United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Water-borne foreign trade statistics
Alternate title:
Waterborne foreign trade statistics
United States water-borne foreign trade
United States waterborne foreign trade
Added title page title:
United States foreign trade
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, including annual cumulation

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in June 1965.
General Note:
"Summary report FT 985."
General Note:
Description based on: Calendar year 1952; title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: June 1965.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 13695873
lccn - sf 86092445
ocm13695873
Classification:
lcc - WMLC L 83/3610
System ID:
AA00010658:00073

Related Items

Succeeded by:
U.S. waterborne foreign trade


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Full Text



U. S. DEPARTMENT O COMMERCE
Frederick s. Mueller, Secretary


7


I REAU Of THE CENSUS
Ro W. Burgess. Director


UNITED S ES FOREIGN TRADE

UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


SUMRY REPORT y FOR RELEASE
rr 985 Jl Nov r 1959


WATERBORNE FOREIGN TRADE STATISTICS

COVERAGE


This report presents statistics on total
United States waterborne inbound and outbound
shipments made in foreign trade, with the excep-
tion of such elements as are specified below.

Frm July 1953 through December 1955 and
starting with July 1956, the statistics on water-
borne exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
and non-Department of Defense shipments of "spe-
cial category" commodities exclude shipments in-
dividually valued at less than $500. For the
months January through June 1956, these statis-
tics exclude export shipments individually valued
at less than $1,000. Information on the exclu-
sion of the low-valued export shipments in the
vessel statistics is contained in the November
1953 and February 1956 issue of the Foreign
Trade Statistics Notes. From January 1954 through
December 1957 vessel import figures exclude ship-
ments having a shipping weight of less than 2,000
pounds, regardless of value, as well as shipments
valued at less than $100, regardless of shipping
Wight. Starting with January 1958 statistics
the import data exclude only those shipments
where the value is less than $100 regardless of
shipping weight. Information on the exclusion of
the low-value and low-weight import shipments in
the vessel statistics is contained in the Febru-
ary and March 1954 and January-March 1958 issues
of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.

Vessel export figures in this report, shown
in columns 4, 9, 13, and 16 of table 1 and in
table 3, represent exports of domestic and for-
eign merchandise laden at the United States Cus-
tom area for shipment to foreign countries and
include export shipments to United States civil-
ian Government agencies and non-Department of De-
fense controlled foreign aid program shipments as
described below. Excluded fro these figures are
shipments to the United States armed forces
abroad of supplies and equipment for their own
se as well as the other types of shipments de-
scribed below for which information is shown in
separate columns in table 1.


Department of Defense controlled and "spe-
cial category" figures, shown in columns 6 and 11
of table 1 and in tables 5 and 6 of this report
cover consolidated data for the following types
of shipments:
1. Vessel export shipments of Department of
Defense controlled cargo under special
foreign aid programs, i.e., Internation-
al Cooperation Administration, Ary Ci-
vilian Supply, etc., made aboard United
States flag vessels such as Army-Navy
transports or commercial vessels char-
tered by the Department of Defense under
time, voyage and space charter arrange-
ments and including "special category "
commodities without distinction.
2. Vessel export shipments of "special cat-
egory" commodities not controlled by the
Department of Defense for which detailed
information cannot be shown separately
because of security reasons. For an ex-
planation and list of "special category"
commodities and their presentation in
foreign trade statistics see the April
1958 issue of Foreign Trade Statistics
Notes.

Only shipping weight data in term of United
States port or coastal district of lading and
foreign trade area of unlading are shown for
these classes of shipments since information on
the dollar value of exports of Department of De-
fene controlled cargo is not available at this
level of detail. Consequently, the total value
figures shown in columns 12 and 15 of table 1 for
dry cargo and banker shipments in that order cor-
respond to the shipping weight figures shown in
columns 3 and 8, respectively, of the same table.

Vessel import figures, shown in columns 3,
6, 9 and 12 of table 2 and in table 4 of this re-
port, are general imports and represent the total
of imports for Immediate consumption plus entries
into custom bonded storage and manufacturing
warehouses made at the United States Customs area


Prepred in the htreui of the Censi Foreip Trade Divieon
hilpplg an formi Aid Branch. Milton Kaf-.an, Chief, C fton Jordan. Aslstent Chief.
ptr wsale t She eM of tbe Cmea. *MwasilgtL ,s. C. 4 rie *We. meal obeerlptle I LM.
-I'mo""







from foreign countries. Vessel import figures
exclude American goods returned by the Unhited
States armed forces for their own use, import
shipments on Army or Navy transports, and ship-
ments covered by informal entries.

The following types of shipments are ex-
cluded from both the vessel export and import
data: (1) Shipments of household and personal
effects, (2) shipments by mail and parcel post,
and (3) shipments of vessels under their own
power and afloat. United States trade with Puerto
Rico and with United States possessions is not
reported as United States exports and imports.

Merchandise shipped in bond through the
United States in transit from one foreign country
to another without having been entered as an im-
port is not included in any of the figures in the
columns previously referred to (imported merchan-
dise cleared through Customs and subsequently
re-exported is included in both the import and
export statistics). Separate information for the
waterborne portion of the in-transit trade in
terms of shipping weight and dollar value is
presented in this report in tables 1 and 2.
Columns 5, 10, 14, and 17 of table 1 reflect
in-transit merchandise laden aboard vessels at
United States ports, while columns 4, 7, 10, and
13 of table 2 reflect such merchandise unladen
from vessels. The waterborne outbound and inbound
in-transit statistics include (1) foreign mer-
chandise transferred from one vessel to another
in the United States port of arrival and shipped
to a foreign country without being released from
Customs custody in the United States; and (2)
foreign merchandise arriving by vessel at one
United States port, shipped through the United
States under Customs bond, and leaving the United
States by vessel from a port other than that at
which it arrived. In addition, the waterborne
outbound in-transit statistics also include (1)
foreign merchandise withdrawn from a general
order warehouse for immediate export by vessel or
for transportation and export by vessel (such
merchandise was not recorded as an import when it
entered the warehouse), and (2) foreign merchan-
dise shipped via vessel from a United States
Foreign Trade Zone to a foreign country (such
merchandise is deposited in the Foreign Trade
Zone without being entered as an import). Any
inbound or outbound in-transit merchandise moving
by methods of transportation other than vessel is
excluded from the in-transit statistics. Thus,
merchandise arriving at the United States by
vessel and leaving by some other method of trans-
portation is included in the inbound data only.
On the other hand, merchandise arriving by other
than waterborne transportation and laden aboard
vessels upon departure is included in the out-
bound statistics but not in the inbound data.
The inbound and outbound segments, therefore, do
not counter-balance one another and are comple-
mentary only insofar as they involve merchandise
carried by vessels to and from the United States.
For a more detailed discussion of the in-transit
trade statistics and the types of shipments ex-
cluded from these data see the February 1953
issue of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.


All types of outbound vessel shipments in
tables 1 and 5 are credited to the coastal dis-
tricts, customs districts, and ports at which the
merchandise was laden. All types of inbound
vessel shipments in table 2 are credited to the
coastal districts, customs districts, and ports
at which merchandise was unladen. In the case of
Vessel general imports this is not necessarily
the same as the customs district in which the
goods were entered into warehouse or entered for
immediate consumption.

Vessel exports in tables 3 and 6 are cred-
ited to the foreign trade areas at which the mer-
chandise was unladen. Vessel imports in table 4
are credited to the foreign trade areas at'which
the merchandise was laden aboard the vessels car-
rying the cargo to the United States. The coun-
tries of destination or origin of merchandise are
not necessarily located within the trade areas to
which the merchandise is shipped or from which it
is received. Detailed definitions of foreign
trade areas in terms of the countries and ports
included in each are contained in Schedule R,
Code Classification and Definition of Foreign
Trade Areas.

Shipping weight figures represent the gross
weight of shipments, including the weight of con-
tainers, wrappings, crates and moisture content.
Vessel export values represent the values at time
and place of export. They are based on the sell-
ing price ( or on the cost if not sold) and
include inland freight, insurance and other
charges to place of export. Transportation and
other costs beyond the United States port of
exportation are excluded. Vessel import values,
as well as the values for in-transit shipments,
are generally based on the market or selling
price and are in general f.o.b. the exporting
country. Since in-transit merchandise is not
subject to the imposition of import duties at the
United States, the valuation reported for such
shipments is not verified by customs to the ex-
tent applicable in the case of import entries and
may in some cases include transportation costs
and insurance to the United States as well as
other cost elements.

Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are
classified as dry cargo or tanker shipments sole-
ly on the basis of the type of vessel used with-
out regard to the cargo carried. Tanker vessels
are those primarily designed for the carriage of
liquid cargoes in bulk, while all others are
classified as dry cargo vessels. A further segre-
gation of dry cargo vessel shipments is provided
in tables 3-6 on the basis of type of service,
i.e., liner (berth) or irregular (tramp). Liner
service is that type of service offered by a
regular line operator of dry cargo vessels on
berth. The itineraries and sailing schedules of
such vessels are predetermined and fixed. Ir-
regular or tramp service is that type of service
afforded by dry cargo vessels which are chartered
or otherwise hired for the carriage of goods on
special voyages. Vessels in this type of service
are not on berth and their sailing schedules are
not predetermined or fixed.









Table 1.-SRII WPu u VGlA O 1TA TL O l I Y Ecwr'I, .A'g i.-1Oin ,WKLr I151 Msi, OA ir.PMT5 W ARWrr OM MXaga ar AM
wIC CATMIT' PART' o, OF DWI C APj' u'gP' r-u GDRY, y rewrLAr- :T.i.7S I ANM"B Or l, DW3

(Toale given fr all ousm district t hi thwh e are re. I1 eshimmnts. Only thoe prts are Nhive wvth c combined el rt and lrt Uonnae averagedd 5 w1llin prlud o more per w-th l& drit *lef-.
ar year 195 ut a district tals a for all ports In Urn diasri t inoluding tho*e not sAu. T(tals rh p the rA a nrw rded figure, hen my ar aligh tly rm e e ,f ns rasd
Murte. tes %*m al for P-ioum a1 -thm include current rMviN0or' 1 n r ih


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Table 1.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND
"SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING-Continued

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker

Domestic, foreign and Domestic, foreign and
Cs sitcGrand in-transit cargo Dept. of Dept. of
Customs district and port to Defense in-transit cargo Defense Domestic In- Domestic In-
Total Domestic In- and "Spe- Total Doand "Spe- Total and for- trans- Total and for- trans-
Total andor- trans- ca Total and fr- trans- cia at- ign it ign it
(2) ) eign it agoryl 7 sign it egory"

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)


South Atlantic Coast Districts-Con.

Floridal...............................
Jacksonville..........................
Miami..................... ........ ....,
West Palm Beach......................
Port Everglades........................

Gulf Coast Districts................

Floridal.................................
Tampe.................................
Pensacola.............................
Bocagrande.......................,..
Panama City..........................
Mobile.................................
Mobile, Ala..........................
Gulfport, Miss.........................
Pascagoula, Miss......................
New Orleans.............................
New Orleans, La.......................
Baton Rouge, La.......................
Port Sulphur, La......................
St. Louis...............................
Sabine................................
Port Arthur, Tex.....................
Sabine, Tex....................,.....
Beaumont, Tex......o..................
Lake Charles, La......................
Galveston...........................;....
Galveston, Tex........................
Houston, Tex..................... ...
Freeport, Tex........................
Corpus Christi, Tex...................
Texas City, Tex.......................
Laredo ........... ... ............. .....
Brownsville, Tex....................

South Pacific Coast Districts......

San Diego...............................
Los Angeles..............................
Los Angeles, Calif.,..................
Port San Luis, Calif................
Long Beach, Calif....................
El Segundo, Calif....................
San Francisco...........................
Eureka, Calif................. ......
San Francisco, Calif.................
Stockton, Calif.......................
Oakland, Calif........................
Richmond, Calif......................
Alameda, Calif.......................
Crockett, Calif......................
Martines, Calif.......................
Redwood City, Calif...................
Selby, Calif..........................

See footnotes at end of table.


193.0
64.7
21.3
45.8
58.3

5,727.4

702.9
604.5
17.1
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259.8
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1,088.0
549.0
138.8

517.6
326.8

103.3
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2,386.6
696.9
1,167.5
28.4
429.0
64.8
40.2
40.2

1,298.5

2.7
739.7
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239.1
36.7
556.1
18.1
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235.3
46.5
100.8
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158.3
63.6
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4,543.8

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989.7
306.3
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390.3
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6 JULY 1959
Table 2.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DR CARGO AND TANKER VESSEIS,
Y CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADIN
(Totals are given for all customs districts at which there are vessel shipments. Only those ports are shown whose combined export and import ton-
nage averaged 5 million pounds or more per month during calendar year 1958. Customs district totals are for all ports in the district Including
those not shown. Totals represent the sums of unfounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals shown
for previous months include current revisions)

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millicdn of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and pbrt Grand General In- T l General In- General n- eral In-
Total s a tp s n Tot To Ger
total ot mpsim ports tr ansi t port transit imports transit imports t .easlt

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)

Total all districts:
Monthly Average 1958.... 31,411.1 13,425.6 13,318.9 106.7 17,985.6, 15,948.5 2,037.1 693.7 673.6 20.1 18.9 128.7 20.2
July 1958............... 33,584.0 14,983.3 14,914.0 69.3 18,600.7 16,436.6 2,164.1 711.4 694.2 17.2 160.5 139.2 21.3
June 1959 .............. 41,684.0 20,289.3 20,127.9 161.4 21,394.6 19,188.6 2,206.0 928.4 907.8 -20.6 162.4 140.6 21.8
July 1959.............. 33,241.7 18,829.8 18,678.6 151.2 14,412.0 12,316.9 2,095.1 884.6 865.3 19.3 110.3 89.5 20.8

North Atlantic Coast
Districts............. 19,271.5 8,274.2 8,146.7 127.5 10,997.3 8,902.2 2,095.1 534.1 519.7 14.4 84.2 63.4 20.8

Maine and New Hampshire...... 2,394.5 35.6 33.8 1.8 2,358.8 266.0 2,092.8 1.0 1.0 (*) 22.8 2.0 20.8
Portland, Maine........... 2,167.5 21.9 20.1 1.8 2,145.6 52.8 2,092.8 0.7 0.7 ) 21.1 0.3 20.8
Bangor, Maine............ ,37.9 1.6 1.6 ... 36.2 36.2 ... ( (*) ... 0.3 0.3
Portsmouth, N. H........... 34.9 ... ... ... 34.9 34.9 ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.2
Belfast, Maine............ 4.3 ... ... ... 4.2 4.3 ... ... 3.. ... ( (*)
Searsport, Maine.......... 102.3 0.7 0.7 ... 101. 101.6 ... ( () ... 0., 0.9...
Massachusetts................ 854.5 297.0 296.7 C.3 557. 557.5 ... 39.6 39.5 0.1 3.1 3...
Boston................... 745.4 265.2 265.0 0.2 480.2 480.2 ... 35.3 35.3 2.7 2.7
Gloucester................. 12.2 12.2 12.2 (- ... .. 2.3 2.3 (* ...
New Bedford.............. 5.6 5.6 5.6 ... ... .... 1.2 2 2 *
Fall River................ 91.2 14.0 14.0 ... 77.3 77.3 ... 0.6 0.6 ... 0.5 0.5
Salem...........,......... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Rhode Island................. 188.4 25.6 25.6 ... 162.8 160.6 2.2 0.8 0.8 ... 1.7 1.7 ()
Providence................ 125.1 25.6 25.6 ... 99 97.3 2.2 0.8 0.8 ... 0.6 0.6 (N1
Connecticut......... ...... 179.8 65.1 65.1 ... 114.7 ... 0.7 0.7 ... 0.7 0.7...
Bridgeport................ 58.5 58.5 58.5 ... ... ... ... 0.5 0.5
New Haven................ 58.8 3.6 3.6 ... 55.2 55.2 ... 0.1 0.1 ... 0.3 0.3
New London................ 62.6 3.0 3.0 ... 59.6 59.6 ... 0.1 0.1 ... 0.4 0.4
New York................ .. 5,104.2 1,996.1 1,927.7 68.4 3,108.1 3,108.1 ... 386.4 372.6 13. 21.6 21.6...
New York.................. 4,884.6 1,848.7 1,780.3 68.4 3,035.9 3,035.9 ... 384.5 370.7 13.8 21.1 21.1...
Albany....................... 103.8 31.5 31.5 ... 72.3 72.3 ... 1.7 1.7 ... 0.6 0.6
Philadelphia................. 5,679.8 2,003.8 1,955.0 48.8 3,675.9 3,675.9 ... 32.4 32.2 0.2 27.6 27.6
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 3,238.7 1,536.6 1,487.8 48.8 1,702.1 1,702.1 ... 27.0 26.8 0.2 12.9 12.9...
Wilmington, Del........... 506.9 84.2 84.2 ... 422.7 422.7 ... 2.9 2.9 ... 2.5 2.5
Paulsboro, N. J........... 828.1 0.4 0.4 ... 827.7 827.7 ... 0.1 0.1 ... 6.0 6.0
Camden, N. J.............. 138.4 54.1 54.1 ... 84.4 4 ... 1.0 1.0 ... 0.6 0.6...
Marcus Hook, Pa........... .639.1 ... ... ... 639.1 639.1 ... ... ... ... 5.7 5.7
Maryland...................... 3,661.7 3,153,3 3,146.1 7.2 508.5 508.5 ... 52.8 52.6 0.2 3.1 3.1
Baltimore............. ....... 3,659.2 3,152.7 3,145.5 7.2 506.6 506.6 ... 52.7 52.5 0.2 3.1 3.1
Virginia.................. .. 1,208.6 697.7 696.6 1.1 510.9 510.9 ... 20.5 20.4 0.1 3.6 3.6
Norfolk................... 477.3 295.2 294.1 1.1 182.2 182.2 ... 11.0 10.9 0.1 1.5 1.5
Newport News.............. 660.8 332.1 332.1 ... 328.7 328.7 ... 6.2 6.2 ... 2.1 2.1
Richmond .................. 53.6 53.6 53.6 ... ... ... ... 2.3 2.3 ...
Alexandria...............,. 16.9 16.9 16.9 ... ... ... ... 1.0 1.0

South Atlantic Coast
Districts............ 1,297.8 765.2 764.5 0.7 532.6 532.6 ... 43.5 43.0 0.5 3.3 3.3

North Carolina................ 139.6 45.3 45.3 ... 94.3 94.3 ... 3.2 3.2 ... 0.5 0.5
Wilmington............... 100.5 45.3 45.3 ... 55.2 55.2 ... 3.2 3.2 ... 0.3 0.3
Morehead City............ 39.1 ... ... ... 39.1 39.1 ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.2
South Carolina............... 225.7 84.9 84.6 0.3 140.8 140.8 ... 9.5 9.2 0.3 0.8 0.8
Charleston............... 225.7 84.9 84.6 0.3 10.8 140.8 ... 9.5 9.2 0.3 0.8 0.8
Georgetown.............. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Georgia...................... .348.6 260.7 260.7 ... 87.9 87.9 ... 8.7 8.7 ... 0.5 0.5
Brunswick................. -37.1 37.1 37.1 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1
Savannah................... 311.4 223.6 223.6 ... 87.9 87.9 ... 8.7 8.7 ... 0.5 0.5
Florida1...................... 583.9 374.3 373.9 0.4 209.7 209.7 ... 22.1 21.9 0.2 1.5 1.5
Jacksomville.............. 270.8 210.6 210.6 ... 60.2 60.2 ... 9.7 9.7 ... 0.5 0.5.
Miami..................... 66.7 41.9 41.7 0.2 24.8 24.8 ... 5.2 5.1 0.1 0.2 0.2..
Vest Palm Beach............ .126.8 80.5 80.3 0.2 46.2 46.2 ... 5.0 4.9 0.1 0.3 0.3
Port Everglades...... ..... 111.9 41.3 41.3 ... 70.6 70.6 ... 2.1 2.1 ... 0.4 0.4

Gulf Coast Districts... 5,277.3 4,677.3 4,663.9 13.4 599.9 599.9 ... 114.3 112.2 2.1 5.1 5.1

Florida..................... 157.0 118.0 118.0 () 39.0 39.0 ... 5.1 5.1 (*) 0.3 0.3.
Tampa..................... 129.5 94.9 94.9 (*) 34.7 34.7 ... 3.6 3.6 (*) 0.2 0.2
Pensacola................. 19.7 15.4 15.4 ... 4.4 4.4 ... 1.4 1.4 ... 0.1 0.1 .
Bocagrande................ .. ... .. ... ... ..
Panama City............... 7.3 7.3 7.3 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1
Mobile....................... 1,750.4 1,695.1 1,694.4 0.7 55.4 55.4 ... 11.6 11.6 0.4 0.4.
Mobile, Ala............... 1,727.9 1,672.5 1,671.8 0.7 55.4 55.4 ... 11.0 11.0 0.4 0.4.
Gulfport, Miss............ 9.9 9.9 9.9 ... ... ... ... 0.4 0.4
Pascagoula, Miss.. ....... 12.6 12.6 12.6 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1
New Orleans................. 2,035.9 3,781.4 1,769.4 12.0 254.5 25.5 ... 56.9 55.1 1.8 2.2 2.2.
New Orleans, La............ 919.4 809.6 797.6 12.0 109.8 109.8 ... 50.8 49.0 1.8 1.1 1.1
Baton Rouge, La.............. 581.4 549.6 549.6 ... 31.7 31.7 ... 2.2 2.2 ... 0.3 0.3.
Port Sulphur, La.......... ... ... ... ... ... ...
St. Louis .................... ... ...
Sabine......................... 86.8 47.5 47.5 ... 39.2 39.2 ... 0.6 0.6 ... 0.3 0.3
Port Arthur, Tex.......... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Sabine, Tex ............... ...
Beaumont, Tax.............. 41.7 2.5 2.5 ... 39.2 39.2 ... 0.3 0.3 ... 0.3 0.3
Lake Charles, La........... 45.1 45.1 45.1 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3
See footnotes at end of table.










Table .INA19-V,*A19,
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I 3'h1* uA R t7


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8 JULT 1959
Table 2.--8HIPPIG WEIGH AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORBE GCEIAL 1POTS AND IMBOUND IN-TRANSrT IHCBHANDISE, ON DRI CARO AND TAKE VESLS,
BY CUSTOM DISTRICT AND PORT OF UIADDIG--Continued

Shipping weight In millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port Gran Genral n- General In- Geeral In- General In-
total imports transit Totl Iports transit Total rt ranport transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (U) (12) (13)

Great Lakes Districts-
Continued

Chicago...................... 513.2 510.9 510.9 ... 2.3 2.3 ... 22.3 22.3 ... 0.4 0.4 ..
Chicago, 111.............. 451.3 .49.0 449.0 ... 2.3 2.3 ... 22.0 22.0 ... 0.4 0 ..
East Chicago, Ind......... 61.8 61.8 61.8 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 ... ......
Gary, Ind........ ......... ... ... ... .
Ohio......................... P,07.1 2,061.9 2,061.9 ... 9.2 9.2 ... .3 .3 ... 03 0.3
Cleveland................. 755.9 755.9 755.9 ... ... ... ... 8.2 8.2
Tpledo.................... 139.5 130.3 130.3 ... 9.2 9.2 ... 1.6 1.6 1.6 ... 0.3 0.3
Erie, Pa................... 62.3 62.3 62.3 ... ... ... ... 0.4 0.4 ... ... ...
Sanduaky.............. .. 20.5 20.5 20.5 ... ... ... ... (*) () ......
Ashtabula.................. 777.7 77.7 777.7 ... ... ... ... 2.9 2.9 ......
Conneaut.................. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Fairport.................. 17.2 17.2 17.2 ... ... ... ... (*) (*)
uron ................... 240.1 240.1 240.1 ... ... ... ... 1.0 1.0 ... ... ......
Lorain..................... 58.0 58.0 58.0 ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.2 ......

Puerto Rico, Hawaii,
and Alaska Districts.. 748.0 153.2 153.1 0.1 594.8 594.8 ... .7 8 .7.7 (*) 4.2 4.2

Puerto Rico.................. 706.2 111.4 111.3 0.1 594.8 594.8 ... 5.7 5.7 (*) 4.2 4.2 ...
unica................... 0.3 0.3 0.3 0 ... ... ... ... (*) () ......
Mayagues................. 6.8 6.8 .8 ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.2 ... ...
Pone..................... 9. 99.4 9.4 ... ... ... ... 0.6 0.6
San Juan.................. 305.0 94.7 94.6 0.1 210.3 210.3 ... 4.9 4.9 (4) 1.4 1.4
Hawaii....................... 440.6 40.6 I.0.o ... ... ... ... 3.0 3.0 ......
Honolulu.................. 37.5 37.5 37.5 ... ... ... ... 2.8 2.8 ... ...
Alaska........................ 1.2 1.2 1.2 ... ... ... ... (C) (') .....


*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds; less than 50,000 dollars.
Florida Atlantic Coast port totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast
Florida.


port totals to obtain total imports through the Custao District of


Table 3.-SHIPPING EIGHT OF UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE ON DRI CARGO AND TAKER VESSELS, BY TRADE AREA, TIPE OF
SERVICE, AND A DONT CARRIED ON NrITED STATES FLAG VESSELS
(Data in millions of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence ay vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals
shown for previous months include current revisions)

Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Ihlted
Trade area Total United Total Sate
nishipping States United Unlted U united Total States
lweiht lag Total States Total States Total Stats flag
weight ilag 11 y
flag nflag flag

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

Total all trade areas:
Tontaly Average 1958..................... 19,104.0 3,113.1 17,425.8 2,722.8 .,958.5 1,548.8 12,467.3 1,174.0 1,678.2 390.3
July 1958.;............................. 20,816.2 3,140.7 18,903.6 2,711.1 < ,818.9 1,489.8 14,084.7 1,221.3 1,912.6 429.6
June 1959.............................. ,18,282.2 2,942.1 16,357.1 2,674.2 5,508.1 1,340.0 10,849.0 1,334.3 1,925.1 267.9
July 1959............................... 22,645.B 4,020.8 20,510.5 3,699.4 5,617.k 1,190.8 14,893.5 2,508.7 2,135.1 321.4


Foreign trade areas except Canadian... 1U5,17.2 1,983.3 LD,.00.7 1,870.. 5,514.9 1,189.0 7,886.0 681.3 1,716.5 112.9

Caribbean................................... 821.9 1i9.2 745.1 147.1 590.7 142.3 154.4 4.9 76.8 2.1
East Coast South Amerlca.................... o36.2 152.7 610.4 152.7 207.7 63.4 402.7 89.3 25.8 ...
West Coast South America.................... 295.2 56.4 227.9 56. 125.6 56.3 102.3 0.1 67.3 .
West Coast Central America and Mexico....... 75.3 13.3 41.5 13.3 33.3 12.9 8.2 0.5 33.8 ...
Gulf Coast Merieo........................... 67.1 ... 67.1 ... 24.8 ... 42.3 ......

United Kingdom and Eire.................... 1,176.5 92.4 885.9 92.'. 584.2 92.4 301.6 ... 290.6 ...
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland.. 875.1 20".4 852.1 207.4 277.5 10.1 574.5 197.3 23.0
Bayonne-Camburg Range....................... 3,916.9 165.9 3,417.5 125.4. 1,211.0 125.. 2,206.5 (a) 499.4 40.5
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic............... 226.2 49.. 187.2 49.4 44.8 4.8 142.4 44.6 39.0
Asores, Mediterranean and Black Sea......... 2,359.1 390.8 2,219.6 362.8 629.5 193.7 1,590.1 169.1 139.5 28.0

West Coast Africa............................ 127.0 28.1 122.6 28.1 81.3 28.1 41.3 ... 4.4 ...
South and East Africa....................... 102.5 >..8 91.6 54.8 91.6 5-.8 ... ... 10.9 ...
Australasia................................ 159.2 18.5 150.6 18.5 11A.2 18.5 36.4 ... 8.6
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea............. 7775.1 31i.9 l..l 27d..5 257.5 98.9 286.7 175.6 231.0 42.4
Malays and Indonesia........................ 45.J 15.9 .5.3 15.9 45.3 15.9 ...
South China, Formosa and Philippines........ n27'.4 128.2 269.0 128.2 2.5.7 128.2 23.3 ... 8.4
North China including Shanghai and Japan... 3,181.. i.3.3 2,923.3 1.3.3 950.1 313.3 1,973.1 ... 258.1

Canadian trade areas.................. 7,528.4 2,037.6 7,109.7 1,829.1 102.2 1.7 7,007.5 1,827.3 418.7 208.5

Pacific Canada............................. 203.6 ii5.8 50.1 6.0 8.5 1.6 41.6 4.4 153.5 109.8
Great Lakes Canada .......................... o,964.2 1,921.5 6,7.0.2 1,822.9 31.1 (*) 6,709.0 1,822.9 224.0 98.6
Atlantic Canada and Nevfoundland............ jbO.t 0.2 319.4 0.1 b2.6 0.1 256.9 ... 41.2 0.1

*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds.
'Classification of dry cargo vessels as "Liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristic of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of a
scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.











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23.3 149.9
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45.7 20.7
43,3 31.2
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109.9 7.4

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19.0 586.0
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able 6.--IPARTMENT OF D NSE CONTROL CARGO E TED BY VESSEL UNDER UNITED STATES FOREIGN AID POCU3MS, AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY MONrPArt-
MENT OF DEFEMS CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL-TRADE AREA BY TY OG VESSEL SERVICE AND AV CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLG VLSSE:
(In thousands of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unfounded figures, hence my vary slightly fa the sums of the rouaded smnmts)
Total all vessels Bry cargo vessels1 'hakr vessels

Total d y cargo Liner Irregular
Trade area Total United United
shipping States United United United Total States
weight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
flag flag flag
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Total all trade areas:
Monthly average 1958.............. 380,099 132,176 142,949 117,732 117,393 97,176 25,556 20,556 237,150 14,444
June 1959....................... 297,597 72,125 77,916 65,638 70,112 58,737 7,804 6,901 219,681 6,487
July 1959...................... 309,144 81,273 89,755 73,532 83,458 68,556 6,297 4,977 219,389 7,740



foreign trade areas except Canadian.. 268,259 73,532 89,744 73,532 83,458 68,556 6,287 4,977 178,515

Caribbean.................................. 3,495 528 3,494 528 2,783 527 711 1 1 ...
East Coast South Aaerica.................. 964 107 307 107 240 107 67 ... 657
West Coast South America .................. 367 252 367 252 360 252 6 ...
West Coast Central America and Mexico...... 26 3 26 3 26 3 1 .........
(ulf Coast Mexioo.......................... 38 ... 38 ... 38 ...
United Kingd and Eire.................... 42,025 440 978 440 977 439 1 1 41,047
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland. 4,860 438 920 438 910 429 10 10 3,940 ...
Bayonne-Hamburg Range...................... 31,186 934 5,723 934 5 250 925 473 10 25,463 ...
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic.............. 1,671 1,241 1,671 1,241 1 609 1,241 62 ...
Unidentified countries in Western Europe... 1,014 1,014 1,014 1,014 1)014 1,014 ......
Asores, Mediterranean and Black Sea........ 116,384 9,385 12,593 9 385 12,591 9,384 2 2 103,791..
West Coast Africa.......................... 2,937 177 697 177 697 177 ... ... 2,240..
South and East Africa...................... 1,600 143 224 143 224 143 ... ... 1,376..
Australasia................................ 594 179 594 179 594 179 ...
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea............ 10,848 9,526 10,848 9,526 10 848 9.526 .........
Malaya and Indonesia....................... 1,470 1,236 1,470 1,236 1,470 1,236......
South China, Formosa and Philippines....... 17,018 16,571 17,018 16,571 14,982 14,535 2,036 2,036 ...
North China including Shanghai and Japan... 31,762 31,356 31,762 31,356 28 845 28,440 2,917 2,917

Canadian trade areas................. 40,885 7,741 11 1 (*) ... 11 1 40,874 7,740

Pacific Canada............................. 13 1 1 1 ... ... 1 1 12
Great Lakes Canada....................... 35,374 7,740 9 ... ... ... 9 ... 35,365 7,740
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland........... 5,497 ... (*) ... (*) ....... 5,497 ...

*Denotes less than 500 pounds; less than one tenth of one percent.
1Classification of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of
a scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1I3 1262 08587 8709lll ll1
3 1262 08587 8709


DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON 25, D. C.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS


UNIV OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
DOCUMENTS DEPT CC
GAINESVILLE FLA


ZF-0999-1




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