<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Title Page
 Vida de Lincoln
 Indice del Tomo XXVII














PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Obras de D.F. Sarmiento
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010664/00026
 Material Information
Title: Obras de D.F. Sarmiento
Physical Description: 53 v. : ; 25 cm.
Language: Spanish
Creator: Sarmiento, Domingo Faustino, 1811-1888
Montt, Luis, 1848-1909
Belin Sarmiento, Augusto, 1854-1952
Publisher: Belin
Place of Publication: Paris
Publication Date: 1899
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Education   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Argentina -- 1860-1910   ( lcsh )
Economic conditions -- Argentina   ( lcsh )
History -- Argentina -- 1860-1910   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Argentina
 Notes
General Note: Vol. 1-6 "reimpresion" 1909.
General Note: Vols. 1-6 have imprint: Paris, Belin hermanos, 1909; v. 7-49: Buenos Aires, Impr. "Mariano Moreno" 1895-1900 (v. 7, 1896); v. 50-52: Buenos Aires, Marquez, Zaragoza y cia., 1902; v. 53: Buenos Aires, Impr. Borzone, 1903.
General Note: Vols. 1-7 comp. by Luis Montt ; v. 8-52 and index comp. and ed. by A. Belin Sarmiento. Cf. "Advertencia"," v. 1.
General Note: Vols. 7-52 "publicadas bajo los auspicios del govierno arjentino."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 04759098
ocm04759098
Classification: ddc - 982
System ID: AA00010664:00026

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Vida de Lincoln
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
        Page 356
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
        Page 362
        Page 363
        Page 364
        Page 365
        Page 366
        Page 367
        Page 368
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
        Page 373
        Page 374
        Page 375
        Page 376
        Page 377
        Page 378
        Page 379
        Page 380
        Page 381
        Page 382
        Page 383
        Page 384
        Page 385
        Page 386
        Page 387
        Page 388
        Page 389
        Page 390
        Page 391
        Page 392
        Page 393
        Page 394
        Page 395
    Indice del Tomo XXVII
        Page 396
Full Text



OBRAS


DE



D. F. SARMIENTO


PUBLICADAS BAJO LOS AUSPIOIOS DEL GOBIERNO
ARGENTINO


TOMO


XXVII


ABRAHAM LINCOLN

DALMACIO VELEZ SARSFIELD


BUENOS AIRES
67'g-ImprenTta y Litografia Mariano Moreno n, Corrientes 829.
4899

























EDITOR
A. BELIN SARMIENTO
















VIDA DE LINCOLN



INTRODUCTION

I. Materiales de que se ha formado esta obra.-La material en relacion A su estilo.
-Solidaridad de los Intereses americanos.-II. Lecciones que encierra esta narra-
clon.-Contraste de antecedentes politicos y sociales entire el Norte y Sud-Am6rica*
-Nuestro anico modelo esta en los Estados Unidos.-El sistema republican triun.
fante.-Cruel desengafio de los monarquistas.-III. Antecedentes hist6ricos y
religiosos de la eselavitud.-La action de la Iglesia A su respecto.-ldem de los
puritanos y reformistas Ingleses.-Su apoyo en la Biblia--0bsequio significativo
del Comit6 Patri6tlco de Roma.-IV. El principle de la autonomla de los pueblos
aplicado A la Repfiblica. Causa del antagonismo entire el Norte y el Sur de los Es-
tados Unidos.-La fuerza del Norte representada por Lincoln.-Su carActer.-Su
prudencia y energia.--V. Su action en el Congreso.-Caracter de su oratoria.-Su
oposieion Ala guerra de M6xico.-Realizacion de sus pron6stlcos.-Poder agresivo
6 Invasor de la esclavitud.-Sus desastrosos efectos sobre la cabeza misma de sus
fautores.-VI. La doctrina de Monroe.-Antagonismo inevitable de los principios
republicans y monarquicos.-Se puede diferir, no evitar el conflicto.-Cambio
necesarlo de political en los Estados Unldos.-VII.-Lincoln se proclama campeon
de la nacionalidad.-Prlmero es unlonista y no aboliclonista.-Empufia con mano
fuerte el poder.-Se mantlene flrme contra toda oposicion.-La ley marcial y el
estado de sitio.-Nl el poder milltar ni el populacho le imponen.-VIII. Su ree-
leccion justiflca completamente su politica.-MArtir de la llbertad de los esclavos.-
Grandeza de su obra.-Segundo solo A Washington.-El problema de la libertad
resuelto por l1.-CarActer conservador de su political de reorganizacion.-Modo de
apreclar su reelecelon.-El juicio severo de la historic no ha llegado ain.-Leccio-
nes que se deducen de su vlda.-Los Estados Unidoqson la fuente de las institu-
clones sur-americanas, y el centro de impulsion para su progress,

I

Mas bien que ejecutado, hemos dirigido el trabajo de
adaptar A la lengua que se habla en la America del Sud,
una Vida del Presidente Lincoln, entresacada de las varias
que corren impresas, y extractando de ellas, por redundan-





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


tes, documents oficiales dados in extenso, y afiadiendo
del,alles 6 explicaciones, necesarias a la distancia del teatro
de los sucesos, para la recta inteligencia de los hechos. En
verdad que nadie puede con propiedad llamarse autor de
la biografia de hombres que han llegado entire las agitaciones
dela Vida-pdblica a puestos tan encumbrados como Lincoln.
Son estcs personajes como aquellos lienzos transparentes,
con letreros legibles desde la distancia, merced A su propia
luz internal. Nacido Lincoln A la sombra de los bosques, su
vida privada, desde que llega A la edad viril, comp6nese
para el pdblico de discursos en los meetings populares; y
su vida pdblica de oraciones parlamantarias, que mas tarde
se fijan en decretos, mensajes y proclamaciones. Su muerte
misma es el iltimo acto de vida tan consagrada a la cosa
pdblica.
Una bala criminal, dirigida por las pasiones political, lo
alcanza, en, medio de las felicitaciones del triunfo, y le
acuerda los honors del martirio. El Comandante General
de los Ej6rcitos y Marina de los Estados Unidos, es el ilti-
mo soldado que muere en aquella guerra colosal.
Esta su historic ha debido ir quedando como estereotipada
en las hojas diarias de la prensa, 6 en los registros oficiales
de documents pdblicos. Ni corregir es dado tales pruebas,
limitkndose, el que quiera darle cuerpo y forma, A compa-
ginarlas por orden de fechas, cuando la Providencia ha
pesto el finis coronat opus A este libro escrito dia A dia en
cincuenta y seis afios de vida.
Asi es que conservando el tono simple y sin pretension
literaria de las diversas biografias, al hablar de personaje
tani sencillo en lenguaje y maneras, esta compilacion ha
querido evitar el juicio que sobre una de las biograffas
publicadas en Francia hace un escritor norte-americano.
( lo distinga de las memories que por millares public la
prensa francesa; pero al abrirlo y leerlo, i cuanta extrafieza
no debe causar al espiritu de un americano, el encontrarse
con esta vida de nuestro tan sencillo Presidente! A veces
aquel sentimiento llega. A ser tan pronunciado, que uno
duda de la identidad de Abraham Lincoln con el h6roe del
vivaz autor frances. Y no viene esto de alguna palpable
inexactitud de los hechos que se refieren A la vida del





VIDA Di LINCOLN


President Lincoln, 6 de deducciones di opinions erradas
sobre su caracter, sino simplemente del peculiar color y
sabor que da A la historic el folletinista parisiense, que no
puede dejar de ser spiritual, aun cuando trata de cosas
series, y que no quiere pasar por pesado, aunque guste de
filosofar. Y de corazon describe M. Arnaud, no puede haber
duda, puesto que es ardiente partidario de la causa de la
libertad y de la verdad, y un sincere admirador del Presi-
dente Lincoln, 6f su manera spiritual y francesa.)
El nombre de Abraham Lincoln ha llegado a la America del
Sud entremezelado con la narracion de los acontecimientos
sorprendentes de una guerra gigantesca, que ha tenido en
suspenso A la humanidad entera. Habiamos asistido desde
lejos a este drama, asi como la actividad asombrosa de las
comunicaciones entire todos los pueblos del mundo, nos
habia hecho seguir de cerca 6 instruirnos sucesivamente en
todos sus pormenores, causes y resultados acerca de la
sublevacion de los cipayos en la India, la toma de Sebasto-
pol en la antigua C61chida; y de las batallas de Solferino
y de Magenta en Italia, cuando los Italiotes volvian a recla-
mar, por segunda vez, diez y ocho siglos despues, sus
derechos a la ciudadania romana.
Mas de cerca que la del resto del globo, nos interest
comprender las evoluciones que en su desarrollo ejecutan
los Estados Unidos de Norte-Am6rica, cuyas instituciones y
rapido engrandecimiento son como el itinerario que nos
esta trazado por la similitud de origen colonial, la comunidad
de continent, y hasta de rios estupendos que fluyen de los
Andes, lo mismo de la Sierra Nevada que del Chimborazo
6 Tupungato; aunque estemos al principio de la jornada, y
vacilemos y perdamos el camino ppr no estar bien tragado;
si no se pretend todavia que estin condenados a vagar sin
t6rmino los descendientes de los patricios y pueblos del
Lacio, que en su dispersion fundaron la serenisima Repd-
blica de Venecia, sentada catorce siglos a orillas del Adria-
tico, G6nova, Pisa, Luca y Florencia, que restauraron las
letras y las bellas artes antiguas, y crearon el comercio y
la industrial modern, hasta que el genio de la raza latina,
con Colon y Cabot, salvando mares hasta entonces ignotos,
ouales otros Eneas, sefialaron el nuevo campamento donde
habria de terminarse, en cuanto a instituciones libres, el





OBRAS DE SARM1ENTO


laborioso' ensayo principiado A orillas del Tiber, y cuya
meta esta ya mas cerca de lo que se pensaba ahora cuatro
afios.
II

En la vida de Lincoln encontrarAnse esas afinidades do
existencia entire ambas Am6ricas; y de los hechos que con
ella se relacionan, deducirse han por fuerza lecciones y
advertencias tiles para nuestro propio gobierno.
Injustos 6 precipitados en demasia andan los gobiernos
y publicistas europeos, cuando echan en cara A la Am6rica
del Sur sus extravios y sus luchas sangrientas. Cilpanla
de su propia obra, exigi6ndole que remedie en treinta ailos
los errors que al colonizarla la legaron durante tres
siglos.
Los Estados Unidos, descartados desde su origen del
recargo de dinastias y de noblezas, continuaron en santa
paz, despues de independientes, el desenvolvimiento de las
hereditarias libertades inglesas, afiadiendo nuevos resorts
a la maquina del gobierno con las constituciones escritas,
la separacion de las creencias religiosas de la administra-
cion civil, la education universal, y las leyes agrarias que
ponen al alcance de cada nueva generation su parte de
heredad en las tierras piblicas.
Las colonies espaholas, vastago del mas envejecido tronco
de la encina europea, venian A la vida de naciones, desde
1825 adelante, en la 6poca de mas vacilacion y obscuridad,
por que haya atravesado la Europa.
Con Felipe II y la Inquisicion en el cuergo, buscaron,
en vano, medios de desembarazarse del demonio que se
Ilamaba Legion de atraso, y clamaba desde sus propias
entrafias. Al hacerse independiente la America del Sud,
cediendo en ello A impulses externos, porque era la 6poca
hist6rica de la emancipacion de las colonies, volvi6 los
ojos A la Europa en busca de mentores para organizer los
nuevos gobiernos. 1,D6nde hallarlos, empero? ZInventa-
ria derisoriamente una aristocracia privilegiada para go-
bernarse como la Inglaterra ? Seguiria a la Francia, que
pretendia ser por entonces el luminar del mundo, en sus
revoluciones sangrientas, pero abortadas en el Imperio ?
Seguiria al glorioso Emperador cuya frente habia sido





VIDA DE LINCOLN


surcada por los rayos del sol en todas las capitals de
Europa, pero cuyos gemidos podian, desde las costas ame-
ricanas, oirse en la vecina isla de Santa Helena, donde,
cual Prometeo, purgaba sus osadas tentativas de crear
instituciones emanadas de la voluntad de un solo hombre ?
, Seguirian a los restaurados Borbones al destierro con su
otorgada carta? Y si al fin aparece Luis Felipe, el rey
ciudadano, conciliando la tradition y el progress, la mo-
narquia hereditaria y la libertad popular, no bien empe-
zaban a estudiar este bello modelo, cuando... Luis Felipe y
su libertad en el orden, y su progress gradual fueron A parar
adonde habian ido el legitimo Carlos X, el grande Em-
perador, Robespierre el incorruptible, y Luis XVI, la victim
expiatoria de los delitos de la monarquia.
La Repuiblica es el gobierno definitive de la humanidad,
se dijo entonces al mundo expectante; pero vi6se luego
que era solo error de imprenta; que no era la Repuiblica
el gobierno definitive de la raza latina, sino el Imperio
democratic, absolute, military. La libertad quedaba para
Sajones de aquende y de allende los mares. La raza latina
traia en su esencia misma las instituciones imperiales.
Y ya empezaban a aplicarse estas doctrinas A la Am6rica,
aprovechandose del siniestro eclipse que amenazaba obscu-
recer por siempre el brillo de las libertades y prosperidad
de la gran Repdblica americana.
Crey6se, al verla convulsionada, que el pueblo sobe-
rano, artifice feliz de ferro-carriles, tel6grafos y naves de
vapor, muy competent para acumular tesoros por la pa-
ciente industria 6 el audaz go ahead, retrocederia siempre,
como en Bull Run, ante el peligro de la muerte vista cara
A cara. Naciones formadas por el voto del pueblo, sin el
derecho superior del hereditario monarca, 6 la mano de
hierro de la conquista, se rasgarian como la cola del come-
ta de Encke, 6 irian sus jirones A disiparse 'por las pro-
fundidades de la Historia. S61lo las monarquias eran, al
decir de los maestros de entonces, planets regulars en
el orden inmutable de la economic del universe. Tardaba
ya la separation del Sud y del Norte en el efimero ensayo
de los Estados Unidos. Las aristocracias s6lo tienen la
tenacidad de prop6sito, y el espiritu de suite que caracteriz6
a Roma, Venecia 6 Inglaterra en la ejecucion, durante si-





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


glos, de un plan fijo. Los Estados Unidos, y en ellos la
Repdblica, desprovistos de estas guards y seguros contra
incendio de las democracies necesariamente turbulentas
y veleidosas, debian sucumbir a la prueba, quedando con
su pr6ximo fin disipadas las falaces promesas de una
corta y robusta infancia.
Tales fueron los oraculos oficiales de la antigua ciencia
de estado.
Lo que sucedi6 en realidad, c6mo y por qu6 sucedi6, ve-
ralo el lector en la Vida de Lincoln, protagonista del
drama, narrado, explicado por 6l mismo en documents
pdblicos, con la sencillez del h6roe que se ignora A si
propio, y cuenta las pavorosas peripecias de su combat
con el monstruo, como si las cosas no hubiesen podido
ser de otro modo, A no mediar su terrible pujanza. Ve-
rise tambien, c6mo sin hacer violencia A las libertades
inglesas, nidesmentir los principios americanos, que sobre
ellas se levantaron cual majestuoso edificio hecho para
la paz, objeto primordial del Gobierno el Poder Ejecuti-
vo de la Repdblica hall, en el mismo arsenal de la
guerra, coraza y guantes de hierro para manejar las esco-
rias asperas 6 incandescentes, sin herirse en sus pdas, 6
quemarse con su abrasador contact.
4Qu6 era, en substancia, la question que tres millones de
ciudadanos soldados han debatido A fuego y sangre, cuatro
afios; disputandose palmo A palmo el terreno, A una orilla
d otra orilla del Potomac; oponiendo al Sud el Norte; al
Merrimac en los mares el Monitor; al Torpedo el Parrot;
A la victoria estlril anteponiendo la taimada derrota, hasta
que contra Lee inventan un Grant, y cansados de acumu-
lar montafias para el asalto de Richmond, los Titanes dan
un prodigioso rodeo, y socavan por la espalda la fortaleza
feudal, proclamando, al fin, entire truenos y rayos la abo-
licion por toda el haz de la tierra de la esclavitud del
hombre ?
Si bien la esclavitud, como institution, fu6 la causa
eficiente de la guerra, y su extincion el resultado apa-





VIDA DE LINCOLN


rente, otros puntos mas vitales para la preservation de
la Repdblica, estaban detras de esta grande faccion'exte.
rior del cuerpo politico; y esto importa conocer para la
inteligencia del grande especticulo.

III

La esclavitud del ilota es la primera manifestation
visible del sentimiento de humanidad, en el contact
hostile de los pueblos primitivos. Mas atras esta el
antrop6fago, devorando en horrible festin al vencido,
vc victisi
Mucho escandalo caus6 a los del Norte ver que sacer.
dotes piadosos, y aun ejemplares obispos, abogaban por
la esclavitud como de institution divina.
Preciso es convenir en ello, sin embargo. El cristianis-
mo traia sin duda, por implicancia, en el 'fondo de su
doctrine toda libertad humana; la libertad del pensamien-
to, puesto que era una doctrine espiritualista; la libertad
civil, puesto que constituia iguales a los hombres ante
Dios; la libertad de las razas inferiores, puesto que las
hacia provenir de un padre comun a la especie humana.
Pero su influencia no ha podido ser ni general, ni direct.
Con el dogma del pecado original veniale de la tradition
hebraica la condenacion a servidumbre eterna de la raza
de Cam. Los dos grandes actos de la creation genesiaca
traen estas dos condenaciones: la serpiente tienta a Eva,
que lega a sus hijos la pobreza y la ignorancia; el sumo,
de la vid embriaga a No6, el segundo Adam, y Cam, por
haberse burlado del 6brio, es maldito, esclavo en su des-
cendencia.
Cuando en los primeros siglos de la Iglesia se ensaya
piadosamente el comunismo, 6 el desprendimiento de los
bienes terrestres, poco se dice ni hace por la abolicion
de la esclavitud, que los barbaros retornaron en servidum.
bre a los romanos vencidos. En la orgia feudal de la
edad media, obispos y abades tomaron la misma parte
que reyes y barones, sin hacerse escrtipulo de mantener





OBRAS DB SARMIENTO


el santuario con el trabajo de los siervos. Al disiparse
aquellas nieblas de donde salia regenerado el mundo, Co-
lon, el dltimo de los cruzados, y el mas exaltado cristia-
no, arrebata indios A sus hogares, para mostrarlos entire
papagayos pintados y otros animals raros en Espafa,
como trofeos de su inmortal victoria sobre el misterioso
Oc6ano, y los vende por esclavos. El santo obispo de
Chiapas, movido A compassion por la raza india que perece
A millones en la servidumbre, abre l61 mismo el ancho re-
guero de esqueletos humans que tapizan el fondo del
Oc6ano entire el Africa y la America, con la trata de negros.
La abolicion de la esclavitud alcanza entonces en las con-
ciencias hasta el seno de la raza cAucasa; pero no protege A la
que No6 maldijo.
Los Padres Peregrinos que desembarcaron en Plymouth,
y se creian la expression mas alta del espiritu del cris-
tianismo primitive, nada dicen ni hacen por borrar de
la historic humana esta mancha original; porque la creen
caida de la pluma de Jehovah, en la Biblia. Decisiones
de los tribunales ingleses muestran largo tiempo el mismo
respeto por el texto sagrado; y es s6lo en nombre del
derecho civil, cuando 6ste se ha fortificado por las con-
quistas de las libertades inglesas, que al fin un Juez
declara no ser la esclavitud del hombre conciliable con
la declaracion de los Derechos contenida en la Magna
Carta.
Sabese el extrafio expediente que al obispo de Nadal ha
sugerido la letra harto positive del texto sagrado sobre
el esclavo; y sAbese tambien cuAl fu6 el estrago que caus6
en la conciencia de un ne6fito negro, cuando el obispo Co-
lenso le traducia en Zulu los versiculos 21 y 22 del Exodo:
((El que hiere A su siervo 6 a su sierva con palo, y murie-
ren entire sus manos, serA reo de crime. Pero si sobrevi-
viere uno 6 dos dias, no quedara sujeto A pena, porque di-
nero suyo es.)) Dinero de los plantadores del Sur eran sus
negros.
Mas acertado, en punto & filiacion de la esclavitud, ha
andado el Comit6 Romano, que tomando una piedra del
Ager de Servio Tulio, sepultado bajo el detritus de veinte






VIDA DE LINCOLN


y cuatro siglos, escribi6 sobre ella esta inscripcion del
Lacio:
ABRAHAMO LINCOLNIO,
REGION. F(EDERAT. AMERIC. PRESIDI. II.
HVNO EX. SERVII TVLLII AGGERE LAPIDEM
QVO VTRIVSQVE
LIBERTATIS ADSERTORIS FORTIS.
MEMORIAL CONJVGATVR
CIVES BOMANI,
D.
A. MDOCCLXV. ()
Y como para suplir A la traditional concision de la leyen-
da inscritural, en la carta de remision de este mouumento
al President Johnson, afiaden: <(Lincoln, sucumbe por la
abolicion de la esclavitud y el mantenimiento de la union
national, como Servio Tulio fuW victim de un parricido,
favorecido por los patricios que querian la opresion de la
plebe y la perpetuacion de la esclavitud. Uno y otro, en
los dos herniferios, A veinte y cuatro siglos de distancia,
fueron benefactores de los pueblos, devolviendo al esclavo
la dignidad de hombres. Sea esta antigua piedra, presa-
gio de libertad eterna para vosotros, y de pr6xima redencion
para nosotros.)>
IV
Cuestion mas grave que la de la esclavitud traia en sus
entrafias la Repiiblica, como institution. Los pueblos no

(1) (Los Ciudadanos Romanos dedican 4 Abraham Lincoln, Presidente (en su segundo
Consulado) de la Region federal americana, esta piedra extraida del Ager de Servio
Tulio, en la cual va unida la memorial de uno y otro fortisimo sostenedor de la Li-
bertad, 1865.)
SAbese que Roma ftu cereada en su cuna de muros renovados por Servio Tulio;
y que A media que crecia la future dominadora del mundo antiguo, se la trazaba
nuevo y mas amplio circuit. La muralla de Servio Tulio fue encontrada y reco-
nocida en excavaciones recientes sobre el Monte Aventino, y en lugar llamado hoy
Termini, verificose el Ager hasta la puerta Viminale. De esta venerable reliqula
de los fundamentos de Roma, el Comitd Patridtico substrajo A hurtadillas un canto
de dos metros cuarenta y nueve centimetres de alto, tres ytreinta y seis de ancho,
y un metro y sesenta y seis centimetres de espesor; y grabando en la una de sus
faces ]a citada inscription, lo ha remitido a America, al Capitolio de la Gran Rep6-
blica, como presagio de sus destinos, y vinculo simbolico de la continuacion de las
instituciones planteadas por los romanos, detenidas en su natural desarrollo por
la resistencia de los patricios, interrumpidas por C6sar, continuadas, quince siglos
despues, en los Estados Unidos.-(N. del Autor).





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


siendo patrimonio de nadie; los hijos no pudiendo ser obli-
gados, sin t6rmino, por los padres, deduciriase que las na-
ciones fundadas en el esponthneo y libre consentimiento
de los pueblos que las componen, pueden disolverse bue-
namente, cuando alguna partede ellasquisiera segregarse.
La historic no presentaba, sin embargo, ejemplos de estos
arbitramientos voluntarios. Las monarquias europeas, hasta
ahora poco se componian y descomponian por el casa-
miento entire principles soberanos que llevaban sus propie-
dades (nacionesl) como bienes matrimoniales, 6 cuyos limi-
tes cambiaba la conquista con harta frecuencia, sin que en
ello entrase la voluntad del pueblo para nada. Hoy se apro-
xima el derecho piiblico en Europa dar por base stable
a las nacionalidades la comunidad de lengua en limits
continues; y la guerra de Italia y el desenlace de la Dina-
marca parece sancionar este principio, con cierta admission,
en leve dosis, de consentimiento 6 asentimiento popular,
discernible al parecerporel 6xitode las batallas. ,Pueden
las Repiiblicas fundadas en la soberania popular disolver-
se, como una firma de comercio, cuyos socios estin mal
avenidos? Parece que las naciones contaran como unida-
des ante los ojos de la Providencia para el desarrollo
human, y la realizacion de sus designios. Una grande
nacion que se disolviera en atomos 6 en fragments, trae-
ria necesariamente una gran perturbacion en la economic
del mundo. iCuAnto desastre se seguiria A la desaparicion
de Cartago, para que tres siglos despues fuese todavia el
prop6sito del genio romano colmar el abismo abierto, resta-
bleciendo la ciudad pinica, ya que no el Estado colonizador
y comerciantel
Esta question que interest a todas las Repdblicas, venia
agitandose en los Estados Unidosde treinta afios atrAs con
Calhoun y los nulificadores, hasta presentarse en el hori-
zonte, cual torva nube de irrepressible conflict. El error de la
transaction, en material de principios, consiste en contar
con que mientras el principio no avanza por prudencia, la
reaction se ha de estar tranquila en su puesto. Cuando
el principio vuelve de su error, es cuando se encuen-
tra circunvenido por todas parties, y tiene que pelear,
no por avanzar, sino por la vida. Asi sucedi6 en los
Estados Unidos. Terminada la terrible lucha, y penetrando





VIDA DE LINCOLN


en los misterios intimos del Sur, se ha encontrado la ver-
dadera causa del antagouismo entire el Sur y el Norte, que
se hacia mas hostile, a media que 6ste realizabha mas con-
quistas en la vida modern. El Sur con los esclavos era
como la capa geol6gica anterior al terreno reciente: era el
intermediario entire la Europa y la Am6rica: el descenso
natural de la America del Sur a la del Norte. Conglome"
rabanse de aquel lado la Florida que fuW espafiola; la Lui-
siana y el Mississipi, que fueron franceses; Texas, que no
acaba de ser mejicano. Cuando en la Convencion de 1768,
que di6 la Constitucion de los Estados Unidos, se discutia
un punto, usA base de este argument: ((La Virginia lo quiere:
seria desagradar a la Virginia)); y las cosas se hacian 6 no,
segun estos estimulos 6 cortapisas a la voluntad de los
otros. La Virginia di6 largo tiempo los Presidentes: el Sur
los ministros, los senadores y almirantes. La vida del pa-
tricio romano entregado a los asuntos del foro, con consa-
gracion exclusive, es possible donde hay esclavos, sobre
cuyos hombros hacen pesar el fardo de la subsistencia.
A mas de esclavos, encontr6se en el Sur plebs blanca, 6 los
blancos pobres y fidalgos, que tienen afinidad de position
con los d-escendientes de espafioles en la America del Sur,
que se llaman gaucho, ranchero, huaso. En el Sur la escuela
primaria no estaba al alcance del blanco pobre, como un
Johnson, hoy Presidente. Los Bancos no eran institution
tan difundida como en el Norte; las fabricas, si no es las que
despepitan el algodon, 6 el ingenio del azdcar, no lanzaban
sus bocanadas de humo para empafiar la claridad de aque-
Ila atm6sfera radiosa y tibia.
El amo de esclavos liacia alarde de la caballerosidad de
sus sentimientos, y debia de tener razon.' Esas diversas
capas sociales llevan los sentimientos nobles A las parties
altas. Los sefores debian ser caballerescos, valientes, tena-
ces en sus prop6sitos, aptos para el gobierno de la Repii-
blica, ya que su casa misma es un gobierno sin afecciones
de raza, muy alto el que manda, muy abajo el que obedece.
haciendose fuertes por el habito, la ley y la discipliia dos
blancos contradoscientosesclavos. Este es el tipo romano.
Este fue el caracter de la aristocracia inglesa que destron6 a
los Estuardos. Cuanto no debian despreciar al habitante
del Norte, comerciante, industrial, plebeyo, parvenu, emi-





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


granted irland6s 6 aleman; el igual de todos, hasta de los
extranjeros; sin grandes nombres como Washington, Jeffer--
son y Madison; rueda inferior del mecanismo gubernativo
de que eran el muelle real los Presidentes, senadores y mi-
nistros del Sur?
Y sin embargo, el Norte con todas las fuerzas de la Re-
pdblica del siglo XIX iba al mismo tiempo marchando
adelante; con sus escuelas, sus maquinas, su inmigracion,
sus fabricas, sus empresas, su igualdad. Esta ola subiendo,
subiendo, llegaria at pie de los castillos del feudalismo
colonial, y trataria de pasar el nivel que tantos prodigies
opera-en el Norte; y como el tribune romano, a su vez
pediria su parte en el sacerdocio, ya que la tenia nominal
en el Consulado. La humanidad entera lo apoyaria con
sus votos en la question de la esclavitud; el mayor nimero
de los Estados en la guerra por su propia emancipacion; y
la mayor riqueza y ndmero de habitantes permitiriap llegar
adonde el heroismo de siempre Ilega, que es A vencer A
la postre con mas recursos pecuniarios, y mayor gasto de
sangre.
Asi venian preparadas las cosas, cuando por un uiltimo
desarrollo del sentimiento de la igualdad y del Norte, con-
tra la dilatacion de la esclavitud del Sur (porque s6lo chocan
los principios cuando se exageran), aparecen en la escena
political dos hombres que concluyen por reconcentrar en
torno suyo aquellas inmensas fuerzas dispersas, y llevarlas
por la election al asaltodel Capitollio, de donde casi siem-
pre habian sido alejados como menos dignos los candidates
del Norte.
V6se venir A Lincoln con el hacha al hombro, el emblema
del trabajo que conquista la tierra, desde el seno de las
selvas del Kentucky, pioneer del desierto, dotado de aquella
ciencia moral de los Establecimientos, que hace la belleza
del tipo que Cooper pasea por todas sus novelas;-Calzas
de cuero; Larga Carabina; Trampero. El otro es un joven
sastre que sale del corazon del Sur, como una protest
viva contra la condition que la esclavitud impone A los
blancos pobres, que forman como una clase intermediaria
entire el esclavo y el senior.
El partidoabolicionista con Boston, la Atenas americana
por cuartel general, con la Nueva Inglaterra por guardia





VIDA DE LINCOLN


escogida, lanza al fin, con Mrs. Beecher Stowe, aquel gran-
de grito de redencion de la raza negra, que se oy6 por toda
la tierra, cuando el alarido salid de las entrafias de una
mujer. '
Lincoln se present en la escena, y desde el primer dia
tiene el sentimiento del caudillo; estimulando A la forma-
cion del partido Republicano, para oponerlo al Democratico,
que de afios venia disponiendo de la direction de los nego-
cios puiblicos. Lincoln, depuesta A la puerta de su casa, en
Springfield, el hacha del lefiador, se ha hecho abogado.
orador y legislator; absorbiendo en su naturaleza de es-
ponja esas esencias de civilization, de gobierno, de libertad,
que estAn flotantes y diluidas en la atm6sfera de los Esta-
dos Unidos, y se reconcentran diariamente en cuatro mil
diaries, y en millares de libros y folletos, que popularizan
el saber del uno, la experiencia del otro, el resultado de la
ciencia 6 de sus aplicaciones en toda la tierra. Del bosque
ha traldo ]a confianza en la Providencia, y el sentimiento
de la armonia de las leyes del Universo, mas visible en
el seno de la naturaleza, cumo poder protector del d6bil
que entire el bullicio de las ciudades: de su vida de paisano
vi6nele su conocimiento de la indole de las masas, y el
acopio de imagenes con que hara palpables y sensibles las
Aridas deducciones de Ia 16gica: del studio del abogado
saca la extrategia del controversista; de la .Legislatura de
Illinois, el hAbito del debate parlamentario; del jury, el
conocimiento prActico de las leyes; del meeting, las inspira-
ciones de la political.
Su primera palabra para contener el ardor de los aboli-
cionistas, es que cree que la esclavitud esta fundada en una
injusticia y en una mala political; pero que la promulga-
cioif de doctrinas abolicionistas tiende mas bien a agravar
el mal que & disminuirlo. Pero cuando ya hay disciplinado
un ej6rcito de opinions decididas A la action, en su famoso
discurso de New York, a media que este Juan viene avan-
zando desde el desierto; ((una casa dividida entire si, excla-
ma, no puede subsistir.-Creo que este Gobierno no puede
existir permanentemente, rnitad esclavo, mitad libre. Ha
de ser lo uno 6 lo otro. El resultado no es dudoso. Si nos
tenemos firme, triunfaremos. Prudentes consejos pueden
ToMO xxvn,-2





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


acelerarla, como retardarla los errors; pero mas tarde 6
mas temprano la victoria es nuestra.
V
La hora del combat ha sonado, pues. A Jerusalenl Al
presentarse en el Congreso ataca la political de expansion
del Sur, por la conquista de M6xico, y su espiritu de justicia
para con las otras naciones se revela en aquella oracion, la
mas acabada en su g6nero especial, pesado de ordinario,
como el hacha que emprende derribar una encina, golpe
tras golpe, hasta que se conmueve, sus hojas se estremecen,
bambolea y cae con fragor. Hay en este discurso la candorosa
malicia de Sancho, depositario de las verdades vulgares; la
ironia de Timon; el estilo rdstico y, sin embargo, clasico de
Paul Louis Courier; pero campea sobre 61, el sistema de
demostracion matematica, que ha aprendido de Euclides.
una condensacion quimica del pensamiento en cristales de
dos palabras, contrapuestas como facetas, que el 6nfasis de
la voz sefiala al hablar, 6 indicarfios con bastardilla en lo
escrito. Si aquel se pusiera al sol, verianse relucir cual pie-
dras preciosas, 6 gotas de rocio, aquellas palabras enfati-
cas, Ilenas de vida y dotadas de inteligencia. Di6ramos el
discurso contra la guerra de M6xico a los j6venes, como.
material de premio de lectura; a los practicantes de dere-
cho, como modelo de anklisis de la prueba contraria, y
de exposicion del caso controvertido. A los sud-americanos.
lo presentamos como una muestra, en lo que Mr. Lincoln
condena, de la influencia que sobre el destiny de una
nacion pueden ejercer los partidos interns de un ve-
cino poderoso. El resume del discurso del Diputado.
Lincoln esti todo en esta frase final: ,Si el Presidente
de los Estados Unidos no demuestra que era. nuestro
el terreno en que se derram6 la primera sangre en la
guerra de M6xico, entonces quedar6 plenamente conven-
cido de lo que ya estaba sospechando, y es que tiene
conciencia de su sinrazon; y que siente que la sangre de
esta guerra, como la sangre de Abel, esta clamando contra
411) Lo que 61 insinuu apenas en este discurso, por no
exasperar A la mayoria esclav6crata, dijolo A boca llena
Mr. Mann mas tarde en la Camara de Diputados. ((La
faccion mas prominent de la civilizacion de este pais, es





VIDA DE LINCOLN


que tiene mas de tres millones de series humans en dura
servidumbre; que el espiritu que gobierna A la nation ha
anexado iltimamente a Texas, porque tenia esclavos; que
ha despojado A M6xico de sus mas ricas provincias, con la
esperanza de extender la esclavitud; que ha intentado
robar Cuba a la Espana con el mismo fin, y que no aban-
dona el pensamiento hasta ahora. )
i Ah, si, contra el Presidente I contra el gobierno de los
duefios de esclavos es que necesitaba decirse; contra los
Estados Unidos, A cuyo nombre se intent y se consume
el acto, clam6 en vano aquella sangrel
Los Estados Unidos tambien sufrieron de rechazo el gol-
pe que lanzaron sobre su hermano Abel. El dia que las
Aguilas americanas atravesaban el Rio Colorado, firmaban
ellos un pagar6 A corto vencimiento, que han cubierto con
intereses, desde la derrota Bull Run hasta la toma de
Petersburgo; no import cuya fuese la sangrey el oro que se
derramaba, como Roma pag6 caro la destruction de Cartago.
La esclavitud busc6 espacio para extenderse hacia el Stir,
sobre Texas por la apexion, sobre M6xico por la conquista,
sobre Centro America por el filibusterismo. Feliz con la
presa dorada de California, el espiritu de invasion no cono-
ci6 limits, pudiendo como Pompeyo ostentar A los avidos
ojosde los romanos cartagineses los tesoros del Asia, las
estatuas de la Grecia, y los reyes bArbaros yencidos y ata-
dos A su carro. Julio C6sar, empero, fu6 el gafnancioso, y
Roma qued6 entonces herida por sus triunfos, como la
ballena A la cual se larga bastante soga,'-cuando ya tiene
clavado el rejoin, para que vaya A morir en lo profundo del
abismo.
La Independencia de la America espafiola venia garan-
tida por el decoro pdiblico de las demas naciones. No era
culpa suya, que la Espafa al colonizarla hubiese sembra-
do los habitantes con mano avara, sobre una superficie
mayor tres veces que la Europa. Los Estados Unidos
estaban codeAndose A orillas del Atlantico en tres colo-
nias, que el vapor recorre hoy en tres dias. Mas previso-
res, por instinto de raza, los puritanos no habian incor-
porado como los espafoles por millones A los pueblos
aut6ctonos, que han sido causa de tanta remora en la
America del Sur.





OBRAS DRB ARMIENTO


Las colonies espanfolas fueron diseminadas, espolvorea-
das por el interior de la America del Sur, sin contact
unas con otras, casi sin puertos en los mares. Las repd.
blicas emancipadas nacieron d6biles de constitution, cada
una con un million de habitantes, cual con dos, una sola
con mas de cuatro, la mayor part indios de la raza azteca.
Veneer & este pueblo, tres siglos despues de que Cortez
someti6 con doscientos europeos el Imperio de M6xico, no
era empresa dificil, estando divididos entire sf los descen-
dientes de raza europea, y en su favor la part mas direc-
tamente heredera de sus vicios orginicos. Los monar-
quistas de M6xico son de la misma raza que los separatists
del Sur, los menos americanizados. Mas dificil habria
parecido que los Estados Unidos lo hubiesen atropellado
despues que Monroe y Canning habian escudado la debili-
dad native de Estados en germen, contra las tendencies de
la Santa Alianza. Pero para conseguirlo tuvo el partido
esclav6crata que dejar la puerta abierta a todas las ten-
tivas futuras sobre la America del Sur, incapaz de defense
maritima; porque un buque como el Dunderberg absorbe-
ria todas las rentas de cada uno de los Estados; entrando
la America del Sur, a deshora, en el ruinoso sistema de la
paz armada, que ha creado las enormes deudas europeas, y
que quisieran abandonar ahora, sus propios inventories, si
pudieran darse garantias reciprocas los soberanos entire
si. Para apoderarse de California y Nuevo Mejico, el Presi-
dente esclav6crata sugiere que de un (( pueblo dividido por
facciones contendientes, y de un gobierno sujeto a cons-
tantes cambios, por medio de revoluciones intestines, no
puede obtenerse satisfaction >. No olvidemos que ia Fran-
cia, la Inglaterra y la Espahia (que siempre deben tener
razon en la America espafiola) estan oyendo el mensaje
del Presidente. 4 Qu6 se hara entonces con aquellos Esta-
dos sujetos a cambios constantes ?
((El medio finico de obtener una paz duradera) sugiere el
President, al decir del Diputado Lincoln, es hacer de modo
que el pueblo mexicano desoiga los consejos de sus jefes
politicos, y confiando en nuestra protection, forme un go-
bierno que pueda asegurar una paz duradera. ) No es
esto mismo, por ventura, lo que hizo el gobierno de Fran-
cia, para acabar con la anarquia y asegurarle a Mexico una





VIDA DE LINCOLN


paz duradera, con una prosecution mas vigorosa de la gue-
rra con tan poca razon en uno y otro caso comenzada ?
Fueron, pues, los Estados Unidos los que atropellando
esas telarafias que se Haman derecho de las naciones,
cuando s6lo concierne A los debiles, abrieron para la Am.-
rica del Sur, en estado de crisalida, la caja de Pandora de
todas las combinaciones de la political europea; y como
con la raza negra arrancada al Africa por los portugueses
A fines del siglo quince, se retard6 la definitive abolicion
de la esclavitud hasta el siglo diez y nueve; asi los Esta-
dos Unidos, con la conquista de Nuevo M6xico y California,
retardaron la formacion de la Repdblica, en el terreno en
donde, por la Emancipacion, las ex-colonias espafiolas po-
dian seguir su propio ejemplo, sin alarma ni ofensa de los
gobiernos tradicionales de Europa.
VI
Tras la guerra de M6xico, en que el Aguila de cabeza
blanca sefal6, con la direction de su vuelo, donde yacia
una presa indefensa, las Aguilas imperiales, de una 6 de
dos cabezas, alzaron su vuelo A trav6s de los mares, como
Audubon ha mostrado que es el seguro instinto de las
aves de su especie, para guiarse las unas por el movi-
miento de las otras, al cruzar el espacio.
Y cuando se ha querido recorder con el generoso pro-
p6sito de Canning y Monroe, muertos lay! de cuerpo y de
espiritu,, que la America es para los Americanos, la ironia de
la historic ha preguntado, A causa de la guerra de Mexico,
si aquel principio no encierra un double sentido, como las
respuestas del orAculo de Delfos. Estados Unidos de Am6-
rica, bastaria para llenar la letra de la sentencia.
Circunstancia providencial parecia, feliz y como buscada
para el desarrollo de los Estados Unidos, en cuanto a
ensayo de instituciones libres, la de no tener vecinos, que
perturben sus movimientos. Pero much empeora la situa-
cion, con la vecindad del principio hostile al en que reposan
sus propias instituciones. Ahora el dnico Estado del
mundo que se vanagloriaba de no tener ni ej rcito ni escua-
dra permanent, tiene uno de observacion en Texas, y una
formidable escuadra en los mares.
Si el nuevo ensayo de instituciones es feliz en M6xico, la





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


America del Sur, tan vulnerable, tan dividida por faccio-
nes internal, pedira a gritos el bilsamo y panacea de
M6xico; y si en tierra por poblarse, bafiada por los rivals
del Mississipi, y unida a los Estados Unidos, ha de pros-
perar, remediando los defects actuales de despoblacion
y malos habitos, desde el Canada hasta el Cabo de Hor-
nos, habra tela donde cortar grandes y poderosos im-
perios.
No fu6 cosaca ni republican la Europa, no obstante las
previsiones del genio; pero cuando las fuerzas se equili-
bran entire corrientes encontradas, pres6ntase de tarde en
tarde el problema que formula Lincoln en su primer dis-
curso de Nueva York: ((Este pais no puede ser siempre
mitad libre y mitad esclavox; y fu6 todo libre. Un dia
lleg6 en que el Mediterrineo no pudo ser mitad romano y
mitad cartagin6s; y Cartago fu6 .borrada de la luz de la
tierra, y su nombre execrado hasta hoy. Mas tarde el
mundo antiguo no pudo ser mitad romano y mitad bar-
baro; y fu6 barbaro diez siglos.
Acaso no era just en la providencial distribution del
bien y del mal entire las naciones, que a los Estados Uni-
dos s6lo cupiesen ventajas, sin mezola de inconvenientes.
Acaso era llegada la hora en que devolviesen a la huma-
nidad, tomando parte en sus tribulaciones presents, y
en sus progress futures, lo que de los progress pasados
recibieran en herencia con las libertades inglesas. Mal
que les pese tendran ej6rcito permanent, y borraran de
sus constituciones la clAusula que recuerda su incompati-
bilidad con las instituciones libres. Mal que. les pese
tendran formidable escuadras, y entenderan en los nego-
cios del mundo antiguo, ya que aquella situation aislada y
apartada ha desaparecido por culpa del gobierno esclav6-
crata, que les deja este legado de su political. Estan, pues,
lanzados por la mano de sus antecedentes y los designios
de la Providencia en los azares de los mares desconocidos
del mundo future, de la political militant, en antagonismo
necesario con los que esperan hacer volver atras la histo-
ria, y que de las aberraciones en la march de los pueblos
tienden a hacer itinerario regular a las instituciones poli-
ticas. Lincoln tuvo, con el instinto del pueblo, el presen-
timiento vago de estos peligros; y bueno es que haya





VIDA DE LINCOLN


protestado solemnemente en el Congreso contra los incautos
que los provocaron.
Las duras verdades que, en el discurso sobre la guerra
de M6xico, dirigi6 al pueblo desde lo alto del Capitolio,
contra la corriente de la opinion popular que veia extra-
viarse, no le hicieron perder su popularidad. Es privilegio
de la sinceridad de prop6sito, y recompensa de la rectitud,
esta docilidad del pueblo para dejarse fustigar en aquellas
predilecciones del moment, que alhagando el amor propio
niacional, no tienen, sin embargo, en su apoyo la aproba-
cion clara de la conciencia. Webster tambien habiasefia-
lado los peligros de la anexion de Texas, que.trajo, como
un abismo llama A otro abismo, la guerra de M6xico, que
A su vez produjo el conflict, que A su turno atrajo el
imperio armado a sus fronteras.
VII
Electo Presidente en 1861, Lincoln llega al Capitolio
atravesando por Chicago, Cleveland, Boston, Nueva York,
Filadelfia, y por todo el camino prodiga su palabra tran-
quila, ofreciendo A sus adversaries tratarlos como Wa-
shington y Jefferson trataron A los suyos. Pero su elevacion
era s6lo la eminencia que debia hacer descargar la electri-
cidad de que estaba cargada la atm6sfera, y la tormenta
se desencaden6. Si el triunfo electoral del Norte era para
el Sur una mortificacion, la elevacion de un campesino
era la dltima de las degradaciones: ((un rajador de lefia
gracejo, y un sastre remendon, decian, de Presidente y
Vicepresidente, ambos salidos de los bosques, ambos crea-
dos en la mas grosera ignorancia ).
El fue'te Sumter cay6, y desde entonces todas las cues-
tiones tomaron fisonomia y cuerpo. Desde entonces tam-
bien Lincoln mostr6, como habia desde antes el pueblo
llano, la masa popular mostrado su passion por la naciona-
lidad y la Union, que s6lo la intervention del pueblo habia
prolongado hasta entonces.
Quiere la Constitudion 'xtal como era)), nada mas, nada
menos; y cuando le urgen que proceda A la abolicion de
la esclavitud, contest con su hAbito de deslindar una idea
por el Sur y por el Norte, por el Este y por el Oeste:
((Quiero, dice contestando A La Tribuna, salvar la Union.





OBRAS DR SARMIENTO


La salvar6 por el mas corto camino bajo la Constitucion.
Si hubiese algunos que no querrian salvar la Union, a
menos de salvar al mismo tiempo la esclavitud, no estoy con
ellos. Si hay quienes no salvarian la Union, a menos que
la esclavatura no desaparezca, no estoy con ellos ). Despues
decreta la emancipacion como media de guerra para sal-
var la Union; pero esta question habia de fijarla definiti-
vamente el 6xito de las armas.
.Qtra internal, que a 61 solo le tocaba fijar, amenazaba
A s retaguardia introducir la division en su propio campio4
Setenta y cinco afios habian los Estados Unidos marchado
tranquilos, como el Mississipi desciende entire las selvas y
praderias del mas espacioso valle del universe. El tnico
accident que perturba la tersura de sus aguas, es la en-
trada de algun majestuoso rio que viene A rendirle el
tributo de sus cristales, 6 la rueda del vapor que acaricia
su superficie, 6 la brisa que la riza blandamente. La
Constitucion tenia mecanismos excepcionales, como las
vilvulas de seguridad de las maquinas de vapor, para
cuando amenaza reveutar el caldero, que por falta de uso,
estaban, por decirlo asi, tornados de orin. Pudiera decirse
que en la conciencia del pueblo no existian; para muchos
habian caido en desuso; para otros no importaban una
suspension de las garantias. El Ejecutivo autoriz6 a los
generals segun su discrecion A suspender el escrito del
habeas corpus en los Estados leales, siempre que la ejecu-
cion de las medidas de guerra encontrase resistencias.
La Ley Marcial fu6 puesta en ejercicio, y se aplic6 A dia-
rios hostiles, A oradores sediciosos. Un Diputado nada
menos fu6 juzgado militarmente y condenado, A causa de
un discurso inflamatorio contra las autoridades.
El President Lincoln es asaltado por los diarios, los
meetings, y aun graves constitucionalistas sobre el abuso
del poder military. El meeting en masa de Albany le
ofrece su concurso, menos para las prisiones arbitrarias:
una comision del Ohio expone los agravios hechos al Es-
tado en el arrest military del Diputado Valandigham.
Lincoln responded A todos, y a cada uno, con la paciente
pertinacia de su dialdctica, comentando el texto y la excep-
cion de la Constitucion, elevandose al principio de que
emana. f La Constitucion salvada y el Estado perdido? se





VIDA DE LINCOLN


pregunta; y responded: ((La Constitucion ha debido en tests
general proveer & los medios de salvarse A si misma...
Va A probarse si un gobierno, como el de los Estados Uni-
dos, demasiado fuerte para no limitar la libertad indivi-
dual, es demasiado debil al propio tiempo para conservarse
A si mismo. La experiencia de todos los tiempos y paises
ha mostrado, que las naciones no se salvan por los proce-
dimientos ordinarios de la justicia. ) Cita el caso de Jack-
son arrestando diaristas, abogados y jueces federales, y
absolucion que el Congreso le di6, treinta afios despues,
devolvi6ndole la multa que le habia sido impuesta por
el juez aprisionado.
La opinion pdblica se ilustra con este debate, y todos
sienten que la Constitucion contiene en si medios de su-
primir insurrecciones, previniendo los delitos sin casti-
garlos, por la suspension del escrito del habeas corpus; y
castigAndolos sumariamente, despues de cometidos, por la
Ley Marcial, que Webster habia definido: la facultad de
arrestar, juzgar sumariamente, y dar pronta ejecucion al
juicio, y que una vez proclamada, la tierra viene d ser un
campamento, y la ley del campamento la ley de la tierra.>
Sobre el caso de Valandigham dice con sencillez: ( no s6
si yo lo hubiera arrestado; pero por regla general tengo
que el Comandante del puhto es el mejor juez de la opor-
tunidad y conveniencia.
Al Teniente General Grant dice otra vez: ((No conozco
sino en globo sus planes, y no pretend saber sus deta-
lles ~; y sin embargo, desde el principio de la guerra y
hasta que se concluye, releva de sus puestos A los Gene-
rales, sean Mc. Clellan, el prestigioso, 6 Butler, el antiguo
servidor; desaprueba A Fremont, como Johnson a Sher-
man, siempre que traspasen los limits de su autoridad
puramente military, 6 la victoria no les sonrie sistemati-
camente. El poder civil queda siempre inc6lume; y la
Repdblica, no obstante sus colosales armamentos, libre de
que los Marios y los Silas vengan a debatir las cuestiones
political con sus legiones en tiempos de paz, 6 creando la
guerra por sus disenciones.
Despues de la revista de Washington, medio million de
veterans vuelven al seno de sus families, y ni aun por la
vista de los uniforms, que nadie usa recargados de relum-





OBRBAS DE SARMIENTO


brones, se sospecharia que medio million de soldados han
vuelto a sus hogares, y que los ferrocarriles todavia van
transportando al Oeste aquellas famosas legiones de Sher-
man, que han eclipsado today gloria. La revolution fran-
cesa muri6 bajo el peso de los laureles, como el primer
imperio en la inevitable represalia de la gloria, que es y
fu6 siempre. la expiacion que aplaca los manes de la jus-
ticia hist6rica.
VIII
Su reeleccion en seguida de estos debates, como habia
sido electo Jackson despues de su condena por actos aun
mas severos, mostraron que el pueblo volvia de su error;
error adonde no lo sigui6 el Presidente, defendiendo las
facultades y prerogativas del Ejecutivo, tan expuestas a
ser agredidas y menoscabadas por las Legislaturas, los
jueces, 6 el pueblo mismo, que se olvidan que el Ejecutivo
es su propio brazo, y que la guerra civil es una maldicion
para todos, para los que vencen como para los vencidos.
Este punto fijado en los Estados Unidos, esta facultad
usada con honradez y al solo prop6sito sefialado por la
Constitucion, ahorrara muchos dias de vergiienza a los
Estados de la Am6rica del Sur, donde el partido liberal, y
iqui6n lo creyera! el gobierno mismo, extraviados por no-
ciones incompletas, tiende casi siempre a exagerar las
garantias, y a debilitar la, accion del poder mismo, que
esta encargado de salvarlas en principio.
Los asesinos de Lincoln cayeron bajo la cuchilla de un
tribunal military, y el habeas corpus fu6 negado en favor de
una seiiora por el Presidente, que, siendo diputado, pro-
puso al Congreso el bill de reparacion de una injusticia
con Jackson;salvando asi la prerogative del Ejecutivo en
tiempo de guerra.
La tragica muerte de Lincoln, elevandolo a la categoria
de los martires. y colocando uno al frente de la emancipa-
cion, como si, para levantar la parcial maldicion de No6,
hubiese sido necesaria una victim expiatoria, ha adelan-
tado el dominio de la historic y la accion de la posteri-
dad hasta la puerta de su fresca tumba. Lincoln ha com-
pletado a los Estados Unidos como gobierno, sometido a
la prueba del conflict intestino, y sacAdolo ileso; como





VIDA DE LINCOLN


asociacion, ha borrado la tacha que empafiaba sus liber-
tades con la abolicion de la esclavitud; como pueblo lle-
gando al powder por solo el influjo de la palabra, del conven-
cimiento, y trayendo consigo a la Presidencia al pueblo tra-
bajador con Asperas y honradas manos, pero con inteli-
gencia cultivada; mostrando al mundo complete ya la
revolution democrAtica A que march fatalmente, en el
hecho de ser gobernado por el pueblo, para el pueblo, con
el pueblo: bien es verdad que ese pueblo, por la difusion
de la ensefianza, por los raudales de luz que derrama la
prensa, por los debates del jurado, el speech del meeting, el
discurso de la Legislatura, el mensaje y la proclamacion
razonada del Presidente, se llama Franklin, Webster,
Clay, Chase, Grant, Douglas, Jackson, Lincoln, Johnson,
todos del pueblo llano, endrgico, instruido y capaz de ele-
varse con el trabajo, con la paciencia, con el talent, con
el patriotism, como m6viles, hasta altura de los mas gran-
des pr6ceres que honran A la humanidad.
Detras de Washington viene al espiritu invenciblemente
el nombre de Lincoln, el que terminal la obra liberatriz
que el senior arist6crata del Sur no se atrevi6 A acometer;
el que realize sus previsiones de grandeza future, y lanza
6 los Estados Unidos en el mar proceloso de la historic
contemporAnea, como veiamos lanzar ayer al Dunderberg
en las olas del Hudson, la mayor de las simb6licas naves,
encorazada, tripulada por cuarenta millones de marines
que pueden ser pilots, con todas las maquinas 6 invencio-
nes que encierra aun el gigantesco cerebro de la Repdblica;
porque esta gran fuerza intellectual y material la ha acumu-
lado en solo ochenta afios, y la present hoy a las miradas del
mundo, como muestra de su poder creador, y no como
coercion, como ejemplo y modelo, y no como fuerza com-
pulsiva.
Por los Estados Unidos ha quedado probado lo que Lin-
coln, en presencia de las tumbas de los millares de muer-
tos en Gettysburg, ponia como un problema de la historic:
((Si un Estado, concebido en libertad, y consagrado a la
proposition de que todos los hombres han nacido iguales,
podria subsistir.) Este Estado subsiste aun despues de
la guerra, habiendo ensanchado durante ella el circulo de
las libertades humans; mientras que con mano fuerte





OBRAS DE 8ARMIENTO


mantuvo el gobierno, sin dejarse arrastrar por las corrientes
de opinion que a derecha 6 izquier.la querian desviarlo: ya
transando con la rebellion, para que la hidra hiciese renacer
luego la cabeza cortada; ya exagerando las garantias indi-
viduales, en presencia de la question de ser 6 no ser, que
los romanossabian ponerse y resolver con frente serena, y
que la experiencia y soltriedad de la libertad inglesa no
esquiv6, dejando al alcance de la corona el resort que en
tiempos turbados suspended la garantia del recurso al habeas
corpus.
Para la reconstruction de la Union, despues de sofocada
la rebellion, tiene su maxima favorite: ala Union como era.a
Grave riesgo habia en efecto de que la deslealtad de los
Gobiernos del Sur, la exageracion misma de sus interpreta-
ciones de la Constitucion por un lado, y por el otro la ten-
dencia de todo poder triunfante A absorber autoridad, tra-
jesen una modificacion esencial an esta organization fede-
ral, que, salida del acaso, ha dado, sin embargo, un nuevo
mecanismo al gobierno; pudiendo la Repdblica dilatarse,
sin traer, por su propia dilatacion, la necesidad de tendones
de hierro para mover tan ponderosa masa. Roma sucum-
bi6 ante esta dificultad que los Estados Unidos salvaron,
dejando a samnitas y griegos su vida propia, y s6lo conser-
vando la Nacion el poder exterior, y los medios de conser-
varlas formas republicans. En la question de la esclavi-
tud, Lincoln estaba contra los abolicionistas y los duefios
deesclavos. En la reconstruction se tuvo en el terreno de
la tradition constitutional, lo que los curiales entienden
por reponer al estado en que las cosas se encontraban, antes
del caso apelado; y lo sigui6 Johnson, cuando, muerto Lin-
coln, debi6 poner la firm en el decreto de restauracion,
encargAndose, solo por acefalia, de darles una forma repu-
blicana de gobierno.
Alanunciarle su reeleccion, emiti6 un profundo pensa-
miento politico, de cuya ignorancia ha sufrido muchas
veces la Am6rica del Sur. Atribuy6ndolo A un viejo y
experimentado labrador dijo, que nunca era bueno cam-
biar caballos en medio del rio. Su reeleccion era solo,
segun 61, hasta pasar, como la prudencia lo aconseja, el
conflict en que el pais se hallaba envuelto.
La apreciacion de las consecuencias de los acontecimien-





VIDA DB LINCOLN


tos que se han desenvuelto durante la administration
Lincoln, no entran en su biografia. Necesitase, para la con-
templacion de los grandes cuadros hist6ricos, colocarse a
la mayor distancia possible de tiempo, A fin de poder abarcar
el conjunto, y estudiar sus armonias, descubriendo detalles
que completan la escena, 6 bien quitando su relieve exce-
sivo A las figures del primer plano,
Asitambien la vida de Lincoln esta por si sola destinada
A ser de un grande beneficio como ensefianza para los
pueblos. No es la violencia del barbaro, abri6ndose paso con
el mazo que descarga sobre sus semejantes mas d6biles: no
es el demagogo que, A trueque de tomar la delantera, dejara
tras si una brecha irreparable. Es el labrador honrado que
estudia las leyes de su pais, y conociendo los signos de los
tiempos, se propone encabezar al pueblo y lo consigue como
San Bernardo, Cobden, como todos los que con la palabra
han dirigido los impulses generosos del pueblo hacia la li-
bertad, el progress, la igualdad moral. Es la historic poli-
tica de la titAnica guerra civil, sus antecedentes y su fin.
Es, al mismo tiempo, el registro official de los actos guberna-
tivosque la dirigieron y llevaron A buen fin; pero sobro todo
es una escuela de buen Gobierno republican, cuyas leccio-
nes no seran desoidas por los hombres honrados, que anda-
mos, hace afos, con escAndalo y disgusto invencible del
mundo, dAndonos contra las paredes, por no acertar A encon-
trar el camino que habremos de seguir.
La Am6rica del Sur carece de antecedentes de gobierno
en su propia historic colonial, pues que no ha de ir A pe-
dirle luces a Felipe II, 6 Fernando VII, sobre el arte de
gobernar. No nos las daria mejores la Francia, cuyos pu-
blicistas s6lo pueden ser perdonados, como la Magdalena,
por lo much que han amado.
La escuela political de la America del Sur estA en Esta-
dos Unidos como coparticipes de las libertades inglesas,
como creadores de un gobierno libre absolutamente, y
fuertisimo por excepcion, que en la paz ha creado la mas
pr6spera nation de la tierra; y que en la guerra ha desple-
gado recursos, reunido ej6rcitos, inventado armas, y obteni-
do laureles, que abren una nueva pagina en la historic de
la guerra modern, dejando pequefias las antiguas.
La difusion que este libro tuviese serA estimulo 6 r6mora





30 OBRAS DB SARMIENTO

para que otros le sigan, sobre aquellas materials que las
prensas de B61gica, Francia y Espafia no acostumbran
mandar en lTbros a la America del Sur, y proveerian con
facilidad de envio, y en cantidades sin limits, las colosa-
les empresas de libreria de Nueva York y Boston, las mas
perfectas y poderosas en medios de ejecucion, y cuyos pro-
ductos son los mas acabados.
La America del Norte cuenta con veinte y cinco millones
de lectores asiduos. La del Sur con veinte y cinco millones
de series que hablan una lengua. Cuintos saben leer y
cuAntos, sabiendo leer, leerAn?
Acaso si la cifra nos fuese conocida, hallariamos el secret
de la sempiterna guerra, y de la posibilidad de conjurarla.
Nueva York, Agosto 16 de 1865.













INFANCtA Y EDUCATION


Semblanzas notables en la nfinez de los hombres pdblicos de los Estados Unidos.
-Genealogia de Lincoln.-La vida en los bosques.-Su nifiez y juventud.-Lincoln
como lefiador, chalupero, comerciante y militar.-Rasgo caracteristico en su edu-
cacion.-Andecdotas.

Muy notables semejanzas presentan los principles inci-
dentes de los primeros aflos, entire los hombres que mas
decidida influencia han ejercido en los Estados Unidos de
Norte-America. Si los detalles difieren, su historic en gene-
ral es la misma: (dos breves y sencillos anales del pobrex).
Obscuros de nacimiento; avezados A la lucha desde sus mas
tiernos afios; con escasas facilidades para adquirir educa-
cion en la-escuela; probados por todo linaje de dificultades;
ysin embargo, independientes, confiando en su propio es-
fuerzo, hasta que por sus propios pufios, diremos asi, se
han abierto paso a aquellas posiciones para las cuales el
talent y las peculiaridades individuals los trajan prepa-
rados.
Hijos de la naturaleza mas bien que del arte, aun en sus
dtltimos afios, en medio de escenas y asociaciones del todo
diferentes a las que les eran familiares en su infancia y
primera juventud, han conservado en sus actos y en sus
palabras ese resabio natal, 6 sea lo que se llama 6 veces,
el pelo de la dehesa. Mas si no han alcanzado a la gracia
del cortesano, la honradez del hombre ha compensado am-
pliamente aquella falta. Si su lenguaje es rudo, al fin es
franco 6 inequivoco. Tanto el amigo como el enemigo saben
d6nde hallarlos; pues poco ejercitados en las dobleces del
politicastro 6 del intrigante, van derecho hacia el punto
A que su juicio 6 conveniencia los dirige.
Entre esta clase de hombres ocupa un lugar prominent
el gran estadista, cuya vida y servicios pdblicos nos propo-
nemos exponer en las siguientes piginas.





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


Abraham Lincoln, el d6cimosexto Presidente de los Esta-
dos Unidos-cuyo nombre ocuparA en la historic de la hu-
manidad, porhaber abolido la esolavitud y preservado la
Union, un lugar tan prominent como Washington, que
asegur6 la independencia de un continent y consolid6 las
iustituciones libres-naci6 el 12 de Febrero de 1809, en un
extreme del territorio entonces despoblado del Kentucky,
en lo que hoy es conocido con el nombre de La Rue.
Su genealogia no alcanza mas alia de su abuelo del mis-
mo nombre,quien emigrando de Virginia hacia el Kentucky,
tom6 posesion en el pais desierto, todavia frecuentado por
los indios, de una extension de terreno, para labrarse un
hogar, como es la prActida de los pobladores fronterizos de
este pais,no sin grave peligro de ser asesinados por los sal-
vajes; no teniendo vecinos sino A dos 6 tres millas de dis-
tancia de su cabafia, y vidndose forzado A tener siempre
apercibido su fusil, mientras que con el hachadesmontaba
campos de labor. Individuos, y aun families enteras de
aquellas vecindades, habian perecido A manos de los indios,
y no pasaron cuatro afios sin que cupiese la misma suerte A
Abraham, cuyo cadaver escalpado fui encontrado A cuatro
millas de su cabafia, en el campo que estaba desmontando
el dia anterior, y donde lo sorprendieron los salvajes.
Con tan terrible contrast la familiar hubo de separarse
no quedando al lado de la viuda mas que el menor de sus
tres hijos, TomAs Lincoln, quien apenas de doce aflos dej6
tambien la casa paterna; aunque, Ilegado A la edad provec-
ta, volvi6 al Kentucky y se cas6 con Nancy Hantz.- Ambos
carecian de toda cultural, pudiendo leer algo la esposa, y ni
eso el marido, si bien 6ste sabia firmarse en caracteres in-
descifrables; pero uno y otro, como es comun entire los
menos aventajados norte-americanos, sablan apreciar el
valor de la education, y honrar y respetar el superior
saber de otros. En cambio era proverbial la bondad de
corazon de TomAs, quien se mostr6 siempre industrioso y
perseverante. De tres hijos que tuvieron, dos Ilegaron A
la edad adulta; una nifia, que muri6 A poco de casada, y
Abraham, llamado por cariflo en su nifiez Abe, contraccion
del nombre de bautismo: un tierno apodo que pronto se
trasmiti6 al lenguaje popular.
A la'edad de siete afios pudo entrar en una escuela que





VIDA DE LINCOLN


accidentalmente se abri6 por aquellos contornos, y cuyo
maestro podia apenas ensefiar A leer y a escribir; peroha-
biendo hallado el padre comprador de su fundo, trat6 de
cambiar de domicilio antes que el alumno hubiese apren-
do mas que A leer.
La propiedad fu6 vendida en doscientos ochenta pesos, de
los cuales s6lo veinte pesos fueron en plata, y el resto en
whiskey 6 aguardientee; y como el poseedor se propusiese
sacar partido de la mercancia, emprendi6, con el escaso
auxilio que podia prestarle el nifio, construir una lancha
para descender el Rollin Fork, en cuya vecindad estaba
la habitacion, y entrar en el Ohio, para trasladarse por
este rio a Indiana, adonde sus hermanos le habian precedido.
Mal 6xito tuvo, sin embargo, el viaje, habi6ndosele vol-
cado la lancha con p6rdida de la carga, de la cual salvaron
apenas tres barriles; teniendo que dar por recompensa la
embarcacion A los que le ayudaron & salvarlos. Desde alli,
internandose en el pais, y abri6ndose camino por entire las
selvas con el hacha, lleg6, despues de muchos dias de fati-
ga, al condado de Spencer, en la Indiana, donde se proponia
residir, escogiendo para ello un campo convenient; con lo
que, dejando sus efectos al cuidado de una persona que
vivia algunas millas de distancia, volvi6se A pie al Ken-
tucky, A fin de trasladar su familiar.
Pocos dias despues decian adios A su antigua morada
partiendo la sefiora Lincoln y su hija en un caballo, Abe en
otro, y el padre en un tercero. Al fin de una jornada de
siete dias, A trav6s de un pais despoblado, y durmiendo A
cielo raso sobre una frazada tendida en el suelo, llegaron
al lugar escogido para su future residencia, poniendo in-
mediatamente mano A la obra de despejar un sitio para
construir la cabafia. Una hacha fu6 puesta en manos de
Abe, y con el auxilio de un vecino en tres dias hubo Mr.
Lincoln construido lo que se llama un log-house, asegurando
en las esquinas con clavijas de madera,como es la costum-
bre, los palos 6 tozas sobrepuestos hasta la altura conve-
niente para techar; y rellenando luego con barro las rendi-
jas entire unos y otros. Una cama, una mesa y cuatro
asientos salieron luego del mismo taller, y con esto la casa
qued6 amueblada. Tal fu6 la mansion paterna del que
TOMO xxvn.-3





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


mas tarde ocup6 el White House (Casa Blanca) en Was-
hington, y llena hoy el mundo con su nombre. Aunque
durante el siguiente invierno su hacha no estuvo ociosa, el
joven Abraham continue ejercitandose en la lectura, princi-
piando desde tan temprana edad A hacerse notar como buen
tirador, de cuya habilidad di6, muestras, con gran deleite de
los padres, cazando un pavo silvestre que se habia aproxi-
mado A la cabafia. El acertado manejo del rifle era de mu-
cha importancia en aquellas apartadas y solitarias regions
por entonces, puesto que la mayor parte de las provisions
dependian de la caza; y muy mal parada se encontraria la
familiaqueno contase entire sus miembros uno 6 dos que
tirasen perfectamente. Poco mas de un afio despues de
haberse establecido la familiar Lincoln en su nueva residen-
cia muri6 Mrs. Lincoln, dejando en el corazon de los suyos
y en el hogar dom6stico un inmenso vacio. Un joven que
vino a establecerse por aquel tiempo en la vecindad, pro-
porcion6 occasion a Abraham de aprender a escribir, lo que
consigui6 en menos de un afio.
Su padre volvi6 a casarse con una viuda, madre de tres
hijos, y que por la suavidad de su caracter era muy digna
de llenar los deberes de su nueva position. La entrafia-
ble afeccion que se estableci6 luego entire Abe y su ma-
drastra continue sin debilitarse en el curso de la vida de
ambos.
Otrojoven mas adelantado en conocimientos que los pre-
cedentes maestros, vino A establecerse en la vecindad y
abri6 unaescuela,en la que el joven Abraham perfeccion6 su
lectura y escritura, adquiriendo ademas nociones de la arit-
m6tica hasta la regla de tres; dandose con esto por termi-
nada la education que pudo recibir en su infancia. Rete-
nia con facilidad lo que aprendia, y como tenia passion por
el studio, su constant aplicacion le proporcionaba la
distinction del maestro, mientras que los conocimientos ge-
nerales adquiridos por sus lectures, lo hacian muy buscado
como escribiente por los pobladores mas ignorantes siem-
pre que necesitaban poner una carta. Dicese que su ves-
tido era de cuero de gamo curtido, A usanza de los fronteri-
zos de aquel tiempo, y un gorro de coati 6 mapuche.
Durante los cuatro 6 cinco ailos subsiguientes, trabaj6
constantemente en los bosques con su hacha, cortando ar-





VIDA. DE LINCOLN


boles, y rajando lefia para cercos; y durante las noches
leyendo, muchas veces a la vacilante luz del hogar, los
libros que pedia prestado a los habitantes de los alrededo-
res. Entre ellos hubo de obtener un ejemplar de la Vida
de Washington, por Weems, cuya lectura debia ejercer en
su espiritu una influencia parecida A la que se atribuye A
la de las Vidas de Plutarco, sobre la conduct piblica de
otros personajes c6lebres en la historic, que las leyeron
en sus primeros afios. Por algun detrimento accidental
que el libro experiment en sus manos, vi6se, en compen-
sacion del dafio, obligado A cortar forraje por dos dias.
A la edad de diez y ocho afios entrd al servicio de un
vecino, ganando diez pesos al mes, para ir a Nueva Orleans
en una lancha cargada con provisions, que debia vender
en lasplantaciones a orillas del Mississipi cerca de Crescent
City, partiendo para tan lejana y peligrosa expedicion con
un solo compafiero. Por la noche amarraban a la costa
durmiendo sobre cubierta A esperar el dia para continuar
aquel viaje de mil ochocientas millas, que llevaron a
cabo, soportando los consiguientes molestias, sin otro inci-
dente notable que el de ser atacados por una partida de
negros, que fueron obligados a tomar la fuga despues de un
severe conflict; vendiendo por fin la mercancia con buena
ganancia, y regresandose inmediatamente a Indiana. En
1830, Mr. Tomas Lincoln traslad6 su familiar a Illinois, tras-
portando sus utensilios de familiar en carretas tiradas por
bueyes, conduciendo Abe una de ellas. En dos semanas
Ilegaron a Decatur, en el condado de Macon, ubicado hacia
el centro del Estado; y en un dia mas tomaban posesion de
un sitio de diez acres de tierra (cosa de cuatro cuadras)
sobre la ribera norte del Sangamon, que se proponian cul-
tivar, A la distancia de unas diez millas de Decatur. Una
cabafia de palos fu6 inmediatamente erigida, y Abe pro-
cedi6 a preparar la rajas de madera con que debia cercarse
el terreno, pues que como lefiador, labrador y cazador el
joven Abraham Lincoln era tenido por uno de los mas exper-
tos, laboriosos y certeros; y much debi6 ser el sentimiento
de la familiar, cuando el joven adulto anunci6 su resolu-
cion de ir a buscarse la vida por su propia cuenta entire los
extratios.
Contando con que poblaciones mas avanzadas le submi-





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


nistrarian teatro adecuado A sus gustos y disposicion, tras-
lad6se al mas poblado condado de Meynard, donde trabaj6
en calidad de labrador en la vecindad de Petersburgo,
durante el siguiente verano 6 invierno, sin descuidar sus
studios en lectura, escrita, aritm6tica y gramatica.
En la primavera siguiente entr6 en tratos con un tal
Offutt para conducir una lancha A Nueva Orleans, y como
no se encontrase A venta una adecuada, Abraham Lincoln
se encarg6 de construir una que, lanzada en las aguas del
Sangamon, sirvi6 para- el proyectado viaje del Mississipi.
Tan buena cuenta di6 de su comision, despues de termi-
nada felizmente, que el nuevo patron, satisfecho del tacto
y laboriosidad de su dependiente, le confi6 la' direction de
su molino y almacen en la villa de Nueva Salem. En esta
position gan6se el honrado Abes como era ya llamado, el
respeto y confianza de todos aquellos con quienes tenia
negocios; mientras que, entire los habitantes del lugar, su
afabilidad y prontitud para asistir A los desvalidos le atraian
la general simpatia, no habi6ndosele jamas reprochado un
acto desdoroso.
Muy a principios del siguiente afio estall6 la guerra cono-
cida como la guerra del Halcon Negro, por el nombre del jefe
indio que acaudillaba el levantamiento; y habi6ndose pe-
dido tropas voluntarias por el gobernador de Illinois, Abe
determine ofrecer sus servicios, inscribiendo su nombre
entire los primeros en la oficina de reclutamientos que se
abri6 en Nueva Salem. Su influencia indujo A muchos de
sus amigos y compafaeros A seguir su ejemplo; y una com-
pafiia fu6 organizadl con prontitud, y Abe fu6 unAnimemen-
te elegido su capitan. Como la compafiia alistada por. solo
treinta dias, no alcanzase en este tiempo A entrar en servi-
cio activo, se ordeno una nueva leva, en la cual 6ste volvi6
& tomar servicio, continuando con su regimiento hasta que
concluy6 la guerra.
A la edad de veinte afios el joven Abe media seis pies y
cuatro pulgadas de alto, con una constitution delgada, aun-
que extraordinariamente fuerte y muscular, lo que lo hacia
un gigante entire aquella raza de gigantes.
En un discurso posterior Abraham Lincoln aludia asi A
esta campafia, burlindose del empefio de los bi6grafos del
General Cass, en hacer de 61 un h6roe military: ((Por lo





VIDA DE LINCOLN


visto, senior Presidente, decia (dirigi6ndose al que presidia
la reunion), Vd. ignora que yo soy un h6roe military? Si,
senior, alla en los tiempos de la guerra del Halcon Negro, yo
combat, derram6 sangre... y me fui. Al oir hablar de la
carrera del General Cass, me acuerdo de la mia propia. No
me hall en laderrota de Stillman, es verdad; pero estuve
tan cerca como el General Cass, del lugar de la rendicion
de Hull. Cierto que yo no rompi mi espada, (1) por la
sencilla razon que no tenia espada; pero una vez estropi6
malamente mi fusil. Si Cass rompi6 su espada, se entiende
que lo hizo por desesperacion. Mi fusil se quebr6 casual-
mente. Si el General Cass se vi6 forzado a comer moras
silvestres, estoy seguro que yo lo aventaj6 en mis ataques a
las cebollas del campo. Si l61 vi6 indios vivos y combatien-
tes, eso es lo que a mi no me toc6 en suerte; pero yo
tuve muchos y sangrientos encuentros con los mosquitos;
y aunque nunca desfalli a causa de la sangre vertida, con-
fieso en verdad que mas de una vez tuve muchisima
hambre.
En 6poca muy posterior y cuando Abraham Lincoln
habia alcanzado la fama de un grande orador, el Rev. Cu-
llivier obtuvo en conversation privada con 61 algunos
detalles interesantes sobre su education, que tienen en
lugar aqui:
-Deseo conocer much, Mr. Lincoln le habia preguntado
el Rev. Cullivier, c6mo adquiri6 Vd. esa extraordinaria
facultad de precisar todas las cuestiones. Esto debe ser
el resultado de la education. No hay hombre dotado de
tal privilegio. G Cu6l ha sido esta education en Vd.?;
-Pues bien, respondi6, en cuanto a education, los pape-
les pdblicos dicen la verdad; porque no alcanc6 a estar
doce meses en la escuela durante toda mi vida. Mas, como
Vd. observa, esto debe ser el product de alguna forma de
cultural. Eso me preguntaba A mi mismo mientras me
hablaba Vd. S61o puedo decir que, entire las reminiscen-
cias de mi nifiez, me acuerdo de que me enfadaba much


(1) Aludlendo al hecho muy citado entonces en los debates politicos de la he-
roicidad del miliciano General Cass en haber roto su espada, cuando supo que sus
fuerzas estaban incluidas en la capitulaclon del General Hull. Cass era en aquel
tiempo candidate del partido democrAtico para la Presidencia.





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


cuando alguien me hablaba de un modo que no entendia.
No creo que habia cosa que me irritara tanto. Esto me
hacia perder los cascos, y me sucede ahora lo mismo. Re-
cuerdo irme A mi pequefio dormitorio, despues de haber
oido por la tarde una conversation de mi padre con los
vecinos, y pasarme una gran parte de la noche paseando-
me de arriba abajo, y discurriendo sobre el significado
exacto de algunas frases obscuras que habia oido. No podia
dormir, por mas esfuerzos que hiciera, una vez que me
ponia tras una de estas ideas, hasta que daba con ella, y asi
que la encontraba, no me satisfacia con esto, sino que la
repetia una y otra vez; y no quedaba content hasta que
habia expresado en un lenguaje tan claro, que cualquier
muchacho pudiera comprenderla. Esta era una especie de
passion en mi, y siempre la he conservado; pues, aun ahora,
no estoy tranquilo hasta que no he deslindado el pensa-
miento que tengo en la mente por todos sus costados-por el
norte,por el sur, por el este y el oeste. Tal vez esto d6 la
clave de ese rasgo caracteristico de mis discursos, aunque
no habi.t pensado en ello.
-Doy A Vd. las gracias, Mr. Lincoln, por esta revelacion,
contest6le el Reverendo. Este es el hecho mas raro que
jamas haya conocido en material de education. Esto es lo
que se llama genio con todo su poderimpulsivo, inspirador;
dominando eLespiritu del que lo posee; y convertido por
la education en talent, con su uniformidad, su permanencia
y su disciplinada fuerza siempre pronta, siempre disponible,
nunca caprichoso: lo que constitute el mas alto atributo
de la inteligencia humana. Pero permitame preguntarle,
Sha tenido Vd. instruction en material de derecho ? Pre-
par6se Vd. para ejercer su profession?
-i Oh! si. Lei ((tratados de leyes), asi como suena;
esto es, fui escribiente de un abogado de Springfield, y
copiaba fastidiosos legajos, adquiriendo en los ratos des-
ocupados el conocimiento de las leyes que me era possible.
Pero la pregunta de Vd. me trae a la memorial un cierto
m6todo de education que adopt y del cual debo hacer
mencion aqui. En el curso de mis lectures sobre el dere-
cho, constantemente tropezaba con la palabra demostrar
Al principio me parecia entender su significado; pero no
tard6 de apercibirme de mi error. Yo me hacia a mi'mismo.





VIDA DE LINCOLN


esta pregunta: qu6 mas hago cuando demuestro, que cuando
razono, 6 pruebo una cosa ? En qu6 se diferencia la demos-
tracion de toda otra prueba ? Consult sobre este punto el
Diccionario de Webster. Este habla de a(cierta prueba) ;
S(prueba fuera de la posibilidad de duda >; pero no podia
yo formarme una idea de la clase de prueba que era esta.
Creia que muchas cosas eran probadas fuera de toda posi-
bilidad de duda, sin adoptar el extrafio proceder de razonar
sobre una demostracion, tal como yo la entiendo. Consulted
sobre ello todos los diccionarios y libros de referencia que
pude haber A la mano, sin mejor resultado. Era como de-
fiiirle A un ciego el color azul. Al fin dije: ( Lincoln, nunca
llegarAs A ser abogado si no entiendes primero lo que sig-
a nifica la palabra demostrar) ; y en consecuencia dej6 mi
empleo en Springfield, volvi a la casa de mi padre, y per-
maneci alli hasta que pude demostrar cualquiera proposi-
cion de los Seis Libros de Euclides. Entonces comprendi
lo que significa demostrar y volvi mis studios de derecho.
--No pude prescindir, concluye el Rev. Cullivier, de
exclamar admirado de este desarrollo de caracter y genio
combinados: ( Ya no me maravilla, Mr. Lincoln, su buen
6xito, pues que estoy viendo que esto es el legitimo resul-
tado de causes adecuadas. Se lo merece Vd. todo, y algo
mas todavia. Si Vd. me lo permit, desearia hacer del
dominion pdblico estas confidencias. Serian valiosisimas
para excitar A nuestra juventud A emprender aquel pa-
ciente studio, y adquirir aquella cultural clasica y mate-
matica, que la mayor parte de los espiritus require.
Nadie puede hablar bien sin que, ante todo, se haya dado
primero cuenta a si mismo de aquello sobre lo cual se
propone hablar. Euclides bien estudiado libraria al mun-
do de la mitad de sus calamidades, desterrando la mitad
de los disparates que lo alucinan y hacen desgraciado.
Muchas veces he pensado que el libro de Euclides seria el
mejor que podia ponerse en manos del pueblo, como prepa-
racion moral. Este libro mejoraria las costumbres.)
-Pienso lo mismo, dijo Mr. Lincoln ri6ndose; voto por
Euclides.
Como nada es insignificant para caracterizar A un hom-
bre notable, afiadiremos aqui las curiosas observaciones
del president Lincoln, A prop6sito de un baston, recor-





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


dando sus gustos y hAbitos de joven. Una persona que
tenia ingerencia en la prensa de Washington, necesitaba
ver al Presidente una noche, y encontr6 que ya estaba
recogido. Dijosele, sin embargo, que se sentara en la ofi-
cina, y a poco present6se Mr. Lincoln en camisa de dormir,
tentando a risa con sus largos, descarnados y velludos
miembros. Despachado el asunto, mostr6se dispuesto &
conversar; y apoderindose del baston del interlocutor,
empez6 A decir: ( Cuando era yo muchacho siempre lie-
a vaba un baston; era esta mi mania. Preferia uno hecho
del renuevo nudoso del haya, y yo misino les labraba el
a mango. Un baston es cosa muy caracteristica, no le
a parece a Vd.? Ha visto Vd. esas cafias de pescar que
se usan como baston? Pues bien, esa fu6 una antigua
idea mia. Garrotes de palo del Arbol del perro, eran muy
a usados por los muchachos por alli, y supongo que toda-
c via los usan: los de encina son muy pesados, 6 menos
que no se obtengan de un renuevo. ,Se ha fijado Vd. en
la diferencia que hay de Ilevar baston ? Sin baston las
a brujas y las viejas no parecen tales. Meg Merrilies ( un
a personaje de Sir Walter Scott) lo sabia muy bien.













ENTRADA EN LA VIDA POBLICA


Su filiacion en la political. Adopta la profession de Abogado.- Es elegido miem-
bro de la Legislatura.-Su opinion sobre la esclavitud.-Su notable defense del
joven Armstrong.- Es elegido diputado al Congreso Federal.

No bien hubo llegado A la edad adulta, cuando Mr. Lin-
coln decidi6 consagrarse a la carrera del foro; y en comun
con muchos otros j6venes animosos de aquella 6poca y
lugar, se entreg6 A la political, abrazando calurosamente la
causa de Enrique Clay y los principios del partido whig,
que este ilustre orador encabezaba, A la par del clebre
Webster. Y es de notar que hacia su debut politico en un
Estado hasta entonces decididamente opuesto a aquel gran
caudillo; pero recibi6 Lincoln la mas grata prueba de su
popularidad personal, donde mejor conocido era, con el
voto casi unAnime de sus correligionarios politicos en su
propio condado de Sangamon, para servir de representan-
te en la Legislatura; si bien poco despues, en la misma
campaia electoral, el General Jackson, candidate del par-
tido democrAtico, aventaj6 A su competitor Clay por ciento
cincuenta y cinco votos.
Mientras seguia sus studios del derecho, dedic6se A la
agrimensura como medio de ganar con su practice la sub-
sistencia. En 1834, no admitido aun en el foro un ver-
dadero campesino en su traje, maneras y expression, alto,
flaco y nada agradable de aspecto- fu6 por la primera vez
electo representante A la Legislatura de su Estado adop-
tivo, siendo con una sola excepcion el mas joven de sus
miembros.
Durante la session rara vez tom6 la palabra, contentan-
dose con el papel de expectador. Fu6 por entonces que
entr6 en relacion con Estevan Douglas, recientemente
emigrado de Vermont, y en cuyo asocio estaba destinado





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


A figurar de una manera tan conspicua en la political de
su pais.
Reelecto en 1836, dej6 con otro de sus colegas consigna-
das sus opinions con respect de la esclavitud, en la
siguiente protest hecha en Marzo de 1837:
((Habiendo ambas Camaras de la Asamblea General,
durante la present session, sancionado resoluciones sobre
el asunto de la esclavitud dom6stica, los abajo firmados
protestan contra dicha sancion;
( Creen que la esclavitud estA fundada en una injusticia
y una mala political; pero que la proclamacion de doctrinas
abolicionistas tiende mas bien a aumentar que a corregir
el mal;
( Creen que el Congreso de los Estados Unidos no tiene
poder por la Constitucion, para ingerirse en la institution
de la esclavitud en los diversos Estados;
( Screen que el Congreso de los Estados Unidos tiene fa-
cultad para abolir la esclavitud en el Distrito de Columbia;
pero que tal poder no debe ejercerse, sino a peticion del
pueblo de dicho distrito.))
En 1838 y 1840 fuW igualmente electo, recibiendo el voto
de su partido para Presidente de la Sala. Elegido por la
primera vez a los veinte y cinco afios de edad, habiasele
continuado en el mismo destino, mientras se prest6 a ello;
al mismo tiempo que, gracias a sus maneras afables, su
habilidad y su incuestionable integridad, le habian asegu-
rado, a los treinta afios de edad, la'posicion de jefe reco-
nocido de su partido en Illinois. Sus talents como orador
habianse ya desenvuelto, mostrindose l6gico y esforzado
en la discussion. El celo ardiente que despleg6 en pro de
su partido atraia en derredor suyo multitud de amigos, al
mismo tiempo que la reconocida bondad de su corazon le
conquistaba el afecto de otros, que por simples motives de
political no se habrian adherido.
Mientras fue miembro de la Legislatura, continue consa-
grandose a la profession que habia elegido, en cuanto se lo
permitian la necesidad de proveer a su subsistencia, y el
tiempo que le absorbia la political; hasta que en 1836 fu6
admitido a la practica en conformidad del sencillo uso in-
gl6s y norte-americano, que permit, a los que. se consagran
a la carrera del foro, estudiar con un abogado de reputa-





VIDA DE LINCOLN


cion, quien lo present a los jueces, asociandolo A sus tra-
bajos, hasta que reconocida la aptitud del practicante, entra
A abogar de su propia cuenta. Asi no es siempre abogado
el que ba hecho studios en universidades durante su
juventud, sino el que, reconocida y aceptada su capacidad
como orador, complete su carrera con la practice del foro.
En union de otro abogado, Mr. Stuart, Abe Lincoln abri6
su bufete en Sangamon bajo los mas favorables auspicios; y
se hizo notar desde luego como abogado de juri, por la faci-
lidad con que se apercibia del punto fundamental del caso,
y la prontitud para sacar partido de 61. Un cierto tinte
de rareza que a menudo usaba como medio de exposi-
cion, combinado con su s6lido sentido practice, y la preci-
sion con que heria el fondo de la dificultad, imprimian un
caracter original a sus discursos. Desdefiando las argu-
cias del ret6rico, hablaba de hombre a hombre; por lo
cual era universalmente considerado por aquellos con
quienes estaba en contact, como hombre de una pieza, en
el mas lato y recto sentido de la frase. Sus pensamientos,
sus maneras, su modo de expresarse eran suyos propios.
Sin afectar la jerigonza del demagogo, el pueblo tenia con-
fianza en 61, reverenciandolo como a uno de los mejores,
el mejor de todos, puesto que las simpatias del pueblo eran
las suyas, su bien el mayor de sus deseos, y comunes los
intereses.
Recu6rdase una ocurrencia en su practice de abogado,
que merece citarse. Habi6ndose cometido un homicidio en
el condado, se imput6 este crime a un individuo por ape-
llido de Armstrong, hijo de dos ancianos, para quienes
Abraham Lincoln habia trabajado A journal muchos afios
antes. Arrestado 6 interrogado hall6se m6rito para proce-
der contra l1, y pas6 a la carcel a aguardar su juicio. Ape-
nas supo Mr. Lincoln lo ocurrido, dirigi6 una sentida carta
A Mrs. Armstrong, mostrandole el mas vivo interns por su
hijo, y ofreci6ndole defenderlo sin retribution alguna, en
recompensa de la bondad con que lo habian tratado' sus
patrons, cuando afios antes le habian encontrado en ad-
versas circunstancias. El process convenci6 al oficioso
abogado que el joven era victim de una infame cabala, y
determine retardar el juicio hasta que pasase la excita-
cion popular contra su defendido. Al fin lleg6 el dia de





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


juzgar la causa, y el acusador atestigu6 positivamente ha-
ber visto al acusado hundir el pufial en el corazon de su
victim. Record perfectamente todas las circunstancias:
el homicidio habia sido cometido despues de las nueve de
la noche, y la claridad de la luna. Mr. Lincoln hizo una
prolija resefla de todas las declaraciones, y prob6 en segui-
da, de la manera mas concluyente, que la luna que el acu-
sador habia jurado estar a esa hora en todo su brillo, no
habia salido sino una 6 dos horas despues de haber sido
cometido el homicidio. Otras discrepancies quedaron de
manifiesto, y treinta minutes despues de haberse retirado
el juri, di6 un verdict de ( noes culpable. ))
Madre 6 hijo habian estado esperando con congojosa ansie-
dad la sentencia, y apenas hdbose pronunciado la palabra
de absolucion, la madre cay6 desmayada en los brazos del
hijo, que la estrech6 contra su corazon con palabras de
alegria y confianza.
( q D6nde esta Mr. Lincoln ? )) exclam6 el joven, y atrave-
sando en seguida la sala estrech6 la mano de su liberta-
dor, demasiado conmovido para poder hablar.
Sucedia esto A puestas del sol, y hallabanse cerca de una
ventana que daba al dorado horizonte del Oeste.
Aun no se ha entrado el sol, fu6 la respuesta de Mr.
Lincoln, y esti Vd. libre ).
Habiendo fijado permanentemente su residencia en
Springfield, cabecera del condado de Sangamon, a la que
consider siempre como su casa, ejerci6 alli su profession
durante seis aflos, continuando sus studios legales; ha-
biendo contraido matrimonio en 1842 con Mary Todd, se-
flora de maneras cultas y de finos gustos sociales; y aun-
que se habia propuesto retirarse de la arena political, a fin
de gozar mas A sus anchas de las dulzuras de la vida do-
m6stica, desviaronlo de su prop6sito las urgentes instancias
de aquel partido con cuyo triu-nfo 61 creia firmemente inden-
tificados los mas altos intereses de su pais. En 1844 enca-
bez6 en su Estado la campafla electoral en favor de Clay,
pasando en seguida A Indiana, donde pronunci6 diaria-





VIDA DE LINCOLN 45

mente discursos ante reuniones numerosisimas hasta el
dia de la election; y deplorando su derrota, despues de
pasadas las elecciones, mas de lo que su generosa natura-
leza lo hubiera permitido, si solo se tratase de un mero
contrast personal.
Dos aflos despues, en 1846, Mr. Lincoln tuvo que aceptar
un nombramiento del partido whig para Diputado al Con-
greso, por el distrito de Sangamon; y fu6 electo por una
mayoria de que no habia alli precedent. Estaba por aque-
lla 6poca anexada ya Texas; continuibase la guerra de M&-
xico, y habia sido derogada la tarifa de 1842.
A la apertura del Congreso d6cimotercio, en 1847, Mr.
Lincoln tom6 asiento en la Camara de Diputados, apare-
ciendo al mismo tiempo Esteban Douglas, por la primera
vez, como miembro del Senado.














EN EL CONGRESS


Lincoln como orador poliftico.-Se opone a la guerra contra MAxico.-Discurso
important sobre esta cuestion.-Su oposicion conservadora al gobierno.--Toda la
verdad contra u la verdad ,-L6gica de su demostracion.-Anallsis de los diversos
puntos en cuestion.-Lo que es un tratado.-Distincion entire el ejerciclo y el recla-
imo de jurisdiecion.-Verdadera regla para Ia verificaelon de fronteras.-Costo 6
nutilidad de la guerra.-Diflcultades para lograr una paz satisfactoria.


MR. LINCOLN se coloc6, desde su entrada en el Congreso,
en las primeras filas entire los diputados del Oeste. En to-
das las discusiones de entonces se distingui6 como un ora-
dor prominent del partido whig. Persuadido de que la
administration de Mr. Polk habia conducido mal desde su
origen todos los negocios de M6xico, combati6 con la mayor
severidad 6 intrepidez su political interior y exterior; y aun-
que vot6 en favor de todas las medidas para proveer a los
gastos de la guerra, recompensar debidamente el ej6rcito,
etc., protest siempre cohtra la iniquidad de los que la pro-
movieron, deprec6 las fatales consecuencias que habia de
producir-como desgraciadamente se ha verificado mas
tarde-y declin6 aceptar la responsabilidad de ella, para
si A todo su partido, desde un principio hasta el fin de la
lucha.
Haci6ndose el eco de sus colegas del partido whig, pre-
sent6 una series de resoluciones, pidiendo se formase una
comision para investigar los motives que habian dado ori-
gen al rompimiento, exigiendo del ejecutivo todos los da-
tos 6 informes precisos para dar su dictamen. Aunque su
proposition no fu6 aceptada, sostuvo los debates en particu-
lar con gran habilidad. Del mismo modo secund6 la mo-
cion para que se debatiera el abandon de la expedicion,
aunque apoyado solo por una d6bil minbria.
Como esta es una material que interest al lector hispano





VIDA DE LINCOLN


americano, vamos a verter integro su c6lebre y tal vez me-
jor elaborado discurso que pronunci6, con este motivo, en
la session de la Camara de Representantes el 12 de Enero
de 1848; y en el cual quedaron consignados de un modo
irrefragable los deleznables pretextos con que se pretendi6
defender aquella empresa.
( SEfOR PRESIDENTE: Algunos, si no todos los caballeros
del lado opuesto de la Sala, que se han dirigido a la Cnmara
en estos dos iltimos dias, lo han hecho quejandose, si no he
comprendido mal, del voto dado, hace cosa de diez dias, de-
clarando que la guerra de M6xico fu6 comenzada sin nece-
sidad 6 inconstitucionalmente por la administration. Con-
vengo quo tal voto no podia darse por mero espiritu de
parlido, y que seria justamente censurable si no tuviese
otros, 6 mejores fundamentos. Yo fui uno de los que se aso-
ciaron a aquel voto, y procedi en ello conforme a la idea que
tenia de la verdad del caso. Tratar6 ahora de demostrar c6mo
adquiri aquel conocimiento, y de qu6 manera es possible com-
batirlo. Cuando principi6 la guerra era de opinion que los que
por saber muy poco 6 por saber demasiado, no aprobaban en
conciencia (al principio de la guerra) la conduct del Presi-
dente, debian, sin embargo, como buenos ciudadanos guar-
dar silencio sobre aquel punto al menos hasta que la guerra
concluyese. Muchos jefes democraticos, incluyendo al ex
President Van Buren, habian mirado el asunto bajo el mis-
mo punto de vista, como los oi expresarse y yo me adheri a 61,
y obr6 en conformidad, desde que tom6 asiento en esta Sala.
Y creo que aun continuaria en este prop6sito, si no fuera que
el President y sus amigos no lo quieren. Ademas de los
continues esfuerzos del Presidente para hacer pasdr los
subsidies votados en silencio para el ej6rcito, como una
aprobacion de lajusticia y sabiduria de su conduct; ademas
de aquel paragrafo singularmente candido de su mensaje
filtimo, en que nos dice que el Congireso, declare con grande
unanimidad (disintiendo s6lo dos miembros en el Senado, y
catorce en la Sala de Representantes), ((que en virtud de la
accion misma del gobierno mejicano un estado de guerra
( existia entire este Gobierno y los Estados Unidos;)> y esto
cuando el mismo diario de las sesiones del cual sacaba esta
notici~, le estaba informado tambien, que cuando aquella
declaracion se present, desligada de la question de los





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


subsidies, sesenta y siete en la Sala, y no meramente catorce,
votaron contra ella. Esta manifiesta tentative para probar
con la verdad, lo que no podia probar diciendo toda la verdad,
pone en el caso de hablar a los que no quieren ver que se
les impute una injusticia. A mas de todo esto, uno de mis
colegas, muy al principio de la session, present una seriede
resoluciones expresamente para endosar A s6lo el Presidente
la justicia de la guerra en su principio. Cuando estas
resoluciones sean puestas en discussion, yo me ver6 obligado
a votar; pues que entonces no podr6 guardar silencio, aunque
quisiera. En vista de eso, me estoy preparando A dar mi voto
con conocimiento de causa, cuando llegue el caso. He
examinado atentamente los mensajes del Presidente, para
averiguar lo que l61 mismo ha dicho y probado sobre este
particular. El resultado de este examen ha sido que, dando
por cierto todo lo que el Presidente establece como hechos,
esta muylejos de servirle dejustificacion; y que el Presidente
habria ido adelante con sus pruebas, si no hubiese sido por
la friolera de que la verdad no se lo permitia. Bajo esta
impression fu6 que di el voto mencionado. Prop6ngome
ahora mostrar concisamente el resultado del examen que
hice, y c6mo arrib6 A mi conviction actual. En su primer
mensaje de Mayo de 1846, declara el Presidente que el
campo sobre el cual M6xico inici5 las hostilidades era nuestro;
y repite aquella declaracion, casi con las mismas palabras
en cada mensaje annual sucesivo, mostrando cuan esencial
consider aquel punto. En la importancia de aquel punto
esto y perfectamentede acuerdo con el Presidente. A mi juicio
este es el punto exact sobre el cual deberia ser condenado 6
absuelto. Parece que en el mensaje de 1846 se le ocurri6,
como es la verdad, que titulo, propiedad del territorio, 6
cosa parecida, no es un hecho simple, sino la conclusion
que emana de uno 6 mas hechos simples; y que a 61 tocaba
presentar los hechos por donde deducia que era nuestro e
suelo, donde la primera sangre de la guerra fuW derramada.
( Segun esto, un poco mas abajo de la mitad de la pAgina
12, en el mensaje A que me he referido uiltimamente, pone
mano A la obra, entablando una controversial, y presentando
pruebas que van hasta un poco mas abajo de la mitad de la
pAgina 14. Ahora, yo voy a tratar de demostrar que todo ello
(el asunto en question y las pruebas) no es desde la cruz A





VIDA DE LINCOLN 49

la fecha mas que una transparent deception. El punto
en question, como 61 lo present, esta concebido en estas
palabras: ( Pero quedan los que, concediendo que todo esto
sea verdad, sostienen que el verdadero limited de Texas es el
Rio de las Nueces en lugar del Rio Grande, y por tanto, que
pasando nuestro ej6rcito A la orilla oriental del dltimo de
aquellos rios, traspasamos la linea de Texas 6 invadimos el
territorio de M6xico. ) Ahora, esta es una proposition 6
articulo de dos afirmativas, sin ninguna negative. La
principal decepeton est& en que da por una verdad que uno
6 el otro rio es necesariamente el limited, y aleja el espiritu
del hombre superficial la idea de que posiblemente 6ste se
encuentre en un punto entire los dos, y no precisamente en
uno 6 en otro. Una mayor decepcion consist en presentar
como prueba lo que esta excluido del punto en litigio. La de-
manda biea entablada por el Presidente debia ser poco mas
6 menos asi: Yo digo que era nuestro el terreno sobre el cual
se derram6 la primera sangre. Hay otros que dicen que no.
((Ahora procedo A examiner las pruebas del Presidente
aplicables A tal punto. Cuando se analizan aquellas pruebas
quedan reducidas A las siguientas proposiciones:
10 Que el Rio Grande era el limited de la Luisiana, tal
como la compramos a la Francia en 1803.
20 Que la Repiiblica de Texas siempre reclamd el Rio
Colorado como limited occidental.
30 Que por various actos lo habia reclamado en el papel.
40 Que Santa Ana en su tratado reconoci6 como limited
el Rio Grande.
50 Que Texas antes, y los Estados Unidos despues, habian
ejercido jurisdiction mas alld del Nueces, entire los dos rios.
60 Que nuestro Congreso comprendi6 que el limited de
Texas se extendia mas alli del Nueces.
((A cada uno le llegara su turno. Su primera proposition
se reduce A que el Rio Grande fu6 el limited occidental de
Luisiana, tal cual la compramos de la Francia en 1803; y
temiendo aparentemente que se lo pongan en duda, emplea
casi una pagina en probar que es cierto; y acaba con decirnos
que, por el tratado de 1819, nosotros vendimos A la Espafia
todo el territorio desde el Rio Grande al Este del Sabirio.
Ahora, admitiendo que el Rio Grande fuese el limited de la
ToMO xxvII.-4





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


Luisiana, 6qu6 tiene que ver esto, por el amor de Dios, con
el present limited entire nosotros y M6xico? C6mo, sefior Presi-
dente, la linea que otra vez dividi6 su tierra de la mia, puede
ser aun el limited entire nosotros, despues que yo le he vendido
mi tierra a V. E., es lo que A mi no me entra. Y c6mo un
hombre quA s6lotenga el objeto de probar honradamente la
verdad, haya pensado jamas introducir hecho semejante, es
para mi igualmente incomprensible. El ultraje inferido al
derecho de tomar como nuestro, lo que una vez hubimos
vendido, meramente porque fud nuestro antes de venderlo,
es s6lo igualado por el ultraje que se hace al sentido comun al
intentar justificar aquel. La segunda prueba del Presidente
es que laRepdblica de Texas siempre reclamd este rio (el Rio
Grande) como su limited occidental Este hecho no es cierto
Texas lo ha reclamado, pero no siempre. Hay al menos una
exception distinguiente. Su constitution de Estado, el mas
solemne y el mas venerado acto pdiblico, aquel que sin
impropiedad puede llamarse su iltima voluntad y testa-
mento, revocando todas las otras, no hace tal reclamo. Pero
demos de barato, que lo hubiese reclamado siempre.
ZM6xico no ha reclamado siempre lo contrario? De manera
que no habr& mas que reclamo contra reclamo, no dejando
probado nada, hasta que no volvamos atrAs de los reclamos,
y hallemos quien tiene mejores fundamentos.
((Considerar6 ahora, aunque no sea en el orden que pre-
senta sus pruebas el Presidente, aquella clase de aserciones
que en substancia se reduce A nada mas que A demostrar
que Texas por various actos de su Convencion y Congreso
reclam6 como limited el Rio Grande, en el papel. Entiendo por
esto, lo que l1 habla sobre fijar como limited el Rio Grande en
su constitution (no su constitution de Estado), sobre former
distritos congresales, condados, etc. Ahora todo este es un
puro reclamo; y lo que ya Ilevo dicho sobre reclamos, es
aplicable a esto. Cuando yo reclamo vuestra tierra, nada
mas que de boca, esto seguramente no la hbce mia; y si fuera
A reclamarla por una escritura que yo mismo me hubiese-
hecho, y con lo cual vos no teneis nada que hacer, el reclamo
seria enteramente el mismo en substancia, 6 mas bien una
nulidad.
((Viene ahora la asercion del Presidente, de que Santa
Ana, en su tratado con Texas, reconoci6 el Rio Grande





"VIDA DE LINCOLN


como el limited occidental de este Estado. Ademas de esta
proposition tantas veces asumida, de que Santa Ana, siendo
prisionero de guerra, esto es, cautivo, no podia obligar A
M6xico por un tratado, lo que me parece concluyente; pero
A mas de esto, quiero decir algo con relacion a este tra-
tado con Santa Ana, como lo llama el Presidente. Si al-
guno quiere divertirse con aquella cosita, que el Presidente
ha designado por tamaho nombre, no tiene mas que hojear
el Registro de Niles, volume 50, pagina 386. Y si alguno
supusiera que el tal Registro de Niles es un repertorio
tan curioso de documents de tanto calibre como un so-
lemne tratado entire naciones, yo solo puedo decir, que lo
averigtii con cierto grado de certeza en el Departamento
de Estado, que el Presidente mismo no lo ha visto en
ninguna otra parte.
<(De paso dir6 que no tendria miedo de errar, si decla-
rase que, durante los primeros diez afios de la existencia
de aquel document, A nadie le ocurri6 llarnarle un THA-
TADO, que nunca fu6 Ilamado tal, hasta que el Presidente,
in extremis, intent llamarlo asi para sacar algo de l61 en
favor de su political con respect A la guerra de M6xico.
Carece de todos los caracteres distintivos de un tratado.
Ni so design siquiera con el nombre de tratado. Santa
Ana no pretend por este acto obligar a M6xico; 61 supo-
ne obrar solamente como Presidente de la Repdblica y
Comandante en Jefe del Ej6rcito y Marina mexicanos; es-
tipula que cesaran por entonces las actuales hostilidades,
y que por lo que d dl hace, no tomarA las armas, ni ejer-
cerA influencia sobre el pueblo mexicano para que tome
las armas contra Texas, durante la guerra de indepen-
dencia. No reconoce la independencia de 6sta; no pre-
sume poner t6rmino A la guerra, sino que claramente
indica su opinion de que continuara; no dice una palabra
acerca de limits, y lo mas probable es que no le pas6
por las mientes tal cosa. Se estipulaalli mismo que las
fuerzas mexicanas pasardn al otro lado del Rio Colorado; y en
otro articulo, conviene en que, para evitar colisiones en-
tre los dos ej6rcitos, el de Texas no se aproximara A mas
de cinco leguas-no se dice de qud-pero probablemente
del objeto sefialado, esto es, del Rio Grande. Ahora si es
un tratado el que reconoce el Rio Grande, como limiLe





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


de Texas, contiene la singular estipulacion de que Texas no
se acercar& cinco leguas de su propia line divisoria.
(Viene ahora la prueba de que Texas antes de la anexion,
y los Estados Unidos despues, ejercieron jurisdiccion mas
alld del Nueces, y entire los dos rios. Este ejercicio positive
de jurisdiccion es cabalmente la clase 6 calidad de prueba
que necesitAbamos. Nos dice que lleg6 mas alld del Nueces,
pero no nos dice que se extendiese hasta el Rio Grande. Nos
dice que se ejerci6 jurisdiccion entire los dos rios, pero no nos
dice que fu6 ejercida sobre todo el territorio intermediario.
Hay gentes cAndidas que creen possible pasar un rio, 6 ir un
poco mas adelante, sin atravesar todo lo que falta para llegar
al siguiente; que puede ejercerse jurisdiccion entire dos rios,
sin cubrir todoel pais que media entire ellos. Conozco un
hombre, que se me pareceun poco, que ejerce dominion sobre
un pedazo de tierra entire el Wabash y el Mississipi; y tan lejos
esta'de que este caso sea todo el terreno entire los dos rios,
que su sitio mide apenas 152 pies de largo, por 50 de ancho,
y en ninguna parte se acerca, ni con much, A 100 millas
de uno di otro rio. Tiene un vecino entire 61 y el Mississipi
(como si dij6ramos A trav6s de la calle, y de aquel lado),
al cual estoy seguro, no podria persuadir ni obligar A que
le cediera su casa; no obstante que podria muy bien ane-
xarla, si la cosa pudiera hacerse, con s6lo estarse del
otro lado de la calle, y reclamarla; 6 aun sentandose, y
extendi6ndose A si mismo una escritura en que constara
su posesion.
((Pero A renglon seguido, el Presidente nos dice que el
Congress de los Estados Unidos entendid que el Estado
de Texas, que admitian en la Union, se extendia mas alld
del Rio Nueces. Bien; supongo que asi lo entendi6 (que
lo que es yo asi lo entendi), Lpero d6nde es ese mas allA?
Que el Congreso no comprendi6 que se extendia tan clara-
mente hasta el Rio Grande queda de manifesto, por el
hecho de que en su declaratoria colectiva para admitir
A Texas en la Union, se deja la question de limits para
arreglarse mas tarde. Y puede afiadirse que la mejor prueba
de que Texas mismo le ha dado una tal interpretation, es
que ha tratado de conformar exactamente su constitution A
esas resoluciones del Congreso.
((Ya he revisado todas las razones aducidas por el Presi-





VIDA DE LINCOLN


dente; y es un hecho muy singular que, si se observa
por alguien que aquel mand6 al ej6rcito invadiese el
corazon del pueblo mexicano, que nunca se habia some-
tido ni de grado ni por fuerza A la autoridad de Texas,
ni de los Estados Unidos, y alli y a causa deello, se derram6
la primera sangre de la guerra, no se encuentra una
sola palabra en todo lo que el Presidente ha dicho, que
admita ni niegue una declaracion semejante. En esta
extrafia omision consiste la decepcion de la prueba del
President; omision, A mi parecer, que s6lo a designio
puede haber ocurrido. Mi modo de ganar la vida me
hace andar por los tribunales de justicia; y muchas veces
he visto en ellos A un buen abogado, que, en sus esfuerzos
para salvar el pescuezo de su defendido, emplea todo
linaje de artificios para rodear, escamotar y confundir con
muchas palabras una proposition, con que la parte acusa-
dora lo tiene cercado, y que 61 no se atreve A admitir,
pero que no puede negar tampoco. Estratagemas de par-
tido contribuirian a hacerlo recurrir A estos medios; pero
concediendo todo lo possible A tales propensiones, aun asi
me parece que, por una necesidad muy parecida, los es-
fuerzos del Presidente vienen A ser precisamente iguales a
los del dicho abogado.
((Algun tiempo despues de haber introducido mi colega
(Mr. Richardson) las resoluciones de que he hecho mencion,
yo present un preambulo, una resolution 6 interrogatorio,
calculados para traer al Presidente, si la cosa es possible, a este
terreno aun no'explorado. Para demostrar su pertinencia,
me propongo hacer ver c6mo entiendo la verdadera regla
de verificar los limits entire M6xico y Texas. Esta se reduce
A que,donde quiera que Texas estaba ejerciendo juriddiccion, eso
era suyo; donde M6xico la ejercia, era igualmente suyo; y
que todo lo que limitase al actual ejercicio de juris-
diccion de una respect de la otra, ese es el verdadero
limited entire ambos. Si, como es probablemente cierto,
Texas estaba ejerciendo jurisdiccion desde la ribera occi -
dental del Nueces, y M6xico la estaba ejerciendo desde
la ribera oriental del Rio Colorado, errtonces ni uno ni
otro rio era el limited, sino que lo era el pais despoblado
entire ambos.
((La extension de nuestro territorio en aquella region de-





54 OBRAS DR SARMIENTO

pendia, no de un limited fijado por tratados (porque ningdn tra-
tado lo habia intentado), sino de la revolution. Todo pueblo
cualquiera que se sienta dispuesto y tenga el poder para
ser independiente, posee el derecho de levantarse, y de expul-
sar al gobierno existente, y darse otro nuevo que mas le
convenga. Este es un valiosisimo, sacratisimo derecho,
un derecho que, lo creemos y esperamos, dara la liber-
tad al mundo entero. Ni este derecho esta limitado al
caso en que todo un pueblo de una nacion quiera ejer-
cerlo. Cualquiera parte de una nacion, que asi lo quiera,
puede revolucionarse, y dominar como suyo propio todo el
territorio que habitat. Mas que eso, una mayoria de un
pueblo puede revolucionar, echando abajo una minoria,
entremezclada con 61, 6 situada cerca de 61, que quiera
oponerse A sus movimientos. Tal minoria fu6 precisamente
el caso de los Tories de nuestra propia Revolucion. Entra
en el caracter de las revoluciones no ir por los caminos tri-
llados, ni seguir las leyes co'nocidas; sino romper con dstas,
y crearse otras nuevas.
(En cuanto al pais ahora en question, nosotros lo com-
pramos de la Francia en 1803, y lo vendimos A la Espania en
1819, segun lo asegura el Presidente. Despues de esto, todo
M6xico, incluso Texas, se revolucion6 contra Espafia; y toda-
via mas tarde, Texas se levant6 contra M6xico. Segun mi
manera de ver, el limited A que Texas extendi6 su revolution,
haci6ndola aceptar del pueblo por grado 6 por fuerza, hasta
alli el pais es suyo,-y no mas adelante.
((Ahora, seflores, A fin de obtener la prueba mas convin-
cente sobre si Texas habia extendido la revolution hasta el
lugar donde se rompieron las hostilidades de esta campa-
hfa, que contest el Presidente A los interrogatories que
yo propuse, como antes lo he dicho, 6 A otros por el estilo.
Que respond plena, franca y veridicamente. Que respond
con hechos y no con arguments. Que recuerde que estA
sentado donde Washington se sent; y recordindolo, res-
ponda como Washington responderia. Asi como una na-
cion no toleraria, ni Dios permitiria, que fuese engafiada, que
tampoco pretend darnos una evasion 6 ambigiledad por
toda respuesta. Y si al contestar, puede probarnos que
aquel territorio era nuestro, cuando se derram6 la primera
sangre de la guerra; que no fu6 dentro de un pais habitado,





VIDA DE LINCOLN


6 siendo asi, que sus habitantes le hubiesen puesto bajo la
jurisdiction de Texas, 6 de los Estados Unidos; y que otro
tanto sucediera con el terreno en que esta situado el fuerte
Brown; y si nos prueba todo esto, entonces me tendra A
su lado en su defense. En ese caso, me considerar6 feliz
en retractar el voto que di el otro dia. Un m6vil egoista
me anima para desear que el Presidente obre en este sen-
tido. Espero dar algunos votos en varias cuestiones liga-
das con la guerra, que sin esto parecerian poco propios,
segun mi modo de ver; mas que estarian fuera de, toda
duda con aquel antecedente. Pero si 61 no puede 6 no quiere
hacer esto, si por algun motivo, 6 sin motivo alguno, lo
rehusase d omitiese, entonces yo quedaria plenamente con-
vencido de lo que ya mas que sospechaba: que 61 esta
igualmente convencido que no hay justicia, que siente que
la sangre de esta guerra, como la sangre de Abel, esta cla-
mando al cielo contra 6l. Que 61 orden6 al General Taylor
acometiese contra un pueblo de pacificos mexicanos, con el
prop6sito deliberado de traer una guerra; y que teniendo
en su principio algun fuerte motivo (sobre el cual no me
detendr6 a dar mi opinion aqui), para envolver los dos paises
en una guerra; y contando con que sus actos no serian
examinados, si lograba distraer la atencion del pdblico con
la deslumbradora gloria militar-aquel iris encantador
formado por las lluvias de sangre-aquel ojo de serpiente,
que fascina para destruir-hundi6 al pais en ella, y lo ha
arrastrado adelante, adelante, hasta que, frustrado en su
calculo de la facilidad con que M6xico seria subyugado, 61
mismo no sabe ahora en qu6 berenjenal se ha metido.
(qCuAn parecida es toda la parte del mensaje consagrada A
la guerra al delirio de un enfermo medio loco con lafiebrel A.
vecesnos dice que nada posee M6xico digno de retenerse, sino
son sus tierras: en otras nos muestra c6mo podemos soste-
ner la guerra, imponiendo contribuciones A M6xico. Unas
veces invoca el honor national, otras la seguridad del
porvenir, el evitar una intervention extranjera, y aidn el
bien de M6xico mismo, como uno de tantos objetos de la
guerra. Otra vez nos dice, que rechazar una indemniza-
cion en la forma de cesion de una parte de su territorio
seria abandonar todas nuestras justas demands, 6 hacer
la guerra con todos sus costs, sin un plan, ni objeto definido.n





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


Asi, pues, el honor national, la seguridad del porvenir,
y todo lo que no fuese indemnizacion territorial, puede
tenerse como plan ninguno, ni definido objeto de la guerra.
Pero estando convenido ahora de que su ainico fin es
arreglar aquella indemnizacion territorial, se apresura A
pedirnos que nos apoderemos legalmente de todo aquel
terreno con que se daba por content, no hace muchos
meses, y de toda la Provincia de California, por afiadidura:
y que sigamos todavia la guerra para tomar todo aquello
por que estamos ahora peleando, y continuar peleando
todavia. Asi, el Presidente esta siempre resuelto en todo
caso A obtener plena indemnizacion por los gastos de la
guerra; pero se ha olvidado decirnos de d6nde vamos a
recuperarnos del exceso, cuando los gastos hayan sobrepa-
sado al valor de todo el territorio mexicano. Y mientras
insisted en que la existencia separada de M6xico sera respe-
tada, no nos dice cdmo se hara esto despues que hayamos
tornado todo su territorio. Por temor de que se crea que
la proposition aqui indicada s6lo pueda mirarse bajo un
punto de vista imaginario, permitaseme por un moment
probar que no lo es.
(La guerra ha durado ya como veinte meses, por cuyas
expenses, junto con un antiguo pico, el Presidente exige la
mitad del territorio de M6xico, y eso la mtejor mitad (Cali-
fornia), por lo que hace A poder sacar partido alguno de ella.
Esta casi despoblada, de manera que podremos abrir ofici-
nas para la venta de tierras pdblicas, y por este medio
aprovechar alguna cosa. Pero la otra parte, segun lo
entiendo, esta mas poblada, atendida la naturaleza del pais;
y todos los terrenos dignos de poseerse, son ya de propie-
dad particular. I C6mo, pues, vamos A sacar partido de estas
tierras con los gravAmenes que reconocen? 16 c6mo re-
mover estas cargas? Supongo que nadie pretenders
que vamos A acabar con sus pobladores, 6 arrojar-
los fuera de su patria, 6 esclavizarlos, 6 confiscar su
propiedad. 4 Qu6 provecho, entonces, vamos a sacar
de esta parte del territorio? Si ya los gastos de la guerra
han igualado A la mejor mitad de su territorio, verAse que





VIDA DE LINCOLN


no es puramente especulativa sino una question prdctica la
que se nos viene encima; la de saber: 1 cuanto tiempo
tardarA la guerra en igualar con sus costs al valor de la
mitad menos valiosa? Sin embargo, question es esta de que
parece no haberse ocupado nunca el Presidente.
(dgualmente vago 6 indefinido es el pensamiento del Pre-
sidente, en cuanto A los medios de terminar la guerra y
asegurar la paz. Lo primero trata de conseguirse, llevando
vigorosamente la guerra A la parte mas vital del pais ene-
migo; y despues -como si, cansado de tanto esfuerzo, se
hablase A si mismo-baja el Presidente el tono hasta pare-
cer desalentado, y nos dice: que con un pueblo perturbado
y dividido por facciones en pugna entire si, y un gobierno
sujeto A cambios continues, por revoluciones sucesivas, el
continuado buea dxito de nuestras armas puede aun no ser bastante
para obteneruna paz satisfactoria. En seguida sugiere la idea
de engaitar al pueblo mexicano, para que desoyendo los
consejos de sus propios jefes, y confiando en nuestra pro-
teccion, forme un gobierno con el cual podamos arreglar
una paz satisfactoria: afiadiendo, que este puede venir d ser el
ftnico medio de obtener aquella paz. Pero luego le sobrevienen
dudas sobre esto tambien, y retrocede a la mitad del ca-
mino, abandonando ya la idea de proseguir con vigor la
guerra. Todo esto demuestra que el Presidente en manera
alguna estA content con las posiciones adoptadas. Toma
primero una, y cuando intent argdiirnos desde ella, 61
mismo se sale fuera. Entonces toma otra, y le sucede lo
mismo; y en seguida, confuso de no encontrar algo nuevo
que decir, hecha garra otra vez a la vieja argumentacion
que habia desechado. Apurado su espiritu mas allA de lo
que permiten sus fuerzas, corriendo de aqui aculla, como
si caminara sobre ascuas, no halla lugar que le content
para sentarse A descansar.
Tambien es una singular omision en este mensaje, la de
no indicar cudndo el Presidente espera ver el t6rmino de
la guerra. Al principio de ella, el General Scott Tncurri6
en el desagrado, si no en desgracia, de este mismo Presi.
dente, por haber intimado no mas que la paz no podia ob





58 OBRAS DR SARMIENTO

tenerse en menos de cuatro meses. Al fin de cerca de
veinte meses, durante los cuales nos han dado nuestras
armas las mas espl6ndidas victorias, habiendo contribuido
cada departamento, en todas parties, por tierra como por
agua, sus oficiales y soldados, las tropas de linea y los vo-
luntarios con todo lo que hombres podian hacer, y cientos
de cosas que hasta ahora se habia creido que no podian
hacerse; despues de todo esto, ese mismo Presidente nos
dirige un largo mensaje, sin mostrarnos que, por lo que
hace al fin, se tenga 61 formada ni la mas remota idea.
Como lo he dicho antes, 61 mismo no sabe d6nde esti. En-
cu6ntrase desorientado, confundido, y miserablemente per-
plejo. Dios le conceda que pueda mostrarnos un dia que
no hay algo en su conciencia, que sea mas penoso que todas
esas perplejidades mentales.))














EN EL CONGRESS


Efecto desastroso de la polltica anexionista.-Opinion de Lincoln sobre esclavi-
tud y tierras ptiblicas.-Retiro a la vida prIvada.-Su reentrada a la arena political.
-Candidato para Senador y Gobernador.-Su abnegaclon.-Lucha electoral con
Douglas.-Gran importancia y significado de esta contienda.--Su primer discurso
en ella.-El Goblerno no puede existir mitad libre y mitad esclavo.-La gran
cuestlon del dia netamente declarada.-La ley Nebraska y la decision de Dred Scott.
-La Constitucion de Lecompton.-Denuncia la conspiracion para extender la es *
clavitud.-Perro vivo es mejor que leon muerto.-Extrafio ardor y entusiasmo de
la lucha.-Tributo d la Acta de Independencia.-Descripclon, hdbitos y cualidades
de Mr. Lincoln.-Resultado de la lucha.

Aunque los esfuerzos de Mr. Lincoln, para contener la
inicua invasion de Mexico, no anduvieron felices, ellos for-
marin una brillante pAgina de su vida pdblica; tanto mas
que los acontecimientos sucesivos han venido desgraciada-
mente a confirmar muchos de sus pron6sticos. Entre otros
efectos producidos por esta desastrosa political del partido
democratic de entonces, podiamos notar la gran prepon-
derancia adquirida por el partido esclavista con la adqui-
sicion de Texas; preponderancia que se ha dejado sentir
con mas 6 menos fuerza durante todas las administraciones
posteriores, hasta traer el fatal conflict de intereses, que
acaba de decidirse con las armas, a costa de torrentes de
sangre y de dinero. Lo que la Repdblica ganara en exten-
sion lo perdi6 en unidad; si6ndole precise reatar esos
vinculos por medio de una lucha, que ha asombrado. al
niundo, y dado, entire tantas otras victims, la del ilustre
magistrado, cuya memorial escribimos, y quien vino A co-
ronar con su martirio la gran obra de la Union.
Mucho interns tom6 Mr. Lincoln en todas las cuestiones
de mejoras internal que tanto agitaban a los partidos de
aquel tiempo. Sostuvo con energia el ilimitado derecho de
petition, y abog6 en favor de una political liberal hacia el





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


pueblo en el repartimiento y venta de las tierras pdblicas.
En la campafia electoral de 1848, trabaj6 por asegurar la
election de Mr. Taylor, pronunciando eficaces discursos en
la Nueva Inglaterra y en el Oeste.
En el segundo afio de aquel Congreso (el 13 de la 'nion),
se propuso la question de abolir el trafico de esclavos en
el Distrito de Colombia; y aunque Mr. Lincoln no vot6 en
favor de la media, present el proyecto de otra mas com-
prensiva y direct. En este proyecto de ley se disponia
que en adelante ninguna persona, que A la fecha no se
hallase en el Distrito, pudiese ser tenido por esclavo dentro
de los limits de Colombia; y ordenaba la emancipacion
gradual de los esclavos existentes, dando una compensa-
cion A los amos, si una mayoria de los votantes legales del
distrito asentia en ello por una election que al efecto se
celebraria. Salvabase, empero, el derecho de los ciudada-
nos de los Estados con esclavos, que viniesen al Distrito
por asuntos pdblicos, y mientras ellos y sus families resi-
diesen en 1.
Con respect A conceder porciones de los terrenos pdbli-
cos A los nuevos Estados, para ayudarles en la construction
de ferro-carriles y canales, 6l favoreci6 los intereses de sus
propios constituyentes, con aquellas restriccion.es que el caso
requeria.
No habiendo aceptado la indication que se le hizo de ser
reelecto, retir6se nuevamente A la vida privada, volviendo
A ejercer su profession, que habia abandonado A causa de
sus deberes pdblicos; no habiendo tornado parte active en
la political durante la administration del General Taylor,
ni en ninguna de las animadas escenas de 1850.
Sac6le de su reposo la introduction del bill denominado
de Kansas-Nebraska. presentado por Estevan Douglas en
1854, el cual vino A despertar su energia para luchar de
nuevo en favor del derecho oprimido. En la campafla elec-
toral de aquel afio, fu6 uno de los mas activos caudillos
del movimiento anti-Nebraska, como fu6 llamado, dirigien-
do frecuentemente la. palabra al pueblo en los lugares pd-
blicos con aquel ardor y empefio que le eran propios; y
con lo cual ayud6 poderosamente a producer los notables
cambios politicos que en ese aflo ocurrieron en el Illinois.
Debia por entonces la Legislatura nombrar un Senador





VIDA DE LINCOLN


de los Estados Unidos, y como por la primera vez en la
historic de aquel Estado se hiciese possible la election de
un candidate opuesto al partido democratic, Lincoln, no
obstante estar designado por la opinion para aquel destino,
prefiri6, con aquella abnegacion que le era peculiar, tra-
bajar en favor de Mr. Trumbull, hombre de antecedentes
democraticos; y que por tanto podia mas bien -recibir el
voto de los dem6cratas opositores al Gobierno, y reunirlos
A los de los whigs, con 10 que Trumbull result electo.
Ofreci6ronle igualmente nombrarlo Gobernador del Illinois,
pero renunci6 en favor de Bissel, que fu6 elegido por unk
gran mayoria.
A la formacion del partido republican como tal, Mr.
Lincoln cooper active y eficazmente, habi6ndose presen-
tado su nombre, aunque sin efecto, para Vice-Presidente
de la Convencion Nacional de aquel partido. Proclamado
por 6sta, como candidate, el Coronel Fremont, se dedic6
ardorosamente A promover su election, figurando su nom-
bre a la cabeza de la lista de electores generals.
Habi6ndose pronunciado el Senador Douglas contra la
administration de Mr. Buchanan, en lo relative A la Cons
titucion de Kansas, llamada tambien de Lecompton, que
permitia la introduction de la esclavitud en aquel nuevo
Estado, apoyado en esto por el partido democrAtico del
Illinois; y como su reeleccion dependiese del resultado de
la election local de 1858, la Convencion Republicana re-
solvi6 unAnimemente, en medio de los mas vivos aplausos,
que Abraham Lincoln era ( la primera y dnica election de
los Republicanos de Illinois para Senador de los Estados
Unidos como sucesor de Douglas.)
Al terminarse aquel acto, pronunci6 el siguiente discurso
que nos da el tono de aquella gran lucha con Mr. Douglas,
una de las mas notables y excitantes que el pais hubiera
presenciadV hasta entonces; y que contiene en si todos los
g6rmenes de la contienda que mas tarde debia ensangren-
tar la Union, y dar por resultado del terrible conflict la
abolicion de la esclavitud en todos los Estados Unidos. En
este concept lo reproducimos aqui:
(( CABALLEROS DE LA CONVENTION: Una vez que sepamos
d6nde nos hallamos y ad6nde nos dirigimos, facil nos sera
en seguida juzgar lo que mejor conviene hacer y c6mo





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


hacerlo. Llevamos ya cinco afios desde que se inici6 una
political, con el manifesto objeto y la seguridad de que iba
A poner tdrmino A la agitacion en favor de la esclavitud.
Bajo la accion de esta political no solo no ha cesado aquella
agitacion, sino que ha ido en constant aumento; y en rnmi
opinion, no cesara hasta que no sobrevenga una crisis, y la
hayamos atravesado. (Una casa dividida contra si misma
no puede permanecer), y nuestro Gobierno no puede existir
siemrnpre mitad libre y mitad esclavo. No temo que la Union
se disuelva. No temo que la casa caiga; pero confio en que'
dejarA de estar dividida. Vendr& A ser toda libre, 6 toda
esclava. 0 bien los que se oponen A la esclavitud atajarAn
su propagacion, convenciendo-al pdblico que camina A su
complete extincion; 6 sus sostenedores la empujarAn ade-
lante, hasta que venga A ser legal en todos los Estados,
nuevos 6 antiguos, del Norte como del Sur. (Nos inclinamos
hacia la dltima solution del problema? Si alguno duda de
ello, que contemple atentamente aquella maquinacion legal
(pieza de maquinaria debia decir), ya casi complete, que
se compone de la doctrine Nelraska y de la decision judi-
cial de Dred Scott. Que se consider no solo la clase de
obra A que esta maquinaria se presta, y lo bien adaptada
que estA A su plan; sino tambien que se estudie la historic
de su fabricacion: que se rastree, si puede, 6 mas bien,
que trate, si le es possible, de cerrar los ojos y no ver ]as
pruebas del designio y concerto de accion, que ha exis-
tido desde el comienzo entire los principles forjadores de
aquella obra.
(Al principio solo el Congreso habia obrado; y para ase-
gurar el punto ya ganado, y abrirse camino para en ade-
lante, era indispensable obtener su ratificacion real 6 apa-
rente por el pueblo. El aifo nuevo de 1854 encontr6 la
esclavitud excluida de mas dela mitad de los Estados por
sus respectivas constituciones, y de la mayor-parte del terri-
torio national por prohibicion del Congreso. Cuatro 'dias
despues comenz6 la lucha, que concluy6 por derogar la
prohibicion del Congreso. Esto abri6 todo el territorio na-
cional A la esclavitud, y fuM el primer punto ganado.
(Esta necesidad no habia sido desatendida; y muy al con-
trario se la habia prevenido en cuanto podia serlo, con el
notable argument de lo que se complacia en apellidar como





VIDA DE LINCOLN


soberania intrusa (squatter sovereignty), y otras veces condeco-
rado con el titulo de sagrado derecho al propio gobierno; cuya
dltima frase, aunque en verdad sea la uinica base legitima
de todo gobierno, habia sidopervertida en el uso de que ella
intentaba hacer, que equivalia A decir: que si un hombre
quisiere reducir a otro A esclavitud, no se permitirA opo-
sicion alguna de un tercero. Este argument fu6 incor-
porado en el mismo bill Nebiaska en los t6rminos si-
guientes:
((Siendo la verdadera inteligencia y significado de esta
acta, no legislar sobre la esclavitud en ningun territorio 6
Estado, ni excluirla de ellos, sino dejar al pueblo de ellos
en perfect libertad de former y reglamentar, como lo
entiendan, su propias instituciones locales, subordinan-
dose solamente A la Constitucion de los Estados Unidos,
etc., etc.
(Sigui6se despues la griteria sobre la soberania intrusa
(squatter); y las huecas declamaciones sobre el sagrado dere-
cho A gobernarse A si mismos.
((Pero, especifiquemos, decian los miembros de la oposi-
cion; enmendemos el bill, de manera que expresamente
declare que el pueblo del territorio puede excluir la esclavi-
tud. N6, contestaron los amigos del proyecto, y rechazaron
la enmienda.
(Mientras que el bill Nebraska era aprobado por el Con-
greso, estaba debati6ndose ante la Corte del Circuito de
los Estado Unidos en el Missouri, una causa en que se dis-
putaba la libertad de un negro, por haber su duefio llevA-
dolo voluntariamente, primero A un Estado libre, y en se-
guida A un territorio garantido de la esclavitud por prohi-
cion especial del Congreso; teni6ndolo por esclavos por largo
tiempo en cada uno de ellos. El bill de Nebraska y el pleito
fueron decididos en Mayo de 1854. Llamabase el negro Dred
Scott, con cuyo nombre se conoce ahora la decision final
dada al caso.
c(Aproximabase la election de Presidente cuando se san-
cion6 la ley, y se ventilaba la validez de 6sta, ante la Corte
Suprema de los Estados Unidos; pero la sentencia misma
fu6 diferida hasta despues de la election. Ya antes de la
election, el Senador Trumbull, pedia en el Senado A los
principles sostenedores del bill Nebraska, que declara-





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


rasen si, en su opinion, el pueblo de un territorio podia
excluir constitucionalmente la esclavitud de sus t6rminos;
y los uiltimos respondieron: eso es asunto de la Corte Su-
prema.
((Vino la election. Sali6 electo Mr. Buchanan, y con ello
qued6 aparentemente sancionada aquella media por la
voluntad popular, y ganado el segundo punto. Esta sancion,
empero, estuvo muy lejos de ser una clara mayoria popu-
lar, por menos de cuatrocientos mil votos; una circunstan-
cia que la privaba de ser totalmente tranquilizadora y
decisive. El Presidente saliente, en su uiltimo mensaje,
hacia, de una manera muy ufana, much hincapi6 sobre
la pretendida autoridad y peso que esta manifestacion po-
pular daba a este acto mas marcado de la feneciente admi-
nistracion.
((La Corte Suprema volvi6 A reunirse, no para anunciar
esta vez su decision, sino para ordenar que se abriese de
nuevo la litis. Tuvo lugar la inauguracion presidential, y
aun no recaia sentencia definitive del tribunal, cuando ya
el President entrante, en el discurso de apertura, exhor-
taba fervientemente al pueblo A que apoyase la esperada
decision judicial, cualquiera que ella fuese. A los pocos dias
vino la decision.
((Este fu6 el tercer punto ganado. El reputado autor del
bill Nebraska tiene muy luego occasion de hacer un speech
en el Capitolio, defendiendo como suya propia la decision
de la causa de Dred Scott, y denunciando en t6rminos
vehementes toda oposicion A ella.
<(Tambien el nuevo president aprovecha la primera
oportunidad, en su carta a Silliman, para adoptar 6 inter-
pretar aquella decision, mostrarse admirado de que haya
existido jamas otro modo de ver esta question. Al fin se
arma una rencilla ente el Presidente y el autor del bill Ne-
braska sobre un simple punto de hecho; cual era el saber,
si la Constitucion dicha de Lecompton habia sido 6 no vota-
da propia y libremente por el pueblo de Kansas. Acaba la
reyertapor declarar el iltimo, que todo lo que exige es el
sufragio libre del pueblo, sin cuidarse de si 6ste vota en
pro 6 en contra de la esclavitud. Yo no comprendo que
por esta declaracion el autor quisiese significar otra cosa,
sino que 61 consider 6sta como la mas propia definition de





VIDA DE LINCOLN


la political que desearia prevaleciera en el animo del pd-
blico, una political cuyos principios declara que ya ha su-
frido much, y est& dispuesto A sufrir hasta el iltimo.
ccY bien puede aferrarse a esos principios. Si tiene senti.
mientos paternales, bien le est& asirse de ellos. Este prin-
cipio es la dnica hilacha que ha quedado de su original
doctrine iniciada en la ley Kansas-Nebraska. Bajo el im-
perio de la decision Dred Scott, la soberania squatter, sin
existencia, se desbarat6 como andamios provisorios, como
molde de arena, que sirvi6 para una fundicion y cay6
reducido A polvo: ayud6 A ganar una election, y en seguida
fu6 aventada en el aire.
(Su dltima lucha, en union con los Republicanos, contra
la Constitucion Lecompton, nada tiene de comun con la
doctrine primitive de Nebraska. Aquella contienda vers6
sobre un solo punto-el derecho de un pueblo A hacer su
propia constitution; y sobre este punto nunca han diferido
61 y los Republicanos.
a Las varias faces comprendidas en la decision Dred
Scott, junto con la political de qud me importa ) del Sena-
dor Douglas, constituyen el plan de aquella maquinaria
en su estado actual de progress. Los puntos de accion de
esta vienen ser:
( Primero : Que ningun negro esclavo, importa-do por ta
del Africa, y ningun descendiente suyo, puede jamas ser
ciudadano de Estado alguno, en el sentido en que aquel t6r-
mino esta empleado en la Constitucion de los Estados Unidos.
a Este punto esta calculado para privar al negro, en todo
possible event, del beneficio de lo prescrito en la Consti-
tucion de los Estados Unidos, donde declara que: ((Los ciu-
dadanos de cada Estado gozaran de todos los privilegios 6
inmunidades de ciudadanos en los diversos Estados. )
(( Segundo : Que bajo la accion de la Constitucion de los
Estados Unidos, ni el Congreso ni una Legislatura territo-
rial podrAn excluir la esclavitud de ningun Territorio de
los Estados Unidos.
( Este punto esti calculado para que individuos particu-
lares llenen de esclavos los Territorios, sin riesgo de pederr-
los como propiedad; y de este modo aumentar las probabi-
lidades de conservar esta institution en todos los tiempos.
TOMO xxvn.-5





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


( Tercero: Que si bien un esclavo se liberta por el hecho
de ser traido A un Estado libre, como las cortes federales
no han de fallar nunca contra el amo, siendo esta una
question de competencia de cada Estado, el pobre negro
podra al fin ser forzado A seguir A su amo.
(( Este punto esta calculado, no para llevarlo a cabo in-
mediatamente, sino para que, dado caso que fuese aceptado
con el tiempo y aparentemente apoyado por el pueblo, A
consecuencia de una election, sostener en seguida como
su resultado idgico, que lo que podia hacer legalmente el
amo de Dred Scott con su esclavo en el libre Estado del
Illinois, cualquier propietario tendria derecho a hacer con
otro 6 con mil esclavos en el Illinois, 6 en cualquier otro
Estado libre.
( Como auxiliar A todo este plan, y dAndose la mano
viene la doctrine Nebraska, 6 lo que de ella ha quedado
con prop6sito de educar y amoldar la opinion pdblica (al
menos la opinion pdblica del Norte), A que sea indiferente
sobre el resultado de la admission 6 rechazo de la escla-
vitud.
(( Esto muestra exactamente d6nde nos hallamos ahora,
y un poco ad6nde nos vamos encaminando.
((Nueva luz se arrojara sobre lo dltimo, si volvemos atrAs
y recorremos con el animo la cadena de hechos hist6ricos,
que quedan ya establecidos. Varias cosas aparecerAn ahora
menos obscuras y misteriosas de lo que se mostraban,
cuando recien estaban transpirando. El pueblo debia que-
dar ( perfectamente libre , sujeto s6lo A la Constitucion.
Demasiado claro esta ahora que todo ello era s6lo un nicho
ajustado, en el cual debia caber mas tarde la decision Dred
Scott, y declarar que la perfect libertad del pueblo era
no tener absolutamente libertad alguna. jPor qu6 fue re-
chazada la enmienda que declaraba el derecho del pueblo
a excluir la esclavitud?
( Demasiado claro esta ahora, que su adopcion habria
desarreglado el nicho preparado para recibir la decision de
Dred Scott.
~q Por qu6 fue postergada la decision de la Corte? 4Por
qu6 esquivar la opinion individual de un Senador hasta
despues de la election de Presidente? Demasiado claro
esta ahora que el haber hablado entonces habria perjudi-





VIDA DE LINCOLN


cado al argument revestido con aquel (aperfectamente libre ),
con el cual se contaba para ganar la election. Por qu6
las felicitaciones del Presidente saliente sobre la supuesta
sancion del pueblo? ,Por qu6 la p9stergacion 6 iniciacion
de nuevos alegatos? ,Por que las anticipadas exhortaciones
del Presidente entrante, en favor de la decision? Estas
cosas se asemejan al vulgar m6todo de palmer y acari-
ciar un caballo altivo antes de montarlo, cuando se teme
vaya a lastimar al jinete. 6Y por qu6 ese apuro del Presi-
dente y otros para aceptar y confirmar aquella decision?
((No podemos saber con exactitud si todos estos hechos
que tan bien se ajustan entire si, sean el resultado de un
plan preconcebido; pero cuando vemtos una cantidad de
madera labrada, cuyas diferentes piezas sabemos que han
sido preparadas, en tiempos y lugares distintos y por obre-
ros diversos, como Esteban, Franklin, Rojerio y Santiago,
por ejemplo; y cuando observamos que reunidas estas pie-
zas hacen exactamente la armazon de una casa 6 de un
molino, y que todas las espigas y excopleaduras se em-
palman unas con otras, y los largos y las proporciones de
las diversas piezas van adaptadas esactamente a sus res-
pectivos lugares, sin una de mas ni de menos, sin omitir
siquiera los andamios; 6 si una sola pieza se echa de me-
nos, divisamos que hay un lugar en la extructura exacta-
mente dispuesto y preparado para colocar dicha pieza; en
tal caso no es impossible dejar de career que Esteban, y
Franklin, y Rogerio, y Santiago no lo hayan emprendido y
combinidose desde un priucipio, y trabajado de consuno,
segun un plan 6 prop6sito de antemano convenido antes
de dar el primer golpe.
((No debe olvidarse que, per el bill Nebraska, debia de-
jarse al pueblo de un Estado, como al de un Territorio, una
perfect libertad, y subordinada sdlo d la Constitucion. jPor que
referirse a un Estado? Estaban legislando para los Terri-
torios, y no para los Estados. Sin duda que un Estado esta
y debe permanecer bajo el imperio de la Constitucion de
los Estados Unidos. LPero por qu6 traer de los cabellos la
mencion de Estadosen una ley puramente territorial? Por
qu6 vienen ensartados y juntos, el pueblo de un Territorio
y el pueblo de los Estados, y sus relaciones con la Consti-
tucion consideradas como si fueran una misma cosa?





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


Mientras que el dictamen (1) de la Corte, expuesto por su
President Taney, en el caso de Dred Scott, y las opinions
respectivas de todos los otros jueces que concurrieron al
acto, declaran expresamente que la Constitucion de los
Estados Unidos no permit al Congreso ni a. una Legisla-
tura territorial excluir de los Estados Unidos la esclavitud,
todos ellos omiten expresar si la misma Constitucion per-
mite 6 no un Estado, 6 al pueblo de un Estado, excluirla.
Possible es que esto no pase de una mera omision. Mas qui6n
puede estar seguro de que si los jurisconsultos Mr. Me. Lean
6 Curtis (2) hubiesen tratado de afiadir,durante las discusio-
nes, una declaracion sobre el poder ilimitado del pueblo de
un Estado para excluir de sus contornos la esclavitud, ni
mas ni menos como Chase y Mace trataron de poner una
igual declaration a beneficio del pueblo de un territorio,
en el bill Nebraska;-pregunto yo ,qui6n esta. del todo se-
guro de que no habria sido rechazado en un caso como lo
habia sido en el otro?
S((El Juez Nelson fu6 el que mas se acercd al punto de
declarar la facultad constitutional de un Estado sobre la
esclavitud. Mas de una vez 1o anduvo tanto, que se vali6 de
la idea precisa, y casi del lenguaje mismo, de la ley Ne-
braska, tal como qued6.
((Hay un pasaje en su dictamen en que lleg6 & decir:
except en los casos en que esta facultad esta limitada por
la Constitucion de los Estados Unidos, la ley del Estado
es supreme dentro de su jurisdiction respective en mate-
ria de esclavitud ).
( En que casos esta asi restringida por la Constitucion
de los Estados Unidos la faaultad de un Estado, queda
abierta a la discussion; exactamente de la misma manera
que la ley Nebraska dejaba la limitacion de esta facultad
en los Territorios. Juntemos lo uno con lo otro, y tendre-
mos otro nichito, que no ha de pasar much tiempo sin
que lo veamos llenado con otra decision de la Corte, de-
clarando que laConstitucion de los Estados Unidos no per-


(m) En las cortes de justicia inglesas y norte-americanas, cada juez anuncia y re.
gistra por separ.ado su opinion; y en casos importantes la describe extensamente.
(2) Estos fueron los unicos dos miembros de la Corte Suprema que disintleron
del resto, y se pronunciaron en favor de la libertad de Dred Scott.





VIDA, DE LINCOLN


mite un Estado excluir de su jurisdiction la esclavitud.
Y much mas debe esperarse todavia, si la doctrine (qu6
me importa que sea 6 no rechazada la esclavitud ) ganase
terreno en la opinion ppdblica, lo bastante al menos para
asegurarse de antemano, queuna vez hecha una decision
podria sostenerse.
&'Esta decision es todo lo que por ahora le falta a la es-
clavitud para ser uniformemente legal en todos los Estados.
Bien 6 mal recibida tal decision, viene ya probablemente
en camino, y bien pronto la tendremos encima; a menos
que el poder de la presence disnatia political no sea afron-
tado y destruido. Estimonos adormeciendo con el suefio
dorado de que el pueblo de Missouri esth en visperas de ha-
cer libre su Estado; pero en lugar del suefio hemos de des-
pertar la realidad, que la Suprema Corte ha hecho del
Illinois un Estado esclavo.
((Afrontar y echar por tierra el poder de aquella disna-
tia, es la tarea que tienen por delante todos aquellos que
quieran estorbar que tal acto se consume. Esto es lo que
tenemosque hacer. LPero cuAl es el mejor modo de ha-
cerlo?
( Hay algunos que nos acusan abiertamente ante sus
amigos, y que tambien susurran al oido, que el Senador
Douglas es el mas apto instrument que tienen A mano para
llegar A su objeto. No nos dicen, ni nos han dicho que 61
desee que tal objeto se consiga. Se limitan A dejarnos
inferir todo de la circunstancia de haber ocurrido una pe-
quefia disidencia entire 61 y la actual cabeza de la dinastia;
y que 61 ha votado regularmente con nosotros, en una sola
question, en que nunca hemos diferido 61 y nosotros.
( Nos recuerdan que dl es un hombre muy grande, y que
los mas grandes de entire nosotros quedan pequefios a su
lado. Concedido. Pero aperro vivo es mejor que leon muerto.
Si el Juez Douglas no es para esta obra, el leon muerto es
cuando menos un leon enjaulado y sin dientes. a C6mo pue-
de oponerse A los progress de la esclavitud? No ha di-
cho que no se le da un bledo ? Su mission manifiesta es
inducir al ((corazon pdblico)) A que no se ocupe absoluta-
mente de ella.
( Uno de los principales'diarios dem6crato-Douglas cree
que habri necesidad del superior talent de Douglas para





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


resistir A la renovacion de la trata de negros africanos.
Creeri Douglas que se hacen esfuerzos para revivirla ?
El no lo ha dicho. jLo creera asi realmente? Pero si asi
fuera, Ic6mo podria resistirlo? Cuatro aflos ha estado pro-
bando que hay un sagrado derecho de los blancos para intro-
ducir esclavos negros en los Territorios. Puede ahora
probar que es menos sagrado el derecho de comprarlos
donde mas baratos se encuentren? Y sin duda nin-
guna mas baratos estan en Africa que en Virginia. Cuanto
estaba de su parte ha hecho por reducir la question de la
esclavitud A una question de propiedad simple; y como tal,
no veo que 61 pueda oponerse A la importacion de esclavos
ni c6mo negaria que el trAfico en esa especie de (propie-
dad ) es a perfectamente libre ), A menos que lo haga por
via de protection al product national. Y como los produc-
tores del pais no reclamaran probablemente tal protection,
se encuentra sin base alguna de oposicion.
((Bien s6 que el Senador Douglas sostiene que un hom-
bre puede ser mas prudent hoy que lo que lo era el dia de
ayer, y quo 61 puede legitimamente cambiar de idea
cuando ha visto que iba errado. 4 Pero sin mas razon que
esa hemos de partir de pronto, 6 inferir que piensa cam-
biar en un asunto especial, sin que antes nos lo haya
anunciado? Y es licito basar nuestras acciones sobre sim-
ples inferencias ?
(( Ahora, como siempre, no es mi Animo desacreditar la
position del Juez Douglas, ni averiguar sus motives, ni
hacer nada que pueda serle personalmente ofensivo. Si
alguna vez llegamos A estar de acuerdo en los principios, de
manera que nuestra gran causa reciba el auxilio de su
grande habilidad, no temo haber interpuesto ningun obs-
ticulo impropio para ello.
( Pero hablemos claro: 61 no esta con nosotros por ahora;
no pretend estarlo; no promote estarlo n.unca. Nuestra
causa, pues, debe ser confiada A sus amigos mas seguros,
y manejada por ellos-debe ser confiada A los que tienen
las manos libres, A los que tienen amor A la obra, A los que
se interesen por su resultado.
( Dos afios hace que los Republicanos contaban en sus
filas un million y trescientos mil votos; y esto bajo el aisla-
do impulse de un peligro comun, y si6ndoles adversas to*





VIDA DE LINOOLN


das las circunstancias. Compuestosde elements extrafios
discordantes y hasta hostiles, reunimos de los cuatro vien-
tos una fuerza, la formamos en batalla y presentamos la
accion bajo el constant fuego de un enemigo disciplinado,
orgulloso y envanecido. FlaquearAn ahora los que tan
bravos se mostraron entonces ? ahora, quo el mismo ene-
migo se muestra vacilante, desunido y belicoso?
(( No es dudoso el resultado. No sucumbiremos. No su-
cumbiremos, si n{os tenemos firmes. Prudentes consejos pue-
den acelerarlo, 6 errors demorarlo, pero mas tarde 6 mas
temprano, el triunfo es seguro que vendra.
En esta campafia tan vigorosamente proseguida, el Illi-
nois fu6 recorrido en todo su ancho y largo por ambos
candidates y sus respectivos sostenedores; y el pais en ge-
neral sigui6 con interns las peripecias de la gran lucha.
De condado, de municipio en municipio, de villa en villa,
viajaban ambos campeones, a veces en el mismo carro, 6
carruaje, y debati6ndose en la presencia de inmensas mu-
chedumbres de hombres, mujeres y nifios-porque las
m.ujeres 6 hijas de los mismos campesinos participaban
vivamente de las emociones del dia-y argiiian frente A
frente sobre los principles puntos de su creencia political y
se disputaban noblemente la palma del triunfo.
En uno de sus discursos durante aquella memorable cam-
paia Mr. Lincoln rindi6 el siguiente tribute A la acta de
declaracion de la Independencia de los Estados Unidos; y
que bien podria llamarse de la humanidad entera.
( Aquellas comunidades (habla de los trece Estados primi-
tivos de la Union) por medio de sus representantes reunidos
en la antiguaSala de la Independencia, declararon A la faz del
mundo, que tenian por verdades demostradas: que todos los
hombres;han nacido iguales; que su Creador los ha dotado de
derechos inalienables; que entire ellos estan la libertad, la
vida, y la facultad de proveer A su felicidad. Esta fu6 la ma-
jestuosa interpretation que dieron nuestros padres de la
economic del universe. Esta fu6 su alta, sabia y noble con-
cepcion de lajusticiadel Creador para sus criaturas. Si, se-
fiores, para sus criaturastodas, para toda la gran familiar hu-
mana. En su ilustrada creencia no entraba la idea de que
ser alguno, que llevara el sello de la imagen y semejanza de
Dios, hubiese sido enviado al .mundo para ser pisoteado,





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


degradado y embrutecido por sus semejantes. No se con-
cretaron A una sola raza de vivientes, sino que fueron
mas adelante y abarearon la mas remota posteridad. En-
cendieron una antorcha que debia guiar A sus hijos, y a los
hijos de sus hijos y a las miriadas sin cuento, que habrian
de habitar la tierra en otros siglos. Cual sabios hombres
de Estado que eran, conocian la tendencia de la posteridad
A cebar tiranos; y por eso proclamaron aquellas evidentes
verdades, A fin de que, cuando en el distant porvenir,
algun hombre, alguna faccion, algun interns pretendiesen
erigir eq doctrine, que nadie sino los ricos, que nadie sino
los blancos, que nadie sino los Anglo-Sajones, tenian derecho
A la libertad, A la vida, A la prosecution de la felicidad, esa
misma posteridad volviese los ojos hacia la Declaracion de
la Independencia, y recibiese de ella aliento para renovar el
combat que comenzaron sus padres, hasta conseguir que la
verdad, la justicia, la caridad y todas las virtudes humans
y cristianas, no fuesen & extinguirse en la tierra; hasta que
ningun hombre osare en adelante limitar y circunscribir
los grandes principios de la Independencia; y si alguna vez
escuchaseis sugestiones que tiendan A arrebatarle su gran-
deza, y a mutilar la bella simetria de sus proporciones; si os
sintiereis inclinados A career, que todos los hombres no han
sido creados iguales y en posesion de aquellos inalienables
derechos enumerados en nuestra carta de libertad, volvais
A la fuente cuyas aguas fluyeron mezcladas con la sangre
de la Revolucion. No os ocupeis de mi, no os ocupeis de la
suerte political de quien quiera que sea, pero volved A las
verdades estampadas en la declaration de la Independencia.
((Podeis hacer de mi lo que quprais, si os ateneis A estos
sagrados principios. Podeis no s6lo privarme de entrar en
el Senado, sino apoderaros de mi y darme muerte. Sin
pretender que sea indiferente en material de honors terre-
nales, yo reclamo hallarme inspirado en esta lucha por algo
mas alto que el deseo de obtener un destiny. Os pido que
aparteis de vosotros todo mezquino 6 insignificant inter6s
por la ventura de un hombre. Eso es nada. Yo nada soy.
Douglas no es nada. Pero no destruyais aquel inmortal emblema
de la humanidad: LA DECLARACION DE LA INDEPENDENCIA
AMERICANA.))
Tanto interns empezaba A despertar en ]a opinion la





VIDA DE LINCOLN


aparicion de Mr. Lincoln en la arena political, durante su
contienda con Douglas, quo los diarios de la 6poca estan
llenos de descripciones de su persona y otros rasgos carac-
teristicos. De ellos tomamos los mas notables.
((Mr. Lincoln, decia un .peri6dico, mide seis pies y cuatro
pulgadas. Su estructura no es muscular, mas bien es enjuta.
En sus movimientos tiene la elasticidad y falta de gracia,
que revela las rudas tareas de su vida primitive; y su con-
versacion se resiente fuertemente de la pronunciation y
provincialismo del Occidente. Camina lenta, pero delibe-
radamente, casi siempre con la cabeza inclinada hacia
adelante y las manos cruzadas por detris. En material de
vestido es poco esmerado; siempre limpio y culto, nunca a
la moda; descuidado, mas sin desalifio. En sus modales
es notablemente cordial, pero sencillo siempre. Un fuerte
apreton de mano 6 una simpAtica sonrisa de reconocimiento,
es todo lo que reparte sus amigos. Sus facciones, aunque
pronunciadas, estan lejos de ser hermosas; pero cuando
sus ojos pardos brillan con alguna emocion y sus facciones
entran en movimiento, seria sefalado entire mil como quien
posee no s6lo aquellos tiernos sentimientos quo tanto agra-
dan a las mujeres, sino el mas pesado metal de que se
nutren los hombres de talla y se forman presidents. Su
cabeza es grande, y frenol6gicamente bien proporcionada.
Nariz aquilina, boca grande y un color moreno, con sefiales
de haberse curtido A la intemperie, completan la descrip-
cion.
(En sus hAbitos personales Mr. Lincoln tiene la sericillez
de un nifio. Gusta de comer bien, y lo hace en proporcion
de su cuerpo; perosu alimento es simple y nutritivo. No
es aficionado al tabaco en ninguna de sus formas; no bebe
licores, ni aun vino. No se le echa en la cara acto ninguno
licencioso en su vida. No se sirve de palabras impuras, ni
juega. Creese que A nadie debe un solo peso. En su casa
vive como un caballero de modestos medios y gustos sim-
ples. Una casa de madera de buen tamafio, y de propiedad
suya, amueblada con simplicidad que no excluye el gusto,
rodeada de &rboles y flores, le sirve do residencia, viviendo
en paz consigo mismo, siendo el idolo de su familiar, y por
su honradez, habilidad y patriotism, la admiracion de sus
co-npatriotas.





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


vComo orador es rapido, preciso y afluente. Su manera
de presentarse ante una asamblea popular, est& indicando si
trata de hacerse, excesivamente entretenido, 6 muy solemne.
Acciona poco; pero cuando desea producer efecto, se encoge
de hombros, levanta las cejas, y deprime la boca, alterando
su rostro de una manera tan c6micamente desmafiada, que
nunca deja de ((arrebatar a su auditorio. Su enunciacion
es lenta y enfitica; y su voz, aunque clara y poderosa, tiende
a veces A emitir asperos y desagradables sonidos; mas como
antes se ha dicho, su rasgo caracteristico consiste en la
notable movilidad de su facciones, cuyas frecuentes contor-
siones excitan L la risa, que sus palabras no provocan.)
En la election que puso t6rmino a la contienda, el candi-
dato republican para Gobernador del Illinois recibi6
126.084 votos; el Douglas-dem6crata 121.940; los Lecompton-
dem6cratas 5.091. Mr. Douglas fu6, sin embargo, reelecto
Senador por la Legislatura, en la cual sus partidarios, a
causa de la peculiar distribution de los distritos legislativos
y la coalition de las dos facciones dem6cratas, contaban
con ocho votos mas.














ANTE LA NACION


Efecto contrario producido por su derrota.-Su plan de tratar A sus adversaries
politicos. -Notables palabras dirigidas al Sur. Su discurso en Nueva York.-
Facultades del Gobierno Federal respect A la eselavitud en los Territorios.-Pre-
cedentes historicos en su favor.-Opinion de Washington y de los autores de la
Coustituclon.-Su unanimidad de pareceres en este punto.-Limites de su autori-
dad.-La limitation y no la abolicion de la eselavitud es su objeto.-Invocacion A
sus adversarios.-iQud es conservatism? -Verdaderos principios del partido repu-
blicano.-No fomenta, ni es possible, la Insurrecclon de esclavos.-Diferencia entire
el dictamen y una sentencia Judicial.-Deber de los Republicanos.-Absurdas pre-
tensiones de los esclavocratas.-Mr. Lincoln y los nifios de las escuelas dominicales.

El desenlace de la lucha con Douglas, no obstante llevar
todas las apariencias de una derrota, estaba destinado a
convertirse A debido tiempo en un triunfo insigne. Su
reputation como orador y de politico fire en su terreno,
qued6 establecida desde entonces, y admitida por todo el
pals. Volvi6 al siguiente afio a consagrarse al ejercicio de
su profession, pronunciando, sin embargo, en la campafia
electoral de 1853, y a encarecidas instancias de los republi-
canos de Ohio, dos de sus mas convincentes discursos en
aquel Estado: uno en Columbus y otro en Cincinnati.
Aludiendo en el iltimo de estos a laicertidiimbre de un
pr6ximo triunfo de los republicans en la nacion, Mr. Lincoln
hizo un bosquejo de lo que 61 creia ser el inevitable resul-
tado de semejante victoria.
((Os dir6, en cuanto me es permitido dirigirme A, la opo-
sicion, lo que pensamos hacer con vosotros. Pensamos
trataros, en cuanto es possible, como Washington, Jefferson
y Madison os trataron; pensamos dejaros solos,sin intervenir
de manera alguna en vuestras instituciones; respetar todas
y cada una de las estipulaciones de la Constitucion; en una
palabra: es nuestro prop6sito trataros, en cuanto hombres
degenerados (si hemos en efecto degenerado) pueden hacer-





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


lo, imitando el ejemplo de aquellos nobles patriarcas
Washington, Jefferson y Madison. Tenemos present que
vosotros sois tan buenos comos nosotros mismos, y que las
diferencias que existen entire ambos son s6lo de circuns-
tancias.
( Pensamos reconocer y recorder siempre que teneis tan
buenos corazones como los demas, 6 como nosotros pre-
tendemos tenerlos, y trataros de conformidad. Pensamos
casarnos, si ocurriese el caso, con vuestras hijas ( hablo de
las blancas); y tengo el honor de anunciaros que ya para
mi ocurri6 ese caso (aludiendo a su matrimonio con la
sefiora Maria Todd.) Ya os he dicho lo que pensamos
hacer. Ahora necesito saber lo que hareis vosotros, cuando
aquello suceda. He oido muchas veces decir que pensais
dividir la Union, si la election de Presidente de los Esta-
dos Unidos recayere en un republican, 6 cosa que se le
parezca. (Una voz, (Asi es.))) Asi es, dice uno de ellos.
Me asombraria de que fuese un kentuquiano. (Una voz,
cEs uno de los de Douglas.))) Bien, deseo ahora saber
L qu6 hareis con vuestra mitad de Estados Unidos? 4 Vais
A partir medio A medio el Estado del Ohio, y llevaros la
mitad de la pieza? 0 pensais conservarla en contact
con vuestros odiados adversaries ? L 0 pensais construir
de alguna manera una muralla entire vuestro pais y el
nuestro, que impida que vuestra propiedad semoviente
(esclavos) la salve y venga de este lado A perderse?
LCreeis que mejorariais de position, dejAndonos aqui sin
obligacion de ningun g6nero para devolveros aquella espe.
cie de vuestra propiedad semoviente que se venga de este
lado? Habreis partido la Union, porque no os haciamos la
debida justicia, segun creeis, en aquella material; 1pero
creeis.que os encontrareis mejor cuando no tengamos obli-
gacion alguna de hacer nada en obsequio vuestro? 4Vais
A hacernos la guerra y matarnos? Tengo para mi que
sois caballeros tan bizarros como los mas bravos que
alumbra el sol; que sabreis pelear en defense de una
buena causa, hombre A hombre, con tanto valor como el
pueblo mas valeroso del mundo; que os habeis mostrado
capaces de hacerlo en muchas ocasiones; pero, hombre por
hombre, vosotros no sois mejores que nosotros, y vosotros
no sois tantos como nosotros. No es asi no mas, que ha-





VIDA DE LINCOLN


breis de llevarnos por delante. Si fu6ramos menos en
nimero que vosotros, admito desde ahora que podriais
vencernos: si fudramos iguales, seria juego parejo, pero
siendo inferiores en ndmero, nada hareis con intentar
dojninarnos.
S(Digo que no nos entrometeremos con la institution de
la esclavitud en los Estados donde ella existe; porque la
Constitucion lo prohibe y no lo require el bien comun.
No debemos negaros una ley eficaz sobre esclavos fugiti-
vos; porque la Constitucion nos exige una ley semejante
en favor vuestro; pero debemos evitar que la institution se
propague, porque ni la Constitucion ni el bien general nos
piden tal cosa. Debemos estorbar que se renueve la trata
de esclavos africanos, y que el Congreso sancione para los
Territories un c6digo de esclavos. Debemos impedir que
cada una de estas cosas sea hecha, ora sea por el Congreso,
ora por la Corte Suprema. EL PUEBLO DE ESTOS ESTADOS
UNIDOS ES EL DUENO LEGITIMO DEL CONGRESS Y DE LOS TRIBU-
NALES, no para trastornar la Constitucion, sino para expeler
A los hombres que pervierten la Constitucion. )
En la primavera de 1860, cedi6 Mr. Lincoln a los urgen-
tes llamados que le venian del Este de la Union, para que
les trajera ayuda para la excitante campafia electoral en
que estaban por entonces empefiados por aquella section
pronunciando al efecto discursos en various lugares de
Connecticut, New Hampshire y Rhode Island, y tambien
en la ciudad de Nueva York: siendo en todas parties reci-
bido con entusiasmo por numerosos auditorios. Uno de
los mas notables discursos de su vida fud sin duda el que
pronunci6 en el Instituto de Cooper, en Nueva York, el 27
de Febrero de 1860. Damos en seguida por complete esta
obra maestra de anulisis de los hombres y actos ptiblicos.
Despues de haber sido introducido en los t6rminos mas
cumplidos por el venerable poeta Guillermo Bryant, que
presidia en aquella occasion, habl6 asi:
(c SEROR PRESIDENT Y OONCIUDADANOS DE NUEVA YORK: Los
hechos de que habrA de ocuparme esta noche son en su
mayor parte ya viejos y familiares; sin que haya tampoco
cosa nueva alguna en el uso que en general hard de ellos.
Si alguna novedad hubiera, seria en la manera de pre-
sentar los hechos, y en las inferencias y deducciones que





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


de ellos saque. El Senador Douglas, si hemos de estar A
lo que public El Tiempo de Nueva York, dijo en su dis-
curso pronunciado en Columbus:
((Cuando nuestros padres formaron el Gobierno bajo el
cual vivimos, comprendian tan bien, y aun mejor que
nosotros, esta cuestion.
a Yo acepto de piano esto, y lo adopto como texto para
este-discurso. Y lo adopto, porque subministra un punto
de partida precise y convenido entire los republicans y
aquella ala de la democracia capitaneada por el Senador
Douglas. Queda s6lo por averiguar: 4 6mo entendian
aquellos padres la question mencionada?
4Cul es la forma del Gobierno bajo el cual vivimos?
((La respuestaebe de ser: La Constitucion de los Esta-
dos Unidos. Aquella Constitucion consiste de la original
dictada en 1787 (y bajo la cual se puso en ejercicio por la
primera vez el present Gobierno) y de doce enmiendas
afiadidas subsiguientemente, y de las cuales las primeras
diez fueron agregadas en 1789.
(( Quienes fueron esos nuestros padres que organizaron
la Constitucion? Supongo que podriamos Ilamar asi con
toda propiedad a dlos treinta y nueve que firmaron el ins-
trumento 6 carta original, A los que nos dieron esa parte
de nuestro gobierno actual. Se diria con plena exactitud
que ellos lo crearon, y es positivamente cierto que ellos
representaban la opinion genuina y los sentimientos de la
nacion entera en aquella 6poca; y como sus nonibres son
familiares ai casi todos, y accesibles A todos absolutamente,
no hay necesidad de repetirlos ahora.
((Doy ahora por sentado que los ( treinta y nueve son
((nuestros padres), que crearon el gobierno bajo el cual
vivimos.
(gCual es la question, que, segun el texto, nuestros pa-
dres comprendian tan exactamente bien, y ann mejor que
nosotros ?
((Esta es: j La division establecida entra la autoridad
local y la federal, d otra disposicion cualquiera de la
Constitucion, prohibe al gobierno general el derecho de
intervenir con la esclavitud en los Territorios?
S(Sobre este punto, Douglas estA por la afirmativa, y los
Republicans por la -negativa. Esta afirmativa y esta





VIDA DE LINCOLN


negative forman el punto en dispute; y esta question es
precisamente la que el texto declara que nuestros padres
comprendian mejor que nosotros.
c Averigfiemos ahora si los ( treinta y nueve , 6 algunts
de entire ellos, trataron alguna vez esta question; y si lo
hicieron, en qu6 sentido la trataron, y c6mo expresaron
aquella superior inteligencia.
c En 1784-tres afios antes de la Constitucion-poseyendo
entonces los Estados Unidos el Territorio del Noroeste, y
ningun otro alguno-el Congreso de la Confederacion se
ocup6 de la question de prohibit la esclavitnd en aquel
Territorio; y cuatro de los treinta y nueve, que despues
formaron la present Constitucion, se hallaban en aquel
Congress, y notaron sobre aquella question. De 6stos
Sherman, Mifflin y Williamson votaron por la prohibicion
-mostrando de este modo, que en su inteligencia no
existia linea alguna divisoria entire la autoridad local y la
federal, ni disposicion alguna, que negase al Gobierno fe-
deral dominio sobre la esclavitud en un territorio federal.
Me. Henry, que era el otro de los cuatro, vot6 contra la
prohibition, manifestando que, por alguna causa, 61 creia
impropio votar en favor de ella.
En 1887, siempre antes de la Constitucion, pero mientras
se hallaba en session la Convencion que la di6, y mientras
el territorio noroeste era el anico territorio que los Estados
Unidos poseian, volvi6 a tratarse en el Congreso de la Con-
federacion la misma question de prohibir la esclavitud en
el territorio; y tres mas, de los treinta y nueve que despues
dictaron la Constitucion, se hallaban en aquel Congreso y
votaron la material. Eran 6stos Blount, Few, y Baldwin, y
todos tres votaron por la prohibicion; probando asi que, en
su entender, ninguna line divisoria entire la autoridad local
y la federal, ni ninguna otra cosa, prohibia al gobierno
federal ejercer imperio sobre la esclavitud en aquel terri-
torio.
ccPor este tiempo la prohibition se convirti6 en ley, for-
mando parte de lo que ahora es bien conocido con el nom-
bre de Ordenanza de'87.
c Parece que la question de la atribucion federal sobre la
esclavitud en los territories, no fu6 promovida directamente
ante la Convencion que prepare la constitution original; y





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


de aqui proviene que no conste en los registros que, durante
los debates relatives & ella, los treinta y nueve, 6 al'gunos
de ellos, expresasen opinion alguna sobre aquel punto
coistitucional.
(En 1789, el primer Congreso que funcion6 bajo la Consti-
tucion sanciou6 un acta, ratificando la ordenanza.de '87, 6
incluyendo la prohibicion de la esclavitud en el territorio
noroeste.
cdInform6 sobre el bill de esta acta uno de los treinta y
nueve, que fu6 Fitzsimmons, entonces miembro de la Ca-
mara de Representantes por Pensilvania. La ley pas6 por
todos sus grades sin una palabra de oposicion, y finalmente
fu6 ratificada en ambas Camaras sin sies ni n6es; lo que
equivale a un voto glor unanimidad. En este Congreso
estaban diez y seis de los dtreinta y nueve) padres que
dieron la Constitucion; y fueron Langdon, Gilman, John'on,
Sherman, Morris,Read, Butler, Fitzsimmons, Few, Baldwin,
King, Pattersoh, Clymer, Butler, Carroll y Madison.
((Esto manifiesta que, en su entender, ninguna linea
divisoria entire la autoridad local y la federal, ni cosa al-
guna en la Constitucion, propiamente inhibia al Congreso
de excluir la esclavitud en el territorio federal; pues, a no
ser asi, su fidelidad A. los principios de justicia y su jura-
mento de obedecer a la Constitucion, los habria inducido a
oponerse a la exclusion.
(Todavia mas: Jorge Washington, otro de los (treinta y
nueve, era entonces Presidente de los Estados Unidos, y
como tal aprob6 y firm el bill, completando con esto su
validez como ley, y mostrando asi, que, en su entender,
ninguna linea divisoria entire la autoridad local y la federal,
ni ninguna otra cosa en la Constitucion impedia al Gob.ierno
federal prohibir la esclavitud en un territorio federal.
aPoco despues de adoptada la Constitucion original, cedi6
Virginia al Gobierno Federal los terrenos que ahora forman
el Estado de Tennessee; y un poco mas tarde la Georgia
cedi6 los que ahora constituyen los Estados de Mississipi y
Alabama. En ambas actas de cesion los Estados cesionarios
pusieron por condition al Gobierno federal, que la escla-
vitud no seria abolida en el pals cedido. Bajo tales condi-
ciones el Congreso, al aceptar aquellos territories, no podia
prohibir absolutamente la esclavitud en su jurisdiccion.





VIDA DE LIN COLN


Pero aun asi, siempre ejerci6, hasta cierto punto, la facultad
de regirla. En 1798 el Congreso organize el territorio de
Mississipi; y en la acta de organization se prohibit la intro-
duccion de esclavos de cualquier lugar, fuera de los Estados
Unidos, bajo pena de una multa, y de dar libertad A los es-
clavos intrdducidos. Esta acta fu6 sancionada en ambas
Camaras sin discussion. En aquel Congreso se hallaban tres
miembros de los dtreinta y nueve)) que formaron la Cons-
titucion original, y fueron Langdon, Read y Baldwin. Todos
elios probablemente votaron por la prohibicion, pues A no
ser asi habrian dejado consignada su oposicion en los re-
gistros, si hubieran comprendido que existia una linea
divisoria entire la autoridad local y la federal, 6 disposicion
alguna de la Constitucion, que estorbase al G'obierno gene-
ral el legislar sobre la esclavitud en territorio federal. En
1803 el Gobierno federal compr6 el pais de Luisiana. Nues-
tras primeras adquisiciones territoriales nos vinieron de
algunos de nuestros propios Estados; mas no asi con la
Luisiana, que adquiriamos de una nacion extrafia. En 1804
el Congress di6 organization territorial aquella parte que
ahora compone el Estado de Luisiana. Nueva Orleans, si-
tuada en aquella parte, era una antigua y comparativa-
mente una gran ciudad. Habia ndmero considerable de
colonos y establecimientos, y la esclavitud estaba difundida
por todas parties, y mezclada con los habitantes.
((El Congreso no prohibit la esclavitud en la acta territo-
rial; pero intervino y ejerci6 dominion sobre ella en una via
mas lata y determinada que en el caso del Mississipi. H6
aqui en substancia las disposiciones entonces tomadas, con
respect A esta question:
((Primero. Que no se introdujesen esclavos de pais ex-
tranjero.
(Segundo. Que no pudiese ser llevado al Territorio el esclavo
que hubiese sido importado a los Estados Unidos despues
de Mayo de 1798.
(Tercero. Que ningun esclavo fuese introducido mas que
por su duefio, y para su propio uso, como un poblador;1
siendo la pena de todos estos casos, una multa por la viola-
cion de la ley, y la libertad del esclavo.
( Esta acta fu6 votada tambien sin discussion. En el Con-
ToMo xxvII.-8





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


greso que la sancion6 hallabanse dos de los Etreinta y
nueve, Baldwin y Dayton; y como se dijo en el caso de
Mississipi, es probable que ambos votasen en favor de la ley;
porque sin eso, no habrian dejado de consignar su oposi-
cion, si & su entender violaba la linea que con propiedad
dividiera la autoridad local de la federal, 6 alguna disposi-
cion de la Constitucion.
c En 1819-20 sobrevino y fu6 resuelta la question del
Missouri. Muchas votaciones fueron tomadas por sies y
por n6es, en ambas CAmaras del Congreso, sobre las varias
faces de la question en general. Dos de los (treinta y
nueve, King y Pinckney, tenian asiento en aquel Con-
greso. King vot6 firmemente por la prohibicion de la es-
clavitud y contra toda transaccion, mientras que Pinckney,
con la misma decision, vot6 contra la prohibition de la
esclavitud y contra todo compromise. Con esto di6 a en-
tender King que, en su concept, el Congreso al excluir
la esclavitud en un territorio federal, no traspasaba line
alguna trazada entire la autoridad local y la federal, ni
otra disposition de la Constitucion; mientras que Pinckney,
por su voto, manifestaba que, en su opinion, habia razo-
nes suficientes para oponerse, en aquel caso, A una pro-
hibicion semejante.
((Los casos mencionados son los ilnicos actos de los
((treinta y nueve), 6 de algunos de entire ellos, que sobre
este punto he podido descubrir.
((Si hubi6ramos de enumerar las personas que expusie-
ron su juicio, y que fueron cuatro en 1784, tres en 1787, diez
y siete en 1789, tres en 1798, dos en 1804, y dos en 1819,
tendriamos los treinta y uno por junto. Pero esto seria con-
tar A cinco de ellos dos veces, y A otro cuatro. El verdadero
ndmero de los (treinta y nueve) que he demostrado haber-
se expresado sobre la question, que, segun el texto, enten-
dian mejor que nosotros, es veinte y tres; quedando diez y
seis que no emitieron su parecer en ningun sentido, A este
respect.
((Aqui, pues, tenemos veinte y tres de los (treinta y nueve)
padres, que crearon el gobierno bajo el cual vivimos, y que
han manifestado sujuicio, bajo su responsabilidad official y
la deljuramento, sobre la misma question, que el texto afir-
ma c(ellos entendfan tan bien, y acaso mejor que nosotross;





VIDA DE LINCOLN


y veinte y uno de ellos, es decir,una decidida mayoria de los
atreinta y nuevo), a riesgo de cometer la mas' palpable
infraccion de sus deberes priblicos, y de hacerse reos de
perjurio, si, en su entender, alguna perceptible division
existia entire la autoridad local y federal, 6 algo en la
Constitucion que habian jurado sostener, impidiese al
Gobierno federal ejercer autoridad sobre la esclavitud en
un territorio federal. Asi obraron los veinte y uno; y
del mismo modo que los actos "hablan mas alto que las
palabras, tambien los hechos ejecutados bajo su responsabi-
lidad son aun mas elocuentes.
((Dos de los veinte y tres votaron contra la prohibicion
de la esclavitud en los territories federales hecha por el Con-
greso, cuando tuvieron occasion de votar sobre aquella cues-
tion. Pero no se conocen las razones que tuvieran para obrar
asi. Pudieron hacerlo en virtud de career que existia de
por medio una division marcada entire la autoridad local
y la federal, 6 alguna disposicion 6 principio de la Consti-
tucion; 6 pudieron, sin tener en vista tal question, haber
votado contrala prohibicion por conveniencias de estado. El
que ha jurado sostener la Constitucion no puede-en con-
ciencia votar por aquello que consider ser una media
inconstitucional, por convenient que le parezca; pero
no debe votar contra una media que reputa constitu-
cional, si al mismo tiempo la cree perjudicial. No seria por
tanto propio el aseverar, que aun aquellos dos que votaron
en contra de la prohibicion, lo hicieron asi, porque, en su
entender, alguna regulardivision entire la autoridad local
y federal, 6 algo en la Constitucion, impidiese al Gobierno
federal ejercer su poder sobre la esclavitud en el territorio
federal.
(Los restantes diez y seis de los a(treinta y nueveD, a lo que
he podido averiguar, no han dejado constancia de su opinion
sobre la question del Gobierno federal en punto a esclavi-
tud en territories federales. Peru hay fundamentos para
career que su modo de pensar sobre esta material, no ha
debido diferir sustancialmente del de sus veinte y tres
concolegas.
(A fin de adherirme mas escrupulosamente al texto, he
omitido de prop6sito toda expression que nazca de persona
alguna, por mas distinguida- que sea, que no fuese uno de





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


los treinta y nueve fundadores de la Constitucion original;
y por la misma razon tambien he suprimido las opinions
expresadas por estos mismos durante las diversas faces bajo
las cuales se present esta question. Si echamos una
mirada sobre sus actos y declaraciones en los distintos
aspects de esta controversial, tales como la trata de escla-
vos y el merito moral y politico de la esclavitud en general,
apareceri bien claro, que si los diez y seis se hubiesen ha-
Ilado en position de ejercer directamente este imperio del
Gobierno federal sobre la esclavitud en un territorio federal,
habrian probablemente obrado exactamente lo mismo que
los veinte y tres.
(Entre esos diez y seis, contkbanse algunos de los mas
decididos adversaries de la esclavitud. Tales eran Franklin,
Hamilton y Morris; mientras que hoy no se sate de uno solo
que pensase de otro modo, con excepcion quiza de Ruledge
de la Carolina del Sur.
El resultado final es, que de los treinta y nueve de
nuestros padres que dieron la Constitucion original,
aveinte uno) (la mayoria relative) comprendieron sin
duda alguna que ninguna separacion legal de las auto-
ridades locales y federales, ni parte alguna de la Cons-
titucion, impedian al Gobierno federal ejercer imperio
sobre la esclavitud en los territories federales; cuando es
probable que todos los demas entendian la question del
mismo modo. Sin la menor dispute, tal era la mente de
los fundadores de la Constitucion original; y el texto
mismo nos asegura que ellos entendian la question mejor
que nosotros.
(Pero hasta ahora he venido considerando el modo
de enterider esta question de parte de los autores de la
constitution original, segun aparece de las discusiones de
su tiempo.
((En el mismo document primitive se disponia la manera
de enmendarlo; siendo una cosa establecida, que la actual
forma de gobierno, bajo el cual vivimos, se compone de la
Constitucion original y de doce articulos sancionados y afia-
didos despues.
((Los que ahora insisted en career que el imperio ejercido
sobre la esclavitud por el Gobierno federal en los Territorios
es una violacion de la Constitucion, no sefialan las disposi-





VIDA DE LINCOLN


ciones que suponen violadas; y, A lo que yo entiendo, se fijan
en las de los articulos eninendatarios y no en el document
original.
(La Corte Suprema, en el caso de Dred Scott, se plant en
el articulo quinto de las enmiendas que prescribe que nin-
guna persona sera despojada de su propiedad, sino por mi-
nisterio de la ley); mientras que el Senadoi' Douglas y sus se-
cuaces extremists, se fundan en la decima enmienda, la
cual estatuye que (los poderes no concedidos por la Cons-
titucion, quedan reservados respectivamente a los Estados,
6 al pueblo.)
((Ahora, t6ngase present que estas enmiendas fueron
sancionadas por el primer Congreso, que funcion6 bajo
la Constitucion, el mismo Congreso que ratific6 el acta
ya referida, dando fuerza de ley A la prohibicion de la
esclavitud en el territorio del Noroeste. No solamente
fu6 el mismo Congreso, sino que fueron id6nticamente
los mismos hombres, los que durante la misma session
estaban tratando y tramitando a un tiempo aquellas
enmiendas constitucionales, y el acta que prohibe la es-
clavitud en todos los territories que la nacion poseia en
aquel tiempo. Las enmiendas constitucionales fueron in-
troducidas antes, y fueron sancionadas despues del acta
que daba fuerza de ley a la ordenanza de 87; de manera
que durante toda la discussion del acta para ratificar esta
ordenanza, estaban tambien pendientes las enmiendas
constitucionales.
(Aquel Congreso, compuesto en todo de setenta y seis
miembros, incluyendo diez y seis de los que prepararon la
Constitucion original, como antes se ha dicho, entra preemi-
nentemente en el ndimero de aquellos de nuestros padres
que fundaron el Gobierno bajo el cual vivimos, y al cual aho-
ra se pretend negar que posea imperio sobre la esclavitud
en territories federales.
,No es algo presuntuoso que un hombre de nuestra
6poca afirme, que las dos cosas que deliberadamente
fund aquel Congreso, y llev6 a cabo al mismo tiempo,
eran absolutamente inconsistentes entire si? gY no es
mas temeraria y absurda aquella asercion, cuando se la
junta A la otra salida de los mismos labios, que da por
sentado el hecho de que aquellos que hicieron estas dos





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


cosas, que ahora resultan contradictorias (suponindolas
tales), las comprendian mejor que nosotros, mejor que el
que asegura que estAn en contradiction?
((No es por cierto aventurado-establecer que los streinta
y nueve ) que formaron la Constitucion original, y los se-
tenta y seis miembros del Congreso que sancion6 las en-
miendas, tomados en conjunto, componen aquel cuerpo
que, sin violencia alguna, podian ser designados como nues-
tros padres y fundadores del gobierno bajo el cual vivimos.
Y dando esto por sentado, desafio A todo hombre A que
nos pruebe, que alguno de ellos declare jams en su vida,
que creia que existiera una division legal entire la autori-
dad local y federal, 6 parte alguna de la Constitucion, que
impidiese al Gobierno Federal ejercer imperio sobre la es-
clavitud en los Territorios federales. Voy mas adelante
todavia. Desafio a todo hombre que diga, si hay ser huma-
no en toda la redondez de la tierra, que haya sostenido
jamAs, antes de comenzar este siglo (y pudiera casi decir
antes de mediados del siglo) que, A su entender, existia
una propia division entire las autoridades locales y federa-
les, 6 alguna parte de la Constitucion, que impedia al Go-
bierno Federal ejercer imperio sobre la esclavitud en los
Territories federales. D6ile A los que tal declared ahora,
no s6lo a nuestros padres, que fundaron el gobierno bajo el
cual vivimos, sino tambien a todos los hombres del siglo
en que fu6 fundado, para que busquen entire ellos, seguro
que no han de hallar un solo hombre que est6 de acuerdo
con ellos.
((Ahora es el caso de ponerme un poco A cubierto contra
una mala inteligencia. No es mi animo decir que estamos
obligados A seguir implicitamente A nuestros padres en
todo lo que hicieron. Obrar asi seria renunciar A las luces
de la experiencia que se va adquiriendo-desechar todo
progress, toda mejora. Lo que quiero decir es que, si hu-
bi6semos de suplantar las opinions political de nuestros
padres, en algun caso, debe s6lo hacerse esto, cuando ocu-
rran pruebas y razones tan claras y conclusivas que aun
su gran autoridad, buenamente considerada y pesada, no
pueda subsistir; y seguramente much menos, en una cues-
tion que nosotros mismos declaramos que ellos entendian
mejor que nosotros.





VIDA DE LINCOLN


((Si alguien, en nuestros dias, cree sinceramente que
una propia division entire la autoridad local y federal, 6
una parte de la Constitucion impide al gobierno federal
ejercer imperio sobre la esclavitud en Territorios federales,
en su derecho estA de decirlo, y reforzar su position con
toda clase de pruebas verdaderas, y los buenos arguments
de que pueda valerse. Pero no tiene derecho de extraviar
a otros, que no conocen la historic y no tienen tiempo de
estudiarla, con la err6nea creencia de que (nuestros pa-
dres)) y fundadores del gobierno bajo del cual vivimos,
tenian la misma opinion, substituyendo de este modo a las
pruebas veridicas y 6 los buenos arguments, la falsedad
y el engafio. Si hay en nuestra 4poca un hombre que crea
sinceramente ((que nuestros padres que fundaron el gobier-
no bajo el cual vivimos ), sostenian y pusieron en prActica
principios que indujeran a career que ellos comprendian que
habiauna division propia entire las autoridades locales y fede-
rales que impidiese al Gobierno Federal legislar sobre la
esclavitud en Territorios federales, duefio es de proclamarlo.
Mas debe aceptar al mismo tiempo la responsabilidad
de declarar que, en su opinion, 4l entiende sus principios
mejor que lo que ellos mismos los entendieron, y espe-
cialmente no equivocar- aquella responsabilidad, asegu-
rando que ellos entendian la question tan bien y much
mejor que nosotros.
(( Pero basta de esto. Dejemos A los que creen que los
fundadores de nuestro gobierno entendian esta question
tan bien yaun much mejor que nosotros, hablar como ha-
blan, y obrar como obran. Esto es todo lo que los Repu-
blicanos exigen y todo lo que los Republicanos desean, con
respect A la esclavitud. Como lo caracterizaron nuestros
padres, asi la marcan ellos ahora, es decir, como un mal, no
para ser propagado, sino para ser tolerado, y protegido s6lo
por causa de, y hasta donde, su actual existencia entre nos-
otros la hace una necesidad soportable y defensible. Que
sean en buena hora, plena y abiertamente mantenidas to-
das las garantias con que nuestros padres la escudaron.
Por esto luchan los Republicanos, y con esto, segun en-
tiendo y creo, se darian por satisfechos.
Y ahora, si quisieran escucharme (como creo que no lo
harAn), yo dirigiria unas pocas palabras al pueblo del Sur.





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


((Yo les diria: Vosotros os creis un pueblo racional y
sensato; y no creo que en las dotes de racionabilidad y de
justiciaseais inferiores a pueblo alguLno. Y sin embargo,
cuando hablais de nosotros los Republicanos, lo haceis
para denostarnos como reptiles, 6 cuando mejor, como
hombres fuera de la ley. Prestariais oidos A pirates y
asesinos, pero nada escuchariais de ((negros republica-
nos.~ (1) En todas las discusiones que ocurren entire vos-
otros, s6lo estais de acuerdo en condenar en comun a los
e negros republicans ). Tal condenacion en verdad os pa-
rece ser requisito preliminary indispensable (licencia pudie-
ra decirse), para ser admitido entire vosotros, 6 conceder la
palabra.
(( Ahora, conseguiria 6 no de vosotros, que os detuvie-
rais un instant A meditar sobre si esto es absolutamente
just para con nosotros, y aun para con vosotros mismos ?
((Presentad vuestra acusacion y especificaciones, y dig-
naos en seguida armaros de paciencia para escuchar nues-
tra denegacion 6 descargos.
((Decis que nosotros sostenemos opinions seccionales.
Lo negamos. He aqul un capitulo de acusacion, y A vos-
otros os incumbe probarlo. Producis la prueba, y cuAl es
ella ? Que nuestro partido no tiene existencia en vuestra
section. El hecho es cierto en el fondo; pero esto prueba
acaso el cargo? Si lo prueba, entonces, dejariamosde ser
seccionales desde el dia en que, sin cambiar de principios
empezAramos A ganar votos en vuestra seccion. No podeis
escaparos de este dilema; y estais dispuestos sin embargo
A aceptar esta conclusion? Si lo estais, probablemente
muy pronto hallareis que hemos dejado de ser seccionales
porque este mismo afio vamos A obtener votos en vuestra
section. Entonces empezareis A descubrir, lo que es la
sencilla verdad, que vuestra prueba no justifica el cargo.
((La causa de que no tengamos partidarios alli es de vuestra
misma hechura, y no de la nuestra. Y si hay falta en aquel
hecho, la falta viene primeriamente de vosotros; y conti-
nuara siendo asi, mientras que no probeis que nosotros os
repelemos con nuestra doctrine 6 actos injustos. Si esta
exclusion proviniera de algun principio 6 injusticia nuestra

(1) Un apodo con que los dem6eratas pretendlan abrumar al partido republican.





VIDA DE LINCOLN


la falta es nuestra; mas esto no lleva al punto de donde vos-
otros debais haber partido: a la discussion de la justicia 6
injusticia de nuestros principios. Si puestos en practice
nuestros principios, perjudicaran vuestra seccion en favor
nuestro, 6 para otro objeto cualquiera, entonces nuestros
principios, asi como nosotros mismos, somos seccionales; y
nos anatematizariais justamente como tales, y nos resisti-
riais con razon. Discutamos, pues, sobre la question de saber,
si la practice de nuestros principios dafia a vuestra seccion
y discutamosla tambien con la conciencia de que algo pue-
de decirse en favor nuestro. Aceptais el desafio ? No ?
Entonces creis realmente que el principio, que los fundado-
res de nuestro gobierno juzgaron tan evidentemente just
que lo adoptaron y confirmaron una y otra vez con sus ju-
ramentos oficiales, es ahora tan evidentemente injusto que
intentais condenarlo sin oirnos un instant.
( Hay muchos de los vuestros que se complacen en des-
plegar a nuestra vista las amonestaciones hechas por
Washington en su famosa despedida contra los partidos
seccionales. Habian transcurrido apenas ocho aflos des-
pues de haber dirigido aquellas amonestaciones, cuando
Washington, como Presidente de los Estados tJnidos, apro-
baba y firmaba una acta del Congreso, dando fuerza de ley
a. la prohibicion de introducir la esclavitud en el Territorio
Noroeste; cuya acta legalizaba la political del Gobierno a
este respect desde su principio, y hasta el moment en
que 61 mismo escribia aquella advertencia; y un afio des-
pues de haberla publicado, decia en carta privada a Lafa-
yette, que 61 consideraba la prohibition como una media
sabia, expresando, con el mismo motivo, la esperanza de
que un dia tendriamos una Confederacion de Estados
libres.
( Teniendo esto present, y viendo que el seccionalismo
ha aparecido despues sobre el mismo asunto, Lson aquellas
amonestaciones una arma en vuestras manos contra
nosotros, 6 en las nuestras contra vosotros? Si Washington
pudiese hablar, ,a qui6nes echaria la culpa del secciona-
lismo? LA nosotros que sostenemos su political, 6 a vosotros
que la repudiais? Nosotros respetamos la amonestacion
de Washington y os la recomendamos, al mismo tiempo





90 OBRAS DE SARMIENTO

que su ejemplo, que nos esta indicando su recta aplica-
cion.
a Pero decis que vosotros sois conservadores-- mientras
que nosotros somos revolucionarios, destructores, 6 algo de
ese jaez. aQul Ilamais conservation? No es el apego A
lo antiguo y probado contra lo nuevo y por ensayarse ?
Nosotros nos aferramos y peleamos por la antigua 6 id6n-
tica political, sobre el punto en controversial; tal cual fu6
adpptada por nuestros padres, que fundaron el Gobierno
bajo el cual vivimos.
((Mientras que vosotros unAnimemente desechais, escupis
aquella antigua political, insists por colgarle algo de nuevo.
Verdad es que no estais de acuerdo entire vosotros mismos,
sobre lo que habeis de substituirle. Teneis un buen acopio
de nuevas proposiciones y planes; pero estais de acuerdo
en desechar y denunciar como mala la vieja political de
nuestros padres. Algunos de vosotros estan por revivir la
trata de esclavos; otros por un C6digo esclavista del Con-
greso para los territories; aquellos por que el Congreso
impida que los territories destierren la esclavitud de sus
jurisdicciones respectivas; 6stos por mantener la esclavitud
en los Territorios por virtud del poder judicial. Hay, por
fin, quienes van por aquel Kgrrran prrrincipio de que ((si
un hombre quiere esclavizar A otro hombre, un tercero no
tiene derecho A oponerse)): 6 sea lo que tan bizarramente
se apellida la Soberania Popularm. Mas no se encuentra
un solo hombre de entire vosotros, que est6 por la prohibi-
cion federal de la esclavitud en los Territorios federales,
conform A lo que practicaron e nuestros padres que funda-
ron el Gobierno bajo el cual vivimos*. Ninguno de vuestros
various proyectos se apoya en un solo precedent, ni en
autoridad alguna durante la centuria en que se origin
nuestro Gobierno. Pensad, pues, si vuestras pretensiones
de conservatism, y las de destruction que nos imputais,
estan basadas en los mas claros y estables fundamentos.
a Tambien decis, que hemos hecho de la esclavitud una
question mas prominent ahora de lo que anteslo era. Lo
negamos. Admitimos que es mas prominent, pero no que
nosotros le hayamos dado esa prominencia. No somos
nosotros sino vosotros los que habeis abandonado la political
de nuestros padres. Resistimos y resistiremos vuestra in-





VIDA DE LINCOLN


novacion; y de aqui viene la mayor prominencia de la
question. ,Querriais reducir la question a sus primeras
proporciones? Volved A aquella antigua political. Lo que
antes era, volveri A ser, bajo las mismas condiciones. Si
quereis tener la paz de los tiempos pasados, adopted de
nuevo los preceptos y political de aquellos tiempos.
((Nos echais en cara, que fomentamos insurrecciones
entire vuestros esclavos. Negamos el cargo. j Y cual es
vuestra prueba? Harper's Ferry, &Juan Brown? (1) Juan
Brown no era Republicano; y vosotros no habeis podido
implicar A un solo Republicano en la empresa de Harper's
Ferry. Si hay uno solo de nuestros partidarios culpable de
un tal atentado, vosotros lo sabeis 6 no lo sabeis. Si lo
sabeis, sois inexcusables en .no designer el hombre, y
probar el hecho. Si no lo sabeis, mas inexcusables sois
en aseverarlo; y especialmente en persistir en la acusa-
cion, despues de haberla propalado y no poder presentar la
prueba. No es necesario deciros, que persistir en un cargo
que uno sabe ser falso, es simplemente una maliciosa
calumnia. Algunos de entire vosotros admiten, que ningun
Republican ayud6 6 foment6 a designio el suceso de


(1) Este primer episodlo en el drama sangriento que se ha representado despues,
ocurrl6 el 16 de Octubre de 1859, y es conocido como la Insurrecclon de Harper's
Ferry, del nombre de la deliciosa villa situada en las riberas del Potomac, como a
cincuenta millas de Washington, donde esta el segundo gran Arsenal, 6 mas bien,
Armeria de los Estados Unidos. En la noche del citado dia, Juan Brown, A la
cabeza de 17 consplradores blancos y seis negros entr6 en el pueblo, y antes que
nadie se apercibiera de sus planes, se habia apoderado de la Armeria, que estaba
A cargo de un portero, con sus 200.000 fuslles. En seguida pusieron en prison A
los princlpales habitantes en calidad de rehenes. Al dia siguiente s6lo se aperci-
bleron las autoridades p6blicas de tan Inesperada y singular revolution. Pronto
acudieron las miliclas y destacamentos de tropas de linea, las cuales pusieron cerco
A los sublevados, que se refuglaron en uno de los talleres. Uno A uno fueron ca-
yendo los lntr6pidos abolicionlstas; y Juan Brown mismo, despues de haber visto
caer dos de sus hijos A su lado y various otros de sus compafieros, manteniendo
casi solo A la distancla A sus perseguidores durante mas de cuarenta horas, fu6
cautivado al fin con las armas en la mano, y defendl6ndose hasta el iltimo. El 2
de Diciembre del mismo afio, Juan Brown y cuatro de sus complices fueron ahor-
cados en Charlestown, en virtud de sentencla de la Corte, y despues de seguirseles
un largo proceeso en debida forma. Este valiente y sincero amigo del esclavo ma-
nifest6 hasta el iltimo la serenidad y plena convicclon de un martir, como indu-
dablemente serA tenido por tal en la historic, aunque condenado por las leyes y
opinion de su patkla. ( Nota del autor.)





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


Harper's Ferry; pero insisted, no obstante, en que nuestras
doctrinas y declaraciones necesariamente conducian A
aquel resultado. Nosotros no lo creemos asi. Nosotros
sabemos que no sostenemos doctrine, ni hacemos decla-
raciones, que no hayan sido sostenidas y hechas por
anuestros padres que fundaron el Gobierno bajo el cual
vivimos)). No jugais limpio con nosotros en esta material.
Cuando el suceso ocurrio, estaban pr6ximas algunas
importantes elecciones de Estados; y pareclais contentisi-
mos con la creencia de que culpindonos, lograriais aven-
tajarnos en aquellas votaciones.
((Vinieron las elecciones, y vuestras esperanzas no que-
daron del todo realizadas. Cada Republicano, por lo que a
61 respect al menos, sabe que vuestra imputacion era una
calumnia, y que os proponiais solo con esto inclinarlo &
votar en vuestro favor. Las doctrinas y declaraciones re-
publicanas van siempre acompaifadas de protests contra
todo lo que huele A entrometimiento con vuestros esclavos,
6 con vosotros mismos, respect de vuestros esclavos. Sin
duda que semejante conduct no los incitaria a sublevarse.
Sin duda que nosotros, en comun ((con nuestros padres que
fundaron el Gobierno bajo el cual vivimos), proclamamos
como fe nuestra, que la esclavitud es injusta, pero ni esto
llega 6 los oidos de los esclavos.
(( Aunque digamos 6 hagamos lo que se quiera, los escla-
vos apenas saben que exista un partido republican. Yo
creo que, en efecto, ellos no lo saben, sino es por el mal que
de nosotros decis en su presencia. En vuestra contienda con
nosotros, cada fraccion echa en cara la otra sus simpatias
por el Republicanismo Negro; y para hacer mas acertado el
cargo, definis el republicanismo negro como una simple in-
surreccion, matanza y anarquia entire los esclavos.
( No son mas comunes ahora las insurrecciones de escla-
vos, que lo que lo eran antes que se originase el partido
republican. Qu6 origin la insurreccion de Southam-
pton, ahora veinte afios, en la cual se perdieron por lo m6-
nos tres veces mas vidas que en la de Harper's Ferry ? Por
mas eldstica que sea vuestra fantasia, jamas podriais
explicar aquella sublevacion por el republicanismo negro.
En el actual estado de cosas en los Estados Unidos, yo no
creo en la posibilidad de una insurreccion general de





VIDA DE LINCOLN


negros, 6 de much extension. No podrian obtener la
precisa unidad de accion. Los esclavos no tienen medios
rApidos de comunicacion, ni sediciosos blancos, 6 negros
libres, pueden proporcionarselos. Los materials explosi-
bles estAn en todaspartes reducidos A particular; pero no
tienen ni pueden dArseles la necesaria cohesion.
<( Mucho hablan los hombres del Sur del apego de los
esclavos por sus amos y sefioras; y una parte de esto por lo
menos es cierto. No bien se habria tramado el plan de
un levantamiento, y comunicAdose A veinte de entire ellos,
cuando alguno, por salvar la vida de un amo 6 sefiora
querida, ya lo habria divulgado. Esta es la regla; y la re-
volucion de Haiti no lo contradice, por haber ocurrido
bajo circunstancias especiales. La conspiracion de la
p6lvora en Inglaterra, aunque nada tenga que ver con la
esclavitud, viene mas al caso. En ella s6lo veinte estaban
en el secret; y sin embargo, uno de ellos, ansioso por
salvar A un amigo, revel6 la trama a& ste, y por consecuen-
cia estorb6 el desastre. El envenenamiento de las viudas
en algun caso, el asesinato abierto 6 clandestine en los
campos, la sublevacion de veinte 6 mas, continuarAn acae-
ciendo como resultadopaatural de la esclavitud; pero no creo
que por much tiempo ocurra en este pais un levantamiento
general de esclavos. Los que temen, 6 esperan tal acon-
tecimiento, quedarian igualmente burlados.
(a Sirvi6ndome de las palabras de Mr. Jefferson, pronun-
ciadas muchos afos hace: ((esta todavia en nuestro poder
encaminar la obra de emancipacion y de deportacion gra-
dual y pacifica, de modo que el mal desaparezca insensi-
blemente; y los huecos vayan siendo ocupados, pari passu,
por trabajadores blancos libres. Si por el contrario la de-
jamos abrirse violentamente un camino, la naturaleza
humana se horroriza al contemplar tan espantoso espe-
tAculo en el porvenir.)
I* Mr. Jefferson no intentaba decir, ni lo digo yo, que el
derecho de amancipar correspondiese al Gobierno Federal.
El hablaba de Virginia, y por lo que hace A la facultad de
emancipar, yo hablo de todos los Estados esclavistas.
((Yo insist, sin embargo, en que el Gobierno federal
tiene la facultad de limitar la expansion de esta institution
-el poder de asegurar de que jamAs ocurra una insurrec-





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


cion general de esclavos, en territorio americano que
esta hoy libre de la esclavitud.
( La empresa de Juan Brown fu6 peculiar. No era una
insurreccion de esclavos. Era una tentative hecha por
hombres blancos, para sublevar A los negros; tentative que
estos no quisieron secundar. Era en verdad tan absurdo
el plan, que los negros, con toda su ignorancia, compren-
dieron que no podia salir bien. Aquel asunto por su lado
filos6fico, corresponde mas bien A los muchos atentados que
nos refiere la historic, para asesinar reyes y emperadores.
Un entusiasta se preocupa de la opresion de un pueblo,
hasta que llega A imaginarse comisionado por el cielo para
libertarlo. Aventura su ejecucion, que casi siempre con-
cluye por su propia ruina. La tentative de Orsini contra
Napoleon, y la de Juan Brown en Harper's Ferry, eran
precisamente id6nticas en su aspect filos6fico. El empeflo
de acusar A la vieja Inglaterra sobre la una, y a la nueva
Inglaterra sobre la otra, no contradice la sirhilitud de
ambos casos.
e(De qu6 os valdrian libros como el de Helper, (1) d otros
de su clase; de qu6 servia Juan Brown, para vuestra obra
de disolver el partido republican? La action humana
puede ser modificada hasta cierto punto, pero la natura-
leza humana no puede ser cambiada. Hay en la nacion
un juicio y un sentimiento contra la esclavitud, que dara
por lo menos million y medio de votos. No os es dado des-
truir aquel juicio y aquel sentimiento, desbaratando la or-
ganizacion political que los concentra. Dificilmente podreis
romper sus filas, y dispersar un ejercito que ha sido puesto
en batalla al frente de vuestros mas nutridos fuegos; pero
si lo pudierais, 4qu6 habriais ganado con forzar el senti-
miento que lo cre6 A que salga del pacifico canal que le
subministra la urna electoral, para lanzarlo por alguna
otra via?
GCual serA probablemente el otro canal? Disminuira 6
aumentarA con esto el ndmero de los Juan Brown?

(1) Este libro titulado ((La Crisis Amenazante,) demostraba con datos estadisticos
incontestables los desastrosos efectos de la esclavitud en ]a prosperidad y ade-
lantos del Sur. Escrito por un joven de la Carolina del Norte, esclt5 grande-
mente la ira de los esclav6eratas, y fue objeto de vivos debates en el Congreso
mismo.





VIDA DE LINCOLN


( Pero vosotros rompereis mas bien la Union, que some-
teros a una denegacion de vuestros derechos constitucio-
nales.
Esto tiene un significado algo violent; pero quedaria
paliado, si no enteramente justificado, en el caso en que
nosotros, por solo la fuerza de los ndmeros, nos propusi6-
semos privaros de algun derecho claramente escrito en la
Constitution. Mas nada de eso nos proponemos.
( Cuando haceis estas declaraciones, aludis especifica-
mente y de una manera sentenciosa a un pretendido dere-
cho constitucional-el de introducir esclavos en Territorios
federales, y conservarlos alli como propiedad; pero no esta
tal derecho especificamente definido en la Constitucion. La
letra de aquel instrument guard silencio sobre aquel
derecho. Nosotros por el contrario negamos que tal derecho
tenga existencia alguna en nuestra Constitucion, ni aun por
implicancia.
((Vuestro pensamiento, Ilanamente declarado, es que des-
truireis el Gobierno a menos que se os permit interpreter
y ejecutar la Constitucion, como mejor os plaza, en todos
los'puntos en dispute entire vosotros y nosotros. Vosotros
gobernareis, 6 en caso contrario arruinareis.
( Este es sin disfraz vuestro lenguaje para con nosotros.
Acaso direis que la Suprerna Corte ha decidido en vuestro
favor la controvertida question constitutional. Vamos por
parties. Dejando a un lado la distinction de los jurisperitos
entire dictameh y sentencia, las Cortes han decidido la que-
rella a vuestro favor en una cierta manera. Las Cortes han
dicho en sustancia, que es un derecho constitutional vues-
tro el introducir esclavos en los Territorios federales, y
retenerlos como propiedad privada.
(Cuando digo que la decision fue pronunciada en una
cierta manera, quiero significar que fue dada por una
Corte dividida en pareceres, y por una escasa mayoria de
los Jueces, sin estar de acuerdo entire si sobre las razones
en que debian fundarse; y que fu6 de tal manera expre-
sada, que sus mismos sostenedores no estan de acuerdo
sobre su sentido; y que esta basada principalmente sobre
un grave error de hecho, como es la asercion, en la opinion
de un Juez, que ((el derecho de propiedad en un esclavo, esta
distinta y expresamente afirmado en la Constitucion.)'





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


((El examen de la Constitucion mostrark que el derecho
de propiedad sobre el esclavo no esta distinta y expresa-
mente afirmado en ella. TUngase present que los jueces
no empefian su opinion judicial sobre que tal derecho est6
expresamente afirmado en la Constitucion; pero si han
empefiado su veracidad, diciendo que alli esta distinta y
expresamente afirmado),-distintamente, esto es, no mezclado
con otra cosa cualquiera; expresamente, esto es, que esti
en palabras que expresan aquello exactamente, sin la ayuda
de inferencia alguna, y sin admitir otro significado.
aSi ellos hubiesen empefiado- su opinion judicial, de que
tal derecho estA afirmado en aquel instrument por impli-
cancia, habria tocado a otros mostrar que ni la palabra
esclavo)) ni (esclavitudx) se encuentra en toda la Constitu-
cion; ni aun la palabra ((propiedad)) siquiera se lee en
conexion con el lenguaje relative a las cosas de esclavo y
esclavitud; y donde quiera que en aquel document se
alude al esclavo, se le llama una (persona)); y donde quiera
que se menciona el derecho que legalmente ejerce el amo,
se habla de 61, como servicio 6 trabajo obligatorio, 6 como
edeuda) pagadera en servicio 6 labor.
(Tocariale tambien probar con la historic contemporanea,
que este modo de hacer alusion a la esclavitud y a los
esclavos, en lugar de hablar de ellos, era empleado a pro-
p6sito para excluir de la Constitucion la idea de que hubiese
propiedad en el hombre.
((Demostrar esto es cosa facil y segura. 4No es de justicia
esperar que cuando llegue a conocimiento de los Jueces esta
obvia equivocacion, retiren aquella errada asercion, y re-
consideren la sentencia basada sobre ella ?
((No debe ademas olvidarse que nuestros padres que
fundaron el Gobieno bajo el cual vivimos-los hombres que
hicieron la Constitucion -decidieron la misma question
constitutional en nuestro favor, sin estar divididos entire si, al
pronunciar tal decision; sin que ocurriera division, despues
de emitida, sobre la interpretation que debiera darsele, y en
cuanto han quedado pruebas, sin basarla en equivocaciones
de hecho.
((Bajo todas estas circunstancias os creis realmente justi-
ficados para echar por tierra este gobierno, a menos que
no se someta a una semejante decision, tomandola como





VIDA DE LINCOLN


regla decisive y final de accion political, tal cual la inter-
pretais vosotros mismos!
( Mas, no os someteriais la election de un Presidente
republican. Y si tal sucediere, decis que destruireis la
Union; y en este caso el gran crime de haberla destruido
serA nuestro I
una pistola al pecho, dici6ndome: deteneos y entregad la
bolsa, d os mato, y entonces vos sereis el asesino t Lo que
el ladron me pide, mi bolsa, es seguramente mia, y yo tenia
un derecho indisputable A guardarla; pero ya no era mas
mia, que lo que ahora mi voto; puesto que la amenaza de
muerte, A fin de arrancarme mi dinero, y la amenaza do
destruir la Union A fin de arrancarme mi voto, serian difi-
cilmente reputadas como principios distintos.
((Unas pocas palabras ahora a los Republicanos. Es de
desearse ardientemente que todas las parties de esta gran
Confederacion se mantengan en paz y armonia entire si.
Hagamos los Republicanos lo que nos corresponda para
conseguirlo. Por mas que se nos provoque, abstengdmonos
de-todo acto inspirado por la pasion.y el rencor. Aun dando
por sentado que las gentes del Sur no nos prestaran oidos,
examinemos con calma sus exigencias, y acord6moselas,
si despues de considerar detenidamente cual es nuestro
deber, crey6semos nos correspondia ceder. Juzgando por
todo lo que dicen y hacen, y por el asunto y naturaleza de
la controversial que con nosotros sostienen, no podriamos
convenirnos sobre el modo de satisfacerlos, si fuese possible?
f(Quedarian satisfechos si se les entregasen los Territorios
sin condition alguna? Sabemos que esto no los satisfarA.
Entre sus actuales quejas contra nos'otros, apenas hacen
mencion de los Territorios. La mania ahora son las insu-
rrecciones 6 invasiones. L Quedarian satisfechos si en lo
adelante nada tuvi6ramos que ver con insurrecciones 6
invasiones ? Estamos ciertos de que no. Lo estamos, porque
tenemos conciencia de que nunca tuvimos que ver con
insurrecciones 6 invasiones; y no obstante esta total abs-
tencion, no estamos libres del cargo y de la acusacion.
Naturalmente viene la pregunta: jqu6 podr& satisfacer-
4os entonces? Simplemente esto. No basta dejarlos a sus
TOMO xxvii.-7





OBRAS DRI SARMIENTO


anchas, sino tambien convencerlos de alguna manera-que&
asi lo hacemos; y por la experiencia sabemos que esto no es.
cosa facil. Lo hemos intentado indtilmente desde el princi.
pio de nuestra organization. Igualmente indtil ha sido el
tratar de convencerlos con el hecho de que ninguno de
nosotros ha sido jamas descubierto en conato alguno de-
perturbarlos.
a(Y no habiendo bastado todos estos medios naturales, y
al parecer incontestables, para convencerlos, Lqu6 los satis-
fari? Esto y s6lo esto. Dejar de Ilamar injusta la esclavitud,
y unirnos a ella para declararla just. Y esto debe hacerse
sin rodeos y por complete, es decir, de palabra y de obra. El
silencio no lo tolerarian jamas; es preciso ponernos abierta-
mente de su lado. La nueva ley de sedicion propuesta por
Douglas debe ser sancionada y ejecutada, y acallada toda
declaracion contra la injusticia de la esclavitud, ya sea en
actos politicos, en la prensa, en el puilpito, en privado.
Debemos prender y entregar a. sus esclavos fugitivos con
nuestra alegria. Debemos hacer pedazos nuestras cons-
tituciones de Estados libres. La atm6sfera misma debe ser
purificada de todo miasma de oposicion A la esclavitud, antes
de que ellos dejen de career que todos sus embarazos les
vienen por causa nuestra.
((Yo se muy bien que ellos no dicen todo esto en los.
mismos terminos. La mayor parte de ellos nos dirian
probablemente: (Dejadnos solos, no os entrometais con
nosotros, y decid lo que os diere la gana sobre la esclavitud.)
Pero ya los hemos dejado solos, nadie se mete con ellos.
y entonces result, que lo que hablamos, es lo que les
molesta.
(S6 tambien que hasta ahora no han exigido terminante-
mente, que destruyamos nuestras constituciones de Estados.
libres. Y sin embargo, como esas constituciones condenan
como injusta la esclavitud en t6rminos mas solemnes que.
todo lo que nosotros podamos decir en su contra, se exi-
gird su destruction tan pronto como no haya otra cosa
con que resistir a sus pretensiones. No importa que hoy
no lo exijan. Al pedir lo que piden, y por la razon
que lo hacen, no se contendran hasta que lo hayan con-
seguido. Considerando, como consideran, moralmente jus-
tificada la esclavitud, y como convenient en political, na





TIDA DE LINCOLN


dejarAn de requerir que se reconozca como institution
national, como un derecho, como una bendicion para la
sociedad.
(Ni podriamos nosotros negarles esto con justicia, sino
en virtud de nuestra conviction de que la esclavitud es
injusta. Si la esclavitud es just, todas las palabras, actos,
leyes y contituciones contra ella, son injustas, y deben res-
cindirse y borrarse. Si es just, no podemos en justicia opo-
nernos a que sea nacionalizada y se haga universal. Si es
injusta, ellos no pueden con justicia insistir en su extension,
ni propagacion. Todo lo que piden debemos concederles,
si creemos just la esclavitud; todo lo que nosotros exigimos,
nos lo concederian gustosos, si creyesen injustificable la
esclavitud.
((La calificacion de just 6 injusta, tal es el punto deter-
minado sobre el cual versa la dispute. Teni6ndola por
just no hay que vituperarlesde que pretendan su complete
reconocimiento; pero crey6ndola injusta, gc6mo podriamos
nosotros cederles? ,Podemos darles nuestros votos, segun
su manera de very contra la nuestra? En vista de nuestra
responsabilidad moral, social y political, &podemos buena-
mente hacerlo?
((Injusta como creemos que es la esclavitud, p.odemos de-
jarla sola donde estA; porque todo eso se debe ai la necesidad
que nace de su actual existencia en la nacion; pero, 4mien-
tras nuestros votos puedan estorbarlo, permitiremos que
se extienda hasta los Territorios federales, y nos domine
alli y en nuestros Estados libres?
((Si nuestra conciencia del deber nos prohibe consentir
en esto, pongamonos sin miedo y con firmeza de parte de
nuestro deber. No nos dejemos extraviar por esos sofisticos
amafios, A que nos prestamos tan fAcilmente; amafios tales,
como de ir buscando A tientas un terreno intermediario,
entire lo just y lo injusto-tentativa tan ,ana, como la de
buscar un hombre que no est6 ni vivo ni muerto;-tales
como la de aquella political de qu6 me importa,) en una
question que tanto importa A todo hombre de corazon-ta-
les como las amonestaciones A los sostenedores de la Union
para que cedamos A los separatists contra la regla divina,
y de llamar no al pecador, sino al just a que se arrepienta;
tales como invocar a Washington, implorando que contra-





100 OBRAS DE SARMIENTO
digamos lo que Washington decia, y deshagamos lo que
Washington hizo.
((Ni nos dejemos apartar de nuestro deber por falsas acu-
saciones, ni amedrentarnos por amenazas de destruir nues-
tro Gobierno, y de abrir los calabozos para nosotros. Tenga-
mos fe en que la justicia es poder, y con aquella fe
osemos, hasta el fin, hacer nuestro deber, tal como lo en-
tendemos.
Durante esta visit Nueva York ocurri6 el siguiente
incident, de que damos cuenta en los t6rminos con que
lo refiri6 entonces uno de los preceptores de la Casa de
Industria de Five Points en esta ciudad.
((Un sabado por la mahana que estaba reunida nuestra
escuela dominical, hace pocos meses, vi entrar y tomar
asiento a un hombre alto y de notable aspect. Como lo
viese escuchar con la mayor atencion nuestros ejercicios,
revelkndose en su fisonomia el vivo interns que tomaba en
ellos, me acerqu6 61 para insinuarle que podia, si lo
deseaba, dirigir algunas palabras A los nifos. Acept6 la
invitacion con sefiales evidentes de placer; y dando algu-
nos pasos .hacia adelante, di6 principio a un sencillo dis-
curso que cautiv6 al juvenile auditorio, y produjo un silencio
general. Su lenguaje era notablemente bello, y la emocion
daba tonos musicales a su voz. Las fisonomias de los
nifios indicaban el efecto producido por la conviction:
cuando les dirigia amonestaciones, sus semblantes se entris-
tecian, asi como brillaban de gozo, cuando les hablaba de
esperanzas. Una 6 dos veces intent terminal sus obser-
vaciones, pero los imperativos gritos ((seguid,)) (oh! conti-
nuad,) lo compelian a continuar. Al ver la forma imponente
del extranjero, y al observer su poderosa cabeza y lo pro-
nunciado de sus facciones, dulcificadas esta vez por la im-
presion del moment, senti una invencible curiosidad de
saber algo mas acerca de este hombre, y cuando iba tran-
quilamente dejando ra sala, le supliqu6 me dijera su nom-
bre, a lo que contest cortesmente: ( Illinois.)














CANDIDATE Y PRESIDENT


El mecanismo de los partidos politicos.-Convencion de Chicago.-Idem de Char-
leston.-Lincoln es nombrado candidate para ]a Presidencia por la primera.-Su
aceptacion.-Su eleccion.-Agitacion en el Sur.-La Carolina del Sur se levanta,
primero, y la siguen otros Estados.-Pusllanlmidad del Presidente Buchanan.-La
rebellion se organize y amenaza al gobierno.

Es prActica nacida de la indole de las instituciones repu-
blicanas en los Estados Unidos, y de la necesidad misma de
dar organization y unidad de accion a las facciones que se
disputan el powder, la de celebrar reuniones political en que
cada partido, A guisa de congress popular, discute y esta-
blece el program de principios que se propone hacer triun-
far en cada election, y nombra los candidates que cree mas
dignos de representarlos y convertirlos en realidad. Estas
asambleas, aunque sin color legal alguno, adoptan y siguen
en un todo las reglas y usos parlamentarios de los cuerpos
legislativos, que son tan familiares A todo americano, cual
si fueran parte esencial de su vida. Cuando se trata de
designer el candidate para la presidencia, y de proclamar
los principios que han de servir de divisa de partido, 6 sea
la plataforma (segun la parlanza political en uso) en que aqu6l
se ha de colocar ante el pueblo, estas reuniones denomina-
das convenciones, compuestas de delegados de toda la
Union, toman proporciones muy vastas y original mas agi-
tacion y entusiasmo que la solemne inauguracion de un
Congress.
El 16 de Mayo de 1860 se reuni6 en Chicago la Convencion
Nacional de los Republicanos, con el objeto de designer
candidates para Presidente y Vice-Presidente y de acordar
el program politico de que 6stos debian ser los porta-
estandartes, durante la vigorosa campafia electoral, a que
se aprestaban todos los partidos con inusitado fervor. La





OBRAS DE SARMIENTO


Convencion de los Dem6cratas, recien celebrada en Char-
leston, se habia disuelto sin haberse puesto de acuerdo
sobre un candidate comun para las dos grandes alas en que
se encontraron fraccionados. La una, que constituia la
mayoria mas moderada, queria A todo trance hacer preva-
lecer la candidatura de Douglas; mientras que la otra
fraccion, apoyada por influencias administrativas, teniendo
el powder de estorbar su election, en virtud de former mas
de una tercera parte de la asamblea, se mostraba igual.
mente tenaz en su resolution. El resultado fu6, que apla-
zada la session A Baltimore, tampoco se logr6 conciliar A los
disidentes; y la convention acab6 por dividirse, proclamando
la una la candidatura de Douglas y Johnson, y la otra la de
Breckinridge y Lane. De esta manera se consum6 el des-
membramiento y ruina del maspoderoso~partido, que jamas
se haya organizado en los Estados Unidos; y que, con dos
6 tres excepciones, habia gobernado la nacion desde los
dias de Jefferson, A quien se reputaba por su fundador.
Otro partido medio, llamado la ((Union Constitucionalh,
se habia formado sobre las ruinas de los antiguos whigs y
americanos netos (apodados tambien know-nothings, 6 nada
saben), que proponian como candidate A un Mr. Bell y al
eminente orador Everett; pero, como todos los juste milieu en
tiempos de crisis, estaba destinado A ser aplastado fAcil-
mente entire aquellas dos grandes moles.
Con motivo de este fraccionamiento de sus formidable
adversaries, los Dem6cratas, las circunstancias se presenta-
ban sumamente favorables al partido Republicano; y daba
mas interns A la gran convention de Chicago. Trascurridos
los dos primeros dias en organizer y reglamentar el orden
de la session, el dia 18 se procedi6 a la votacion en medio de
una agitacion inmensa produtcida por los mil doscientos
delegados y un auditorio de mas de ocho mil almas, reuni-
dos todos bajo un inmenso toldo de tablazon, que aqui se
llama un wigwam, del nombre empleado por los indios del
Norte en sus fiestas de tribu. En el primer escrutinio, Mr. Se-
ward sac6 173, votos, Mr. Lincoln 102, y el resto se repartie-
ron entire otros siete candidates. Para reunir los votos disper-
sos se procedi6 como de costumbre, A segunda votacion,
obteniendo Lincoln 181 y Seward 184. En la tercera, A que
se recurri6 inmediatamente, Lincoln obtuvo 231, quedando