S. trops in the
In Latin America
WASHINGTON, Oct. 8 (USISi
McCarthy insisted that Missi Sixteen Latin American re-
DeHaas "positively gave me no Publics, including Panama will
Information"and said "they have! Premiere showings In
got the wrong person.'1 Spanish, Portuguese and French
.____________________ Of the new United States In-
formation Service film /'The
F. g\ n- Ancient Curse," during the first
I r S t UO PlOnO week of November.
Concert In Panam Thta pPulr treatment of
Unt-CIl in rBlWimmalaria control methods will al-
Rw Innrnmc TtvblV "P ** Premiered in 31 other ha-
Py ingramS I Oa Nelly and Jaime Ingram, in-1 The film was previewed in-
ternationally famous husband formally by delegates attending
and wife piano team, will pre- the recent Pan American Sanl-
the cen'ral front.
SOme 2000 Chinese Reds hit
the South Korean and French Red attacks were not part of a
action."
Highranking officers said the
ed States carrier.
sent the first duo-piano concert
to be held in Panam at the
Lux Theater tonight at 8.
The Ingrams. who returned
tary Bureau Congress in Hava-
na. The experts voiced their ap-
proval of the film as a vehi-
cle for informing the public
here recently from a successful about a worldwide scourge which
concert tour of Rio de Janeiro, [ takes a yearly death toll of
Sao Paulo and other' Brazilian about 3.000.000 lives. In addt-
oitles. are turning over all prof-|tion. malaria Incapacitates, for
Its of tonight's concert to the varying periods of time, anoth-
st. Vincent s College, run by the er 3,000,000 persons every year
Marvknoll Sisters in Panama I
City. The new USIS film illustrates
Their program will include dramatically the methods used
Mozart's Sonata in D, Rachma- by the World Health Organiza-
ninoffs Suite No. 2. opus 17 and tlon to figt malaria. The 80-
compositlons by Shubert, Weber, I minute feature was produced in
Debussy and Milhaud. |ment of Thailand during actuai
Tickets, at $1,50 for reserved .malaria control operations.
seats and $1 general admission, _.
are being sold at Dagmar's on In general the premieres L
Tivoll Avenue today and will belLatm Amerlca will be preceded
on sale at the box office to-' by Introductory talks by health
night officials of the country and the
.------------------------------showings will be followed by dls-
, cussion periods. Photographic
Light Planes Cou\SSS ffS^SS^ wi" *
Play Major Role
In Atomic Attack 15 Books Donated
WASHINGTON. Oct. 8 (UPW TO PanOm ScflOOl
By Zone Library
New PC Employes
Families, Attend
Briefing Party
iront lines is a question 01
"military judgment.'
Loven told a news conference
that the two-year training given
the ROK troops "retlects great
credit on the U. S. Army's train-
ing system." This training, he
said, has been a major ac-
complishment" of the Korean
war.
He said "more and more"
South Korean troops' will be
A large group of new em- added .to he United Nations
ployes and their families were ,10ices ln Kor,ea as tneir traln-
welcomed to the Canal organ- i ln8 Is cmPletedj^ .
ization last night and entertain- He 8atd tne ROK trooPs *re
ed with a program designed to I 'touBh" and capable of standing
acquaint them with some of, ,UP against equivalent Commun-
ie points of interest to be lsi i0**6")' Tney have f0"lfnt
E. Byrnes. Armed Services or-
>?anlier; W. H. Sinclair, staff or-]
ganizer; E. A. Gaskln, president'
and Ed K. Welsh, international
representative.
3 M. .
It's jough when the children .
married ond move away, but
con be o lot tougher when
don't.

found In their new Isthmian
surroundings.
Lieutenant Governor H. O.
Paxson spoke briefly to the new
i-employe group, welcoming them
to the Canal organization and
encouraging them to get ac-
quainted with their Isthmian
neighbors, organizations and
points of local interest.
The gathering, which was at-
"gallanuy and effectively in the
defense of their homeland," he
said.
Lovett made no reference to
Dwlght D. Elsenhower's state-
ment at Champaign. 111., last
Thursday that the South Ko-
reans can be prepared to man
their own front lines.
Lovett said the U. S. Army
now Is supporting about 400,000
ROK troops. In addition, he
_____ NEA Telephoto)
HORSEBACK HANDSHAKE- Gen. Dwlght Eisenhower shakes
hands with cowgirl Rose Liggett when the campaign train
reined In at Whitehall, Mont. The Republican presidential
nominee is making platform speeches en route to the Pacific
coast.
Light planes capable of landing
on improvised strips, in streeta
or on other emergency landing
areas could play a major part
in civil defense ln case of ato-
A collection of 15 books and 40
magazines i being donated by
lie attack, the magazine Planes the Canal Zone Libran
Simon Bolivar Library of the
School in
Republic of Brazil
David. Chlriqui.
The donation was announced
in a letter from Gov. Seybold to
Miss Diana Vargas de Pea.
Tf an atomic attack were to
orne planes would probably be
the best means of moving civil
r8' workers and supplies to
stricken areas since ground
nn!nn^l0n ? m*'fht "* ed secretary of the school" library:
fDfiMaf0dnK?lt0.,the "W. The "brary at the David
nJS5ri-pUi,"c*Mon oi Alrcraft | school recently addressed a re-
^ irr.,uMnM iouest the Governor for ln-
rrenVnitinn n, % nR?ern.me,,t ,ormatlve material of any nature
recognition of the light plane's regarding the United States
pmm8 in rt2S Te,nt, in-tTbe request was transmitted to
tesdann f ft f rnaterlal al-'the Canal Zone Library and the
Th .K.r ir onst",ctlf>n. | collection will serve to provide
to dellllr nftndUf.t^, f^f'f vala' orce of reference
rhL,deyearr ^portSi! **"" g *!*?*"* "" **?"" "
Army Reserves Have
60 Days To Accept
New Appointments
All reserve officers and war-
rant officers of the U. S. Army
, tended by about 100, was held w- **>uth Krea ,h" a co":
last night in the Library of the ;*MeWe umber of troops not
'Balboa High School Building. supported by the United States.
Native Panamanian dances
and songs were presented by
the Conjunto Plicet, costumed
dance group from the National
Tourist Commission, whose ap-
pearance was arranged through
the cooperation of Stanley
Shaw de la Ossa, National Tour-
ist Commissioner.
A series of slides prepared by
nf .nJnf 1^,*;"'Caribbean this week received
fastas? wa;rssn# ?Jtr *
p' Letters were mailed by the
Other slides presented by Mrs. ofilce of Liuetenant Colonel R.
i Benowitz showed the new Canal T- Weber, Senior Army Instruc-
IZone residents the activities of .tor, USARCARIB, at Fort Ama-
I about 15 local hobbv groups and'dor, who announced that each
recreation organizations. These reserve officer would have 60
slides were made available by days in which to decline or ac-
the organizations represented, cept the appointment.
Prior to passage of the Re-
A booklet on the attractions serve Act last July, Army re-
of the Republic of Panama and serve appointments were for
the Canal Zone, published and five-year terms. The new act
distributed by the National provided that all reserve ap-
Tourist Commission, was given pointments from then on be for
to the new employe group. j indefinite terms, with reservists
The Catherine of new em- hiding commissions at the time
ploTyees.^hohhranvKe jolnedThe Ca- ll^TI^^^nXl
nal organization within the ac<*ptmg appointments on the
sonnel Bureau. BUI G. Mauzy,
that an executive order issued
CAMPAIGN STRATEGYGov. Adlal Stevenson fright) maps
nut his 14,430 mile campaign tour of 24 states which will
keep him on the road until election day. The Democratic
standard-bearer, is conferring with his campaign manager,
Wilson Wyatt (left) and Sen.7. William Fulbrlght of Arkansas.
THE HELL BOMB--2
, Assistant Training Officer., September 25. has extended cur-
served as master of ceremonies ren,t JIresertYe appointments -
for the program. The Lleute- Deluding those previously ex-
Inant Governor was Introduced "nded Dv la* w *"' '
i by E. A. Doolan. Personnel Dl- 1953- ThoM "meers whose ap-
I rector. pointments end after that date
have not been affected.
"EINZ
are the finest, select
'foods scientifically pre-
pared to retain maxi-
mum nutritive value. Their pure, fresh
flavor makes them unusually appetizing,
and they are strained to a fine, even tex-
ture, so it's never any problem to get
baby to eat.
Most important, Heinz Quality Con-
trol assures you that these superior foods
are always of uniform quality so that
your baby is always sure of the best nour-
ishment! Specify Heinz Baby Foods!
HEINZ
BABY
FOODS


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