United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Water-borne foreign trade statistics
Alternate title:
Waterborne foreign trade statistics
United States water-borne foreign trade
United States waterborne foreign trade
Added title page title:
United States foreign trade
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, including annual cumulation

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in June 1965.
General Note:
"Summary report FT 985."
General Note:
Description based on: Calendar year 1952; title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: June 1965.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 13695873
lccn - sf 86092445
ocm13695873
Classification:
lcc - WMLC L 83/3610
System ID:
AA00010658:00102

Related Items

Succeeded by:
U.S. waterborne foreign trade


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Full Text






^2 United States

SForeign Trade


April 1965


IORNE FOREIGN TRADE STATISTICS
COVERALuE


Thi ~ep. pr- ..tics on total United
Statt it-u .. .. :.. outbound shipments
made irZ n t w.th the exception such
elements as peciied below,


Effective January L the statistics on water-
borne expc r-: of dons tic and .:':,-le rmerchandise
and non-Depa-rtrnt of Defense shipments of "spe-
cial category" commodities exclude shipments to
Canada individually valued at less than $2,000
.n.j shipnents to other countries nr,>vidually
valued at less than :-.. July 1953 thrc,~g
December 1955 and July 1956 through December 1962
these statistics exclude all shipments individ-
ually valued at less than $500. For the months
January through June 1956 these statistics exclude
all shipments individually valued at less than
$1,000.


From January 1954 through December 1957 vessel
import figures exclude shipments having a ship-
ping weight of less than 2,000 pounds, regardless
of value, as well as shipments valued at less
than $100,regardless of shipping weight. Starting
with January 1958 statistics the import data
exclude only those shipments where the value is
less than $100 regardless of shipping weight.


Vessel export figures in this report, shown in
columns 4, 9, 13, and 16 of table 1 and in table
3, represent exports of domestic and foreign
merchandise laden at the United States Customs
area for shipment to foreign countries and include
export shipments to United States civilian Govern-
ment agencies and non-Department of Defense con-
trolled foreign aid program shipments as described
below. Excluded from these figures are shipments
to the United States armed forces abroad of
supplies and equipment for their own use as well
as the other types of shipments described below
for which information is shown in separate columns
in table 1.


Department of Defense controlled and speciall
category" fi -..:. shown in col umn6 a'nd 11 of
table 1 and in tables 5 and 6 of this report cover
consolidated data for the following types of
shipments:
1. Vessel export shipments of Department
of Defense controlled cargo under spe-
cial for,'i. aid programs such as De-
partment of Defense Military Assistance
Program--Grant-Aid, etc., shipped on
commercial or military vessels (vessels
owned and cpr-r'tcd by Department of
Defense).


2. Vessel export shipments of "special
category" commodities not controlled by
the Department of Defense for which
detailed information cannot be shown
separately because of security reasons.
For an explanation and list of "special
category" commodities and their pres-
entation in foreign trade statistics
see J i 1065 issu of FT 410.


Only shipping weight data in terms of United States
port or coastal district of lading and foreign
trade area of unlading are shown for these classes
of shipments since information on the dollar value
of exports of Department of Defense controlled
cargo is not available at this level of detail.
Consequently, the total value figures shown in
columns 12 and 15 of table 1 for dry cargo and
tanker shipments in that order correspond to the
shipping weight figures shown in columns 3 and 8,
respectively, of the same table.

Vessel import figures, shown in columns 3, 6, 9
and 12 of table 2 and in table 4 of this report,
are general imports and represent the total of
imports for immediate consumption plus entries
into customs bonded storage and manufacturing
warehouses made at the United States Customs area


For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C., 20233. Price 10q per copy.
Annual subscription (FT 900, 930, 950, 970, 975, 985, and 986 combined) $5.00.


f I 1*


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
John T. Connor, Secretary

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
A. Ros Eckler, Director


F'iR ItiLiA;!'.









from foreign countries. Vessel import figures
exclude American goods returned by the United
States armed forces for their own use, import
shipments on Army or Navy transports, and ship-
ments covered by informal entries.

The following types of shipments are excluded from
both the vessel export and import data: (1) ship-
ments of household and personal effects,(2) ship-
ments by mail and parcel post, and (3) shipments
of vessels under their own power and afloat.
United States trade with Puerto Rico and with
United States possessions is not reported as
United States exports and imports.

Merchandise shipped in bond through the United
States in transit from one foreign country to
another without having been entered as an import
is not included in any of the figures in the
columns previously referred to (imported merchan-
dise cleared through Customs and subsequently
re-exported is included in both the import and
export statistics). Separate information for the
waterborne portion of the in-transit tradeinterms
of shipping weight and dollar value is presented
in this report in tables 1 and 2. Columns 5,
10, 14, and 17 of table 1 reflect in-transit
merchandise laden aboard vessels at United States
ports, while columns 4, 7, 10 and 13 of table 2
reflect such merchandise unladen from vessels.
The waterborne outbound and inbound in-transit
statistics include (1) foreign merchandise trans-
ferred from one vessel to another in the United
States port of arrival and shipped to a foreign
country without being released from Customs cus-
tody in the United States; and (2) foreign mer-
chandise arriving by vessel at one United States
port, shipped through the United States under
Customs bond, and leaving the United States by
vessel from a port other than that at which it
arrived. In addition, the waterborne outbound
in-transit statistics also include (1) foreign
merchandise withdrawn from a general order ware-
house for immediate export by vessel orfor trans-
portation and export by vessel (such merchandise
was not recorded as an import when it entered the
warehouse), and (2) foreign merchandise shipped
via vessel from a United States Foreign TradeZone
to a foreign country(such merchandiseis deposited
in the Foreign Trade Zone without being entered as
an import). Any inbound or outbound in-transit
merchandise moving by methods of transportation
other than vessel is excluded from the in-transit
statistics. Thus, merchandise arriving at the
United States by vessel and leaving by some other
method of transportation is included in the in-
bound data only. On the other hand, merchandise
arriving by other than waterborne transportation
and laden aboard vessels upon departure is in-
cluded in the outbound statistics but not in the
inbound data. The inbound and outbound segments,
therefore, do not counter-balance one another and
are complementary only insofar as they involve
merchandise carried by vessels to and from the
United States. For a more detailed discussion of
the in-transit trade statistics and the types of
shipments excluded from thesedataseethe February
1953 issue of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.


All types of outbound vessel shipments in tables
1 and 5 are credited to the coastal districts,
customs districts, and ports at which themerchan-
dise was laden. All types of inboundvessel ship.
ments in table 2 are credited to the coastal dis-
tricts, customs districts, and ports at which
merchandise was unladen. In the case of vessel
general imports this is not necesearily the same
as the customs district ip which the"goods were
entered into warehouse or enriered for immediate
consumption.
.4
Vessel exports in tables '3 aj' 6 are-eredited to
the foreign trade areas at which the merchandise
was unladen. Vessel imports in table 4 are cred-
ited to the foreign trade areas at which the
merchandise was laden aboard% he vessel carrying
the cargo to the United States. Thipountries of
destination or origin of merchandise'are not nec-
essarily located within the trade areas to which
the merchandise is shipped or from which it is
received. Detailed definitions of foreign trade
areas in terms of the countries and ports included
in each are contained in Schedule R, Code Class-
ification and Definition of Foreign Trade Areas.

Shipping weight figures represent the gross weight
of shipments, including the weight of containers,
wrappings, crates and moisture content. Vessel
export values represent the values at time and
place of export. They are based on the selling
price (or on the cost if not sold) and include
inland freight, insurance and other charges to
place of export. Transportation and other costs
beyond the United States port of exportation are
excluded. Vessel import values, as well as the
values for in-transit shipments, are generally
based on the market or selling price and are in
general f.o.b. the exporting country. Since in-
transit merchandise is not subject to the imposi-
tion of import duties at the United States, the
valuation reported for such shipments is not
verified by customs to the extent applicable in
the case of import entries and may in some cases
include transportation costs and insurance to the
United States as well as other cost elements.

Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are classified
as dry cargo or tanker shipments solely on the
basis of the type of vessel used without regard
to the cargo carried. Tanker vessels are those
primarily designed for the carriage of liquid
cargoes in bulk, while all others are classified
as dry cargo vessels. A further segregation of
dry cargo vessel shipments is provided in tables
3-6 on the basis of type of service, i.e., liner
(berth) or irregular (tramp). Liner service is
that type of service offered by a regular line
operator of dry cargo vessels on berth. The
itineraries and sailing schedules of such vessels
are predetermined and fixed. Irregular or tramp
service is that type of service afforded by dry
cargo vessels which are chartered or otherwise
hired for the carriage ofgoodson special voyages.
Vessels in this type of service are not on berth
and their sailing schedules are not predetermined
or fixed.








Table 1.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATzRORNE EXPRTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIIMEfTS OF EPARIMENT OF DEFENSE CGITR LD CARGO AND
"SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPARINIT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND POT OF LADING

(Totals are given for all customs district at whih there are vessel shipments. Only those ports are shown whose combined export and import tonnage averaged 5 million pounds or ore per month during cealn-
dar year Customs district totals are for all ports in the district including those not shown. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sms of the rounded
amounts. Totals shown for previous months include current revisions)

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker

Domestic, foreign and Dept. of Doestic, foreign and Dept of
Customs district and port Grand in-transit cargo Defense in-transit cargo Defense Domestic Domestic
t l Total and Total and Total and t Total and
Domestic In. "SpeSpcial cial foreign tr foreign
Total and categ Total and
Total gn transit category" Total gn transit category"
foreign foreign
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)






.I, A l' I L *.!..... **l4.', '.' ,s 0,656.2 -',636. 5 9r,55 .b 6. .7 I I'. I ..' i'.'/.l 7 i. ( .: "* "
.:....... .................... -, 1 K4 .. ..


Pl .. .......................... -


,Ph' l: 4>r4, ... ........................ 5. 5 7...3 ..l -. .
Prtil )t I:. .............. ....... 66 6 6 .7..
P la %.r, N.J....................... .. ..... 36. 4. 4, 4.5 1.
C .:t r., N..T ...................... 5. 5.1 5.S 5.











Mf: 1 r Hook, l '........................ 195.3 11 6.1 6.1 6.1. 1 1 -
M ry :i ..... ....... ..................... 11. H i286.9 1 3.5 .4 -6 5

S : -re. ............................ 1,297.1 1,2949 1286. 1,83.5 34 .. -












ir n, .... .......................... 6,113.0 6 5 6 50 6, 50.0 9 .1 .1 .1 .1
:Nor .............................. 4,3550 4,294,9 4 293.1 4 5 0 18 01 61 5.5 .

N wprt e........................... 1,54.7 1,4.9 1 4.6 -. i
1:' .1 ............................ I. 3 3 -I -. -1 -


,North C r ...i............................ 8.0 8. 5. 5 1 1.
Ne 11 F'von ............................

4'". .. ... ...... .. ... 64.0 64.0 62. 6. 1.1 -



r ....... .. ....... .... ........ 3.5 2. 13.5 .1 -


tn C:rine ............................. 17.3 91.3 1 .3 15.6 ( .
Ph' '. ................................. i4. 6 14. 6 9. '. 41. 3. -1.6





Cvi con ................... ....... 12. 1.7 12. 14. .7 (- -
P eori o.......................... 33.4 4.5 3.5 4.5 1. .. -
c Irg i................................... 2435.2 252.3 242. 4.2 (Z) .1 0. 0. 6 1.
iru t r swi k. ....... ..................... 21. 0 20. 20.1 2 .1 3 4
Sar4:". oo. .. ....... ............... .. 1.3 62.1 62.1 6.1 .- 1.1
Phi rl.n .................................. 61,2755.1 1,294.9 1,26.9 3. 2..2 2.2 2.. 6.P
'i1' "r r4.............................. 1,297.1 1,294.9 1,286.9 1,23.5 .4 .2
S1rn NI ................................... 6,113.4 6,53. 6,5. 6, 5, 0 .9 2.1 .1 .- 3.1 1.. 1.
NCo o1.. ............................... 55. 4,294.9 4,23.1 4,5 2.0 0. 1.8 #. .. 5 .

rr o N................................... 1,2754.7 1,154.9 1,754.6 1, 854.4 .3 1. -
814"' 4 ............................. 1,297.1 1,29 3. 9 1,23. 3. 8 2


Al x ndri..............................- -


Sou tl,otio Const Distriits ...... 697.1 693.7 692.5 6)0.8 1.7 1.2 3.4 3 .4 6.5

North Carollnn ........................... 87.0 87.0 85.) 85.9 1.1 -- 13. 13.
S... ... ...... .. 6 0 64. 62. 6 ..' 1.1 -
....... ..... 23.0 2.1 231 23.1 -.7
SQ .tx. C rlir!iM............................. 176.311 176.3 176.3 175.6 0.7 () 1..6
Ch rl.ston ............................ 142.9 1.9 142. 142.9 142.2 0.7 (2) 15.5 1-.
Gorg9 ..................... 3....3.3... 33.4 33. 3 3.4 33.4 2.1
O oir!................................... 243.2 242.3 242.2 242.2 (2) 0.1 0.8 0.8 0.8 .7
Bru.sw ................................. 21.0 1 20.2 20 .1 20.1 0.1 8 0.8 0.8 3. -
Sy nnh............................. 222.2 222.1 22.1 222.1 (7) .1.-

See footnotes A end of tt4ble.








Table 1.-iPSH Np W TVArsDVAIE OTrTIM'ST S M ERIES E SF' STIC AND IiG'tHUCIaNSEINRANSIT HEiRHANDIS, AND SMIMI ITS OF DEPARWNIT OF DEFUSE COMTRCLED CARGO AND *
"SPECIAL CATEGORY" IONZ-EPARHDIT OF DEFBSE CC~NTRLEOD CARGO, ONt IRY 1ARG0 AND TANI VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF IADING-Continued

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry oargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker

Domestic, foreign and Dept. of Domestic, foreign and Dept. of
Custom diatriot and port Grand in-transit cargo Defense in-transit cargo Defense Domestic mestic
total Total esc and Total oec and Total and ran Total and
Domestic "Special Destic Special foreign fans foreign
Total eiand transit category" Total and transit category"
foreign foreign
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)
:Ourt Atla:itl- Conra DiStrits--Con.

Florida................................. 190.7 188.2 188.1 187.1 1.0 0.1 2.6 2.6 2.6 17.3 16.9 0.4 0.2 0.2
Jeeksonvlle.......................... 99.1 97.1 97.1 97.0 0.1 (Z) 2.0 2.0 2.0 5.5 5.4 0.1 3.2 0.
i...................... ........ .32.4 32.4 32.4 31.9 0.5 (Z) 8.3 8.-1 0.2 -
et Pl Be:ch...................... 11. 11.1 11.1 11.1 (Z) 0.9 0.9 (2)
Por Everlaes............... ......... 42.0 41.3 41.3 41.0 0.3 (Z) 0.6 0.6 0.6 2.6 2.5 0.1 (Z) (2)
Port C r.vertl................ ........- -

'ilL C-cst DistriCts................ 11,492.1 8,843.7 8,826.6 8,793.4 33.2 17.1 2,648.4 2,648.4 2,600.6 47.8 437.0 430.3 6.7 101.8 100.9

orT ........... .......................... 1,593.2 1,5909 1,590.9 1,590.8 0.1 2.3 2.3 2.3 19.6 19.6 (Z) 0.2 C.-
S................................ 1,426.7 1,425.3 1,425.3 1,425.2 0.1 1.4 14 1 13.3 13.3 (2) O.1 0.1
K*ay et............................. (Z) (Z) (Z) (2) (Z) (Z)
Penaecol ............................... 22.1 22.1 22.1 22.1 (Z) 2.0 2.0 (Z)
Boc grnde ........................... 87.2 87.2 87.2 87.2 0.3 0.3
Pen rts City......................... 53.6 52.7 52.7 52.7 0.9 0.9 0.9 3.8 3.8 (.1 0.1
Part St. Joe........................... 3.5 3.5 3.5 3.5 0.2 0.2 -
M b le.... ....................... 620.5 545.7 541.2 541.2 4.5 74.7 74.7 74.7 21.6 21.6 2.7 2.7
b e, A....................... ......... 305.1 305.1 300.6 300.6 4.5 14.0 14.0 -
S, ........ .... 26.1 26.1 26.1 26.1 1.4 1.4 -
S ; ........ ........... 2892 214.5 214.5 214.5 74.7 74.7 74.7 6.2 6.2 2.7 2
............... 4,40.3 3,379.1 3,366.6 3,356.3 10.3 12.5 1,021.1 1,021.1 1,021.1 194.5 192.7 1.8 42.0 4;.
N Orlenn s, LI............,.......... 2,423.3 1,937.7 1,925.2 1,915.5 9.7 12.5 485.6 485.6 485.6 151.3 149.6 1.7 26.2 .6.
Btor. R Luge, L.......................... 728.6 524.3 524.3 523.7 0.6 204.2 204.2 204.2 16.6 16.5 0.1 4.2 4.2
Port Sulphur, 1 ..................... 196.6 187.8 187.8 187.8 8.7 8.7 8.7 1.8 1.8 C.1 .1
Kentufit y.................................
Sle r~ec...............................

........ ................ ... 1,376.1 907,1 907.1 907.11 (Z) 469.0 469.0 469.0 31.1 31.1 12.3 12.3
P tt Arthur, Tex..................... 421.4 1875 187.5 187.5 233.9 233.9 233.9 5.0 5.0 6. 6.
Cr Tex......................... 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.0 1.6 1.6 -
'u-rl, T'ex...................... 793.9 565.3 565.3 565.3 (Z) 221.5 228.5 228.5 16.4 16.4 5.4 5.
'L Ch.rle, I, ............. .... 14,.8 134.2 134.2 134.2 6,6 6.6 6.6 8.2 8.2 0. 0.
C l ............ ... ...................... 3,422.7 2,390.6 2,390.6 2,388.1 ,.5 (Z) 1,032.1 1,032.1 1,032.1 164.6 164.1 o.5 42.' 42.
'lv ., Tex.,.......... ........ 856.2 821.9 821.9 821.3 .6 34.3 34.3 34.3 44.8 44.7 0.1 1.i 1.
;t;, T............ ......... 1,976. 1,25.C 1,252.0 1,250.1 1.9 (Z) 723.' 723.9 73.9 -1 18. 17.9 .5 26.9 2(.
7r : rt, t......................... 126.9 53.7 53.7 53.7 73.2 73.2 73. 3.6 3.6 4.5 ..,5
C: Ctr't, Tx..............39.2.0 262.9 262.9 262.9 122.1 11299.1 7 9 .1
Is C~';, I"......... .............. 71.6 1. 1.6 71.1. '.2 7.2
L ..:.................................. 79.4 30.2 30.2 9.9 20.3 49.2 49., 1.4 47.8 5.4 1.1 ..3 1..
.rvivllte, Tx................... 79.4 30.2 30,2 9.9 20.3 4".2 49.2 1.4 47.8 5.4 1.1 4.3 1. .1


? c!fc; f D'ltrtiictA.......... 2,485,C 1,967.8 1,956.7 1,947..3 9.'. 11.1 517.21 7.7.2 473.3 23.9 13 .1 12.'.3 1.8 6,. '.

S:..... .................. 7.. 74.0 74.0 74 () () 5.9 () -
L AJ i ir...... .................... ... 1,216.2 835.2 834.0 85.5 8.5 1. 381.0 381.0 357.1 '3,. 51 10.P 1. 1.5 3.3
I T.f.,................... 356.2 175.0 174.3 170.3 4.0 .7 1,1.3 181.3 157.4 23.0 2.7 .2.4 3 ;.3

S C1 C.f...................... '.. 655.1 654.5 650.0 4,5 175.1 165.1 165.1 9.1 .*8.. 1.1.
01 ,. ....................... 34' 347 3.7 34.7 -
S, frft i i ................................ 1,134.7 1,.58.3 1,048,7 1,047. 0.9 9.8 131.2 136.2 136.2 72.1 71.i C. .7
T.>ir.4, C C.............,.... ...... 18.2 2.2 dB.2 28. 13 1.3 -
y ..i'. C'if. 103,6 103.6 3 12.5 101.7 0.8 1.1 41.3 4a.9 0.5 -
ASt. .., C'1f............. ............ .345.5 34.4 345.4 (Z) (Z) ( -
ik.in, Ci ....................... 111.4 111.4 l4.O 1.O .4 -
37l'M,7n1l, 3,rCif.,,.,.,.,.,,.,,.... ....139.71 44,2 44.2 4..2? (/. 95,5 5.5 995. 1.3 1.3 (28 1.8 1.7
l. '*.i, Clf,.,.,.,......,......... 25.7 18.6 17,9 17.0 1 0.7 7.1 71 7.1 3.6 3., (.) 0,7 0.7
S,, i ..1 : ..................... 172 172.5 1 -

S ................ ..
S ...... -
S................. ..

3 Cnoatr. '; *n3 .'f t'>tls.









North Pacific Coast Districts...... 2,242.7 1, /1.2 1,96i.2 1,9 1.2 5.0 /1 .' 71. 2 .'. .2 I *.
Oregon ............................ ...... .4 1, .. 1, ( ) (%) 163.4 i6).4 1 .4- .. (.) .
Astoria.................... .... ......... 1 6.. -
Coos Bay ............................... 12.7 1 2.7 -I -
Portland............................. 6"4.4 0.2 (Z) (Z) 114.1 11.1 i..l i. (1) .
Longview, Wash. ........................ X. : 7 58.7 49. ] 4. 4. 76 .
Vancouver, Wash ........................ 137. 1. -- -
Washington ................................ 0 1. -6 /5.1 ..
Seattle ........................ ........ 7. 1 .5 1 1 .2 12. .
Tacoma.................................... 7 17/. i.. () 0.9 )6. i 5.
Aberdeen-Hoquiam....................... 14.. 14. 1b..4 14. .
Bellingham ............................ .9 31.-
Everett.............................. 1.6 17.6 -- -
Port Angeles............................ 8.. ".. 1. 0.- 2. ()
Port Townsend............................ .7 .7 (Z
Anacortes................... ............ C. ... .. < .0 -. I '.
Olympia................................ '. .. -
Great Lakes Districts............... 6. J, 53.3 ,/,53.'3 53.' .3 52.7 5.71 1.1 .. 1.1 '.
St. Lawrence........................... ..... (.) () ) (z) -)
Ogdensburg, N.Y........................ (. ) (.) () )
Massena, N.Y............................
Waddington, N.Y..........................
Rochester.................................. 3.5.5 335.5 315.5 335.5 1. 1. -
Oswego, N.Y................ ......... -
Rochester, N.Y.......................... 2. 2.0 -
Po;nt, 1. Y...................... 313.5 313.5 113.5 3. 1.0 -
Buffalo .................................. .. .. -
Buffalo, N.Y........................... -
Duluth and Superior ........................ 558. 5.6 532.6 53 .6 25. 25.1) 25. 5.' i.
Duluth, Minn .......................... 117. 91.9 2 91. -, 25. 25.9. 2. I..
Ashland................................... -
International Falls-Ranier, Minn. -
Superior, Wis.......................... 2- 24.3 24.3 24. .1 :.
Wisconsin ................................. 121.1 15.5 118.5 118.5 -- 2.6 2.6 2.6 10. 10.
Milwaukee.............................. 11.8 109.7 109.7 109.7 1.1 1.1 1.1 .' -
Marinette.............................. -
Green Bay .............................. 8.0 6.5 6.5 6.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 -I 1.7 1. -
Racine....................... .......... 2.3 2.3 3 0. -
Michigan ................................ .73.6 273.6 273.3 0.3 18.6 18.6 18.6 4. '. 4. .1
Detroit................................ 20,.7 0.7 20.4 0.3 1.8 1.8 1.8 3. 2 .1 .
Port Huron.............................. -
Saginaw-Bay City....................... 2. 15.1 15.1 5.1 16.9 16 16.9 .
Escanaba ............................. ... -
Muskegon ............................... 1.2 1. 1.2 -
Calcite ............................ -
Presque Isle ........................... 101. 101.9 101.9 101.' -- -
Chicago................................... 60.2 54.7 54.7 54.7 5.5 5.5 5.5 2.2 2.2 -.
Chicago, Ill ........................... 47.0 4.70 47. 47.0 2.1 -
East Chicago, Ind...................... 13.2 7.7 7.7 7.7 5.5 5.5 5.5 -- .2.
Gary, Ind..............................- -
Ohio .................................... 2,138.4 2,138. 2,138.4 2,138.4 7. -
Cleveland.............................. '3. 23.9 2 239 2. -- 1.2 1. -
Toledo ................................. 88. 88.0 88R.O 5 ..II -8 -, -- 1. 10.7 -
Erie, Pa............................... -
Sandusky ............................... 109.6 109. 1 .6 .4 .. --
Ashtabula............................. *... 753.3 753.3 753.3 3.5 3.5
Conneaut ............................. 316.3 316.3 316.3 1.1 1.1
Fairport.............................. -
Huron.................................. -
Lorain................................. 47. 7.0 -. -
Puerto Rico, Hawaii, and Alaska
Districts.......................... 137. 75.3 75.3 75.C 1.3 62.0 62.0 62.0 4.7 4.7 (Z) ..
Puerto Rico............................... .9 12.5 12.5 12.: 0.3 52.5 52.5 52.5 1.1 1.1)
Guanica............................... 4.6 4.6 4.6 4.6 0.1 .1 -
Mayaguez.............................. (Z) () (Z) (7) ) ( -
Ponce.................................. 1.9 1. ( ) ( ) -
San Juan................................ 5.8 5.9 5.9 5.6 0.3 0.6 -
Hawaii................................... 19.10 9.6 9.6 9.6 '.5 9.5 .5 .
Honolulu............................... 19.0 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 0.9 {) .
Alaska.................................... 53.3 53.3 53.3 53.3 2.7 -
Ketchikan.............................. ..1.6 1 1.6 .6 0..1 1--
Wrangell............................. 14. 14. 14.9 14.9 0.2 .
Sitka................................ 36. 36,8 36.P 36.8 -I -1 2.3 -


i .;s tu in 50,.o(0 oturl ;t :;; exprtle 5to0,0(X) t t Dtlrs .
1i42r5i; Atlntic Co5ist port totals stoui bi 5ddj to Flr5'i43 51 ulfI Cast por5 t t5otis to obtain totsl exports through th.5e C5usto!l District of F51 r'..










6 April 1965

Table 2. -SHIPPING WEIGT AND VALUE OF UITED STATES VAT~ BO RN E H IMPTS AD IMBOHmD IN-TRANSIT LERCHADISZ, G M CABOO AND %TAN~ VESSES,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF ILADIN

(Totals are given for all customs districts at which there are vessel shipments. Only those parts are sown whose ccabined export and import tamJ
nage averaged 5 million pounds or more per month during calendar year 1964. Custoa district totals are for all parts in the district including
those not shown. Totals represent the smns of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly ro the sms of the rcaded amounts. Totals ahow
for previous months include current revisions)

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in 411linm of dollars

Dry cargo Tanter Dry cargo Taer
Custanoms district and pprt irand
total General In- General In- GneGaral In- G al
to To lmparts transit Total Imprts transit Tol prt transit prt trait

_(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)


Total all districts:
Monthly average 1964.....
April 1964.............
March 1965.............
April 1965.............
North Atlantic Coast
Districts..............
Maine and New Hampshire.......
Portland, Maine.............
Bangor, Maine.............
Eastport, Maine............
Portsmouth, N.H...........
Belfast, Maine..............
Searsport, Maine...........
Massachusetts.................
Boston.....................
Gloucester .................
New Bedford.................
Fall River...................
Salem.....................
Rhode Island..................
Providence.................
Connectiout...................
Bridgeport.................
New Haven................
New London.................
New York.....................
New York..................
Albany.....................
Philadelphia..................
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Chester, Pa...............
Wilmington, Del......... ....
Paulsboro, N.J.............
Camden, N.J................
Gloucester City, N.J.......
Marcus Hook, Pa............
Maryland......................
Baltimore..................
Virginia.....................
Norfolk.....................
Newport News...............
Richmond...................
Alexandria.................


South Atlantic Coast
Districts..............
North Carolina ...............
Wilmington................
Morehead City...............
South Carolina..................
Charleston................
Georgetown..................
Georgia......................
Brunswick..................
Savannah...................
Florida'......................
Jacksonville ..............
Miami......................
West Palm Beach............
Port Everglades............
Port Canaveral.............

Gulf Coast Districts....
Florida ......................
Tampa..,.............. ..
F *.. '..................
F .-.. I ........... ........
r .l r ,I .................
F .:, "" -* I ................
Port St. Joe................
Mobile.............. .......
Mobile, Ala.................
Gulfport, Miss..............
F -. li ............
New T I ..................
New Orleans, La............
Baton Rouge, La...........
Port Sulphur, La...........
Kentucky ......................
Tennessee......................
St. Louis...................


41,456.1
38,009.7
48,391.9
46,377.7

29,652.4
3,597.0
3,100.7

0.6
116.8
118.3
224.5
1,405.4
1,192.0
16.0
43.1
85.1
68.4
210.9
210.9
742.2
71.0
547.5
123.6
9,257.6
8,885.6
118.0
9,533.1
4,221.1

582.1
1,632.8
281.8
37.2
914.8
3,961.1
3,769.9
945.3
585.7
301.2
17.6
40.8



2,119.7
252.7
207.2
45.5
213.0
150.2
62.9
396.3
64.6
331.8
1,257.8
702.8
72.7
219.2
227.5
29.6

6,507.8
313.1
248.1

26.9
37.9

0.1
1,551.9
1,498.9
52.9

2,554.3
910.5
1,041.3
0.6


18,978.5
16,356.2
19,282.6
19,814.7

10,496.6
53.3
15.2

0.6
35.0

2.0
320.2
294.2
16.0
5.9
3.2

13.5
13.5
113.4
28.4
76.7
8.3
1,954.0
1,920.8
10.1
4,557.6
2,496.8

78.9

135.9
0.2

3,137.1
3,130.7
347.7
206.8
94.9
5.2
40.8



835.9
77.4
75.9
1.5
114.4
113.3
1.1
248.2
57.3
190.8
395.9
266.2
44.3
1.6
48.3
29.6

5,134.3
142.0
115.0

26.9


0.1
1,479.4
1,426.5
52.9

2,104.0
679.7
996.5
0.6


18,897.9
16,270.8
19,153.2
19,713.8

10,432.8
52.6
14.5

0.6
35.0

2.0
319.4
293.4
16.0
5.9
3.2

13.5
13.5
113.4
28.4
76.7
8.3
1,895.0
1,861.8
10.1
4,556.5
2,495.7

78.9

135.9
0.2
Oo

3,135.1
3,128.7
347.4
206.5
94.9
5.2
40.8



834.6
77.4
75.9
1.5
113.5
112.4
1.1
248.2
57.3
190.8
395.6
266.2
44.1
1.5
48.2
29.6

5,108.3
141.1
114.1

26.9


0.1
1,477.7
1,424.8
52.9

2,095.9
672.2
95.9
0.6


80.6
85.4
129.4
100.9


22,477.6
21,653.6
29,109.2
26,562.9


20,119.8
19,780.0
24,878.6
23,757.4


2,357.8
1,873.6
4,230.6
2,805.5


990.1
993.4
L,310.5
L,217.7


975.4
977.3
1,289.8
1,200.6


63.8 19,155.8 16,350.3 2,805.5 755.5 744.4
0.7 3,543.8 738.3 2,805.5 1.5 1.5
0.7 3,085.6 280.1 2,805.5 1.2 1.2


81.8
118.3
222.5
1,085.2
897.7

37.3
81.8
68.4
197.4
197.4
628.8
42.6
470.8
115.3
7,303.6
6,964.8
107.9
4,975.5
1,724.3

503.3
1,632.8
145.9
37.0
914.8
824.0
639.2
597.6
378.9
206.3
12.3




1,283.8
175.3
131.3
44.0
98.5
36.8
61.8
148.0
7.2
140.8
861.9
436.6
28.5
217.6
179.2


1,373.6
171.0
133.1


37.9


72.4
72.4


450.3
230.8
44.8


81.8
118.3
222.5
1,085.2
897.7

37.3
81.8
68.4
197.4
197.4
628.8
42.6
470.8
115.3
7,303.6
6,964.8
107.9
4,975.5
1,724.3

503.3
1,632.8
145.9
37.0
914.8
824.0
639.2
597.6
378.9
206.3
12.3




1,283.8
175.3
131.3
44.0
98.5
36.8
61.8
148.0
7.2
140.8
861.9
436.6
28.5
217.6
179.2


1,373.6
171.0
133.1


37.9


72.4
72.4


450.3
230.8
44.8


(Z)
(Z)

0.1
55.9
51.5
3.6
0.4
0.3

0.5
0.5
5.4
0.2
4.8
0.3
477.6
476.8
0.7
89.4
75.8

3.0

3.0
0.1

80.3
79.1
44.7
24.8
17.5
0.1
2.4



67.1
5.3
4.4
1.0
20.6
20.4
0.2
15.7
0.1
15.7
25.4
14.2
7.7
0.2
3.1
0.2

168.2
6.7
5.7

1.0


(Z)
16.8
14.3
2.5

85.3
67.0
1 .


0.1
55.5
51.1
3.6
0.4
0.3

0.5
0.5
5.4
0.2
4.8
0.3
467.4
466.6
0.7
89.2
75.6

3.0

3.0
0.1

80.2
79.0
44.6
24.7
17.5
0.1
2.4



66.9
5.3
4.4
1.0
20.5
20.3
0.2
15.7
0.1
15.7
25.3
14.2
7.6
0.2
3.1
0.2

164.9
6.5
5.5

1.0


(z)
16.5
14.0
2.5

83.8
65.6
9.9
(2)


168.4
162.4
219.4
201.0

142.7
32.3
29.5




0,
0.5
0.7
1.5
6.4
5.3

0.2
0.5
0.4
1.1
1.1
4.4
0.4
3.3
0.7
51.3
49.1
0.8
37.7
13.0

3.9
12.0
1.0
0.2
7.4
5.4
4.2
4.1
2.6
1.4
0.1




9.3
1.5
1.2
0.3
0.6
0.2
0.4
1.4
0.6
0.9
5.8
2.7
0.2
1.5
1.4


10.1
1.5
1.2


0.2


0.5
0.5


3.9
2.4
0.3


14.9
143.2
176.0
173.3

115.0
4.6
1.8


0.5
0.7
1.5
6.4
5.3

0.2
0.5
0.4
1.1
1.1
4.4
0.4
3.3
0.7
51.3
49.1
0.8
37.7
13.0

3.9
12.0
1.0
0.2
7.4
5.4
4.2
4.1
2.6
1.4
0.1


See footnotes at end of table.













Tuble 2.--SHIPPIN WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATS WA!T~UitNE DKEMAL II'I(TS OO AND INOID I-T IT ND N CA AND TANK VS S,
BY CUST1S DISTRICT AND RBT Y IlADING-Cuntinmud

Shipping weight In l1olau of pounds V.lut In mlll.n* of doU .r

Dry argo TaIkr Dry aorge T~.r
Customa district and port Grwd -
total GTcsl tk rel In- General In- Total G rl In- Total enril In-
taporta transit import tran rta tranit lar t it
(1) (2) ((3) 4) (1) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (1) (12) (13)






.t!- t... ; .......... ... *,(i'.l -I 1 7.." 4* .65 -1 ;, 1 8 -2. 3. 23.4
-- --1 -----






S ...................... i ) 15. 2 1 (.



1i:i1 P i>.(. ............ .i .. .. .' .3


.L .... ....... .. .. .( 1 1l )., 9. 16. .
l'a A ,:> I S, -i'....... ,... I. .7 -. .. 45.3 0. 0.
t f.... ) ..... .
l e..... '< ....if........ .. .i .. 1.7 4.5 .3 6.7
1 etm = ............ 6- .. ... -





SF tt.. ............... 0 ,2 .1 1 .0 77 57.2 6.5 .7 6. 6.
urei t ., C. lf ............ 0.4 0. ) (
S .n P-:>ei>, l*lf ..... 17.; P. 166., I 44.8 '4.2 .6 -

l C'f............. 7 ... 8.2 81 .1 -
Ri..t ............... 4..3 4.7 44.7 .2 3. 3.5
.r(t C'. ............... .1 4.1 .4 0.4

st;: I i.... ... .......... 0. 11.1 0.7 0.86

;rturi:................ L.... .. -7. 1.7 1.7 6.
istit .... 3. 4.8 1........ 41.. 066. 130. 29.8 3 30 3.0






rti't3 133 (.... ........... 15.( -
r hsterd .................. 7 0 0.-
Coos Ci............... ....7 44.7 448.6 448.6 0.2 3.5 3.5













S W.h.............. .. 13 21. 2.9 .9 -
t W.i............ 13.3 3.3 0.4 0.4
1odus Point, N.1....... 5.4 0.1 7











gto .................... 891.5 7.5 8472.8 3.8 414.8 414. 3.1 29.8 0.3 3.0 3.0
S ttl ..................... 175. 15. 161.6 1. 1. 10. 9.8 0.1
m ................... 2.7 .7 165.7 1 0.2 3.2 1.0
Ahln :' n u..... ...........
1el lirh ................ 88.5 8115 1188.5 0.8 0.11.7 8 11) -
i.rt ............ 1. 18.0 .2 0.2 -(
rt Aeles ........... 1. 13.6 12.6 0.4 0.4 -
Port Tos>,l............. 20.7 0.7 20.7 (Z) (Z) -
UAlaort................... 88.8 4.4 42.4 84.4 84.4 1.6 0.3 3.0 0.70
Olnia ................... 17..0 15.4 1.0 10.1 .1 -

reat .......kes Distrits.. 1,3.7 165. 1,422.3 0 .4 5 1.0 51.0 39.1 39.1 (Z) 1.0 1.0


Ogdens.g, N.Y.............. 33..4 4 1.7 1.7 0.1 0.
Netr ji2............... 2 2. 2.6 -. 0.4 0. -
Port HUrnS,.............. ....20.




ingo~, N.Y.......... -. 8.- () ( 0. .-
Rochester................... .8 33.8 33.8 0.4 0.4 -
aOwgo, N...Y............... 2.4 11.1 -. (Z) (Z) -
Rochester, N.Y ............ 334.7 24.7 24.7 11.1 11.1 0.37 1.7 0.3 -
Sous Point, N.Y............ -
Buffalo....................... 38.5 38.5 38.58 0.8 0.8 -
Buffalo, N.Y.............. 35.0 0.8 0.8 -
uluth and Suprior............ 4.7 2 4.7 .7 0.4 0.4 -
Duluth, Mi.................... 38.5 384.7 4.7 0.4 0.4 -

Ashland..................... -
International Falls-
Ranier, Minn.............. -
Superior, Wis .............
Wisconsin .................... 8.2 8.2 8.2 1.3 1.3 -
Milwaukee................. 5.4 5.4 5.4 1.1 1.1 -
Marinette .................. -
Green Bay .................. 2.8 2.8 2.8 0.2 0.2 -
Racine .................... -
Michigan ...................... 320.4 315.1 314.8 0.3 5.3 5.3 12.1 12.1 (Z) 0.3 0.3
Detroit.................... 292.0 291.9 291.6 0.3 11.5 11.5 () -
Port Huron ................ -
S........ 16.8 11.5 11.5 5.3 5.3 0.3 0.3 .3

Muskegon................... 11.7 11.7 11.7 0.3 0.3
Calcite ....... ... ..........
Presou Isl ................ -

Se f.ototes t I ,i of tS 5le.











8 April 1965

Table 2.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES VATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOWD IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DZR CARGO AND TANE VESSELS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF ULADING-Continued

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port Grand
total Total Total General n- Total General In- TotalGeneral In-
S imports transit imports transit iaports transit imports transit
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)

Great Lakes Districts-
Continued
C rl C C ca ...... ............... i. .. 1 .
CbL e c.., 111 .............. i) ? i: .- .: '"' .. -. ...
East Chicago, Ind......... 51.2 51.2 51.2 -7 0.7 -
Gary, Ind................. -
Ohio.............. .. 819.5 787.0 787.0 32.5 32.5 9.1 .1 ( ) .4 0.4
Cleveland................. 445.6 445.6 445.6 5.1 5.1 () -
Toledo................... 59.0 26.6 26.6 32.5 32.5 15 1.5 0.4 0.4
Erie, Pa.................. 13.4 13.4 13.4 0.5 0.5 -
Sandusky.................. 1.0 1.0 1.0 (2) () -
Ashtabula................. 211.5 211.5 211.5 1.7 1.7 -
Conneaut..................- -
Fairport................. 47.7 47.7 47.7 (Z) () (Z) () -
Huron..................... 41.2 41.2 41.2 0.3 0.3 -
Lorain ...................

Puerto Rico, Hawaii,
and Alaska Districts.. 1,726.6 201.0 200.2 0.8 1,525.6 1,525.6 16.8 16.7 0.1 11.4 11.

Puerto Rico.................. 1,183.9 167.8 167.0 0.8 1,016.0 1,016.0 12.3 12.2 0.1 7.3 7.3
Guanica...................
Mayaguez.................. 63 6.3 6.3 .7 .7 -
Ponce..................... 8.9 8.9 8.9 0.2 .2 -
San Juan ................. 601.5 152.6 151.8 0.8 448.9 448.9 11.4 11.3 .1 3.1 3.1
Hawaii......................... 531.5 29.3 29.3 (Z) 502.2 502.2 4.4 4.4 (2) 4.0 4.0
Honolulu................... 531.4 29.2 29.2 (Z) 502.2 502.2 4.4 4.4 () 4.0 4.0
Alaska....................... 11.2 3.8 3.8 7.3 7.3 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Ketchiklan................ 3.4 3.4 3.4 0.1
Wrangell.................. (Z) (Z) (Z) (2) (Z)
Sitka ..................... 0.7 .


Represents zero.
Z Less than 50,000 pounds; less than 50,000 dollar.
'Florida Atlantic Coast port totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast port
Florida.


totals to obtain total imports through tle Cust District of


Table 3.-SHIPPING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE ON M CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY TADE AREA, TPE OF
SERVICE, AND AMOUNT CARRIED W UITED STATES FLAG VESSELS


(Data in millions of pounds.


Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly fral the sums of the rounded amounts. Totela
shrun fnr nrevnus ma nth nnt n t r )rvrnmal


Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels" Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Total United United
Trade area shipping States Unitd ed United United Total States
weight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
flag flag flag
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Total all trade areas:
Monthly average 1964.................. 28,509.0 3,979.8 25,614.0 3,381.2 5,845.0 1,766.0 19,769.0 1,615.2 2,8.0 .6
April 1964........................... 26,829.5 4,269.7 23,498.4 3,482.2 -. '. 1,730.8 '. 7..5
March 1965 ........................... 35,413.5 4,759.8 26,239.5 3,796.8 ..'. 2,162.5 3.0
April 1965........................... 30,135.5 4,208.5 26,480.1 3,544.8 .,"..' 1,904.1 20,566. 1,60.6 3,655.4 66.7

Foreign trade areas except Canadian... 26,472.5 3,771.7 23,039.3 3,210.6 5,912.8 1,903.9 17,126.5 1,306.7 3,433. 561.1
Caribbean.................................. 875.2 164.2 811.8 158.6 477.2 117.1 33.6 41.6 ,3.4 5.6
East Coast South America..................... 882.5 109.6 793.4 109.6 214.4 109.6 579. 8s.1
West Coast South America.................... 391.4 113.1 377.9 113.1 253.5 113.1 124.4 13.5
West Coast Central America and Mexico....... 93.1 11.5 93.1 11.5 70.8 11.5 22.-
Gulf Coast Mexico........................... 73.9 1.6 72.1 1.6 16.5 5. 1.6 1.8
United Kingdom and Eire..................... 1,181.6 92.2 906.3 92.2 359.5 92.1 S6. ( 275.3
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland.. 891.5 26.3 815.7 26..3.8 570. 75.
Bayonne-amburg Range........................ 5,421.1 289.9 4,435.8 289.9 897.6 196.4 3,538.2 63.6 35.3
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic.............. 610.0 33.6 549.7 33.6 61.7 32.7 488.0 61.2
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea......... 5,803.4 1,076.8 5,147.2 866.9 634.5 217.3 4,12.8 6..6 656.2 209.9
West Coast Africa........................... 222.9 61.2 216.3 61.2 110.1 61.2 106.3 .6
South and East Africa....................... 193.9 80.3 191.5 0.3 133.7 '0.3 57. 2.
Australasia................ ................ 510.0 49.7 459.3 36.7 36.7 16.6 50.7 13.0
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea............. 2,292.3 999.9 1,604.7 667.4 630.6 26.1 74.1 03.3 687.6 332.5
Malaysia and Indonesia...................... 47.7 5.3 38.0 5.3 3S.O 5.3 -- .7
Far East-Southern Area, including
Taiwan and Philippines..................... 737.1 226.9 729.6 226.9 13.6 1.6 13.2 7.5
Far East-Northern Area, including Japan..... 6,243.8 429.6 5,796.8 429.6 1,09.2 326.5 4,737.6 13.1 7.0

Canadian trade areas.................. 3,663.0 436.9 3,..4.8 33.2 0.5 0.3 3,0. 333.0 22.2 102.7

Pacific Canada.............................. 254.08 120.8 47.2 0.4 0.3 120.4 ".0 14.3. 89.6
Great Lakes Canada......................... 264.8 251,7 ..7 3. 13.1
Atlantic Canada ............................. .. ; 35.3 -" 35. 3 0.1 .3 9 -

Re;rejentJ zero.
Z Le; than 50,00. 3ou.dsH.
i lhci^ r!-nt otv ry I.o-go lal.. 1 r Tnr t' i' ti t-r or o t" rii lt .n ,wt.l 7. tf
;i.iSltfiltr berth operation, 'tc.) u.,1n4 51r fl;ail~tl on -,''5r; ot t) Mrts HiiUt A 1il'mcto.











Table 4.--PPI NO VJOIrBT oF UNITED STATE IEEYAL MERANDIE N Ia CA]") ANt TAN M B Tw ANA, TrFN 4 iVC, AND
An-Wr CAOIUi ON UNITED TATS F! V

(Data inaililLon of eouias. Totals represent the Bousf of ...d. rmI ures:, .. a iy vWr, -.!. 1 1.., Fs r.du fa tOra. 70l0 a
sh-wni for prI vious sWithe iLnoludl eurrient .- I in


Trade area


Total all trade areas:



Iir.-r.;: .'"i;.......... ....... .........
Apr:l 19 ................ ..........

Foreign trade ara exopt Canadian.....
Carbbean...................................
ast Coast South America.....................
Vest Coast South Amrlca....................
West Coast Central America and Mexico........
Gulf Coast M eeico..........................

United Kgdo and Eire......................
Balt.c. Scandinavia. letland and Greenland...
Bayevme-H-burg Range.......................
Portugal and Spanish AUantlc................
mores, Mediterranean and Black Sea.........

West Coast frica............................
South and ota Africa........................
Aut lania ..................................
iDdia, Perian Oulf and Red Se..............
Maloyeia and Indonesia.......................
Far Bfat-Souther Area, including
Taiwan and Phipp ......................
Far IBstI-tortheA Area, naluding Japan......
Can*dian trade ar"a....................
Paciic Canada..............................
Great Lakes Canada.........................
la ti Canada .............................


1 In] l.I1 .rIn *.


Total
shipping
weiht

(1)


id, .


1 )5.
.,94.3
8%6.'

707. o
I,*53. '


united
States
flag

(2)


k.Lal 1r,. .*gr

United
'otal lStates
flag

() (4)


S.,/


.'



31t.L


271.; 3.-


'ft1.-


I .r' n r |: r 'I r ,


I.LInrr


Total


(5)


.1

1-. 5.






:i.i


United
States
flag

(6)


21.h




'I .S 4
4l.i.

82.1
52.2

8,.
118.3
1z.3


1 rr,'uJ uar


Total


(7)


7, t.;




'7(. i
5'9.1
28;. i
358.7



1.3.
;33.'/

2.6
2.e
.36.3

4,657.i?
699. 3
357.1

3,601.z


United
States
flag

(8)


4i, K -.:


48l".


Unileo
States
flag



(10)


130.4


j,. (w i t-i. -r l vo"


c uUl rtth opitlct, ,.t..) USLIF tsi' l sSifiction crit..Iri:of t. M Ii


Table 5.-DPARIMT OF DEFEtSE CONTROLLED CARGO EXERTED BT VESSEL UNDER TI UNITED STATE FOREIGN AID PBDOGAMS, AND "SPECIAL CATiEGORI" NON-DEPAR3MNT
CF DFW SE CONfROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL,-COASTAL DISTRICT OF LADING BY TYPE OF SERVICE AND AMOUNTS CARRIED ON UNITED SATES FLAG AND FOR-
Eai FLAG VSSELS
(Shipping weight in thousands of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts.
Totals shown for previous months include current revisions)

Total all vessels United States flag vessels Foreign flag vessels

United States Coastal district Grand Liner Irregular Tanker Liner Irregular Tanker Liner Irregular Tanker
of ladin total service or trarp vessel service or tramp vessel service or tramp vessel
service service service
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

Total all coastal districts:

Monthlc.-irsr 4 l-r r .................,3 3... 102 17,5" i.'Y *,..,.
Aprli- .pir....................... 136, ,56 10,581 5 53,127 ,S 1 -19 6
l rch 1965....................... F,7 5,)97 1.6 10,508 ,091
pril 965........................ 52., ..i A,511 3,53. 37,451 3,1 11,060 7 -

North Atlantic ports.... ................ l ?,SO
South Atlatle port.................... 1,1" 1,116 -
Gulf Coast ports........................ 7, 17,5 I 16
South Pacific parts..................... 1l,; ,i6 3 -
North Pacific ports ..................... 3
Great Lakes ports ......................
Puerto Rico, Havall and Alaska ports....


TUfia r *lI.e',I r


c 1 :).






Table 6.--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL UNDER UNITED STATES FOREIGN AID PROGRAMS, AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPART-
MENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL-TRADE AREA BY TYPE OF VESSEL SERVICE AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS
(In thousands of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts)

Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Trade area Total United United
shipping States United United United Total States
weight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
flag flag flag
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Total all trade areas:
Monthly average 1 '................ 104,884 55,615 74,077 54,613 62,349 45,092 11,728 9,521 30,807 1,00.
.'-il ..................... 136,,',. 63,102 83,127 63,102 72,546 53,127 10,581 9,079 5;,958
March 1965...................... 89,729 75,129 89,729 75,129 63,792 53,284 25,937 21,8S4
April 1965...................... 52,043 40,575 52,043 40,575 48,511 37,451 3,532 3,15



Foreign trade areas except Canadian... 52,043 40,575 52,043 40,575 48,511 37,451 3,532 3.1;,
Caribbean.......................... ........ 612 442 612 442 574 439 38 -
East Coast South America .................. 1,440 1,132 1,440 1,132 1,440 1,132 -
West Coast South America................... 799 793 799 793 799 793
West Coast Central America and Mexico...... 16 11 16 11 16 11 -
Gulf Coast Mexico................., ....... 3 3 3
United Kingdom and Eire .................... 638 220 638 220 638 220 -
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland. 1,493 1,396 1,493 1,396 1,457 1,360 36 3 -
Bayonne-Hamburg Range ..................... 7,354 259 7,35.- 259 6,997 259 357 -
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic............... .111 107 111 107 111 107 -
Unidentified countries in Western Europe... -
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea........ 6,649 4,552 6,649 4,552 6,649 4,552 -
West Coast Africa ........................ 479 469 479 469 479 469 -
South and East Africa ...................... 22 20 22 22 20 -
Australasia .............................. ...,' 887 1 .i7 1 -1
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea........... 3,537 3,249 3,537 3,249 3,467 3,195 "!0 (
Malaysia and Indonesia..................... () ()() 25 (Z) -
Far East-Southern Area, including
Taiwan and Philippines .................... 19,555 19,71 19,555 19,521 17,229 17,195 2, 2,3 ;
Far East-Northern Area, including Japan.... 8,424 8,401 8,424 8,401 7,719 7,697 i'. 71'.-
Canadian trade areas..................
Pacific Canada.........., ....... ............
Great Lakes Canada.................... -
Atlantic Canada........................... .


rcj- rc-.. er'' zero.
Z Le-. than } .. I
S'lsSlflcation uf firp :! v';.;iJ: ,): '" t 1e I' r" or "i r *,r ox trrmp" o,; ;cl r rrI'Leeai f l l I,'t.l' w ir l'r
' s .'"hn'I'i.l I cIhrt' uprD r",tl' Jn, ef ;. ) u i' til'e < 'ia>i j f'li.'ftIloi frr c L r l-a of tie 11' r, ti m Am jni r[ i trluoiL .


. N*, i [,'. or














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