Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00456

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 14, No. 48


Ending
ber 4, 1965


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND


TH SERVICE


MEASLES MASON COUNTY, KENTUCKY


Since the measles immunization campaign among
schoolchildren in Mason Count\ (MM\HR, Vol. 14, No. 44),
there have been 12 additional cases of measles reported.
All of these cases were directly related to the Orangeburg
School outbreak in Maysville, Kentucky. Ten of them
occurred in preschool children who were either siblings
or contacts of school cases; of these 10, five had been
given measles vaccine 2 to 6 days following a known
exposure to measles. The other two cases were in
Orangeburg School second graders who were vaccinated 8
and 9 days respectively before they developed symptoms
which have been diagnosed as measles rather than
reactions to measles vaccine.


Measles Masor. ('i . .. 409
Measles Dover, 1q,-r .J. r-i \ ...... .. 410
Staphylococcal Food PI -..rin, Cincinnati, Ohio ..... 411
International Notes
Yellow Fever Senegal, West Africa . ... 411
Quarantine Measures. ..... . .. 416


In May s Lick, Kentucky, some 10 miles from Maysville,
two cases of measles in preschool children occurred on
November 11 and resulted from a known contact with an
Orangeburg School case. The school-age siblings of these
two Mays Lick cases were immunized in the county-wide
campaign early in November and had not developed
measles by the first week in December.
(Continued on page 410)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
48th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 48 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE DECEMBER 4, NOVEMBER 28, 1960-1964 MEDIAN
1965 1964
1965 1964 1960-1964
Aseptic meningitis .. ......... 47 39 39 1,979 2,003 2,398
Brucellosis ..-.......... ..... *1 7 7 227 372 372
Diphtheria ................. 1 2 10 149 249 423
Encephalitis, primary infectious 30 43 --- 1,763 3,040 --
Encephalitis, post-infectious 8 7 618 749 -- -

Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ......... 748 557 912 31,167 34,973 39.612
Measles ............... .... 2,630 2,272 2,907 253,373 475,806 413,445
Meningococcal infections ...... 70 41 41 2,806 2,559 2,030
Poliomyelitis. Total ......... 5 18 52 113 848
Paralytic .............. 4 13 38 89 673
Nonparalytic 1 10 13 -
Unspecified ............- --- 4 11 -

Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ....... ... 8194 6,331 6,327 358,429 360,761 290,856
Tetanus *................ 6 3 --- 256 254 ---
Tularemia ............... 4 230 304 ---
Typhoid fever ............ 15 11 11 421 422 589

Rabies in Animals * 77 98 52 3,976 4,163 3,365

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY


Anthrax:.................................
Botulism : ................................
Leptospirosis: ...................... .... ..
Malaria: Calif.-l ............................
Plague: .......... ................ .......
Psittacosis: Fla.-l, Minn.-l, Tenn.-3 .. ............
Cholera: ..... ................. .....


Cum.
7
13
51
75
6
47
2


Rabies in Man: ............................
Smallpox: ...............................
Trichinosis: Calif.-2 ........................
Typhus -
M urine: ........... ............. .......
Rky. Mt. Spotted: N.C.-1, Va.-1 ................


Cum.
1

105

26
260


ccaw








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


DECEMBER 4, 1965


MEASLES MASON COUNTY, KENTUCKY
(Continued from front page)


Four weeks after the Mason Count. immunization
campaign, telephone inquiries were made from the 13
physicians in Mason County regarding calls from parents
of the 345 children who had been given measles vaccine'.
Seven of the physicians had not had any such calls; six
had received one call each and of these only four had


actually seen the child concerned. Nc severe reactions
had been noted.

(Reported by Mr. J.R. Sills, Administrator, Mason County
Health Department;Dr. Joseph W. Skaggs, Kentucky State
Health Department; and an EIS Officer.)


MEASLES DOVER, NEW JERSEY


There have been 115 cases of measles reported in
Dover, New Jersey, between September 24 and November
29. Dover, which has a population of 13,070, has four
elementary schools with a total enrollment of 1,206
children in kindergarten through third grades. The outbreak
has been largely localized in one elementary school
which had 82 cases. The other three elementary schools
had four, three and no cases respectively. There were 20
cases in preschool children, 4 cases in a junior high
school and 2 cases reported from schools outside Dover.
The age distribution of all cases and the attack rates by
class in the elementary school with 82 cases are in
Tables 1 and 2.


Table 1

Age <1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1011121314 Total
Number
Patients 0 3 4 6 8 20 26 17 12 7 2 4 1 3 2 115



Table 2
EAST DOVER SCHOOL

Grade Cases Enrollment Attack Rate

K 21 89 24%
1 29 82 35%
2 13 103 13%
3 7 94 7%
4 5 99 5%
Other 7 369 0.2%

Total 82 836 10%


Analysis of cases by families showed that there were
56 cases in 21 different families. In 11 of these families,


spread was considered to be intra-familial from a primary
case in the family to other siblings; in 10 such families
the primary case was a school-age child.
The peak of measles incidence occurred during the
week of November 14-20, and besides being localized
largely to one elementary school, was also localized to
one area of the town. The Health Department anticipated
further outbreaks in other schools and areas in town and
decided that the intensive vaccination of all susceptible
school children might abort an epidemic. Arrangements
were accordingly made by the Dover Health Officer and
local physicians for a combined measles immunization
program to be carried out in the three public and one
parochial elementary schools involved.
Analysis of school records and permission notes
from parents indicated that 627 children had had measles
previously or had been immunized against measles. This
left 579 children regarded as susceptible and on December
2, 465 of these children were given further attenuated
live virus vaccine. This would be expected to reduce the
percentage of susceptibles in the elementary school-age
group to approximately 10 percent. It is of importance
that this cooperative campaign has also resulted in a
marked increase in the number of children of all ages
attending physicians' offices and child health clinics for
measles immunizations. During the period November 29 to
December 3 an estimated 600 additional children were
immunized in this way.
Officials of the Dover Board of Health and New
Jersey State Department of Health are continuing sur-
veillance to obtain pertinent post-immunization data in
the child community.

(Reported by Mr. William J. Young, Health Officer, Dover,
New Jersey; Dr. Donald Myers, Director, Northern State
Health District; Dr. William J. Dougherty, Director,
Division of Preventable Diseases, New Jersey State
Department of Health: and an EIS Officer.)


410








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



STAPHYLOCOCCAL FOOD POISONING

CINCINNATI, OHIO


Two outbreak- of acute t.aph-ilout, k ,1l enteritis,
associated with crean- l'lld d( uglhnui f and eclairs
from the same bakery, have been reported from Cincinnati.
On October 2'. three members of one fiinil\, the
father, mother and a son of 16 years, developed severe
diarrhea and *omining 4 to 6 hours nl'afr eating cream-
filled doughnut- All recovered without mishap. A fourth
member of the family, who did not eat the douihnul -, was
not affected. The dougi'hnul had been purchased from a
certain bakery the previous day and had been kept in a
cupboard at room temperature for 24 hours before they
were eaten. No specimens were obtained either from the
patients or of the doughnuts, so further studies were not
possible.
On October 2.. it was reported that 40 people had
become ill after eating chocolate eclairs at a college
function. Investigation h11 the City Health Department
failed to reveal more than seven people who had actually
been ill. In these, the onset of the illness was from 4 to
7 hours after eating the eclairs and those affected had
complained of nausea. %omiting. and some diarrhea.
The college function had been planned for 3 p.m.
on October 25, but had been postponed until 7 p.m. The
chocolate eclairs, which had been purchased from the
same bakery as the doughnuts, had been kept at room
temperature in the college for 10 hours.


S11


On examination the eclairs were found to be heavily
contaminated with staphylococci and there were
also l.iLrgo numbers of coliform organisms present. l-, Itir-.
from the Imaktr\ were likewise heavily contaminated with
-laphiloi 1t ii. Two isolates of -iaphil.lhiom i from the
college eclairs were (oagul.i-, positive, one isolate
!ieing phage type 7 and the other being untypable.
All 15 members of the bakery and its food service
staff were examined and nasal swabs taken. Only two
persons, both of whom had been engp.ged in preliring the
eclairs, had positive cultures. Each had a -taiph.lo occal
lesion on a finger and isolates from each of these lesions
were coagulase positive. The phage type from one isolate
was type 3C; that from the other isolate was untypable.
Eclairs from the bakery and from the college were
tested for staphylococcal toxins. No toxins were demon-
strated in the eclairs but a strain of .-:taphilococu-
isolated from them produced enterotoxin A. Further
laboratory studies are in progress and the possibility
of an unidentified enterotoxin being responsible is being
explored.
(Reported by Dr. Thomas A. Cockburn, Assistant Com-
missioner of Health and Director, Division of Research,
Mr. Harold Cook, Director of Cirn in rl!. Public Health
Laboratories, and Mr. Charles Lenzer, Chief Sanitarian,
Cincinnati Department of Health, Ohio.)


INTERNATIONAL NOTES
YELLOW FEVER Senegal, West Africa


An outbreak of yellow fever in Senegal has been
reported from Diourbel, 100 km due east of Dakar. The
first case was confirmed by histology on November 12.
Since then there have been 23 fatal cases of confirmed
yellow fever reported to WHO.
The ages of the first 11 fatal cases histologically
confirmed have ranged from 1 year to 26 years, 9 of the
cases being 10 years of age or younger. In the area of the
outbreak, children under 10 years appear to be most sus-
ceptible. Previous yellow fever vaccination campaigns
have resulted in an immunity level around 70 percent of
the population over 20 years of age. These campaigns
were carried out with the Dakar vaccine and did not in-
clude children under 10 years of age.


A mass vaccination campaign was started on
November 16 using the Dakar vaccine for persons 10
years and over and the Rockefeller 17D vaccine for
children under 10 years of age.
This is the first time yellow fever has been reported
in Senegal since November 1, 1953 and is the first re-
ported since December 1964 in Africa as a whole, when
there were six cases in Portugese Guinea.




(Data obtained from the World Health Organization Weekly
Epidemiological Records, No. 46, Nov. 19, 1965, and
No. 48, Dec. 3, 1965.)


I)1- CI' M1. 4, 1965










412 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

DECEMBER 4, 1965 AND NOVEMBER 28, 1964 (48th WEEK)


SEncephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.

1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 47 39 30 8 52 113 38 89 1 149

NEW ENGLAND......... 1 1 2 2 2
Maine.............. I -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont............ -
Massachusetts ..... I -- 2
Rhode Island ....... 1 -
Connecticut........ 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 8 4 6 5 15 4 13 6
New York City...... 4 I 1 2 2 3
New York, Up-State. 2 1 2 1 10 1 9 1
New Jersey.......... 2 2 2 3 3 3 2 -
Pennsylvania...... 1 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 5 4 5 2 2 24 2 17 1 8
Ohio............... 2 2 1 3 2 2
Indiana............ 1 1 9 6 1 3
Illinois........... 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 5 2
Michigan........... 1 1 1 1 3 1 2 -
Wisconsin.......... 1 1 3 2 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 1 1 11 10 7 8 21
Minnesota.......... 2 1 1 3 1 2 7
Iowa............... 5 1 2 1 1
Missouri........... 1 4 3 I
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... 1 9
Nebraska........... 3 3 2
Kansas............. 1 1 1 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 3 2 7 1 31 1 25 38
Delaware............ 2 1 -
Maryland............ 1 1 1 1 1 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 -- --- 3
Virginia........... 4 4 -
West Virginia ...... I -
North Carolina..... 1 12 7 4
South Carolina..... 1 I 2
Georgia............ 3 3 .20
Florida............ 1 5 9 8 9

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 5 1 3 6 1 5 28
Kentucky............ 5 -
Tennessee.......... 2 3 1 2 2
Alabama............ I 2 2 24
Mississippi......... 1 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 6 7 1 2 19 11 16 10 37
Arkansas........... 1 2
Louisiana........... I 2 1 10
Oklahoma........... 2 3 2 2 1
Texas............. 6 6 2 15 8 13 8 24

MOUNTAIN............. 4 3 1 5 11 3 6 -
Montana............. -
Idaho.............. 1 -
Wyoming............ 1 2 2 -
Colorado........... 3 2 2 -
New Mexico......... 1 5 I -
Arizona............. 2 4 1 2 1 -
Utah............... 1 -
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC.............. 13 17 9 3 6 3 4 3 9
Washington......... 4 2 2 2 3
Oregon............. 1 1 1 1 1 1
California......... 8 16 7 3 3 2 1 2 5
Alaska............ -
Hawaii............. -

Puerto Rico 1 3 15










Morbiditv and Mortality Weekly Report 113


(ASES OF SPEC(IFIED NOTIFIABLIE DISEASES: UINITH ) STATES

FOR % I I K ENI)IFD

I)(t I MII K 1. 1965 ANI) N V('I MH I R 28, 196i (s8h \% II K)- Continued


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis Meningoc cdal
loss including Serum Hepatitis Infect ions T tanus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
incl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 1 748 393 317 31,167 34,973 70 2,806 2,559 6 256

NEW ENGLAND ......... 40 22 18 1,771 3,140 2 144 82 1 7
Maine.............. 5 2 3 308 973 18 6 -
New Hampshire...... 1 1 166 246 9 2 2
Vermont............ 90 366 8 4 -
Massachusetts...... 19 12 7 707 723 1 54 31 1 4
Rhode Island....... 7 2 5 195 202 1 17 11 -
Connecticut........ 8 5 3 305 630 38 28 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 203 98 105 5,539 7,666 11 375 329 2 19
New York City....... 21 7 14 1,137 1,201 2 61 45 2 3
New Y. rk, Up-State. 112 49 63 2,079 3,338 2 107 100 6
New Jersey......... 22 8 14 1,019 1,255 4 100 104 2
Pennsylvania....... 48 34 14 1,304 1,872 3 107 80 8

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 120 73 44 6,078 5,587 10 425 341 35
Ohio................ 25 19 6 1,640 1,474 3 117 89 3
Indiana............. 8 4 3 511 462 1 50 54 9
Illinois........... 25 16 9 1,150 1,057 3 113 92 16
Michigan............ 56 32 24 2,398 2,208 2 97 75 3
Wisconsin.......... 1 6 2 2 379 386 1 48 31 4

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 40 21 19 1,736 1,930 3 137 143 22
Minnesota........... 6 2 4 199 218 32 32 9
Iowa................ 6 3 3 568 341 12 9 4
Missouri ........... 15 10 5 392 482 1 54 64 4
North Dakota....... 4 1 3 34 63 1 13 20 1
South Dakota....... 22 134 3 3 -
Nebraska........... 89 69 10 6 2
Kansas............. 9 5 4 432 623 1 13 9 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 61 36 22 3,186 3,249 17 530 501 1 62
Delaware........... 78 73 1 11 7
Maryland............ 13 9 4 569 588 3 53 38 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 49 68 11 16 -
Virginia........... 7 5 1 743 517 3 71 61 6
West Virginia...... 11 9 2 436 460 1 27 35 1
North Carolina..... 14 4 10 323 527 1 110 87 11
South Carolina..... 2 2 137 147 1 65 57 7
Georgia............. 1 1 112 106 1 61 81 10
Florida............ 11 6 5 739 763 6 121 119 1 24

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 58 31 16 2,225 2,381 5 215 194 32
Kentucky............ 30 14 5 808 842 4 83 67 8
Tennessee.......... 21 13 8 753 842 1 68 58 10
Alabama............ 3 1 2 385 462 39 43 12
Mississippi........ 4 3 1 279 235 25 26 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 44 24 20 2,617 2,725 11 351 287 2 53
Arkansas........... 10 4 6 334 272 18 31 1 13
Louisiana.......... 6 3 3 445 654 6 192 129 1 9
Oklahoma............ 54 131 21 14 1
Texas.............. 28 17 11 1,784 1,668 5 120 113 30

MOUNTAIN............. 35 22 6 1,702 2,114 2 100 91 3
Montana............ 2 1 1 148 180 2 1 -
Idaho............... 1 195 299 13 4 -
Wyoming........... 2 2 50 86 5 5 -
Colorado............ 2 1 1 360 554 27 21 2
New Mexico......... 23 18 3 371 300 11 35 -
Arizona............. 4 359 465 20 8 1
Utah................ 1 1 204 179 17 7 -
Nevada.............. 15 51 2 5 10 -

PACIFIC.............. 147 66 67 6,313 6,181 9 529 591 23
Washington.......... 11 2 9 488 620 4 45 48 -
Oregon.............. 16 11 5 540 637 1 37 25 4
California.......... 101 51 50 4,971 4,532 4 421 498 19
Alaska.............. 14 231 275 18 7 -
Hawaii............. 5 2 3 83 117 8 13 -

Puerto Rico 25 16 9 1,323 961 11 35 2 56









414 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

DECEMBER 4, 1965 AND NOVEMBER 28, 1964 (48th WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 2,630 253,373 475,806 8,194 230 15 421 77 3,976

NEW ENGLAND.......... 47 37,192 19,610 1,107 2 7 48
Maine............... 15 2,914 3,400 267 4
New Hampshire...... 383 670 20 5
Vermont............ 12 1,387 2,383 37 32
Massachusetts...... 15 19,372 6,190 149 2 3 2
Rhode Island....... 1 3,952 2,250 63 1 1
Connecticut........ 4 9,184 4,717 571 3 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC....... 488 16,710 53,000 328 1 2 68 13 228
New York City...... 182 3,052 15,462 13 30
New York, Up-State. 59 4,344 13,006 205 1 1 16 12 212
New Jersey......... 140 3,187 12,299 65 -- 7 -
Pennsylvania....... 107 6,127 12,233 45 1 15 1 16

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,085 59,883 104,903 513 14 3 49 18 612
Ohio............... 37 9,033 19,902 37 1 10 9 330
Indiana............ 68 2,255 23,082 102 5 2 16 1 69
Illinois........... 180 3,395 16,746 65 6 11 4 88
Michigan........... 292 27,449 29,602 208 2 7 2 60
Wisconsin.......... 508 17,751 15,571 101 1 5 2 65

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 100 17,211 31,002 324 30 2 17 8 792
Minnesota........... 1 760 343 11 1 1 3 171
Iowa............... 48 9,235 23,531 82 2 2 222
Missouri............ 19 2,657 1,066 2 20 2 11 2 120
North Dakota........ 32 3,982 5,180 198 1 47
South Dakota....... 115 52 9 3 58
Nebraska............. 462 830 6 2 3 36
Kansas............. NN NN NN 16 4 138

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 202 26,319 39,558 880 34 78 8 516
Delaware........... 1 510 416 35 4 -
Maryland............ 11 1,216 3,437 150 21 1 27
Dist. of Columbia.. 16 110 356 18 -
Virginia........... 5 4,190 12,874 191 8 9 4 311
West Virginia...... 126 14,561 9,351 240 3 2 25
North Carolina..... 1 411 1,247 24 8 15 3
South Carolina..... 28 1,148 4,295 18 3 9 3
Georgia............... 1 627 212 13 15 12 1 70
Florida............. 13 3,546 7,370 191 5 77

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 317 15,143 68,712 1,355 23 2 45 8 804
Kentucky............ 185 3,195 18,700 73 3 10 1 92
Tennessee........... 126 8,450 24,809 1,099 19 2 17 7 655
Alabama............ 4 2,351 18,457 123 1 10 16
Mississippi........ 2 1,147 6,746 60 8 41

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 153 31,706 73,219 917 96 1 60 19 642
Arkansas........... 1,088 1,150 1 66 15 5 95
Louisiana.......... 4 120 121 3 7 1 11 2 83
Oklahoma............ 7 233 1,035 43 11 10 2 133
Texas.............. 142 30,265 70,913 870 12 24 10 331

MOUNTAIN............. 107 20,584 20,485 1,505 16 32 2 95
Montana............. 32 3,874 3,777 75 4 1 5
Idaho............... 14 2,977 2,086 56 -
Wyoming............ 3 859 275 34 4 1 -
Colorado............ 19 5,935 3,350 568 1 9
New Mexico.......... 1 688 911 392 12 21
Arizona............ 15 1,413 6,747 88 14 2 57
Utah............... 15 4,616 2,343 279 8 1 2
Nevada............. 8 222 996 13 2 1

PACIFIC.............. 131 28,625 65,317 1,265 14 5 65 1 239
Washington......... 28 7,461 20,702 454 7 8
Oregon............. 17 3,422 8,885 24 5 8 9
California......... 82 13,490 33,804 652 9 5 49 1 220
Alaska............. 203 1,146 50 2
Hawaii............. 4 4,049 780 85 I -

Puerto Rico 21 2,780 7,152 4 15 14











413


Week No. Table 4. D ATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES ( II Is ()R WEEK ENDED 1)1 I MNHI R *, 1965


(By plaFe of



All
Ages


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Maass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Sprianfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.-----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


851
294
39
32
24
59
25
18
29
71
90
21
53
33
63

3,479
56
40
160
57
40
41
62
121
1,722
39
479
228
72
116
23
38
52
71
31
31

2,649
79
34
799
181
193
95
81
347
45
47
55
30
43
161
30
135
29
49
33
128
55

990
84
23
30
167
35
125
78
311
78
59


.ccurraenc and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


65 years
and over


537
174
20
18
19
36
14
15
22
45
60
16
37
23
38

2,021
33
25
90
29
18
32
31
54
1,018
24
268
116
45
73
15
27
31
45
21
26

1,499
47
19
396
117
112
47
48
200
34
26
31
17
31
90
18
85
15
24
21
85
36

618
58
14
18
105
27
86
46
176
48
40


and
Influenza
All Ages


1 year
All
Causes


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


Area


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.---------
Pasadena, Calif.*------.
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


Total


i i... and
41l 65 years and
is and ove r Influenza
es Aland l Ages
All Ages


1,267
140
306
46
66
94
68
86
42
103
67
200
49

717
84
88
30
144
155
43
53
120

1,223
36
57
37
170
53
90
225
47
194
92
107
66
49

445
59
18
122
10
92
25
48
71

1,845
20
55
46
52
97
671
117
39
137
58
94
204
38
118
59
40


686
74
177
22
29
49
30
46
23
81
39
95
21

388
47
46
22
88
86
18
24
57

611
21
27
17
82
23
50
104
33
98
47
56
29
24

260
32
13
66
7
49
16
25
52

1,116
16
21
35
31
54
409
54
29
86
39
55
118
26
73
39
31


1 year
All
Causes


66
7
18
4
5
5
8
2
2

5
10


43
3
4
1
11
10
3
4
7

116
4
5
5
18
8
8
21
2
23
7
4
9
2

32
7
1
11

9
1
2
1

92

9
1
3
2
43
4
1
7
2
1
7
3
4
5


4~ *


13,466


7,736


Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks


All Causes, All Ages-------------------------
All Causes, Age 65 and over-------------------
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages-------------
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age---------------


589,606
332,957
23,761
34.735


' '


l1oriidit anld MlortalitI \ cNevkl Reptorl











416


QUARANTINE MEASURES

Immunization Inrform.atior for in/errioa.iovral Trcael

1964-65 edition-Public Health Strcice Publication \o. J.38

The following information should be added to the list of

Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:

Page 78

City: Las Vegas Ne\ ado

Center: Clark County District

Health Department

625 Shadow Lane


Clinic Hours: Monday. 1:0(-3:00 p.m.


Fee:


DECEMBER 4. 1965


TE MOREIOITY ANDMORTAL iT 'EEE L L REPORT tlTH A CIRCULA-
TIOGN OF 14 ,00 i5 UBLiH-ED AT T.E COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER ATLANTA GEORGIA
CM.EF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD M.D.
C-IEF Er IDEMIOLOG BRANCH A. D LANGMUIR. M.D.
AC TIN,.- C IEF STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
i:-EF uRVEI-L.IANCE SECTION 0. A E NDERSON M.D.
EDIlTOa MMAR D.J M MACKENZIE M.B.
F.R.C P.E.

iN ADDITION TO TI-E ESTABELIi-ED PROCEDuRES FOR REPORTING
MOREBDiTr AND MORTALITY T-E COMMUNICAe.LE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS DR CASE IN.
\ TiGA TION W .IC ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND W.HICm ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMIuNiC'-iLE DISEASES SuCI- COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE AD
ORETSED TO
THE EDITOR
MOR'ICITY AND MORTALITY WEEKL REPORT
CO MMUNIC ABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATiLANTA GEORGIA !3G133

NOTE TiE O. TA IN T1-11 REPORT ARE PRO SIGNALAL AND ARE BASE
ON WEEKL TELEGRAM T T0THE CDC B& THE INDIVIDUAL STATE
EALTM- C DEPARTMENTS THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SAT-
URDAY. COMFILECI DATA ON NATIONAL BASIS APE RELEASED ON
Ti-E SuCCEECINC FRI Day.


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DUNIV OF FL Li-- "d
DOCUMENTS DEPT








L j DEPOSITORY


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


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