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PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
United States foreign trade
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010658/00097
 Material Information
Title: United States foreign trade
Portion of title: Water-borne foreign trade statistics
Alternate title: Waterborne foreign trade statistics
United States water-borne foreign trade
United States waterborne foreign trade
Added title page title: United States foreign trade
Physical Description: v. : ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication: Washington, D.C
Publication Date: -1965
Frequency: monthly, including annual cumulation
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in June 1965.
General Note: "Summary report FT 985."
General Note: Description based on: Calendar year 1952; title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: June 1965.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 13695873
lccn - sf 86092445
ocm13695873
Classification: lcc - WMLC L 83/3610
System ID: AA00010658:00097
 Related Items
Succeeded by: U.S. waterborne foreign trade

Full Text




U. S. DEPARTMENT OCOMMERCE
Frederick H. Mueller. Secretary






UNITED STATES FOREI


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
I W. Burgess. Director


SUMMARY REPORT
FT 985


1 (;A ST 1)59


Fuli RELEAL3E
[t:.:,=L. .- 1 '5,,


WATERBORNE FOREIGN TRADE STATISTICS

COVERAGE


This report presents statistics on total
United States waterborne inbound and outbound
shipments made in foreign trade, with the excep-
tion of such elements as are specified below.

From July 1953 through December 1955 and
starting with July 1956, the statistics on water-
borne exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
and non-Department of Defense shipments of "spe-
cial category" commodities exclude shipments in-
dividually valued at less than $500. For the
months January through June 1956, these statis-
tics exclude export shipments individually valued
at less than $1,000. Information on the exclu-
sion of the low-valued export shipments in the
vessel statistics is contained in the November
1953 and February 1956 issues of the Foreign
Trade Statistics Notes. From January 1954 through
December 1957 vessel import figures exclude ship-
ments having a shipping weight of less than 2,000
pounds, regardless of value, as well as shipments
valued at less than $100, regardless of shipping
weight. Starting with January 1958 statistics
the import data exclude only those shipments
where the value is less than $100 regardless of
shipping weight. Information on the exclusion of
the low-value and low-weight import shipments in
the vessel statistics is contained in the Febru-
ary and March 1954 and January-March 1958 issues
of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.

Vessel export figures in this report, shown
in columns 4, 9, 13, and 16 of table 1 and in
table 3, represent exports of domestic and for-
eign merchandise laden at the United States Cus-
toms area for shipment to foreign countries and
include export shipments to United States civil-
ian Government agencies and non-Department of De-
fense controlled foreign aid program shipments as
described below. Excluded from these figures are
shipments to the United States armed forces
abroad of supplies and equipment for their own
use as well as the other types of shipments de-
earibed below for which information Is shown in
separate columns in table 1.


Department of Defense controlled and "spe-
cial category" figures, sh.wn in columns 6 and 11
of table 1 and in tables 5 and 6 of this report
cover consolidated data for the following types
of shipments:
1. Vessel export shipments of Department of
Defense controlled cargo under special
foreign aid programs, i.e., Internation-
al Cooperation Administration, Army Ci-
vilian Supply, etc., made aboard United
States flag vessels such as Army-Navy
transports or commercial vessels char-
tered by the Department of Defense under
time, voyage and space charter arrange-
ments and including "special category *
commodities without distinction.
2. Vessel export shipments of "special cat-
egory" commodities not controlled by the
Department of Defense for which detailed
information cannot be shown separately
because of security reasons. For an ex-
planation and list of "special category"
commodities and their presentation in
foreign trade statistics see the April
1958 issue of Foreign Trade Statistics
Notes.

Only shipping weight data in terms of United
States port or coastal district of lading and
foreign trade area of unloading are shown for
these classes of shipments since information on
the dollar value of exports of Department of De-
fense controlled cargo is not available at this
level of detail. Consequently, the total value
figures ahown In column 12 and 15 of table 1 for
dry cargo and tanker shipments in that order cor-
respond to the shipping weight figures shown in
columns 3 and 8, respectively, of the same table.

Vessel import figures, shown in colum i 3,
6, 9 and 12 of table 2 and in table 4 of this re-
port, are general Laporte and represent the total
of iAporta for isediate consumption plus entries
into customB bonded storage and manufacturing
warehouses made at the United States Custom area


Prepred in the grea. of the Ceasu, Foreign Trade Division
ilplng| aid Foreip Aid Branch, Wiltoa lAufas, Chief, Clifton Jordan, Asilatant Chief.
Aor -sale 1 smoAs af t*e Cases. UW.iugti U. C. FTrle g. meal mMbertp tle ILM.
CMM~


C5, 3,







from foreign countries, Vessel import figures
exclude American goods returned by the United
States armed forces for their own use, import
shipments on Army or Navy transports, and ship-
ments covered by informal entries.

The following types of shipments are ex-
cluded from both the vessel export and import
data: (1) Shipments of household and personal
effects, (2) shipments by mail and parcel post,
and (3) shipments of vessels under their own
power and 'afloat. United States trade with Puerto
Rico and with United States possessions is not
reported as United States exports and imports.

Merchandise shipped in bond through the
United States in transit from one foreign country
to another without having been entered as an im-
port is not included in any of the figures in the
columns previously referred to (imported merchan-
dise cleared through Customs and subsequently
re-exported is included in both the import and
export statistics). Separate information-for the
waterborne portion of the in-transit trade in
terms of shipping weight and dollar value is
presented in this report in tables 1 and 2.
Columns 5, 10, 14, and 17 of table 1 reflect
in-transit merchandise laden aboard vessels at
United States ports, while columns 4, 7, 10, and
13 of table 2 reflect such merchandise unladen
from vessels. The waterborne outbound and inbound
in-transit statistics include (1) foreign mer-


chandise transferred
in the United States
to a foreign country
Customs "custody in
foreign merchandise
United States port,
States under Customs


from one vessel to another
port of arrival and shipped
without being released from
the United States; and (2)
arriving by vessel at one
shipped through the United
bond, and leaving the United


States by vessel from a port other than that at
which it arrived. In addition, the waterborne
outbound in-transit statistics also include (1)
foreign merchandise withdrawn from a general
order warehouse for immediate export by vessel or
for transportation and export by vessel (such
merchandise was not recorded as an import when it
entered the warehouse), and (2) foreign merchan-
dise shipped via vessel from a United States
Foreign Trade Zone to a foreign country (such
merchandise is .deposited in the Foreign Trade
Zone without being entered as an import). Any
inbound or outbound in-transit merchandise moving
by methods of transportation other than vessel is
excluded from the in-transit statistics. Thus,
merchandise arriving at the United States by
vessel and leaving by some other method of trans-
portation is included in the inbound data only.
On. the other hand, merchandise arriving by other
than waterborne transportation and laden aboard
vessels upon departure is included in the out-
bound statistics but not in the inbound data.
The inbound and outbound segments, therefore, do
not counter-balance one another and are comple-
mentary only insofar as they involve merchandise
carried by vessels to and from the United States.
For a more detailed discussion of the in-transit
trade statistics and the types of shipments ex-
cluded from these data see the February 1953
issue of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.


All types of outbound vessel shipments in
tables 1 and 5 are credited to the coastal dis-
tricts, customs districts, and ports at which the
merchandise was laden. All types of inbound
vessel shipments in table 2 are credited to the
coastal districts, customs districts, and ports
at which merchandise was unladen. In the case of
vessel general imports this is not necessarily
the same as the customs district in which the
goods were entered into warehouse or entered for
immediate consumption.

Vessel exports in tables 3 and 6 are cred-
ited to the foreign trade areas at which t+e mer-
chandise was unladen. Vessel imports in table 4
are credited to the foreign trade areas at-which
the merchandise was laden aboard the vessels car-
rying the cargo to the United States. The coun-
tries of destination or origin of merchandise are
not necessarily located within the trade areas to
which the merchandise is shipped or from which it
is received. Detailed definitions of foreign
trade areas in terms of the countries and ports
included in each are contained in Schedule R,
Code Classification and Definition of Foreign
Trade Areas.

Shipping weight figures represent the gross
weight of shipments, including the weight of con-
tainers, wrappings, crates and moisture content.
Vessel export values represent the values at time
and place of export. They are based on the sell-
ing price ( or on the cost if not sold) and
include inland freight, insurance and other
charges to place of export. Transportation and
other costs beyond the United States port of
exportation are excluded. Vessel import values,
as well as the values for in-transit shipments,
are generally based on the market or selling
price and are in general f.o.b. the exporting
country. Since in-transit merchandise is not
subject to the imposition of import duties at the
United States, the valuation reported for such
shipments is not verified by customs to the ex-
tent applicable in the case of import entries and
may in some cases include transportation costs
and insurance to the United States as well as
other cost elements.

Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are
classified as dry cargo or tanker shipments sole-
ly on the basis of the type of vessel used with-
out regard to the cargo carried. Tanker vessels
are those primarily designed for the carriage of
liquid cargoes in bulk, while all others are
classified as dry cargo vessels. A further segre-
gation of dry cargo vessel shipments is provided
in tables 3-6 on the basis of type of service,
i.e., liner (berth) or irregular (tramp). Liner
service is that type of service offered by a
regular line operator of dry cargo vessels on
berth. The itineraries and sailing schedules of
such vessels are predetermined and fixed. Ir-
regular or tramp service is that type of service
afforded by dry cargo vessels which are chartered
or otherwise hired for the carriage of goods on
special voyages. Vessels in this type of service
are not on berth and their sailing schedules are
not predetermined or fixed.












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Table 1.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND
"SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPARTHENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING-Continued

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars
Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Domestic, foreign and Dept. of Domestic, foreign and
Customs district and port and in-transit cargo in-transit cargoDomestic In- Dmestic In-
Total Domestic In and "Spe- Total Domes"Spal and e- Total and for- trans- Total and for- trans-
Total and fr- trans- cial at- Total and or- tran- l cat- ig it ign it
sign it eoy" eign It egoy

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)
South Atlantic Coast Districts-Con.

Floridal.............................. 111.0 110.6 110.4 107.3 3.1 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.4 .. ... 12.9 12.4 0.5 () () ...
Jacksonville .......................... 43.8 43.4 43(4 43.4 ... (*) 0.4 0.4 0.4 ... ... 2.4 2.4 ... () (a)
Man.................................. 16.4 16.4 16.3 14.3 2.0 0.1 ... ... ... ... ... 4.5 4.1 0.4 ...
West Pals Beach ....................... 30.5 30.4 30.3 30.3 () 0.1 ... ... ... ... 5.4 5.4 () ... ... ...
Port Everglades ....................... 18.3 18.4 18.4 17.3 1.1 ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.5 0.3 0.2...

Gulf Coast Districts............... 5,316.1 4,405.2 4,382.5 4,292.4 90.1 22.7 910.9 797.1 797.1 ... 113.8 204.2 184.6 19.6 27.8 27.8
Florida................................. 655.0 655.0 654.1 654.1 () 0.9 ... ... ... ... ... 7.8 7.8 () ... ......
Tampa............................... .98.6 598. 598.5 598.5 (* ( (*) ... ... ... ... ... 4.7 4.7 ()...
Pensacola............................. 18.8 18.8 17.9 17.9 ... 0.9 ... ... ... ... ... 1.4 1.4 .....
Bocagrande ............................ 12.1 12.1 12.1 12.1 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... () ) ...
Panama City ........................... 24.2 24.2 24.2 24.2 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1.5 1.5
Mobile................................... 308.2 308.1 306.4 306.4 () 1.7 ... ... ... ... .. 9.7 9.7 ()...
Mobile, Ala........................... 296.8 296.8 295.1 295.1 () 1.7 .. ... ... ... ... 9.0 9.0 () ... ... ...
Gulfport, Miss ........................ 11.3 11.3 11.3 11.3 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.7 0.7 ......
Pascagoula, Miss ...................... 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... (.) ()
New Orleans.............................. 1,596.5 1,248.1 1,232.1 1,223.2 8.9 16.0 348.5 281.8 281.8 ... 66.7 67.9 66.7 1.2 11.9 11.9...
New Orleans, La....................... 931.0 743.3 736.4 727.5 8.9 6.9 187.7 187.7 187.7 ... ... 55.9 54.7 1.2 9.2 9.2 ...
Baton Rouge, La ....................... 455.2 323.2 320.4 3.4 4 ... 2.8 132.0 65.3 65.3 ... 66.7 9.5 9.5 ... 1.1 1.1...
Port Sulphur, La ...................... 163. 163.8 163.8 163.8 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1.8 1.8 ......
St. Louis ............................,... ... ... ... ......
Sabine.................................. 441.8 278.5 277.4 277.4 ... 1i1 163.3 157.9 157.9 ... 5.4 13.3 13.3 .. 3.2 3.2
Port Arthur, Tex ...................... 273.3 142.0 141.4 141.4 ... 0.6 131.2 131.2 131.2 ... () 4.0 4.0 ... 2.3 2.3...
Sabine, Tex........................... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Beaumont, Tex ......................... 51.4 38.2 37.7 37.7 ... 0.5 13.3 7.9 7.9 ... 5.4 2.9 2.9 ... 0.3 0.3...
Lake Charles, La...................... 110.1 91.3 91.3 91.3 ... ... 18.8 18.8 18.8 ... ... 6.2 6.2 ... 0.3 0.3...
Galveston................................ 2,212.1 1,8130 1,812.5 1,810.7 1.8 0.5 399.1 357.4 357.4 ... 41.7 4.7 84.5 0.2 12.7 12.7...
Galveston, Tex........................ 604.4 568.1 568.1 567.9 0.2 ... 36.3 36.3 36.3 ... ... 16.2 16.2 () 1.0 1.0...
Houston, Tex.......................... 1,178.8 889.9 889.4 887.8 1.6 0.5 288.9 247.2 247.2 ... 41.7 58.2 58.0 0.2 8.5 8.5
Freeport, Tex ........................ 19.0 7.7 7.7 7.7 ... ... 11.3 11.3 11.3 ... ... 0.8 0.8 ... 0.9 0.9...
Corpus Christi, Tex................... 393.2 347.3 347.3 347.3 ... ... 45.9 45.9 45.9 ... ... 9.4 9.4 ... 1.1 1.1...
Texas City, Tex....................... 16.8 ... ... ... ... ... 16.8 16.8 16.8 ... ... ... ... ... 1.2 1.2
Laredo.................................. 102.6 102.7 100.0 20.6 79.4 2.7 ... ... ... ... ... 20. 2.6 1.2..
BrowMnville, Tex ...................... 102.6 102.7 100.0 20.6 79.4 2.7 ... ... ... ... ... 20.8 2.6 18.2...
South Pacific Coast Districts...... 1,463.4 1,035.5 1,014.7 1,010.3 4.4 20.8 427.8 427.6 427.6 ... 0.2 59.8 58.1 1.7 4.1 4.1
San Diego ................................ 7. 7.8 7.8 7.7 0.1 () ... ... ... ... ... 0.6 0.6 () ... ... ...
Los Angele ............................... 634.6 313.1 307.4 304.1 3.3 5.7 321.5 321.5 321.5 ... ... 20.2 18.8 1.4 2.6 2.6...
Los Angeles, Calif.................... 354.3 174.2 170.9 168.3 2.6 3.3 180.1 180.1 180.1 ... ... 14.4 13.2 1.2 1.7 1.7...
Port San Luis, Calif.................. 33.7 ... ... ... 33.7 33.7 33.7 ... ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.2
Long Beach, Calif..................... 243.6 135.9 33.5 132.8 0.7 2.4 107.8 107.8 107.8 ... ... 5.7 5.5 0.2 0.7 0.7...
El Segundo, Calif..................... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
San Francisco........................... 821.0 714.6 699.5 698.4 1.1 15.1 106.4 106.2 106.2 ... 0.2 39.0 3.7 0.3 1.5 1.5...
Eureka, Calif......................... 19.9 19.9 17.4 17.4 ... 2.5 ... ... ... ... ... 0.6 0.6
San Francisco, Calif.................. 73.0 73.0 72.6 71.8 0.8 0.4 0.1 0.1 0.1 ... ... 12.3 12.0 0.3 () ()..
Stockton, Calif ...................... 369.7 369.7 369.7 369.7 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 10.1 10.1 ...
Oakland, Calif ........................ 116.5 116.5 104.7 104.7 (*) 11. ... ... ... ... ... 8.0 8.0 ()...
Richmond, Calif........................ 125.5 59.9 59.9 59.9 (*) (a) 65.6 65.3 65.3 ... 0.3 2.4 2.4 () 1 1.2...
Alameda, Calif........................ 50.3 50.3 50.0 49.8 0.2 0.3 ... ... ... ... ... 5.5 5.5' () ... ... ..
Cro ckett, Calif....................... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Martinea, Calif........................ 19.0 2.3 2.3 2.3 ... ... 167 16.7 16.7 ... ... () () ... 0.1 0.1 ...
Redwood City, Calif................... 20.9 20.9 20.9 20.9 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... () () *** ***
Selby, Calift...........n....... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ..

See footnotes at end of table.












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6 AUGUST 1959
Table 2.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERMBRNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARO AND TANKER VESSELS,
BY CUSToMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADING
(Totals are given for all customs districts, at which there are vessel shipments. Only those ports are shown whose combined export and Import ton-
nage averaged 5 million pounds or more per month during calendar year 1958. Customs district totals are for all ports in the district including
those not shown. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals shown
for previous months include current revisions)

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in million of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port Grad a" General In- al General In- tal eneral In- General n-
total Total imports transit Total imports transit Total imports transit Total imports transit

t(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)


Total all districts:
Monthly Average-1958...
August 1958 .........
July 1959...........
August 1959.........

North Atlantic Coast
Districts.............

Maine and New Hampshire......
Portland, Maine...........
Bangor, Maine.............
Portsmouth, N. H..........
Belfast, Maine............
Searsport, Maine..........
Massachusetts................
Boston....................
Gloucester................
New Bedford................
Fall River................
Salem....................
Rhode Island .................
Providence ................
Connecticut................**
Bridgeport................
New Haven.................
New London................
New York....................
New York..................
Albany....................
Philadelphia.................
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Wilmingtonj Del...........
Paulsboro, N. J...........
Camden, N. J..............
Marcus Hook, Pa.........
Maryland.....................
Baltimore.................
Virginia....................
Norfolk ........ ........
Newport News............
Richmond..................
Alexandria................

South Atlantic Coast


No,





Ge


Fl







Fl




Mol



Ne



St
SaB


31,411.1
30,394.2
33,292.4
32,994.2


18,9b7.6

2,102.4
1,86b4..6
24.0
98.6b
26.9
63.2
1,008.3
928.1
11.4
1.0
67.7

166.0

222.5
99.4
61.0
62.1
5,299.4
5,221.2
8.7
7,044.2
4,620.7
611.2
949.5
168.9
663.2
2,165.3
2,052.5
959.5
373.6
524.3
11.8
14.3


Districts............. 1,367.3

rth Carolina'............... 64.3
Wilmington................ 56.8
Morehead City............. 7.5
uth Carolina ................ 235.5
Charleston................ 235.5
Georgetown................ ...
orgia...................... 368.7
Brunswick................. ...
Savannah.................. 368.7
wridal...................... 698.8
Jacksonville.............. 285.7
Miami............. ....... 58.8
Vest Palm Beach........... 54.1
Port Everglades........... 268.5

Gulf Coast Districtse.. 4,188.8

oridal..................... 205.2
Tampa..................... 183.8
Pensecola................. 8.6
Bocagrande................ ...
Panama City.:............. 12.8
bile ......."............... 1,387.6
Mobile, Ala............... 1,362.5
Gulfport, Miss............ 4.2
Pascagoula, Miss.......... 20.9'
SOrleans.................. 1,544.8
New Orleans, La........... 851.0
Baton Rouge, La........... 535.1
Port Sulphur, La.......... ...
SLouis.................... ...
bine......................... 73.8
Port Arthur, Tex..........
Sabine, Tex...............
Beaumont, Tex............. 41.0
Lake Charles, La .......... 32.9
See footnotes at end of table.


13,425.6
14,166.4
18,857.4
17,395.1


7,266 6

97.5
24.4
1.8
35.1

11.2
298.9
273.2
11.4
1.0
13.3

17.5

57.6
29.0
2.7
25.9
1,786.0
1,707.8
8.7
3,097.6
2,907.8
101.2
3.6
54.2

1,552.0
1,552.0
359.5
220.9
100.2
11.8
14.3


621.7

64.3
56.8
7.5
86.3
86.3

196.3

196.3
274.8
171.7
23.9
27.6
51.5

3,747.1

166.1
148.5
4.8

12.8
1,335.1
1,309.9
4.2
20.9
1,342.7
751.3
500.4


35.4


2.6
32.9


13,318.9
1-,067.2
18,706.2
17,302.3


7,205.4

97.5
24.4
1.8
35.1

11.2
298.6
273.0
11.3
1.0
13.3

17.5

57.6
29.0
2.7
2.5.9
1,752.9
1,674.7
8.7
3,094.4
2,905.8
101.2
3.6
53.0

1,527.4
1,527.4
359.5
220.9
100.2
11.8
14.3


620.9

64.3
56.8
7.5
86.3
86.3

196.3

196.3
274.0
171.7
23.9
26.9
51.5

3,725.5

165.9
148.3
4.8

12.8
1,332.5
1,307.3
4.2
20.9
1,330.5
739.1
500.4


35.4


2.6
32.9


106.7
99.2
151.2
92.8


61.2

(a)




0.3
0.2
0.1









33.1
33.1

3.2
2.0


1.2

24.6
24.6
(*)





0.8










0.8

N
0.7


21.6

0.2
0.2



2.6
2.6


12.2
12.2


17,985.6
16,227.8
14.435.0
15,599.1


11,701.0

2,004.9
1,840.2
22.2
63.5
26.9
52.0
709.4
654.9


54.4

148.5

16506
70.4
58.3
36.2
3,513.4
3,513.4

3,946.6
1,712.9
510.0
945.9
114.6
663.2
613.3
500.5
600.0
152.7
424.0




745.6




149.2
149.2

172.4

172.4
424.0
113.9
34.9
26.5
216.9

441.6

39.1
35.3
3.9


52.6
52.6


202.0 6
99.7
34.7


38.i


38.4


15,948.5
14,671.5
12,339.9
13,882.7


9,988.2

292.1
127.4
22.2
63.5
26.9
52.0
709.4
654.9'






165:6
70.4
58.3
36.2
3,513.4
3,513.4

3,946.6
1,712.9
510.0
945.9
114.6
663.2
613.3
500.5
600.0
152.7
424.0



745.6




149.2
149.2

172.4

172.4
424.0
113.9
34.9
26.5
216.9

441.6

39.1
35.3
3.9


52.6
52.6


202.0
99.7
34.7





38.4


2,037.1
1,556.3
2,095.1
1,716.4


1,712.8

1,712.8
1,712.8


693.7
633.7
885.5
845.0


522.7

1.3
0.8
(*)
(*)


35.2
32.2
2.0
0.3
0.8



1.0o
0.3
0.1
0.7
371.1
370.6
0.4
57.7
52.5
2.0
1.1
1.7

39.8
39.8
16.6
11.4
3.7
0.3
1.1


34.0

2.6
2.5
0.1
7.6
7.6

8.3

8.3
15.6
7.5
3.5
2.3
2.3

101.4

5.1
3.7
1.2

0.612
11.1
10.7
0.3
0.1
52.8
48.4
3.3


0.4


0.2
0.2


673.6
611.5
866.2
828.5


511.1

1.3
0.8
(*)

(*)

35.2
32.2
2.0
0.3
0.8

0.2

1.0
0.3
0.1
0.7
360.3
359.8
0.4
57.4
52.4
2.0
1.1
1.6

39.2
39.2
16.6
11.4
3.7
0.3
1.1


33.6

2.6
2.5
0.1
7.6
7.6

8.3

8.3
15.2
7.5
3.4
2.0
2.3

99.2

5.1
3.7
1.2

0.2
10.9
10.5
0.3
0.1
51.1
46.7
3.3


0.4

0.2
0.2


148.9
136.8
110.4
118.0


88.9

19.9
19.0
0.1
0.4
0.2
0.3
4.1
3.8


0.3

0.9

0.9
0.4
0.3
0.2
24.6
24.6

360.6
12.7
3.7
7.9
0.8
5.4
4.0
3.3
3.8
1.0
2.7




5.1




0.9
0.9

il1

1.1
3.1
0.8
0.3
0.2
1.6

4.2

0.3
0.2
0.1


0.3
0.3


1.5
0.9
0.2


615
0.3
0). 3


128.7
121.8
89.6
99.7


70.7

1.7
0.8
0.1
0.4
0.2
0.3
4.1
3.8




0.9
0.9


0.4
0.3
0.2
24.6
24.6

30.6
12.7
3.7
7.9
0.8
5.4
4.0
3.3
3.8
1.0
2.7




5.1




699
0.9




3.1
0.8
0.3
0.2
1.6

4.2

0.3
0.2
0.1


0.3
0.3


1.5
0.9
0.2


0.3


0.3












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8 AUGUST 1959
Table 2.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERMORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AMND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSElS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNIADING-Continued

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port and Total General In- Total enal I Total Total General In-
total imports transit imports transit imports transit imports transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Great Lakes Districts-
Continued

Chicago...................... 313.4 312.3 312.3 ... 1.1 1.1 ... 18.4 18.4 ... 0.2 0.2 ...
Chicago, 11............. 313.4 312.3 312.3 ... 1.1 1.1 ... 18.4 18.4 ... 0.2 0.2
East Chicago, Ind......... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Gary, Ind ................. ... ... ... ...
Ohio......................... 3,010.4 2,994.6 2,994.6 ... 15.7 15.7 ... 21.1 21.1 ... 0.4 0.4
Cleveland................. 1,038.6 1,036.4 1,036.4 ... 2.2 2.2 ... 10.1 10.1 ... 0.1 0.1 ...
Toledo.................... 470.5 457.0 457.0 ... 13.5 13.5 ... 4.8 4.8 ... 0.3 0.3 ...
Erie, Pa.................. 107.7 107.7 107.7 ... ... ... ... 0.7 0.7 ... ... ...
Sandusky.................. 8.6 8.6 8.6 ... ... ... ...' (*) () ... ... ... ...
Ashtabula................. 951.5 951.5 951.5 ... ... ... ... 3.8 3.8 ... ... ...
Conneaut.................. ... ... ... ... ... ...
Falrport.................. 43.4 43.4 43.4 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1 ... ... ... ...
Huron ..................... 372.7 372.7 372.7 ... ... ... .. 1.5 1.5 ... ...
Lorain..... ; .............. 13.0 13.0 13.0 ... ... 0.1 0.1 ... ... ... ...

Puerto Rico, Hawaii,
and Alaska Districts.. 831.6 139.8 139.7 0.1 691.8 688.1 3.7 8.8 8.8 (a) 4.9 4.8 0.1

Puerto Rico.................. 798.3 110.1 110.0 0.1 688.1 688.1 ... 5.1 5.1 () 4,8 4.8 ...
Guanica................... 15.3 15.3 15.3 ... ... .... ... 0.2 0.2 ... ... ... ...
Mayagues.................. 1.2 1.2 1.2 ... ... ... ... (*) (*) ... ... ... ...
Ponce ................ ... 3.9 3.9 3.9 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 ... ... ... ...
San Juan:.................. 282.6 89.7 89.6 0.1 192.8 192.8 ... 4.6 4.5 0.1 1.3 1.3 ...
Haaii....................... I 18.5 18.5 18.5 (a) ... ... ... 2.5 2.5 () ... ...
Honolulu .................. 17.8 17.8 17.8 (*) ... ... ... 2.4 2.4 () ...
Alaska......................... ........ 14.9 11.2 11.2 ... 3.7 ... 3.7 1.2 1.2 ... 0.1 ... 0.1

*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds; less than 50,000 dollars.
1Florida Atlantic Coast port totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast port totals to obtain total imports through the Customs District of
Florida.

Table 3..-SHIPPING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF
SERVICE, AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS
(Data in millions of.pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals
shown for previous months include current revisions)

Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
United
Trade area Total te United United United Total States
eight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
eight flag flag flag

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Total all trade areas:
Monthly average 1958................. 19,104.0 3,113.1 17,425.8 2,722.8 4,958.5 1,548.8 12,467.3 1,174.0 1,678.2 390.3
August 1958....................... -.2,93'.9 3,504.0 21,161.9 3,062.1 4,957.5 1,366.7 16,204.4 1,695.4 1,776.0 441.9
July 1959......................... 22,645.6 4,020.8 20,510.5 3,699.4 5,617.1 1,190.8 14,893.5 2,508.7 2,135.1 321.4
August 1959....................... 20,043.0 3,835.8 18,283.0 3,418.5 5,485.2 1,356.2 12,797.9 2,062.3 1,760.0 417.3

Foreign trade areas except Canadian... 14,583.7 2,195.3 13,196.7 1,952.8 5,401.2 1,354.0 7,795.5 598.9 1,387.0 242.5

Caribbean................................... 671.9 144.1 644.4 137.6 553.9 135.0 90.6 2.6 27.5 6.5
East Coast South America.................... 777.1 189.3 725.0 153.0 209.9 63.6 515.2 89.4 52.1 36.3
West Coast South America.................... 131.2 48.1 131.2 48.1 114.0 48.1 17.3 () ...
West Coast Central America and Mexico....... 52.1 13.0 45.0 13.0 28.7 12.8 16.3 0.2 7.1 ...
Gulf Coast Mexico........................... 43.3 ... 38.6 ... 24.3 ... 14.3 ... 4.7 ..

United Kingdom and Eire..................... 971.5 114.6 773.4 114.6 427.3 114.6 346.1 () 198.1 ...
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland.. 934.0 128.0 908.9 128.0 327.0 39.9 581.9 88.0 25.1 ...
Bayonne-Hamburg Range....................... 3,683.1 230.3 3,345.0 230.3 1,140.4 186.9 2,204.6 43.5 338.1 ...
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic............... 195.5 68.1 179.4 68.1 20.8 1.1 158.5 67.0 16.1
Asores, Mediterranean and Black Sea......... 2,464.7 376.7 2,270.4 289.4 537.4 131.3 1,733.0 158.0 194.3 87.3

West Coast Africa........................... 107.8 30.2 101.1 30.2 82.4 30.2 18.7 ... 6.7 ...
South and East Africa........................ 115.5 48.6 106.7 48.6 83.2 48.6 23.6 ... 8.8
Australasia ................................. 156.8 39.9 146.8 29.9 117.3 29.4 29.5 0.5 10.0 10.0
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea............. 772.7 399.6 670.2 297.2 337.8 147.6 332.4 149.6 102.5 102.4
Malaya and Indqne'sia........................ 113.0 48.9 113.0 48.9 90.7 48.9 22.3 .........
South China, Formosa and Philippines........ 307.5 91.9 307.5 91.9 219.4 91.9 88.1
North China including Shanghai and Japan.... 3,086.0 224.1 2,690.1 224.1 1,086.9 224.1 1,603.2 (*) 395.9

Canadian trade areas.................. 5,459.3 1,640.3 5,086.3 1,465.6 84.0 2.3 5,002.3 1,463.4 373.0 174.7

Pacific Canada.................. ..... 81.7 38.8 42.3 15.1 8.3 2.1 34.1 13.0 39.4 23.7
Great Lakes Canada.......................... 5,165.7 1,589.4 4,880.4 1,438.4 60.0 ... 4,820.4 1,438.4 285.3 151.0
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland............ 211.7 12.0 163.5 12.0 15.7 0.1 147.8 11.9 48.2 ...
*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds.
'Classification of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each ,oyage (whether the voyage is part of a
scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.









-[]CIr 1999 9
Tmbl .-M41N T P r AES GEMuL BTS or MawiCKAUSE 01 CRY LAC AM TAx mLA 11 I K, TTi EVicg, ALs
A8BT CAMXE WU triTX STATILA YLISE1
Data In 11 of p d. tnltas repes t the -O Lf UnaWtIU ftgures, thne -J vary 1..*g'.I fr- the e4 of the ror it nnt. Totatl
__ot. i fir gred.-'uf aucstrij tra -Arci re re*!(*'.t


T.eri are .. h. a





WeTa *.I .trae La a ** .
A~.M--j ** * *







Aug cst Ibil

i b n .. ..................... .



.l ted 9 1 n g a o K .....
Plr .itpc fini l .l. A: e i &r.L ur
Bsiul -RsB,. . . ............... ........
tM r ea t L Ae t .....................









*jo, u.! trz .in ........a
We t ...t A ................. ....
oth a t Afra lt ......d fa. .........
Aualf Call z ia i .. ................. ..........











India, Nm~rlkn Ikf ar Re sea .......
&ated Kwnt *ral Elt.....I ..... . .
IlBlUijfram1n :eilna 'nghal and rrpar. .







0iui amdltbaLr ita e .ar a.....................
Pormtr aun 'pa.ar. Atlrt .. .
Aaores, Med i trranc;, a| 8*: m: Sa. . ... .. .

eart Cll- t A fra l. ............................
Mothsl East Atfrla......... .. .. ...
Autralasoia..................... .. .
lnll*, Perlan onaf and toid Sa..............
rkL1j and lIndto ite.......... ....
3outm Q|, P-r- W ... P..l.i..........
Artt !ia ieh Shangh and Jae......

Canadlan trade area................ ...

Paclfl Qarada...............................
Great Whek ana.,i. .. ......................
Atlanti: t ana adun bufonndian.............


Total all -e.l


18.
a'. I 14







a ~.,J 5
31 I
31,185 0


2,, 319.3

1... 315.1

,, 38."
196.5
415.5

203.5
2, 3.2

2
&A3 7


30b.l
166.7



350.1

0

'~4~ .6
1,70o.7
4,696.2


,,rnt a...



. .^1o
nag


(2)




*.5to 70
3, 4.7


l,B7*'.l1

37. V

7.7
.' .
O.1

59.9
8.1
81.9
.o4
7-.0

63.7
W .3
4M..8
82.9
38.9!
13 .9l
8.* I

1,470.

18., |
747.8|
2..


I ,-78. 3
10,*7.,1.

*., *.?
1,038.9
196.5
,3.9

.*9.3
1.19 7
215.9
1,132.7
359,7


309.1
166.7
173.2
96.0
610,.&
350.1

6, .3

442.4
1,683.)
*,696. 2


L'iu I.']
Ltatea
flag


29.9.
'3.3
30p. 1
? .7
27.*
O.I

59.9
8.1

9.


38.9

1 3.9
1yr.3


17.4
1*3.9
88.-

1,452..

103.9
74 1.4
7*4.1
M.(2..


M "argeo -l


Total


3,95S.S8


I In




8*0. /
3,5.. 1


589
I8.6

176,.
183.
(M.*
6 .5
195.7

120.1
ltl.1
121.7
It.f
95.9
*U.0
333.7



55.1
-* a

8.l
24.6


'.i'nf!
State-
ram


( ) I 6)


1,1 3.5
1,OIV.


I ______ ______ ______ J


r-rf...ar


Total ~tatae
tiag

(7 6)




f 1,95. -
I, ~W1J


t~, 89.

17~.7
3,,

19. ,o
1 ".3

70.7
3..9
44~ 3
38
166~

169...
1.5.
45.1
10.0
.1
1'fl.~


0,037,9

3w)'~)
3*o58.5
4 59~ 1


(q '









is9
"-'.











51 1
0.1

0.1

31. 3





0.5

1,439...

91+ 1
7,., .
I.)4 .4


Th~k.r YW1E


I'a~ leG
ta: 'ml..
fleg


(9 101


7
9,833...



271 .



1-.







r, .0
501.0






70.0


41.7

18..


-.34
.378.0


45,5




.18

3,.
+.7


______ I _____ ______ I. ______


V te- Lee t t CIa prunffs.
1Cl-seffstt~io of dry cargo vesel t "liner" or 'irre4.rar or tramp" is bamed B charaterittl
achedaed herth opratno* et,.) UAiu the elaafleation 'riterla f of the M.rittir Aa1lm etratlon.,


1 f f'ot6, vyYage


vhther the voyage in BArt o'f


.Table 5.- ALIT F T COf W L'M WL'3 UftTUL 8 VB'L UNIER T N= WITI SATL 7IN A:1 F1AK :ii SI:A, OAT if"' W-rPAAN
F _P_ XrlI: MO E'7T BY VES-L-COITA. DIThl F LLM I TYPE 7!, S -tK AK) A4 ui. 0l81 1 0NTE 'ATL AoW P t1-
I;IN ruA VE


( ipg it ic a. ?Tls r-rTa enA h ula, of u rated + f, i gw, be -y vary '1* re fr!..
T.l.a.a sht..M, for provIonm okAtt tinelwi ctrerBt re'Bi..r.u


the en of the roLwet d aBouta.


101r. *1, I4 .r'


"ts.'d..; *v .*<, **


A ', .




C ,AO -r 'u i .,.n . .. .
Sou'.b pa-T T; r'e . . .....
muroh ii-if ;x r-.a
Great aIz [ p.rtl..
Pit rt-, 4i!c--. Haira &r..' AA. &iA. p r ts.


Ilted StateM flag ea.la Foreign flag v.eels

.',,r -r :rr(,. i. j .ara -r i .n.r I rrf...ar TJ u...r
pr.. o r *r1zi r..... ir.. r .r lra| .
Herr. r ,rr





*. -.


-C teM le t. n C und- .


Total all eele

rnd .rer rr.fr.2 r 'rJr~
' I l n.- r *, 're = _, .
I ~ ~ rv'*T -


*1


..... ... & ,,,


?.La. dry .:ar(, rl.rr




-able 6. -IEPARiENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL UNDER UNITED STATES FRQEIQ AID PFOXRAMS, AND "SPECIAL C&TEOOKgC *ON-DEPART-
MENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED B VESSEL-TRADE AREA BY TYPE OF VESSEL IERIGCE AND AMlUTR CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS:
(In thousands of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts)
Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tanker vessels

Total dWr cargo Liner Irregular
Trade area Total United United
shipping States United United United Total States
weight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
flag flag flag
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

Total all trade areas
Monthly average 1958.............. 380,099 132,176 142,949 117,732 117,393 97,176 25,556 20,556 237,150 14,444
July 1959...................... 309,144 81,273 89,755 73,533 83,458 68,556 6,297 4,977 219,389 7,740
August 1959 ................... 219,032 84,741 99,953 79,643 80,696 65,686 19,257 13,957 119,078 5,098



foreign trade areas except Canadian.. 179,927 79,872 99,930 79,622 80,696 65,686 19,234 13,936 79,997 248

Caribbean ................................. 8,155 675 2,616 675 2,545 652 71 23 5,539
East Coast South America ................... 268 149 268 149 268 149
West Coast South America ................... 1,154 988 1,154 988 1,130 988 24
West Coast Central America and Mexico...... 38 1 38 1 38 1 (*) (*)...
Gulf Coast Mxioo........................... 33 (*) 33 ... () ... ...
United Kingdn and Eire.................... 2,058 182 2,058 182 266 182 1,792 .........
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland. 11,124 7,191 7,504 7,191 7,504 7,191 ... ... 3,620...
Bayonne-Hamburg Range...................... 45,525 820 8,849 820 5,431 820 3,417 (*) 36,676 ...
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic .............. 1,961 1,277 1,743 1,277 1,743 1,277 ... ... 218 ...
Unidentified countries in Western Europe..... ... .. ... ... ... ...... ..
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea........ 44,425 8,235 10,728 8,235 10,723 8,235 5 ... 33,697 ...
West Coast Africa.......................... 847 283 847 283 847 283 ............
South and East Africa ...................... 334 285 334 285 334 285 ...
Australasia................................ 1,794 1,481 1,546 1,233 1,546 1,233 ... ... 248 248
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea............ 6,700 5,074 6,700 5,074 6,700 5,074 ...........
Malaya and Indonesia ....................... 2,039 1,023 2,039 1,023 2,039 1,023 .........
South China, Formosa and Philippines....... 17,889 17,333 17,889 17,333 17,635 17,086 254 247 ......
North China including Shanghai and Japan... 35,586 34,875 35,586 34,875 21,914 21,209 13,671 13,666 ......

Canadian trade areas ................. 39,104 4,870 23 20 ... ... 23 20 39,081 4,850

Pacific Canada ............................. 21 20 21 20 ... ... 21 20
Great Lakes Canada ......................... 4,852 4,850 2 ... ... ... 2 ... 4,850 4,850
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland........... 34,231- ... ... ... ... ... 34,231

*Denotes less than 500 pounds; less than one tenth of one percent.
1Clase fication of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of
a scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the M&ritila Administration.


... .. : 11 I .. . .i ""' r' :i... . .. .".. .. . "' .. .. . = .... '







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08587 8857
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON 25. D. C.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS


UNIV OF FLORIDA L| BR
DOCUMENTS DEPT i
GAINESVILLE FLA

F C'999 I