United States airborne foreign trade

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
United States airborne foreign trade
Portion of title:
Customs district by continent
Issues for calendar year 1969- have title:
U.S. airborne foreign trade
Physical Description:
v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of the Census
Publisher:
Bureau of the Census
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly with calendar year summaries
monthly
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Aeronautics, Commercial -- Freight -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
Bureau of the Census, U.S. Department of Commerce.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: Calendar year 1970.
General Note:
"FT 986."
General Note:
"Summary report."
General Note:
Description based on: Sept. 1964; title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 00963348
lccn - 2003238825
issn - 0501-7785
ocm00963348
Classification:
lcc - HF105 .C137135
System ID:
AA00010657:00070

Related Items

Succeeded by:
U.S. foreign trade. Airborne exports and general imports

Full Text
r3j/(~i'


United States Airborne

Foreign Trade


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Alexander B. Trowbridge, Secretary
William H. Shaw, Assistant Secretary, Economic Affairs

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
A. Ross Eckler, Director


SUMMARY REPORT FOR RELEASE
FT 986 September 1967 November 27, 1967


CUSTOMS DISTRICT BY CONTINENT


COVERAGE


This report presents statistics on U.S. exports and
imports by air in U.S. customs district by continent
arrangement. Data have been compiled from Shipper's
Export Declarations (Commerce Form 7525-V) and
import entries during the regular processing of statis-
tical data on foreign trade shipments. The customs
districts shown in this report are those having combined
exports and imports by air valued at $2 million or more
during the calendar year 1966. A complete list of the
customs districts and ports currently in effect appears
in the January 1, 1967 edition of Schedule D, Code Clas-
sification of United States Customs Districts and Ports.

Exports

These statistics represent exports of domestic and
foreign merchandise combined and include government
and nongovernment shipments of merchandise by air
from the United States to foreign countries. The
statistics, therefore, include Department of Defense
Military Assistance Program--Grant-Aid shipments,
Mutual Security Program economic assistance ship-
ments, and shipments of agricultural commodities
under P.L. 480 (The Trade Development and Assistance
Act of 1954, as amended) and related laws. Shipments
to U.S. armed forces and diplomatic missions abroad
for their own use are not included in the export
statistics. U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and U.S.
possessions and trade between U.S. possessions are not
included in this report, but exports from Puerto Rico to
foreign countries are included as a part of the U.S.
export statistics. Merchandise shipped through the
United States in transit from one foreign country to
another, when documented as such through U.S. Customs,
is excluded. (Foreign merchandise that has entered the
United States as an import and is subsequently reexported
is not treated as intransit merchandise, and is included
in this report.) The figures in this report exclude ex-
ports of household and personal effects, shipments by


mail and parcel post, and shipments of airplanes under
their own power.

For security reasons, certain commodities are desig-
nated as Special Category commodities, for which
security regulations place restrictions upon the export
information that may be released. The data shown in
this report for individual customs districts and conti-
nents exclude exports of Special Category commodities,
but overall shipping weight and value totals for Special
Category commodities are shown. Further information
and a list of Special Category commodities may be ob-
tained from the Bureau of the Census.


The statistics shown for exports to Canada represent
fully compiled data for shipments individually valued
$2,000 and over combined with estimated data for
shipments valued $100-$1,999 based on a 10-percent
sample of such shipments. The statistics shown for
exports to countries other than Canada represent
fully compiled data for shipments individually valued
$500 and over combined with estimated data for ship-
ments valued $100-$499 based on a 50-percent sample
of such shipments. Effective with the statistics for
January 1967, estimated shipping weight and value data
are also shown for shipments valued under $100. These
estimates are not included in the data shown for individ-
ual customs districts.


Since the export figures shown include estimates based
on a sample of low-valued shipments, they are subject to
some degree of sampling variability. The following is a
rough guide to the general level of sampling variability
(on a 2 chances out of 3 basis) of value totals. Usually,
the higher value figures will have the lower percent
samps detailed information on the sampling
vai fl figures is available upon request.


For sale by the Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Price 100 per copy.
Annual subscription (FT 900, 975, 985, and 986 combined) $5.00.


f/-i >'/c











Proportion of cells with
Value totals for sampling variability of:
"Total" and "North 20
America" of: under under under under
2% 5% 10% 20% and
over

$1,000,000 and over .60 .85 1.00

$500,000-$1,000,000 .45 .65 .70 1.00

$100,000-$500,000 .15 .40 .45 .55

$20,000-$100,000 .25 .75

Cells of under $20,000 Are likely to have sampling
variability from $10,000
to $20,000


Value totals for Are likely to have sampling
continents of South variability of:
America, Europe,
Asia, Australia and
Oceania, and Africa of:

$300,000 and over Less than 2%

$100,000-$300,000 Less than 5% with over half
of the totals less than 2%

$20,000-$100,000 Generally less than 10%
with over half of the
totals less than 5%

Under $20,000 Generally $1,000 to $2,000

Cells of $0 Generally less than $500

The sampling variability of shipping weight figures, in
percentage terms, can be approximated by the percent
sampling variability of value.

Imports

These statistics represent general imports, which are
a combination of imports for immediate consumption


and entries into bonded warehouses. The statistics
include government as well as nongovernment shipments
of merchandise by air from foreign countries to the
United States. However, American goods returned by
the U.S. Armed Forces for their own use are excluded.
U.S. trade with Puerto Rico and with U.S. possessions
and trade between U.S. possessions are not included in
this report, but imports into Puerto Rico from foreign
countries are considered to be U.S. imports and are
included. Merchandise shipped through the United States
in transit from one foreign country to another, when
documented as such through U.S. Customs, is not re-
ported as imports and is excluded from the data shown
in this report. (Foreign merchandise that has entered
the United States as an import and is subsequently re-
exported is not treated as intransit merchandise and is
included in this report.) Imports of household and
personal effects, imports by mail and parcel post, and
imports of airplanes under their own power are not
included.

The statistics shown for individual customs districts
represent fully compiled data for shipments valued $251
and over. Data for shipments valued under $251, re-
ported on formal and informal entries (informal entries
generally contain items valued under $251), are esti-
mated from a 5-percent sample, effective January 1967.
Prior to January 1967, the estimates were based on a 1-
percent sample. Separate shipping weight and value
estimates for shipments valued under $251 are shown,
effective with the January 1967 statistics. The shipping
weight data are estimated from the values on the basis
of constants that have been derived from an observation
of the value-weight relationships in past periods.

Since the statistics showing total value of imports
by all carriers include sample estimates, they are
subject to sampling variability. In general, the
higher value figures will have the lower percent
sampling errors. Value totals of $500,000 and over will
generally have a sampling variability of less than 3
percent; value totals of under $500,000 will generally
have a sampling variability of less than $50,000.





















SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

SPECIAL REPORTS ARRANGED FOR ON A COST TO SUBSCRIBER BASIS

Special reports contracted for on a cost basis are listed in current publications so that all users of
foreign trade statistics may be informed of the type of reports being prepared and the cost involved. These
special reports cover foreign trade data in greater detail or in different arrangement than that available in
the regularly published statistics, or supply at nearly date information which will be published later. The
entire cost of the special workrequiredto compile or duplicate the information from the basic data available
in the Bureau is charged to the subscriber.

The reports listed below covering statistics related to import data are those which have been initiated
since the last published list. Special reports covering statistics related to other types of foreign trade data
are listed in the current foreign trade reports covering such data. Additional subscribers may purchase any
special reports listed in any issue. The maximum payment required in each case will be at the rate shown
in the list. Unless otherwise indicated, the prices listed cover subscriptions through the end of the
calendar year. Where the period covered is less than a full calendar year, the actual period covered is
indicated. When more than one user subscribes to one of these reports at the beginning of a calendar year,
the cost is prorated among all subscribers. If a new subscriber requests the report during the calendar
year, the cost to him in most cases is the same as the cost to each original subscriber.

Cost-sharing arrangements with the original subscribers are sometimes suggested in such cases when the
report is a costly one. Information furnished on a cost basis usually will not be publicly released by the
Bureau without charge or at a reduced rate until after 6 months, but exceptions are made in the case of data
which the Bureau regards as of general interest.

Subscribers who are interested in information which is not obtainable from the regularly published foreign
trade statistics reports, and not listed as a special report, may inquire as to the possibility of obtaining the
desired information and request a cost estimate for initiating a new special report. The Bureau's policy with
regard to services furnished at cost is described more fully in an article entitled "Policy in Regard to
Release of Foreign Trade and Shipping Statistics Reports Prepared for Private Organizations on a Cost
Basis" which was published inthe February 1966 issue of Report FT 125. Reprints describing these policies
are available upon request to the Foreign Trade Division, Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233.
Inquiries regarding the possibility of obtaining unpublished data, or requests for copies of existing special
reports, should also be addressed to the Foreign Trade Division.

SPECIAL MONTHLY REPORTS FOR 1967

FT 1507 IBM punch cards covering U.S. Airborne export and general import foreign trade moving through
the customs districts of Tampa, Florida and Miami, Florida. Customs district of lading/unlading by
country of destination/origin by 7-digit Schedule B/TSUSA commodity number. Price per year per
subscriber $5,000.












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in 2012 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation


http://www.archive.org/details/unitedstatesairb1967sept





U.S. INCOME DISTRIBUTION


T he ever-changing pattern of the way America
earns its livelihood and divides its income is
the subject of the first in a new series of reports
of the nation's fact-finder, the Bureau of the
Census.
Titled "Income Distribution in the United
States," this in-depth study draws its data from
the 1960 Census of Population, one of the most
important single sources of information on social
trends in the United States, and makes com-
parisons with the past three decennial censuses.
Primary emphasis is on changes in income of
men in 116 different occupations and in the
income of families classified by the age and sex
of the family head, residence, and various other
characteristics. The study also contains a detailed
evaluation of the quality of income statistics col-
lected in the 1960 census. Interpretation of these


Is the

distribution

of income

changing?

findings has brought about a new understanding
of occupation levels and the inequality of income
distribution.
Herman P. Miller, author of Income Distribu-
tion in the United States, is Chief of the Popula-
tion Division of the Bureau of the Census and a
recognized authority on income statistics. He is
the author of the 1950 Census Monograph, In-
come of the American People. Mr. Miller has also
written Rich Man, Poor Man and served as editor
of Historical Statistics of the United States,
Colonial Times to 1957 and Poverty American
Style.
Inaugurating the 1960 Census Monograph
Series, "Income Distribution" is published with
the cooperation of the Social Science Research
Council. 311 pp. (cloth) $2.25.


Tentative titles for other volumes in the
1960 Census Monograph Series include:
RURAL AMERICA
EDUCATION OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE
THE METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY
CHANGING CHARACTERISTICS OF THE
NEGRO POPULATION
THE AMERICAN FAMILY
POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES
IN THE 20TH CENTURY
To receive announcements of these forthcoming
books, write to the Publications Distribution Section,
Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233


ORDER FROM: Superintendent of Documents
U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402
Or any U.S. Department of Commerce Field Office
Enclosed is $- (send only check, money order,
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At $2.25 each, please send me copies of
INCOME DISTRIBUTION IN THE UNITED STATES.
Name
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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ItI 111 lllllllll ( II111111 1111 l ll 1111111
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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS
WASHINGTON. D.C. 20233


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