United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Water-borne foreign trade statistics
Alternate title:
Waterborne foreign trade statistics
United States water-borne foreign trade
United States waterborne foreign trade
Added title page title:
United States foreign trade
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, including annual cumulation

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in June 1965.
General Note:
"Summary report FT 985."
General Note:
Description based on: Calendar year 1952; title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: June 1965.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 13695873
lccn - sf 86092445
ocm13695873
Classification:
lcc - WMLC L 83/3610
System ID:
AA00010658:00027

Related Items

Succeeded by:
U.S. waterborne foreign trade


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


q'~


16f'


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Luther H. Hodges, Secretary


I"

/


E~I


UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRADE


UNITED S )ATES WTERBORNE1N TRADE


UNITED STATES WATERBORNE' F hiGN TRADE '' \
,! ,.'. *, \


de r.' "r 1.ui r.. "r,; ,~,-. il .' j ..' .- .- r-. ,
statistical year figures puo-Lisneu on oepLumDoer 10, irol,
represent the aggregate of transactions processed during
the twelve monthly periods January-Decemberl960, including
some shipments unladen from and laden onvessels during the
latter part of 1959 and omitting some late shipments made
during 1960 for which information was not received in time
to be included in the statistical year figures. For a ful-
ler explanation of the differences between the statistical
and calendar year figures see te July 1952 issue of For-
eign Trade Statistics Notes.

'Ber-irn:r, with July 1956 the export shipments of do-
mestic and foreign merchandise individually valued at
$100-$499 are estimated on the basis of a 10 percent sam-
ple of such shipments. A discussion o0 the low-value ex-
port shipments in the vessel statistics is contained in
the November 1953 issue of the Foreign Trade Statistics
Notes. In addition, data on the shipping weight and value
of import shipments of under 2,000 pounds with a value of
$100 or more were estimated on the basis o' a 2 percent
random sample of import documents 1.:'u I 1957. Starting
with January 1958 statistics, the import data exclude only
those shipments where the value is less than $100, re ard-
less of shipping weight. A discussion of the low-weighL
or low-value import shipments in the vessel statistics is
contained in the March 1954 and January-March 1958 issues
of the Foreign Trade Statistics :iotes.


The waterborne statistics presented in the monthly
issues of this report for 1960 excluded the low-valued
exports of domestic and foreign merchandise and non-
Department of Defense shipments of "special ca' :.r com-
modities. In order to provide users of the vessel statis-
tics with a series of comparable annual data on a calendar
year basis, this report' shows in addition to the detail
for the fully compiled export shipments, total figures
(combining the sample estimate o: the low-value export
shipments with the compleLe cover e segments) on a Uni ed
States port level and trade area level. These total
figures for 1960, which include the estimates for exports
are comparable to the calendar year data shown for prior
years.

Vessel export figures in this report, shown in col-
umns 5, 10, 16 and 19 of table and in table 3, represent
exports of domestic and foreign merchandise laden at the
United States Customs area (Unite States and Pu rto Rico)
for shipment to forei;rn countries ani include export s:ip-
ments to United States civilian government agencies and
non-Department of Defens cDontroi:1a foreign aic program
shipm ns as escribei below. Exclude~ from these figures
are shipments to te Unit-. States armed forces abroa of
supplies ani equipment or t r'"r own use as well as the
other types of shipments :descri b low for which infor-
mation is shown in separate co' sis in table 1.


Department o" Der'ense controlled and .T. 'al cate-
Sfi ures, shown in columns 7 and 12 o' table 1 o;


,: : t -_ t- : L,--; ;r'm.: '' r e
S Ti* II' ,' : i pcual rorm .gn 1d pro-
"-:i- .' ."., i ..-i operations Administration,
Arry i -ir .Ir; I etc., made aboard United
'e: Fig h as Army-Navy transports
or commercial vessels chartered by the Department
of Defense under time, voyage and space charter
arrangements and including "special category"com-
modities without distinction.
2. Vessel export shipmentsof "special category" com-
modities not controlled by the Department of Defense
for which detailed information cannot be shown
separately because of security reasons. For an
explanation and listof "special category" commod-
ities and their presentation in foreign trade sta-
tistics see the January-March 1959 issue of For-
eign Trade Statistics Notes and the special notice
appearing in this issue of -. r' FT 985.
Only shipping weight data in terms of United States
port or coastal district of lading are shown for these
classes of shipments since information on the dollar value
of exports of Department of Defense controlled cargo is
not available at this level of detail. Consequently, the
total value figures shown in columns 15 and 18 of table 1
for dry cargo and tanker shipments in that order correspond
to the shipping weight figures shown in columns 4 and 9,
respectively, of the same table.

Vessel import figures, shown in columns 3, 6, 10 and
13 of table 2 and in table 4 of this report, are general
imports and represent the total of imports for immediate
consumption plus entries into customs bonded storage and
manufacturing warehouses made at the United States Customs
area from foreign countries. Vessel import figures exclude
American goods returned by the United States armed forces
for their own use, import shipments on Army or '..- trans-
ports, and shipments covered by informal entries.

The following types of shipments are excluded from
both the vessel export and import data: (1 All shipments
of under $100 in vilue, regardless of shipping weight; (2)
shipments of household and personal effects; (3, shipments
by mail and parcel post; and r shipments a vessels under
their own power and ailoa Trade be ,ween the United
States and its Possessions and trade between he Posses-
sions are not repo: ed as ni ,ed States e ports and
impor s.


Merchandise s
ir transit from one
-- -~_ -_

merchandise cleared
exported is included
tircs ineparnate if
the in-transil r


thrIough
trma tio
ir ter'


far value is preseted ite
Columrs r ii, '', ,i ?
merchandise lader. a: ucr'i re
while columns 4 ", ii and
chandise unl.'ider:;"re.:- vcas


*nd t-:e United .States
i country to another without
_~.. is not included in any of"
oucly referred to (imported
customs and sut'fse ently re-
the import r:: export stati:;-
tf'r t!e waterborne portion of
s f hippin wei-ht and dol-

< be I re''0c' in--trate Ml
-ei: s "rillttee z 'e ort.:,
'Cf t"v!e t'efleCv:'uc-: mer-
The w~:io~ri- orrn e <* :t m':ll


USCOMM-DC


r 'r Bpa rea


D., C.


F'7T 1 f i-'-


,:F Fr.LLXA:L



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4;eDI-r a .1


L, 1 .- ,j


"! .. '. .,.
* 0 in 'T


BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
Richard M. Scammon, Director


sa 0 \L
\ < ..'.
scei.\a **^i











and inbound in-transit statistics include: (1) Foreign
merchandise transferred from one vessel to another in the
United States port of arrival and shipped to a foreign
country without being released from customs custody in the
United States; and (2) foreign merchandise arriving by
vessel at one United States port, shipped through the
United States under customs bond, and leaving the United
States by vessel from a port other than that at which it
arrived. In addition, the waterborne outbound in-transit
statistics also include (1) foreign merchandise withdrawn
from a general order warehouse for immediate export by
vessel or for transportation and export by vessel (such
merchandise was not recorded as an import when it entered
the warehouse), and (2) foreign merchandise shipped by
vessel from a United States Foreign Trade Zone to a for-
eign country (such merchandise is deposited in the Foreign
Trade Zone without being entered as an import). Any in-
bound or outbound in-transit merchandise moving by methods
of transportation other than vessel is excluded from the
in-transit statistics. Thus, in-transit merchandise arriv-
ing at the United States by vessel and leaving by some
other method of transportation is included in the inbound
data only. On the other hand, in-transit merchandise
arriving by other than waterborne transportation and laden
aboard vessels upon departure is included in the outbound
statistics but not in the inbound data. The inbound and
outbound segments, therefore, do not counterbalance one
another and are complementary only insofar as they involve
merchandise carried by vessels to and from the United
States. For a more detailed discussion of the in-transit
trade statistics and the types of shipments excluded from
these data see the February 1953 issue of the Foreign Trade
Statistics Notes.
All types of outbound vessel shipments in table 1 are
credited to the coastal districts, customs districts, and
ports at which the merchandise was laden. All types of
inbound vessel shipments in table 2 are credited to the
coastal districts, customs districts, and ports at which
merchandise was unladen. In the case of vessel general
imports this is not necessarily the same as the customs
district in which the goods were entered into warehouse or
entered for immediate consumption.
Vessel exports in table 3 are credited to the foreign
trade areas at which the merchandise was unladen. Vessel


imports in table 4 are credited to the foreign trade areas
at which the merchandise was laden aboard the vessels
carrying the cargo to the United States. The countries of
destination or origin of merchandise are not necessarily
located within the trade areas to which the merchandise is
shipped or from which it is received. Detailed definitions
of foreign trade areas in terms of the countries and ports
included in each are contained in Schedule R, Code Classi-
fication and Definition of Foreign Trade Areas.
Shipping weight figures represent the gross weight of
shipments, including the weight of containers, wrappings,
crates and moisture content. Vessel export values repre-
sent the values at time and place of export. They are
based on the selling price (or on the cost if not sold)
and include inland freight, insurance and other charges to
place of export. Transportation and other costs beyond
the United States port of exportation are excluded. Ves-
sel import values, as well as the values for in-transit
shipments, are generally based on the market or selling
price and are in general f.o.b. the exporting country.
Since in-transit merchandise is not subject to the imposi-
tion of import duties at the United States, the valuation
reported for such shipments is not verified by customs to
the extent applicable in the case of import entries and may
in some cases include transportation costs and insurance
to the United States as well as other cost elements.

Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are classified as
dry cargo or tanker shipments solely on the basis of the
type of vessel used without regard to the cargo carried.
Tanker vessels are those primarily designed for the car-
riage of liquid cargoes in bulk,while all others are clas-
sified as dry cargo vessels. A further segregation of dry
cargo vessel shipments is provided in tables 3 and 4 on
the basis of type of service, i.e., liner (herth) or ir-
regular (tramp). Liner service is that type of service
offered by a regular line operator of dry cargo vessels on
berth. The itineraries and sailing schedules of such ves-
sels are predetermined and fixed. Irregular or tramp serv-
ice is that type of service afforded by dry cargo vessels
which are chartered or otherwise hired for the carriage of
goods on special voyages. Vessels in this type of service
are not on berth and their sailing schedules are not pre-
determined or fixed.








A!E: %AI E NI i ,H I ANDIE, 4 U J1t iN-. 1 4 44'! 4H4frAND[ 4 ANI II'tl Oi 1 DEP1
) A F DEFE. I 'LFD CARi, N f CAR;" ANtD A'K F ': I 'U t' D At. 1 A1 L


41. t4ii. Vi ..,34~i 4.1 ~ 31; ,i; ls i~t 14ii 4~l i 4
rl. I ~- ll I.~`': ~ t4.1l i 114er 334134iii 44~c ri~.4 ci, I


4i rj! 3~:, 444'4~:?viiit


1 4. : i. c ::i


AR4t"NI O DF:.I-.t t:I NlI;;LLE D lAtCG A AND SPECIAL (KAIEGTY N)N-
IDI NO : -


* 3li 4h 1y l1',t' 'h t"h)' round
4__ i- 4- fo t o 4.44 lar
as~a ><


Fu I,1: comp 1i id : hip:pm


D *--




I tal tic ,il


i ...............


North Atlann ti .. .. ni.,tri. .. .



px:uth ,, :l .......................
Sg r', ... ..................
F t; r -r i i. .......... ....... .. ..
t- s 1 A" t ........ ...........


S' "' . .. .. .. .
ter pcu :, E 44......................




'r Lt -i. ............................
klarleyt,). ........................
i irg- .t............ .. .. .. ..


S"erg .............................


av n u nt at ............. .............
;,:tidgep .........................

ijwv k ',', .........................
l : l. ........................
.............. .............
q : ..........................
I ...........................



lal;, .44 .................

4 k, Pnir 3<4 ............ .......
P.:ILs%! II ........................
;.: .... : ... I ..... .........
44.&'oiill;k P4 4 ..........,.......
r:: I ) ...................... .......

ir:in .............................
~!! r r ...........................

4 ,; i !4 .......................
i cbr::, 1 ........................





r C ~r 6 .....................
4i4 rq .......................
ni?:Pin seh.. J ......................

SC,lr)u, Oar<;:][ ................ .........
rCrles{, ,. ........................

'" rg ia ...............................


(* )

D17.







4 44 1)2 '















4 .
0. "









13

I,, ,X'.

L ". ''9.


6.
747.


i2.

12. s1.4


L, 8a *







84 .










2'.
L: .2' ,




]4, b .


.7,
2y3.2
(*)

















4.3










?








',128.4
i73.


I3,' a).4








i.1










22I.





21.3







2,11". 7
34,b2.2


1i79,. 3






: 2.


562.1
4.

936.
)2.

124.3
1,21i.3


it



















































18. 3
i2."



















































10.
1.











.1
6 )



12.3





1,7


13.










1i, 20.





0. 3

t


4 1









.4 41 1 3





13, 1.


17.2
1i. L





611. ]
491.4




<3 3
341.c<

61 1 2''


e-.



Si '-
j43 I
C 444


3 4,412.9




















U. 3








.. 44.

5. 797.8



2 ...


413.7
14.7 2126.4
1. 126.4
'4. 3 2 .
1.4 .





15.4 111.4

81.3 24.4
81. t
() 224.4
3.9 4.7
4.7

8.5 1I. i

1 .5 1C.1


4.4 -an4. -J





- t tic and
t' roe ign


() (1^)


.. I
































I








































51.6 1.6
126.4 125.0
119.3 118.
6.1 6.1
128.4 127.7
? 7. 7. ')
120c). ` 11.8


I I

I I


I


4 4 I





.4. I





.4 .4 4 I







I I


4 1 4


4 4 I










.4 *1


1.
4.2 0.2



4*) U.4


2


~










AND VALUE OFT 1ITED STATE *ATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-
DEFATMEE!E OF DEFENSE CONTR LLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING--Continued


Du trict --C-ntinued




oi Pa .. B... h....................
e .i ...... .............

.......... .......
S .. C .. Di. t... .........
a1................... .... .....
P ns c ..........................

i ........................


- ... ..................
O........................
.f a ....................








S .. ..............

.... .............


Shipping :eight in millions of pounds


65.'.9
248.7
354.0
255.4

,412.7

9,648.0
8,761.;
129.4
443.7
2 .2





2.7



4,
,3.9



~8~ 4 .4 6


1,472.8
6/u.2
206.4
347.8
251.2

7 ,21.

q. .2
8,743.2
12?. 1
443.7


3,b>8.'
3, > .1


2 ,077.3-
16,52'. 4
1 23.2












2.2








.4


1,
I.>


---T-- -


638.1
26.4
347.8
6.0
5,38.

9,608.5
8,743.2
127.1
443.7
2C3.5
3i S

3, 05.0
2,920.1
133.2
2.7
18,242.8
,014.











I' I -,< -,


1.






01
.310.1
?2


1,4C : 1, 396.9 8.1
638.0 637.1 0.9
205.2 201.2 4.")
347. ,.46.8 O.s
195.9 193.4 2.5

55,586.1 ,008.2 577.9

,603 9,603.3 0.2
8,743.2 8,743.0 0.2
127.1 127.1
443.7 443.7 |
203.5 263.5 '

3,520 3.0 4.0
2,88',.0 12,881.0 4.0
133.2 133.2
2.7 2.7 .
18,04.6 17,941.i !
,8.4 12724.9 i









I7 .. 7 1, 1.2
1. .










2 237. 1i.
.90 ,876.2 30.1
2,1709. 2,68.*i 23.4

3, 36. 3,130.1 ..
1, .. 1 3

7. 20,.



5. 4 58. .1
2, 92 2,85.q 237


.. ..o.


--






Z- __


1.
0.1
1.2
0.2


252.4,


5.0
(*)
(*)


4.9
35.2


9...
188.2
188.2
(0 )






0.4
6.6
.9



0.6
3,)


t.3



5.2


19, 7

2





64



6,83

3,04


3, 31


64

8,
1,71


4
1,04







6,08
3,61


46

1,94




84

42


j Grand
[ total2







(13)


11. 1 I ...
9.. ..


154.5 I
38.2
62.8
44.3
7.4

3,86.3

104.
7 4
75.2
1.6
-7. 6

14.4

5.9
0.1
1,467.5
1,225.4 a
208.5
13.6

22.7 7
141.0
4.61
81.5

1,60 7.3
538.7
62.2
25.5 1
17.2
34.0
114.9
114.9




463.3
271.5
3.3
175.4
2.3
2.0
657.9
8.7
300.2
95.3
143.
44.9

4.:
1.5
0. 3


I "' --

:


66.3
h^.1


2.2 } 19,0 7.2 19,054.0 3.2 315.0





2. 18.
.2
2.0 t641. 641. ... '0.



4.5 634.5 6,834. )
0.8 3,51 .8 3,510.8
7.2 047.2 3,047.2


9.0 3, "01.4 3,30 1.4 ... 17.6
3.6 2,26.0 2,2%. ; ... 1 7.6
.4 .4 15.4 ... ...
8.7 648.7 8.7 ... ...
1.2 341.2 341.2 ... ...
1. 8,254. 8, 252. 2 2.4 129.7
4. 53 7"c.'
1. 4 2 4,123.2 2. Z ?.4 2


. 64 .0 640.0 ... ...
4.3 4.3 3.5 0.8 ...
-;.3 4.3 3.5 0.8 ...



2.5 12.5 12.5 ...
6.2 6,06.2 6,086.2 ... ) I
2.3 3,612.3 3,612.3 ... (*)

7.8 1,367.8 1,367.8 ... 7)
.9 460.4 460.4, ... ()

2.4 1,942.4 1,942.4
o.2 06.2 0.2 ::: :::

.6 .6 .0 6 ... ...
6.2 846.2 846.2 ... ...
3.4 3.4 3.4
6.0 426.0 426.0 ... 1
... ... ...
... I .. I ... I ... i


Grand
total3


Value in millions of dollars

Fully compiled shipments1

Dry cargo Tanker


Do- Do-
mes- I mes-
Total tac trans- Total tic
and and
for- for-
eign eign


In-
trans-
it


(14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20)


3,826.2

102.8
73.6
8.2
1.6
17.6
1.7
148.6
142.6
5.9
0.1
1,4"7.5
1,205.7
208.2
13.6

322:1
140.5
4.6
81.
95.6
1,690.4
538.5
955.7
25.5
137.0
34.0
114.8
114.8

, 128.6

36.5
457.2
274.9
3.3
173.9
2.3
2.0
635.2
8.7
287.4
94.2
138.5
44.7
50.1
4.5
1.5
0.3


140.8
36.3

43.8
6.1

3,186.4

101.4
73.6
8.1
1.6
i6.3
1.7
128.0
122.0
5.9.

0.1
1,191.2
1,046.5
122.4
13.6

233.7
78.5
4.4
64.7
86.1 i
1,417.6
492.7
81.2

100.4
1.5
114.5
114.5

1,051.6

36.4
403.4
238.

162.6
0.2
2.0
612.0
8.7
2?7.4
94.2
138.4
30.7
49.9
0.1
1.5
0.3


138.9
36.0
51.6
43.6
6.0

3,084.8

101.2
73.4
8.1
1.6


127.7
121.7
5.9
0.1
1, 175.7
1,031.1
122.3
13.6

23.37
78.5
4.4
64.7
86.1
3 .412.1
491.8


100.1
1.5
34.4
34.4

1,023.4

32.1
390.4
227.9

160.3
D.2
2.0
601.0
8.7
278.
94.2
138.1
30.6
48.7
0.1
1.5
0.3


0.3 0.8 0.8
1.3 ... ...
0.2 ...
0.1 0.7 0.7

101.6 639.8 039.

0.2 1.4 1.4



.1.
... 0.1 0.1


.. (.) (*.)
0.3 20.631 20.6
.3 20.6 20.6



15.5 256.3 256.3
15.4 159.2 159.2
0.1 85.8 85.8


88:4 88:4
... 62.0 62.0
... 0.2 0.2
... 16.8 16.8
9. 9.
5.5 2/2.8 :272.
0.9 45.8 45.8
4.3 139.2 1392
... 18.6 18.6
0.3 36.6 36.6
32.5 32.5
80.1 0.3 0.2
80.1 0.3 0.2

28.2 77.u 77.0

4.3 0.1 0.1
13.0 53.8 53.8
10.6 36.4 36.4
... 3.3 3.3
2.3 11.3 11.3
... 2.1 2.1

11.0 23.2 23.2

9.4 -) (.)

0.3 0.1 0.1
0.1 14.0 14.0
1.2 0.2 0.2
... 4.4 4.4


.. @







AllS WATERE RNE E F .il5 OF DCNESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND "SPECIAL CATED PY" NON.
DEPARITIENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF IADIN0--Continued

Chirping weight in millions at pounds Value in a


(1 (2) (3) (4)

N-rti Pacfic ast Districts. 20,236.8 16,837.6 14,703.8 14,559.8

' g1r.............................. 11,189.4 11,174.0 9,677.5 9,631.8
Astorla.......................... 166.. 165.1 165.1 165.1
Ne. ort ........................... 96.0 9 6.0 96.n 71.5
C .os B v......................... 866.7 865.1 865.1 856.3
Pori: ........................ 5,538.7 5,568.u, 4,891.1 4,881.2
................... 2,32 0 2,32 .5 1,957.6 1,956.0
S Was.................. 2,145.0 2,144.9 1,696.8 1,695.9

3n. .................. ....... 5),047. 5,663.6 5,026.3 4,928.0
S...... .... .......... 2,531.9 2,521.6 2,352.6 2,299.0
a n. .. ... ..... ................ 2,40o .3 2,402.5 1,955.7 1,954.3
Aber aen-H qui ................. 167.5 167.5 167.5 155.5
BellL hr....................... 168.8 168.5 168.5 16 .5
.erct .......................... 212.2 212.1 212.1 194.7
P: A e e ..................... I 1O .o 91.7 91.7 90.6
Per d .................... 12.5 12.5 12.5 Q.5
A ac e........................ 27.4 27.4 8.2 4.0

L s .trl s......... 46,017. 45,30.5 43,549.6 43,537.4

t. r :nc........................ 17?. 71.4 71.4 71.4
ginst. N. Y................. "79.2 71.4 71.4 71.4



R ....... ................... 2,25.0 2,624.7 2,624.7 2,624.7
go, .................... 470.5 470.5 470.5 470.5
52.5 527.2 527.2 527.2
S .............. 1, 62 1,627.0 1,627.0

............................ 363.9 363.3 337.3 337.3
f ...... .......... 363.9 363.9 337.3 337.3

t r ................. 1,557. 1,55 9, .2 9.3 .2
.lu h, i.. ............ ..... ... ,168. 3,168.1 2,431.3 2,431.3
As.. 3, 2. ....................... ......
i'nterT a al-aner, Mi 4. 4.7 4. 4.7
3xp.rio. .................. 6,8 1. 5,8 5,80.9

;s a.ns............................ '94. 592.9 590.9 590.8
Milwak. ........................ 444. 443.8 443.8 443.8
:,1arinette. ....................... (*) (*) (*) (a)
SB '. .................... 105.9 105. 105.9 105.8

ni ................ ........ .. 6,923.7 6,855.0 6,532.1 6,531.1
Detroit ......................... 1,316.5 1,277.5 987.8 986.8
Sadi a .Ba;,' City ................ 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
a ...................... .... 1 7. 1, 1,017. 1,017.5
g ........... ............. 111.4 111.4 111.4

Calite ......................... 879.7 879. 873.7 879.7
Pr squ I le..................... 2,144.9 2,144.9 2,144.9 2,144.'
Sc ven ......................9 1 1. 1.9

Se, 1 tn tec at -/d of table.


Fully compiled shipments


in-i


Total
Total


/ cargo

ic, foreign and
transit cargo



Domes- In-
tic and trans-
foreign it


(5) (6)

14,515.6 44.2

9,620.4 11.4
165.0 0.1
71.5
856.3 ()
4,80.1 11.1
1,956.0 (*)
1,695.8 0.1

4,895.2 32.8
2,268.4 3D.6
1,954.3 (a)
155.5
168.4 0.1
194.7 (a)
88.5 2.1
9.5
4.0 ..

43,517.3 20.1

71.2 0.2
71.2 0.2



2,624.7 (*)
470.5 ...
527.2 (a)
1,627.0 ..

337.3 (a)
337.3 (a)

9,819.2
2,431.3


5,800.9 ...

590.0 0.8
443.0 0.8

105.8 ...

6,530.6 0.5
986.3 0.5
0.2 ...
1,017.5 ...
111.4 ...

879.7 :::
2,144.9 ...
1.9 ...


Domestic, foreign and
in-transit cargo


Total


Domes- In-
tic and trans-
foreign it


Dept.
of
De-
fense

"Spe-
cial
cate-
gory"

(12)


Grand
total2 3







(13)


Fully compiled shipments1


Grand
total3





(14)


Dry cargo


LDo-
mes-
tic
and
for-
e ign



(16)


Dept.

De-

and
I-'-d
"Spe-
cial
cate-
gory"

(7)

144.0

45.7

24.5
8.8
9.9
1.6
0.9

98.3
53.6
1.4
12.0
(*)
17.4
1.1
3.0
4.2

12.2

(a)
(a)



(a)













0.1
(a)

.1

1.3
1.0
,,.


2,133.8

1,496.5



677.5
370.9
448,1

637.3
169.0
446.8





19.2

2,380.9











26.6
26.6

1,737.8
736.8


1,001.0

2.0




322.9
289.7


2,133.8

1,496.5



677.5
370.9
448.1

637.3
169.0
446.8





19.2

2,379.4











25.1
25.1

1,737.8
736.8


1,001.0

2.0




322.9
289.7


2,133.8

1,496.5



677.5
370.9
448.1

637.3
169.0
446.8





19.2

2,379.4












25.1
25.1

1,737.8
736.8


1,001.0

2.0




322.9
289.7


618.9

363.4
6.6
1.9
21.7
198.4
74.0
60.5

255.5
107.2
107.1
11.0
8.1
10.8
8.4
0.6
1.4

680.7

6.6
6.6



12.0
2.5
3.4
6.1

7.4
7.4

160.0
53.6

(*)
92.9

50.6
36.7
(a)
9.8

123.2
83.0
(*)
4.7
3.5
(*)
0.6
10.0
0.1


566.6

325.3
6.6
1.9
21.7
181. 3
64.6
49.0

241.3
102.9
97.6
11.0
8.1
10.8
8.4
0.6
1.1

624.3

6.6
6.6



12.0
2.5
3.4
6.1

6.8
6.8

116.7
35.2

(a)
68.0

50.5
36.7
(*)
9.8

118.4
78.9
(*)
4.7
3.5
(*)
0.6
10.0
0.1


In-
trans-
it





(]7)

4.3

1.0
(0)


0.9
(0)
(a)

3.3
3.1
(*)

(*)
(*)
0.2





(*)
(*)



(a)

(a)


(*)
(*)

(*)





0.5
0.5



0.4
0.4


Tanker


Do-
mes- In-
Total t trans-
and it
for-
eign



(18) (19) (20)

52.3 52. ...

38.1 38.1




9.4 9. ...
11.5 11.5

14.2 14.2
4.3 3 ...
9.5 9.5 ...





0.3 .3

56.4 56.4 ...












0.6 0.6 ...
0.6 0.6

43.3 43.3
18.4 18.4


24.9 24.9

0.1 0.1




4.8 4.8
4.1 4.1


562.3

324.3
6.6
1.9
21.7
180.4
64.6
49.0

238.0
99.8
97.6
11.0
8.1
10.8
8.2
0.6
1.1

623.3

6.6
6.6



12.0
2.5
3.4
6.1

6.8
6.8

116.7
35.2

(*)
68.0

50.0
36.2
(*)
9.8

118.0
78.5
(*)
4.7
3.5
(a)
0.6
10.0
0.1


F F F F F -8 -F F F


(9) (10) (11)














OF NITED STATES WATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DCMFETIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIPMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON- a'
DEPA'iENT CO DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTC4S DISTRICT AND PORT OF LADING--Continued


;--r-----Grand


i I. .. ......... ..........

la.ig.....o......................
lela .. .........................
e, P...........................
aEri, P ........................ ..
an usl a. .......... ............. .
1h abula..........................
>I ti ..........................
-ji o .............................
: iin ....................... ...




Alaska Distr ................

l.t: Ric...........................
Uaica ......................... .
Z ya ..... .. ...................
Po ...............................

{ ii............ ....... ............
jzrnci ,!u .................. ........
: sk u ..............................


Grand



ta2)


(2)


tSipping weight in millions if pounds

Fully compiled shipments1

EDry cargo I


Tltal





(3)





2,s2l.e
118.6
2, 622..0
2 4.0
11,000.0
422.5
3,209.1
1,348.4


75.4


,[ktno-e:e less than ',O C00 pou ds; le than '0,000 dollars.
b-'d o! aS 1 pyre n1 ample of th -p$ I ..4'-' shipm nt Th
i s tha 1 ds if!r:> .tr. ulse nt She
ttiaL :fo value (SOlumns i) 41!1 r,' .s ,:qe 13


Domestic, foreign and
in-transit cargo



Domes- In-
Total tic and trans-
foreign it


(4) (5) (6)


118.6
20,615.1
232.8
10,A94.2
422.',


3'.O
3,4 .4


L, V40 .


li.8
20, 4


42.
209.1
3, .14
j 1.)
'7.8
75.4





8I.
1 '. (,


ii : ,i~ te c.)ve 't e
ii' vihl. th'TP os U)I
0ui t'tali ahi'


a_: i i ei ,tT, A lr ii Ac i~ ,


Dept.
of
De-
fense
and
"Spe-
cial
cate-
gory"
(7)


11, It

a.iit th


Total





(8)





71.4
77.13
140.9
38.7
102.2


Tanier-


Domestic, foreign and
In-transit cargo



Domes- In-
Total tic and trans-
foreign it


(9) (10) (11)


140.2
38.
102.2


Dept.
of
De-
fense
and
"Spe-
cial
cate-
gory"
(I2)


Value in millions of dollars


Grand
total







(13)


Grand
total




(14)




1 i.
140. I
.0
169.1
30.5
94.7
2.8
14.8
17.0
1.9
1.4
0.8
5.3


Fully compiled shipments1

Dry cargo Tanker


Total





(15)






4.4
166.1
28.9
93.2
2.8
14.8
17.0
1.9
1.4
0.8
i.3


In-
trans-
it




(17)





I*)

0.2
(*)
0.2


In-
trans-
it


(19) (20)


_40.1 1 .O .. ... ... 4'.5 4.7 40. 40.4 0.2 .1 5.1 i

3J(. 36.0 316.0 ... ... 12.7 12.1 7.1 6.9 0.2 5.0 5.0
4912 4' 49.2 .. 1 ).3 (*) ( ) .. 0.3 0. ...
.. ... .2 2 0.1 0. ( 0.1 0.1 ...
.. ... 2. .1 ... 0. ..
9, ,... 5.7 4.2 .8 4.6 0,2 0. 0.4 ...
... ... .2 1 .9 '.9 ( 0. 0. ...
4.i 4.1 I.. I 14.7 14.6 4. 14.6 0. 0.1
... ... ... .. .. i i..6 1 .6 ... .1



; valued at Il! or mr. 2Figurs base ;ampling eror Ior the shipping weight 11igre which include estimates for the low-value shipments is less than one
estimates for th low-valu: shipments is less than ,on percent or less than .50,000 > less otherwise noted
c iumn.. 1 wd 2 ) due to the Iexclusin f value dat f wr xport Defense controlled cargo and
S- to ,btin ttal exports through th Custo: D;titte otI F. sampling error is between I and 2






lal 2.--:.tIPIINO WI IHT AND JALI.U OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESEIYS;,
1Y CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADING:
01
(rTtals are givL- !" r il customer di district at whi.oi thei,' are vessel :hiprment.i. y those ports are shown whoe combined export and import tonluage averaged 1 million pounds or ilre per month during calendar year 1959. 9 uso1ms i
district totals are fr qill ports Ith the distrc eluding tho,;e not shown. Totals represent the i.urins of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums o f the rounded amounts)

Shipping wpirlht in milli-ms or pounds Value in mililios tf do llars ,

Dr eoar,, Tanker Dry -arg, Tanker "
Clus .i,,m; iistrfct and p rrt
S i I- l, In- t ial I t I 4 ra
I I C I 1'I I41

a ir t T impo, rt transit a imp, ts transit im:nprts tr

(: ( ) 0 ( ) (6)) (7) (8) (io ( ) ( 1) (I ) i i 14)

Total a i11tritts:
in.r : r i''............. .. 426,811 198,843.t 197, 347.7 1,495.8 227, 71.6 20 ,059.6 25,912.0 12,136.0 1 30. t10,154.4 236.2 1,74 .4 1,478.1 ;7.
rr ya .:. ........................ 42, 26.1 1)0,9.3 189, l1.2 1,238.1 231,47r. 208, 52 .5 22,953.3 11,568.3 9,86.I 9,600.1 236.0 1,7 .2 1, 8 2 .4

Nrth Atla r ic ,.1t Di..tricts............ 2b7,7.0 9 86.5 96,074.5 912.0 170,580.5 147,1652.8 22,927.7 7,529.9 6,233.' 6,058.3 175.6 1,2. 1, .9

.i id Nw aimpshi re...... .................. 2 ,0 7. 8.7 931.1 15.6 27,408.4 4,',00.c) 22,907.5 263.2 10.4 10.3 ).1 2')8.8 2.8
Srtl d, 1................................. 4,813.7 214.6 199.1 1 5 245..1 ,691.6 22,907.5 245.1 5.9 5.8 0.1 13.2
Bu: .go;,' Mo ................................. 334.0 (.) ( ) .. 314.0 334.0 ... 2.2 ( ) ( ) ....2
Eatp rt, M. ................................ 7 .8 74.8 .8 8 ... ... .. ... 1.9 1.9 1.9
,rt:I iut ,, N. H............................. 1,30.1 220 222.0 (*) 1,078.1 1,078.1 ... 7.9 0 .4 () 7.5
H lfuact, ]e................ .................. 416.7 20.3 20.3 ... 3964 3.4 39... 3.0 0.4 0.4 ... .6 2.6
MNarsp,.t, M ................ ..... ..... 32.1 38.0 38.0 1 ... 864.1 8d4.1 ... 6. 0.. U.7 ... 6.2 6.2
l iu t ................................ .. 12, .2 3,26 .0 3,264.6 .. 9,3 1.2 ,381.2 ... 487.5 4 .2 429. 7.3 57.3
t : ...................................... 1,0J9.' 8.1 2,934.9 4.2 8,03. 8,010.4 ... 41.1 402, 1 401.5 ,. 8.8 4.
i' ;' .... .... .. ......... ..... ... 86.2 86.0 0.2 ... ... ... 15. 15.9 15.8 1
N<- i ...... ... .......................... 9 .4 3 .4 3.4 (3 ) 69.0 ,'. ... 7 8 7.4 7.4 ( ) .4
l'. R: .:............................... ... .190. 1 2. 162.8 ... 1,027.1 1, .. 11.1 4.6 4.6 ... 6. .
1 T ....................................... 4.3 (*) () .... 254. 54.3 ... 1.6 () () .1. 1.6
! I s i........... ............ ......... 3,146.1 209.1 209.1 (*) 2, 7.0 ,937.0 ... 21.0 3.6 3.6 (C) 17.4 17.4
.. ..... ......................... 2, 31 .0 2 5.6 205,6 ( ) 2,107.4 107. ... 16.4 ( ) 1. 12
n t ................................... ,71.3 .8 .8 ... ,2,, 8.5 .. 21.8
[rgep t................................... 82,.4 i 49.4 341.4 ... 476.0 476.0 ... 5. 2. .... .
Nu Hnvn................. ... .... ..... .. .. 2, 21 6 21 .h ... 1,871.9 1,871.9 14.1 2. 2.3 ... l11. 11.8
N :l ............................. .. 95 .4 1.. 44.9 1... 913. 5 913.5 .. 10.2 3.2 3.2 ... 7. 7.
S............................. ........ ,729.5 21,009.0 20,271.1 737.9 55,72?. 5, 70 .1 15.4 4,739.4 4, 37.9 4,161.9 166.0 411. 411.4 0
N.w Y.rk................................... 714,:)0 .6 20,302.,6 io, i6.,0 737.6 54,607.0 54, 1.6 15.4 4,718.6 4. 4,148.5 66.0 404.1 404.0 .1
Al bay.................................. ..... .173.7 239.2 23 .0 0.2 734.1 74.5 ... 17.4 12.6 12.5 .1 4.8 4.8
Phl i,,lo h n. .................................... 87,262.8 31,953.7 1,) 1 .8 36.9 55,309.1 55, )07.4 1.7 1,055 4 63t.2 631.8 4.4 41 .2 419.2 (*)
I:1 l I ht ia, TAi............................. .1,325.2 18,684.6 18,b647. 36.9 22,640.6 22,640.6 (*) 722.6 549.9 545. 4.4 172.7 172.
S I................... ... .. .... ....1.... ....
i ,, '........ .......... ............. 4, 46.9 ... 14,412.6 14,412.6 ... 111.: 3. 3.3 ... 1019. 3 10 .3'
.;:n, i,.,. ................................. 1 520. 3 520.3 ... 1, 38 1, 851.4 () 22.7 12.7 12.7 ... 10.0 C O 1 0
...... .............. 24.8 24.8 4. ... ... 1.7 .7 1.7
:r ... i r................................ : 2. ', 7511,045.5 11,043.8 17 91.8 0.4 0.4 ... 91.4. 91.4
....... ....... ,76.8 112.8 7,99 .9 7, 95. ... 633.9 582.1 78.9 3.2 51. 51.8
i ....................................2. 3,382.4 33,29.. 12.8 6,969.8 ,69.8 ... 626.1 581.3 578.1 .2 4.8 44.8
ji ri ii ..... ... .. .... .. ....... ...... ... ....4 5,937.6 5 ,33.1 4.5 ?, 566. 8,563.7 3.1 293.1 234.9 2 3. 1.0 58.2 58.2
N :' .................................... .663. 1,994.5 1,993.4 1.1 3,66 .9 3,668. ... 168.7 142.8 142.3 0. 2 .9
............... ... .... .., 3,49 3.4 4, 6.5 4,856.5 ... 11.8 6 .7 6 .2 0.5 3.1 32.1
i ..... .............................. 212. 212.5 2 2. (*) ...... .1 ( ) .
Ao xn: riia ................................... 22 2 22 .2 222.2 (*) ... ... ... 13. 3 13.3 13.3 (*)

I;ioul Atn `L q 'al.t L'4stri 't s............ 16, 7,777.8 7, 768.2 9.6 8,539.7 a,539.7 ... 506.8 448.3 447.3 1.0 58.5 58.5

N. :;oh ar U:ia............ ...................... 1,378.1 554.5 554.4 0.1 82 .0 823.6 ... 49.7 42.7 42.7 (*) 7.0 7. ..
1I o In ,l t .................................. -4 543.8 5'3.7 0.1 400.2 400.2 ... 44.91. 41.6 41.6 (* 3.3
MH r t' <.d .i t ................................. 434.1 10.7 10.7 ... 423.4 423.4 ... 4.9 1.2 1.2 ... .7 .7 ...
SC r. I ........................... ....... 2,6-'7.6 928.3 928.3 (1) 1,7 .3 1,769.3 ... 119.5 10 .6 108.6 () 10.9 1).9
C:ir.* :, t Ii ...................... ............. 2,693.0 923.7 12 .? ( ) 1,769.3 1,769.3 ... 119.0 108.1 108.1 10.9 ...
rg.'t :............. .. .................... 4.4 4.4 4.4 ... ... ... ... 3 0. 3 0.3
.i- r;,,, ..........................................9 2, 1., .3 1,753.2 1,758.2 ... 100.8 89.7 8I.6 .1 91.. 1 :1.
[ir u :l,;?. ................................... 72. 72. 72. ... ... ..... 1.5 1. 5 1. 5
.. ....................... 97. 2,0 9. 2,03 8 1,75 .2 1 7 8.2 ... 9 .3 ,8.2 88.1 0.1 i. 1 11.1
S. ............................... 3, 3,7.9 9. 44,188.6 4,188.6 ... 236. 207.4 06.4 1.0 29.5 29.5
,:; ..... ............ ........ ... ,11, 2, 3. ,11. (2) 1,978.9 1,978.9 ... 112.5 98.6 98.6 (1) 13.9 13.9
t ..il ......... .................. .............. 6 .- 3 33'.4 3.7 344.8 344.8 ... 4'L.7 47.1 46.6 0.5 2.6 2.6 ...
t 'iL :i *............................. 33. 391. 188.6 2.7 448.1 448. 1 ... 39.9 36.8 3b.4 0.4 3.1 3.1
po > K. s.a ............................ 1, 1 4< 4 6.8 2.8 1,256.5 1,256. ... 33.3 24.5 24.4 O.1 8.8 8.8

.'lf Co,.o Di.;t: o *s..................... 54,43. 44,214.9 44,042.2 172.7 10,275.1 10,255.4 19.7 1,347.5 1,260.3 1,246.3 23.0 78.2 78.1 0.1

F!loi dai ...................................... 2,40) .0 1,812.5 1,832.4 0.1 576.5 576.5 ... 59.3 55.5 55.5 (*) 3.8 3.8
ii ....................................... i 2. 1,61.4 1,619. ) 0.1 312.6 312.6 ... 47.5 45.6 45.6 () 1.9 1.9
-Pn i:l I .................................... I)..8 1?39. 1 131.1 ... 11.7 11.7 ... 8.9 8.6 8.6 ... 0.3 0. 3...












Table .--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, o
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADING--Continued


Shipping weight in millions if pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
,7C. district ad p rt Grand Grand
iral totGrand
S Total general In- General In- total General In- nTol eral In-
imports transit imports transit Imports transit imports transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)

il C :' 3: t --C: tialued

Floridal--C OntLn. c|
Boca Grande................................. 186.8 0.2 0.2 ... 182.6 182.6 ... 1.3 0.1 0.1 ... 1.2 1....
Panama City................................. 72.5 72.5 72.5 ... ... ... ... 1.1. 1 1 ............
Port St. Jce. ........................... ...... .... ..
Mobile............................ ........... 13,676.' 12,523 2,511.5 12. 1,12.2 1,12.2 ... 117.2 o1. 107.4 .9 9 8.9
Mobile, Ala................................. 12,8.8.8 11,732.6 11,719.8 12.8 1,1 2.2 1,152.2 ... 18.1 9'.2 98.3 .9 8.9 8.9
Gulfport, Miss.............................. 05.7 7057 705.7 ... ... ... ... 8,3 3.3 8.3
Pascagoula, Miss.................... ... 8.9 85. .. .. .. .7 .7
Ne' Jrleans............................... .. 22,573.8 18,425. 18,30.8 12.7 4,14.: 4,1,48.O C .3 .7.3 47.1 62'.7 17.4 28.2 28.2 4 8)
Ne, Crleans, L............................. 8,I10.5 6,964.2 6,845.2 i19.0 1,846. 1,846.0 3 1.4 577.6 J.5 17.1 13.8 13.8 )
Baton Rouge, Li ............................. 7,534.0 7,224.0 7,218.9 5.7 9.4 39.4 ... 40.2 38.1 37.8 2.1 2.1
Port Sulphur, La .............. .................. ......
St. Luis..................................
Sabine...................................... 1,183.9 274.6 274.6 ... 90/. 889.9 .4 14.0 .3 '.3 ... 6.6 6
PFrt Arthur, Tex............................ 221 .9 ... ... ... 221.9 221.9 ... 1.3 ... ..... 1.3
Orange, Tex................................ (.) () (*) ... ... ... .. () ) () .
Beaumont, Tex............................... .36.7 32.7 32.7 ... 6.0 84.6 19.4 1.0 .3 .3 ... .. 4.6 .
Lake Charles, La............................. 32.3 241.9 241.9 ... 83.4 3.4 ... 2. 2.1 2.1 ... .8
Galveston..................................... 14. 1., 110 13 31. 3,43. 3,43.9 ( 44.3 4. 32
Galveston, Tex.............................. 59.3 598.3 95.9 2.4 () () ... 34. 34.6 34.3 ).3 )
Houston, Tex................................ 5,841.0 3,074. 60.4 14.4 2,70, 2,766.2 () 3.3 3. 330.3 3.6 14 19.4 ()
Freeport, Tex................................ 36.3 .9 33. ..3 1 3 1.3
Corpus Christi, Tex........................... 7, 7 7. 7,334.8 7,320.2 3 14. 312.4 12.4 ... a.5 49.6 4 .1 1. 1.9 1
Texas City, Tex ............................ i38.9 31.S 35.9 ... 32 23.0 ... 33.5 2. ... 7.6 7.6
Lared ............................................. 16.2 1 109. 3.7 2. ... 7.2 .2.3
Brownsville, Tex ............................ 165.2 1.2 109. 52.0 2. ... 7.2 6.9 6.2 0.7 0.3 0.

So th Pacific Coast Districts,............ 3 4.2 4.3 988. 2, ) 12 1, .6 27. 172. 1 2.8 (*)

San Dieg ...................................... "i .2 .'. -. ... 2. 2. 22.8 .
Los Angeles................................ 1,. ,2. i ) 5. 551.2 31.1 20.1 10,.2 10,. 4 )
Ls Angeles, Calitf....................... 9,,, 2,4 2, .7 2. ", (*) 47. 373.1 354.7 18.4 54.7 54.7 ()
Port San Luis, Calif. ....................... ....
Long Beach, Calif........................... n, 1 1. ..7 1 4.6 172.9 1.7 -2.4 32.4
El Segundo, Calif........................... 2,458. 3 3. .. 0 2 50 i. 0.9 0. 1. 2 17.2
Hueneme, Calif.............................. 22 2.5 i. ... .. 25
San Franci co. ............................. .... 1,3) 477. 476.7 ,. .
Eureka, Calif....... ......... ............ .... (.) 3.) ( )
San Francisco, Calif.......................... 7 1,874.6 .1 24. ... 44.8 8.5
................ 404. F 3,8 .. 1.u,
St.ckton, Calif............................. 15.1 2. ... 17.4 1. 17. )
Oakland, Calif..................... ....1 .... .. 1. 34.3 34..1 0.2 (*) (*)
Richmond, Calif....... ................ ,84.2 .3 153.3 ( 94.' -, ... >.4 108 10.8 () 35.6 5.6
Alameda, Calif................................ 153. 153.3 .2 7.5 7.4 .
Martinez, Calif....................... .. 3, S. .
Hfed toC City, CaSif .......................... 2 0. 0..ii,.. ..... .7 .7
Selby, Cali........................ ........ ., a 7 1 (.) ... ... ... 5i. 5.. .) ,

North Pacif!c C-ast Distric,............. 12,1 .2 ,772. ,7. 74.3 .0 5,36.0 33. 29.5 252.2 43.5 3.

Astoria.................................... ... c 0.1.3

Ne ,0ort. ...
Ne Baor ..................................... ... 1 0.
C e. orta ................................... 7.2 .' .. 5 ... 7. 24. .. .. 0.1

Washinton. .................................. 64. 3. 6.9 ,266.3 5,266. ... 196.3 14.5 48.3 6.2 41. 41.8
S-attle .......................... 849. 1,75.7 63. 9.1 ... 103. 102.0 9.9 6.1 1.9


Be llinghan ...... .......................... ... i 57. W ,,, 8. 1, 8.9 ... .2 32 ... 4 4.8 4.8 ... .1 0.1 ..
Ev..tt............................... .... 84 7. 23 7. 237.8 3.1 .... 6.0 61.0 6.0 ... ... ..
Port .Ang.................................... 3 39.3 ... ... .. ... 1.7 1.7 1.7 ........
Prt To',nse.nd............................... 402.2 402. 402.2 .. ... ...... 1.0 1 1.0 ... ...
Ana crts ........ ..................... .... 4, 3b. 30..0 ... 4,606.4 4,66.4 ... 3.8 ... .': 34. .

-ee fo,ooteos at end cf table.














Table 2.--SHIPPING 5 EIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATER ORNE GENERAL IMP'R'l S AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TAN) K VE 'FLU',
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND VORT OF UNLADING--COntirued


Shipping weight in millions of pounds Valu in millions of1 dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargn, banker
Customs district suad port Grand Grand
total l General In- General In- total General In- General In-
imports transit imports transit imports transit mports transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (1L) (1 ) (1') (14)

Great Lakes District..................... 25,699.6 25,294.3 25,299.8 4.5 405.3 405.3 ... 457.7 448.5 447.9 0.6 .2 9.2

St. La'rence.................................. 513.1 388.6 388.6 (1) 124.5 124.5 ... 14.0 13.1 13.1 (a) 0.9 .9
Ogdensburg, N. Y........................... 236.1 212.0 212.0 (*) 24.1 24.1 ... 12. 12.3 12.3 (a) 0.2 0.2
Waddington, N. Y............................. 176.6 176.6 176.6 ... ... ... ... 0.8 0.8 0.8 ..
Massena, N. Y.............................. 100.4 ... ... ... 100.4 100.4 ... 0.7 .. ... ... 0.7 0.7
Rochester........................................ 287.9 287.9 287.9 ... ... ... ... 6.9 6.9 6 .
Oswego, N. Y................................ 37.9 37.9 37.9 ........ ... 2.2 2.2 2.2
Rochester, N. Y............................. 250.0 250.0 250.0 ... ... ...... 4.6 4.6 4.6 .
Sodus Point, N. Y...........................
Buffalo......................................... 1,912.3 1,847,8478 (*) 64.7 64.7 ... 15.7 15.1 15.3 () 0.4
Buffalo, N. Y.............................. 1,906.9 1,842.2 1,842.2 (a) 64.7 64.7 ... 15.7 15.3 15.3 (*) 0.4 .4
Duluth and Superior ........................... 476.7 476.7 474.0 2.7 ... ... ... 7.9 7.9 7.9 (*)
Duluth, Minn ................................ 220.6 220.6 217.9 2.7 ... .... .5.5 5.5 5.5 (*)
Ashland, Wis........ .... .................... .....
International Falls-Ranier, Miin............ 162.2 162.2 16.2 ... ... ... ... 1.0 1.0 ...
Superior, Wi ........................ 93.8 93.8 33.8 ... ... ... ... 1.4 1.4 1.4 ...
iscnns in..................................... 1,019.9 1,01.5 1,150 1.5 .4 3.4 ... 50.7 50.7 50.5 0.2 )
Milaukee ...................... .......... 605.5 605.5 604.0 1.5 ... ... ... 31.8 31.8 31.6 0.2 ...
Marinertte................................. 144 144.5 144.5 ... ... ... ... 9.6 9.6 9.6
Green Bay.................................... 97.8 194.4 194.4 ... 3.4 3.4 ... 5.4 5.4 5.4 ... (*) I)
Michiga ........................................ ,791.3 5,676.2 5,676.1 0.1 115.1 115.1 ... 103.4 99.8 99.8 (*) 3.6 3.6
Detroit.......................... ....... 5,158.1 5,156.3 5,156.2 0.1 1.8 1.8 ... 82.9 82.8 82.8 () i .
Saginaw-Bay City............................ 230.4 227.7 227.7 ... 2.7 2.7 ... 6.7 6.6 6.6 ... 0 I.
Escanaba........ .... ........................ 3.6 ... ... ... 3.6 3.6 ... (*) ... (*) (*)
Muskegon.............. .................... 53.9 3.9 53 9 ... ... ... ... 5.2 5.2 5.2 .....
Marquette.............................. .. ...... .. ......... ...... .
:alc. te ....................................... .. ...... ........................
Presque Isle....................................
South Have .................................. 23.9 23.9 23.9 ... ... ... ... 1.2 1.2 1.2
Cln 1'.................. ..................... 4,382.2 4,362.2 4,362.1 0.1 20.0 20.0 ... 156.2 153.5 153.3 0.2
Chicag- I.1............................... 1,704.9 1,684.c 1,684.8 0.1 20.0 20.0 ... 143.5 140.8 140.6 0.2 2.7 2.7
East Chican, Ind........................... 2,636.9 2,36. 2,636.9 ... ... ... ... 12.7 12.7 12.7 .
hi .......................................... 11,316.2 11,238.6 11,238.5 0.1 77.6 77.6 ... 102.8 101.3 101.2 0.1 1.5 .
Cleveland.................................... 4,903.4 4,84.5 4,5 884.4 0.1 18.9 18.9 ... 54.9 54.0 53.9 0.1 0.9 0.9
Toledo....................................... 856.0 797.3 797.3 (*) 58.7 58.7 ... 26.0 25.4 25.4 (6) 0.6 0.6
Erie, P ..................................... 82.9 82.9 82.9 ... ... ... .. 0.9 0.9 0.9 .
Sandusky.............. ... ... 738 738 738 ... ... ... ... () () )
Ashtab la, .................................. 3,591.3 3,591.3 3,591.3 .. ... ... ... 14.8 14.8 14.8 ..
Conneaut.................................... 123. 1 12 3. 3.5 ... ... ... ... 2.4 2.4 2.4 ..
Fairp rt............. ...................... 775.3 775.3 775.3 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 0.3 ..
Huron ....................................... 599.3 599.3 599.3 ... ... ... ... 2.5 2.5 2.5 .
btrain......................... ......... 29. 29 29.0 295.0 ... ... ... .. 1.0 1.0 1..0

Puerto Rico, Hawall, and
Alaska Districts......................... 12,619.7 1,709.4 1,700.1 9.3 10,910.3 10,904.4 5.9 192.4 118.4 117.3 1.1 74.0 73.9 0.1

Puerto Ric................................... 11,253.9 1,241.8 1,235.0 6.8 10,012.1 10,011.7 0.4 145.2 76.9 76.5 0.4 68.3 68.3 (*)
Guanlca..................................... 79.2 11.7 11.7 ... 67.5 67.7 ... 0.5 0.2 0.2 ... 0.3 .3
Mayaguez................................... 83.1 67.2 67.2 ... 15.9 15.9 ... 3.0 2.9 2.9 ... 0.1 0.1
Ponce....................................... 152.8 152.8 152.8 .. ... ... ... 6.4 6.4 6.4 .
San Juan..................................... 3,653.7 1,003.5 996.7 6.8 2,650.2 2,650.2 ... 83.8 67.2 66.8 0.4 16.6 16.6
Hawail......................................... 1,280.0 393.3 393.2 0.1 886.7 886.7 ... 42.7 37.2 37.2 () 5.5 5.5
Honolulu.................................... 1,258.6 371.9 371.8 0.1 886.7 886.7 ... 41.0 35.5 35.5 (*) 5.5 5.5
Alaska......................................... 85.8 74.3 71.9 2.4 11.5 6.0 5.5 4.5 4.3 3.7 0.6 0.2 0.1 0.1


IFlorida Atlantic Coast port totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast port totals to obtain imports through the Customs District of Florida.


*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds; less than 50,000 dollars.











CALENDAR YEAR 1960

Table 3.-SHIPPING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARGO AI) TANKER VESSELS, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF SERVICE,
AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS:

(Data in millions of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary lightly from the suas of the rouded amounts)
-- -- --- -- -- -- --- ---- -- ---


Trade area








Total all trade areas:
Calendar year 1959.................
Calendar year 1960 ................

Foreign trade areas except Canadian...
Caribbean..................................
East Coast South America...................
West Coast South America ...................
West Coast Central America and Mexico.......
Gulf Coast Mexico ..........................

United Kingdom and Eire.....................
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland..
Bayonne-Hamburg Range........................
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic..............
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea .........

West Coast Africa ..........................
South and East Africa ......................
Australasia.................................
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea.............
Malaya and Indonesia........................
South China, Formosa and Philippines........
North China including Shanghai and Japan....

Canadian trade areas..................

Pacific Canada..............................
Great Lakes Canada..........................
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland.............


Grand
total all
vessels





(1)



218,951.8
252,878.7

206,872.4
8,535.6
9,195.7
3,822.3
646.2
815.3

16,013.6
10,861.8
49,129.1
2,360.3
31,364. 1

1,537.7
1,569.7
2,703.7
17,481.7
1,112.7
4,490.1
45,232.8

46,006.5

5,142.0
37,203.0
3,661.5


Total all vessels


Total


(2) (3)


217,520.0
248,456.3

205,947.6
8,146.6
9,180.4
3,765.1
614.3
810.0

15,988.3
10,812.2
49,052.0
2,356.4
31,326.5

1,510.1
1,538.9
2,664.4
17,442.1
1,088.7
4,440.1
45,211.5

42,508.9

1,755.1
37,132.9
3,620.9


United
States
flag


35,637.5
40,171.3

32,418.4
1,344.6
1,789.9
1,066.7
151.9
27.4

1,901.23
2,1j2.3
2,624.9
520.3
5,419.5

531.7
709.7
470.9
8,143.0
380.3
1,922.6
3,221.4

7,752.8

918.9
6,689.1!
144.8


Fully l~ Ii 'ed shipments'

Dry cargo vessels

Total dry car o Liner


United United
Total statess Total States
flag flag

(A) (5) (6) (7)


193,3,3.4
214,395.1

174,495.9
7,273.8
7,367.5
3,444.7
508.9
774.1

14,136.6
8,993.3
39,315.9
1,963.1
28,631.3

1,425.1
1,365.5
2,368.5
13,081.9
944.9
4,353.8
38,547.0

3q,899.4


31,940.0 61,642.5
33,706.2 70,927.4


27,079.7
1,272.6
1,028.3,
1,066.7
151.9
8.9

1,950.4
1,085.27
2,604.9
2.2
4,567.6

;27.3
709.7
414.2
5,811.7
380.3
1,922.6
3,195.2

6,626.5


70,402.1
5,522.7
2,812.6
2,108.0
4 8.9
307.7

5,668.3
3,802.4
12,243.9
77'.8
8,635.2

1,011.4
1,363.5
1, 835.
5,365.7
811.3
3,728.01
14,169.1l

525.41


16,580.8 131,743.9
19,962.3 143,467.7


19,859.2
1,196.5
940.0
994.4
149.3
0.7

1,884.2
669.6
2,388.5
94.7
2,553.0

463.3
7C9.7
387.7
2,082.5
313.2
1,901.4
3,130.5

i03.0


451.6 114.7 79.51 27.0
S.67.6 6,367.0 214.2I 7.
,280.2 144.- 231.7 0.
-"- 2.


104,093.8
1,751.1
4,554.9
1,336.7
70.0
466.4

8,468.3
5,190.9
27,072.0
1,385.3
19,996.1

413.7
2.0
533.4
7,716.2
133.1
625.8
24,377.9

39,374.0

372.1
35,953.4
,048.5


Crregul5ui


United


Tanker vessels



Uiniited


Total


States
flag

(9) (10)



15,359.2 24,133.6
13,743.9 34,061.2

7,220.5 31,451.7
76.1 872.8
88.3 1,812,9
72.3 320.4
2.6 105.4
8.2 35.9

66.2 1,851.7
415.6 1,818.9
216.4 9,736.1
287.5 193.3
2,014.6 2,695.2

64.0 85.0
... I 173.4
26.5 295.9
3,729.2 4,360.2
67.1 143.8
21.2 86.3
64.7 6,664.5

6,523.5 2,609.5

87.7 1,303.5
6,291.1 965.3
144.7 340.7


*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds. 'Figures based on complete coverage of snipmenc valued at $00 or more. 2Figures based on complete coverage of shipments
valued at $500 or more and an estimate based on a 10 percent sample of the $100-$499 shlments. The chances are 2 out of 3 in the long ran that the sampling error for
the figures which include estimates for the low-valued shipments is less than one percent or less than 50,00 pounds. 'Classification of dry cargo vessels as
"liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of a 'chedulea berth operation, etc.) using the classification
criteria of the Maritime Administration. The sampling error is 3 percent.


Table 4.-SHIPPING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATES GENERAL IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARPI TANKER VE. UNITED STATES FLAG ';; ELS:


OF S!VC, AND AMOUT CA'HIED ON


Trade area


Total all vesse:


Total all trade areas:
Calendar year 1959............................. 399,407.3
Calendar year 1960............................... 398,0.6


Foreign trade areas except Canadian................

Caribbean ..............................................
East Coast South America................................
West Coast South America................................
West Coast Central America and Mexico....................
Gulf Coast Mexico.......... .............................

United Kirndom and Eire................................
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland...............
Bayonne-Hsamburg Range....................................
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic...........................
Azores, Mediterranean and Black ea......................

West Coast Africa.......................................
South and East Africa....................................
Australasia..............................................
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea..........................
Malaya and Indonesia......................................
South Ci..na, Fonmosa and Philippines.....................
North China including Shanghai and Japan.................

Canadian trade areas..............................

Pacific Canada.........................................
Great Las Calada......................................
At anti Csanada and Newfoundland ........................


2,607.5
3,041.6
9,901.3
775.6
11,343.5

4,490.0
3,404.1
1,160.4
32,376.1
8,964.3
5,502.5
4,697.5

49,127.9


7,357.
25,799__;)


38,421.2
39,298.0

32,010.3


1,576.1
4,675.7
6C7.1
319.2


197,347.7 29,5 4,43.9 i 1,
1S9,561.1 27,41 I 1:63. I 11,938.

141,413.4 20,41,.. 3',717.3 11,723.:

65,686.9 ,742.! .396.7 ,18.
7,350.1 1,76 3.4
19,518.81 4,675.7 ,679.1 1,77.
3,604.3 9 1.9 126.
2,878.1 319.2 606.4 ].


594.6 4,490.0
1, 339.3 3,44.1
363.2 1,160.4
1,712.0 3,073.0
556.6 943.6
088.4 5,434.4
1,10.1 4,278.4

7,287. 4,147.3


4, 2. 15,75".
13,


Crotes less than 50,000 pounds. iClassification of dry carfo vessels as "liner" or "irrec i;
voyage is part of a scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritli


170.5 29
796.I 6,936.8

874.4 |, ;,47.4



1,339.i ,1 .
56. ",61.4
1,3.2 31.6



7,C46- ,i .<.-
I, lbl4 742.
4,494'. 2 ,
Z %/ 2.,


6, .3 202,059.6 ,7i.
.. L 15,25.4 208,523.5 11,,34.,:


,66. ,6.5 207,543.-

,58.9 157,190.4
05. 5.5 218.2
.5,39.7 2,;<( .9 71.8
0 66. a 84.4
2,271 318.0 2,589.3
588.4 .1 14.2

0 1 i

S683.8 26.
2,571.6 .2 92.3
1964.2 I


:63.8 11I


C 3. 4 .7 :


or tran;? >
Adr] in'

States
flag


(11)



3,697.5
6,465.1

5,338.7
72.0
761.6


18.5

10.8
1,047.1
19.6
138.6
851.9

4.4

56.7
2,331.3


26.2

1,126.3

804.2
322.1


10,609.1


75.

I'6,8








SPECIAL NOTICES


TRANSSHIPMENTS TO CANADA OF C: ..- _. _' Ii .- OF CANADIAN ORIGIN VIA SUPERIOR, WIic'l:..'I:

Transshipments by vessel from Superior to ports in Canada of crude petroleum of Canadian
origin are a source of difference in the in-transit statistics of the Bureau of the Census and the
Corps of Army Engineers. Data on these movements are excluded from the Bureau of the Census sta-
tistics on waterborne in-transit trade but are included in the figures published in the annual
report of the Chief of Engineers, Department of the Army, entitled Waterborne Commerce of the United
States. (For a discussion of the reasons why these data are not in..1.1i1_ in t: -- .tat iti: : -npi l.I
by the Bureau of the Census, see article in the June 1952 Foreign Trade Statistics Notes).

Amounts excluded from the Census in-transit data for 1960, but included in the Army Engi-
neer data, are shown in the following table:

CRUDE -ITP'..-.'' OF C ) J.'JLIAN ORIGIN Lt''Ji ON TANKER YE'L tlS AT
I. E;. I'i. k .,':i.;. I; FOR '.uJl..iill i [:1i1 TO CANADIAN PORTS
CALENDAR YEAR 1960


Month Value Shipping weight
(thousands of dollars) (thousands of pounds)

January....................................... ... ...
February...................................... ... ...
March........................................ ... ...
April................................ ........ ....
May........................................... ... ..
June........................................ ...
July.......... .. ............................. .. ..
August....................................... 747 97,866
September.................................... 681 89,184
October...................................... 471 61,616
November..................................... 262 34,268
December.................................. ...

Total................................... .... 2,16i 282,934


'.ETAII-D JTATIcTICS TO BE RELEASED ON b,.Ji:R,!.Ilw! EXPORTS OF AVIATION GASOLINE,
AVI.UTAI'1 Elii'lE i _.ilf rFTiTl'-, OILS, AND JET 7'' (ALL TYPES)

For the calendar year 1960, and effective on a current basis with the January 1961 sta-
tistics, data on waterborne exports of aviation gasoline, jet fuels (all types) and aviation lubri-
2ating oils are included in the regularly compiled export sh, ; statistics in complete United
States port by foreign port by Schedule S, Statistical Classification of Domestic and Foreign Mer-
r-.. _r, I t.] at tn- .. .' commodity by country
.' .',, -: .. T .- ...:. .:l _'. : i ~ AL Category" and include e
Sthe shi:..ir.' statistics combined with waterborne Department of Defense shipments under the
Mutual Security Program in terms of -T i. wi totals only, on the basis of United States port
y foreign country/area of unlading arrangement, without segregation by foreign port of unlading or
country of destination. The commodities for which security restrictions have row been removed with
heir respective commodity numbers and descriptions are shown below.


Code Number Code N,-mboe Range


Aviation motr fuels 9(
number and oer


521 (50400) Aviation lubrLca-1 o


sc 'lpeion


ctan(


(50161,50163)







12 REVISED LIST OF SPECIAL CATEGORY CLASSIFICATIONS EFFECTIVE
JANUARY 1961


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08587 9053


A revised list of the "Special Category" commodities effective January 1, 1961 is shown
below in terms of the classifications in Schedule S. This revised list is identical with the
list previously in effect (April 1958 Foreign Trade Statistics Notes) except for the deletion of the
Schedule S commodity numbers listed above.

Schedule S Commodity Schedule B Commodityi
Code ,~er ,Schedule S Description
Code Number Code Number Range

GROUP 2 VEGETABLEE PRODUCTS, INEDIBLE, EXCEPT FIBERS AND WOOD
206 (20630,20656) Aircraft tires, casings and inner tubes
GROUP 6 METAL. AND MANUFACTURES, EXCEPT MACHINERY AND VEHICLES

610 i (61907) Bridges, portable and knockdown, and specially fabri-
cated parts, not elsewhere classified (all metals)

GROUP 7 MACHINERY AND VEHICLES

705 (70660,70867 Special electrical machinery and apparatus. (Includes
70921,709991 searchlights and airport beacons; electronic detection
and navigational apparatus; aircraft type starting,
lighting, and ignition equipment, except sparkplugs;
electrical apparatus and parts, not elsewhere clas-
sified)
708 (70779-70789, Radio communication transmitters (except radio beacon),
70797,70840) receivers, transceivers, and parts, not elsewhere
classified; electron tubes, except receiving type and
cathode-ray.
739 (74032 74058, Artillery and ammunition lathes; shell tappers; rifling
74447) and rifle-working machines
784 (79555,79560) Military watercraft (except converted), and parts
788 (79013,79017, Military automobiles, trucks, busses and trailers and
79021,79025, including parts, accessories and military service
79029,79037, equipment
79041,79045,
79057,79067,
79073,79078,
790 -5-79095,
79114 79133,
791455
789 (79277) Automobile, truck, bus and trailer parts and acces-
sories (military only) except combat and armored
utility vehicle parts and accessories
794 (79321-79359, Aircraft and parts, not elsewhere classified
79381-79440,
79461-79466
79470-79496)
GROUP 8 CHELrICALC AND RELATED PRODUCTS

807 (80110) Toluene or toluol
833 (83952) Military gases
863 (86015 86070- Explosives, fuses and blasting caps, except dynamite
862751
GROUP liUj'ELLAIIjEOJS

908 (94700,94721, Small arms (including revolvers but excluding sporting
94740,94745 rifles and 1hottmn), machine guns, parts and acces-
94814-948505 series; ammunition components and parts
909 ( ."'.',90025, Special miscellaneous commodities. (Includes gun and
91493,91650, aerial cameras; binoculars; artillery and naval guns,
94750-94798, mortars, rockets and missile launchers; self-propelled
94961,94970, weapons and tanks; fireworks and pyrotechnics; navi-
99930, 99960) national instruments; military apparel of all types,
including footwear; miscellaneous military and naval
equipment, not elsewhere classified)


USCOMM--DC




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