United States foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States foreign trade
Portion of title:
Water-borne foreign trade statistics
Alternate title:
Waterborne foreign trade statistics
United States water-borne foreign trade
United States waterborne foreign trade
Some issues have title:
United States foreign trade
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly, including annual cumulation
monthly
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Shipping -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in June 1965.
General Note:
"Summary report FT 985."
General Note:
Description based on: Calendar year 1952; title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: June 1965.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 13695873
lccn - sf 86092445
ocm13695873
Classification:
lcc - WMLC L 83/3610
System ID:
AA00010658:00001

Related Items

Succeeded by:
U.S. waterborne foreign trade

Full Text








CE SI J APR 9 1957 ENS



UNITED STATES FOREIGN TRA


SUMMARY REPORT FOR RELEASE
FT 985 CALENDAR YEAR 1955 October 11, 1956


UNITED STATES WATER-ORNE FOREIGN TRADE

COVERAGE

This report presents annual statistics in terms of calendar year periods. The calendar figures represent ship-
ments unladen from and laden on vessels arrivingor departing during the interval January 1 December 31. The sta-
tistical year figures published on June 15, 1956, represent the aggregate of transactions processed during the twelve
monthly periods January-December 1955, including some shipments unladen from and laden on vessels during the latter
part of 1954 and omitting some late shipments made during 1955 for which information was not received in time to be
included in the statistical year figures (see July 1952 issue of the Foreign Trade Statistics Notes).
Effective with July 1953, the statistics on export shipments of domestic and foreign merchandise individually
valued at $100-$499 are estimated on the basis of a 10 percent sample of such shipments. A discussion of the $100 to
$499 export shipments in the vessel statistics is contained in the November 1953 issue of Foreign Trade Statistics
Notes.
Effective with statistics for January 1954, procedures for estimating the shipping weight and value of
import shipments of under 2,000 pounds with a value of $100 or more were also instituted, based on a 2 percent ran-
dom sample of import documents. A discussion of the under 2,000 pound shipping weight import shipments in the vessel
statistics is contained in the March 1954 issue of Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.
The water-borne statistics presented in the monthly issues of this report for 1954 excluded completely exports
of domestic and foreign merchandise and non-Department of Defense shipments of "special category" commodities valued
at less than $500 and import shipments of under 2,000 pounds regardless of value as well as shipments valued at less
than $100 regardless of shipping weight. In order to provide users of the vessel statistics with a series of com-
parable annual data on a calendar year basis, this report shows in addition to the full detail for the export ship-
ments of $500 or more and import shipments of 2,000 pounds or more, total figures (combining the sample estimates of
the $100-$499 export shipments and the less than 2,000 pound import shipments of $100 or more in value with the com-
plete coverage segments for exports and imports) on a United States port level and trade area level. These total
figures for 1955, which include the estimates, are comparable to the calendar year data shown for prior years.
Vessel export figures in this report, shown in columns 5, 10, 16 and 19 of table 1 and in table 3, represent
exports of domestic and foreign merchandise laden at the United States Customs area (continental United States,
Puerto Rico and the Territories of Alaska and Hawaii) for shipment to foreign countries and include export shipments
to United States civilian government agencies and non-Department of Defense controlled foreign aid program shipments
as described below. Excluded from these figures are shipments to the United States armed forces abroad of supplies
and equipment for their own use as well as the other types of shipments described below for which information is
shown in separate columns in table 1.
Department of Defense controlled and "special category" figures, shown in columns 7 and 12 of table 1 of this
report cover consolidated data for the following types of shipments:
1. Vessel export shipments of Department of Defense controlled cargo under special foreign aid programs, i.e.,
Foreign Operations Administration, Army Civilian Supply, etc., made aboard United States flag vessels such as
Army-Navy transports or commercial vessels chartered by the Department of Defense under time, voyage and space
charter arrangements and including "special category" commodities without distinction.
2. Vessel export shipments of "special category" commodities not controlled by the Department of Defense for which
detailed information cannot be shown separately because of security reasons. For an explanation and list of
"special category" commodities and their presentation in foreign trade statistics see the January 1954 issue
of Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.
Only shipping weight data in terms of United States port or coastal district of lading are shown for these
classes of shipments since information on the dollar value of exports of Department of Defense controlled cargo is
not available at this level of detail. Consequently, the total value figures shown in columns 15 and 18 of table 1
for dry cargo and tanker shipments in that order correspond to the shipping weight figures shown in columns 4 and 9,
respectively, of the same table.
Vessel import figures, shown in columns 4, 7, 12 and 15 of table 2 and in table 4 of this report, are general
imports and represent the total of imports for immediate consumption plus entries into customs bonded storage and
manufacturing warehouses made at the United States Customs area from foreign countries. Vessel import figures ex-
clude American goods returned by the United States armed forces for their own use, import shipments on Army or Navy
transports, and shipments covered by informal entries.
The following types of shipments are excluded from both the vessel export and import data: (1) All shipments
of under $100 in value, regardless of shipping weight; (2) shipments of household and personal effects; (3) ship-
ments by mail and parcel post; 'and (4) shipments of vessels under their own power and afloat. Trade between the
United States and its Territories and Possessions and trade between the Territories and Possessions are not reported
as United States exports and imports.
Merchandise shipped in bond through the United States in transit from one foreign country to another without
having been entered as an import is not included in any of the figures in the columns previously referred to (imported
merchandise cleared through customs and subsequently re-exported is included in both the import and export statistics).
Separate information for the water-borne portion of the in-transit trade in terms of shipping weight and dollar value
is presented in this report in tables 1 and 2. Columns 6, 11, 17, and 20 of table 1 reflect in-transit merchandise
laden aboard vessels at United States ports, while columns 5, 8, 13 and 16 of table 2 reflect such merchandise unladen
from vessels. The water-borne outbound and inbound in-transit statistics include: (1) Foreign merchandise transferred
from one vessel to another in the United States port of arrival and shipped to a foreign country without being


Prepared in the Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division
For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washington 25, D. C. Price 10/, annual subscription $1.00.







-2-


released from customs custody in the United States; and (2) foreign merchandise arriving by vessel at one United
States port, shipped through the United States under customs bond, and leaving the United States by vessel from a
port other than that at which it arrived. In addition, the water-borne outbound in-transit statistics also include
(1) foreign merchandise withdrawn from a general order warehouse for immediate export by vessel or for transportation
and export by vessel (such merchandise was not recorded as an import when it entered the warehouse), and (2) foreign
merchandise shipped by vessel from a United States Foreign Trade Zone to a foreign country (such merchandise is de-
posited in the Foreign Trade Zone without being entered as an import). Any inbound or outbound in-transit merchan-
dise moving by method? of transportation other than vessel is excluded from the in-transit statistics. Thus, in-
transit merchandise arr..ir at tri- United States by vessel and leaving by some other method of transportation is in-
cluded in the inbound data only. On the other hand, in-transit merchandise arriving by other than water-borne trans-
portation and laden aboard vessels upon departure is included in the outbound statistics but not in the inbound data.
The inbound and outbound segments, therefore, do not counterbalance one another and are complementary only insofar
as they involve merchandise carried by vessels to and from the United States. For a more detailed discussion of the
in-transit trade statistics and the types of shipments excluded from these data see the February 1953 issue of the
Foreign Trade Statistics Notes.
All types of outbound vessel shipments in table 1 are credited to the coastal districts, customs districts, and
ports at which the merchandise was laden. All types of inbound vessel shipments in table 2 are credited to the
coastal districts, customs districts, and ports at which merchandise was unladen..In the case of vessel general
imports this is not necessarily the same as the customs district in which the goods were entered into warehouse or
entered for immediate consumption.
Vessel exports in table 3 are credited to the foreign trade areas at which the merchandise was unladen. Vessel
imports in table 4 are credited to the foreign trade areas at which the merchandise was laden aboard the vessels
carrying the cargo to the United States. The countries of destination or origin of merchandise are not necessarily
located within the trade areas to which the merchandise is shipped or from which it is received. Detailed definitions
of foreign trade areas in terms of the countries and ports included in each are contained in Schedule R, Code Clas-
sification and Definition of Foreign Trade Areas.
Shipping weight figures represent the gross weight of shipments, including the weight of containers, wrappings,
crates and moisture content. Vessel export values represent the values at time and place of export. They are
based on the selling price (or on the cost if not sold) and include inland freight, insurance and other charges
to place of export. Transportation and other costs beyond the United States port of exportation are excluded. Vessel
import values, as well as the values for in-transit shipments, are generally based on the market or selling price and
are in general f.o.b. the exporting country. Since in-transit merchandise is not subject to the imposition of import
duties at the United States, the valuation reported for such shipments is not verified by customs to the extent ap-
plicable in the case of import entries and may in some cases include transportation costs and insurance to the United
States as well as other cost elements.
Vessel shipments in tables 1 and 2 are classified as dry cargo or tanker shipments solely on the basis of the
type of vessel used without regard to the cargo carried. Tanker vessels are those pti1arily designed for the carriage
of liquid cargoes in bulk, while all others are classified as dry cargo vessels. A further segregation of dry cargo
vessel shipments is provided in tables 3 and 4 on the basis of type of service, i.e., liner (berth) or irregular
(tramp). Liner service is that type of service offered by a regular line operator of dry cargo vessels on berth.
The itineraries and sailing schedules of such vessels are predetermined and fixed. Irregular or tramp service is
that type of service afforded by dry cargo vessels which are chartered or otherwise hired for the carriage of goods
on special voyages. Vessels in this type of service are not on berth and their sailing schedules are not predeter- *
mined or fixed.











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Table 3.-SHIPFING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATE EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE F0 ^D ^: OID TAN IER VESSELS, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF SERVICE, AND
AMOUNT CARRIED ON UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS: .'w, A .I.S.a 1955

(Data in millions of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts)

Shipments of $500 or more in value

Grand
total all Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels2 Tanker vessels
vesselsl
Trade area Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Total
shipping Total United United
f States United United United Total States
weight shippn Total a Total Total flag
weight flag States States States
flag flag flag
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)

Total all trade areas:
Calendar Year 1954.................. 157,808.1 156,791.0 36,682.7 134,995.7 31,546.7 51,249.5 17,514.9 83,746.3 14,031.8 ..,-'.;2 5,136.0
Calendar Year 1955.................. 226,115.5 225,169.3 44,244.4 201,424.2 39,532.7 55,906.8 20,515.8 145,517.3 19,016.9 :;',- .; 4,711.7

Foreign trade areas except Canadian.... 176,689.2 175,813.4 31,554.1 157,397.6 29,719.5 55,300.4 20,426.5 102,097.2 9,293.0 18,415.8 1,834.6

Caribbean.................................... .:-. 3' 10,819.7 3,238.7 7,845.2 2,307.8 6,276.4 2,102.3 1,568.8 205.5 2,974.5 930.8
East Coast South America..................... ,_ 6,287.4 1,212.9 5,453.7 1,156.4 2,938.7 1,111.7 2,515.0 44.7 833.7 56.5
West Coast South America..................... 3,472.8 3,420.5 1,240.4 2,607.9 1,072.5 1,902.0 949.0 705.9 123.5 812.5 167.9
West Coast Central America and IMxico........ 2,912.4 2,871.0 408.0 731.8 224.4 588.7 202.9 143.1 21.5 2,139.2 183.7
Gulf Coast Mexico............................ 510.1 501.8 10.9 464.5 5.5 340.8 1.4 123.7 4.1 37.3 5.4

United Kingdom and Eire...,.................. 24,308.6 24,294.1 3,081.1 21,215.5 3,048.3 6,227.9 2,464.3 14,987.6 584.0 3,078.6 32.8
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland... 7,301.6 7,275.2 983.9 6,962.3 967.3 3,491.5 835.0 3,470.8 132.2 312.9 16.6
Bayonne-Hamburg Range........................ 52,844.0 52,780.9 4,860.2 49,032.3 4,521.4 11,105.5 2,742.2 37,926.8 1,779.2 3,748.6 338.9
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic ............... 1,207.3 1,204.0 450.4 1,140.4 435.8 396.0 63.2 744.4 372.6 63.6 14.6
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea.......... 29,833.8 29,800.5 5,599.4 29,532.9 5,594.9 5,481.4 2,522.3 24,051.6 3,072.6 267.6 4.5

West Coast Africa............................ 1,177.9 1,145.9 349.0 1,098.3 331.5 799.6 308.8 298.7 22.7 47.6 17.5
South and East Africa........................ 1,793.7 1,761.8 916.4 1,713.9 916.4 1,503.6 916.4 210.3 ... 47.9
Australasia................................ 2,054.8 2,034.4 335.1 1,870.2 298.4 1,407.1 297.0 463.2 1.3 164.1 36.7
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea.............. 2,695.5 2,662.1 1,121.3 2,619.5 1,121.3 2,028.7 867.3 590.7 254.0 42.6 ...
Malaya and Indonesia........................ 720.7 703.8 215.8 611.6 215.8 528.4 215.6 83.2 0.2 92.2 ...
South China, Formosa and Philippines......... 3,370.6 3,323.2 1,691.5 3,227.3 1,691.5 2,643.0 1,443.8 584.3 247.8 95.8
North China including Shanghai and Japan..... 24,945.8 24,927.3 5,839.1 21,270.2 5,810.3 7,641.1 3,383.1 13,629.0 2,427.2 3,657.1 28.8

Canadian trade areas................... 49,426.3 49,355.9 12,690.3 44,026.6 9,813.2 606.5 89.3 43,420.1 9,723.9 5,329.4 2,877.1

Pacific Canada.............................. 2,523.4 2,503.0 1,574.8 831.0 291.9 177.7 84.5 653.3 207.4 1,671.9 1,282.9
Great Lakes Canada.......................... 44,003.7 43,968.5 10,889.5 40,995.4 9,505.9 205.7 ... 40,789.6 9,505.9 2,973.1 1,38r".
Atlantic Canada and Newfoundland............ 2,899.2 2,884.5 225.9 2,200.2 15.4 223.1 4.8 1,977.1 10.5 684.3 21 .6

IFiguree based on complete coverage of shipments valued at $500 or more and an estimate of the $100-$499 shipments computed from a 10% sample of such ship-
ments. The chances are two out of three that the sampling error for these figures which include estimates for the $100-$499 shipments is less than 1 percent.
Classificaion of dry cargo vessels as "liner" or "irregular or tramp" is based on characteristics of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of a scheduled
berth operation, etc.) using the classification criteria of the Maritime Administration.

Table 4.-SHIPPING WEIGHT OF UNITED STATES GENERAL IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE ON DRY CARGO AND TANIER VESSEIS, BY TRADE AREA, TYPE OF SERVICE, AND AMOUNT CARRIED ON
UNITED STATES FLAG VESSELS: CALENDAR YEAR 1955

(Data in millions of pounds. Totals represent the sums of unrounded figures, hence may vary slightly from the sums of the rounded amounts)

Shipments weighing 2,000 pounds or more

Grand
total all Total all vessels Dry cargo vessels2 Tanker easels
vessels
Trade area Total dry cargo Liner Irregular
Total Total United United
shipping shipping States United United United Total States
Weight flag Total States Total States Total States flag
flag flag flag
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11)


Total all trade areas:
Calendar Year 1954 .................
Calendar Year 1955..................

Foreign trade areas except Canadian....

Caribbean...................................
East Coast South America....................
West Coast South America....................
West Coast Central America and Mexico........
Gulf Coast Mexico...........................

United Kingdom and Eire.....................
Baltic, Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland...
Bayoame-Hamburg Range.......................
Portugal and Spanish Atlantic................
Azores, Mediterranean and Black Sea..........

West Coast Africa ...........................
South and East Africa.......................
Australasia................................
India, Persian Gulf and Red Sea............
Mlaya and Indonesia........................
South China, Formosa and Philipineos.........
North China including Shanghai and Japan.....

Canadian trade areas..................

F ... ... .
.1.. .....L .. .. .. ... ...
] '1 '. dl.lj .... ... .


240,654.5
283,309.6

239,302.4



10,916.2
2,352.4
8,745.0

2,017.3
5,182.2
6,623.1
483.1
13,236.2

4,384.2
2,896.2
777.3
24,597.2
4,994.4
5,369.3
1,685.5

44,007.2


l, 0


240,424.4
283,068.8

239,064.1

140,102.0
4,935.0
10,915.4
2,352.3
8,744.0

1,981.2
5,173.0
6,549.2
481.2
13,207.0

4,383.7
2,895.5
775.8
24,592.1
4,993.9
5,362.6
1,620.4

44,004.7


72,641.1
74,971.7

61,970.1

39,813.4
1,240.4
4,915.1
1,370.9
2,033.2

532.0
594.8
1,102.5
137.6
1,301.8

539.6
1,817.9
282.4
3,197.7
753.1
1,707.6
629.9

13,001.5


113,733.9
137,323.9

93,577.0

38,726.6
4,928.4
10,498.6
2,219.6
842.6

1,716.1
5,058.5
6,085.8
481.2
3,085.7

4,383.7
2,870.1
775.8
3,712.6
1,420.2
5,166.2
1,605.4

43,747.0


*-,L',..


33,017.1
39,806.2

26,938.1

9,552.4
1,240.4
4,879.0
1,370.9
72.1

532.0
594.8
921.7
137.6
1,136.5

539.6
1,792.5
282.4
1,066.2
547.4
1,642.6
629.9

12,868.1



"^*;'.i


32,355.1
36,117.8

35,020.3

4,169.5
2,607.0
3,160.0
279.3
573.6

1,391.4
2,335.5
4,565.6
336.3
1,741.3

1,594.0
2,288.5
575.1
1,963.1
1,415.3
4,561.2
1,463.5

1,097.6


:


12,446.8
14,321.8

13,990.3

1,673.2
1,217.6
2,052.8
88.0
0.4

532.0
533.7
844.7
137.6
814.2

460.4
1,792.5
276.1
832.1
543.1
1,595.6
596.2

331.5

.1 '.
: *:


81,378.8
101,206.1

58,556.7

34,557.2
2,321.4
7,338.5
1,940.3
269.0

324.7
2,723.0
1,520.2
144.9
1,344.4

2,789.6
581.5
200.6
1,749.5
4.9
605.0
141.9

42,649.4


'us.-,


20,570.3
25,484.5

12,947.9

7,879.2
22.8
2,826.2
1,282.9
71.7

(a)
61.1
77.0

322.3

79.2

6.4
234.1
4.2
47.0
33.7

12,536.6
&.1'.d


126,690.5
145,744.9

145,487.1

101,375.4
6.6
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25.0
11-.'.


10,121.3


25.4

20,879.4
3,573.7
196.5
15.1

257.7


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35,032.0




















133.5
30,iri.L

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Figures bhsed on c-,plets coverage of shipments weighing 2,000 pounds or more and over $100 in value and an estimate of the less than 2,000 pound shipt-ir,.
Valued at $100 or mare io d on a 20 ucmple of the Import documents. The chances are two out of three that the sampling error for I.r.:.: i lari .ir .i..r Isi.i rl
estitla for te un~ir 2,000 pound shipments is lesu than 1%. Shipments of under $100 in value regardless of shipping weight are :..~'iO'. ..i.. li-..tir,.
of dry cieio veaIeI s "ineor" or irregularr or trasp" is baeed on characteristics of each voyage (whether the voyage is part of a scheduled l rr rn Tro ton,
etc.) wing Ithe claseiication criteria of the Miritine Administrutlon.


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