Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00453

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

,I- >60/1 1('/


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER ,




tI tilk z U 5
1* USbA ,


Qaai +w


Vol. 14, No. 45

!" ?


Week Ending
November 13, 1965


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AN WILRFAR PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE
/%< .- -


AN OUTBREAK OF FOOD POISONING
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS

An outbreak of diarrheal llnes.s affecting two public
schools in Little Rock was reported to the Arkansa, State
Board of Health on Tuesday, October 19. The outbreak
followed a luncheon on October 6, cooked in one school
kitchen and served in the cafeterias of the two schools
involved. Epidemiological investigations by the Little
Rock City Health Department indicated that the vehicle
of infection was probably turkey-a-la-king. Cultures from
turkey breast left over from the meal later yielded three
serotypes of Clostridium perfringen.s.
There are 36 public schools in Little Rock and all
participate in a Federal Government-sponsored school


CO rE\ TS


An Outjr '.ik of Foodi Poisonine I.ittl, H Ro k. Ark.An.- i '5
pid mnii6loaic N teL and Re.prt-
Diphtheri ., in i (..ruup r. f Indi. n ,mtrn l]t- N,'br,L.-k.i 3'6
S Arbo iru.- Encr'ph.hnilI 1965 -
bs--' Jer.sc.' and Del.-la .rr 7
S Plaaue a ahn la. I ount C.i]fo..rnia 92


lunch program. The cafeterias of these schools all have
the same menu each day. The two public schools affected
served turkey '-a-la-king on October 6 prepared from their
allotment of four L'SDX graded and inspected turkey. The
turkey dish was served to approximately 301 children and
teachers at the two schools, one of which has an approxi-
mate registered total of 800 children, the other, 58. The
(Continued on page 386)


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
45th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 45 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE NOVEMBER 13, NOVEMBER 7, 1960- 1964 MEDIAN
1965 1964
1965 1964 1960-1964
Aseptic meningitis .......... 39 56 47 1,835 1,862 2,267
Brucellosis ................. 8 1 3 217 351 351
Diphtheria ................ 5 3 7 140 236 382
Encephalitis, primary infectious 45 58 --- 1,667 2,902 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious 6 2 --- 593 730 --
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ..... .......... 523 672 805 29,211 33,105 37,499
Measles ................. .. .. 1,235 1,903 1,903 247,419 469.679 405.051
Meningococcal infections 45 51 36 2.633 2,408 1,911
Poliomyelitis, Total ......... 3 30 51 104 777
Paralytic ............... 3 23 37 83 615
Nonparalytic ........... --- 10 11 ---
Unspecified ** ** .... --- 4 10 ---
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ....... 6,701 7,301 5,525 336,101 340,481 274,007
Tetanus .................* 6 4 --- 234 244 ---
Tularemia .... ..........*. 2 5 --- 223 291
Typhoid fever .... -*. 6 38 11 381 400 554

Rabies in Animals ...' 87 56 56 3,761 3,917 3,222

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ................. ................ 7 Rabies in Man: ........................... ... 1
Botulism: ................................ 13 Smallpox: ............................... -
Leptospirosis: Iowa- 1, Calif. -1 .................. 48 Trichinosis: ..................... ........ 100
Malaria: Calif. 1 ............................. 73 Typhus-
Plague: .............. ................... 6 Murine: Texas- 2 ......................... .. 24
Psittacosis: Calif. ......................... 38 Rky. Mt. Spotted. N.J. -1, Va. -1, Ga. -1 ........... 251
Cholera: ................................. 2 __


'








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


NOV.EMBER 13. 1965


AN OUTBREAK OF FOOD POISONING
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS
(Continued from front page)


attack rates at the schools are shown in Table 1. None
of the other 34 schools were affected.
Table 1
OUTBREAK OF FOOD POISONING AT TWO SCHOOLS:
LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS, October 6, 1965

Total Total Total
Known Inter- Known Attack Lun
Rate/100 Hour
Eating viewed Ill

School I
Students* 83 52 18 35 11:15-12:00
Teachers 10 10 10 100 Grades 1&2
Total 93 62 28 61
Students* 58 47 32 68 11:45-12:30
Teachers 9 9 8 89 Grades 3&4
Total 67 56 40 71

Students' 72 64 60 94 12:15-1:00
Teachers 9 9 9 100 Grades 5 & 6
Total 81 73 69 95

School II
Students* 58 32 32 55 12:00 noon
Teachers 2 2 2 100
Total 60 34 34 57


*Information on
sentee lists.


students was obtained from teachers and ab-


**Three servings of lunch at School I.

The illness was sudden in onset and characterized
by acute abdominal pain followed by diarrhea; nausea was
marked in the majority of cases but little vomiting occurred.
There were no fatalities and none of the patients required
hospitalization. However, 20.7 percent of those affected
were ill enough to be absent from school the next day.
The incubation period of the illness ranged from 3% to
13'.; hours with an average of 7.8 hours. The duration of


the illness averaged 15 hours with a range from 1 to 36
hours.
Epidemiological investigations by the City Health
Department revealed that an allotment of four frozen
turkeys was received at the larger school kitchen on the
morning of Monday, October 4. The next morning the tur-
keys were cooked at 3509F for 4 to 5 hours, cooled at
room temperature, and placed overnight in a milk cooler
which maintains a temperature of about 40F. On Hednes-
day, October 6, the turkey meat was diced and added to a
broth of peas, carrots and onions. The food was then
heated, but not boiled, for 30 minutes. Thereafter, the
turkey-a-la-king was kept warm on steam tables at the
larger school during the three lunch periods from 11:15
a.m. through 1:00 p.m. The food forthesmallerschool was
transported by private auto to that school and served
shortly after arrival there.
Laboratory investigations of the left-o.er turkey
meat at the Arkansas State Health Department Laboratory
and at the CDC have yielded cultures of Clostridium per-
fringens in which there were three separate serotypes.
One serotype has been identified as Hobbs 13 but the
other two were non-typable.
The State Sanitarians have inspected the school
kitchens frequently in the past and pointed out the inade-
quacy of storage space for frozen meats and other perish-
able foods. Since this outbreak, new and effective refrig-
eration equipment has been installed. Other remedial
measures have included a series of lectures on kitchen
hygiene to all personnel handling food.

(Reported by Dr. J. T. Herron, State Health Officer, and
Dr. William L. Bunch. Jr., Acting Director. Communicable
Disease Control, Arkansas State Board of Health; Dr.
Mason C. Lawson, Director, and Mr. James V. Cairns.
Sanitarian. Little Rock City Health Department. and an
EIS Officer.)


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
DIPHTHERIA IN A GROUP OF INDIAN FAMILIES
Douglas County, Nebraska


On September 18, 1965, in Omaha, Nebraska, a
physician saw a 3-year-old Indian child who was not
seriously ill but was suffering from a bloody nasal
discharge. The following day the Omaha-Douglas County
Health Department Laboratory reported a presumptive
isolation of Corynebacterium diphtheria from the child.
Swabs were then immediately obtained from nine house-
hold contacts in the child's home.


Subsequent laboratory studies yielded isolates of
virulent C. diphtheria from nasal smears taken from the
child, his father, and two siblings. During the following
week, 42 additional contacts in 11 closely associated
neighboring families were investigated and non-virulent
C. diphtheria were isolated from 3 of these contacts.
The index case and the six positive contacts were
given penicillin therapy over a 10-day period. Repeat


386








Morbidity and Mortality


cultures on October 12 showed that the patient and his
two -tiling contacts were still h.rIl'iing virulent diph-
theria organi -m-. by then all other contacts were m gitive.

Follow i ng a subsequent 7-day course of i ihriiomi in.
two consecutive swabs from each of the two ihlining
proved to be negative on culture. The index case had
been fatally injured li\ a fall several days before the
final cultures were obtained from the two -illing-.
Act ordingl\ a repeat culture was not obtained.
Of the total group of 51 persons involved, just over
50 percent gave a history of adequate immunization
against diphtheria. Among the seven ind tidii.l-. who
yielded positive cultures for C. diphtheriae, the immu-
nization status is shown in Talile 2.

On October 2 and 3 all individuals in the family
groups concerned received booster immunizations against
diphtheria, tetanus and poliomyelitis; children under 6
%ears of age were also given pertussis vaccine.


Weekly Report 387



Table 2
DII'll I'IIi-.I IN A GROUP OF INDIAN FA\Mll.lI-.
Omaha, Nebraska


.Relation-
'- \r Reltio- Immunization Laboratory
ship

Index 3 years None \ irul-.ni
2 4 years Sibling Primary series* \ ruleni
3 11 months Sibling None Virulent
4 2,' years Father Primary series* Virulent
5 34 years Aunt Primary series Non-virulent
6 4 years Contact Full Non-virulent
7 26 years Contact Full Non-virulent
*No booster followed these primary series.
(Reported by Dr. E.D. Lyman, Health Director; Miss
Beatrice Adams, Director of Preventable Disease
Ci.ltrl,,: Mr. Matthew Severin, Laboratory Director, all
of the Omaha-Douglas County Health Department,
Nebraska; and an EIS Officer.)


ARBOVIRUS ENCEPHALITIS 1965


Eastern Equine Encephalitis New Jersey and Delaware
The seventh confirmed human case of Eastern equine
encephalitis in the United States during 1965 has been
reported from New Jersey. Occurring in Cape May County,
this is the first and only serologically confirmed human
case in New Jersey this year. The patient is a 60-year-old
woman who became ill on October 9 with manifestations
of severe encephalitis. She is now improving slowly but
there is evidence of permanent damage to the central
nervous system.
Between September 5 and October 8 there were five
confirmed cases of EEE in horses in New Jersey and dur-
ing the same period the virus was recovered from a pheas-
ant flock in the same area. Across the border in Delaware,
EEE virus was also recovered from three horses between
September 22 and October 11.
An important and significant complementary finding
this year in New Jersey has been the recovery of EEE
virus from two pools of Aedes solicitans on September 14
and 29. Prior to September there had been numerous iso-
lations of EEE virus from pools of Culiseta melanura
without any cases of human encephalitis appearing. It
was only after the recovery of virus from Aedes solicitans
that a human case of EEE occurred.
This is the first time that EEE virus has been iso-
lated from Aedes solicitans although during the 1959


epidemic of EEE there was presumptive evidence that
Aedes solicitans was a vector of the disease to humans.
St. Louis Encephalitis New Jersey
There have also been two human cases of St. Louis
encephalitis in New Jersey with onsets of illness on
September 19 and October 4 respectively. The first patient
was a woman of 44 years who developed convulsions, high
fever, headache, drowsiness, stuttering speech and tremor.
The second patient was a man aged 41 years who com-
plained of fever, vague myalgia, headache, mental con-
fusion and vomiting. Both patients reside in Burlington
County and both have made a good recovery from the ill-
ness. The laboratory confirmation of St. Louis encephalitis
is based on the examination of single specimens of sera,
from each of the patients, which showed high titers for
SLE in hemoagglutination inhibition and neutralization
tests.
(Reported by Dr. William J. Dougherty, Director of Pre-
ventable Disease Control Programs, New Jersey State
Department of Health; Dr. Martin Goldfield, Director, and
Drs. Oscar Susman and Ronald Altman of the New
Jersey State Laboratories; Dr. Edward F. Gliwa, Deputy
State Health Officer, Delaware State Board of Health;
and the Arbovirus Unit of the Laboratory Branch of
CDC.)
(Epidemiologic Notes and Reports continued on page 392)


NO% 1.MB'R 13, 1965










388 lorbidily and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES. UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
NOVEMBER 13, 1965 AND NOVEMBER 7, 1964 (45th WEEK)


SEncephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 39 56 45 6 51 104 37 83 5 140

NEW ENGLAND.......... 3 2 2 2 2
Maine.............. -. 1 1 -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont............. -
Massachusetts...... 2 2
Rhode Island....... 1 2 -
Connecticut........ 1 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 6 5 13 5 15 4 13 1 6
New York City...... 2 6 1 2 2 3
New York, Up-State. 3 2 1 10 1 9 1 1
New Jersey.......... 4 2 5 3 3 3 2 -
Pennsylvania ....... 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 7 3 4 1 2 22 2 16 6
Ohio................ 2 2 1
Indiana............ 1 2 8 5 2
Illinois........... 4 1 1 1 1 6 1 5 2
Michigan........... 3 1 1 3 1 2 -
Wisconsin............. 1 3 2 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 4 16 2 11 10 7 8 20
Minnesota.......... 1 4 2 1 3 1 2 7
Iowa............... 1 13 5 1 2 1 I
Missouri............ 1 4 3 1
North Dakota ..... 1 -
South Dakota ..... -- -- 8
Nebraska........... .- 3 3 2
Kansas............... 3 1 1 1 1 I

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 3 5 2 1 30 1 24 35
Delaware........... -
Maryland............ 1 1 1 1 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 3
Virginia........... 1 1 4 4 -
West Virginia...... 1 1 -
North Carolina..... 1 12 7 4
South Carolina..... 1 1 1 I
Georgia............ 2 2 18
Florida............ 1 1 2 9 8 9

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 8 1 3 6 1 5 3 27
Kentucky........... 1 7 1 1 -
Tennessee.......... 1 2 3 1 2 2
Alabama........... 2 2 2 3 23
Mississippi........ -- I 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 7 3 1 18 9 15 8 1 35
Arkansas.......... .- 2
Louisiana.......... 2 2 1 1 9
Oklahoma............ 2 3 2 2 1
Texas.............. 5 3 1 14 6 12 6 23

MOUNTAIN............. 1 2 6 5 7 3 4 -
Montana............ .
Idaho.............. 1 1 -
Wyoming............ 2 2 -
Colorado........... 1 6 1 1 -
New Mexico......... 1 3 1 -
Arizona............ 1 4 2 -
Utah............... 1 -
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC.............. 7 24 3 2 6 3 4 3 9
Washington......... 1 1 2 2 3
Oregon............. 1 1 1 1 1
California......... 6 23 3 2 3 2 1 2 5
Alaska.............. -
Hawaii............. -

Puerto Rico 12










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Relp rt 389


CASES OF %Plt( 111) NOTIFIAIII DISEASES: IGNITED STATES

toR Ilks INI)I)

NOVIMHIR 13, 1965 \NI) NI)VIMBiI 7, 1964 (45th WEEK) Continued


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis Meningococal
loss including Serum Hepatitis Infections Tetanus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
incl.unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 8 523 227 270 29,211 33,105 45 2,633 2,408 6 234

NEW ENGLAND.......... 24 7 16 1,664 2,992 3 133 76 5
Maine.............. 7 3 4 292 936 17 6 -
New Hampshire...... 160 231 7 2 1
Vermont............ 88 359 8 4 -
Massachusetts...... 9 3 6 650 680 3 49 31 3
Rhode Island ...... 5 5 185 182 14 10 -
Connecticut........ 3 1 1 289 604 38 23 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 79 30 49 5,124 7,305 7 344 312 1 15
New York City...... 14 4 10 1,057 1,129 1 58 44
New York, Up-State. 36 18 18 1,903 3,176 1 98 91 1 6
New Jersey......... 10 1 9 963 1,231 3 88 102 2
Pennsylvania....... 19 7 12 1,201 1,769 2 100 75 7

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 121 60 57 5,694 5,217 14 398 321 32
Ohio............... 30 16 14 1,552 1,376 5 107 85 3
Indiana............ 8 2 6 478 441 49 51 8
Illinois........... 1 30 15 14 1,077 969 1 103 83 15
Michigan........... 48 26 21 2,230 2,072 6 92 71 3
Wisconsin.......... 5 1 2 357 359 2 47 31 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 35 15 19 1,648 1,801 2 132 135 1 22
Minnesota........... 2 2 187 213 1 32 29 9
Iowa................ 3 4 1 3 548 310 12 8 4
Missouri........... 20 12 7 366 442 1 53 61 1 4
North Dakota....... 29 63 11 20 1
South Dakota....... 1 1 22 131 3 3 -
Nebraska.......... 2 2 87 48 10 6 2
Kansas.............. 6 2 4 409 594 11 8 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 54 25 28 3,005 3,096 7 494 473 2 55
Delaware........... 2 2 78 68 10 6 -
Maryland............ 6 4 2 534 557 47 34 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 3 3 44 64 10 16 -
Virginia........... 13 4 9 700 491 4 63 57 7
West Virginia...... 9 7 2 415 441 26 35 1
North Carolina..... 6 4 2 297 511 2 103 78 1 9
South Carolina..... 130 125 62 55 6
Georgia............ 2 1 1 106 103 59 79 8
Florida............. 13 5 7 701 736 1 114 113 1 22

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 42 21 12 2,112 2,281 1 202 188 1 32
Kentucky............ 19 7 4 770 809 1 78 65 8
Tennessee......... 15 11 3 704 802 64 56 10
Alabama............ 6 3 3 371 444 35 43 1 12
Mississippi........ 2 2 267 226 25 24 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 43 20 22 2,486 2,576 4 333 274 1 49
Arkansas........... 4 2 2 308 255 1 17 27 11
Louisiana.......... 11 5 6 417 629 1 182 126 1 7
Oklahoma............. 1 53 125 1 21 13 1
Texas............... 2 28 13 14 1,708 1,567 1 113 108 30

MOUNTAIN............. 15 4 2 1,596 1,996 2 94 80 3
Montana............ 137 171 2 1 -
Idaho.............. 191 280 11 3
Wyoming............. 4 1 1 45 80 5 5 -
Colorado........... 337 525 2 26 14 2
New Mexico......... 2 2 333 276 11 32 -
Arizona............ 7 342 439 19 8 1
Utah................ 2 1 1 196 174 17 7 -
Nevada............. 15 51 3 10 -

PACIFIC.............. 1 110 45 65 5,882 5,841 5 503 549 21
Washington......... 7 2 5 441 589 39 43 -
Oregon.............. 4 2 2 504 591 35 21 4
California.......... 1 97 41 56 4,656 4,287 5 403 465 17
Alaska.............. 207 260 18 7
Hawaii.............. 2 2 74 114 8 13

Puerto Rico 25 19 6 1,261 911 11 34 2 54










390 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

NOVEMBER 13, 1965 AND NOVEMBER 7, 1964 (45th WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965


UNITED STATES.. 1,235 247,419 469,679 6,701 2 223 6 381 87 3,761

NEW ENGLAND.......... 30 37,066 18,294 748 1 7 1 45
Maine............... 17 2,873 3,210 164 4
Niew Hampshire...... 382 471 11 3
Vermont............. 1,344 2,362 25 1 32
Masiachusett ...... 8 19,346 5,753 77 I 3 2
Rhode Island....... 3,950 2,099 38 1
Connec icut ........ 5 9,171 4,399 433 3 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 155 15,669 52,770 179 64 9 188
New York City...... .5 2,647 15,426 2 29
New York, up-State. 9 4,252 12,899 101 15 9 173
New Jersey......... 73 2,916 12,271 32 7 -
Pennsylvania....... 28 5,854 12,174 44 13 15

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 414 57,680 103,898 609 14 1 42 39 582
Ohio............... 20 8,958 19,783 60 9 36 313
Indiana............. 23 2,073 22,971 163 5 1 10 1 66
Illinois........... 37 3,037 16,696 77 6 11 84
Michigan........... 119 26,962 29,186 198 2 7 2 58
Wisconsin.......... 215 16,650 15,26? 111 1 5 61

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 94 16,942 30,543 375 28 14 13 760
Minnesota........... 8 723 340 8 1 1 2 156
Iowa............... 32 9,145 23,415 109 2 4 214
Missouri........... 13 2,622 1,048 56 20 9 5 113
North Dakota....... 41 3,881 4,880 89 1 46
South Dakota....... 115 40 20 3 1 57
Nebraska............ 456 820 1 2 36
Kansas ............. iUl! 111 t111 92 4 138

SOUTH ATLANTIC ...... 181 25,671 38,984 868 33 1 75 5 490
Delaware ........... 508 415 8 4
Maryland........... 5 1,188 3,424 94 20 25
Dist. of Columbia.. 83 355 -
Virginia........... 15 3,938 12,765 238 8 8 4 295
West Virginia...... 114 14,301 9,023 193 3 22
North Carolina .... 2 403 1,191 11 8 15 3
South Carolina..... I 1,099 4,283 6 3 9 3
Georgia............ 5 623 205 2 14 1 11 67
Florida............ 39 3,528 7,323 316 5 1 75

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 83 14,577 68,414 1,085 22 1 42 9 779
Kentucky............ 28 2,859 18,647 107 3 10 1 85
Tennessee.......... 53 8,232 24,608 805 18 1 14 8 637
Alabama............ I 2,345 18,431 86 I 10 16
Mississippi ........ I 1,141 6,728 87 8 41

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 77 31,393 72,711 674 2 95 1 52 10 601
Arkansas.............. 1,088 1,149 4 1 65 13 87
Louisiana.......... 2 113 119 1 7 9 2 76
Oklahoma ... ...... 4 215 1,025 21 11 1 8 2 130
Texas.............. 71 29,977 70,418 648 1 12 22 6 308

MOUNTAIN.............. 80 20,265 19,600 837 16 31 1 85
Montana............ 7 3,825 3,512 23 4 1 5
Idaho.............. 22 2,887 2,010 84 -
Wyoming............ 1 854 275 10 4 1 -
Colorado........... 36 5,836 3,309 279 1 9
New Mexico......... 679 602 220 12 14
Arizona............ 6 1,381 6,718 117 13 1 54
Utah............... 2 4,589 2,182 104 8 1 2
Nevada ............. 6 214 992 2 1

PACIFIC.............. 121 28,156 64,465 1,326 14 2 54 231
Washington......... 33 7,352 20,366 468 7 8
Oregon............. 15 3,356 8,777 14 5 8 9
California......... 57 13,256 33,508 778 9 2 38 212
Alaska............. 5 197 1,135 33 2
Hawaii............. II 3,995 679 33 -


Puerto Rico 16 2,645 6,869 18 1 15 13











Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


391


DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED NOVEMIm1 H 13, 1965

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and I year
Ages and over Influenza All Ages and over Influenza All
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.---------
Buffalo, N. Y.---------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.----------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y .---------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio---------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.---------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa-----
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


686
247
27
29
28
42
34
23
31
40
64
13
34
36
38

3,211
51
39
134
36
34
41
58
75
1,717
35
431
192
38
91
25
36
58
59
27
34

2,417
61
37
695
156
199
106
74
358
35
48
43
41
47
122
33
130
38
24
24
95
51

713
61
24
30
119
3
115
67
209
51
34


436
152
20
16
22
27
19
20
22
20
33
9
24
23
29

1,862
24
23
79
21
13
22
33
38
997
19
265
109
27
51
17
21
35
28
21
19

1,390
36
24
392
110
117
69
45
179
21
19
31
20
29
71
14
74
21
15
14
53
36

421
41
20
18
65
2
63
40
122
33
17


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.------------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.------
Miami, Fla.-------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. PEtersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.-------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.*------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.--------
Louisville, Ky.---------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,179
115
236
55
55
79
57
93
44
86
70
247
42

587
85
33
52
111
127
47
37
95

1,007
37
20
32
124
29
67
166
55
178
80
99
64
56

358
22
13
110
20
85
23
34
51

1,312
14
29
21
53
64
364
62
27
81
72
102
173
42
113
53
42


Total 11,470 6,494 409 672

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 551,991
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 311,589
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 22,187
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 32,641


Week No.









392 Morbidity and Moi





EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS (Continued)
PLAGUE Shasta County, California


Field studies, following the case of human plague
in Viola, Shasta County, California, reported in the
MMWR, Vol. 14, No. 38, have confirmed the presence
of plague in squirrels in this area. Pasteurella pestis
has been isolated from the tissues of a recently dead
Citellus beecheyi found 250 yards south of the home
of the 5-year-old boy who developed plague in September.
Two other rodent carcasses which were too decomposed
for species identification were also recovered from
within a mile radius of the boy's home. Bone marrow
scrapings from these specimens yielded presumptive
positive findings for plague, using the fluorescent antibody
technique. Two pools of fleas, Diamanus montanus,
obtained from animals and burrows in the same area have
also been proved, by animal inoculation, to be positive
for plague.
Serological studies were carried out on sera obtained
from the boy's parents, his two playmates, theboy's pet
dog and the playmates' dog. Only one serum, that from
the boy's pet dog, gave a positive hemoagglutination
inhibition test with a titer of 1:32.
(Reported by Dr. Henry Renteln, Bureau of Communicable
Diseases, and Mr. Keith Murray, Bureau of Vector
Control of the California State Health Department; the
San Francisco Field Station of CDC; and an EIS Officer.)








ERRATUM, Vol. 14, No. 43, p. 371:


Summary of Reported Cases of Infectious Syphilis


The U.S. total of cases of infectious syphilis for
September 1965 should be recorded as 1,914 cases and
not 1,194 cases.


tality Weekly Report


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 14.000 IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER ATLANTA GEORGIA
CHIEF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
CHIEF EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. 0. LANGMUIR. M.D.
ACTING CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
CM-IEF SUR /EILLANCE SECTION D. A. HENDERSON. M.D.
EDITOR MMAR D.J.M MACKENZIE. M.B.,
F.R C P.E.

IN ADDITION TO Ti-E ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOME- ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE IN-
V ESTIGA TION5 WHICHH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFICIALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMM4,UNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE AD-
DRESSED TO
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE BASED
ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE
HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SAT-
URDAY. COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS APE RELEASED ON
THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


I C OIV F L Lid
D CUDENTSIDEPT.
i





U S DEPOSITORY


NOVEMBER 13, 1965


'C--
a

o J

0
OIf




z


n


0 C

Cl
*S a

0 C3

n5
m




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EAV9B9K6L_Z9TQ5A INGEST_TIME 2013-02-07T19:09:31Z PACKAGE AA00010654_00453
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES