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United States foreign trade
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010658/00096
 Material Information
Title: United States foreign trade
Portion of title: Water-borne foreign trade statistics
Alternate title: Waterborne foreign trade statistics
United States water-borne foreign trade
United States waterborne foreign trade
Some issues have title: United States foreign trade
Physical Description: v. : ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication: Washington, D.C
Publication Date: -1965
Frequency: monthly, including annual cumulation
monthly
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in June 1965.
General Note: "Summary report FT 985."
General Note: Description based on: Calendar year 1952; title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: June 1965.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 13695873
lccn - sf 86092445
ocm13695873
Classification: lcc - WMLC L 83/3610
System ID: AA00010658:00096
 Related Items
Succeeded by: U.S. waterborne foreign trade

Full Text





U. S. DEPARTMENT O COMMERCE
Frederick H. Mueller, Secretary






UNITED STATES FOREI


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Robert W. Burgess, Director


SUMMARY REPORT
FT 985


OCTOBER 1959


FOR RELEASE
March 4, 1960


WATERBORNE FOREIGN TRADE STATISTICS

COVERAGE


This report presents statistics on total
United States waterborne inbound and outbound
shipments made in foreign trade, with the excep-
tion of such elements as are specified below.

From July 1953 through December 1955 and
starting with July 1956, the statistics on water-
borne exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
and non-Department of Defense shipments of "spe-
cial category" commodities exclude shipments in-
dividually valued at less than $500. For the
months January through June 1956, these statis-
tics exclude export shipments individually valued
at less than $1,000. Information on the exclu-
sion of the low-valued export shipments in the
vessel statistics is contained in the November
1953 and February 1956 issues of the Foreign
Trade Statistics Notes. From January 1954 through
December 1957 vessel import figures exclude ship-
ments having a shipping weight of less than 2,000
pounds, regardless of value, as well as shipments
valued at less than $100, regardless of shipping
eight. Starting with January 1958 statistics
the import data exclude only those shipments
where the value is less than $100 regardless of
shipping weight. Information on the exclusion of
the low-value and low-weight import shipments in
the vessel statistics is contained in the Febru-
ary and March 1954 and January-March 1958 issues
of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.

Vessel export figures in this report, shown
in columns 4, 9, 13, and 16 of table 1 and in
table 3, represent exports of domestic and for-
eign merchandise laden at the United States Cus-
toms area for shipment to foreign countries and
include export shipments to United States civil-
ian Government agencies and non-Department of De-
fense controlled foreign aid program shipments as
described below. Excluded from these figures are
shipments to the United States armed forces
abroad of supplies and equipment for their own
use as well as the other types of shipments de-
scribed below for which information is shown in
separate columns in table 1.


Department of Defense controlled and "spe-
cial category" figures, shown in columns 6 and 11
of table 1 and in tables 5 and 6 of this report
cover consolidated data for the following types
of shipments:
1. Vessel export shipments of Department of
Defense controlled cargo under special
foreign aid programs, i.e., Internation-
al Cooperation Administration, Army Ci-
vilian Supply, etc., made aboard United
States flag vessels such as Army-Navy
transports or commercial vessels char-
tered by the Department of Defense under
time, voyage and space charter arrange-
ments and including "special category "
commodities without distinction.
2. Vessel export shipments of "special cat-
egory" commodities not controlled by the
Department of Defense for which detailed
information cannot be shown separately
because of security reasons. For an ex-
planation and list of "special category"
commodities and their presentation in
foreign trade statistics see the April
1958 issue of Foreign Trade Statistics
Notes.

Only shipping weight data in terms of United
States port or coastal district of lading and
foreign trade area of unlading are shown for
these classes of shipments since information on
the dollar value of exports of Department of De-
fense controlled cargo is not available at this
level of detail. Consequently, the total value
figures shown in columns 12 and 15 of table 1 for
dry cargo and tanker shipments in that order cor-
respond to the shipping weight figures shown in
columns 3 and 8, respectively, of the same table.

Vessel import figures, shown in columns 3,
6, 9 and 12 of table 2 and in table 4 of this re-
port, are general imports and represent the total
of imports for immediate consumption plus entries
into customs bonded storage and manufacturing
warehouses made at the United States Customs area


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
Shipping and Foreign Aid Branch, Milton Kaufman, Chief, Clifton Jordan, Assistant Chief.
Peor ale by the Bare-m of the Casus,. Washingtoen s. D. C. Price 18e, annual subscription $100.
USCOM6-DC









from foreign countries. Vessel import figures
exclude American goods returned by the United
States armed forces for their own use, import
shipments on Army or Navy transports, and ship-
ments covered by informal entries.

The following types of shipments are ex-
cluded from both the vessel export and import
data: (1) Shipments of household and personal
effects, (2) shipments by mail and parcel post,
and (3) shipments of vessels under their own
power and afloat. United States trade with Puerto
Rico and with United States possessions is not
reported as United States exports and imports.

Merchandise shipped in bond through the
United States in transit from one foreign country
to another without having been entered as an im-
port is not included in any of the figures in the
columns previously referred to (imported merchan-
dise cleared through Customs and subsequently
re-exported is included in both the import and
export statistics). Separate information for the
waterborne portion of the in-transit trade in
terms of shipping weight and dollar value is
presented in this report in tables 1 and 2.
Columns 5, 10, 14, and 17 of table 1 reflect
in-transit merchandise laden aboard vessels at
United States ports, while columns 4, 7, 10, and
13 of table 2 reflect such merchandise unladen
from vessels. The waterborne outbound and inbound
in-transit statistics include (1) foreign mer-
chandise transferred from one vessel to another
in the United States port of arrival and shipped
to a foreign country without being released from
Customs custody in the United States; and (2)
foreign merchandise arriving by vessel at one
United States port, shipped through the United
States under Customs bond, and leaving the United
States by vessel from a port other than that at
which it arrived. In addition, the waterborne
outbound in-transit statistics also include (1)
foreign merchandise withdrawn from a general
order warehouse for immediate export by vessel or
for transportation and export by vessel (such
merchandise was not recorded as an import when it
entered the warehouse), and (2) foreign merchan-
dise shipped via vessel from a United States
Foreign Trade Zone to a foreign country (such
merchandise is deposited in the Foreign Trade
Zone without being entered as an import). Any
inbound or outbound in-transit merchandise moving
by methods of transportation other than vessel is
excluded from the in-transit statistics. Thus,
merchandise arriving at the United States by
vessel and leaving by some other method of trans-
portation is included in the inbound data only.
On the other hand, merchandise arriving by other
than waterborne transportation and laden aboard
vessels upon departure is included in the out-
bound statistics but not in the inbound data.
The inbound and outbound segments, therefore, do
not counter-balance one another and are comple-
mentary only insofar as they involve merchandise
carried by vessels to and from the United States.
For a more detailed discussion of the in-transit
trade statistics and the types of shipments ex-
cluded from these data see the February 1953
issue of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.


All types of outbound vessel shipments in
tables 1 and 5 are credited to the coastal dis-
tricts, customs districts, and ports at which the
merchandise was laden. All types of inbound
vessel shipments in table 2 are credited to the
coastal districts, customs districts, and ports
at which merchandise was unladen. In the case of
vessel general imports this is not necessarily
the same as the customs district in which the
goods were entered into warehouse or entered for
Immediate consumption.

Vessel exports in tables 3 and 6 are cred-
ited to the foreign trade areas at which the mer-
chandise was unladen. Vessel imports in table 4
are credited to the foreign trade areas at-which
the merchandise was laden aboard the vessels car-
rying the cargo to the United States. The coun-
tries of destination or origin of merchandise are
not necessarily located within the trade areas to
which the merchandise is shipped or from which it
is received. Detailed definitions of foreign
trade areas in terms of the countries and ports
included in each are contained in Schedule R,
Code Classification and Definition of Foreign
Trade Areas.

Shipping weight figures represent the gross
weight of shipments, including the weight of con-
tainers, wrappings, crates and moisture content.
Vessel export values represent the values at time
and place of export. They are based on the sell-
ing price ( or on the cost if not sold) and
include inland freight, insurance and other
charges to place of export. Transportation and
other costs beyond the United States port of
exportation are excluded. Vessel import values,
as well as the values for in-transit shipments,
are generally based on the market or selling
price and are in general f.o.b. the exporting
country. Since in-transit merchandise is not
subject to the imposition of import duties at the
United States, the valuation reported for such
shipments is not verified by customs to the ex-
tent applicable in the case of import entries and
may in some cases include transportation costs
and insurance to the United States as well as
other cost elements.

Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are
classified as dry cargo or tanker shipments sole-
ly on the basis of the type of vessel used with-
out regard to the cargo carried. Tanker vessels
are those primarily designed for the carriage of
liquid cargoes in bulk, while all others are
classified as dry cargo vessels. A further segre-
gation of dry cargo vessel shipments is provided
in tables 3-6 on the basis of type of service,
i.e., liner (berth) or irregular (tramp). Liner
service is that type of service offered by a
regular line operator of dry cargo vessels on
berth. The itineraries and sailing schedules of
such vessels are predetermined and fixed. Ir-
regular or tramp service is that type of service
afforded by dry cargo vessels which are chartered
or otherwise hired for the carriage of goods on
special voyages. Vessels in this type of service
are not on berth and their sailing schedules are
not predetermined or fixed.










Table l--SHINI ,EG" AND VAL'. OF
T"SPE1IA! CAT-

(Totals are gve fr a toms di stri
da ar r 1- 5 to dtrpic tot,
anoults. Totals ohwi for previous m



















act At. tie a > t' t...t.t




Maine a i Net Hai hi ............. ..
Portland, 1 li.. .. ... .................
B atir, Ml,.. ....................

el fant, Maine .........................
Searspor i4 ne.............. ........
M sacthupet .... ........ .. .......... ...
Boeton. ........ ............ .. .......
Glouee ter. ....... .... ...........
New ed or ......... ........ ......

Sa em ...................................
Rhode It. ant ................ ... ........

Cone i ut ..... ..... ................. ..
Br dge ort. .. . ..... ..... .... ......
New vet ... .. .... .... ........
New I
New LodI ........ .... .... ..............
Nwt tYor .... ......... .. ... .... ..

Phi lade }h .. ... ... ........ .........


Wl n N ..l................ ......
Paul [ a od ..... .. .. ........ .... .

C dr e ]k .. ... .. .. ... .. ...... .
MaryN ; . .. . . . .... ..
r t .. .. .. ...... . .
Virgl .t tb.



l x. . . .











So at Ci. ............................

See fot.notes at end of table.


rNITF SIAT7I WATFRBORNF EXPORT OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND 8
IEHY" NON-D APARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING
ts at whlch there are vessel shipments. Only those ports are shown whose combined export and import tonnage averaged 5 million pounds or more per month during calen-
I are f'r all ports In the district including those not shown. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded
onths Inchlde current revisions)


Shipping weight in millions of pounds


- 1


6: 0 6;'.







7 56.4


Dry cargo


I ~,. ,* I
I r 'CT,,. I


17,i74.4


1 3II.

',7 '

17. 1
12.8

0.5

3.J
175.9
173.4
2.6










9113.9
871. 1

0,.9

4t .8

(a)
4.2

485,.
1,77.2,7
I,310.2
1,411..

0.3
1 1


6.. 4






46.0
56.4


17,4.
J9,3

I',49



1
1



17
17
175












81
84








41
48
3,77

1,41





1






6

5


, 1 I n-
r





.8 148.6
'1. 181.2
/,,' 179.1
.0 138.6

1.0 22.4

7.1 ...
2.8 ...

0.5 ...

3.3
'5.9 (a)
'3.4 (e)
2.6 ...



43 8 ...
.6










t1.6 0.6
2.7 0.6
r.9


4_) ...
4.2
5.4 0.1
V5.4 0.1I
'2.5 0.2
.0.2 ...
18.0 0.2
38.6 ...
0.3 ...

3.1 1.0

46.9 ...
>3.0 ...
3.8
7.9 0.4
>5.3 0.4
.2.6
2.4 ...
6.0 ...
6.4 ...


L[er'riet-
rin "Spe-

o, ri'





142.9
167.7
110.4
96.8

24.4

(5)





(")















5.5
4.3

1.1


0.1
0.1
3.4
3.4
(.)



3.1




(*)
(2)
2.9.





















0.1
(a)
(a)


V 4


1,921.7
2,349.2
1,887.1
2,367.0

150.5





















60.8
60.8

69.5
3.1
3. D










1.2
3.3.












20.1

20.1



11.8








0.3

0.3


T tel





1,684.5
2,097.0
1,654.7
2,192.4

140.3





















55.7
55.7

64.4
3.1

31.2

30.2


20.1

20.1



11.8








0.3

0.3


Tanker


lr.- rarnil .:arg.:.


amr fi r -





1,678.2
2,092.2
1,654.7
2,181.0

140.3





















55.7;
55.7

64.4
3.1

31.2




20.1

20.1



11.8








0.3
0.3


I -






6.3
4.8

11.4


bepL. 1:
defense e
and ".'pe-
-.I l ct-
eg ry'





237.2
252.2
232.4
174.6

10.2





















5.1
5.1

5.1




5.1


889.9
926.1
940.4
850.9

422.5

0.7
0.2

0.1

0.2
8.0
7.6
0.4



0.5
0.5
0.7
0.7


318.3
317.2
1.1
16.2
15.8
(a)
0.2
(a)
0.1
17.6
17.6
60.6
35.3
22.7
2.4
(*)

36.1

9.5
6.6
2.9
7.4
6.6
0.8
5.6
0.3
5.4


Value in millions of dollars


Dry cargo



Dan me1or
ei gn



I LI
'!.


854.2
887.0
898.1
819.8

413.4

0.7
0.2

0.1

0.2
8.0
7.6
0.4



0.5
0.5
0.7
0.7


309.3
308.2
1.1
16.1
15.7

0.2
(a)
0.1
17.6
17.6
60.5
35.3
22.6
2.4
(a)

35.7

9.5
6.6
2.9
7.1
6.3
0.8
5.6
0.3
5.4


. 1 I


IiL a


Tanker



['ame'.0 IC
arod f.r-
e Igr.












Table I.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND
"SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING-Continued


Customs district and port









S. l e'. .. ................... .........
ea.oni:, T............................

Fa s L........... ..... ........
F rl er -. ................ ........



r lvs t Te................................
aTo ......x............................
:r' e ........... ......................







'Crpus, r'sti Tx.....................
F. 6 1 . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.' . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. T. ...... .........................









La eo....................................
: . . . . . .... ... . . . . .
S. Sabine, . . .. ... . . . . . .



Beaumont, Tex......................
SrGalve . . . . .. . .. . ..

oustab ne, Tex..........................
Freeport, Tex........................
Lakeorpus Christi, LaTex.....................



Texas City, Tex .......................
Laredo..................................
Brownsville, Tex ......................


South Pacific Coast Districts......

San Diego....... ........................
Los Angeles..............................
Los Angeles, Calif ....................
Port San Luis, Calif..................
Long Beach, Calif .....................
El Segundo, Calif.....................
San Francisco......... ..................
Eureka, Calif.........................
San Francisco, Calif..................
Stockton, Calif.......................
Oakland, Calif........................
Richmond, Calif.......................
Alameda, Calif........................
Crockett, Calif......................
Martinez, Calif......................
Redwood City, Calif...................
Selby, Calif..........................

See footnotes at end of table.


,rsrd +


Grand
total




(1)


Shipping weight in millions of pounds


Dry cargo


Total




(2)


I -


Domestic, foreign and
in-transit cargo


Total


(3)


Domestic
and for-
eign

(4)


In-
trans-
it

(5)


Dept. of
Defense
and "Spe-
cial cat-
egory"


(6)


I -~






I
- I

I I -.


Tanker


Total




(7)


Domestic, foreign and
in-transit cargo

an f I r


Total


I,.


and for-
eign

(9)


n-
trans-
it

(10)


Dept. of
Defense
and "Spe-
cial cat-
egory"

(11)


Value in millions of dollars


Total




(12)


Dry cargo


Domestic In-
and for- trans-
eign it


Tanker


Domestic In-
and for- trans-
eign it


______ + 4. L ______


I.


62.2
173.0
1,493.1
486.8
755.8
19.2
137.3
94.1
119.6
119.6

1,783.1

7.2
936.6
17.8
17.9
293.2
103.0
839.3
24.3
80.5
307.7
139.2
143.3
42.3

10.9
36.9


48.7
106,4
1,080.9
447. 5
511.2
0.1
122.1

119.6
119, 6

1,041.2

7.?

14..

2 30.8

671.2
24.3
80.4
307.8
131.4
42.7
42.2

1.7
36.9


46.4
106.4
1,'079.9
447.5
51 .2
0.1
122.1

119.6
119.6

1,02',.6

7..

14.6

28.7

658.1

80.1
307.0
123.2
42.7
42.2

1.7
36.9


46.4
106.4
1,077.4
447.1
508.1
0.1
122.1

33.1
33.1

1,016.7

3.9F

13.5

228.2

654.1
20.o
78.2
306.9
121.8
42.7
41.6

1.7
36.9


.;3



1.0






15.6



0.2

2.1

13.1
3.7
0.3
0.8
8.2

(a)


13.8
66.6
412.1
39.3
244.5
19.1
15.1
94.1



741. 9


573. 8
3.0
17.9
62.4
103.0
168.1

'()

7.8
100.5


8.5


. .












7.9 7.9
48.1 48.1
350.9 350.9 .
39.3 39.3
05.. 15. ...


94.1 94.1



741.9 741.9 ...


573.8
3.0
17.9
62.4
103.0
168.1



7.8
100.5


8.5


3.0
17.9
62.4
103.0
168.1



7.8
100.5


8.5


u.4
0.1
0.3



17.5
17.5

2.5

0.9
0.6
0.4

0.1

1.0



0.4

0.1



o.o









North Pacific Cost districts ......

Oregon....... .......... ...... .......*
Ast a.................... .....
Cor tla d .................. ... ........
Lor v ew, Wash ......... .......... ...
VL ri er, 'a-... .... ... .....

Wa Ses tt ............................
Tea ttl. ....... .... .. ...... ...... .

Aberde, n-H quiam............... .......
Bell ir h .............................
E'e 1 .5...... .............. ....... ..

Er ..................................



S4 N . .... ....
Wea.r T w ...,... .. ...., .... ... ......

Sreat La 1 -e" 'i tr...i s..............
S h. L re e.... ............ ..............
O dens u ..... .......... ....
Waldd! tci N. Y................. ....


Rcchestr. M ... I.. ......... ........
OsEeuf N. .... .......... ...........


3%, eal N. Y ........................
S, . .. .. ..... .. ..............




Ashlan .. ... .............. ........
Ouluth and Superior....................
De uth, Ml ................. ........ ..
Ashl nd, s..............................
Inte5.&:t!.nal Fall'-Ran e5, 551n ......
Superior, W.. ....... ...................
Wiscos .. ...... ................. .
Milwa k.ee....................... .......
rinette .............................
Green By..........................
Mhia1: ....... ...........................




Deta r', I..... .. ... ... ........ .
Sa .a 3 t ....... ..... .. ......





Muekelond ....... ....... ....... ........

Preir .e ;... .......... ............. .
Ch c . .... .............. ........... .












.- aa, and Ala..ka

H:. 1 ... .. . . . .... ....


, V?[






160.



1..
".


4.4


i .1


1, 277.1 1,251.5 1,241.0 10.5

2.7 8 2. 872. 10.3

69.7 62.2 ...
1. 1.5 451. 10.3

3.7 132. 132.7 ...
14.8 ,14 214.8 ...
84.6 39. 8.9 C0.
30.4 18.:; 18.5 (3)
1009 0,9 100.7 0.2
10.5 10. 10.5 ...
1. 1 1. .1 ...
4 6.4 6.4
9. 9. 9. 0.1

5 ...

4,1 5.3 4,125.3 (*)

.' 6.
6. 6.2 ...

4. 3.5 430.'5 ...
1.1 108.1 108.1
77.7 77.7 77.7
24.6 24a.6 244.6
78.1 78.1 78.1 ...
78.1 78.1 78.1
538.4 538.4 538.4
126.3 16.3 126.3


412.1 412.1 412.1 ..
64.1 64.1 64.1
60.6 60.6 60.6 ...


514.8 512.3 512.3 (*)
6,. 64.0 64.0 (*)
6.0 6.0 6.0
6. 46.4 46.4 ...
176.6 176.6


.. .. ... ...


S 2,028.8 2,028.8
4.7 24.6 24.6 ...
797.6 797.3 797.3 ...
76.8 76.8 76.8 .
477.7 477.7 477.,7
.0 409.0 0 ...
4.6 4.6 4.6 ...
84.4 84.4 84.4

136.1 136.1 136 .1 ...


0.4
0.1
0.3


93.8

37.1


9.8
27.3

56.7
39.1
15.0








192.1












74.0
51.0


23.1





41.9
37.3





38,6
21.2
17.4

37.5
26.3
11.2


97.9 17.7 17,7 17.7 (*) (*) 80.1

6.', 6.4 6.4 6.4 (*) (*) 80.1





1 .

"L___ ''


93.8

37.1


9.8
27.3

56.7
39.1
15.9






















74.0
51.0








41.9
37.3





38.6
21.2
17.4

37.5
26.3
11. 2


93.8

37.1


9.8
27.3

56.7
39.1
15.9








183.0












74.0
51.0








41.9
37.3





38.6
21.2
17.4

28.4
26.3
.2.1


...

...
...

...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...

...

9.1

...


...
...
...
...
...
...
...
.,,
...

...
...
...


...
...
...
...
...

...
...
...
...
9.1
...
9.1
...
...
...
..
...

...


42.0

29.1
0.5
1.6
17.3
3.7
6.0
12.9
6.3
3.2
1.0
0.6
0.8
0.3

0.5

71.0

0.3
0.3

1.7
0.5
0.3
0.9
1.0
1.0
12.9
3.1


9.8
7.0
6.6

0.3
6.5
4.4
0.8
0.5
0.1

24.4
24.0

0.4
17.2
6.0
5.7
0.3
2.2
1.9
(C)
0.3

0.6


0.2

0.1


0.1


0.1
(<)


'()

(")




( )
























(*)




.'M
(<*)


2.3

1.0


0.3
0.8

1.3
1.0
0.2








4.9












1.6
1.2


0.4





1.0
0.8





1.7
1.6
0.1

0.6
0.2
0.41


80.1 77.8 2.3 ... 1.5 1.5 (*) 1.6

80.1 77.8 2.3 ... 0.8 0.8 (*) 1.6



0.3


ae .ad lee tha. Cl0 poGlds; less then 50,000 dollars.
.61ord. AUnc a at p rt totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast port totals to obtain total exports through the Customs District of Florida.


0
...

... 8
...

...















0.3


1.6
1.4


40.





1.0
0.8





1.7
1.6




0.1











1.6 (

1.6 (*
0.2


0.3










6 OCTOBER 1959
Table 2.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADING
(Totals are given for all customs districts at which there are vessel shipments. Only those ports are shown whose combined export and import ton-
nage averaged 5 million pounds or more per month during calendar year 1958. Customs district totals are for all ports in the district including
those not shown. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals shown
for previous months include current revisions)

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port Grand General In- Total General In- enotal eral In- General In-
total Total imports transit imports transit imports transit imports transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)

Total all districts:
Monthly average 1958... 31,411.1 13,425.6 13,318.9 106.7 17,985.5 15,948.5 2,037.1 693.7 673.6 20.1 148.9 128.7 20.2
October 1958........... 36,222.1 16,260.0 16,144.6 115.4 19,962.1 17,832.9 2,129.2 740.5 719.2 21.3 158.2 137.5 20.7
September 1959......... 36,726.5 19,855.5 19,770.1 85.4 16,871.1 15,247.3 1,623.8 1,009.9 993.8 16.1 125.0 109.0 16.0
October 1959........... 35,129.0 17,870.5 17,756.5 114.0 17,258.4 15,308.1 1,950.3 784.4 764.9 19.5 129.3 109.1 20.2

North Atlantic Coast
Districts ............. 1,997.1 7,143.8 7,067.2 76.6 12,853.3 10,983.3 1,870.0 453.6 440.6 13.0 96.8 77.4 19.4

Maine and New Hampshire ...... 2,236.3 37.9 36.6 1.3 2,198.4 329.4 1,869.0 1.1 1.1 (*) 22.2 2.8 19.4
Portland, Maine........... 1,935.2 25.0 23.7 1.3 1,910.3 41.3 1,869.0 0.9 0.9 (") 19.7 0.3 19.4
Bangor, Maine............. 25.4 1.7 1.7 ... 23.7 23.7 ... (*) (*) ... 0.1 0.1 ...
Portsmouth, N. H.......... 75.1 ... ... ... 75.1 75.1 ... ... 0.5 0.5
Belfast, Maine............ 44.7 1.1 1.1 ... 43.7 43.7 ... () () ... 0.3 0.3
Searsport, Maine.......... 146.3 0.7 0.7 ... 145.6 145.6 ... (*) (*) ... 1.6 1.6 ...
Massachusetts................ 1,000.7 253.9 252.9 1.0 746.9 746.9 ... 31.1 30.9 0.2 4.7 4.7 ...
Boston..................... 882.6 220.7 219.8 0.9 661.9 661.9 ... 27.5 27.4 0.1 4.2 4.2 ...
Gloucester................ 13.2 13.2 13.1 0.1 ... ... ... 2.5 2.5 () ...
New Bedford............... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Fall River................ 104.9 19.9 19. 9 4.9 ... 1.1 1.1 ... 0.5 0.5
Salem..................... ... ... ......
Rhode Island................. 51.6 18.2 18.2 (2 ) 33.4 33.4 ... 0.1 0.1 () 0.2 0.2
Providence................ 51.6 18.2 18.2 (*) 33.4 33.4 ... 0.1 0.1 () 0.2 0.2 ...
Connecticut.................. 309.8 92.8 92.8 ... 217.0 217.0 ... 0.4 0.4 ... 1.3 1.3 ...
Bridgeport................ 62.3 6.7 26.7 ... 36.5 36. ... 0.2 0.2 ... 0.2 0.2 ...
New Haven................. 173.0 6 .2 63.2 ... 109.8 109.8 ... (*) () ... 0.6 0.6
New London................ 73.6 3.0 3.0 ... 70.6 70.6 ... 0.2 0.2 ... 0.4 0.4 ...
New York...................... 4,951.1 1,516.: 1,497.4 38.8 3,414.9 3,413.9 1.0 J19.5 307.6 11.9 23.3 23.3 (')
New York................... 4,735.5 1,420.1 1,381.3 38.8 3,315.4 3,314.4 1.0 318.7 306.8 11.9 22.8 22.8 (*)
Albany.................... 60.3 22.7 .7 (') 37.6 37.6 ... 0.8 0.8 ( .) 0..2 ...
Philadelphia................. 7,857.8 2,711.0 ,709.5 1.5 5,146.8 5,146.8 ... 46.7 46.6 0.1 38.3 38.3
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 4,666.0 2,590.6 2,53).1 1.5 .,075.5 2,075.5 ... 44.6 44.5 0.1 15.. 15.2
Wilmington, Del........... 437.9 28.3 8.3 ... 409.6 409.6 ... 0.8 0.8 ... .7 2.7
Paulsboro, J ........... 1,425.9 1.8 1.8 1,424.1 1,424.1 ... 0.2 o.2 () 10.3 10.3
Camden, N. J ................... 95.0 15.4 15.4 ... 79.5 79.5 ... 0.9 0.9 ... 0.1 0.6
Marcus Hook, Pa........... 1,158.2 ... ... ... 3,158.82 1,158.2 ... ... ... ... 9.5 9.5 ...
Maryland..................... 2,542.5 1,918.9 1,885.0 33.3 623.6 623.6 ... 42.1 41.4 0.7 3. 3.9
Baltimore................. 2,465.3 1,918.1 1,884.. 33.3 547.. 547.. ... 4z.1 41.4 0. 3.4 3.4 ...
Virginia....................... 1,047.4 575.1 7/4.3 0.8 472.? 472. ... 12.5 12.4 0.1 3.0 3.0
Norfolk................... 314.4 196.8 196.0 0.8 117.6 117.6 ... 8.3 8.2 0.1 0.8 0.8
Newport News.............. 697.1 353.0 35.0 ) 44.1 344.1 ... 2.7 2.7 ) 2.1 2.1
Richmond................... 55.6 .6 5. ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 ... ..
Alexandria................ 19.8 19.8 19.8 ... ... ... ... 1.2 1.

South Atlantic Coast
Districts............. 916.5 565.1 563.6 1.5 51.3 351.3 ... .9 29.1 0.8 2.3 2.3

North Carolina............... 92.3 43 4. ) 49.1 49.1 ... 2.6 ( 0. 0.5
Wilmington................ 70.89 4..'9 27.9 2.5 .5 ) 0.3 0.3 ...
Morehead City............. 21.5 0.3 0.3 ... 21.2 ... ) ) ... 0.1 0.1
South Carolina............... 213.1 92. 9 92.6 0.3 120.2 120. ... 6.6 6.3 0.3 0.7 0.7 ...
Charleston................ 212.3 92.1 91.8 0.3 120. 30..2 ... 6. 2 0. 0.7 0.7
Georgetown................ 0.8 0.8 0.8 ... ... ... ... ) ... ...
Georgia....................... 163.4 89.3 O.3 ... 74.1 741 ... 4. ... 0.4 0.4
Brunswick................. 12.3 12.3 1. ... ... ... ...
Savannah.................. 151.1 77.0 77,0 ... 74.1 74.1 ... 4.3 4. ... 0.4 0.4
Florida'..................... 447.7 339.7 338.5 1. 107.9 107.9 ... 16.4 6.0 0.4 0.7 0.7
Jacksonville.............. 259.2 40.9 240.7 0. 18.3 18.3 ... 7.7 7.7 ( 0. 0.1 ...
Miami ..................... 59.3 3.9 30.7 0. .4 8.4 ... 4 4. 0.1 0.. 0..
West Palm Beach........... 35.8 19.4 1 .6 0.8 16.3 16.3 ... 2.0 1.7 0. 0.1 0.1
Port Everglades........... 90.0 45.0 4. (*) 4.9 44.9 ... 2.3 2.3 0. 0.3
Gulf Coast Districts... 4,644.2 3,804.8 3,786.2 1 '39.4 9.4 ... 91.9 8.6 1. 6.5 6 6.5

Florida' ........................ 94.8 159.0 159.0 () ) .8 35.8 ... 4.4 4.4 () 0.2 0.2
Tampa..................... 136.4 136.4 136.4 () ... ... 3. 3.1 () ......
Pensacola................. .7 5.7 ... ... ... ... 1. ... ...
Bocagrande................ ... ... ... ... .... ... ... | .. .
Panama City............... 16.0 16.0 It.0 ... ... . ...
Mobile....................... 1,417.3 1,316.4 1,315.7 0.7 00.9 100..1 O. ) 0.6 .
Mobile, Ala............... 1,3811,04 1, .7 .7 00.9 100.9 ... .9 .9 ( 0.6
Gulfport, Mis. ............ 28.9 8.9 ... ... ... .. 0.2 ...
Pascagoula, Miss.......... 7.1 7. 7.1 ... ... .. ... ) ( ..
Jew Orleans.................. 1,6:8.'' 1,321.7 1,3 i.3 12.4 06.5 306.: ... 43.1 41.3 1. 1. i
New Orleans, .La........... .2 405.1 i32.7 12.4 57.1 57.1 6. 0.4 0.4
BaUtn Rouge, la........... 0.4 67.7 3.7 ... 32.7 ... 2. ... 0.3 0.
Port Sulphur, La........ ... ... ... .. .. .....
A ,uis ................... .. ... .. .. ... ..
a ne ...... ......... ........ 52. < C17 1 1 0 35.- 0 3 ...
Port Arthur, Tex..........
Sabine, Tex ............... .. ...
Beaumont, Tex ............. 5. .8 U. 35.0 35.0 ... 0.1 .1 ... .3
Lake Charles, La.......... 14.6 14. 14. ... ... ... ... I 0. ... ... ......
See footnotes at end of table.










OCTOBER 1959

Table 2.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITE) STATE. WA7TE-RNE GENEPAL I PT AN INBOUN IN- N M AN; N) AN TANK 'E
iY 3UT~l DT I AN. PAT OF UN ING--ont a


I!


Gulf Coast Districts-
Continued

Galveston....................
Galveston, Tex............
Houston, Tex..............
Freeport, Tex .............
Corpus Christi, Tex.......
Texas City, Tex ...........
Laredo.......................
Brownsville, Tex..........


South Pacific Coast
Districts .............

San Diego ....................
Los Angfeles ..................
Los Angeles, Calif........
Port San Luis, Calif......
Long Beach, Calif .........
El Segundo, Calif.........
San Francisco................
Eureka, Calif.............
San Francisco, Calif......
Stockton, Calif...........
Oakland, Calif............
Richmond, Calif...........
Alameda, Calif............
Crockett, Calif...........
Martinez, Calif...........
Redwood City, Calif.......
Selby, Calif..............


North Pacific Coast
Districts.............

Oregon.........................
Astoria...................
Coos Bay ..................
Portland..................
Longview, Wash ............
Vancouver, Wash...........
Washington.................
Seattle............ .......
Tacoma ....................
Aterdeen-Hoquiam..........
Bellingham ................
Everett............ .
Port Angeles..............
Port Townsend...... .
Anacortes.................


'Vale iln i i f d lar
]


J.- 4- 4-- .. _



1,343.8 982.6 980.8 1.8 31.2 361.2 ... 3.7 12.
38.8 24.0 23.7 0.3 14.5 14. ... 2.4 2.4
5:1.2 299.2 297. 1.5 6
18.5 0.1 0.1 .
765.3 659.2 659.2 106.1 1 .l 3.1
0.1 .1 .1 .. ..
7.4 7.4 3.7 ... ...
7.2 7.2 3.5 3.7 ... ... .. 1. 0.



2,492.2 676.0 671.3 4.7 1, 81.2 1,86. ... 107. i 105.

16.3 16.3 I 1.9 0 ...
1,635.0 39. 39.7 1, 1, ... .3 7.
3 .3 .... .. ....


154.5.
43.6 1 16.0 7. 4Y1. ... *'.



2 5.3 188.7 1?86.7 C 6. .. .6 3.1
9.4 9.4 9.4 ... .I .
34.6 34.6 34. .. ... .
357.1 .8 18. (*) ... 1.9


91.4 .... ... .4 : 1.4 ... ... :
0.1 0.1 0.1 ... ... ... ... 0.1
.9. 1



996. 8.8 18 106 1 I 78.0 ,4.7


181. 154.0 147.0 .4

4. 4.
136.6 1 8.7
4 g ,
4.1 4.1 4.1 .
814.7 37.8 370.6







276.2


Great Lakes Districts.. 5,081.6 5,032.


St. Lawrence................
Ogdens.urg, N. Y..........
Waddinyton, N. Y..........
Rochester....................
Oswego, Y.............
Rochester, N. Y ..........
!odus P nt, N. Y.........
ffalo.... ..................
uffalo, N. Y.............
luth and uperi'or ..........
i lu th, Min ..............
Ashland, Wis ..............
Internatio nal Fall s-
}arier, Minn.............
uper r, .............
l an::....................
Marl et te .................
3reen a eay.................
i a .ri ...................

rae: sya- ty..........
al..te ..................
a 1 e 3 I .. ..............


62.8 .*;''.R 8 22.,
4 .4 18.4 'i L.4.
29.6 I ).6 9.6
6.7 6.7 b,



2





7.2.





11 .
4. .4%, 4.1.


g2'). "'-.19. }.>


0. .



. 0.5


(*)3 3.





_21


C. 3


!









8
Table 2.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND


OCTOBER 1959
VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADING-Continued


Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port Grand General In- Total general In- General In- General In-
total Total imports transit Total imports transit Total imports transit Total imports transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)

Great Lakes Districts-
Continued

Chicago...................... 1,204.5 1,203.4 1,203.4 (a) 1.1 1.1 ... 24.4 24.4 (*) 0.2 0.2 ...
Chicago, Ill............... 1,204.5 1,203.4 1,203.4 (*) 1.1 1.1 ... 24.4 24.4 (*) 0.2 0.2 ...
East Chicago, Ind ......... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ......
Gary, Ind................. ... ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... .. ...
Ohio......................... : 2,652.4 2,627.5 2,626.8 0.7 25.0 25.0 ... 17.6 17.3 0.3 0.4 0.4
Cleveland................. : 860.0 860.0 859.3 0.7 ... ... ... 8.5 8.2 0.3 ... ...
Toledo..................... I 226.6 201.7 201.7 ... 25.0 25.0 ... 2.6 2.6 ... 0.4 0.4 ...
Erie, Pa.................. 532.5 532.5 532.5 ... ... ... ... 2.6 2.6 ... ... ...
Sandusky.................. | 15.0 15.0 15.0 ... ... ... ... () () ... ... ......
Ashtabula................. 778.6 778.6 778.6 ... ... ... ... 3.2 3.2 ... ......
Conneaut.................. (7 ) (*) (*) ... ... ... ... (*) () ... ... ...
Fairport.................. 71.1 71.1 71.1 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1 ... ... ......
Huron..................... 99.9 99.9 99.9 ... ... ... ... 0.4 0.4 ... ... ......
Lorain.................... 68.6 68.6 68.6 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 ... ... ...

Puerto Rico, Hawaii,
and Alaska Districts.. 1,000.9 119.9 119.4 0.5 881.0 878." 2.3 9.6 9.5 0.1 6.0 6.0 (*)

Puerto Rico.................. 979.9 98.8 98.4 0.4 881.0 878.7 2.3 7.5 7.4 0.1 6.0 6.0 (*)
Guanica................... 0.4 0.4 0.4 ... ... ... ... () () .....
Mayaguez.................. 2.3 2.3 2.3 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1 ...
Ponce...................... 21.8 21.8 21.8 ... ... ... ... 0.4 0.4
San Juan.................. 279.6 74.3 73.9 0.4 205.3 203.0 2.3 6.9 6.8 0.1 1.2 1.2 (*)
Hawaii........................ 18.5 18.5 18.5 (*) ... ... ... 2.0 2.0 () ...
Honolulu.................. 13.4 13.4 13.4 (*) ... ... ... 1.8 1.8 (*) ...
Alaska....................... I 2.5 2.5 2.5 () ... ... ... 0.1 0.1 (*) ...


*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds; less than 50,000 dollars.
IFlorida Atlantic Coast port totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast
Florida.


port totals to obtain total imports through the Customs District of


Table 3.-SHIPPING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF
SERVICE, AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS
(Data in millions of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals
shown for previous months include current revisions)

Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Trade area Total United United United United Total State
shipping States Total States Total States Total States flag
weight flag flag flag flag

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)


Total all trade areas:
Monthly average 1958 ..................
October 1958 ..........................
September 1959........................
October 1959 ..........................


Foreign trade areas except Canadian...

Car'ib ean... .......................... ......
East Coast South America...................
West Coast South America ....................
West Coast Central America and Mexico .......
Gull Coast Mexico...........................

United Kin'dom and Eire.....................
altic Scandinavie, Iceland and Greenland..
ayonne-Hambur ar,,'e ........................
Portual and Spanish Atlanti ...............
Azores, Medi erranea and Black Sea .........

est Coadlt A ica... .. .. ................
iouth and East A i ua .......................
Australasia. ..................................

Ia + and .1n c ............ ...........
os) h "U dJna Komos a7d '\, [ Ip tort!. Chinf ircilljjn; lha<[nai a~ii Japan ....


na a, N1


19,104.0
21,483.7
18,611.9
17 ,673.6


13,635.7

751.6
7.

3.

4.7


i.


3,113.1
3,885.5
3,140.9
3,003.0


1,904.2

143.6
106.2

01.9
1.9


205 .9

313.9


17,425.8
19,391.5
16,957.2
15,492.6


11,768.6

697.
350.8
141.6
34.0
43.7

680.7
57 .

.0
1.
52,93.J


2,722.8
3,351.9
2,790.7
2,658.06


1,753.8

141.5
35.0
73.1
21.9
1.9

134.5

205.9
'4.4
307.3


4,958.5
5,406.6
5,865.2
5,412.4


5,364.5

629.9
157.9
108.7
33.4
16.5

452.7

1, 98.4
12. G
500.4


1,548.8
1,523.6
1,494.9
1,267.4


1,266.8

138.7
35.0
54.9
21.


134.5
8.0
205.9
0.3
125.2


12,467.3
13,984.9
11,092.0
10,080.2


6,404.1

67.3
192.9
32.8
0.6
27.2

227.9
276.8
1,924.7
209.3
1,592.9


1,174.0
1,828.3
1,295.9
1,391.3


1,678.2
2,092.2
1,654.7
2,181.0


487.0 1,867.1

2.8 54.4
146.7
18.3
11.7
1.9

143.6
64.3 80.4
698.9
44.1 3.3
182.1 32.6


390.3
533.6
350.2
344.4


150.4

2.1
71.2








6.6


1 ... 2. 5
I 30.2 70. | 30. 67.2 30. 2.9
S20 22. 0. 94.0 20.4 27.9 (*) 20.5
3 3. 5 7 .. 7. 998 291.6 173 95.6 70.5

14,.7 34;. 14".7 27.7 ; 14-'.7 63.8 | () 29.2 C
174. 0.4 174. '8.1 74.3 1,437.3 0. 550.1 ...

i,0)S.. ; ,24.0 I O9 ,. | 47.C o.' 3,.76.2 904.3 1 313.9 194.0

S. 49. .3 3.6 0.5 45.9 7.8 168.6 117.6
'. 5. .1 36.1 ... 3,39.4 896.1 96.9 72.7
.... 28F8.. 0.4 48. 3.F


S rI vessels ; er" r "Irreg--lr or traimp" is based On characteristics of each
Se ) the class ificati criteria of the Maritime Administration.


voyage whether the voyage is part of a










Table 4.-SHIPPING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATES GENERAL IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSEL:, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF SERVICE, AND
AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS
(Data in millions of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals
shown for previous months Include current revisions)

Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Trade area Total United inte Uned Unitednin d Tt ,
United United United Total States
shipping CSates Total States Total States Total States flag
weight flag flag flag flag


(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)


Total all trade areas:
Monthly .ver e 1958 ..................
Cciober 195 ..........................
tSe tem r 1959.......................
October 1959..........................


Foreign trade areas except Canadian....

Caribbean...................................
East Coast South America .....................
West Coast South America.....................
West Coast Central America and Mexico.......
Gulf Coast Mexico ............................

United Kingdom and Eire ......................
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland...
Bayonne-Hamburg Range ........................
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic................
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea..........

West Coast Africa............................
South and East Africa ........................
Australasia ..................................
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea..............
Malaya and Indonesia .........................
South China, Formosa and Philippines.........
North China including Shanghai and Japan.....

Canadian trade areas ...................

Pacific Canada............... ...............
Great Lakes Cnada ................. ..........
Atlantic Canada and Newfoudiand ..........


29,267.4
33,977.5
35,017.4



25,508.

14,964.8
539.9
1,71.6
149.
385.7

238.8
.90.4
919.1
43.6
62o.,


15.01


92.


3,441.1

4,376.8



3,7. ,


17. 2
335. i
56.7



77.7
10.9
75.



12.

26. 7
123. 1
40.:

L .


1, 1448. ,265.6


17,756.5 ,72?.6




1 4. ,316.3





?7V.3 77.7


854.0 75.8

73.




2-1


3,1 ..

137.
194.2
3 :. 8
.1
21.8


215. 5

2.1
190.8


170.3
92. 7
908. '


-Denotes less than 50,000 pounds.
IClassification of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "Irregular or trap is based n -harra ters ti
scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classifi, action criteria of th "-ritiLc Ad inii tr')o .


1,010.4

972. C


1,44.1 1,261.8


14, 23.5 1,750.6


,1 20.0 657.5

3,83.6 273.2
5.5 44.5
1,41 192.9
140.2 51.8
v9.3 ...


74.9
247.6 ...
21.5
67o1.


44.7


99;5


15,9448.5
17,832.9
15,247.3
15,308.1


,,267.7

1,793.9



::84.7

2.5

65.1

268.3


1,176.1
S611.4
1,20!.
999.5


963.4

963..


S. j ,61. 9 .
2': 4,4,,0.4 [ 19.3


f eah voyage (whether the voyage is part of a


Table 5.-DE'ARTMENT DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL UN ER THF UNITED STATE OREGN AIl PRO'AI, ANT "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPARTMENT
OF DEFEN'S CONTROLLEDD CARGC EXPORTED BY VESSEL-CLASTAL DISTRIrT F .A ; 'G BY TYPc ;F 3 ICE AN' AMUNT CARRIED ON UNITE "TATE.; FLAG AND FOR-
EIGN FLAG VES.:- I
(Shipping weight I 1, po ic. Totals represent the aumr of .roumdel flur'es, _hene ay vary slig tly fro the suas of the rounded amounts.
Totals shown for previous onts include current revisi' n.


Total all vessels




117,)93
c. ,7


United Stat-- <-*".




Total all coastal listritis:


)c sto rl i ..... ............... 3-7.,06


North Atlantic ports ..................
South Atlantic ports....................
Gulf Coast ports........................
South Pacific ports ..................... ,6
North Pacific ports .....................
Great Lakes ports.......................
Puerto Rico, Hawaii and Alaska ports.... 4

*Denotes less than 500 pounds.


7, 2

9'-/


States flag vessels Foreign flag vessels

Trregular Tanker L r Irregular Tanker
or tramp| vessel service or tramp vessel
service service

{ ,: 4,Z4 67 :(< '%


A , ,i: 7' "l: ,i ,


L '.~


41 ..


, 97t'J 4 8
,,r U'. ? 1% <4. f











*6o.--EP OF '... ,..rWJLLE V CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL UNDER UNITED STATES FOREIGN AID PiG .RAMS, AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY MON-DEPART- H
S) R0 ,LL ',-,-, EXPORTED BY VESSEL--TRADE AREA BY TYPE OF VESSEL SERVICE AND A1MDUW CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS: 0
(In thousands of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unfounded figures, hence may vary slightly front the sums of the rounded amount)

Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 TaEnkr vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
rade area Total United United
shipping States United United United Total States
weight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
flag flag flag
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Tota all tde areas
S e 1958.........- ,99 132,1'. 142,949 117,732 117,393 97,176 25,556 20,556 237,150 14,444
S................ 34.,795 11,064 110,403 91,879 108,958 91,423 1,445 456 232,392 20,185
S .................... 91,086 96,833 80,879 82,149 66,452 14,684 14,427 174,573 10,207



Foreign trade areas except ..'l..i i.. 225,274 80,878 96,717 80,878 82,035 66,452 14,682 14,426 128,557

Caribbean....... ...................... 2,779 412 1,570 412 1,494 410 76 2 1,209 ...
East :-.st. South America .................. 3 --, 235 332 235 331 235 1 ... 2,958 ...
West 3 -t '-- America................... 34,550 573 860 573 860 573 ... ... 33,690 ..
West Coast _...r-l America and Mexico ...... 34 11 34 11 34 11 ... ... ... ...
Gulf Coast Mexico.. ........... .......... 1.22 ... 122 ... 113 ... 9 . ... ...
United '- I.. and Eire.................... 1, -, 1,524 1,703 1,524 738 559 965 965 () ..
Baltic Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland. 4,895 243 583 243 583 243 ... ... 4,312 ..
B.w.r..- ................. 18,456 447 8,901 447 8,882 444 19 2 9,555 ...
Portugal and .- -* Atlantic.............. 372 57 372 57 372 57 ...... .....
Unidentified countries in W.. .--r Europe... 167 167 167 167 167 167 ...
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea........ 84,861 8,853 11,044 8,853 8,730 6,692 2,314 2,161 73,817 ..
West Coast Africa.......................... 3,568 208 556 208 556 208 ... ... 3,012 ..
South and East Africa...................... 389 272 389 272 389 273 ... ... ... ...
Australasia... ...... ...................... 948 563 948 563 948 563 ... ... ... ...
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea............ 9,764 8,955 9,764 8,955 8,128 7,319 1,636 1,636 ... ...
Malaya and Indonesia....................... 127 67 127 67 127 67 ...
South r.:'. 7o.:.> and Philippines ....... 5,447 5,208 5,443 5,208 5,428 5,192 16 16 4 ...
North ( ... -" ;lr.- Shanghai and Japan... 53,799 53,083 53,799 53,083 44,153 43,438 9,646 9,644 .....

Canadian trade areas................. 46,133 10,209 116 1 114 ... 2 1 46,015 10,207

Pacific Canada............................. 1 1 1 1 ... ... 1 1
Great Lakes Canada......................... 10,207 10,207 ... ... ... ... ... ... 10,207 10,207
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland........... 35,925 1 116 1 114 ... 2 1 35,809 ... 8

-[._...tes less than 500 pounds; less than one tenth of one percent.
iClassification of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of H
a scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the MaritinmeAdministration.
1o








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08587 9004IIIIIIIII 1 lliil l ll
3 1262 08587 9004


DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON. 25, D. C.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS