<%BANNER%> xml version 1.0 standalone yes
Volume_Errors
Errors
PageID P6
ErrorID 1001
ErrorText Rotate CW: 0003-0009


PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
United States foreign trade
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00010658/00095
 Material Information
Title: United States foreign trade
Portion of title: Water-borne foreign trade statistics
Alternate title: Waterborne foreign trade statistics
United States water-borne foreign trade
United States waterborne foreign trade
Some issues have title: United States foreign trade
Physical Description: v. : ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication: Washington, D.C
Publication Date: -1965
Frequency: monthly, including annual cumulation
monthly
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in June 1965.
General Note: "Summary report FT 985."
General Note: Description based on: Calendar year 1952; title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: June 1965.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 13695873
lccn - sf 86092445
ocm13695873
Classification: lcc - WMLC L 83/3610
System ID: AA00010658:00095
 Related Items
Succeeded by: U.S. waterborne foreign trade

Full Text



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF CO MERCE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Sinclair Weelu, Secrearr Rober W. Burges, Director



CENSUS


oi FL 0
UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRA



rt P : JANUARY-DECEI BER 1956 >2 it 195 '



UNITED STAT WATRBORNE FORION
COVERAGE

'his 'rr .r ; resents statis't.:al year figLure or. t. It "'nlt.-d :'ates wa'-rt. ri'e n'r b uld ndd jIl. *.nd s r! [mr.t!;: M:e
ir. f'r-Ign rstra ., with the exception .f s-,h elerme ta .s a art; t -1!!-J .- tbel I' i a year :.t.ret :..r r rt --.
sen. the aggr-gate of transactions processed during the :we '- n.n'.hly Jsta'il: ; }r *s: .' tanULary-..r -mtb'r '.-
:Ladirg a se Jh;ament. unliaden fraE and lider. -i. .e-sels during the latter ;ar' .1" ,'' ua2d CtIB'lI.. :'m.ne at'.r :.iL.merits
made .iring I 't .'1 r wh1 n .'format tr. was nt recIve in te e in .e I. le :' ya -r :lgres-. a-r.-
dar yrar :'r 're: ror 1956, rrpreserninrg Lhikmentia srdader. !'rom anld sad'-. *. ..,.*',1" urrrilrng r ,e;ar'. .i.g iurir, 't.he
interval :.r.arry !-December 31, l45t. ,vx:ldrdLr. late 19''. trarsa.a r. ir..nludled !. 'te- : *'.. -tai '. l 'ur !. tI.i
and Ir.:luding late 195t transactlr.s whi-h were ex:ladrd will Le instuerid 'b:.eqt.'l. F r Ij' r 'x; .a:'. :.
the differer.:es tl'.ween the statist.l-l and -alendar ye-ar :ig'res -ee the '- 'y '.- .' :. .;Ltv .1 f rt-r t .raE.- .a'.. 'L
i otes.
The waterbrrie statis'.tls presented Lr. the monrthly issues this repur' ex ided ..-mcr'etrly *-r; r: ..: I ir."
and fcreigr. mercha dlse and non-Department -f IDfer.se shipments "spe-iAl .at-e, ry" iml1t:e ft val jt-'I IB aI..
thar. 00 JurLag 1955 and beginning with July 16 and (b) less than $1,000 !'.r the I'er" d Jannary-'J Iir', .1, a.-
ditler, il-p.r shipments u under 2,000 pounds regardless of iva-ue as well a- L;hlrent. ;al.t'd t'. I '.C thaj. 11L
regardless of shipping weight were ex-luded from the monthly f.: i -this re-F...rt durlrit and .',. .r.. r.''r t.
provide users of the vessel statistics with a series of Lomparable annual data *ir, a ntatisti al year ta;,iu, irr r'-
port shows in addition tco the detail for the fully umpiled export shipments arnd im -r' :;hipme.nt: f -Ju'!i ;. ..af. r
more (:oBarable to the monthly aata., tutal figures (combining sample estimates !' the ,Lw-value export srilpmernt:: aid
the less than 2,000 pounds import shipments of $100 or mure in value with the c'iumplee -.t.e-rage segnitr.ts i.-.r er,.urt
and Imports on the United States port level and trade area level. These total figures 'L.r I S'., tw! .hli i ude t'he
estimates, are Ecomarable to the data shown for prior years.
The statistics an low-value export shipments of domestic: and forv'ign merchardiJ, ELax' ,'lmated unr '.the bait s ,,I a
10 percent sample of such shipments. A discussion of the l...w-value erport shlpmenr.tl ir. tr .ssl ~a.latiati 1I:. on-
taLned in the November 1953 and February 1956 issues of Fo.reign Trade Statistl- N It ... I, addlt irl, data .n lthe
shipping weight and value of import shipments of under 2,000 pounds with a .alue Tf i',l.I .'r more ar' voilmat--d ur. t'he
baias of a 2 percent random sample of import documents. A discussion -if the a.Uider 2,r00 ToiunLd shippirLg wurlgit Lmiuprt
shipments in the vessel statistics is contained in the March 195w. issue of the F.rt-:gn Irade .:tatistil-s leLt-.:.
Vessel export figures in this report, ahown in columns 5, 10, lb, and 1' I' table 1 and ir. table. 3, r,:,rre-ent
exports of domestic and foreign merchandise laden at the U.nited States .'us.toms area ortirmelrtal I'rFlted gStates, Puert.
Rico and the Territories of Alaska and Hawail) for shipment to foreign countries; and include export ..hipmints tn
United States civilian government agencies and non-Department Of Defense contrtlle'd :ra-eig aid pr:_-,ram shtiimenti as
described below. Excluded from these figures are shipments to the United States armed Vorces abroad ofi ,ui.p[liits and
equipment for their own use as well as the other, types of shipments described bel,-w I .r whILh tii'f.rmati,.r ii sh..-r, ii
separate colunsm in table 1.
Department of Defense controlled and "special category" figures, shown In lum.r 7 and 12 .. '.ab.le I and in
table 5 of this report cover consolidated data for the following types of" shipm'-rn'.-:
1. Vessel export shipments of Department of Defense ,-ontrolled cargo uinde-r Ie ..c-tI Il.rvigri ald [.rgram,, .e..,
Foreign Operations Administration, Armn Civilian Supply, etc:., made aboard '.nr ted .:tat'te :lag v.s:*.I ;rj't.,
am Ary-Navy transports or commercial vessels 'chartered by the L'epartmer.t .: Leic'ir.a e under time, yu:- urid
space charter arrangements and including "special category" commud 1ti'.i. with u. ali.tin..ti ri.
2. Vessel export ahipmenrt of "special category" commodities nut controlled by the Litparumrient i 'refen"e I..r
which detailed information cannot be shown separately because 'if :it.i.ri/ty rea'miiiu. hi.r aj e txplar' I a .r.
list of "special category" commodities and their presentation in firecgr t rale- !.tLiL.;ti. ;.e- '.he Januuary
1954 issue of Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.
Only shipping weight data in terms of United States port or coastal distr.it .: Lading are diL si i. r Lthei-,
classes of shipment since information on the dollar value if exports of Department ."! Difrinse ..-ntri lield arga. 1!
not available at this level of detail. Consequently, the total value figures shownr iT. lumnAs i' and 18 -f tabhlel I
for dry cargo and tanker shipments in that order correspond to the shipping weight figure's shownn li. lumra ar.d ',
respectively, of the same table.
Vessel import figures, shown in :olu:mn 4, 7, L2 and 15 of table 2 and In able ul thl, re-port, are -'r-ri*rai
mparts and represent the total of imports for immediate consumption plus entrie-s irnt *uoit.m b inde.l :;itLraK-g ani
manufacturing warehouses made at the United States JustBua area from foreign :uLuntriers. '.'coacl LmpJort flglr"-- 'x-
clude American goods returned by the United States armed forces for their own use, iiF;nrt shiipment:. r. Ar,.y r S.ary
transport and abhpments covered by informal entries.



Prepared i te Bureau of the I'ensus, FLre gn Trade Ll ;luiiln
For sale by the Bureau of the Census, WashLngton 25, ID. C. Price 10, annual subscrlptimn $1 .uJ.







-2-

The following types of shipments are excluded from both the vessel export and import data: (1) All shipments of
under $100 in value, regardless of shipping weight; (2) shipments of household and personal effects; (3) shipments by
mail and parcel post; and (4) shipments of vessels under their own power and afloat. Trade between the United States
and its Territories and Possessions and trade between the Territories and Possessions are not reported as United States
exports and imports.
Merchandise shipped in bond through the United States in transit from one foreign country to another without having
been entered as an import is not included in any of the figures in the columns previously referred to (imported merchan-
dise cleared through customs and subsequently re-exported is included in both the import and export statistics). Sepa-
rate information for the waterborne portion of the in-transit trade in terms of shipping weight and dollar value is
presented in this report in tables 1 and 2. Columns 6, 11, 17 and 20 of table 1 reflect in-transit merchandise laden
aboard vessels at United States ports, while columns 5, 8, 13 and 16 of table 2 reflect such merchandise unladen from
vessels. The waterborne outbound and inbound in-transit statistics include: (1) Foreign merchandise transferred from
one vessel to another in the United States port of arrival and shipped to a foreign country without being released from
customs custody in the United States; and (2) foreign merchandise arriving by vessel at one United States port, shipped
through the United States under customs bond, and leaving the United States by vessel from a port other than that at
which it arrived. In addition, the waterborne outbound in-transit statistics also include (1) foreign merchandise with-
drawn from a general order warehouse for immediate export by vessel or for transportation and export by vessel (such
merchandise was not recorded as an import when it entered the warehouse), and (2) foreign merchandise shipped by vessel
from a United States Foreign Trade Zone to a foreign country (such merchandise is deposited in the Foreign Trade Zone
without being entered as an import). Any inbound or outbound in-transit merchandise moving by methods of transportation
other than vessel is excluded from the in-transit statistics. Thus, in-transit merchandise arriving at the United
States by vessel and leaving by some other method of transportation is included in the inbound data only. On the other
hand, in-transit merchandise arriving by other than waterborne transportation and laden aboard vessels upon departure
is included in the outbound statistics but not in the inbound data. The inbound and outbound segments, therefore, do
not counterbalance one another and are complementary only insofar as they involve merchandise carried by vessels to and
from the United States. For a more detailed discussion of the in-transit trade statistics and the types of shipments
excluded from these data see the February 1953 issue of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.
All types of outbound vessel shipments in tables 1 and 5 are credited to the coastal districts, customs districts,
and ports at which the merchandise was laden. All types of inbound vessel shipments in table 2 are credited to the
coastal districts, customs districts, and ports at which merchandise was unladen. In the case of vessel general imports
this is not necessarily the same as the customs district in which the goods were entered into warehouse or entered for
immediate consumption.
Vessel exports in table 3 are credited to the foreign trade areas at which the merchandise was unladen. Vessel im-
ports in table 4 are credited to the foreign trade areas at which the merchandise was laden aboard the vessels carrying
the cargo to the United States. The countries of destination or origin of merchandise are not necessarily located with-
in the trade areas to which the merchandise is shipped or from which it is received. Detailed definitions of foreign
trade areas in terms of the countries and ports included in each are contained in Schedule R, Code Classification and
Definition of Foreign Trade Areas.
Shipping weight figures represent the gross weight of shipments, including the weight of containers, wrappings,
crates and moisture content. Vessel export values represent the values at time and place of export. They are based on
the selling price (or on the cost if not sold) and include inland freight, insurance and other charges to place of ex-
port. Transportation and other costs beyond the United States port of exportation are excluded. Vessel import values,
as well as the values for in-transit shipments, are generally based on the market or selling price and are in general
f.o.b. the exporting country. Since in-transit merchandise is not subject to the imposition of import duties at the
United States, the valuation reported for such shipments is not verified by customs to the extent applicable in the case
of import entries and may in some cases include transportation costs and insurance to the United States as well as other
cost elements.
Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are classified as dry cargo or tanker shipments solely on the basis of the type
of vessel used without regard to the cargo carried. Tanker vessels are those primarily designed for the carriage of
liquid cargoes in bulk, while all others are classified as dry cargo vessels. A further segregation of dry cargo vessel
shipments is provided in tables 3-5 on the basis of type of service, i.e., liner (berth) or irregular (tramp). Liner
service is that type of service offered by a regular line operator of dry cargo vessels on berth. The itineraries and
sailing schedules of such vessels are predetermined and fixed. Irregular or tramp service is that type of service af-
forded by dry cargo vessels which are chartered or otherwise hired for the carriage of goods on special voyages. Ves-
sels in this type of service are not on berth and their sailing schedules are not predetermined or fixed.

















I. S -I -- TI-C- W-4- -- t -4


j's ..tm r'. i *-. "


















atC-- .! *-. *m .-. -





.f. -* 't
. .- .





r Lit- -.

Pr i-d en c






*, -v c, ,
.. '1... ....... .... ... ...













.. . . .
Plt l .. ...................




S tr4't, ....... ....... ....





iP :. ...... .. .. ..

01cA t 's.i-.A3....,......

rt i ..................



















S .. . .
'in r~a ,. .. .. .


.4

* -



*


I





- I







. I


H--1




rrn-g


. ....




4 + -- -i ,
** .


I -----t - -
4 ...-- 'i - -


' I *


,... 1."; "a,[ O ,ts '

-- -, -





Sr. I :: *

re- r -


C1 1- I.9
4'

*1.. ,.'


'ii~~ i

Ac.. e-rr


- .,


* It.'

* .


* p


.. F IB aI t 'a*,bl..


*1


,i .
*-- +


: 1


1 *i ..


L
~










Table 1.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING: JANUARY-DECEBER 1956-Continued

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars


Fully compiled shipments' Fully compiled shipments'

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker

Customs district and port Grand Domestic, foreign and De Domestic, foreign and Dept.
total2 Grand in-transit cargo of in-transit cargo of Grand Do- Do-
total De- De- t ,'al. Grand mee- mes-
fense fense total3 tic In- tic In-
Total Domes- In- and Total Domes- In- and Total and trans- Total and trane-
Total tic and trans. "Spe- Total tic and trans- "Spe- for- it for- it
foreign it cial foreign it oial eign sign
cats- cate-
gory" gory"
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20)

South Atlantic Coast
Districts-Con.

Florida4 ............................ 1,919.8 1,843.6 1,546.4 1,534.9 1,526.4 8.5 11.5 297.2 297.2 297.2 ... ... 173.0 159.6 156.4 154.8 1.6 3.2 3.2 ..
Jacksonville..................... 539.9 528.6 523.7 523.5 521.7 1.8 0.2 4.9 4.9 4.9 ... ... 26.6 25.5 25.2 24.9 0.3 0.3 0.3 ...
Miami............................ 214.3 156.2 156.0 151.3 146.3 5.0 4.7 0.2 0.2 0.2 ... ... 43.1 32.7 32.7 31.9 0.8 (*) () ...
West Palm Beach.................. 556.5 549.7 549.7 543.1 542.3 0.8 6.6 ... ... ... ... ... 88.9 87.0 87.0 86.5 0.5 ... ...
Port Everglades ................. 494.3 494.3 202.2 202.2 201.4 0.8 (*) 292.1 292.1 292.1 ... ... 8.5 8.5 5.6 5.6 (*) 2.9 2.9 .
Gulf Coast Districts.......... 68,0.54.3 b8,025.b 44,141.5 3,2"2.5 2,o<.L0.0 878.5 .63.0 23,884.. ) 20,tl'." 2.3,616.2 1.5 3,266.3 3,015.6 2,963.9 9 ,561.8 2,389.2 172.6 .02.1 401.9 0.2

Florida ............................ 6,685.4 6,638.0 6,623.0 6,615.1 6,613.8 1.3 7.9 15.0 15.0 15.0 ... ... 74.4 71.1 70.3 70.1 0.2 0.8 0.8 ...
Tampa ........................... 5,761.5 5,720.4 5,720.3 5,712.6 5,712.3 0.3 7.7 .. ... ... ... ... 48.0 45.3 45.3 45.1 0.2 .
Pensacola ..................... 287.1 281.9 281.9 281.7 280.7 1.0 0.2 ... ... ... ... ... 16.8 16.3 16.3 16.3 ()
Booagrande...................... 516.7 516.7 516.7 516.7 516.7 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1.8 1.8 1 1.8 1.8 ...
Panama City...................... 99.1 98.7 83.7 83.7 83.7 ... 15.0 150 15.0 5.0 ... ... 6.1 6.1 5.3 5.3 ... 0. 0.8
Mobile............................. 3,137.7 3,122.3 2,722.6 2,701.9 2,701.8 0.1 20.7 399.7 399.7 399.7 ... ... 127.5 126.1 115.3 115.2 0.1 10.8 10.8
Mobile, Ala..................... 2,961.1 2,946.3 2,547.1 2,526.4 2,526.3 0.1 20.7 399.2 399.2 399.2 ... ... 115.0 114.6 103.8 103.7 0.1 10.8 10.8 ...
GuJLporL, flies................... 176.2 175.7 175.2 175.2 175.2 ... (*) 0.4 0.4 0.4 ... ... 11.3 11.3 13 11.3 .3 ... (*) ( ...
New Orleans......................... 1l,268.9 19,005.4 .14,728.4 14,172.4 14,083.0 89.4 556.0 4,277.0 3,159.0 3,159.0 ... 1,118.0 1,215.3 1,178.3 1,074.6 1,060.4 14.2 103.7 103.7 ..
New Orleans, La................. 12,795.4 12,532.8 11,573.2 11,059.5 10,970.1 89.4 513.7 959.6 948.6 948.6 ... 11.0 1,063.9 1,027.2 999.4 985.2 14.2 27.8 27.8 .
Baton Rouge, La .................. 3,284.7 3,284.0 1,561.6 1,554.2 1,554.2 ... 7.4 1,722.5 869.2 869.2 ... 853.3 66.7 66.5 50.2 50.2 ... 16.3 16.3 ...
Port Sulphur, La................. 1,376.0 1,3-6.0 1,376.0 1,376.0 1,376.0 ... ... ... .. ... ... ... 17.0 17.0 17.0 17.0 ... ......
St. Louie .......................... ..... ... ... ... ...
Sabine ............................. 9,250.5 9,231.1 4,130.2 3,968.5 3,968.5 ... 161.7 5,101.0 4,646.3 4,646.3 ... 454.7 228.7 227.9 166.9 166.9 ... 61.0 61.0
Port Arthur, Tex................. 4,181.9 4,164.3 2,422." 2,281.1 2,281.1 ... 141.6 1,741.6 1,427.8 1,427.8 ... 313.8 66.7 66.0 46.6 46.6 ... 19.4 19.4 ..
Beaumont, Tex.................... 2,328.0 2,32".7 582.2 572.7 572.7 ... 9.5 1,745.5 1,632.0 1,632.0 ... 113.5 60.8 60.8 40.1 40.1 ... 20.7 20.7
Lake Charles, La................. 2,455.9 2,454.6 958.3 947.7 947.7 ... 10.6 1,496.3 1,468.9 1,468.9 ... 27.4 90.7 90.6 71.4 71.4 ... 19.2 19.2
Galveston.......... ................ 29,045.7 28,964.4 15,020.5 14,903.8 14,862.5 41.3 116.7 13,943.9 12,250.3 12,248.3 1.5 1,693.6 1,181.3 1,172.3 948.3 941.1 7.2 224.0 223.8 0.2
Galveston, Tex................... 8,028.9 8,017.7 7,402.5 7,397.1 7,384.8 12.3 5.4 615.2 615.2 615.2 ... ... 379.2 378.5 362.6 360.8 1.8 15.9 15.9 ...
Houston, Tex..................... 13,391.9 13,322.7 6,523.5 6,415.4 6,390.0 25.4 108.1 6,799.2 5,660.8 5,660.8 ... 1,138.4 661.7 653.4 541.7 537.4 4.3 111.7 111.7 .
Freeport, Tex .................... 1,245.2 1,245.2 24.3 21.4 21.4 ... 2.9 1,220.9 673.6 673.6 ... 547.3 18.6 18.6 0.9 0.9 ... 17.7 17.7
Corpus Chrtiti, Tex.............. 5,322.0 5,321.1 1,070.1 1,069.8 1,066.2 3.6 0.3 4,251.1 4,243.1 4,241.6 1.5 8.0 95.4 95.3 43.1 42.0 1.1 52.2 52.0 '.2
Texas City, Tex................ 1,05. 1,057.7 ... ... ... ... ... 1,057.7 1,057.7 1057.7 ... ... 26.5 26.5 ... 26.5 26.5
Laredo. ........................... 1,066.0 1,064.3 916.8 916.8 170.5 746.3 (a) 1A7.5 147.5 147.5 ... ... 188.5 18 16.5 35.6 150.9 1.8 1.8
Brownville, Tex................. 888.1 886.6 886.5 886.5 170.0 716.5 ...... ... ... ... 185.1 185.0 185.0 35.3 149.7 ... ...
Port Isabel, Tex................. 177.8 177.7 30.3 30.3 0.5 29.8 () 147.5 147.5 147.5 ... ... 3.4 3.3 1.5 0.3 1.2 1.8 1.8 ...
South Pacific Coast Distriots. 19,111.8 18,838.1 11,582.8 11,232.2 10,887.1 345.1 350.6 7,255.2 7,029.6 7,029.5 0.1 225.6 1,011.4 967.4 896.6 787.8 108.8 70.8 70.7 0.1
San Diego........................... 186.3 185.4 185.4 185.2 67.1 118.1 0.2 ... ... ... ... 42.1 42.0 42.0 7.7 34.3.
Los Angeles......................... 10,060.7 9,992.9 4,890.5 4,846.6 4,668.9 177.7 43.9 5,102.5 4,928.6 4,928.5 0.1 173.9 427.1 417.4 368.9 311.8 57.1 48.5 48.4 0.1
Los Angeles, Calif... ........... 4,416.2 *4,365.3 2,075.2 2,050.2 1,962.5 87.7 25.0 2,290.2 2,153.3 2,153.2 0.1 136.9 241.0 233.8 212.8 183.2 29.6 21.0 20.9 0.1
Port San luls, Calif............. 254.4 254.4 ... ... ... ... ... 254.4 25.4 254.4 ... ... 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7
Long Beach, Calif................ 4,987.6 4,971.1 2,800.1 2,783.3 2,693.3 90.0 16. 2,11.0 2,11.0 2171.0 ... ... 182.0 179.5 156.0 128.4 27.6 23.5 23.5
El Segundo, Calif................ 352.2 352.2 ... ... ... ... ... 352.1 315.1 315.1 ... 37.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1
San Francisco....................... 8,864.7 8,659.7 6,507.0 6,200.4 6,151.2 49.2 306.6 2,152.7 2,101.0 2,101.0 ... 51.7 52.2 508.0 485.7 468.3 17.4 22.3 22.3
Eureka........................... 115.7 11 .5 114.6 112.6 112.6 ... 2.0 ... ... ... ... ... 3.3 3.3 3.3 3.3 ...
San Francsoea, Calif............. 1,677.1 1,588.8 1,555.1 1,416.0 1,367.8 48.2 139.1 33.7 33.7 33.7 ... ... 267.5 248.4 247.7 230.6 17.1 0.7 0,7
Stockton, Calif.................. 2,939.7 2,928.7 2,701.4 2,698.1 2,698.0 0.1 3.3 227.2 227.2 227.2 ... ... 60.3 59.0 54.5 5.5 (J 4.5 4.5
Oakland, Calif.................. 1,080.3 1,028.6 1,022.9 913.9 913.2 0.7 109.0 5.7 5.7 5.7 ... ... 110.6 103.5 103. 103.2 0.2 0.1 0.1
Richmond, Calitf................. 1,638.6 1,633.6 365.9 347.9 347.9 ... 18.0 1,267.7 1,239.4 1,239.4 ... 28.3 24.9 24.6 13.2 13.2 11.4 11.4
Alamsda, Calif................... 502.0 454.1 454.1 443.7 43.4 0.3 10.4 ... ... ... ... ... 66.8 60.4 60.4 60.3 0.1
artines Calif.................. 14.4 14.4 ... ... ... ... ... 14.5 144 .4 ... 0. 0.5 0.5 ... ... ... 0.5 0.
IlRdvood City, Calif.............. 182. 182.5 2 .5 1 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 ...
Selby, Calif...................... 24.7 24.7 24.7 24.7 24.7 (*) ... ... ... 1... ... ... 1.5 1. 1.5 (*)

See rootnotes at end of table.








L -ArIW P VT Z mAThZ& A, M t *A.. .- . wx eni rVn I n m
kJ s-a Y. q-> F i . H nu K ^


-.

i ,


- .. I











4 .


4~-













-nr
1W.










-~4
. < '
Rullr

rf6ls^
' (tr"


at:f l





i^1^ *i
l lt4 a


-t
., -.-


. ,



. .



**"


A..

.4..


C

(

S-T 4 --


- -r - -








0*


*. '1


- -- 4.

. ...

* I*.-


-


. *


- I


i ifar i ai 4-Bt if o tre


S..

r-
cn













.


0'







"C




-r-




0
, -. -.


if ^I'iv


NN
CD

ro a











0.-
3 "0




CD'


, *-. ,


, '.


k.. .*


::


' :


r:~c~Ir
niur;xi
rr~rgcs;


I
-


i


I


o












Table. 1.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF APARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-
IEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING: JANUARY-DECEMBER 1956-Continued


Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Fully compiled shipments Fully compiled shipments1

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker

Domestic, foreign and Dept. Domestic, foreign and Dept.
Customs district and port Grand in-transit cargo of in-transit cargo of Grand
total2 Grand De- De- total2 3 Grand D-n Do-
total fense fense total3 me In- s- In-
Total and Total and Total tra- Total trtic
Domes- In- "Spe- Domes- In- "Spe- and it and it
Total tic and trans- cial Total tic and trans- cial for- for-
foreign it cate- foreign it cate- eign eign
gory" gory"

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20)

Great Lakes Districts-Con.

Chicago............................ 3,499.3 3,495.1 3,265.3 3,265.1 3,265.1 () 0.2 229.9 229.9 229.9 ... ... 74.1 73.6 70.6 70.6 ) 3.0 3.0
Chicago, Ill..................... 3,244.3 3,240.1 3,226.9 3,226.7 3,226.7 ) 0.2 13.2 13.2 13.2 ... ... 71.7 71.2 70.2 70.2 ) 1.0 1.0
East Chicago, Ind................ 255.0 255.0 38.4 38.4 38.4 ... ... 216,7 216.7 216.7 ... ... 2.5 2.5 0.5 0.5 ... 2.0 2.0
Ohio............................ .... 25,394.4 25,363.1 24,582.6 24,579.1 24,429.8 149.3 3.5 780.5 716.7 716.7 ... 63.8 154.7 154.0 144.4 143.1 1.3 9.6 9.6
Cleveland ........................ 265.1 264.2 237.8 236.3 203.4 32.9 1.5 26.3 26.3 26.3 ... ... 22.1 21.8 21.3 21.0 0.3 0.5 0.5 ..
Toledo .......................... 11,211.4 11,211.3 10,457.2 10,455.2 10,338.8 116.4 2.0 754.1 690.3 690.3 ... 63.8 67.1 67.1 58.0 57.0 1.0 9,1 9.1
Erie, Pa......................... 1,314.3 1,314.3 1,314.3 1,314.3 1,314.3 ... (*) ... ... ... ... ... 4.8 4.8 4.8 4.8
Sandusky ......................... 3,464.4 3,464.3 3,464.3 3,464.3 3,464.3 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 16.0 16.0 16.0 16.0
Ashtabula....................... 4,531.2 4,501.0 4,501.0 4,501.0 4,501.0 ... () ... ... ... ... ... 27.4 27.1 27.1 27.1 ... ... ...
Conneaut........................ 824.4 824.4 824.4 824.4 824.4 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.8 ... ..
Fairport........................ 1,409.7 1,409.7 1,409.7 1,409(7 1,409.7 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 5.4 5.4 5.4 5.4 ... ... ... ...
Huron............................ 104.6 104.6 104.6 104.6 104.6 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
Lorain .......................... 2,247.6 2,247.6 2,247.6 2,247.6 2,247.6 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 8.5 8.5 8.5 8.5 ... ... ...

U. S. Territories and
Possessions Districts........ 1,038.7 1,011.0 615.3 614.8 613.8 1.0 0.5 395.5 395.5 395.5 (w) ... 37.1 34.2 31.1 30.8 0.3 3.1 3.1 (a)

Puerto Rico ....................... 723.8 708.6 335.0 334.8 333.8 1.0 0.2 373.6 373.6 373.6 (w) ... 16.5 14.8 11.9 11.6 0.3 2.9 2.9 (*)
Mayagues.......................... 1.1 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.9 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 ... ... ...
Ponce............................ 235.8 233.0 233.0 233.0 233.0 ... (*) ... ... ... ... ... 4.5 4.4 4.4 4.4
San Juan.......................... 149.4 137.3 97.7 97.5 96.5 1.0 0.2 39.6 39.6 39.6 () ... 9.5 7.9 7.4 7.1 0.3 0.5 0.5 (*)
Hawaii............................... 250.6 238.8 217.1 216.8 216.8 () 0.3 21.7 21.7 21.7 ... ... 17.3 16.1 15.8 15.8 () 0.3 0.3 .
Honolulu ......................... 170.0 161.4 161.4 161.1 161.1 () 0.3 ... ... ... ... ... 12.9 12.0 12.0 12.0 ()
Alaska ............................. 64.2 63.6 63.3 63.2 63.2 ... 0.1 0.3 0.3 0.3 ... ... 3.4 3.4 3.4 3.4 ... () ()

*Denotes less than 50,000 po.urds less than 50,000 dollars. 'Figures based on complete coverage of shipments valued at $500 or more during January-Oecember 1955 and July-December 1956 and shipments valued at l$,000 or
more during January-June 1956. *Figures based on complete coverage of shipments valued at $500 or more and an estimate of the $100-$499 shipments computed from a 10 percent sample of such shipments during January-December
1955 and July-December 1956 and complete coverage of shipments valued at $1,000 or more and an estimate of the $103-)999 shipments computed from a 10 percent sample of such shipments during January-June 1956. The chances are
2 out of.3 in the long run that tne sampling err.:.r for the shipping eight figures which include estimates for the low-value shipments is less than one percent or less than 50,D00 pounds unless otherwise noted. The sampling
error for the value figures whicn include .atimates for the low-val.e shipment Is less than one percent or less than $50,000 unless otherwise noted. 3The grand totals for value (columns 13 and 14) are not strctltv rela-
tive to the grand totals (columns 1 and 2) for shipping weight due to the exclusion of value data for exports of Department of Defense controlled cargo and 'special category" commodities. 'Florida Atlantic Coast port
totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast port totals to obtain total exports through the Customs District of Florida. 'The sampling error is between 1 and 5 percent. 'The sampling error Is between 15 and 20 percent.







Table 2.--NdIN I Fr AIDYLT M O 1g M! V IA MW W I KIgI A I 3 -.U rJI T Alr AND T InM WEllS,
g MTIMG D1MtWT! AND PM W aIuILADhI0i AElaf-lrE 1996


(Tlta. S ar glw.r. I! .f L a o.aj.a Itr:* L-1 a Uln rF e.M1 esl Ip.ia. Z W w nly Ua.- ptrr e ar. 5ha I Cmblnd .Ipofl Mu LIap-r n.. *r.rUl r *.:,r; rbi .. -ar r Pw *t d"!nj
csal rdir )..r :i 9 .t. l.isr t.al. ar. I r l; prt. Ir. ui distrI lI r...dlinrt I.h.. r sh-ih r. 1- al r. rer- '.haw pJ .:raJd fllr.r... n. mry r ..:.... .~ ,ra r .
r Iw l aja. ur ta


. -.s : *r ,


% -'. '.rt ,"


r : -.i, I. A

eB l a W*.. ..,..-. +.. .... ..
rN. a f. H r......,...........
l t . .. .... ...... .........
rl Mt .. .. .. ........... ...... .
a +(++.............. .....

. '. ...... . ... ......





S ... .. ..... ...... ........
*w .........................
**...................I........
No 74.. BeM
........;..
.l..r. .....










+iM -m................................


















. . .
S G.... + .... ............. ......*
Pt w O .. ..1 ........ .........
1 W 7 ...........................





S... ... ...........

S.. .....,.. .........
.ar r .ov ... .. .. . .


















o i <* .,....,, * ...
'* a t . . . * .


h inprl'E w la. ul1U ofLe




T t11" ; I
,--i -

I . .r j '~~~ '*' \ a r*, .l \r a'.


F-- ij* '.u
L- ---I---L~~


-. 3.... Ir-


as..

SIr



II
I



II


I...~.









I...






* .3.


3. . 3


I)







-A


.. 1





-'I





* ...


., ...

.1








.3..


* I





,* .












If

.o


r* ai re*, rU
-~ 1 r IIr* *! r:** a t.: C .** i -"1 rs i*


I -- , . J..
S I ;








I.
I ;"** 'r- I '* "




S* * ... .. 2











..







I .






| '' '
- .' I ' "












I ,, . .. ..
...o ~ ' .,. .


.o ,.


I I

>. ?. i '* .r 3rt.nrr


S- '-
---4 -.-.-
.=.L r*+*a *-


1.
I I 'e


. 9. 3 ': "
,+


I.
-
























I ,


I -I


.1.

- 1I .


.. ** '


d P + ..... *. ..~..... ~...... *. ....... |+ 1*I


.1


Ic .


.3o


I
r r


; : : : : : :


'





1









Table 2.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNIADING: JANUARY-IECEMBER 1956-Continued

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Shipments weighing 2,000 pounds or more Shipments weighing 2,000 pounds or more

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port Grand Grand
total1 Grand total1 Grand
total Total General In- l General In- total T l General In- T l General In-
imports transit l imports transit imports transit imports transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16)

Gulf Coast Districts-Continued

Florida2-Continued
Bocagrande............................. ...
Panama City ......................... 66.6 66.6 66.6 66.6 ... ... ... ... 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 ...
Mobile................................. 13,736.1 13,736.0 13,119.1 13,096.7 22.4 617.0 617.0 ... 94.0 94.0 90.6 89.1 1.5 3.4 3.4
Mobile, Ala......................... 13,501.3 13,501.2 12,884.2 12,861.8 22.4 617.0 617.0 ... 88.5 88.5 85.1 83.6 1.5 3.4 3.4 ...
Gulfport, Miss ....................... 190.5 190.5 190.5 190.5 ... ... ... ... 5.3 5.3 5.3 5.3 ...
New Orleans ........................... 14,671.1 14,658.9 12,361.9 12,263.5 98.4 2,297.0 2,297.0 ... 656.1 651.3 628.8 614.2 14.6 22.5 22.5
New Orleans, La.................... 8,033.4 8,021.2 6,735.8 6,637.4 98.4 1,285.4 1,285.4 ... 609.9 605.1 591.7 577.1 14.6 13.4 13.4 ...
Baton Rouge, La........... ........... 5,521.5 5,521.5 5,394.5 5,394.5 ... 127.0 127.0 ... 25.4 25.4 24.3 24.3 ... 1.1 1.1 ...
Port Sulphur, La.................... 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 (*) ... ... ... 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 (a)
St. Louis ...............................
Sabine.................................. 280.3 280.2 259.3 259.3 ... 20.8 20.7 0.1 4.4 4.3 4.2 4.2 ... 0.1 0.1 (*)
Port Arthur, Tex ..................... 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 ... 0.1 (:) 0.1 (*) (*) (*) (*) ... (w) (*) (*)
Beaumont, Tex ....................... 66.0 65.9 45.2 45.2 ... 20.7 20.7 ... 2.8 2.7 2.6 2.6 ... 0.1 0.1
Lake Charles, La..................... 212.4 212.4 212.4 212.4 ... ... ... ... 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6
Galveston ............................... 8,907.0 8,903.4 4,837.1 4,816.0 21.1 4,066.3 4,066.3 (a) 404.2 402.7 372.0 369.3 2.7 30.7 30.7 (*)
Galveston, Tex........................ 783.9 783.6 778.3 771.1 7.2 5.3 5.3 ... 72.4 72.2 72.1 71.7 0.4 0.1 0.1
Houston, Tex......................... 5,457.2 5,453.9 1,808.0 1,794.1 13.9 3,645.9 3,645.9 (*) 283.3 281.9 255.2 252.9 2.3 26.7 26.7 (a)
Freeport, Tex........................ 0.5 0.5 ... ... ... 0.5 0.5 ... 0.1 0.1 ... ... ... 0.1 0.1
Corpus Christi, Tex.................. 2,583.1 2,583.1 2,250.9 2,250.9 (*) 332.2 332.2 ... 46.5 46.5 44.7 44.7 (*) 1.8 1.8
Texas City, Tex...................... 82.4 82.4 ... ... ... 82.4 82.4 ... 2.0 2.0 ... ... ... 2.0 2.0
Laredo................................. 167.9 167.8 67.4 60.7 6.7 100.4 100.4 ... 6.9 6.8 5.3 4.8 0.5 1.5 1.5
Brownsville, Tex..................... 158.4 158.3 57.8 51.1 6.7 100.4 100.4 ... 4.0 3.9 2.4 1.9 0.5 1.5 1.5 ..
Port Isabel, Tex .................... 9.5 9.5 9.5 9.5 ... ... ... ... 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.8 ... ....

South Pacific Coast Districts..... 20,044.4 19,998.4 5,914.6 5,813.1 101.5 14,083.9 14,083.9 ... 853.9 819.9 702.8 669.0 33.8 117.1 117.1 ...

San Diego.............................. 266.1 265.9 125.3 111.6 13.7 140.6 140.6 ... 8.1 8.0 6.1 4.6 1.5 1.9 1.9
Los Angeles ............................ 9,540.9 9,517.3 3,118.1 3,072.8 45.3 6,399.2 6,399.2 ... 405.6 388.1 330.4 311.9 18.5 57.7 57.7
Los Angeles, Calif.................... 7,432.9 7,415.0 1,932.9 1,890.5 42.4 5,482.1 5,482.1 ... 314.4 300.2 249.9 232.5 17.4 50.3 50.3
Port San Lula, Calif................. ... ... .. .. ..
Long Beach, Calif.................... 1,953.6 1,947.9 1,181.3 1,178.4 2.9 766.7 766.7 ... 89.8 86.5 80.2 79.1 1.1 6.3 6.3.
El Segundo, Calif .................... 150.. 150.4 ... ... ... 150.4 150.4 ... 1.1 1.1 ... ... ... 1.1 1.1
San Francisco........................... 10,237.6 10,215.3 2,671.2 2,628.7 42.5 7,544.1 7,544.1 ... 440.3 423.8 366.3 352.5 13.8 57.5 57.5
Eureka, Calif ....................... 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 ... ... ... ... (*) (*) (*) (*) ...
San Francisco, Calif................. 1,768.5 1,747.1 1,747.2 1,705.9 41.3 ... ... ... 338.8 322.9 322.9 309.5 13.4
Stockton, Calif ...................... 91.7 91.3 91.3 91.2 0.1 ... ... ... '2.2 2.1 2.1 2.0 0.1 ... ...
Oakland, Calif....................... 142.5 142.1 142.1 141.3 0.8 ... ... ... 14.6 14 14 14 144 14.2 0.2 ... ... .
Richmond, Calif ..................... 3,194.8 3,194.7 166.7 166.7 (*) 3,027.9 3,027.9 ... 29.2 29.2 7.0 7.0 (.1 22.2 22.2
Alameda, Calif....................... 9 45 45.9 45.9 45.9 45.6 0.3 ... ... ... 3.7 3.7 3. 3.6 3.1 ... ...
Martines, Calif..................... 2,719.2 2,719.2 () ... () 2,719.2 2,719.2 ... 20.5 20.5 () ... () 20.5 20.5
Redwood City. Calif.................. 39.7 39.7 39.7 39.7 ... ... ... ... (a) (*) () (*) ...
Selby, Calif ........................ 207.0 207.0 207.0 207.0 ... ... ... ... 13.5 13.5 13.5 13.5 .. ... ...

North Pacific Coast Districts..... 5,734.1 5,726.1 5,046.6 4,991.4 55.2 679.4 679.4 ... 228.2 222.9 214.3 208.4 5.9 8.6 8.6 ...

Oregon.................................. 612.2 609.9 537.6 537.4 0.2 72.3 72.3 ... 69.0 67.9 66.8 66.8 (*) 1.1 1.1
Astoria............................. 33.3 33.3 33.3 33.3 ... ... ... ... 5.4 5.4 5.4 5.4 ... ... ...
Newport .............................. ... ... ... ... ......... ... ... ... .
Coos Bay............................. () (a) () (*) ... ... ... ... (a) (a) (*) (*) ..
Portland............................. 397.4 395.3 337.1 336.9 0.2 58.3 58.3 ... 55.2 54.3 53.4 53.4 () 0.9 0.9
Longview, Wash..................... 141.6 141.5 132.7 132.7 (*) 8.8 8.8 ... 7.0 7.0 6.8 6.8 () 0.2 0.2 ...
Vancouver, Wash...................... 34.6 34.5 34.5 34.5 ... ... ... ... 41.4 1.2 1.2 1.2 ...
Washingron.............................. 5,122.0 5,116.2 4,509.0 4,454.1 54.9 607.1 607.1 ... 158.9 154.8 147.3 141.5 5.8 7.5 7.5
Seattle.................... .......... 1,353.0 1,347.4 1,195.0 1,140.9 54.1 152.4 152.4 ... 70.6 66.5 64.3 58.8 5.5 2.2 2.2 ..
Tacoma............................... 1,034.2 1,034.1 966.3 965.5 0.8 67.8 67.8 ... 75.3 75.3 73.9 73.6 0.3 1.4 1.4 ...
Aberdeen-Hoquiam...................... 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 .
BellLngham.......................... 11,483.41,483.4 1,197.8 1,197.8 ... 285.7 285.7 ... 6.7 6.7 4.1 ..1 ... 2.6 2.6
Everett.............................. 211.0 211.0 109.8 109.8 ... 101.2 101.2 ... 2.3 2.3 .0 1.0 ... 1.3 1.3 ...
Port Angeles......................... 111.4 111.4 111.4 111.4 ... ... ... ... 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 ... ... ...
Port Townsend........................ 893.4 893.4 893.4 893.4 ... ... ... ... 2.7 2.7 2. 2.7 ... ... ...

Great Lakes Districts............. 21,574.4 21,566.3 21,303.3 21,273.4 29.9 263.1 263.1 ... 300.0 292.9 289.9 288.8 1.1 3.0 3.0 .

St. Laurence............................ 516.6 515.8 470.8 470.7 0.1 5.1 45.1 ... '11.8 11.2 10.8 10.7 0.1 0.4 0.4
Ogdensburg, N. Y.................. 288.4 287.6 266.3 266.2 0.1 21.3 21.3 ... 10,7 10.1 9.9 9.8 0.1 0.2 0.2
vaddington, N. Y................... 228.2 228.2 20.4 20.4 ... 23.8 23.8 ... 1.1 1.1 0.9 0.9 ... 0.2 0.2

-Se footnoaUt at end of table.



















7a4e z sHiPm tSIf RAM VA9ID' '1 W1 N -,7.: A AIVa K4 AL Zwn S:1 14 '"[ :k-.ThAT%.2I IWLTlUAUS, CD O 1 CAl WA TAn Xw,
..1 .t ..t9 AID P( ( .A . Ja.sA L Fs V-- a 'r . .




--p,. I *. . .. ... ---- '. -*... .






.- .-, 1.r ,r. 1 ,I ~. -.m J, ,n .
J ..*..I I




..r. .m*. ..- . r. ?


ti.


, "A- ...'!. -' - ..**


S. . . . ..
S.. .. . .. . ..



. . . . . . . . . . . . .


. .. . . . . . . .. I






I . . . ..







S. .



.* . . .. . . . ... .. .














. .- . . . . . .. .




-.- ... . .. . .. .. .
J .


r ,


..


1~
-
r
rl. I




r,





'

'''



Ii










-








r


.2. .J













LI.

















* 22


i,. I






































.91.


.1

-All


Y~ r'~~

'L






I I













''
L_


VC~ (
'r




,'











I



i

I


--.I

1
..


2*.


qis


ra~

I.


* I


II































.2


i,.' --T---
I r k. r -




-.* .
"a sa


.- ---. r- Vi --- + .












. ,.


'I


I I

1~
















I




















.I
















I

'
I


:-4
. I *















--

. . I











- '"


- ~n~r Urr is flat Y po1nds l,, ts ~ Y,~i '.flr. F7lj~rflln Ar cm a4tI. totrer r ur C rKI 4 ngpr t,i~9 tr 6.s.tA KR b~f trAr YSITr I n r fl f, t t,~r4t'lttu 4 t&~ p'~n eUl~tt nln at $1>. at m ta#4 <1~t '. Maranlr nqmk 1*. l~r ~r dmxomaal TI. ta art 'r tf a It Ina 1* IS ta 1< ~ a st Cr isa a, r~lppti4 *t1
Arta tit Cm A c~t~saa V r ts jztr t p. in3I a+l rt* itan lis r - 4 jfl tsar sA p >A., san Ua;l t.4 Tr na< tnt - t t Vt

esltintr aa C h I~5 r ip pmz a rlntj~rt itr (t15nritY lg .rr .ad unrit ladl *'. a: A a..i ~c .At tale ewd In adnc tr 5 al: "t pin
VQIaIL Atat t~i mnC twst ttr m41 th st~. ptltrt't SF flcrlda. "xwIrcL an It Irntc 5 a~ I( pcrrccnt .i. '4 *rti 4* iisS Ji d ii inrwt.


*. .1- *
I.."



A.. .
*- r


I


r..
ii" "


. **.














Tar.le 3.--ILPPING *EIGHT OF WirTED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGi MERtHANIDSE ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, B TRADE AREA, TIPE OF SERVICE, AND
AlOUI T CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLr VESSELS: JANUARY-DECEMBER 1956
,Data in millt..r f' p.und. T..-taio represent the sums .,f unu.runded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sams .f the rounded amounts)

Fully ccaplled shipments

tral Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels3 Tanker vessels
total all

Trade r eaela Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Total rTot a ed United
shipping shipping States U ted United U Led TOtal states
weight weight a ag Total States Total States Total States
Sla flag nlag flag

ill 1t, (i 14.) iS) t6) (7) (8) t9) (10) (11)

.:t.al alil Trace areas:
Janmarj--Dcember 1)55.......... 26,S3..:_' 25.:5,58.0 .,288.9 201,583.8 39,523.7 55,941.9 20,501.0 145,641.9 19,022.7 24,005.2 4,765.2
lanuary-UtCELter 196. ......... 291,28." 289,510.1 5.,60".1 256,769.7 48,167.3 60,725. 23,224.9 19b,04-.7 .24,9'.2.4 32,740.4 6,439.8

F..rtigir tra.- areas ex.ept Canadian.... 23,.,7o5.1i 35,0l1.-0 38,278.5 207,213.7 35,406.1 60,301.5 23,1.9.1 146,912.2 12,257.1 27,847.3 2,872.4

Caritbear .......... . .... .. ...... 13,1i 5." 12,363.3 3,478.4 8,780.3 2,-,lo.9 6,792.1 2,243.1 1,988.2 173.9 3,583.0 1,061.4
EB st cast Scutri AmericCa... ...... ......... 10,18'.3 10,lo2.3 2,065.7 9,23i..1 1,915.1 3,671.9 1,359.2 5,563.1 555.9 927.3 150.6
BWet i t S-uuth Amveric ........... ......... 3,7'03.' 3,ct'7.3 1,340.8 3,292.5 1,308.5 2,273.4 1,210.6 1,019.1 98.0 314.8 32.3
West C a Central America ann Mexico........ 2,587.3 2,521.5 281.9 675.0 202.7 543.1 198.3 131.9 4.3 1,846.5 79.2
Olfr C.ast Mexi.:.............. .. ........ 895.- 878.6 5.6 ;09.8 1.6 ..3 (") 261.4 1.6 168.9 4.0

United iLrngdom and Fire...................... 21,093.1 21,052.6 2,21o.9 15,821.3 2,216.9 5,373.5 1,931.7 10, 7.8 285.2 5,231.3 ...
Balti.,, :5andina..a, Iceland and Greenlana... 9,09-..8 9,21.8 929.2 8,154.1 906.5 3,482.1 884.2 4,672.i 22.3 867.7 22.7
Bayorrne-Hamburg Reange.......... 8'p,552.4 a89,395.6 8,328.9 80,250.3 7,2*9.0 11,876.8 3,238.- 68,373.5 ..,010.6 9,145.2 1,079.9
Prtuuga ana Spanien Alant,.: .......... ... 2,17.1 2',210.2 '65.3 2,0o4.2 465.3 620.8 177.2 1,.43.4 288.1 6.1 ...
Azorec, ME1;lerrawdar, an.0 Black Sea....... 38,li0.0 38,040.2 5,656.4 36,i"2.o 5,453.6 3,811.9 2,762.6 30,360.7 2,690.9 1,867.6 202.8

West iast Africa......................... 1,793.8 1,73".i 559.4 1,429.9 540.9 937.5 414.0 492.4 126.9 307.3 18.5
Sourn ian Ea.t Africa..................... ... 1,59.8 1,.2.6 861.6 1,463.0 861.6 1,379.5 861.6 83.5 ... 29.7 ..
Au ,vtrai. 1B ................................. 1,"'?5.8 i,681.0 283.e 1,547.7 283.8 1,233.6 282.5 314.1 1.2 133.4 ...
Inaia, Persiai Gulfa and Rea Sea........... .. 5,682.2 5,618.2 1,970.7 5,485.8 1,841.- 2,055.1 '799.3 3,.30.7 1,0w2.1 132.3 129.3
Malaya ana ioela..................... ..... 1,.2. 1,385.0 588.. 1,349.9 588.. 839.6 370.1 510.3 218.3 35.1
South China, F,:.rm5Ea and PhilippinesE....... .,005.9 3,896.8 1,997.9 3,838.7 1,997.9 3,187.5 1,740.4 651.2 257.5 58.1
North China Lr.:lud.ng Shanghai and Japan..... 30,03.8 29,99o.7 7,24.7.9 26,943.6 ",156.3 9,77..9 4,675.9 17,168.7 2,480.4 3,053.1 91.6

:.anaEian trade area ................... 5.,863.7 5'.,,-.9.2 10,328.6 09,556.2 12,761.1 423.3 75.8 .9,133.0 12,685.4 4,892.9 3,567.4

Pacif Canada............................ .. 2,767.2 2,733.1 1,801..' 826.8 280.3 139.5 74.2 687.3 206.2 1,906.3 1,521.1
Great La.ke Jman a. ............. ............ ..9,-80.5 49,l2..b 14-,3.1.3 .6,519.5 12,426.1 159.7 ... ..6,359.9 12,426.1 2,605.1 1,915.2
Atianti.: Canaia and Newfournland............... 2,,oo.2 2,591.~ 185. 2,209.9 54.7 121..1 1.6 2,085.8 '3.2 381.5 131.1

I*Denote- less than 50,003) poundE. IFigurel based on complete overagefe of shipments valued at $500 or more during January-December 1955 and July-December
1956 and shIpments valued at 1,000 or more souring January-June 1?5b. FLgurea based on complete coverage or shipments valued at $500 or more and an estimate
cf the 1100-ti-. shbpments computed from a 10 percent sample or such shipments during January-December 1955 and July-December 1956 and complete coverage or ship-
ment: saluea at s,0C00 or more and an estimate of the i00-1999 shipments computed from a 10 percent sample or such shipments during January-June 1956. The
chance. are 2 out of 3 in the long run that Lne sampling error for the figures which include estimates for the low-value shipment Is less than 1% or less than
5.0,0)jO porundj. 3Cla.jiif'ication ary cargo vessels aa "iner" or "irregular or tramp"is based on characteristics of each voyage whether the voyage is part of
a jcrn'dulea berun operation, etc.) using tIe clas.ificati.n criteria ofr the Maritime Aoministration.


Taile *..-SHIPPINlG IWEiCI OF UNITED STATES GENERAL IMPORTS OF MERCHA&NISE ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF SERVICE, AND AttOUNT CARRIED ON
.tNITED SIArTE FLAG VESSELS: JAIIAUli-DECEI8LR 1956
iCate in millions of pounds. Totair reprtse nt the sumE of unrounded figures, hence may lary lightly from the sums of the rounded amount)

Shipments weigning 2,000 pounds or more

Grand
total all Tctal all vsseels Dry cargo vessels' Tanker vessels
vesselst
Trade area rotal dry eargo Liner Irregular
Total Total United Uni ted
shipping shippLng States United United United Total States
eight weignt flag Trotal States Total States Total States flag
ilag flag flag

I1) (21 13) 14) (5) 161 (7) (81 (9) (10) (u1)

Total all trade areas:
January-December 1955............... 282,862.2 282,621i. 74,958.5 137,034.4 39,-96.1 35,982.2 .1,280.6 101,052.2 25,515.5 145587.0 35,162.4
Jan',ary-December i5t, ............... 319,2"7.1 316,9- .3 -'8,77. 159,0-7.8 42,089.7 38,810.5 15,287.8 120,287.3 26,801.8 159,846.5 36,698.2

Foreign trade areaE except Canadian.... 2o5,280.9 2o0,979." c3,9.9.4 107,.15.6 29,447.2 37,621.6 14.,905.2 69,794.0 14,5,42.0 157,564.0 34,502.2

Caribbean.................................. 159,064.9 159,0:9.3 "1,112.9 '.6,312.6 11,059.5 4,317.1 1,670.0 41,995.5 9,389.5 112,746.7 30,053.3
East Coast South America...................... .,892.9 5,891.t 1,795.1 5,890.7 1,795.1 2,851.5 1,332.8 3,039.2 462.3 0.9
West haist South Amertica..................... 12,399... 12,398.9 ,'.51.5 12,125.6 4,416.0 3,10b.3 2,044.6 9,019.3 2,371.. 273.3 35.6
West C:oast Central America and Mexico........ 2,253.7 2,253.6 930.1 2,074.3 91..4 193.3 69.9 1,880.9 844.5 179.3 15.7
Gu.lf .,oast Mexico............................ 8,759.7 8,758.1 2',O.'.8 1,123.4 297.1 496.8 ('1 626.7 297.1 7,634.7 1,747.7

United Kingdom and Eire...................... 2,083.3 2,038.1 546.3 1,835.2 546.3 1,p.69.3 545.3 365.Q 1.0 202.9 ...
Baltic, Scanninavia, Iceland and Greenland... 4,8,7.9 .,847.0 312.- 4,710.9 31.4 2,311.8 290.1 2,399.1 22.3 136.2 ...
Bayonne-Hamburg Range........................ 7,895.2 ",808.0 1,29o.6 7,179.5 1,241.8 5,357.2 1,114.5 1,822.3 127.3 628.5 54.8
Portugal and Spanish Atlar.iC.................. 493.- 491.3 127.8 491.3 127.8 317.5 127.8 173.7 ... .
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea.......... 1.,,.5.4 14,012.5 1,601.2 3,863.2 1,241.. 2,130.7 973.7 1,732.5 267.8 10,149.3 359.7

West Coast Africa.............................. 5,.20.3 5,419.9 75. 5,19.9 675.5 1,642.6 543.7 3,777.3 131.8
South and East Africa......................... 3,180. 3,179.k 1,961.1 3,159.7 1,961.1 2,995.2 1,938.' 664.5 22.7 19.7 ...
Australasla.................................. 1,020.7 1,019.5 .16.8 998.7 416.8 834.6 416.3 164.1 0.5 20.7 ...
India, Persian Cull and Red Sea............... 25.146.3 25,141.3 3,3-..3 3,549.5 1,302.3 1,957.8 757.5 1,591.8 544.8 21,591.8 2,132.0
Malaya and Lndonesia. .... ... .............. 5,293.1 5,292." o54.3 1,3.9.1 551.0 1,345.9 551.0 3.2 ... 3,943.6 103.4
Sours .:Cuia, Formcsa and Phil;ppien ......... 5,5c3.8 5,55.5 1,885.8 5,538.1 1,885.8 5,131.6 1,863.2 406.4 22.6 13.4 ..
North China nLrcluding Shanghai and Japan..... 1,910.i 1,817.1 703.0 1,794.0 703.0 1,662.4 666.6 131.6 36.4. 23.0 ..

:anadianr trae areas ................... 5)3,ithb. 53,964.5 1-,838.- 51,p82.2 12,642.4 1,189.2 382.6 50,493.0 12,259.9 2,282.3 2,196.0

Pacifi.l Canaa ............................... 6,777.1 B,7"6.9 3,2t.6.i .,780.5 1,251.0 571.1 382.6 4,209.4 868.5 1,996.4 1,995.1
Great LaneB Canada.............. ............. 15,645.- 15,64-.5 .,706.8 15,371.4 .,506.6 8.9 ... 15,362.6 4,506.6 273.1 200.2
Atlantic Canada and Newfourkdland............. 31,543., 31,5-3.1 6,885.5 31,530.4 6,8&.8 609.3 (*) 30,921.1 6,884.8 12.8 0.7


in value and an estimate of
three that the sampling er-
regardless of shipping weight
(whether the voyage is part


*Den.tes less than 50,000 pounds. tFigures base on completee coverage of shipments weighing 2,000 pounds or more and over $100
the les- than 2,000 pound Erdipmente valued at I.100 or more base on a 2% sample of the import documents. The chances are two out of
ror f.,r .nese f'igrei ahlcn Lnclude eEtimates for the under 2,000 poured shipments is less than 1%. Shipments of under $100 In value
S are excluded. 2Cla.Is.ification of ary cargo vesaelE as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage
of a acheuled berth operation, etl.i. using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.










*~~~~~~~~~~~"* -t3 ue> L~V ~? "tfll X~T~U~ A~~ UPACr m ~~V X~1~[ ~ h~5W
-~ AAA L~ i~ ~ ~ 3L~1L- ~AL ~ II ) P A1i~ ~ I mll ~( ~ ~:~a3~ ^~ A2 A ~ ~ AN. :L P~ A
*~ .i :

.i C-I XIAr ?i _~ ~ (D~* ~~I ~j A -I -;s t.O rp ri t~rb:IT B~ r~


*k- *. -
ar-? ~Z


*t.gs.. : r. e. .*:r .*. *. o : of .t W o. r are .rl 1W* "* rt. -* :rr .* 1 al-: *r

0.;..=* to-.: -.gat .-ag : salen*. ualrt a' ; r 2. rr a : artl iif --1" r h~ra -r as: a la ".rsar~en ?]~ 1 i
ah- I ;Am f r1d IU, flli6 R B~U ir~flp ICP

fI .r a.. - "\ r"' iai.. *.f a I. w I 1 < 1
:br l:. .?* .r"r 11 21Ier ar * ;*r r0 :




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08587 8915


DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON 25, D. C.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS


IJNIVERSI;IY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
DOCTJ'rENTS DEPARTMENT
GAINESVILLE FLA


ZF-0998-1


4-5


Comm-DC