Proceedings - Spring Interface 2012 + Digital Humanities Day : Faculty Seminar

External Link ( Related URL )
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Proceedings - Spring Interface 2012 + Digital Humanities Day : Faculty Seminar
Physical Description:
Proceedings
Language:
English
Creator:
Academic Technology
Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere
George A. Smathers Libraries
Means, Tawnya
Johnson, Doug
Acord, Sophia
Taylor, Laurie N.
Technology Innovations Advisory Committee
Publisher:
Academic Technology
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
UF DH Day (UF Digital Humanities Day)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
System ID:
AA00010797:00002


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 1 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. SPRING INTERFACE 2012 FACULTY SEMINAR + DIGITAL HUMANITIES DAY THEME: Open Resources, Open Possibilities For ten years, MIT has made all of its educational content available for anyone wanting to use it. During the same time period, Stanford has championed Creative Commons, which has defined and made available a form of open intellectual property attribution. Many other institutions and organizations are moving in the direction of open content and resources including scholarly disciplines and societies, federal granting agencies, and library archives. The result is a wealth of new opportunities for the use and dissemination of scholarly work, resources, and learning materials. At the University of Florida, we are exploring the implications of "Open Resources, Open Possibilities" and the impact on teaching, learning, research, and public engagement with scholarship in higher education by joining the 2012 Interface Faculty Seminar a nd the first annual UF Digital Humanities Day to focus on the production and use of open resources on our own campus. The event will include 10 minute lightning talks, roundtables, posters, and refreshments, including lunch. These presentations will examine a range of projects from open archives and data, to open courseware and open educational resources, and to open and alternative publishing venues. The complete schedule for the event is available online: http://interface.at.ufl.edu

PAGE 2

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 2 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. WELCOME Judith C. Russell Bio: Judith C. Russell is the Dean of University of Libraries of Florida. She was formerly the Managing Director, Information Dissemination and Superintendent of Documents at the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO). She previously served as Deputy Director of the U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS) and as director of the Office of Electronic Information Dissemination Services and Federal Depository Library Prog ram at GPO. Russell worked for over ten years in the information industry, doing marketing and product development as well as serving as a government industry liaison. Her corporate experience includes Information Handling Services (IHS) and its parent com pany, the Information Technology Group; Disclosure Information Group; Lexis Nexis (then Mead Data Central), and IDD Digital Alliances, a subsidiary of Investment Dealers Digest. She received her masters in library science from the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. KEYNOTE Brian Croxall CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow and Emerging Technologies Librarian in Emory Universitys Robert W. Woodruff Library Roger T. Whitson Assistant Professor of Nineteenth Century British and Anglophone Literature at Washington State University, and former Andrew Mellon Fellow in the Digital Scholarship Commons at Emory University Theses on the Public Humanities In every era the attempt must be made anew to wrest tradition away from a conformism that is about to overpower it. Walter Benjamin The incorporation of digital technology in post secondary education has transformed the traditional role of the teacher and the physical space of the University. In an age when students can watch free lectures from MIT sch olars, why should they bother attending classes staffed by TAs or adjuncts? Wed like to suggest that experimenting with digital and mobile tools can radically de center teaching and learning through a making public of our pedagogy and our students work What are the public humanities? Our talk will feature a set of theses that draw a constellation of the public humanities and illustrate their value in digital pedagogy. Along the way, we will show how teachers can use digital technology to develop inter institutional teaching networks, fork syllabi, help their students work become public and publishable, and make the humanities matter beyond the crumbling walls of the ivory tower. Bios: Brian Croxall is CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow and Emerging Technologies Librarian in Emory Universitys Robert W. Woodruff Library. In this position, he is helping to establish the new, Mellon Foundationsponsored Digital Scholarship Commons (DiSC). Along with developing and managing digital scholarship projects in collaborat ion with faculty, graduate students, librarians, developers, and more, he teaches a new undergraduate Introduction to Digital Humanities and integrates digital technologies into the whole of the library. His interests in the digital humanities include vi sualizing geospatial and temporal data as well as integrating digital approaches into pedagogy. His dissertation investigated the relationships between technology, media, and psychologicaltrauma.

PAGE 3

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 3 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. Since then, he has taught modern and contemporary American l iterature as well as courses on media studies, digital culture, and war fiction and co edited a journal issue on steampunk. Brian is a contributing author to the blog ProfHacker and to the #alt academy project. Roger Whitson is an Assistant Professor of Ni neteenth Century British and Anglophone Literature at Washington State University. He previously worked with Brian Croxall as an Andrew Mellon Fellow in the Digital Scholarship Commons (DiSC) at Emory University. He is currently working as project manager for the DiSC project "Lynchings in Georgia: 1875 1930," helping develop a Digital Humanities concentration for graduate students at WSU, and investigating the role of the digital humanities in teaching and researching Nineteenth Century British Literature His digital research and teaching interests include distant reading and cultural analytics, digital and network materiality, the digital remediation of literature and literary studies, and the role of Twitter and GoogleDocs in creating an interactive cla ssroom environment. He is the coauthor of William Blake and the Digital Humanities: Collaboration Participation, and Social Media, which is forthcoming from Routledge. He also participates on the editorial board of Hybrid Pedagogy: A Journal on Teaching and Technology and has written extensively about digital pedagogy for ProfHacker, TECHStyle, and on his personal blog ( http://www.rogerwhitson.net ). LIGHTNING ROUND S #1 Presenter: Tawnya Means Director, Teaching Excellence & Assessment, Warrington College of Business Administration Title: A Shift Toward Open: Changing the Paradigm Abstract: O pen ness what does t hat mean when it comes to educatio n ? This term is used in a variety of ways to mean sharing resources, reusing content, and using technology to remov e barriers thus e mpowering more people to participate, collab orate, create, and learn. This presentation wil l overview some of the ways that others are embracing the concept of openness, and will examine what impact this concept can have on you as an instructor, as well as the university and the teaching and learning community as a whole. Bio: Tawnya Means is the Director of Teaching Excellence and Assessment for the Warrington College of Business Administration. Her primary roles in the College are to manage the Instructional Design and the Video Services teams for the College, and to serve as the subject matter expert on assessment and accreditation efforts in the College. Tawnya earned her Ph.D. from the University of Missouri in Information Science and Learning Technologies with an emphasis in Learning Systems Design. Her research is in onli ne and blended learning and focuses on access to digital learning resources. She is currently project manager for a $227,000 donor gift to design and develop a classroom that brings together local and remote students to actively engage in collaborative lea rning. She is also engaged in a number of campus initiatives and committees and presents at conferences and other institutions and organizations on technology in online and blended courses and programs.

PAGE 4

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 4 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. Presenter: Mike Conlon Title: VIVO linked open dat a for connecting, sharing and discovery Abstract: VIVO is a an open source, semantic web application for representing scholarly activity and connecting people. VIVO at UF has information regarding courses taught, grants awarded, papers published and much more. VIVO has been adopted by over 100 institutions worldwide and is being created by an NIH funded consortium led by UF. A brief tour of features will be presented, along with direction for future work. Bio: Dr. Conlon is Associate Director and Chief Operating Officer of the University of Florida Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Director of Biomedical Informatics, UF College of Medicine, and Principal Investigator of the NIH project VIVO: Enabling National Networking of Scientists. His r esponsibilities include development of academic biomedical informatics, expansion and integration of research and clinical information resources and strategic planning for academic health and university research. As PI of the VIVO project, Dr. Conlon leads a team of investigators at seven schools in the development, implementation and advancement of an open source, semantic web application for research discovery. He earned his Ph.D. degree in Statistics from the University of Florida, undergraduate degree s in Mathematics and Economics from Bucknell University, and is the author of over 150 scholarly publications and presentations. His current interests include enterprise change and organizational issues in the adoption of information technology, and the development of research capacity across the translational spectrum. Presenter: Terry Harpold Title: Fostering Collaborative Undergraduate Scholarship in the Humanities with Wikis Abstract: Wiki based collaborative writing is an effective medium in which to introduce undergraduate students to the collective, aggregative process of humanities research and scholarship. Wiki collaboration also significantly extends interactions between the instructor and students, and between students, beyond the confines of the classroom lecture and the conventional writing assignment. In this presentation, I will briefly survey my experiences this semester, po sitive and negative, teaching an undergraduate literature course in which all assigned writing took place in Sakai's wiki tool. Bio: Terry Harpold is Associate Professor of English, Film, and Media Studies at the University of Florida. His research interests and teaching include narrative and material operations of digital and print media; psychoanalytic theory; science and literature; and the scientific romance (primarily Jules Verne). Nominated in 2002 and 2005 for an award for teaching excellence in the UF College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, he was a winner of the award in 2007. His book Ex foliations: Reading Machines and the Upgrade Path was published by the University of Minnesota Press in 2008. He is a member of the editorial boards of Game Studies, ImageTexT and Postmodern Culture, a founding member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Verniana: Jules Verne Studies / Etudes Jules Verne, and a Tr ustee of the Board of Directors of the North American Jules Verne Society.

PAGE 5

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 5 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. Presenter: Charlie Mitchell, Assistant Professor/School of Theatre and Dance Title: Overcoming Sakai Interface Limitations Abstract: This presentation will show how to replace the cluttered native splash page in Sakai with a html page of your own choosing as well as a method to replace Sakai's calendar with Google Calendar including links to Google Maps. Bio: Dr. Charlie Mitchell teache s Theatre Appreciation (live and online) and Improvisation for Political and Social Change. Presenter: Mark Rieger Associate Dean, CALS, and Editorial Board member, MERLOT Title: Suggested pairing: MERLOT and Open Educational Resources Abstract: With tens of thousands of open educational resources on the internet, searchable repositories or libraries are valuable tools for finding and organizing resources for online teaching. Familiar repositories include Connexions, OCW Search, OER Commons, National Science Digital Library, and MERLOT. This presentation will highlight MERLOT [Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching, www.merlot.org ], which is in its 15th year and contains over 33,000 le arning materials organized by discipline (Biology, Business, Engineering, etc) and has over 100,000 members worldwide. It is much more than a simple collection of learning materials, and importantly, it provides a means of documenting ones contributions t o the scholarship of teaching and learning. Specifically, MERLOT allows one to: Find learning materials to use in courses; most are OER and have Creative Commons licenses. Browse by discipline or do a federated search of MERLOT and other repositories. Make a personal collection of materials and share it with colleagues. Build a learning exercise around an existing material and share with fellow teachers of your subject. Register yourself with the Virtual Speakers Bureau and give guest lectures to others via the internet. Share your (online) expertise with communities of practice in your discipline. Contribute learning materials to MERLOT whether you authored them yourself or just found useful materials on the web. Build learning materials from scratch usin g MERLOTs authorware, Content Builder Be recognized for your contributions to MERLOT by having materials peer reviewed. This works the same way as peer review of manuscripts. Review materials or join an editorial board in your discipline. Contribute an a rticle to MERLOTs refereed online journal, JOLT ( Journal of Online Learning and Teaching), which publishes articles on the scholarly use of multimedia resources in education. Attend MERLOTs annual conference as a speaker, panelist, or participant and lea rn about emerging technologies and pedagogical approaches to online learning and teaching. Bio: Mark Rieger is an associate dean in UFs College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and is the editor of the Agriculture and Environmental Sciences discipline o f MERLOT. Even if one prefers to use a repository other than

PAGE 6

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 6 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. MERLOT, the presentation will shed light on the utility of such resources and their potential value to faculty that teach online or blended courses. WELCOME II: DIGITAL HUMANITIES INTRODUCTION So phia K. Acord and Laurie Taylor Bio s : Sophia Krzys Acord is Associate Director of the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere at the University of Florida, and Lecturer in Sociology and Criminology & Law. Dr. Acord holds PhD and MRes degrees in Sociology from the University of Exeter (UK) and a BA from Swarthmore College. Prior to Florida, Dr. Acord was a Specialist Researcher at the Center for Studies in Higher Education, University of California, Berkeley, where she worked on two An drew W. Mellon Foundationfunded projects examining the Future of Scholarly Communication, and Peer Review in Academic Promotion and Publishing. Dr. Acords current research examines the production of knowledge in the arts and humanities disciplines in the digital age, and she has published work in the sociology of the arts and culture, museum studies, qualitative research methods, and mobile technologies. Dr. Acord also edits the refereed open access journal Music and Arts in Action (MAiA). Laurie N. Taylo r, PhD, is the Digital Humanities Librarian for the UF Digital Collections (UFDC) and associated collections and projects hosted by the UF Libraries using SobekCM including the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and many others. Her work focuses on building scholarly cyberinfrastructure to build, preserve, and ensure findability and usability for digital humanities and other digital scholarship projects with digital collections. She is the technical director for the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dL OC), technical director for the Florida Digital Newspaper Library, and was co principal investigator on America's Swamp: the Historical Everglades, a project to digitize six archival collections. She supervises interns working on class credit internships o n UFDC and related digital scholarship projects. Prior to joining the Digital Library Center in 2007, she taught undergraduate digital humanities courses and graduate writing courses, as well as workshops on digital technologies. Her current research explo res methods to digitally represent and contextualize archival materials, as well as other issues related to the digital humanities. She has published refereed articles on collaborative international digital libraries, digital media, library and information science, open access, and literature; and she co edited a collection on digital representations of history and memory, Playing the Past: Video Games, History, and Memory LIGHTNING ROUND S #2 Presenters: Angelos Barmpoutis (Digital Worlds), Eleni Bozia (Classics), Robert Wagman (Classics) Title: Digital Epigraphy Toolbox Abstract: Studying ancient inscriptions is based up to date mostly on observation and manual analysis by means of which epigraphists attempt to establish a geographical and chronologica l classification as well as to analyze the lettering techniques. In this paper we propose a novel framework for efficient 3D reconstruction of inscriptions and for statistical analysis of their reconstructed surfaces. The proposed framework employs a shape fromshading technique to reconstruct in 3D the shape of the inscribed surfaces. The obtained surfaces are segmented into smaller box shaped regions containing single letters. These letters are classified into groups of same characters or

PAGE 7

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 7 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. symbols and then an atlas (average) letter shape is created for each character. For the construction of those atlases we employ a functional minimization method that registers the surfaces of same letters to the unknown average surface, which is also estimated simultaneou sly. Using the estimated atlases an automated analysis of the inscribed letters is performed. This framework can be effectively used for the study of the variations of the lettering techniques within an inscription or a set of inscriptions. We applied our framework to five ancient Greek inscriptions. Our results are reported in detail and the variations found in lettering techniques are commented on by archaeologists who also validate the accuracy of our proposed method. Bios: Angelos Barmpoutis is an Assistant Professor of Digital Arts and Sciences, and the coordinator of research and technology in the Digital Worlds Institute at the University of Florida. Prof. Barmpoutis current research interests lie in the areas of machine vision and applications, virt ual reality in medicine, human motion capture and analysis, biomedical image processing and visualization, and facial expression analysis. He has coauthored numerous journal publications, conference articles and book chapters in the aforementioned topics, including the most cited article in the volume Information Processing in Medical Imaging, in 2007. Dr. Eleni Bozia is a faculty member in the Department of Classics at the University of Florida. Her research interests include Imperial Greek and Latin, Et hnicity and National Identity, Early Christian Literature, and Literary and Cultural Theory. Currently she is editing her book "Lucian and his Roman Voices". She has served as an external reviewer for the National Endowment for the Humanities and she is a lso the co director of the Digital Epigraphy Project at the University of Florida. Dr. Bozia is the recipient of several national and international awards including the Mary A. Sollman Scholarship of the American Academy in Rome and the CIEGL Bursary from the University of Oxford. Professor Wagman is in the UF Classics Department, where he specializes in Greek Poetry, Epigraphy and Ancient Religion. He took a Doctorate of Literature from the University of Pisa (Italy) and a PhD. from Johns Hopkins Universi ty. Presenters: Greg Ulmer and Jack Stenner Title: Consulting in Xanadu Abstract: "Murphy's Well Being" is an interactive database installation included in the exhibition "Region 4: Transformation through Imagination," Thomas Center Art Gallery, March2 April 28. The work is a collaboration by the Florida Research Ensemble, undertaken o n behalf of the EmerAgency, a virtual consultancy, designed in the electrate genre of konsult. Konsults apply Arts and Letters knowledge and forms to public policy problems. Bios: Jack Stenner is an artist who utilizes techniques from ubiquitous and physi cal computing, game technologies, and experimental software to create conceptual work often taking the form of installation, network practices and experimental video. He is an Assistant Professor of Art + Technology at the University of Florida. His work a ddresses issues related to our socio culturally constructed reality. He is interested in the forms and means with which ideology is embedded, particularly how meaning is manipulated and transcoded in place. To this end, his work explores the constructi on of a hybrid subject; a subject neither entirely human nor machinic. Using electronic media he seeks to create experiences that encourage us to reconsider what we think we know about our world and imagine an alternative utopia.

PAGE 8

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 8 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. Presenter: Jennifer Tho mas, School of Music Title: Searching for Old Music: What can you do with a mountain of data, and what can it do with you? Abstract: What can users do with databases that they cannot do with printed indexes? What are the perks and pitfalls of creating auth oritative online research tools? What is the status of online materials in academic peer review? Bio: Jennifer Thomas is a musicologist and professor of music history in UF's School of Music. She is also the author of the most comprehensive catalogue of t he Renaissance motet to date. Her current and recent research touches on a wide range of Renaissance topics such as repertory formation, classical traits in Renaissance polyphony, the relationships among the major Renaissance genres of mass, motet, and cha nson, and new methodologies enabled by the availability of large musicological databases. Thomas directs the Motet Choir at the University of Florida and has performed on the Baroque recorder. Presenter: Sanford V. Berg, Distinguished Service Professor Economics Title: Learning Resource for Infrastructure Regulation Abstract: With funding from the World Bank, the Public Utility Research Center created a comprehensive online resource for utility and regulation professionals, policy makers, and academics focusing on regulatory reform and the promotion of strong performance in ene rgy, telecommunications, transportation, and water sectors. www.regulationbodyofknowledge.org is the Body of Knowledge on Infrastructure Regulation; it contains summaries of regulatory literature, tu torials, self paced tests, and more than 500 downloadable references for regulatory reform and performance improvements in infrastructure industries. The online glossary has been translated from English into Chinese, French, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish, and Thai. The Glossary is being translated into Arabic and Russian. The redesigned site also includes a new feature providing guidance regarding Frequently Asked Questions. This online resource was originally developed in 2006 and has benefitted from funding from The World Bank and the Public Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility (PPIAF). Bio: Sandy has a B.A. from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. in Economics from Yale University. Serving as Director of the Public Utility Research C enter from 1980 to 2004, his publications include two books and over ninety articles on infrastructure, including innovation, governance, benchmarking, and incentives. He has been honored with a number of awards, including University Teacher/Scholar of t he Year. As Co Director of the PURC/World Bank International Training Program on Utility Regulation and Strategy, he has trained over 2,600 regulators and managers from 148 nations. Currently, he is adding material on energy efficiency and renewables to www.regulationbodyofknowledge.org

PAGE 9

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 9 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. Presenter: Douglas Johnson Title: Social Software for Teaching Abstract: A program that focuses on openness, freely available tools and resources, and social soft ware naturally leads to the question, How do I choose among the huge array of option out there? Social Software for Teaching will bring this down to size by focusing on a small number of high impact tools instructors can use in teaching and research and that can be recommended to students for group assignments and other interaction. Bio: Doug Johnson is the Associate Directo r for Learning Services in the Office of Academic technology where he manages eLearning Support Services and IT Training as well as the multi unit Sakai Support Team. Doug took his doctorate in Educational Leadership with a dissertation in Law (obscure st ate constitutional amendments having the potential to affect the flow of tax dollars into religious institutions). Doug has 18 years of both face to face and distance education teaching experience ranging from 7th grade to college undergraduates (in the UF History and Religion departments) not to mention training hundreds of faculty on using previous UF course management systems and related technologies. Doug has also done a numerous presentations to UF audiences and at national and international conference s. As a result of his wide ranging experience, Doug can bore audiences into submission on a huge array of topics. LIGHTNING ROUND S #3 Presenter: Meredith Babb, Director, University Press of Florida Title: Orange Grove Texts Plus Abstract: In Florida, as in 37 other states, legislation is in place condemning the high cost of higher education texts. Orange Grove Texts Plus a joint venture of UPF and The Orange Grove digital repository, was developed to provide students and faculty with quali ty, affordable, peer reviewed texts that are readily discoverable and easily customizable. Works may be read on screen, user printed, or ordered as printed and bound books. Revenue generated can be used to fund future editions. See how such a text was buil t at UF. Bio: Meredith Morris Babb is the director and CEO of the University Press of Florida. A graduate of Duke University with an MA in Comparative Religions, Meredith began her publishing career in 1984 selling college textbooks throughout the Southea st. She came to the University Press of Florida fifteen years ago and has never looked back. Goals yet to achieve: Help an author win a National Book Award. Challenges facing publishing: dwindling interest in reading more than 5 sentences at a time.

PAGE 10

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 10 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. Pres enter: Stewart Duncan Department of Philosophy Title: Philpapers.org, a directory of online work in philosophy Abstract: PhilPapers combines two functions: it is both a guide to published work, and a guide to publiclyposted preprints and drafts. I want t o introduce two aspects of PhilPapers: the project of categorizing papers, and the tools related to individual authors (profiles, following, etc). Bio: Stewart Duncan is an assistant professor of philosophy at UF. He works on the history of philosophy, in particular on seventeenth century discussions of materialism. He can be found online at stewartduncan.org. Presenters: Trysh Travis, Womens Studies, and Alex Tepperman, History Title: Academic History Blogging on Drugs Abstract: Two members of the edito rial team of Points: The Blog of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society (fd. 2010) will discuss creating and managing a blog that serves a global academic audience as well as constituents in the worlds of policy and practice. Bios: Alex Tepperman is a Doctoral candidate in the University of Florida Department of History, where he works on issues relating to American deviance, moral panic, crime policy, and corrections. He is co authoring the third edition of Deviance, Crime, and Control: Beyond The Straight and Narrow (Oxford University Press, 2013) with his father, Dr. Lorne Tepperman. In January 2012, he took the position of Editorial Intern at Points: the Blog of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society Trysh Travis is an Associate Professor in th e Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research, focusing on 20th century US literary and cultural history with an emphasis on gender and print culture. Her book The Language of the Heart: a Cultural History of the 12 Step Recovery Movement from AA to Oprah was published in 2009 by University of North Carolina Press. With Joseph Spillane, she founded Points: the Blog of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society in 2010, and currently serves as a Managing Editor. POSTERS Ivan Mutis Title: Virtual Teams Resear ch: Understanding Individual and Collective Project Actors Actions Through a Social Network Technology Abstract: The disjointed group of actors who team up to work on a construction project forms a collective entity that is represented by a social structure. This structure takes the form of a social network that explicitly connects the heterogeneous actors within a project. The emerging use and advancement of social network technologies enables researchers to study individual and collective actions taken b y actors in order to effectively solve problems, make decisions, enrich knowledge, and reach consensus. Social network technologies allow for (1) an effective

PAGE 11

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 11 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. interfacing of actors who belong to the various social structures and (2) the identification of t ies and bounds among actors, which, in turn, define project networks. Furthermore, these technologies support the execution of collaborative actions (i.e., information processing activities, including accessing, analyzing, sharing, and integrating informat ion). This research studies the nature of and the dynamics between individual and collective actions within the project network, specifically focusing on the extent to which individual actions influence collective ones. This investigation stems from a new frontier of computationally mediated human interactions and reframes what it means to make decisions and to learn, compute, and execute project activities. These mediated human computer interactions, conducted within a social network, constitute a new kind of collective intelligence. A better understanding of these interactions allows for the design of methods to study how actions are more intelligently and collectively performed through a social network technology. Bio: Dr. Mutis is an Assistant Research S cientist in the Center for Advanced Construction and Information Modeling at the M.E. Rinker, Sr. School of Building Construction at the University of Florida, and Director of the Laboratory of Intelligent Semantic Resources for Collaboration in Constructi on (InserLab). His work focuses on understanding the complex social nature of civil and construction projects and investigates theories, tools, and methods to achieve high project performance through information technologies. By focusing on social systems, technological tools, and the natural environment of the project, he investigates the ability to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of associated processes such as project design, construction, and sustainability. Dr. Mutis pursues more effective mea ns of collaboration and communication of project information by working in areas such as natural language processing, information retrieval, social networks, and organizational theories. Dr. Mutis completed his Ph.D. at the University of Florida in 2007, and he has held positions as Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Mississippi (20072008) and at Texas A&M University (2008 2010). His work has been published in more than 20 peer reviewed papers in journals, book chapters and conference proce edings, and he has been an invited speaker to several symposiums and research workshops. Krissy Wilson Title: An Untapped Peritextual Cache: Somnotexts in the Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature Abstract: The Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature is a collection of truly used books, and the physical condition of the collection has exposed many examples of binder's waste hidden to 19th century child readers. Bound into the spines of books as reinforcement, these strips of the binderys scrap paper are of variety to match the rest of the collections eccentricities, including handwritten sheet music, color images, Shakespeare, and newspaper clippings, as well as Punch! and the Bible. Using full text search through Google Books, it is often possible to determine a fragment's text of origin. As a gesture of respect, and with the intention of returning what was hidden, indeed, discarded, to the public spectrum, I offer the ter m somnotext ("sleeping text") to reference this phenomenon in cataloging and critical writing. Bio: Krissy Wilson curated the 2011 exhibit Anomalies and Curiosities of the Baldwin: An Exhibit Making the Case for (Very) Used Books for the George A. Smather s Libraries at the culmination of her research on somnotexts. She created and maintains The Art of Google Books ( theartofgooglebooks.tumblr.com ), a blog project which recognizes book digitiz ation as photography and values the signs of use that accompany digitized texts as worthy of

PAGE 12

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 12 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. documentation and study. In the spring of 2012, she will graduate summa cum laude from the University of Florida with her Bachelor of Arts degree in English. In th e fall, she will join the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for their Master of Fine Arts in Writing program. http://kcw.co Jack Stenner Title: Working with the UF Art and Architecture Fabrication Laboratory Abstract: The Art and Architecture Fabrication Laboratory is a collaboration between the College of Fine Arts, School of Art + Art History and College of Design, Construction and Planning, School of Architecture. Students and faculty from both schools have access to the latest in digital fabrication and rapid prototyping equipment. The facility is also available on a case bycase basis to the general UF and Gainesville community. Equipment includes laser cutters, powder and photopolymer 3 D printers, a 3D scanner, and 3 axis CNC mill. Bio: Jack Stenner is an artist who utilizes techniques from ubiquitous and physical computing, game technologies, and experimental software to create conceptual work often taking the form of installation, network practices and experimental video. He is an Assistant Profess or of Art + Technology at the University of Florida. His work addresses issues related to our socio culturally constructed reality. He is interested in the forms and means with which ideology is embedded, particularly how meaning is manipulated and trans coded in place. To this end, his work explores the construction of a hybrid subject; a subject neither entirely human nor machinic. Using electronic media he seeks to create experiences that encourage us to reconsider what we think we know about our wo rld and imagine an alternative utopia. Mark Sullivan Title: UF Digital Collections & SobekCM, Open Source Software for Digital Scholarship Abstract: The University of Florida Digital Collections (UFDC) hosts more than 300 outstanding digital collections, containing over 7 million pages of unique manuscripts and letters, antique maps, rare books, research materials, oral histories, and more as this is a constantly growi ng collection of resources. UFDC enables users to find digitized and curated borndigital materials from the University of Florida, partner institutions, and affiliated researchers. With UFDC, remote and local researchers have free, open access to the full content of the resource. UFDC is supported by the UF Libraries which developed and supports the SobekCM software that powers UFDC and related digital humanities and digital scholarship projects. SobekCM was designed with scholarly needs in mind. SobekCM w as designed to ensure permanent access to and preservation of materials, within a system that is always current for web standards and user needs. SobekCM was also designed with specific supports for digital scholarship, including scholar curated collection s and online exhibits, as well as support for specific materials. The UFDC team within the George A. Smathers Libraries at UF and others at partner institutions are conducting ongoing work to enhance the existing digital collections and digital scholarship projects/programs as well as the system wide support for digital scholarship.

PAGE 13

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 13 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. Bio: Head of the digital / web unit within information technology at the libraries and the lead developer responsible for creating digital library tools and software: 1) SobekCM the enterprise level open source digital library management system powers the UF Digital Collections; 2) Digital Library of the Caribbean Toolkit, for metadata submission by 30 partners to digitize and transfer files/metadata to a centralized repository for access and archiving; 3) DLC Toolkit, a specialized, enterprise, production scale version of the dLOC Toolkit adopted as the official digital production software by the Digital Initiatives Subcommittee of the State University Libraries of Florida; 4) m yUFDC and myDLOC, online patron tools and a full suite of collection managers, partner tools, and administrative tools. Erik Deumens, Director, UF Research Computing Title: Research Computing Abstract: Overview of the services provided by UF Research Comp uting to support research activities of faculty and their collaborators. Bio: Erik Deumens has worked on many aspects of computational science including algorithm development, as well as building, managing and teaching the use of computer systems for solvi ng complex problems. He is the architect of the super instruction architecture paradigm of parallel programming for petascale computer systems. He is now the director of UF Research Computing. Dina Benson, Institutional Repository Coordinator Matthew C. Mariner, Digital Validation, Archiving, and Preservation Coordinator, Digital Library Center Title: Institutional Repository Abstract: The Institutional Repository (IR@UF) is the open access digital archive for the intellectual output of the extended Univ ersity of Florida community, and includes research, creative, news, outreach, and educational materials. Materials in the IR@UF are openly and freely available worldwide, with permanent URLs which are ideal for use in classroom instruction, poster present ations, conference and journal publications, annual reporting, and CVs. Usage statistics for all self submitted materials are tracked for individual items as well as divisional collections; data can be accessed online and via automated reports that are emailed for all self submitted materials once per month. The UF Libraries provide support for perpetual access and preservation for all materials in the IR@UF. Additionally, the UF Libraries provide reference support for all users of the IR@UF. Bios: Dina Be nson is the coordinator of the Institutional Repository for the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida, the open access digital collection of scholarly works hosted within University of Florida Digital Collections. She received her Bach elor of Arts in Philosophy and Classics from the University of Florida and Master of Science in Library and Information Studies from Florida State University. Her research interests include open access to recent and archival materials, copyright education for all authors in the university community, new methods of information organization and searching, and identifying new communities for reference outreach.

PAGE 14

Interface: Spring 2012 Proceedings Page 14 Spring Interface 2012: Faculty Seminar + Digital Humanities Day is co organized by Academic Technology, the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, and the George A. Smathers Libraries, with support from the CLAS Deans Office and the UF Office of Research. Matt received his BA in English, focusing on modern literary criticism and film, and his Master of Historic Preservation degree (MHP), both from the University of Florida. Matt's film studies background supports his current research in film theory and historic preservation, just as his textual studies background supports his work with Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology. Matt recently published an article on Optical Character Recognition and its use in digital libraries. In his capacity as a coordinator in the UF Digital Library Center, Matt has served as project manager for the Florida Aerial s Phase III grant (10/1/20098/1/2009) in the Florida Aerial Photography Digital Collection as well as the Historic Preservation Studies Collection Matt coordinates all aspects of the text finalization, verification, and archiving processes. This includes supervising metadata (METS) file validation, digital archiving, text processing for Optical Character Recognition, and coordinating data transfer to additional archives and libraries ( International Children's Digital Library Internet Archives Library of Congress ) and to the Florida Digital Archive for long term digital preservation. Lourdes SantamaraWheeler Title: Korean Art: Collecting Treasures Collaboratively Develop ing and Online Exhibition and Digital Collection Bio: Lourdes SantamaraWheeler is the Exhibits Coordinator for the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries. This role includes planning, directing, and organizing an active exhibition program, including physical and online exhibits, designed to share, interpret, and promote the Libraries collections. She serves as the designer and translator of the Digital Library of the Caribbean. Previously she was the Museum and Special Projects Coordinator at the UF Digital Library Center. She holds an MA in Museum Studies and a BFA in Creative Photography, both from UF. Abstract: To celebrate the inaugural exh ibitions at the Harn Museum of Arts new David A. Cofrin Asian Art Wing, the Museum partnered with the George A. Smathers Libraries to develop a permanent online exhibition. Korean Art: Collecting Treasures features all the items from the physical exhibition of the same name, as well as additional multimedia content. Additionally, all items from the Harns Korean Collection are available as zoomable images in the UF Digital Collections ( http://ufdc.ufl.edu ) and thus freely available to an international audience, as well as to the local community and scholars. Making the art objects, along with their respective record information, available through the Digital Collections allows them to be united with related texts in order to create a more complete research portal.