Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00458

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
* s r


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER ,





Vt Iis
ILI 4^E



oww# Us^


Vol. 14, No. 50


Week Ending
December 18, 1965


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
_______ ^ ^ __ *


I WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


VIBRIO FETUS INFECTIONS IN HUM ~jOREGON
S JAN I
During No\ember 1965. two tn infection in children %\ere brought to the ioni n of the
Oregon State Board of Health by the Ba.t ologN
oratory of the Pediatrics Department of the --it\
of Oregon Medical School.
The first case reported was in a -24 to 28 week
premature baby born in the Medical School Hospital on
August 25, 1965. At delivery, the lower extremities, back
and abdomen of the infant showed extensive petechiae and
the body surface was covered by a foul smelling oily film.
A few hours after birth the baby developed respiratory
distress with rales noted in the chest; it died after 14


< (tN I ]:N I
S '.. I ,i In n i n n.rn- ()r L.I.
l nit Lc i u iltim.n r .
i- lo. Ju l, I .. rnil r 1 I' .',,
-m Full,' rt..ri d if rni.1
.- in N ho,- Il .-I .liiti frm 1, 1k I'_1.1t,


hours. Spinal fluid and blood from the baby were positive
on culture for Vibrio fetus at the Pediatrics Department
Laboratory; these findings were later confirmed by the
by the Laboratory Branch of CDC. Blood cultures from the
mother were negative but her serum at 1: 120 agglutinated
the vibrios cultured from the baby.
(Continued on page 426)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
50th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 50 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE DECEMBER 18, DECEMBER 12, 1960- 1964 MEDIAN
1965 1964 1965 1964 1960- 1964
Aseptic meningitis .......... 38 35 34 2,052 2,076 2,475
Brucellosis ... ............... 5 3 6 240 383 388
Diphtheria ...... ........*. 3 11 12 154 286 444
Encephalitis, primary infectious 30 50 --- 1,828 3,120 -
Encephalitis, post-infectious 9 3 --- 634 763 ---
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis .......... 609 747 945 32,430 36,415 41,385
Measles ...... ........... ... 2,866 3,249 3,939 259,309 481,767 421,463
Meningococcal infections ..... 66 64 45 2,918 2,683 2,116
Poliomyelitis, Total ... 2 6 57 114 862
Paralytic .............. 2 5 41 89 683
Nonparalytic .* *.* --- 10 14 ---
Unspecified ************ --- 6 11 ---
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ............. 7,917 8,887 7,711 375,078 377,392 304,988
Tetanus ........ ....3 5 --- 269 266 ---
Tularc A * .3 3 --- 236 313--
Typhoid fever ......... 4 8 9 435 436 611
Rabies in Animals ** ...... 67 120 51 4,115 4,356 3,470

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: .. .................................. 7 Rabies in Man: ** .. ..................... .... 1
Botulism: ............................... 18 Smallpox: .............................. -
Leptospirosis: Mass.-1, Hawaii-3, Iowa-4, Calif.-2 6 4 Trichinosis: ............................... 107
Malaria: Pa -2 ................... .......... 81 Typhus-
Plague: ................................. 6 Murine: ............................... 26
Psittacosis: .............................. 48 Rky. Mt. Spotted: ........ ..... .. 260
Cholera: ................................. 2









426


The mother gave no history of recent illness. In the
past she had had two miscarriages but during this
pregnancy the only unusual event until the premature birth
had been a temporary heavy blood-stained discharge
during, the fourth month. At the time of the delivery there
had been a low grade temperature which soon returned to
normal without any treatment being given. The family
lives on a farm which has a few cattle and swine but
the mother gave no history of direct contact with the
animals. However, in view of the serological findings
associated with a premature birth she is presumed to have
been a subclinical case of Vibrio fetus infection.
The second case reported was in a 2%-year-old child
admitted to the same hospital on September 1 of this year.
The history prior to admission was of a 3 weeks-fever of
inconstant pattern, the highest temperature noted being
1020 F. There had been an increasing anorexia for 3 or 4
days with rhinorrhea and mild joint and muscle pains.
This was followed by the appearance of several small
swellings in the left side of the neck. When examined on
entry to the hospital there was a large, soft submandibular
swelling associated with a few discrete and firm nodules
in the left side of the neck. There was no general
adenopathy and no other abnormal findings were noted.
The child's temperature later rose to 1040F and there
was an increase in the white count to 24,000 with a 29
percent lymphocytosis. Skin tests were tuberculin negative
and were also negative for brucellosis, coccidiomycosis
and histoplasmosis. Four blood cultures were also made
and the fourth proved positive for Vibrio fetus after 6 days.
The child was then given penicillin intramuscularly in
daily doses of 600,000 units. The fever quickly resolved,
there was a gradual decrease in the size of the lymph
nodes and the child made a good recovery.


DECEMBER 18, 1965


This child's family also lived on a farm and there
was a history of drinking raw milk for some time prior
to the illness.
Epidemiological investigations at the two farms,
which are 35 miles apart, included blood cultures and
vaginal smears from cattle and swine. The latter were all
negative for Vibrio fetus and no primary source of infection
has been identified.

(Reported by Dr. Monroe A. Holmes, Acting Director,
Epidemiology Section, Oregon State Board of Health; the
Professional Staff of the Pediatrics Department of the
University of Oregon Medical School; Dr. Gerda Benda
and Dr. William Austin, Attending Physicians of the two
patients; and the Laboratory Branch of the CDC.)



Editorial Note: Vibriofetus infections cause vibriosis
in cattle and sheep which is a common cause of abortion
and sterility in infected herds. The infection is uncommon
in man and according to Hull (1963), only 22 human
infections, all in adults, had been recorded up to that
time; eight were in France and the remainder in the
United States. Four of these cases occurred in women,
placentitis and abortion with fever being the predominant
symptoms. As far as is known the two laboratory confirmed
cases above are the first to be described in children.
The first documented human strain of V. fetus was isolated
in 1947.


Reference:
Hull, Thomas G.: Diseases transmitted
man. Thomas Press, Springfield, Illinois,
185.


from animals to
1963, V:pp 170-


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
SHIGELLOSIS July 1 September 30, 1965


During the third quarter of the year, 2,248 shigella
isolations from human sources have been reported from
52 centers. Compared to the total reported from 49 centers
during the previous quarter, this represents an increase of
733 isolations (MMWR, Vol. 14, No. 42). The numbers of
isolations reported indicate a seasonal pattern of in-
creased activity in July going on to a peak of incidence
in September. Since reporting was first instituted in
January 1964, seventeen States have been reporting
shigella isolations consistently. The data from these


States indicate a decrease in the totals reported during
the first 9 months of 1965 although the seasonal
distribution is similar to the comparable period in
1964.
The age and sex distribution of isolations during the
third quarter is consistent with past experience as is
the high concentration of isolations among children.
Almost 70 percent of isolations were from children under
10 years of age, with children between the ages of 1 and 4
accounting for 40 percent of the total. Accumulating


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



VIBRIO FETUS INFECTIONS IN HUMANS OREGON
(Continued from front page)








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


evidence -ugc,' -tr that there is no ,liiirriini in the
frrequciIn' of occurrence of -Iiigrllh-i in the two sexes.
Isolations from family grilii- with more than one
member infected account for 26.8 percent of the total
during the quarter.
There were 13 different -,r0i.'I-O of human -higiellae
determined and of these, 6 serotypes accounted for hi,
percent of all isolations. Table I shows the order of
frequency of the six most common serotypes ilIring the
third quarter, in comparison to the second quarter. The
major numbered -uligroup- of S. flexineri only have been
indicated for these two quarters as all States do not
undertake final -oro.lwping. The 24-month di-trillution
in the last column is, however, based on :'in:il -'ro(tping.


Table 1
Frequency of Shige'lla Srot\pe-;


427


Figure /


140-


120-


100-


80-


60-


40-


- Human Sources


Previous 24-\lonth
Third Quarter
Quarter* Period
Rank Seroti p No. % % %
1 S. sonnei 728 32.4 34.1 37.9
2 S. flerneri 2 604 26.9 25.8 (2a)24.9
3 S. flexneri 3 270 12.0 11.0 (3a) 9.8
4 S. flexneri 4 176 7.9 6.3 (4a) 6.1
5 S. flexneri 6 86 3.8 3.6 6.0
6 S. flezneri 1 81 3.6 5.7 (2b) 5.5


*The 24-month period firurt give a percentage of the total
of 12,474 isolations which is calculated according to the
distribution of a sample finally serotyped.



The regional differences in distribution of the
S. flerneri and S. sonnei isolations remain much the same
as in previous surveillance summaries. In the southern
States, S. fleIrzne accounts for between 70 and 80 percent
of all isolations while in the northern States the range is
between 40 and 60 percent, reflecting an apparently greater
seasonal incidence in the third quarter. S. sonnei isolations
throughout the United States have been reported at a
relatively constant rate.
The 26 isolations of shigella from nonhuman sources
during the third quarter of 1965 is in Table 2.


(Reported by the Shigrlla Surveillance Unit, CDC.)


0 1 1 I *


SEASONAL INCIDENCE
OF REPORTED SHIGELLA ISOLATIONS
FOR 17 STATES* WHICH HAVE REPORTED
SINCE JANUARY 1964


1964 ----
1965-


7'

( \
I

/


J F M A M J J A S


0OND


*ALASKA, ARIZONA, HAWAII, ILLINOIS, KANSAS, MARYLAND,
NEW JERSEY, NEW MEXICO, NORTH CAROLINA, NORTH DAKOTA, OHIO,
OKLAHOMA, OREGON, SOUTH DAKOTA, TENNESSEE, TEXAS, VERMONT.


Table 2
Frequency of Shigella Serotypes -


Nonhuman Sources


Serotype No. of Reporting Source
e Isolations Center
S. flexneri 5 Mich. Monkeys
S. flexneri 2a 3 Texas Lab. stock cultures
S. flexneri 2b 2 Texas Lab. stock cultures
S. flexneri 3 13 Md. Monkeys
1 Pa. Monkey
S. flexneri 4b 1 Ill. Monkey
S. sonnei 1 Ill. Monkey
TOTAL 26


BOTULISM FULLERTON, CALIFORNIA


Two cases of botulism, following the ingestion of
home-canned albacore in a salad, were reported in the
MMWR, Vol. 14, No. 40. Laboratory investigations were
conducted at the California Department of Public Health


Laboratory, the Hooper Foundation and the CDC Lab-
oratory.
An extract of the salad examined at each of the
laboratories proved to be toxic to mice. The toxin was
(Continued on page 432)


t1 c(' MI K 18. 1965


v


r










428 Ilorbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

DECEMBER 18, 1965 AND DECEMBER 12, 1964 (50th WEEK)


Aseptic Encephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 38 35 30 9 2 57 114 2 41 89 3 154

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 2 2 2 2
Maine.............. .- 1 1 -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont.............. -
Massachusetts..... I 2
Rhode Island....... 1 1 -
Connecticut........ I 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 6 4 1 5 15 4 13 6
New York City...... 2 1 1 1 2 2 3
New York, Up-State. 2 1 10 1 9 1
New Jersey......... 3 3 3 3 3 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 9 2 4 1 2 24 2 17 8
Ohio................ 1 3 2 2
Indiana ............ 6 2 9 6 3
Illinois........... 2 1 1 1 6 1 5 2
Michigan........... 1 1 1 1 3 1 2-
Wisconsin.......... 3 2 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 3 3 2 11 10 7 8 21
Minnesota........... .- 2 1 3 1 2 7
Iowa............... 5 1 2 1 1
Missouri........... 2 1 1 4 3 1
North Dakota ....... 1 -
South Dakota....... 9
Nebraska........... 3 3 2
Kansas............. 3 2 1 1 1 1 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 4 1 3 1 1 32 1 25 1 39
Delaware........... 2 -
Maryland........... .- 1 1 1 1 1- -
Dist. of Columbia.. 3
Virginia ........... 1 4 4 -
West Virginia ...... 1 -
North Carolina ..... 1 12 7 4
South Carolina..... 1 11 2
Georgia............ 1 3 3 1 21
Florida............ 2 10 8 9

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 2 1 4 6 2 5 1 31
Kentucky........... 1 1 -
Tennessee.......... 1 2 3 1 2 2
Alabama............. 1 2 2 1 27
Mississippi........ 1 1 1 1 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 4 1 1 20 11 1 17 10 1 38
Arkansas ........... 1 1 1 1 1 2
Louisiana.......... I 1 2 1 1 11
Oklahoma............. 2 3 2 2 1
Texas.............. 1 3 1 15 8 13 8 24

MOUNTAIN............. 2 3 10 5 11 3 6- -
Montana............ 1 -
Idaho............... 1 -- 1 -
Wyoming............ 2 2 -
Colorado........... 3 9 2 2 -
New Mexico......... 1 5 1 -
Arizona............ 2 4 1 2 1 -
Utah................ .
Nevada.............. -

PACIFIC.............. 15 13 3 3 1 9 3 1 5 3 9
Washington......... 1 3 1 3 3
Oregon............. 1 1 1 1 1
California.......... 15 10 3 3 5 2 1 2 5
Alaska.............. -
Hawaii.............. 3 -

Puerto Rico 16










129


Morbidity and Mortality weekly y Report


CASESS OF SPF(:IFIII) NOTII-I\ II DISIASUS I'NITEI) SIATIS

FOR WEEKS ENDED

D1)( I Mb I R IN, 1965 AND 1ll ( I Mlt R 12, 1964 (50th \ I k) (ontinucd


Brucel-
losis
Area Total
incl. unk.


Infectious Hepatitis
including Seium Hepatitis

Under 20 years Cumulative
20 years and over Totals


1965 1965 1965

b '-1w I200.' t=


NEW ENGLAND...........
Maine...............
New Hampshire......
Vermont...........
Massachusetts......
Rhode Island.......
Connecticut........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC......
New York City......
New York, Up-State.
New Jersey.........
Pennsylvania.......

EAST NORTH CENTRAL...
Ohio................
Indiana............
Illinois...........
Michigan...........
Wisconsin..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL...
Minnesota..........
Iowa................
Missouri............
North Dakota.......
South Dakota.......
Nebraska............
Kansas..............

SOUTH ATLANTIC.......
Delaware..........
Maryland............
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia...........
West Virginia......
North Carolina.....
South Carolina.....
Georgia.............
Florida.............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Kentucky...........
Tennessee..........
Alabama...........
Mississippi........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Arkansas..........
Louisiana .........
Oklahoma............
Texas..............

MOUNTAIN.............
Montana............
Idaho...............
Wyoming............
Colorado............
New Mexico..........
Arizona............
Utah................
Nevada............

PACIFIC...............
Washington..........
Oregon..............
California..........
Alaska..............
Hawaii.............


141
11
16
111
2
1


UNITED 1 1Tf .


6,587
509
572
5,185
235
86


6,440
647
644
4,736
290
123


ritrrn
lInti s


Tt iuns ta Inus


Cumu l t iv v C ui.
965 1964 1965 I "

7I I .' .7hb J 't '


91
7
2
4
38
11
29


Puerto Rico 14 12 2 1,358 975 11 36 57


1965

32,-3-i

1,819
321
167
91
722
203
315

5,789
1,200
2,174
1,047
1,368

6,336
1,709
531
1,189
2,509
398

1,802
218
581
397
34
22
99
451

3,340
87
598
50
767
453
365
141
118
761

2,294
828
779
400
287

2,692
342
455
55
1,840

1,771
156
196
54
374
383
372
220
16


1l


1964

lh.* 1;

3,226
996
256
375
741
217
641

7,933
1,261
3,440
1,295
1,937

5,852
1,532
485
1,118
2,316
401

2,020
226
383
496
64
135
74
642

3,374
76
620
69
543
482
543
152
112
777

2,473
872
873
479
249

2,859
288
675
132
1,764

2,238
190
316
93
588
324
487
189
51










430 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

DECEMBER 18, 1965 AND DECEMBER 12, 1964 (50th WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965


UNITED STATES... 2,866 259,309 481,767 7,917 3 236 4 435 67 4,115

NEW ENGLAND.......... 140 37,371 21,261 973 2 7 48
Maine.............. 14 2,933 3,654 148 4
New Hampshire...... 383 809 9 5
Vermont............ 13 1,420 2,417 5 32
Massachusetts..... 94 19,468 6,777 154 2 3 2
Rhode Island....... 13 3,970 2,419 43 1 1
Connecticut........ 6 9,197 5,185 614 -- 3 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 358 17,714 53,296 167 1 68 11 256
New York City...... 182 3,443 15,504 7 30 -
New York, Up-State. 24 4,431 13,096 121 1 16 11 240
New Jersey.......... 152 3,577 12,342 39 7- -
Pennsylvania....... 6,263 12,354 15 16

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,283 62,349 105,693 593 2 16 50 11 632
Ohio............... 32 9,162 20,046 35 10 5 338
Indiana............ 38 2,351 23,161 118 1 6 16 1 74
Illinois........... 411 4,042 16,772 98 1 7 11 1 91
Michigan........... 73 27,686 29,954 228 2 7 3 63
Wisconsin.......... 729 19,108 15,760 114 1 6 1 66

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 96 17,399 31,312 369 30 17 7 811
Minnesota........... 39 847 345 17 1 1 3 178
Iowa............... 25 9,286 23,615 116 2 225
Missouri........... 17 2,678 1,094 103 20 11 2 124
North Dakota....... 12 4,007 5,350 111 48
South Dakota....... 116 67 15 3 1 59
Nebraska........... 3 465 841 5 2 3 36
Kansas............. NN NN NN 2 4 1 141

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 254 26,768 40,133 864 35 1 80 11 536
Delaware............ 516 419 42 1 5 -
Maryland............ 20 1,260 3,442 114 21 27
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 128 357 9 -
Virginia........... 86 4,280 12,957 243 9 9 6 326
West Virginia...... 84 14,743 9,746 137 3 2 27
North Carolina..... 3 415 1,263 26 8 16 3
South Carolina..... 23 1,190 4,301 100 3 9 3
Georgia............ 628 214 6 15 12 2 72
Florida............. 37 3,608 7,434 187 5 1 78

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 373 15,894 69,148 1,147 1 25 1 47 15 826
Kentucky............ 186 3,659 18,835 75 3 10 2 95
Tennessee.......... 185 8,732 25,051 798 1 21 1 19 12 673
Alabama............ 1 2,354 18,502 104 1 10 16
Mississippi........ 1 1,149 6,760 170 8 1 42

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 102 32,035 73,657 825 97 60 12 671
Arkansas........... 6 1,194 1,154 1 66 15 97
Louisiana.......... 8 129 121 9 8 11 3 86
Oklahoma............ 1 234 1,058 12 11 10 1 137
Texas.............. 87 30,478 71,324 803 12 24 8 351

MOUNTAIN............ 115 20,822 21,287 1,566 16 1 33 95
Montana............. 7 3,901 4,059 23 4 1 5
Idaho............... 10 2,995 2,181 84 -
Wyoming............ 2 873 285 23 4 1 -
Colorado........... 32 5,989 3,393 760 1 9
New Mexico.......... 3 691 1,116 429 1 13 21
Arizona............ 56 1,507 6,760 109 14 57
Utah............... 5 4,641 2,480 138 8 1 2
Nevada............. 225 1,013 2 I

PACIFIC.............. 145 28,957 65,980 1,413 14 1 73 240
Washington.......... 41 7,535 20,954 421 7 8
Oregon............. 22 3,469 8,944 29 5 8 9
California......... 80 13,694 34,070 851 9 1 57 221
Alaska.............. 2 207 1,152 26 2
Hawaii............. 4,052 860 86 1 -


Puerto Rico 46 2,872 7,273 3 1 16 14










Morbidity and Mortality WeeklN Report






Week No. Table 4. DEATHS IN 122 UNIT STATES CITIESS FOR WFII-K IND ) )1D IIt MHIIR 1, 1965
50
(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All tC.,""'- Pmunu .nl.n Under All tauc. r%.. i ,,nt, I'. r

Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and year
and over Influenza All Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes nd All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge. Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.,--------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.------
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Haterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.----------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.--------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.-----------
Rochester, N. Y.-------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trcnton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y.-----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.--
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.--------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.---------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


807
276
39
35
28
46
39
18
37
64
78
18
50
31
48

3,429
51
39
171
47
44
40
64
93
1,768
42
526
190
48
91
26
34
54
46
21
34

2,577
69
39
796
107
211
121
69
368
52
49
43
22
57
166
21
108
43
24
41
116
55

799
61
16
39
149
26
104
73
237
60
34


524
178
25
26
16
26
26
12
28
36
49
11
33
22
36

2,008
29
22
99
28
25
22
40
49
1,047
27
283
114
30
56
13
20
39
26
14
25

1,443
35
22
433
69
124
68
39
197
38
25
22
8
33
88
15
70
19
10
25
69
34

468
39
10
18
90
13
62
46
142
35
13


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.-------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.*-----------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.---------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.*--------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-*----
Long Beach, Calif.----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg*-------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif*------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,103
139
243
46
62
66
58
68
37
76
71
195
42

676
124
60
49
130
127
48
30
108

1,193
32
38
35
168
46
74
228
65
176
82
132
59
58

416
46
18
126
18
81
20
59
48

1,608
24
48
32
43
66
621
8
36
116
81
91
174
39
120
64
45


Total 12,608 7,173 587 7

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 615,545
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 347,646
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 24,907
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 36,232


" "










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


BOTULISM FULLERTON, CALIFORNIA
(Continued from page 427)



neutralized by type A antitoxin and cultures of Clos-
tridium botulinum type A were obtained from specimens
of the salad. The quantity of toxin in the portions of
salad examined varied from 2,500 to 25,000 MLD's per
gram.
Specimens of serum obtained from the two patients
were examined at the Hooper Foundation and the CDC
Laboratory and were not toxic when injected intra-
peritoneally into mice.
Eight out of the 18 jars of canned fish examined at
the latter two laboratories were found to contain toxin
neutralized by type A antitoxin and these eight also
yielded cultures of Clostridium botulinum. The contents
of seven of the contaminated jars had a putrid odor and
were of mushy consistency; the contents of the eighth
contaminated jar were of normal odor and appearance.
The remaining 10 jars were of normal appearance and
yielded neither toxin nor a culture of organisms. In one
of the eight contaminated jars examined for toxin at CDC
there were 250,000 MLD's of toxin per gram. Frozen
fillets of the albacore were examined for toxin only at
the CDC Laboratory, with negative results.
(Reported by the California State Health Department
Laboratory, the Hooper Foundation and the Laboratory
Branch of CDC.)





MEASLES IN RHODE ISLAND FROM 1961 1965


Morbidity and mortality from measles
from 1961 to 1965 are line listed below:
1961 1962 1963


Reported Cases 7,118 3,184 1,378
Encephalitis 9 4 7
Deaths 2 2 1


in Rhode Island


1964 1965*


2,610 3,952
2 5
0 0


*1965 figures include January through November 27, 1965.
It has been estimated that 15 percent of all children
with measles experience one or more complications;
these include encephalitis, pneumonia, bronchitis, otitis
media, corneal ulcers, and myocarditis. From January
1964 to June 1965, at least 181 Rhode Island children
were hospitalized because of measles and its complications,
with an average hospital stay of 9.5 da.s and at a total
cost of over fifty thousand dollars.
(Reported by the Division of Epidemiology, Department
of Health, Rhode Island.)


T-IE MORBIDIT / AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 14.000. IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER ATLNTA. GEORGIA.
C-iEF COMMuNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAME5 L. GODDARD. M.D.
C-IEF. EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
ACTINCC CHIEF. STA TISTICS SEC TION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
C-IE F. SURVEIL LANCE SECTION D.A. HENDERSON. M.D.
EDITOR MWR D.J.M. MACKENZIE. M.B.,
F.R.C.P.E.

IN ADDITION TO T.- E ESTABLISIED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MOR6IDITV AND MORTALITY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOME ACCOUNTS OF I1tTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE IN.
VESTIGATIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY, RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMINICAEBLE DISEASEC SUCI COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE AD-
DOESEED TO
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE. TE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE BASED
ON .,EEK.L TELEGRAM TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE
HEALT.- DEPARTMENTS. T.-E REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SAT-
U DAV. COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON
THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


' DJNIV OF FL LI- -
SOCUMENTS DEPT.






_U.S DEPOSITORY


432


DECEMBER 18, 1965


o--





o -


3
p n
0 a

an
o

a a


.
<-* r
i"


m





>
$o
-4 M

Z

ZZ

a
r-
m'
mn
aI-
o




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E9V72XT3Y_AZFJFW INGEST_TIME 2013-02-07T19:13:04Z PACKAGE AA00010654_00458
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES