United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Water-borne foreign trade statistics
Alternate title:
Waterborne foreign trade statistics
United States water-borne foreign trade
United States waterborne foreign trade
Some issues have title:
United States foreign trade
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, including annual cumulation
monthly
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in June 1965.
General Note:
"Summary report FT 985."
General Note:
Description based on: Calendar year 1952; title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: June 1965.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 13695873
lccn - sf 86092445
ocm13695873
Classification:
lcc - WMLC L 83/3610
System ID:
AA00010658:00051

Related Items

Succeeded by:
U.S. waterborne foreign trade


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Full Text

& 3. /63- -3

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE







UNITED STATES FOREIGN


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Robert W. BLrges:., directorr


SUFTf Y hE:7':
FT -14!


WATERBORNE FOREIGN TRADE S


COVER AGE


This repL.rt presents statistics on ...ta
United States watertorne inbound and oult. u'nd
shipments made in foreign trade, with the exce;'-
tion of such elements as are specified below.

From July 1953 through December 1955 and
atartinr with July 19"o, the statistics on water-
borne exports of Jame6tic and foreign merchaNd!sr-
and non-Department of Defense shipments of "3;e-
cial ca.eg.ry" commL.dities exclude shipment_; in-
dividually valued at less than $500. For the
months January through June 195b, these statis-
tics exclude export shipments individually valued
at less than $1,000. Information on the exclu-
sion of the low-valued export shipments in the
vessel statistics is contained in the Novemier
1953 and February 1956 issues of the Foreignr
Trade Statistics Notes. Frm January 1954 t-hrou.h
December 1957 vessel import figures exclude ship-
ents having a shipping weight of less than 2,U0tC
pounds, regardless of value, as well as shipments
valued at less than $100, regardless of shipping
eight. Starting with January 1958 statistics
the import data exclude only those shipments
where the value is less than $100 regardless of
shipping weight. Inflrmatin on the exclusion 3f
the low-value and low-weight irmport shipments in
the vessel statlstlc. is contained in the Febru-
ary and March 954 and January-March 1958 issues
of the Fcreign Trade -tatlstics NoLes.

Vessel export figures in this report, shown
in columns 4, 9, 13, aid 16 of table 1 and in
table 3, represent exports of domestic and for-
eign merchandise laden at the United States Cus-
om area for shipment to foreign countries and
include export shipments to United States civil-
ian Goverrment agencies ad non-Department of De-
fense controlled foreign aid program shipments as
described below. Excluded from these figures are
shipments to the United States armed forces
abroad of supplies and equipment for their ow
ue as well as the other types of shipments de-
scribed below for which information is ohona in
separate column in table 1.


departmentt of Lefer.nze controlled a '-
clal category" figures, shcwn in .-~L an
:f table 1 and in tables 5 and 6 of this r-; r-
cover consolidated data for the f 12-'r., 'y: f
of shipments:
1. Vessel erpcrt shImen'., :e;r'-r:. of
Defense contr.ll!e rar-.- under .;-e'2
foreign bid pro-grami, i.e., Internation-
al Cooperation Admin':f'ra! ri, Ar '-
vilian Supply, etc., made aboard nite
States flag vessels such as Ar~y-',avy
transports or comrc !ra] vessels char-
tered by the Department of 'efer.e under
time, voyage and space charter Frri',-'e-
ments and including "special after .ry "
conmodities without distinction.
2. Vessel export shipments of "srper al cat-
egory" commodities not contrt 11ed by the
Department of defense for which detailed
information cannot be shown re;a rzteily
because of security reasons. Fur an ex-
planation and list of speciall *-ate ry"
commodities and their preser.t'e.!'-r. in
foreign trade statistics see the April
1958 issue of Foreign Trade .'sti..tles
Notes.

Only shipping weight data in terms of 'r.itd
States port or coastal district of .a:;- a
foreign trade area of unlading are shw :
these classes of shipments since inf rmatt n on
the dollar value of exports of rlT.artment of '--
fense controlled cargo is not avalItl: e at this
level of detail. Consequently, the total value
figures shown in coluis 1." and 15 of tah .r f r
dry cargo and tanker shipment in that order cor-
respond to the shipping weight figures rhwn in
columns 3 and 8, respectively, of the sa i '.t ..

Vessel impocrt figures, shon in -.'. .Um.. 3,
6, 9 and 12 of table 2 and n table 4 -f this re-
port, are general Linort: and reT recent the t ti'
of imports for immediate c..rumzpti. n I ... entries
into custoaa bonded, storage and mn'jufa.' ta-.1r'
warehouses made at the United .taten "';t..m aiea


Prepred In the Bureau of the CeIus, Foreign Trade Oivision
hipping and Formig Aid Branch. Mlton Kaufman. Chief, Clifton Jordan, Rsistant Chie,
PtW a ho te woam of the Comis, ltma|te a. C. Price let. aneal -mbecritlo SLOB1.


.. _...~'


N1\ 1(.11 1959








from, foreign countries. Vessel import figures
exclude American goods returned by the United
States armed force or their own use, import
shipments on ArEmy E'v 'transports, and ship-
ments covered by informal entries.

The following types of shipments are ex-
cluded from both the vessel export and import
data: (1) Shipments of household" and personal
effects, (2) shipments by mail and' parcel post,
and (3) shipments of vessels under their own
power and afloat. United States trade with Puerto
Rico and with United States possessions is not
reported as United States exports and imports.

Merchandise shipped in bond through the
United States in transit from one foreign country
to another without having been entered as an im-
port is not included in any of the figures in the
columns previously referred to (imported merchan-
dise cleared through Customs and subsequently
re-exported is included in both the import and
export statistics). Separate information for the
waterborne portion of the in-transit trade in
terms of shipping weight and dollar value is
presented in this report in tables 1 and 2.
Columns 5, 10, 14, and 17 of table 1 reflect
in-transit merchandise laden aboard vessels at
United States ports, while columns 4, 7, 10, and
13 of table 2 reflect such merchandise unladen
from vessels. The waterborne outbound and inbound
in-transit statistics include (1) foreign mer-
chandise transferred from one vessel to another
in the United States port of arrival and shipped
to a foreign country without being released from
Customs custody in the United States; and (2)
foreign merchandise arriving by vessel at one
United States port, shipped through the United
States under Customs bond, and leaving the United
States by vessel from a port other than that at
which it arrived. In addition, the waterborne
outbound in-transit statistics also include (1)
foreign merchandise withdrawn from a general
order warehouse for immediate export by vessel or
for transportation and export by vessel (such
merchandise was not recorded as an import when it
entered the warehouse), and (2) foreign merchan-
dise shipped via vessel from a United States
Foreign Trade Zone to a foreign country (such
merchandise is deposited in the Foreign Trade
Zone without being entered as an import). Any
inbound or outbound in-transit merchandise moving
by methods of transportation other than vessel is
excluded from the in-transit statistics. Thus,
merchandise arriving at the United States by
vessel and leaving by some other method of trans-
portation is included in the inbound data only.
On the other hand, merchandise arriving by other
than waterborne transportation and laden aboard
vessels upon departure is included in the out-
bound statistics but not in the inbound data.
The inbound and outbound segments, therefore, do
not counter-balance one another and are comple-
mentary only insofar as they involve merchandise
carried by vessels to and from the United States.
For a more detailed discussion of the in-transit
trade statistics and the types of shipments ex-
cluded from these data see the February 1953
issue of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.


All types of outbound vessel shipments in
tables 1 and 5 are credited to the coastal dis-
tricts, customs districts, and ports at which the
merchandise was laden. All types of inbound
vessel shipments in table 2 are credited to the
coastal districts, customs districts, and ports
at which merchandise was unladen. In the case of
vessel general imports this is not necessarily
the same as the customs district in which the
goods were entered into warehouse or entered for
immediate consumption.

Vessel exports in tables 3 and 6 are cred-
ited to the foreign trade areas at which the mer-
chandise was unladen. Vessel imports in table 4
are credited to the foreign trade areas at-which
the merchandise was laden aboard the vessels car-
rying the cargo to the United States. The coun-
tries of destination or origin of merchandise are
not necessarily located within the trade areas to
which the merchandise is shipped or from which it
is received. Detailed definitions of foreign
trade areas in terms of the countries and ports
included in each are contained in Schedule R,
Code Classification and Definition of Foreign
Trade Areas.

Shipping weight figures represent the gross
weight of shipments, including the weight of con-
tainers, wrappings, crates and moisture content.
Vessel export values represent the values at time
and place of export. They are based on the sell-
ing price ( or on the cost if not sold) and
include inland freight, insurance and other
charges to place of export. Transportation and
other costs beyond the United States port of
exportation are excluded. Vessel import values,
as well as the values for in-transit shipments,
are generally based on the market or selling
price and are in general f.o.b. the exporting
country. Since in-transit merchandise is not
subject to the imposition of import duties at the
United States, the valuation reported for such
shipments is not verified by customs to the ex-
tent applicable in the case of import entries and
may in some cases include transportation costs
and insurance to the United States as well as
other cost elements.

Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are
classified as dry cargo or tanker shipments sole-
ly on the basis of the type of vessel used with-
out regard to the cargo carried. Tanker vessels
are those primarily designed for the carriage of
liquid cargoes in bulk, while all others are
classified as dry cargo vessels. A further segre-
gation of dry cargo vessel shipments is provided
in tables 3-6 on the basis of type of service,
i.e., liner (berth) or irregular (tramp). Liner
service is that type of service offered by a
regular line operator of dry cargo vessels on
berth. The itineraries and sailing schedules of
such vessels are predetermined and fixed. Ir-
regular or tramp service is that type of service
afforded by dry cargo vessels which are chartered
or otherwise hired for the carriage of goods on
special voyages. Vessels in this type of service
are not on berth and their sailing schedules are
not predetermined or fixed.












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Table 1.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND J,
"SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING-Continued


Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars
Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker

Domestic, foreign and Domestic, foreign and Do-
in-transit cargo Dept. of in-transit cargo Dept. of Do- Do-
Customs district and port Grand Defense Defense ms- In- s- In-
total Total Domes- In- and Total Domes- In- and Total trans- Total trns-
Total tic and trans- "Special Total tic and trans- "Special adfo ait
foreign it category" foreign it category" eign ein-
eign eign
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)

South Atlantic Coast Districts-Con.

Florida1 .................................. 82.7 81.4 80.9 79.5 1.4 0.5 1.3 1.3 1.3 ... ... 12.4 12.1 0.3 0.1 0.1
Jacksonville........................... 22.0 20.7 20.7 20.6 0.1 (*) 1.3 1.3 1.3 ... ... 1.6 1.6 (*) 0.1 0.1
Miami .................................. 14.9 14.9 14.5 13.1 1.4 0.4 ... ... ... ... ... 5.0 4.7 0.3
West Palm Beach........................ 42.8 42.8 42.7 42.7 (*) 0.1 ... ... ... ... ... 5.4 5.4 ()...
Port Everglades........................ 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 ......

Gulf Coast Districts................ 5,101.4 4,287.6 4,237.8 4,185.5 52.3 49.8 813.8 689.8 689.8 ... 124.0 212.0 202.6 9. 18.9 18.9.
Florida .................................. 668.9 668.8 668.8 668.7 0.1 (*) ... ... ... ... ... 8.0 8.0 (*)
Tampa................................. 612.6 612.6 612.6 612.5 0.1 ... ... ... ... ... ... 5.5 5.5 ()...
Pensacola.............................. 42.9 42.9 42.9 42.9 ... () ... ... ... ... ... 1.6 1.6...
Bocagrande...............................
Panama City ............................ 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.7 0.7 .
Mobile ................................... 242.6 242.6 242.0 242.0 ... 0.6 ... ... ... ... ... 9.1 9.1 ......
Mobile, Ala............................. 242.2 242.3 241.9 241.9 ... 0.4 ... ... ... ... ... 9.0 90 ......
Gulfport, Miss.......................... 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 ... 0.2 ... ... ... ... ... ( ) (...
Pascagoula, Miss ....................... ... ... 0. .
New Orleans.............................. 1,483.2 1,233.7 1,216.8 1,209.6 7.2 16.9 249.5 248.3 248.3 ... 1.2 71.0 69.9 1.1 7.5 7.5
New Orleans, La........................ 970.6 879.7 865.7 858.5 7.2 14.0 90.9 90.9 90.9 ... ... 60.0 58.9 1.1 2.8 2.8
Baton Rouge, La........................ 456.6 316.0 313.0 313.0 ... 3.0 140.6 139.4 139.4 ... 1.2 9.7 9.7 ... 3.6 3.6.
Port Sulphur, La....................... 20.4 20.4 20.4 20.4 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.2 ...
St. Louis................................
Sabine................................... 384.7 275.6 270.7 270.7 ... 4.9 109.1 70.5 70.5 ... 38.6 15.7 15.7 ... 1.6 1.6
Port Arthur, Tex....................... 149.2 113.3 112.4 112.4 ... 0.9 35.9 35.9 35.9 ... ... 3.2 3.2 ... 1.0 1.0.
Sabine, Tex............................ ...
Beaumont, Tex............... 130.7 68.1 64.1 64.1 ... 4.0 62.7 21 4.1 ... 38.6 5.8 5.8 ... 0.3 0.3
Lake Charles, La....................... 104.8 94.3 94.3 94.3 ... ... 10.5 10.5 10.5 ... ... 6.7 6.7 ... 0.3 0.3
Galveston................................. 2,269.9 1,814.7 1,787.4 1,784.0 3.4 27.3 455.2 371.0 371.0 ... 84.2 99.0 98.4 0.6 9.8 9.8
Galveston, Tex......................... 706.3 706.3 706.3 706.1 0.2 ... ... ... ... ... ... 32.7 32.7 ()
Houston, Tex........................... 1,197.9 846.2 818.9 815.8 3.1 27.3 351.7 293.3 293.3 ... 58.4 59.5 59.0 0.5 7.4 7.4
Freeport, Tex.......................... 26.1 0.3 0.3 0.3 ... ... 25.8 ... ... ... 25.8 () (.)
Corpus Christi, Tex.................... 261.0 261.0 261.0 260.9 0.1 ... ... ... ... ... ... 6.7 6.7 ()-
Texas City, Tex......................... 78.6 0.9 0.9 0.9 .. ... 77.7 77.7 77.7 ... ... () () ... 2.5 2.5
Laredo.................................... 52.0 52.0 52.0 10.4 41.6 () ... ... ... ... ... 9.2 1.5 7.7
Brownsville, Tex....................... 52.0 52.0 52.0 10.4 41.6 (*) ... ... ... ... ... 9.2 1.5 7.7

South Pacific Coast Districts....... 1,835.9 832.2 820.0 803.6 16.4 12.2 1,003.7 1,003.7 1,003.7 ... ... 61.5 56.4 5.1 7.5 7.5.
San Diego................................. 11.7 11.6 11.6 2.7 8.9 (-) ... ... ... ... ... 2.8 0.4 2.4
Los Angeles............................... 1,079.9 344.5 341.6 335.6 6.0 2.9 735.4 735.4 735.4 ... ... 23.9 21.5 2.4 5.4 5.4
Los Angeles, Calif..................... 593.0 174.0 173.5 170.1 3.4 0.5 418.9 418.9 418.9 ... ... 15.1 13.6 1.5 3.1 3.1
Port San Luis, Calif .................. 20.2 ... ... ... ... ... 20.2 20.2 20.2 ... ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1
Long Beach, Calif...................... 420.0 166.4 164.0 161.4 2.6 2.4 253.7 253.7 253.7 ... ... 8.7 7.8 0.9 2.0 2.0.
El Segundo, Calif ...................... 42.6 .. ... ... 42.6 42.6 42.6 ... ... ... ... ... 02 0.2
San Francisco............................. 744.3 476.1 466.8 465.3 1.5 9.3 268.3 268.3 268.3 ... ... 34.9 3.5 0.4 2.1 2.1
Eureka, Calif.......................... 8.3 8.3 8.3 8.3 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.2 ...
San Francisco, Calif................... 69.4 69.3 67.4 66.0 1.4 1.9 ... ... ... ... 18.2 17.8 0.4
Stockton, Calif........................ 247.7 247.7 247.7 247.7 ... ... ... 5.7 5.7 .
Oakland, Calif........................ 51.6 46.3 39.4 39.4 (;) 6.9 5.3 5.3 5.3 ... ... 6.2 6.2 (*) 0.1 0.1
Richmond, Calif........................ 187.3 40.7 40.7 40.7 ... ... 146.5 146.5 146.5 ... ... 1.9 1.9 ... 0.8 0.8
Crockett, Calif...................... ...
Alameda, Calif......................... 13.2 13.1 13.1 13.1 (1) (*) ... ... ... ... ... 2.4 2.4 (*) ... ...
Martinez, Calif........................ 48.2 ... ... ... ... ... 48.2 48.2 48.2 ... ... ... ... ... 0.6 0.6 ...
Redwood City, Calif ................... 38.8 3i:i 3ii 3i.. 0.1 ...i
Redwoodlby, Ci ali.... .................... 38.8 38.8 38.8 38.8 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1 ... ... ... ...

See footnotes at end of table.











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MARCH 1959


Table 2.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLOADING

(Totals are given for all customs districts at which there are vessel shipments. Only those ports are shown whose combined export and Import ton-
nage averaged 5 million pounds or more per month during calendar year 1958. Customs district totals are for all ports in the district including
those not shown. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals shown
for previous months include current revisions)


Customs district and port


Total all districts:
Monthly average 1958...
March 1958............
February 1959...........
March 1959............

North Atlantic Coast
Districts.............
Maine and New Hampshire......
Portland, Me.............
Bangor, Me...............
Portsmouth, N. H..........
Belfast, Me..............
Searsport, Me............
Massachusetts................
Boston....................
Gloucester ...............
New Bedford...............
Fall River ...............
Salem.....................
Rhode Island.................
Providence................
Connecticut..................
Bridgeport................
New Haven ................
New London ...............
New York.....................
New York .................
Albany....................
Philadelphia.................
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Wilmington, Del...........
Paulsboro, N. J...........
Camden, N. J .............
Marcus Hook, Pa...........
Maryland.....................
Baltimore.................
Virginia.....................
Norfolk...................
Newport News..............
Richmond..................
Alexandria................

South Atlantic Coast
Districts..............
North Carolina ..............
Wilmington................
Morehead City..;..........
South Carolina...............
Charleston...............
Georgetown................
Georgia.....................
Brunswick.................
Savannah.................
Florida ....................
Jacksonville..............
Miami.....................
West Palm Beach..........
Port Everglades...........

Gulf Coast Districts...
Floridal.....................
Tampa.................. ..
Pensacola.................
Bocagrande................
Panama City...............
Mobile.......................
Mobile, Ala...............
Gulfport, Miss............
Pascagoula, Miss..........
New Orleans..................
New Orleans, La...........
Baton Rouge, La...........
Port Sulphur, La..........
St. Louis....................
Sabine.......................
Port Arthur, Tex..........
Sabine, Tex................
Beaumont, Tex..............
Lake Charles, La..........


Shipping weight in millions of pounds


Value in millions of dollars


*1. r I


Grand
total

(1)


31,411.1
27,123.6
33,582.8
37,369.9


25,929.1
2,922.0
2,655.5
18.1
91.5
50.5
70.1
1,574.1
1,447.4
2.8
1.6
47.8
74.6
451.6
404.4
637.7
32.5
465.0
140.3
9,342.0
9,094.8
77.9
6,789.0
2,805.2
688.8
1,153.6
305.8
1,145.9
2,872.7
2,821.4
1,340.0
581.7
715.1
17.9
16.2


1,784.7
169.0
133.3
35.7
405.4
404.7
0.7
307.6

307.6
902.7
430.9
76.1
95.2
267.9

5,535.1
418.6
299.5
2.3
69.9
43.2
1,323.2
1,299.3
23.9

2,079.0
920.2
917.8
0.2

92.8


45.6
47.2


See footnotes at end of table.


Dry cargo


Tanker


Dry cargo


Tanker


Total General In- l General In- T l General In- Total General In-
imports transit l imports transit imports transit imports transit
(2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)


13,425.6
10,471.6
10,978.0
12,996.2


7,088.8
33.7
29.6


2.6
0.7
358.8
343.9
2.8
1.6
10.4

19.0
19.0
65.9
24.8
39.9
1.1
2,062.5
2,053.0
9.5
1,724.2
942.0
74.5
1.9
16.2

2,311.8
2,311.8
512.8
230.9
247.8
17.9
16.2


497.9
49.0
41.8
7.1
92.4
91.7
0.7
113.9

113.9
242.6
129.1
26.8
47.7
39.2

3,984.1
163.3
147.8
2.3

9.5
1,321.5
1,297.6
23.9

1,637.5
709.1
891.7
0.2

18.9


7.6
11.3


13,318.9
10,376.3
10,882.3
12,803.1


6,918.4
28.2
24.1


2.6
0.7
354.1
339.4
2.6
1.6
10.4

19.0
19.0
65.9
24.8
39.9
1.1
1,938.4
1,928.9
9.5
1,722.0
939.8
74.5
1.9
16.2

2,278.1
2,278.1
512.8
230.9
247.8
17.9
16.2


497.4
49.0
41.8
7.1
92.4
91.7
0.7
113.9

113.9
242.1
129.1
26.7
47.2
39.2

3,971.3
163.2
147.7
2.3

9.5
1,320.2
1,296.3
23.9

1,627.3
698.9
891.7
0.2

18.9


7.6
11.3


106.7
95.3
95.7
193.1


170.4
5.5
5.5




4.7
4.5
0.2









124.1
124.1

2.2
2.2




33.7
33.7
(*)
(*)





0.5
(.)
(*)







0.5

0.1
0.5


12.8
0.1
0.1



1.3
1.3


10.2
10.2


17,985.6
16,652.0
22,604.8
24,373.7


18,840.3
2,888.3
2,625.8
18.1
91.5
47.9
69.4
1,215.4
1,103.5


37.3
74.6
432.6
385.4
571.9
7.7
425.1
139.1
7,279.4
7,041.8
68.3
5,064.7
1,863.2
614.3
1,151.6
289.6
1,145.9
560.9
509.6
827.1
350.7
467.3


15,948.5
15,037.8
20,466.2
21,855.6


16,322.2
370.2
107.7
18.1
91.5
47.9
69.4
1,215.4
1,103.5


37.3
74.6
432.6
385.4
571.9
7.7
425.1
139.1
7,279.4
7,041.8
68.3
5,064.7
1,863.2
614.3
1,151.6
289.6
1,145.9
560.9
509.6
827.1
350.7
467.3


1,286.7 1,286.7
120.0 120.0
91.4 91.4
28.6 28.6
313.0 313.0
313.0 313.0

193.6 193.6

193.61 193.6
660.0 660.0
301.8 301.8
49.3 49.3
47.5 47.5
228.7 228.7

1,551.1 1,551.1
255.4 255.4
151.81 151.8

69.9 69.9
33.7 33.7
1.7 1.7
1.7 1.7


441.5 441.5
211.1 211.1
26.2 26.2


73.8 73.8


38.0 38.0
36.0 36.0


2,037.1
1,614.2
2,138.6
2,518.1


2,518.1
2,518.1
2,518.1



















(e)
(*)


693.7
635.5
710.5
849.8


558.6
1.1
0.8


0.1
(*)
45.4
43.7
0.4
0.5
0.7

0.5
0.5
0.5
0.3
0.1
0.1
386.7
386.3
0.5
49.5
43.8
2.3
0.3
0.9

46.5
46.5
28.4
20.4
6.1
0.8
1.0


42.4
2.7
2.5
0.2
14.8
14.8
(*)
5.5

5.5
19.4
9.7
4.3
3.0
2.3

123.5
5.1
4.1
0.6

0.1
10.6
9.9
0.6

66.6
61.1
3.3
0.1

0.8


0.6
0.2


673.6
616.5
687.8
825.0


538.8
1.1
0.8


0.1
(*)
44.0
42.3
0.4
0.5
0.7

0.5
0.5
0.5
0.3
0.1
0.1
369.0
368.6
0.5
49.3
43.6
2.3
0.3
0.9

46.0
46.0
28.4
20.4
6.1
0.8
1.0


42.2
2.7
2.5
0.2
14.8
14.8
(*)
5.5

5.5
19.2
9.7
4.2
2.9
2.3

121.4
5.1
4.1
0.6

0.1
10.5
9.9
0.6

65.3
59.8
3.3
0.1

0.8


0.6
0.2


148.9
133.9
180.9
189.0


148.2
27.5
25.7
0.'1
0.6
0.6
0.4
8.3
7.6


0.2
0.4
2.7
2.4
4.3
(a)
3.3
0.9
53.5
51.9
0.5
42.4
15.4
3.6
11.3
2.0
10.0
3.6
3.2
6.0
2.7
3.3




8.7
0.7
0.5
0.2
1.8
1.8

1.5

1.5
4.7
2.2
0.41
0.3
1.5

11.3
1.5
0.9
...2
0.5
0.2
0.1
0.1


3.5
1.7
0.2


0.6


0.4
0.2


128.7
117.9
159.7
164.0


123.2
2.5
0.7
0.1
0.6
0.6
0.4
8.3
7.6


0.2
0.4
2.7
2:4
4.3
(a)
3.3
0.9
53.5
51.9
0.5
42.4
15.4
3.6
11.3
2.0
10.0
3.6
3.2
6.0
2.7
3.3






KAX7 's~

T~bo~ ,~;YI AtE: .A r~ ;I i


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BiL~trlett.............
S.......... ...... .





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Co If... .....
C, a C l i .....'a .
H inetfo.................
? **. .. a.... .





k1 a.l, ft .C ..

n Callf.........
R wii~,, :S&.............
Citll!'...........


Al .^ eOt.......
M ir;ll:f...........
: t i. .........."
;lt,, Calif.......~
car, Giir..............


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Irif.~.................

us r l............

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~~. .. .. ... ....
a i, .................
Ttco-...............~...
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Arge.ne ,,. .. .



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e9. .........

It. 4.... ....


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~utb~ ~prlIit. 1.. ......
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piluth, iona... ...........


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Ct.y. ... ..
.~ .......... ..
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u Ir1#...... ...... ..


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8.9



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e...


,,9

83.98 87-

8.1 8.1



4*,7 '4


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18.0
479,6
772."
7( .9


3,4?


A: 7.


i7. 2 .~,
2.;"


]1 01 Mk :i K.


Af XBt.1,J.i


1.; ?<




1.' i;:

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32~."



18L,3


1X1.**,








32.,7



It*.3


37-5


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21.1/
:1.3


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*** 'f t"a v 4 1 bl .







Table 2.-SHIPPING WEIGHT AND


MARCH 1959

VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADING-Continued


Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port Grand
total Total General In- General In- Total General In- TotaGe Cnral In-
imports transit Total imports transit imports transit imports transit
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)

Great Lakes
Districts-Continued

Chicago...................... (*) (") (*) (*) ... ... ... ( ) (.) ( ) ...
Chicago, Ill.............. (*) (*) (.) (*) ... ... ... ) (a) (*.
East Chicago, Ind......... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Gary, Ind.................... ...... ... ... ...... .. .
Ohio......................... 17.1 5.3 5.3 ... 11.8 11.8 ... (6) (*) ... 0.1 0.1
Cleveland................. 11.8 (*) (*) ... 11.8 11.8 ... (*) (*) ... 0.1 0.1 ...
Toledo .................... ... ... ... ...... ... ... ... ... ... ... .
Erie, Pa .................... ...... ...

Ashtabula ................. ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Conneaut................... .. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Airport .................. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Huron. ................... ... ...... ...... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Lorain .................... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...


Puerto Rico, Hawaii and
Alaska Districts...... 838.3 97.7 97.6 0.1 740.6 740.6 ... 7.6 7.6 (*) 5.0 5.0

Puerto Rico.................. 814.9 74.4 74.3 0.1 740.6 740.6 ... 5.1 5.1 (*) 5.0 5.0 ...
Guanica................... 3.3 ... ... ... 3.3 3.3 ... ... ... ... ( ) ( )
Mayaguez.................. 15.9 4.3 4.3 ... 11.6 11.6 ... 0.2 0.2 ... 0.1 0.1 ...
Ponce..................... 3.1 3.1 3.1 ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.2
San Juan .................. 254.5 67.1 67.0 0.1 187.4 187.4 ... 4.7 4.7 (*) 1.2 1.2
Hawaii....................... 22.2 22.2 22.2 (a) ... ... ... 2.5 2.5 () ... ... ...
Honolulu.................. 22.2 22.2 22.2 (*) ... ... ... 2.5 2.5 () ... ...
Alaska....................... 1.1 1.1 1.1 ... ... ... ... (*) ( ) ...


*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds; less than 50,000 dollars.
Florida Atlantic Coast port totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast
Florida.


port totals to obtain total imports through the Customs District of


Table 3.-SHIPPING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE ON FRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF
SERVICE, AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS

(Data in millions of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unfounded figures, hence may vary a.lightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals
shown for previous months include current revisions)

Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Total United United
Trade area shipping Stted United United United Total States
weight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
weit fg flag flag flag

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)


Total all trade areas:
Monthly average 1958.............
March 1958........................
February 1959.....................
March 1959........................


Foreign trade areas except Canadian..

Caribbean..................................
East Coast South America..................
West Coast South America...................
West Coast Central America and Mexico......
Gulf Coast Mexico..........................

United Kingdom and Eire....................
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland.
Bayonne-Hamburg Range......................
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic.............
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea........

West Coast Africa ..........................
South and East Africa......................
Australasia................................
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea.............
Malaya and Indonesia......................
South China, Formosa and Philippines.......
North China including Shanghai and Japan...

Canadian trade areas................

Pacific Canada.............................
Great Lakes Canada.........................
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland............


19,104.0
16,324.3
13,773.5
15,730.8


15,558.3

795.0
530.0
281.1
118.7
42.0

896.6
517.1
4,236.3
242.5
2,556.9

119.8
112.6
91.7
1,392.2
61.3
296.6
3,268.1

172.4

92.6
37.4
42.4


3,113.1
2,445.3
2,184.1
2,306.1


2,234.8

147.2
55.1
69.4
15.5
0.1

122.6
15.7
133.1
45.0
554.4

27.7
45.3
13.7
629.4
11.9
167.1
181.8

71.1

65.2
5.9


17,425.8
14,561.5
12,436.7
13,637.1


13,553.2

733.9
481.4
211.5
51.8
42.0

757.0
455.7
3,967.4
236.4
2,460.7

119.8
106.8
91.7
945.5
61.3
291.3
2,539.1

83.9

11.6
37.4
34.9


2,722.8
1,961.4
2,034.9
1,926.4


1,916.0

147.1
55.1
69.4
15.5
0.1

118.1
14.6
133.1
45.0
524.2

27.7
45.3
13.7
346.4
11.9
167.1
181.8

10.3

4.4
5.9


4,958.5
4,777.2
4,412.8
4,967.0


4,949.0

527.8
199.8
150.0
49.7
23.1

305.4
250.3
765.6
51.6
651.1

79.1
83.6
91.6
374.9
39.1
268.9
1,037.2

18.1

3.4
9.4
5.3


1,548.8
1,605.1
1,317.5
1,412.7


1,410.2

122.2
55.1
69.4
15.5


118.1
14.6
133.1
2.5
271.7

27.7
45.3
13.7
160.8
11.9
167.1
181.6

2.5

2.5


12,467.3
9,784.3
8,024.0
8,670.0


8,604.2

206.1
281.6
61.6
2.1
18.8

451.7
205.4
3,201.8
184.7
1,809.5

40.7
23.2
(a)
570.6
22.2
22.4
1,501.8

65.8

8.2
28.0
29.6


1,174.0
356.3
717.4
513.6


505.8

24.9



0.1




42.5
252.4




185.6


0.2

7.9

1.9
5.9


*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds.
'Classification of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage (whether the
scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.


1,678.2
1,762.8
1,336.8
2,093.7


2,005.1

61.1
48.6
69.6
66.9


139.6
61.4
268.9
6.1
96.2


5.8

446.7

5.3
729.0

88.5

81.0

7.5


390.3
483.9
149.2
379.7


318.8

0.1





4.5
1.1


30.2









60.8

60.8


voyage is part of a


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rdia .. ~.8 8 8.8. .. ........



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able 6.--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL UNDER UNITED STATES FOREIGN AID PROGRAMS, AND "SPECIAL CATEGI NON-DPART-
MENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL--TRADE AREA BY TYPE OF VESSEL SERVICE AND AUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS
(In thousands of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly frame the sums of the rounded amount)
Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tader vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Trade area Total United United
shipping States United United United Total States
weight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
flag flag flag
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Total all trade areas
Mbnthly average 1958.............. 380,099 132,176 142,949 117,732 117,393 97,176 25,556 20,556 237,150 14,444
February 1959..................... 318,418 66,414 83,845 66,413 74,618 58,326 9,227 8,087 234,574 1
March 1959........................ 243,020 63,230 117,448 63,230 81,137 58,481 36,311 4,747 125,572



Foreign trade areas except Canadian.. 241,701 63,229 117,080 63,229 80,770 58,482 36,310 4,747 124,621

Caribbean. ................................. 7,235 549 3,032 549 2,621 545 411 4 4,203 ...
East Coast South America .................. 1,535 1,429 1,535 1,429 1,535 1,429 ......
West Coast South America ................. 2,746 2,391 2,746 2,391 2,740 2,391 6......
West Coast Central America and Mexico...... 30 6 30 6 12 6 18
Gulf Coast Iexico........................... 50 1 50 1 49 ... 1 1
United Kingd and Eire .................... 37,512 75 199 75 199 75 ... ... 37,313 ...
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland. 29,442 289 27,209 289 473 289 26,736 ... 2,233 ...
Bayonne-Hamburg Range....................... 28,905 768 15,013 768 10,160 291 4,853 477 13,892 ...
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic.............. 1,264 221 822 221 822 221 ... ... 442 ...
Unidentified countries in Western Europe... ** **...... ...... ... ...
Azores, Mditerranean and Black Sea........ 49,947 11,602 13,126 11,602 11,443 9,939 1,683 1,663 36,821 ...
West Coast Africa .......................... 1,244 427 1,244 427 1,244 427 ........
South and East Africa ...................... 187 149 187 149 187 149 ...... ......
Australasia ............................... 583 127 583 127 583 127 ... ... ...
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea............ 30,138 11,204 14,639 11,204 13,557 10,122 1,082 1,082 15,499
Malaya and Indonesia....................... 15,512 88 1,294 88 1,294 88 ... ... 14,218
South China, Formosa and Philippines....... 9,303 8,816 9,303 8,816 8,852 8,365 451 451 ...
North China including Shanghai and Japan... 26,068 25,087 26,068 25,087 24,999 24,018 1,069 1,069 ...

Canadian trade areas................. 1,318 i) 368 3,*) 367 ... 1 ) 950

Pacific Canada............................. 950 ( ) (*) i ) ... ... (*) (*) 950..
Great Lakes Canada.............................................
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland........... 368 ... 368 ... 367 ... ......

*Denotes less than 500 pounds.
1Classification of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of
a scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.


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