United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Water-borne foreign trade statistics
Alternate title:
Waterborne foreign trade statistics
United States water-borne foreign trade
United States waterborne foreign trade
Added title page title:
United States foreign trade
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, including annual cumulation

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in June 1965.
General Note:
"Summary report FT 985."
General Note:
Description based on: Calendar year 1952; title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: June 1965.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 13695873
lccn - sf 86092445
ocm13695873
Classification:
lcc - WMLC L 83/3610
System ID:
AA00010658:00071

Related Items

Succeeded by:
U.S. waterborne foreign trade


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Full Text





U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Luther H. Hodges, Secretary


11 IB
If


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Richard M. Scammon, Director


ICENUS


UNITED STATES FOREIGN T


SUMALRY REPORT
FT 985


JANUARY 1961


WATERBORNE FOREIGN TRADE STATIST

COVERAGE


This report presents statistics on total
United States waterborne inbound and outbound
shipments made in foreign trade, with the excep-
tion of such elements as are specified below.

From July 1953 through December 1955 and
starting with July 1956, the statistics on water-
borne exports of domestic and foreign merchandise
and non-Department of Defense shipments of "spe-
cial category" commodities exclude shipments in-
dividually valued at less than $50. For the
months January through June 1956, these statis-
tics exclude export shipments individually valued
at less than $1,000. Information on the exclu-
sion of the low-valued export shipments in the
vessel statistics is contained in the November
1953 and February 1956 issues of the Foreign
Trade Statistics Notes. From January 1954 through
December 1957 vessel import figures exclude ship-
ments having a shipping weight of less than 2,000
pounds, regardless of value, as well as shipments
valued at less than $100, regardless of shipping
weight. Starting with January 1958 statistics
the import data exclude only those shipments
where the value is less than $100 regardless of
shipping weight. Information on the exclusion of
the low-value and low-weight import shipments in
the vessel statistics is contained in the Febru-
ary and March 1954 and January-March 1958 issues
of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.

Vessel export figures in this report, shown
in columns 4, 9, 13, and 16 of table 1 and in
table 3, represent exports of domestic and for-
eign merchandise laden at the United States Cus-
toms area for shipment to foreign countries and
include export shipments to United States civil-
ian Government agencies and non-Department of De-
fense controlled foreign aid program shipments as
described below. E...lrJ-Ji from these figures are
shipments to the United States armed forces
abroad of sup lie and equipment for their own
use as well as the other types of shipments de-
scribed below for which information is shown in
separate columns in table 1.


Department of Defense &ontbiljiar'A -
cial category" figures, shown co9tra 1
of table 1 and in tables 5 and 6* t? report
cover consolidated data for the following types
of shipments:
1. Vessel export shipments of Department of
Defense controlled cargo under special
foreign aid programs, i.e., Internation-
al Cooperation Administration, Army Ci-
vilian Supply, etc., made aboard United
States flag vessels such as Army-Navy
transports or commercial vessels char-
tered by the Department of Defense under
time, voyage and space charter arrange-
ments and including "special category"
commodities without distinction.
2. Vessel export shipments of "special cat-
egory" commodities not controlled by the
Department of Defense for which detailed
information cannot be shown separately
because of security reasons. For an ex-
planation and list of "special category"
commodities and their presentation in
foreign trade statistics see the April
1958 issue of Foreign Trade Statistics
Notes.

Only shipping weight data in terms of United
States port or coastal district of lading and
foreign trade area of unlading are shown for
these classes of shipments since information on
the dollar value of exports of Department of De-
fense controlled cargo is not available at this
level of detail. Consequently, the total value
figures shown in columns 12 and 15 of table 1 for
dry cargo and tanker shipments in that order cor-
respond to the shipping weight fli-u shown in
columns 3 and 8, ir-;-e:tively, of the same table.

Vessel import figures, shown in columns 3,
6, 9 and 12 of table 2 and in table 4 of this re-
port, are *-:ir:i1 imports and represent the total
of imports for immediate consumption plus entries
into customs bonded storage and manufacturing
warehouses made at the United States Customs area


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade division
Shipping and Foreign Aid Branch, Milton Kaufman, Chief, Clifton Jordan, Assistant Chief.
For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D. C. Price 104, annual subscription $1.00.


USCOMM-OC











from foreign countries. Vessel import figures
exclude American goods returned by the United
States armed forces for their own use, import
shipments on Army or Navy transports, and ship-
ments covered by informal entries.

The following types of shipments are ex-
cluded from both the vessel export and import
data: (1) Shipments of household and personal
effects, (2) shipments by mail and parcel post,
and (3) shipments of vessels under their own
power and afloat. United States trade with Puerto
Rico and with United States possessions is not
reported as United States exports and imports.

Merchandise shipped in bond through the
United States in transit from one foreign country
to another without having been entered as an im-
port is not included in any of the figures in the
columns previously referred to (imported merchan-
dise cleared through Customs and subsequently
re-exported is included in both the import and
export statistics). Separate information for the
waterborne portion of the in-transit trade in
terms of wehip int' weight and dollar value is
presented in this report in tables 1 and 2.
Columns 5, 10, 14, and 17 of table 1 reflect
in-transit merchandise laden aboard vessels at
United States ports, while columns 4, 7, 10 and
13 of table 2 reflect such merchandise unladen
from vessels. The waterborne outbound and inbound
in-transit statistics include (1) foreign mer-


chandise transferred
in the United States
to a foreign country
Customs custody in
foreign merchandise
United States port,
States under Customs


from one vessel to another
port of arrival and shipjp'ed
without being released from
the United States; and (2)
arriving by vessel at one
shipped through the United
bond, and leaving the United


States by vessel from a port other than that at
which it arrived. In addition, the waterborne
outbound in-transit statistics also include (1)
foreign merchandise withdrawn from a general
order warehouse for immediate export by vessel or
for transportation and export by vessel (such
merchandise was not recorded as an import when it
entered the warehouse), and (2) foreign merchan-
dise sh 5l'r.3 via vessel from a United States
Foreign Trade Zone to a foreign country (such
merchandise is deposited in the Forc 7n Trade
Zone without being entered as an import). Any
inbound or outbound in-transit merchandise moving
by methods of transportation other than vessel is
excluded from the in-transit statistics. Thus,
merchandise arriving at the United States by
vessel and leaving by some other method of trans-
portation is included in the inbound data only.
On the other hand, merchandise arriving by other
than waterborne transportation and laden aboard
vessels upon '- b .~ei r is included in the out-
bound statistics but not in the inbound data.
The inbound and outbound segments, therefore, do
not counter-balance one another and are comple-
mentary only insofar as they involve merchandise
carried by vessels to and from the United States.
For a more detailed discussion of the in-transit
trade statistics and the types of shipments ex-
cluded from these data see the February 1953
issue of the Foreign -.: ~a Statistics Notes.


All types of outbound vessel shipments in
tables 1 and 5 are credited to the coastal dis-
tricts, customs districts, and ports at which the
merchandise was laden. All types of inbound
vessel shipments in table 2 are credited to the
coastal districts, customs districts, and ports
at which merchandise was unladen. In the case of
vessel general imports this is not necessarily
the same as the customs district in which the
goods were entered into warehouse or entered for
immediate consumption.

Vessel exports in tables 3 and 6 are cred-
ited to the foreign trade areas at which the mer-
chandise was unladen. Vessel imports in table 4
are credited to the foreign trade areas at which
the merchandise was laden aboard the vessels car-
rying the cargo to the United States. The coun-
tries of destination or origin of merchandise are
not necessarily located within the trade areas to
which the merchandise is shipped or from which it
is received. Detailed definitions of foreign
trade areas in terms of the countries and ports
included in each are contained in Schedule R,
Code Classification and Definition of Foreign
Trade Areas.

Shipping weight figures represent the gross
weight of shipments, including the weight of con-
tainers, wrappings, crates and moisture content.
Vessel export values represent the values at time
and place of export. They are based on the sell-
ing price (or on the cost if not sold) and
include inland frei Lht, insurance and other
charges to place of export. Transportation and
other costs beyond the United States port of
exportation are excluded. Vessel import values,
as well as the values for in-transit shipments,
are generally based on the market or selling
price and are in general f.o.b. the exporting
country. Since in-transit merchandise is not
subject to the imposition of import duties at the
United States, the valuation reported for such
shipments is not verified by customs to the ex-
tent applicable in the case of import entries and
may in some cases include transportation costs
and insurance to the rUnitedJ States as well as
other cost elements.

Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are
classified as dry cargo or tanker shipments sole-
ly on the basis of the type of vessel used with-
out regard to the cargo carried. Tanker vessels
are those primarily designed for the carriage of
liquid cargoes in bulk, while all others are
classified as dry cargo vessels. A further segre-
gation of dry cargo vessel shipments is provided
in tables 3-6 on the basis of type of service,
i.e., liner (berth) or irregular (tramp). Liner
service is that type of service offered by a
regular line operator of dry cargo vessels on
berth. The itineraries and sailing schedules of
such vessels are predetermined and fixed. Ir-
regular or tramp service is that type of service
afforded by dry cargo vessels which are chartered
or otherwise hired for the carriage of goods on
special voyages. Vessels in this type of service
are not on berth and their sailing schedules are
not predetermined or fixed.








Table 1.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND
"SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPARIMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING
(Totals are given for all customs districts at which there are vessel shipments. Only those ports are shown whose combined export and import tonnage averaged 5 million pounds or more per month during calen-
dar year 1960. Customs district totals are for all ports in the district including those not shown. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded
amounts, Totals shown for previous months include current revisions)


Customs district and port


Cornnec LCuL ...................... .......
Bridgeport ........................... .
New Haven.............................
NEw Lo i.l .............................
New Yor .................................
ow r ...............................
Al ar ly. .. ..... .. ....... .. .........

hl a lnlehi u.........................

P ,ola ~ n ......................

Ji : i n, Del.........................

Irt a:rov i .......................
Cnii trann ..............................
a otn.or !i t. ......... ........... .
o I 1;.................................
No t ~ h A............................







Norti CarolIns .......... ...............
i r i' tonir ................... ..........
oreheatiL Cty1 ...................r.....








Seorgl a ... ....... ......................
Bruls ic ko .............................
Nbrehea i City..........................





Savanna a ................... ............

See footnotes at end of table.


Shipping weight in millions of pounds


Grand
total Tot





l'I,


.5



I .


Dry cargo

Domestic, foreign and
in-transit cargo

al Domestic In-
Total and for- trans-
i 1- I IT


i..





99.3


1.9


1.i)


I.'


..








.65
0i.'
















65.,
10.
i0.
1I,


i, I
1 ..





.1
i.











13.
<1.









S.''






10. (
14. 3
(.
1 ,.


Tanker


Domestic, foreign and
in-transit cargo

Domestic In-
Total and for- trans-
'.' M t





I I


Value in millions of dollars


Dry cargo


I- I.


Dept. of
Defense
and "Spe- Total
cial cat-

1 I '
,I: I ,i I


Domestic
and for-
eign






I.

1.1I


. I




5.o
31.. I




J.i
(<)
()
1.1

1.i
31..












11.


11.3


In-
trans-
it





77nI


Total




i :I


Tanker


Domestic In-
and for- trans-
eign it



SIl (17)


0.6






.3
























1.


I..







i t ..


M .












Table 1.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND
"SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPARIMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING-Continued


Customs distri': an, ii :rt






South Atlantic Coa: '. ---' ..n

Floridal.............
Jacksonville .......
Miami...............
West Palm Beach......
Port Everglades....

Gulf Coast Distr:-

Florida .................
Tampa ...............
Pensacola..............
Bocagrande ..................
Panama City..........
Mobile.................... .
Mobile, Ala ........
Gulfport, Miss.......
Pascagoula, Miss,...
New Orleans............
New Orleans, La.......
Baton Rouge, La.....
Port Sulphur, La....
St. Louis ..............
Sabine.................
Port Arthur, Tex....
Orange, Tex.........
Beaumont, Tex.......
Lake Charles, La....
Galveston .............
Galverton, Tex.......
Houston, Tex........
Frep ort, Tex.......
Corpus Christi, Tex.
Texas City, Tex..... .
Laredo. ................
Brownsville, Tex,...

South Pacific Co .

San Diego..............
Los Angeles.......... ..
Lo: Angeles, Calif..
Port San Luis, Calif
Long Beach, Calif...
El Segundo, Calif.....
Huemene, Calif ..........
Morro, Calif ....... ...
San Francisco ..........
Eureka, Calif........ ..
San Francisco, Calif .
Stockton, Calif.....
Oakland, Calif.......
Richmond, Calif.....
Alameda, Calif.......
Martinez, Calif..... ..
Redwood City, Calif. .. ..
Selby, Calif..........................
See footnotes at end of table.


Shipping weigh








-1,
i [. ".1 : r- -


-: ---. .-



I


t in millions of pounds


. .


Value in millions of dollars


Tajua r






SL.r I .




















S. i .






I

.. .._


.1


I

*: .-L -ll-


ani Csr-



i1 'I


,1

I I -


1-I


Value in millions of dollars


I


:: :i


'


I ~I


: 1


I








North Pacific Coatt I I '

Oregon ..... ...........
u tor .. .......
Neport .............
Coo B aayy...............
Portlanl ...............
L view, Wash.........
Vaco ver. Wash ......
Wa hin ton................
Seattle ...............
Ti coma. ................
Abl r ien-Hoqu un .......
Bellir;ham .............
Everett.............
Port Angeles...........
Port Townsend ..........
Anacorte. .............

Great Lakes IDl;trict

St. LaTence.. ........ .
O de':bur g, tN. Y .......
Ma ena, N. Y.........
Waddrn ton, N. Y.....
Rocheste r. ......... ...
Oswego, N. Y....... ..
Rochester, N. Y.. ....
SoJu.: poit, N, Y......
Buffalo..................
B ,falo, N. Y. .......
Duluth an Superior ......
D luth, Minn...........
Inernat onal Fan lJ-Ran
Superior, Wi. ......
W i .contin ................
ilwaiuke ...............
Marinette. .............
Green tHy..............
Michirgan1 ...............
Detroit. ...............
Port Huron. ...........
Sagi na-Bay City........
Escanaba ..............
Muskegon ............
Calcite .... ......... .
Pre: que Isle........... .
ChcR ag. .................
Ch cago, Ill ...........
East Chlcago, Ini ......

Ohio. ... ... .............
hlo......................
Clevelan ..............

e ...............

AF r Pa ...............
SaioiU.n ................
Coimeaut .. ............




Puerto Rii i Di trc..........


Puert Ri. ..............

Ptiau..... ............
Ponce ..................
San Juan ...............
Hawaii .....................
Honolulu ...............
Alaska ....................
Wrarnell................
Sitl. ..................


'*Denotes less than 50,000less than ess than 50,000 dollars.
FloriJa Atlantic Coast port totals should be aided to Florida Gulf C


oast port totals to obtain total


exports through the Customs District of Florida.


I


Ii


I


.I
.2i
.2?



.


)

*)
I




I.


1


e










6 JANUARY 1961
Table 2.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADING

(Totals are given for all customs districts at which there are vessel shipments. Only those ports are shown whose combined export and import ton-
nage averaged 5 million pounds or more per month during calendar year 1960. Customs district totals are for all ports in the district including
those not shown. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals shown
for previous months include current revisions)

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port Grand General In- General In- General In- General In-
total imports transit Total imports transit Total imports transit Total imports transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)

Total all districts:
Monthly average 1960. 35,128.7 15,952.7 15,850.0 102.7 19,176.0 17,276.2 1,899.8 823.3 804.1 19.2 143.2 124.5 18.7
January 1960......... 30,704.7 13,220.9 13,151.7 69.2 17,483.8 15,531.5 1,952.3 753.6 738.5 15.1 130.4 110.9 19.5
December 1960........ 33,033.2 11,622.8 11,529.6 93.2 21,410.5 19,159.2 2,251.3 725.1 706.0 19.1 167.6 145.7 21.9
January 1961......... 32,724.3 11,265.6 11,180.3 85.3 21,458. 19,359.4 2,099.2 717.9 701.3 16.6 160.9 140.1 20.8


North Atlantic Coast
Districts.............. 22,368.8 6,320.1 6,257.0 63.1 16,048.7 13,949.5 2,099.2 489.1 476.5 12.6 124.2 103.4 20.8

Maine and New Hampshire ...... 2,334.9 .0 5.0 ... 2,279.0 179.8 2,099.2 1.4 1.4 ... 22.0 1.2 20.8
Portland, Maine............ 2,194.4 21. 21. ... 2,172.9 73.7 2,099.2 0.8 0.8 ... 21.5 0.5 20.8
Bangor, Maine .............. ... ...
Eastport, Maine............ 4.0 4.0 4.0 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1
Portsmouth, N. H .......... 2.1 2.1 2.1 ... ... ... ... (") (e)
Belfast, Maine............. 32.3 .9 2.9 ... 29.5 29.'. ... () ( .) ... 0.2 0.2
Searsport, Maine .......... 60.3 2.2 2.2 ... 35.1 35.1 ... 0.3 0.3 ... 0.2 0.2
Massachusetts................. 1,338.6 209.4 20 .4 1.0 1,129.2 1,129.2 ... 32.0 31.8 0.2 7.0 7.0
Boston...................... 1,161.4 201.7 200.7 1.0 959.0 959.6 ... 30.5 30.3 0.2 5.9 .9
Gloucester ............... 5.6 .. 5.6 ... ... ... ... 1.0 1.0
New Bedford ................ 0.3 0.3 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1
Fall River ................. 131.8 1.8 1.8 ... 130.0 130.0 ... 0.3 0.3 ... .8 0.8
Salem..................... 9.6 .. ... ... 39.6 39.6 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3
Rhode Island ................. 337.8 9.2 9.2 ... 328.6 328.6 ... 0.1 0.1 ... 2.1 2.1
Providence.................. 285.9 9.2 9.2 ... 276.7 276.' ... 0.1 0.1 ... 1.7 1.7
Connecticut..................... 513.0 1.' 10.8 ... 502.2 502.2 ... 0.4 0.4 ... 3. 3.7
Bridgeport................. .2 4.2 4.2 ... 71.0 71.0 ... 0.1 0.1 ... 0.4 0.4
New Haven ................. 269.7 4. 4.0 ... 25.7 25.7 ... 0.1 0.1 ... 1.9 1.9
New London ................. 1i.1 j ?. 2.6 ... 155 165. ... 0.1 0.1 ... 1.3 1.3
New York..................... 7,8 6.1 1 1 1,472.1 60. 6,324.1 ,324.0 ... 335.1 323.0 12.1 47.6 47.6
New York................. 7,. 1,52. 1,46. 0.0 ,17. ,17. ... 334.9 322.8 12.1 46.4 46b.4
Albany..................... 9 5.2 .. 85.5 0.3 0.3 0.6
Philadelphia.................. 7.. 1,3 .0 1, 1,.4 ,C0.3 4,041.8 ... 44.2 43.9 0.3 31.9 31.9
Philadelphia, Pa........... 2,397.2 64.7 8.3 1.4 1,52. 1,532.5 ... 37.3 37.0 0.3 12.7 12.7
Wilmington, Del ........... 472.7 .3 ... 409.4 409.4 ... 1.7 1.7 ... 2.4 2.4
Paulsboro, N. J............ 1,0.1 ... 1,033 1,033.8 ... 0.4 0.4 ... 8.1 .1
Camden, N. J.............. 219. 1. 21. ... 98. 19. ... 1.0 1.0 ... 1.2 1.2
Marcus Hook, Pa............ 8 6. .. ... ... 86 .8 8 ... ... ... ... 7.4 7.4
Maryland...................... 2,908.4 2,256. 2,255. 652.0 62.0 ... 46.5 46.4 0.1 4.5 4.5
Baltimore................ 2,813.6 2,25.4 2,255.8 0. 557.1 55.1 ... 46.5 4.4 0.1 3.9 3.9
Virginia ..................... 1, 203.1 1 410.2 .1 2. 72. ... 29.5 2.4 0.1 .3 .3
Norfolk................... 1-4.1 212. 212.3 ( 01.1. ... 24.5 .5 (.) 2.9 2.9
Newport News.............. 59.2 16.2 ( 3) 391.0 01.0 ... 3.6 3.6 () 2.4 2.4
Richmond ................... 14. 14. 14. ... ... ... ... .4 0.4
Alexandria ................ 1 14. ... ... ... ... 0.9 0.9

South Atlantic Coast
Districts.............. 1,38.6 1 514.4 1.2 9 8'.9 ... 31.4 31.3 0.1 .9 5.9

North Carolina................. 141.3 3. ... 87. ... 2.9 2.9 ... 0.5 0.5
Wilmington................ 111i ..4 2. ... 5.7 ... 2.9 2.9 ... 0.3 0.3
Morehead City.............. 30. 1.1 1.1 ... 2.9 28.9 ... (*) () ... .2 .2
South Carolina................ 312.6 .1 9.1 ... 1. 217. 8.4 .4 ... 1.7 1.
Charleston ................ 312.., 91.1 95.1 ... 217. 217. ... .4 8.4 ... 1. 1....
Georgetown................. 0.1 .1 ... ... ... ... (.) (*)
Georgia ....................... 2 .9 1 1 6. ... 1 0 1 1 ... 6.4 6.4 ... 1.1 1.1
Brunswick.................. i 12.3 12.3 ... ... ... ... ( ) ()
Savannah .................. 2., 4 94. ... 1 11. ... 6.4 6.4 ... 1.1 1.1
Florida ...................... 3. 2 258.7 1.2 383.8 3'3.8 ... 13.7 13.6 0.1 2.7 .7
Jacksonville .............. 401.4 21. 2 21. (,) 00.1 200.1 ... 6.8 6.8 (*) 1.3 1.3
Miami..................... 49., 2 22. 22.2 .1 2 27. ... 3.4 3.4 ( 0) 0.2 0.2
West Palm Beach............ 19.2 14. 1.2 3.3 ... 2.2 2.1 0.1 () (
Port Everglades............ 15. C.4 20. (.) 1 ,. 136. ... 1.2 1.2 (.) 1.0 1.

Gulf Coast Districts... 4,080 .' 3, .. ,22. 12. 34. ... 92.0 90.2 1.8 .1 .

Florida ...................... 134... ... 7 ... 2.3 2.3 ... O. .
Tampa, .................... 8.0 2.3 ... ... 2.1 2.11 ... (0.2
Pensacola.................. 11. c. ... 4. .5 ... 0.1 0.1 0.1
Bocagrande ................ ... ... .35. ... ... ... .. 0 .2 0.
Panama City. ............... ... ..
Mobile....................... 9 5.9 803. .0 0.4 112. 112. ... 7.3 7.3 ( )
Mobile, Ala ............... 914.' 1.0 0.4 112. 112. ... 6.0 () 0 0.7 7
Gulfport, Miss............ 1.9 1 1. ... ... ... ... 1. 1.3
Pascagoula, Miss........... ...
New Orleans................... 1,349. 1,18 .1 9. 151. 151. ... 1. 1. 1. 1....
New Orleans, La ............ 30.1 1 59. 86.0 ... 49.0 47.5 1.5 0.6..
Baton Rouge, La............ .3.0 58... .. ... 2. 2.4 ...
Port Sulphur, La........... ... ... ... ..
St. Loui ... [ .. ...
Sabine............... ..... '6. 1 53 o. 3 ..
Port Arthur, Tex .......... 1. ... ... ... .7 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1
Orange, Tex................ ..
Beaumont, Tex............... 9 1. 1.2 ... 8.3 63 ... 0.3 0.3 ... 0.5
Lake Charles, La... ....... .3 0. 0.3 ... ... ... ... ( ) ( )

See footnotet- at end of table.












JANUARY 1961

Table 2.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANT SE, ON DRY CARGO M;i TANKER VETCEIS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADING--Continued


Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in million: of dollar:

ury cargo ianxer ury cargo aiurr
Customs district and port Grand Total General In- Total General In- Total General In- Total ,neral In-
imports transit imports transit imports transit import: transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)() ( (1

Gulf Coast Districts-
Continued

Galveston..................... 1,437.3 1,095. 1, 093. 1.1 ,.2.4 .. ... ..
Galveston, Tex............ 9.7 9 8. 1. ... ... ... 1.0 1.() ()
Houston, Tex........ ..... .. 231.7 231.6 .1 '294.0 '24. ... 20.. 20). () 2.
Freeport, Tex............. 1.0 1.0 ... ... ... ... 0.2
Corpus Christi, Tex..... 0.2 0 () ... ... .
Texas City, Tex........... 2. 2.4 ... 4". ... .. .
Laredo.................... 25.5 24.4 1.1 80. ;XO.3 ... .
Brownsville, Tex........... 25.5 24.4 1.1 0.3 80.3 ... O 0.

South Pacific Coast
Districts............. 2,52.9 30.0 525.9 4.1 2,042.9 2, 2.97 ( 7.9 7.3 I. .1

San Diego .................... 92.1 18.8 18.4 0.4 73.4 74 ... i. 1.,) 0.1 0.
Los Angeles................... 1,453.3 296.3 293.4 2.9 1,156.9 1,1 1.9 ... 40.4 3. 3 1.1 .
Los Angeles, Calif........ .1 Ic5.3 162.6 2.7 6.0 77 ... .0 24.0 1.0 5.
Port San Luis, Calif .....
Long Beach, Calif......... 473. 131.1 130.9 0.2 342.5 342.5 ... 1..4 15. .
El Segundo, Calif ......... 38. ... ... ... 38.4 38..4 ... .. ... ... 0.2
Huemene, Calif ............ .... ... ...
Morro, Calif..............
San Francisco................. 1,027.5 214.9 214.1 0.8 812. '12.' () 4.
Eureka, Calif .............
San Francisco, Calif...... 139.4 139.4 13.6 0.3 ... ... ... 2
Stockton, Calif.......... 10.. 10.4 10.4 ... ... ... ... 1.7 1.7
Oakland, Calif............ 15. 15. 15.1 (,) ... ... ... 1
Richmond, Calif........... 397. 25.0 25.C (*) 72.3 272.3 ... 1.9 1. () 2.2 ...
Alameda, Calif............ 6 6.4 ()... .. .5 0. (
Martinez, Calif........... 31. 4 ... ... ... 1. L.
Redwood City, Calif...... 4. 0 ... ... ... 0.2 0.2
Selby, Calif.............. L,.I 14.1 14.1 ... ... ... ... 0.5 0..

North Pacific Coast
Districts............. 923.4 462.1 458.7 3.4 4.1.4 461.4 ... 1.., 1. .3 .

Oregon......................... 96.3 96.3 (*) ... ... ... .. ()
Astoria .................... 0.4 0.4 ... ... ... ... (
Newport ...................
Coos Bay. ................. i- (.) (.) ... .. ... ( ) (..
Portland .................. 1.0 81.0 (*) ... ... ... (.)
Longview, Wash............ 13.0 13.0 ... ... ... ... 1.. 1.
Vancouver, Wash........... 1. 1.9 1.9 ... .. ... ... O.i 0..
Washington ................... 1 365. 362.4 3.3 41.4 61. ... .
Seattle ........... ....... 6.3 63.1 3.2 ... ... ... .
Tacoma.................... 1 132. 132.8 1.l ... .. ... 3.1 0.
Aberdeen-Hoquiam. ......... ... ... ... ... ... .. .. .
Bellingham ................ 1 .. 103. 103.6 ... ... ... 0.3 0.3
Everett ................... 23.5 23.5 .. ... ... ... 7 7
Port Angeles........ ......... 23.1 .1 ... ... ... ... (*) (
Port Townsend ........... 10.0 10.0 ... .. ... ... (
Anacortes................ 4 .3 6.3 ... 433.3 43.3 ... 1 .1 ...

Great Lakes Districts.. 5. .3 0.7 .5 .1 .

St. Lawrence ................. 4 4 4.2 4 ... ... ... ... ..i
Ogdensburg, N. Y .......... 4. 4.2 4.2 ... .. ... ... .
Massena, N. Y .. ........... .... .. ... .
Waddington, N. Y..........
Rochester .................... 1.4 1.4 1. ... ... ... ... () (* .
Oswego, N. Y..............
Roche ter, N. Y ........... 1.4 1.4 .4 ... ... ... .. ( )
Sodus Point, N. Y......... ... ...
Buffalo...................... 15. 15. 15.3 ... ... ... 1. ... .
Buffalo, N. Y............. 15. 15 15.3 .... ..
Duluth and Superior.......... ( .3 ... ... ..
Duluth, Minn.............. .. 0.3 () 0. ... ... ... (- (
International Falls-
Ranier, Minn ................
Superior, Wis............. ...
Wisconsin .................... 2 1 2.1 .. ... ..i
Milwaukee ................ 0.2 0.? ... ... ... r.l
Marine tte ................. ...
Green Bay ................. 1.9 1. 0 .
Michigan.................... 6.. 29 2, .. 7
Detroit................... 23.
Port Huron ............... ( (() .. ... .. ) ....
Saginaw-Bay City.......... ... ... ... ... .. .
Escana ba..................
Muskegon.................. () ii
Calcite .................. ... (. (.... .. .
Presque Isle........... at e ....
See footnotes at end of table.












8 JANUARY 1961

Table 2.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADING--Continued


Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker

Customs district and port
Customs district and port Grand General In- T General In- General In- General In-
total l imports transit imports transit imports transit T imports transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)

Great Lakes Districts-
Continued


Chicago......................
Chicago, Ill..............
East Chicago, Ind.........
Ohio.........................
Cleveland..................
Toledo....................
Erie, Pa ...............
Sandusky..................
Ashtabula................
Conneaut..................
Fairport .................
Huron. ....................
Lorain....................
Puerto Rico, Hawaii,
and Alaska Districts..
Puerto Rico...................
Guanica ..................
Mayaguez....................
Ponce.....................
San Juan..................
Hawaii.......................
Honolulu..................
Alaska. ......................
Wrangell.................
Sitka .....................


5.2
5.2

9.2.
8.9
0.4









1,311.5
1,014.5
31.3
9.3
34.7

295".0
294.0
0.8

(")


5.2
5.2

9.2
8.9
0.4









130.9
100.3


38.7
56.3
29.7
27.
0.9

H


1,1G0.6
914.1
31.3


239.2
266.
266.5


1,180.6
914.1
31.3


239.2
2606. 5
266.5
2*# .5


*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds; less than 50,000 dollars.
IFlorida Atlantic Coast port totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast port totals
Florida.


0.6
0.6

0.2
0.1
0.1









8.5
6.2

0.5
O.8
4.9
2.3
2.0
(*)

(*)


7.9
6.3
0.2


1.6
1.6
1.6


to obtain total imports through the Customs District of


Table 3.--SHIPPING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF
SERVICE, AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS


(Data in millions of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from
shown for previous months include current revisions)


the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals


Trade area





Total all trade areas:
MorVily avgerage 19(o ...............
Janu ry 1 0 ......................

Su ,r; 1 6:1 ..... .................


Forei; trade areas except Canadian....
Caribbean. ..................................
East Coast South America...................
West Coast South America...................
West Coast Central America and Mexir .......
Gulf Coast Mexico..........................
UniteL Kingdom and Eire.....................
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland..
Bayonne-Hamburg Range.......................
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic...............
Azores, Meiiterranean and Black Sea .........
We Coat Afr'ca....... .................... .
South and East Afric ......................
A:. trail ia......... ...................
Inis, Persian Gul an,'d e- Sea............
Malaya and Indonesia. .....................
Far Ea1 t-Southern Area, including
Taiwar an! Phllippinles....................
Far E'sti-NorTher' res, including Japan .....

Canadiarn trade peas.................


Total all vessels


Total
shipping
weight



(1)


20,377. 4

1 399.






I.I
8%.-

.1
1.

1,151.,


2 .9






15-.1

135 .
4,2 3.


United
States
flag


Total dry cargo


Dry cargo vessels1

Liner


______ ______ + 4


Total


(3)


United
States
flag

(4)


Total


(5)


United
States
flag

(6)


Irregular


United
States
flag

(8)


Tanker vessels


Total


United
States
flag


(9) (10)


4 -t + + 4 -4 t 1 4


3,38.2


2,10. 1.4, "7.
71.2 5..4
2.' 127,4
71.4 207.8
1 55.1
51.5


14.4 2,1.4
58.8 234.2
474.' )j -!0 2

44. l.

1 .

4 i4
12.2


14. i <. 3


2,832.7
?,333.2
2, 732.5
1 62.(0


1, :8.'
71.2
92. 8
21.4
10.3




14 .4
2.4
J88. "


3.4






1. 1


5,470.6

2' .
271.6

45.,
20.0
373.
267.4


4.5
623.4

93.7




158.
%.
142.2

312.


Pacl! ic Canada. ........ .......... ........... 1 28. 2.6 .
GreaT, Lak;e Ca ads ......................... .. 0. .. .. ..
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland............... ..3

*Denotei less than 5o, ) pounds.
1'Cl 1:iication of ',. cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characters
schedule berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Adiinistratior.


l,' 8.0
1, 16.5
1,911.1



1,441.6

u9.0
92.2
'1,-.
10.3
...
10. 7
35.6
12b.3
7.7
219.2
53.4

.9

148.


211.9

1.2

1.2


11,760.6
7,511.8
10,46,.'5
9,199.2


9,127.1
52.8
555.8
52.1

31.
rh* .(
54/4..
1,9 3.1
'S6.7
2,0 ,.8


20.3



7.1
33.3


7.1


.. 3


1,144.8
616.8
821.3
419.;.


417.3
2.3







22.1
20.7
169.4



1.2
192.


(*)


1.9

1.4
..,


2,671.6
2,505.9
2,591.5
1,722.8


1,608.8
110.6
27.4




110.6
121.6
421.1
31.1
183.5
6.0



16.9

5.3
480.0

114.1

110.6
3.5


525.5
349.4
564.1
288.1


251.8






()
93.6

30.4
85.6
6.0

2.6
33.6





36.4

36.2
0.2


tics of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of a
















...,j~p, 7El~jiT 'I',EFlA' 111K 4F7r< F'ZdC.AN C .-Y'Ai{FML"ANU' .'lN3K.. Y I7 -thAj [I ,A
A~jIIU NI~r A Cl ; NRII 'N TE 'Kn .JA 17 'C


Sn ofWIVuZ Tel i-s- SeT5ei Cf~ l2TiB
hbov r~r


el- t- tat~
3.liih fa


Total all trade areas:





,if C aribbean. ... ............... 3,.



a.t Cas Suth A r ................... .... .


West oart er3 Ae"ica an Mexo.
Gulf ot Mexi. ....................... .
W- ;-u-:V fail. ...................... Stli .


FOreigT: trade area: except a aneaOian.... : ,i.






Unitbec Kain a. ...... ........................ I
East Coast Es th ierlca. ..................... .






Baltic, Scadinaria, Iceland azid Greenland..
Bayonine-Hambrg Range......................
Portal a Spanish Atlanti................
Azoresj Meiterranean an Blac: Sea.......... .

West Coast Africa. ........... ...... ........
Saut. an East frica. .....................
St a ia ................. ........ .......
India, Persiar Gulf a Re Sea,.............S. .
Malaya ad Inionesia.....................
Far East-Southem Area, ineludiii
Tai-an and Philipi.es ................. .-
Far East-'or-them Area, including Japan......
Canadian trade areas ................... i.

Pacific Canada ............................... 4L ., o.
Great Lakes Canada .......... ......... .
Atlantic Canada and Ne ouniland............. .

-Denotes less thar 5,:O) pound:.
s Classification of n-: ecar. ues;e as "Liner" or "ir: la
scheduled berth operation, etc.s uslo the classi'ca:ior. crter


Table .--DEPARENP OF D'llE'SE CC5R.LE CARGO XjPOFEI~ 3Y *ET' Z L;D-ER TlE ITEI .-tATi F-
OF DEFESE CONTROL Cj.RGO ET(P lT BY VISSE--COISTAL DISTRICT O7? ILING BY LTE OF el
EIGN FLAG VESSELS


Total all cosa isris:







hA:ar rti e
a :- ..:: ...................
I :e: epr i ~C ..... ............




'.orth Atlaentic ports...................,
h Atat ots...................

ifL oeaL ports ..... .. ...........

North Psacific ports.....................
Great Lake:: ports........................
uerto Rico, Ha'aii a-c. Alaska SOrtr...

IDenctes less than 5L0 pounds.


--ic. iont? I-c:d 35~ ~ ir r- 3 -


Y~i t(
; ;tat(:
Zle~


tt 9
tely


ncS. Tot S reprLse:i:1: tf
Tctals show


- ;r h i n r -


:CIAL I ATE, F fY- : -DEPA T:.-
N tT;I : :A"'C FLAG A r FD}-


.. .


(Ship;g r eign-t in-









Table 6.--DEPARTMENT OF EFE;ISE CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL UNDER UNITED STATES FOREIGN AID PROGRAMS, AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPART-
MENT OF -ETjENE CONTROLLED CARGO E~C'RIED BY VESSEL--TRAfE AREA BY TYPE OF VESSEL SERVICE AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS:


(In thousands of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence


may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts)


Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Trade area Total United United
shipping States United United United Total States
weight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
flag flag flag
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Total all trade areas:
Monthly average 1960.............. ;: ',359 70,732 94,066 70,340 82,455 59,856 11,610 10,483 144,293 392
January 1960...................... 248,4,-' 71,253 88,577 70, -: 74,576 59,412 14,0Ci 11,471 159,905 37C
December 1960 ..................... 158,~- : ,496 97,057 79,774 .'.,739 70,651 10,318 9,123 60,971 722
January 1961...................... 64,527 50,381 62,322 50, 1' 47,106 36,260 15,216 14,122 2,205 (*)



Foreign trade areas except Canadian... 64,522 50,381 62,317 50,381 47,101 36,260 15,216 14,122 2,205 (*)
Caribbean .................................. 4,322 101 4,322 101 3,278 101 1,044 1
East Coast South America ................... 1,107 937 1,107 937 1,107 937 ... ... () (*)
West Coast South America................. 442 151 442 151 442 151 ...
West Coast Central America and Mexico...... 50 50 ... ... ... ..
Gulf Coast Mexico.......................... 12 ... 12 ... 12 .. .......
United Kingdom and Eire.................... 272 92 272 92 272 92 .....
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland. 378 112 378 112 378 112 ...
Bayonne-Hamburg Range...................... 7,332 1,025 5,127 1,025 5,075 1,024 52 1 2,205
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic .............. 3,676 3,605 3,676 3,605 3,676 3,605 ...
Unidentified countries in Western Europe... I''- 106 106 106 105 105 1 1
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea........ 8,104 7,293 8,104 7,293 3,794 2,983 4,310 4,310 ...
West Coast Africa.......................... 699 565 699 565 699 565 .........
South and East Africa....................... 269 154 269 154 269 154 .
Australasia................................ 584 308 534 308 543 266 41 41
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea............ 2,539 1,755 2,539 1,755 2,539 1,755 ...... ...
Malaya and Indonesia....................... 1,073 960 1,073 960 1,073 960 ......
Far East-Southern Area, including
Taiwan and Philippines.................... 9,263 9,181 9,263 9,181 6,496 6,414 2,767 2,767 ...
Far East-Northern Area, including Japan.... 24,293 24,037 24,293 24,037 17,293 17,036 7,000 7,000...
Canadian trade areas ................... 4 () 4 () 4 (*)
Pacific Canada.............................. 1 ( ) 1 ( ) 1 ( ) .....
Great Lakes Canada.........................
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland ........... 4 ... 4 .. 4


*Denotes less than 500 pounds.
IClassification of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristic
a scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.


ics of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of










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Special reports contracted for on a cost basis are listed in current publications so that all users of foreign trade statistics
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The reports listed below are those which have been initiated since the last published list covering statistics related to the
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Subscribers who are interested in information which is not obtainable from the regularly published foreign trade statistics
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SPECIAL MONTHLY REPORTS FOR 1961

FT 1000 United States Waterborne Foreign Trade Foreign Trade Area by United States Coastal District. Price per :year per
su scriLer .' .

FT 1005 United States Waterborne General Imports and Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise by Type of Vessel Service by
Trade Area by Coastal District by Country of Lading/Unlading by Customs District of Unlading/Lading. Price per year per sub-
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FT 1006 United States Waterborne Exports (Including Re-exports) and General Imports of Merchandise on Dry Cargo Vessels
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FT 1010 Preparation of Magnetic Tapes Containing Summary Records on Total U.S. Waterborne Export, F .*: Intransit, General
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FT 1012 -T .r of Magnetic 7 ~ '1 : Summary Records on United States Waterborne Export, Export Intransit, General
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FT 1016 United Statee Waterborne (1) General Imports of Merchandise; (2) Inbound Vessel of In-transit Merchandise;
(3) Exports of Domestic and Foreign Merchandise and; (4) Outbound Vessel Shipments of In-transit Merchandise Moving through
the Ports in the New Orleans Customs District. (Extracts from Machine Tabulation S 0, SM 30 -I, SM 05705 and SM 705-IT).
Price per year pr- sutscrier 02j..

FT 1026 United States Waterborne (1) General Imports of Merchandise; (2) Inbound Vessel Shipments of In-trancit Merchandise;
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

I Iglll Ill Ill II IIIIIill || Ilillll| II Ill| II 11
3 1262 08587 9202
12

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The following monthly tabulations are available on a cost-to-subscriber basis for 1961:

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SM 305-IT SM 705-IT Inbound (Outbound) Vessel Shipments of In-transit Merchandise in Type of Vessel Service by United States
Port of Unlading (Lading) by Foreign Port of Lading (Unlading) by Schedule T (S) Commodity by Country of Origin (Destination)
Arrangement.

SM 705-706 Supplement Department of Defense Controlled Cargo E..-irteri by Vessel Under the United States Foreign Aid Programs
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or

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SM 305-705 series or SM 306-706 series.


REPORTS FOR SPECIFIED PERIODS

United States Waterborne Exports of Selected Machinery Commodities (Schedule S Numbers 700, 710, 720, 730, 740, 745, and 773)
Laden on Vessels at the C'ustoms Districts of San Diego, Los Angeles and San Francisco, California. Calendar Year 1951.
Price per subscriber 3?75.

United States Waterborne Exports and Outbound In-transit Shipments (Combined) and General Imports and Inbound In-transit Ship-
ments (Combined) Moving Between United States Great Lakes Ports and Canadian Great Lakes Ports and Overseas Trade Areas by
Schedule S/T Commodity. Includes Supplemental Tabulations Prepared from Canadian Great Lakes Trade Area Jovirg Totals for
Individual Schedule S/T Commodities with Non-Canadian Countries of Destirn-tir, Orr,.ir,. Calendar Year 1960. Cost per sub-
scriber '700.

United States Waterborne General Imports and Exports of Domestic and t. r'. ~-r' Merchandise Laden/Unladen on Dry Cargo Vessels
at Mediterranean Ports and Unladen/Laden at U.S. Atlantic Coast Ports. Shipping Weight Totals on all Vessels and U.S. Flag
Vessels on Port-to-Port Basis Only. January-December 1959. Price per subscriber JOO.

United States Imports of Merchandise for Consumption and General Imports of Merchandise into the Customs Districts of San
Francisco, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and Hawaii; Customs District of entry by Commodity by Country of Origin. Calendar
Year 1960. P, ice per subscriter contingent upon the number of subscribers.

United States imports of Merchandise for Consumption and General Imports of Merchandise into the Customs Districts of San
Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Oregon, and Washington; Customs District of entry by Commodity by Country of Origin.
Calendar Year 1960. -7'-ct per sibscrier contigent upon the number of subscribers.

United States Exports of Iron and Steel Scrap (Schedule B Commodity Numbers 60030, 60040, 60050, 60060, 60065, 60075 and 60085)
of Domestic and Foreign Origin, through the Customs Port of Tampa, Florida, by Commodity. January-October 1960 (Cumulative
data). price per su'scrier O0.

Ui;ltet States Imports of ercehaVdise for Consumption into the Customs Districts of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia,
Florida, Mobile, New Orleans, Sabine, Galveston, and Laredo from Canada, Sweden, Denmark, United Kingdom, Netherlands, Belgium
and Luxembourg, France, West Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, and Japan; Customs District of Entry by Country of
Origin by Unit Control. Calendar Year 1960. Price per subscriber ,820. (This price covers ten copies.)

The following annual tabulations are available on a cost-to-subscriber basis for calendar year 1960 data:

SA 305 SA 705 United States Waterborne Imports ( 7 : .) of Merchandise in Type of Vessel Service by United States Port of
Urlading (Lading) by --i.- "- Port of Lading (Unlading) by Schedule T (S) Commodity by Country of Origin (Destination)
Arrangement.

SA 305 IT SA 705 IT Inbound (Outbound) Vessel Shipments of In-transit Merchandise in Type of Vessel Service by United States
Port of d ; (Lading) by Foreign Port of Lading (Unlading) by Schedule T (S) Commodity by Country of Origin (Destination)
Arrangement.

SA 705-706 Supplement Department of Defense Controlled Cargo L I r -- by Vessel under the United States Foreign Aid Programs
and 1 : Non-Department of Defense Controlled Cargo Exported by Vessel in Type of Vessel Service by United
States Port of Lading by Country/Area of Unlading Arrangement. Price per subscriber for complete series $325.




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