United States foreign trade

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Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Water-borne foreign trade statistics
Alternate title:
Waterborne foreign trade statistics
United States water-borne foreign trade
United States waterborne foreign trade
Added title page title:
United States foreign trade
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, including annual cumulation

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in June 1965.
General Note:
"Summary report FT 985."
General Note:
Description based on: Calendar year 1952; title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: June 1965.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 13695873
lccn - sf 86092445
ocm13695873
Classification:
lcc - WMLC L 83/3610
System ID:
AA00010658:00025

Related Items

Succeeded by:
U.S. waterborne foreign trade


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Full Text


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMER E
Luther H. Hodges, Secretary


'/


CENSUS


UNITED STATES FOREIGN


SUMIaARY PORUT
FT 985


OCTOHBE 1961


./tpCard M Scaomrfn. Dir toi


TR '

TRDE7
,,./'


FOR RELEASE


WATERBORNE FOREIGN TRADE STATISTICS
COVERAGE


This report presents statistics on total United
States aterborne inbound and outbound shipments
made in foreign trade, with the exception of such
elements a are specified below.

Fr July 1953 through December 1955 and starting
with July 1956, the statistics on waterborne ex-
ports of domestic and foreign merchandise and
non-Department of Defense shipments of "special
category" comodities exclude shipments individu-
ally valued at less than $500. For the months
January through June 1956,these statistics exclude
export shipments individually valued at less than
$1,000. Information on the exclusion of the low-
valued export shipments in the vessel statistics
is contained in the November 1953 and February
1956 issues of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.
From January 1954 through December 1957 vessel
import figures exclude shipments having a shipping
weight of less than 2,000 pounds, regardless of
value, as well as shipments valued at less than
$100, regardless of shipping weight. Starting
with January 1958 statistics the import data
exclude only those shipments where the value is
less than $100 regardless of shipping weight.
Information o the exclusion of the low-value and
low-weight import shipments in the vessel statis-
tics is contained in the February and March 1954
and January-March 1958 issues of the Foreign Trade
Statistics Notes.

Vessel export figures in this report, shown in
colulum 4, 9, 13, and 16 of table 1 and in table
3, represent exports of domestic and foreign
merchandise laden at the United States Customs
area for shipmentto foreign countries and include
export shipments to United States civilian Govern-
ment agencies and non-Department of Defense con-
trolled foreign aid program shipments as described
below. Excluded from these figures are shipments
to the United States armed forces abroad of
supplies and equipment for their own use as well
as the other types of shipments described below
for which information is shown in separate column
in table 1.


Department of D-.f-n-se contr- lld ""-pe 'al
category" figures, shown in :-lumns 6 and 11 of
table 1 and in tables 5 and 6 of this report cover
consolidated data for the follovwng type s cf
shipments:
1. Vessel erp-rt shipments of Department of
Defense controlled cargo under special
foreign aid programs, i.e.,Inerr.aticn-
al Cooperation Adinistration, Ar,' Ci-
vilian Supply, etc., made aboard United
States flag vessels such as Army-Navy
transports or commercial vessels char-
tered by the Department of Defense under
time, voyage and space charter arrange-
ments and including "special category"
commodities without distinction.
2. Vessel export shipments of special cat-
egory" commodities not control ie by the
Departmentof Defense for which detailed
information cannot be show separately
because of security reasons. For an ex-
planation and list o "special category"
commodities and their presentation in
foreign trade statistics see the April
1958 issue of Foreign Trade Statistics
Notes.

Only shipping weight data in terms United States
port or coastal district of lading and foreign
trade area of unloading are shown for these classes
of shipwnts since information on the dollar value
of exports of Departent of Defense controlled
cargo is not available at this level Xf detail.
Consequently, the total value figures shown in
column 12 and 15 of table 1 for dry car., and
tanker shipmentE in that order corT'-pon, to the
shipping weight figures shown in columns 3. and R,
respectively, of the same tsblp.

Vessel import figur-es, shown in col1m 3, 6, 9
and 12 of table 2 and in table 4 of this report,
are general ciports and represent the total of
imports for imdiatu- cunsumptior, plus entries
int. custom b nded st rae4-" and manIufac :uring
warehouses made at the n ted States Custom.; area


UG;CCM-DC
Prepord in the Bureu of the Censu,, Foregn Trade Division
Shipping and Foreign Aid Branch. Milton Kaufman. Chief, Clifton Jodon, Assistant Chef
For sale by the Bureea of the Cenlus, Washington 25, 0. C, Price 10Q onnuo I vbscrptlon $) 00.


____







from foreign countries. Vessel import figures
exclude American goods returned by the United
States armed forces for their own use, import
shipments on Army or Navy transports, and ship-
ments covered by informal entries.

The following types of shipments are excluded from
both the vessel export and import data: (1) ship-
ments of household and personal effects,(2) ship-
ments by mail and parcel post, and (3) shipments
of vessels under their own power and afloat.
United States trade with Puerto Rico and with
United States possessions is not reported as
United States exports and imports.

Merchandise shipped in bond through the United
States in transit from one foreign country to
another without having been entered as an import
is not included in any of the figures in the
columns previously referred to (imported merchan-
dise cleared through Customs and subsequently
re-exported is included in both the import and
export statistics). Separate information for the
waterborne portion of the in-transit trade in terms
of shipping weight and dollar value is presented
in this report in tables 1 and 2. Columns 5,
10, 14, and 17 of table 1 reflect in-transit
merchandise laden aboard vessels at United States
ports, while columns 4, 7, 10 and 13 of table 2
reflect such merchandise unladen from vessels.
The waterborne outbound and inbound in-transit
statistics include (1) foreign merchandise trans-
ferred from one vessel to another in the United
States port of arrival and shipped to a foreign
country without being released from Customs cus-
tody in the United States; and (2) foreign mer-
chandise arriving by vessel at one United States
port, shipped through the United States inder
Customs bond, and leaving the United States by
vessel from a port other than that at which it
arrived. In addition, the waterborne outbound
in-transit statistics also include (1) foreign
merchandise withdrawn from a general order ware-
house for immediate export by vessel or for trans-
portation and export by vessel (such merchandise
van not recorded as an import when it entered the
warehouse), and (2) foreign merchandise shipped
via vessel from aUnited States Foreign Trade Zone
to a foreign country (such merchandise is deposited
in the Foreign Trade Zone without being entered as
an import). Any inbound or outbound in-transit
merchandise moving by methods of transportation
other than vessel is excluded from the in-transit
statistics. Thus, merchandise arriving at the
United States by vessel and leaving by some other
method of transportation is included in the in-
bound data only. On the other hand, merchandise
arriving by other than waterborne transportation
and laden aboard vessels upon departure is in-
cluded in the outbound statistics but not in the
inbound data. The inbound and outbound segments,
therefore, do not counter-balance one another and
are complementary only insofar as they involve
merchandise carried by vessels to and from the
United States. For a more detailed discussion of
the in-transit trade statistics and the types of
shipments excluded from these data seatheFebruary
1953 issue of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.


All types of outbound vessel shipments in tables
1 and 5 are credited to the coastal districts,
customs districts, and ports at which the merchan-
dise was laden. All types of inbound vessel ship-
ments in table 2 are credited to the coastal dis-
tricts, customs districts, and ports at which
merchandise was unladen. In the case of vessel
general imports this is not necessarily the same
as the customs district in which the goods were
entered into warehouse or entered for immediate
consumption.

Vessel exports in tables 3 and 6 are credited to
the foreign trade areas at which the merchandise
was unladen. Vessel imports in table 4 are cred-
ited to the foreign trade areas at which the
merchandise was laden aboard the vessels carrying
the cargo to the United States. The countries of
destination or origin of merchandise are not nec-
essarily located within the trade areas to which
the merchandise is shipped or from which it is
received. Detailed definitions of foreign trade
areas in terms of the countries and ports included
in each are contained in Schedule R, Code Class-
ification and Definition of Foreign Trade Areas.

Shipping weight figures represent the gross weight
of shipments, including the weight of containers,
wrappings, crates and moisture content. Vessel
export values represent the values at time and
place of export. They are based on the selling
price (or' on the cost if not sold) and include
inland freight, insurance and other charges to
place of export. Transportation and other costs
beyond the United States port of exportation are
excluded. Vessel import values, as well as the
values for in-transit shipments, are generally
based on the market or selling price and are in
general f.o.b. the exporting country. Since in-
transit merchandise is not subject to the imposi-
tion of import duties at the United States, the
valuation reported for such shipments is not
verified by customs to the extent applicable in
the case of import entries and may in some cases
include transportation costs and insurance to the
United States as well as other cost elements.

Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are classified
as dry cargo or tanker shipments solely on the
basis of the type of vessel used without regard
to the cargo carried. Tanker vessels are those
primarily designed for the carriage of liquid
cargoes in bulk, while all others are classified
as dry cargo vessels. A further segregation of
dry cargo vessel shipments is provided in tables
3-6 on the basis of type of service, i.e., liner
(berth) or irregular (tramp). Liner service is
that type of service offered by a regular line
operator of dry cargo vessels on berth. The
itineraries and sailing schedules of such vessels
are predetermined and fixed. Irregular or tramp
service is that type of service afforded by dry
cargo vessels which are chartered or otherwise
hired for the carriage f goods special voyages.
Vessels in this type of service are not on berth
and their sailing schedules are not predetermined
or fixed.










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Table 1.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE, OUTBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, AND SHIRENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO AND
"SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF IADING-Continued

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars
Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Domestic, foreign and pt. Domestic, foreign and .
Customs district and port iG d n-transit cargo Defes in-transit cargo DDc
e total Defense Domestio In- Domestic in-
Totalomestic and "pe- Total Destic In- and "pe- Total nd for- tras- Total and for- tran-
cimestic tr cial cat- cial cat- sign it esin it
Total and for- trans- egory" Total and for- trans- al t egn et n gt
eign it sign it

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17)
South Atlantic Coast Districts--Con.

Florida ............................ ... 80.9 79.4 79.4 78.9 0.5 () 1.5 1.5 1.5 ... ... 8.4 8.3 0.1 0.1 0.1
Jacksonville ........................... 48.5 47.0 47.0 46.9 0.1 1.5 1.5 1.5 ... ... 3.1 3.1 (.) 0.1 0.1
Miami ............................... 15.7 15.7 15.7 15.5 0.2 () ... ... ... ... 3.4 3.4 ()
West Palm Beach....................... 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 ... ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 .
Port Everglades,....................... 4.4 4.4 4.4 4.2 0.2 ) .. .. ... 0.7 0.7 (.)

Gulf Coast Districts................ 7,011.1 5,189.9 5,179.5 5,069.2 110.3 10.4 1,821.3 1,805.8 1,804.7 1.1 15.5 275.0 261.7 13.3 67.8 67.8 (*)

Floridal................................ 800.8 796.2 796.2 796.2 ... () 4.6 4.6 4.6 ... .. 7.4 7.4 ... 0.2 0.2.
Tampa................................ 737.0 737.0 737.0 737.0 ... () ... ... ... ... ... 5.4 5.4
Penaacola ............................. 13.2 12.6 12.6 12.6 ... ... 0.6 0.6 0.6 ... ... 0.5 0.5 ... ()
Bocagrande............................ 17.6 17.6 17.6 17.6 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1 .
Panama City.......................... 32.6 28.7 28.7 28.7 ... ... 4.0 4.0 4.0 ... ... 1.5 1.5 ... 0.2 0.2
Mobile ............................... 217.0 181.7 181.4 179.5 1.9 0.3 35.4 35.4 35.4 ... ... 8.9 8.6 0.3 1.3 1.3
Mobile, Ala ......................... 190.8 155.5 155.2 155.2 () 0.3 35.4 35.4 35.4 ... ... 7.8 7.8 (*) 1.3 1.3
Gulfport, Mis........................ .5 14.6 14.6 12.7 1.9 () ... ... ... ... ... 0.7 0.4 0.3
Pascagoula, Miss ....................... 11.6 11.6 11.6 11.6 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3
New Orleans ..................... ...... 2,932.4 1996.4 1,986.7 1,975.1 11.6 9.7 936.0 936.0 936.0 .. () 124.3 122.7 1.6 35.9 35.9
New Orleans, La............. ...... 1,849.6 1,256.7 1,247.0 1,237.9 9.1 9.7 592.9 592.9 592.9 ... ) 95.2 93.7 1.5 23.2 23.2
Baton Rouge, La....................... 758.1 514.7 514.7 512.3 2.4 ... 243.4 243.4 243.4 ... ... 18.2 18.2 ) 7.5 7.5
Port Sulphur, La....................... 102.7 102.7 102.7 102.7 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1.1 1.1 ...
St. Louis .......................... .... .....
Sabine.............................. ... 774.9 518.9 518.6 518.6 ... 0.3 256.0 256.0 256.0 ... ... 18.7 18.7 ... 7.1 7.1
Port Arthur, Tex ...................... 462.8 275.9 275.9 275.9 ... ... 186.8 186.8 186.8 ... ... 7.4 7.4 ... 4.6 4.6
Orange, Tex.......................... 24.1 24.1 24.1 24.1 ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.5 0.5 .
Beaumont, Tex........................... 192.0 155.6 155.5 155.5 ... 0.1 36.4 36.4 36.4 ... ... 7.0 7.0 ... 1.4 1.4
Lake Charles, La..................... 96.0 63.3 63.1 63.1 ... 0.2 32.7 32.7 32.7 ... ... 3.8 3.8 ... 1.1 1.1
Galveston.................... ......., 2,180.3 1,591.7 1,591.6 1,581.7 9.9 0.1 588.6 573.1 572.7 0.4 15.5 100.3 99.7 0.6 23.2 23.2 (*)
Galveston, Tex ...................... 719.3 647.9 647.9 647.4 0.5 ... 71.3 71.3 71.3 ... ... 26.5 26.4 0.1 2.0 2.0
Houston, Tex .................... 1,059.0 786.4 783.3 783.3 3.0 0.1 272.6 260.6 260.6 ... 12.0 64.6 64.1 0.5 11.9 11.9
Freeport, Tex...................... 33.5 8.1 8.1 8.1 ... ... 25.3 25.3 25.3 ... ... 0.6 0.6 ... 2.8 2.8
Corpus Christi, Tex ................... 268.7 149.2 249.2 142.9 6.3 ... 119.5 116.0 115.6 0.4 3.5 8.7 8.6 0.1 3.4 3.4 (a)
Texas City, Tex........................ 99.9 ... ... 99.9 99.9 99.9... ... ... ... 3.1 3.1
Laredo................................ 105.6 105. 105.0 18.0 87.0 ... 0.7 0.7 ... 0.7 ... 15.3 4. 10.8 () ... ()
.Brownville, Tex...................... 105.6 105.0 105.0 18.0 87.0 ... 0.7 0.7 ... 0.7 ... 15.3 4.5 10.8 () ... ()

South Pacific Coast Districts...... 1,901.4 1,280.7 1,262.2 1,257.4 4.8 18.5 620.7 620.7 620.7 (*) ... 95.6 93.4 2.2 7.7 7.7 (*)

San Diego.................. ............. 6.7 6.6 6.5 5.4 1.1 0.1 ... ... ... ... ... 1.0 0.7 0.3
Los Angeles.............................. 1,031.0 502.5 500.7 498.3 2.4 1.8 528.6 528.6 528.6 ... .. 30.1 29.2 0.9 5.4 5.4
Los Angeles, Calif.................. 503.1 112.8 112.4 111.2 1.2 0.4 390.3 390.3 390.3 ... ... 13.4 13.0 0.4 4.2 4.2
Port San Luis, Calif.................. 50.0 .. .. ... 50.0 50.0 50.0 ... ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3
Long Beach, Calif..................... 470.1 381.8 380.4 379.2 1.2 1.4 88.4 88.4 88.4 .. ... 16.5 16.0 0.5 0.9 0.9
3 Segundo, Calif ......... ............ ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... *
Huemene, Calif........................ 7.9 7.9 7.9 7.9 .,, .1. ... ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 .. .. .
Morro, Cal if.......... .......... ........
San Francisco ............................. 863.7 771.6 755.6 7S." 1.3 516.6 921 921 92.1 () ... 64.5 63.5 1.0 2.3 2.3 (*)
Eureka, Calif ...................... 30.0 30.0 28.4 28.4 .. 1.6 ..... ... ... 0.6 0.6 ...
San Francisco, Calif................ 102.8 102.8 101.6 100.6 1.0 1.1 (.) (a) ... (a) ... 28.3 27.5 0.8 (a) ... (0)
Stockton, Calif..................... 308.1 308.1 307.9 307.9 ... 0.2 ... ... ... ... ... 11.8 .8 ...
Oakland, Calif......................... 143.1 143.1 132.9 12. 0.1 10.2 ... ... ... ... ... 15.9 15.9 ()...
Richmond, Calif........................ 110.5 68.5 68.5 68.5 ... 41.9 41.9 41.9 ... ... 2.4 2.4 ... 1.7 1.7
Alamed, Calif. ....................... 30.5 28.4 28.4 28.2 0.2 ) 2.1 2.1 2.1 ... ... 5.0 4.9 0.1 0.1 0.1...
MartLnez, Calif ........................ 11.5 ... ... ... ... ... 11.5 11.5 11.5 ........ ... 0.1 0.1 ...
Reduood City, Calif................... 850 85.0 85.0 8.0 ... ... ... .. 0.2 0.2 ... ... ...
Selby, Calif......................... 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 ... ... ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1 ...
See footnotes at end of table. '








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6 October 1961
Table 2.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBORNE GENERAL IMPORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON DRY CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF UNLADING

(Totals are given for all customs districts at which there are vessel shipments. Only those ports are shown whose combined export and import tan-
nage averaged 5 million pounds or more per month during calendar year 1960. Customs district totals are for all ports in the district including
those not shown. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals shown
for previous months include current revisions)

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and port Grand General In- General In- General In- General In-
total imports transit Total imports transit Total imports transit Total imports transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Total all districts:
Monthly average 1960. 35,128.7 15,952.7 15,850.0 102.7 19,176.0 17,276.2 1,899.8 823.3 804.1 19.2 143.2 124.5 18.7
October 1960......... 33,596.8 15,487.8 15,399.0 88.8 18,109.0 16,257.4 1,851.6 771.0 753.3 17.7 137.6 119.3 18.3
September 1961....... 33,639.6 15,223.6 15,146.6 77.0 18,416.0 16,634.2 1,781.8 743.0 732.2 10.8 1.6 124.0 17.6
October 1961......... 35,929.7 17,795.8 17,711.2 84.6 18,133.3 16,118.9 2,014.4 839.5 826.7 12.8 138.3 118.4 19.9


North Atlantic Coast
Districts.............. 20,828.3 8,040.6 7,984.1 56.5 12,787.7 10,773.9 2,013.8 501.8 493.7 8.1 98.7 78.8 X9.9

Maine and New Hampshire....... 2,632.4 81.2 79.5 1.7 2,551.2 539.7 2,011.5 0.9 0.9 ) 23.7 3.8 19.9
Portland, Maine............ 2,082.9 21.9 20.2 1.7 2,061.0 49.5 2,011.5 0.8 0.8 () 20.2 0.3 19.9
Bangor, Maine.............. 46.1 ... ... ... 46.1 46.1 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3
Eastport, Maine............ 3.4 3.4 3.4 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1
Portsmouth, N. H........... 161.0 46.2 46.2 ... 114.8 11.8 ... i() () ... 0.8 0.8.
Belfast, Maine............. 74.9 ... ... ... 74.9 74.9 ... ... ... ... 0.5 0.5
Searsport, Maine ........... 225.4 9.5 9.5 ... 215.9 215.9 ... ) ) ... 1.6 1.6
Massachusetts................. 928.6 263.5 262.5 0.9 665.2 665.2 ... 34.7 34.4 0.3 4.4 4.4
Boston..................... 823.8 239.3 238.4 0.9 584.5 584.5 ... 33.1 32.8 0.3 3.9 3.9...
Gloucester................. 7.1 7.1 7.1 ... ... ... ... 1.3 1.3
New Bedford................ ...
Fall River.............. 58.9 16.9 16.9 .. .. 42.0 42.0 ... 0.4 0.4 ... 0.3 0.3
Salen...................... 38.9 0.2 0.2 ... 38.7 38.7 ... (*) (*) ... 0.3 0.3
Rhode Island.................. 113.2 5.1 5.1 ... 108.0 108.0 ... 0.2 0.2 ... 0.7 0.7...
Providence................. 113.2 5.1 5.1 ... 108.0 108.0 ... 0.2 0.2 ... 0.7 0.7
Connecticut.................. 303.5 37.7 37.7 ... 265.7 265.7 ... 0.9 0.9 ... 1.8 1.8
Bridgeport................. 74.5 5.0 5.0 ... 69.5 69.5 ... 0.2 0.2 ... 0.4 0.4...
New Haven.................. 188.3 31.5 31.5 ... 156.8 156.8 ... 0.6 0.6 ... 1.1 1.1...
New London................ 40.6 1.2 1.2 ... 39.4 39.4 ... 0.1 0.1 ... 0.3 0.3...
New York ..................... 5,495.1 1,921.1 1,887.7 33.4 3,573.8 3,571.5 2.3 352.3 345.0 7.3 26.8 26.8 ()
New York................... 5,286.8 1,829.8 1,796.2 33.6 3,457.0 3,454.7 2.3 351.9 344.6 7.3 26.1 26.1 (*)
Albany..................... 122.4 5.6 5.6 ... 116.9 116.9 ... 0.3 0.3 ... 0.8 .8
Philadelphia.................. 6,899.1 2,436.0 2,418.0 18.0 4,463.1 4,463.1 ... 51.5 51.1 0.4 33.5 33.5...
Philadelphia, Pa........... 3,327.2 1,362.2 1,344.2 18.0 1,965.0 1,965.0 ... 43.9 43.5 0.4 14.0 14.0...
Wilmington, Del............ 752.0 72.3 72.3 ... 679.7 679.7 ... 2.1 2.1 ... 4.5 4.5
Paulsboro, N. J ............ 1,123.1 3.1 3.1 ... 1,120.0 1,120.0 ... (*) ) ... 9.5 9.5 ...
Camden, N. J ................ 147.7 73.3 73.3 ... 74.4 74.4 ... 1.5 1.5 ... 0.6 0.6
Marnus Hook, Pa............ 624.0 ... ... ... 624.0 624.0 ... ... ... ... 4.9 4.9
Maryland..................... 3,549.0 2,936.7 2,934.6 2.1 612.3 612.3 ... 45.4 45.3 0.1 4.2 4.2 ...
Baltimore.................. 3,509.9 2,936.6 2,934.5 2.1 573.3 573.3 ... 45.4 45.3 0.1 4.0 4.0
Virginia...................... 907.6 359.2 359.0 0.2 548.4 548.4 ... 16.0 16.0 (M) 3.6 3.6
Norfolk.................... 419.6 187.9 187.9 (*) 231.6 231.6 ... 11.4 11.4 M) 1.6 1.6
Newport News............... 450.7 150.8 150.6 0.2 299.9 299.9 ... 3.3 3.3 (*) 1.9 1.9
Riclmond................... 4.9 4.9 4.9 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 ... ... ...
Alexandria ................. 15.6 15.6 15.6 ... ... ... ... 0.9 0.9 ... ...

South Atlantic Coast
Districts.............. 1,387.1 805.1 804.6 0.5 581.9 581.9 ... 38.5 38.4 0.1 3.8 3.8

North Carolina................ 103.2 67.7 67.7 ... 35.5 35.5 ... 2.7 2.7 ... 0.2 0.2 ...
wilmington................. 89.8 66.4 66.4 ... 23.4 23.4 ... 2.5 2.5 ... 0.1 0.1 ...
Morehead City.............. 13.4 1.3 1.3 ... 12.1 12.1 ... 0.1 0.1 ... 0.1 0.1
South Carolina................ 207.1 129.8 129.4 0.4 77.3 77.3 ... 10.8 10.7 0.1 0.5 0.5
Charleston................. 207.1 129.8 129.4 0.4 77.3 77.3 ... 10.8 10.7 0.1 0.5 0.5
Georgetown.i ............... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Georgia ....................... 433.4 299.8 299.8 () 133.6 133.6 ... 10.4 10.4 (*) 0.9 0.9
Brunswick.................. 35.5 35.5 35.5 ... ... ... ... ( M) ().
Savannah ................... 397.9 264.3 264.3 () 133.6 133.6 ... 10.4 10.4 () 0.9 0.9...
Florida'...................... 643.4 307.9 307.8 0.1 335.5 335.5 ... 14.6 14.6 ) 2.3 2.3...
Jacksonville............... 395.7 229.0 229.0 (*) 166.6 166.6 ... 7.8 7.8 M") 1.1 1.1
Miami....................... 52.2 29.0 28.9 0.1 23.1 23.1 ... 4.2 4.2 () 0.2 0.2...
West Palm Beach............. 0.1 0.1 0.1 ... ... ... ... () () ... ...
Port Everglades............ 194.2 48.4 48.4 (M) 145.7 145.7 ... 2.4 2.4 (*) 1.0 1.0

Gulf Coast Districts.... 5,019.5 4,135.3 4,118.6 16.7 884.2 884.2 ... 108.7 106.6 2.1 5.5 5.5

Florida ...................... 291.6 214.0 213.9 0.1 77.6 77.6 ... 7.4 7.4 (.) 0.5 0.5
Tampa...................... 192.5 192.5 192.4 0.1 ... ... ... 7.0 7.0 () ...
Pensacola.................. 21.5 21.5 21.5 ... ... ... ... 0.4 0.4
Bocagrande................. 40.0 ... ... ... 40.0 40.0 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3...
Panama City...................
Mobile................ ...... 1,004.1 946.7 944.6 2.1 57.4 57.4 ... 10.1 9.9 0.2 0.4 0.4
Mobile, Ala ................ 966.8 909.4 907.3 2.1 57.4 57.4 ... 9.1 8.9 0.2 0.4 0.4
Gulfport, Miss............. 37.3 37.3 37.3 ... ... ... ... 1.1 1.1 ... ... ...
Pascagoula, Miss........... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ......
New Orleans................... 1,973.9 1,798.0 1,7908 7.2 175.8 175.8 ... 50.2 49.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 ...
New Orleans, La............ 539.1 433.0 425.8 7.2 106.1 106.1 ... 42.5 41.4 1.1 0.6 0.6
Baton Rouge, la............ 827.7 827.7 827.7 ... ... ... ... 3.6 3.6
Port Sulphur, La...........
St. Louis..................... .. ... ... ... ... ...
Sabine........................ 16.2 9.1 9.1 ... 7.1 7.1 ... 0.7 0.7 ... 0.1 0.1
Port Arthur, Tex........... 7.1 ... ... ... 7.1 7.1 ... ... ... ... ()
Orange, Tex................ ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...
Beaumont, Tex.............. 4.6 4.6 4.6 ... ... ... ... 0.4 0.4 ... ... ...
Lake Charles, La........... 4.5 4.5 4.5 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3...
See footnotes at end of table.












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8 October 1961

Table 2.--SHIPPING WEIGHT AND VALUE OF UNITED STATES WATERBRNE GENERAL IMORTS AND INBOUND IN-TRANSIT MERCHANDISE, ON H CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS,
BY CUSTOMS DISTRICT AND PORT OF IUNADING-Continued

Shipping weight in millions of pounds Value in millions of dollars

Dry cargo Tanker Dry cargo Tanker
Customs district and portn- General In T eral Toa Gneal In-
total To imports transit imports transit imports transit imports transit

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13)
Great Lakes Districts-
Continued'
Chicago ..................... 563.2 556.4 556.4 (*) 6.7 6.7 ... 24.6 24.6 (*) 0.8 0.8 ...
Chicago, Ill.............. 294.3 287.5 287.5 (a) 6.7 6.7 ... 23.1 23.1 (a) 0.8 0.8 ...
East Chicago, Ind......... 268.9 268.9 268.9 ... ... ... ... 1.6 1.6 .. .. ...
Ohio....................... 1,675.9 1,670.7 1,670.7 (a) 5.1 5.1 ... 16.8 16.8 (a)* 0.1 0.1 ...
Cleveland ................ 994.4 994.4 994.4 () ... ... ... 11.1 11.1 () ... ... .
Toledo.................... 184.8 179.6 179.6 (*) 5.1 5.1 ... 3.8 3.8 (*) 0.1 0.1 ...
Erie, Pa,................. 20.0 20.0 20.0 ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.2 .. .....
Sandusay.................. 9.3 9.2 9.2 ... ... .... ... () ()...
Ashtabula................ 322.7 322.7 322.7 ... ... ... ... 1.4 1.4 .. .., ... ...
Conneaut.................. ... ... ... ... ...
Fairport.................. 9.9 94.9 94.9 ... ... ... .. () () ...
Hurn..................... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ..
Lorain.................... 48.8 48.8 48.8 ... ... ... ... 0.2 0.2 ... ...
Puerto Rico, Bawaii,
and Alaska Districts.. 1,652.0 146.0 145.8 0.2 1,506.0 1,505.4 0.6 11.1 11.1 (a) 11.2 11.2 (a)
Puerto Rico................... 1,178.6 107.4 107.3 0.1 1,071.1 1,070.5 0.6 7.1 7.1 (*) 7.9 7.9 (*)
Guanica.................. 1.0 1.0 1.0 ... ... ... ... (*) () .
Mayague................. 0.8 0.8 0.8 ... ... ... ... 0.1 0.1 .....
Ponce..................... 7.3 7.3 7.3 ... ... ... ... 0.4 0.4 ...... ... ...
San Juan.................. 383.7 98.4 98.3 0.1 285.2 284.6 0.6 6.7 6.7 ( 2) 2.0 2.0 ...
Hawaii......................... 462.2 27.4 27.3 0.1 434.9 434.9 ... 3.6 3.6 (*) 3.4 3.4 ...
Honolulu................. 457.4 22.6 22.5 0.1 434.8 434.8 ... 3.1 3.1 (") 3.4 3.4 ...
Alaska....................... 11.2 11.2 11.2 ... ... ... ... 0.3 0.3 .. .. ... .
Wrangell..................
sirangell.................... ... ...() (...) ... ... ... ... ...() () ... ... ... .
Sitka..................... (*) () (u) () ()

*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds; less than 50,000 dollars.
IFlorida Atlantic Coast port totals should be added to Florida Gulf Coast port totals to obtain total imports through the Customs District of
Florida.

Table 3.--SHIPPING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATES EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE ON DR CARGO AND TANKER VESSELS, BY TRADE ARBE, TYE OF
SERVICE, AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS
(Data in millions of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts. Totals
shown for previous months include current revisions)

Total all vessels Dry cargo veasels1 Tanker vessels

Total United Total dry cargo Irregular nted
Trade area dipping States nted United d United Total
S flag .Total States Total States Total States f
flag flag flag

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Total all trade areas:
Monthly average.................... 20,377.8 3,358.2 17,706.2 2,832.7 5,975.8 1,688.0 11,760.6 1,144.8 2,671.6 525.5
October 1960....................... 22,888.3 4,188.3 20,541.7 3,758.2 6,288.9 1,723.2 14,252.8 2,034.9 2,346.6 430.1
September 1961.................... 22,065.6 2,972.6 19,950.6 2,763.7 5,411.6 1,482.4 14,539.0 1,281.3 2,115.0 208.9
October 1961 ..................... 24,425.9 3,648.9 21,406.7 3,285.8 5,726.7 1,480.4 15,680.0 1,805.4 3,019.2 363.1


Foreign trade areas except Canadian.... 18,331.1 2,807.0 15,419.4 2,503.9 5,693.2 1,478.6 9,726.2 1,025.3 2,911.7 303.1
Caribbean................................... 573.6 70.6 536.8 70.2 360.5 67.6 176.3 2.5 36.8 0.4
East Coast South America................... 915.5 306.2 769.2 271,5 238.7 82.4 530.4 189.1 146.3 34.7
Vest Coast South America..................... 356.7 160.9 347.9 160.9 191.4 91.9 156.5 69.0 8.8 ...
Vest Coast Central America and Mexico....... 56.0 6.1 56.0 6.1 35.8 6.1 20.2 .......
Gulf Coast Mexico.................... .......... 98.8 1.2 98.8 1.2 21.1 ... 77.6 1.2 ...
United Kingdom and Eire..................... 986.3 67.1 906.2 67.1 431.0 67.1 475.2 ... 80.1 ...
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland.. 595.6 21.6 547.0 21.6 258.9 13.6 288.1 8.0 48.6 ...
Baycnne-Hnmburg Range....................... 4,479.6 126.2 3,251.1 126.2 1,049.6 99.1 2,201.5 27.0 1,228.5 ...
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic ............... 166.7 20.5 121.2 20.5 53.8 20.5 67.5 ... 45.5 ...
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea......... 3,493.2 892.4 3,123.5 743.8 644.4 234.5 2,479.1 509.4 369.7 148.6
West Coast Africa.......................... 168.0 102.3 162.8 102.3 142.0 91.6 20.8 10.7 5.2 ...
South and East Africa..................... 157.6 78.4 113.1 78.4 112.8 78.4 0.3 ... 44.5 ...
Australasia................................ 180.3 17.6 168.2 10.1 138.2 10.1 30.0 ... 12.1 7.5
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea............. 968.4 472.3 752.2 398.7 42'.6 190.3 324.6 208.4 216.2 73.6
Malaya and Indonesia........................ 85.9 26.8 74.8 26.8 74.8 26.8 () ... 11.1 ...
Far East-Southern Area, including
Taiwan and Philippines..................... 466.2 197.9 462.1 197.9 399.2 197.9 63.0 ... 4.1 ...
Far East-Northern Area, including Japan..... 4,582.5 238.8 3,928.5 200.6 1,113.3 200.6 2,815.2 ... 654.0 38.2

Canadian trade areas ................. 6,094.8 842.0 5,987.3 781.9 33.5 1.9 5,953.8 780.0 107.5 60.1

Pacific Canada.............................. 66.9 32.0 18.5 3.9 3.7 1.9 14.8 2.0 48.4 28.1
Great Lakes Canada.......................... 4,856.3 783.2 4,802.3 751.2 4.3 ... 4,797.9 751.2 54.0 32.0
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland ............. 1,171.5 26.8 1,166.4 26.8 25.4 ... 1.141.0 26.8 5.1 ...

*Denotes less than 50,000 pounds.
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Table 6.--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL UNDER UNITED STATES FOREIGN AID PROGRAMS, AND "SPECIAL CATEGORY" NON-DEPART-
MENT OF DEFENSE CONTROLLED CARGO EXPORTED BY VESSEL--TRADE AREA BY TYPE OF VESSEL SERVICE AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS:
(In thousands of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts)

Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels1 Tanker vessels

Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Trade area Total United United
shipping States United United United Total States
weight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
flag flag flag
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)
Total all trade areas:
Monthly average 1960............... 238,359 70,732 94,066 70,340 82,455 59,856 11,610 10,483 144,293 392
October 1960...................... 227,080 70,186 110,084 70,186 105,976 66,215 4,109 3,971 116,996
September 1961.................... 129,400 100,006 116,151 96,669 110,571 91,154 5,580 5,515 13,249 3,337
October 1961...................... 96,937 67,791 81,440 67,791 64,363 50,792 17,077 16,999 15,497 ...



Foreign trade areas except Canadian... 92,168 63,023 76,671 63,023 64,361 50,791 12,310 12,231 15,497
Caribbean ........................... 1,666 96 1,661 96 1,602 53 59 44 5
East Coast South America................... 2,195 232 397 232 347 232 50 ... 1,798
West Coast South America.................. 412 141 412 141 412 141 ...... ...
West Coast Central America and Mexico...... 62 1 62 1 62 1 ...
Gulf Coast Mexico.......................... 27 ... 27 ... 27 ..... .
United Kingdom and Eire.................... 201 116 201 116 157 71 45 45 ...
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland. 1,410 1,028 1,410 1,028 1,410 1,028 ...
Bayonne-amburg Range..................... 12,643 1,089 8,252 1,089 7,807 644 445 445 4,391
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic ............. 689 661 689 661 689 661 ... ....
Unidentified countries in Western Europe... 18 18 18 18 18 18 ...2
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea........ 27,570 18,018 19,624 18,018 17,317 15,724 2,307 2,294 7,946
West Coast Africa.......................... 763 733 763 733 762 733 (*) (*)
South and East Africa...................... 1,434 26 77 26 77 26 ... ... 1,357 ...
Australasia.............................. 425 68 425 68 425 68 .... .
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea.......... 5,066 4,311 5,066 4,311 5,066 4,311 ... ... ()
Malaya and Indonesia......... 0 ........... 1,309 943 1,309 943 754 388 555 555 ...
Far East-Southern Area, including
Taiwan and Philippines.................... 10,660 10,532 10,660 10,532 6,055 5,928 4,605 4,605 ...
Far East-Northern Area, including Japan.... 25,618 25,010 25,618 25,010 21,373 20,765 4,244 4,244 ...
Canadian trade areas................. 4,769 4,768 4,769 4,768 2 1 4,767 4,767 ...
Pacific Canada .......................... 4,768 4,768 4,768 4,768 1 1 4,767 4,767 ......
Great Lakes Canada ..................... ... ... ... ..... ...
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland........... 2 ... 2 ... 2 ... .. ... ...
*Denotes less than 500 pounds.
'Classification of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of
a scheduled berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08587 9376


DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON 25, D. C.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS




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