Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00445

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
















4/


Vol. 14, No. 30






Week Ending
July 31, 1965


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


PLAGUE IN NEW MEXICO

On the morning of August 2, 196.5, a report was
received of a suspected case of plague in the Public
Health Service Hospital in Gallup, New Mexico. The
patient, a 3-)ear-old Indian boy, was suffering from
purulent meningitis and inguinal adenitis. Material from
the CSF and the affected lymph node yieldedd organi-m-<
morphologically compatible with Pasteurella pestis.
Two further cases have since been reported. One is
in a 2-'.-year-old Indian girl with frank meningitis and a
left ineuinal bubo. The other is in a 9-year-old Indian
boy with a pustular lesion on his left forefinger and a
left axillarN bubo. Cerebro spinal fluid and purulent bubo
material from the 2-%-year-old girl have yielded char-


CO \ TE.\ TS
Plague New Mexico ............. .... ...... 257
Epidemiologic Notes and Reports
Western Equine Encephalitis . ... .. .. 258
Hepatitis Outbreak in a Parochial School ... 258
Encephalitis in Horses . ..264
Hepatitis 1964-65 Surveillance Summary . ... 259
International Notes Quarantine Measures ... 264


acteristic Pasteurella pestis in examinations carried out
at the Special Projects Laboratory of CDC. Further
laboratory in estigation-, are proceeding.
The three patients are each from different Navajo
Indian camps, two camps being within 15 miles of Gallup
and one within 40 miles. Epidemiological investigations
have established that two out of three of the patients


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
30th WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 30 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE JULY 31, JULY 25, 1960-1964 MEDIAN
1965 1964 1 1960- 1964
Aseptic meningitis ......... 57 51 68 881 952 952
Brucellosis ................ .. 6 16 13 139 235 242
Diphtheria ...... .......... 1 5 5 89 159 231
Encephalitis, primary-infeenLous' 42 37 --- 906 1,083 ---
Encephalitis, poit-infectl oks 16 16 --- 469 607
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis .......... 540 576 694 20,271 23,707 26,118
Measles ................ 1,171 2,534 2,601 235,133 455,168 385,955
Meningocodcal infections ..... 46 41 35 2,128 1,752 1,402
Poliomyelii. Total ......... 1 5 20 29 58 301
Paralytic tr ........ ........ 1 5 17 23 47 213
Nonparalyttl 6 8 ---
Unspecifie * 3 -
Streptococcal S&rV Throat and
Scarlet fever .. 3,876 4,071 3,408 261,268 267,496 219,211
Tetanus ............. 5 8 --- 138 143 ---
Tularemia ........ ....... .8 6 --- 145 190 ---
Typhoid fever ............. 6 16 19 215 225 308
Rabies in Animals *......... 77 84 80 2,771 2758 2,319

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ................................. 6 Rabies in Man: ........................... ..... 1
Botulism: .................. .............. 11 Smallpox: ........ ...................... 1
Leptospirosis: Ill.-2 ................ ....... 22 Trichinosis: N.Y. Up-State-1, Calif.-1 .......... .... 71
Malaria: Mass.-l, N.J.-l, N.Y. City-i, Pa.-1, Ohio-1, Calif.-1 43 Typhus-
Plague: ................................... Murine: Calif.-1, Texas-1 .................. ... 18
Psittacosis: N.Y. Up-State-1, Texas-1 ............. 27 Rky. Mt. Spotted: Md.-6. N.Y. Up-State-1, N.J.-l, N.C.-l, 152
Cholera: ................................. 2 Pa.-5, Ohio-3, Va.-1, Tenn.-l
i"" ~ "


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


ancd






Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


PLAGUE IN NEW MEXICO
(Continued from front page)


had had contact with wild rodents prior to the illness.
Further field investigations are underway to determine
the source of infection and the control measures which
may be required.
The three patients have all made good recoveries
after treatment with sulphadiazine and chloramphenicol.
There is no evidence of serious neurological sequelae


in the two patients who had meningitis.
(Reported by H. Gordon Doran, D.V.M., Epidemiologist,
New Mexico Department of Public Health; Dr. Robert L.
Brutscha, Medical Officer in Charge, Public Health
Service Indian Hospital, Gallup, New Mexico, and Dr.
John Bourne, District Health Officer, District 2, New
Mexico, and a team from CDC.)


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS
WESTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS Colorado


Recent Western equine encephalitis viruss activity in
Colorado, including isolations of virus from pools of
Culex tarsa!is mosquitoes, several confirmed cases in
horses and one confirmed human case, has been reported
in the last issue of the hMMWR (Vol. 14, No. 29). An
additional 11 suspected cases in humans, all with onsets
of illness between July 13 and July 31, are currentlN
under investigation. Of these 12 cases, including the one
with serologic confirmation already reported, three are 5
years of age or younger, four are teenagers, four are


aged 22, 23, 25, and 28 respectively, and one is 45.
Four cases are reported from Weld County, three from
Otero County, two from Boulder County, and one each from
Kit Carson, Denver, and Garfield Counties.
The number of cases of encephalitis in horses is
now 93, out of which 7 are reported to have died.
(Reported by Dr. C.S. Mollohan, Chief, Section of Epide-
miology, Colorado State Department of Public Health
and by the Disease Ecology Section, Technology Branch,
COC, Greeley, Colorado, and an EIS Officer.)


REPORT OF A HEPATITIS OUTBREAK IN A
PAROCHIAL SCHOOL Johnson County, Kansas


Thirty-s.i students attending an elementary parochial
school in an upper socioeconomic area of Johnson County,


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Kansas, developed icteric infectious hepatitis during the
months of February, March, and April 1965. No cases had


Figure I
HEPATITIS OUTBREAK IN A PAROCHIAL SCHOOL
JOHNSON COUNTY. KANSAS
JANUARY THROUGH MAY. 1965


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14 21 28
FEBRUARY


14 21 28 4


II 18 25 2


MARCH APRIL
WEEK OF ONSET
(Epidemiologic Notes and Reports continued on back page)


8

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I 31
31


258


July 31, 1965


7







July 31, 1965


been reported from this school during the previous 10
years. The first case, a third-grile girl, became ill during
the fir.t week of February 11165. no further cases occurred
in her classroom. During the next 2 weeks, however, 13
more cases were recognized. 8 of which were in one
second-gradt' classroom. Thi- sharp initial outbreak was
followed by a 2-week period during which only two cases
were reported. Subsequently, during the months of March
and April. 2L' additional cases appeared (Figure 1).
Potential common sources of infection such as food,
water, and ;anitary inacli mie were in e-tligated intensively
but there was no epidemiologic evidence to relate these
factors to the outbreak. The cases, by residence, were
scattered throughout the community and no secondary
cases were observed among neighbor, of affected children.
In several instances, secondary cases did appear among
the sibling- although all family contacts of known cases
were given gamma globulin.
The epidemic curve shows two distinct groups of


Morbidity and Morta


HEPATITIS 1964-65
The total cases and incidence of viral hepatitis per
100,000 population in the last two quarters of the epide-
miological year 1964-6.)* are the lowest reported since
1959-60. The continuing decline in incidence since the
1960-61 peak %ear is evident in Figure I.
There were 10,2t,7 cases of viral hepatitis reported
in the United raite- during the winter quarter and 7,877
cases reported during the spring quarter of the epide-
miological year 1964-65. This represents rates of 5.4 and
4.1 per 100,000 population for these two quarters, re-
spectively. The total of reported cases for the 12-month
period is 34,342, and represents an annual incidence of
17.9 cases per 100,000 population (Table I).
*Hepatitis morbidity data are most conveniently summarized in
terms of an "epidemiological year" which runs from the 27th
week of the current year through the 26th week of the succeed-
ing year.


- Surveillance Summary
Table I Reported Cases of Hepatitis, 1958-59 1964-65


Epidemiological Summer Fall Winter Spring
Year Quarter Quarter Quarter Quarter Total

1958-59 3,403 4,028 7,169 4,902 19,502
1959-60 4,700 6,026 9,793 9,917 30,436
1960-61 8,940 12,403 23,026 19,898 65,267
1961-62 14,229 15,580 17,995 13,533 61,337
1962-63 10,272 11,330 13,848 9,864 45,314
1963-64 8,969 10,250 12,118 9,320 40,657
1964-65 7,581 8,597 10,287 7,877 34,342

Incidence per 100,000 Population per Quarter

1958-59 2.0 2.3 4.0 2.8 11.1
1959-60 2.7 3.4 5.5 5.5 17.1
1960-61 5.0 6.9 12.8 11.1 35.8
1961-62 7.9 8.7 9.8 7.4 33.8
1962-63 5.6 6.2 7.4 5.3 24.5
1963-64 4.8 5.4 6.4 4.9 21.6
1964-65 4.0 4.5 5.4 4.1 17.9


lity Weekly Report 259



cases. I'JlI concentration of (cases iliiriic_ a short period
of time which characterized the first grluIp undoubtedly
-utgg.'-I- that these infections were acquired from a
common source. Supporting this hypothesis is the fact
that during the outbreak there were no cases of hepatitis
in the ccmnliinii\ as a whole which could not be traced
directly to the school. The epidemic curve also -iug"ir-,
that the second group of cases, (, u'rrrinin approximately
one month afl'lr the first case, was caused by exposure to
the first group.
The source of infection of the first case has not
been traced, but the epidemiological evidence indicates
that the outbreak was primarily limited to the school and
that the infection was spread by person-to-person contact.
(Reported by Or. Robert F. Cavitt, Director, Johnson
County Health Department; Dr. Don E. Wilcox, Director,
Division of Communicable Disease, Kansas State De-
partment of Health; and the Kansas City Field Station,
CDC.)








260 Morbidily and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 31, 1965 AND JULY 25, 1964 (30th WEEK)


Encephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 57 51 42 16 1 29 58 1 23 47 1 89

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2 1 1 2 2 1
Maine.............. 1 1 -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont............ -
Massachusetts...... 1
Rhode Island....... 2 1 -
Connecticut........ -- 1 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 6 3 8 1 1 8 8 5
New York City...... 3 4 1 1 1 3
New York, Up-State. 1 5 5 -
New Jersey......... 3 2 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 2 3 1 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 10 7 2 1 8 7 3
Ohio................ 2 5 2 2 1
Indiana............ 1 2
Illinois........... 5 2 1 4 4 -
Michigan........... 2 3 I -
Wisconsin.......... 1 1 1 1 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 2 1 3 1 6 4 1 6 3 18
Minnesota.......... 3 2 3 1 1 1 1 7
Iowa............... 1 1 2 1 2 1
Missouri........... 2 1 1
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... 7
Nebraska........... 3 3 1
Kansas............. 1 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 5 3 14 19 14 23
Delaware........... 1 1 -
Maryland............ -- 1 i 1-
Dist. of Columbia.. 3
Virginia........... -
West Virginia...... 1 -
North Carolina..... 1 3 9 5 2
South Carolina..... 1 -
Georgia............ 1 1 11
Florida............ 3 1 10 7 6 6

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 10 2 1 4 1 3 1 15
Kentucky........... 3 -
Tennessee............ 1 1 1 2 1 1- -
Alabama............ 6 2 2 1 14
Mississippi........ 1 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 9 5 2 2 12 4 10 4 19
Arkansas.......... 1 2
Louisiana.......... 2 -- 1 2
Oklahoma.......... 1 1 1 -
Texas............. 7 4 2 1 11 3 9 3 15

MOUNTAIN ............. 2 1 2 5 6 3 3 --
Montana........... -
Idaho................ -
Wyoming............. 2 2
Colorado........... 1 1 1 -
New Mexico........ 1 3 1 -
Arizona............ 1 I 4 2 -
Utah............... 1 1 -
Nevada.............. -

PACIFIC.............. 27 17 5 7 3 3 3 3 5
Washington......... 1 1 2 2 -
Oregon.......... ..... 1 1 1
California............ 24 16 4 6 1 2 1 2 4
Alaska............ .- -. -
Hawaii............. 3 -

Puerto Rico 1 7








Morilidity and Mortality N weekly Report 261


CASES OF PH( IFH I) Nc)ilIlABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS INI)ED

JULY 31, 1965 AND JULY 25, 1964 (30th \X I I ) (Continucd


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis Meningococcal
loss including Serum Hepatitis Infections Tetanus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
incl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 6 540 243 265 20,271 23,707 46 2,128 1,752 5 138

NEW ENGLAND.......... 17 5 12 1,208 2,320 3 109 48 5
Maine ............. 2 2 225 760 2 16 5
New Hampshire...... 1 1 112 168 5 1 1
Vermont.............. 2 1 1 69 292 6 1 -
Massachusetts...... 7 2 5 470 481 1 35 19 3
Rhode Island....... 1 1 148 125 14 7
Connecticut ....... 4 1 3 184 494 33 15 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 96 43 53 3,579 5,354 3 281 213 1 9
New York City...... 21 6 15 686 803 49 31
New York, Up-State. 23 8 15 1,413 2,409 1 76 62 1 4
New Jersey.......... 26 15 11 667 958 1 75 72
Pennsylvania....... 26 14 12 813 1,184 1 81 48 5

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 91 43 43 3,883 3,639 6 286 241 1 14
Ohio............... 23 10 12 1,085 953 2 75 64 1
Indiana............ 9 8 339 323 1 39 37 6
Illinois............ 29 15 11 734 636 2 75 61 1 5
Michigan........... 28 16 12 1,480 1,450 62 53 -
Wisconsin.......... 2 2 245 277 1 35 26 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 29 10 18 1,249 1,296 2 109 110 1 10
Minnesota.......... 5 2 2 124 132 1 22 26 1 7
Iowa............... 1 4 3 1 456 180 7 6 1
Missouri........... 10 3 7 269 327 1 50 53 1
North Dakota....... 17 51 7 12 -
South Dakota....... 1 1 17 108 2 -
Nebraska.........,.. 43 33 10 6 1
Kansas............. 9 1 8 323 465 11 7

SOUTH ATLANTIC ....... 4 48 20 28 2,070 2,225 11 418 371 37
Delaware........... 59 42 1 6 6 -
Maryland........... 7 1 6 382 424 1 39 25 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 1 27 35 8 12 -
Virginia............ 5 4 1 473 349 1 49 43 7
West Virginia...... 8 5 3 310 351 24 26 1
North Carolina..... 15 7 8 191 397 4 82 64 5
South Carolina..... 82 76 56 49 3
Georgia............. 4 2 2 78 55 53 51 4
Florida............. 10 2 8 468 496 4 101 95 16

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 33 9 18 1,445 1,666 3 167 154 20
Kentucky........... 15 1 8 511 663 1 68 52 6
Tennessee.......... 10 5 5 507 561 1 49 51 5
Alabama............ 7 3 4 247 293 30 33 8
Mississippi........ 1 1 180 149 1 20 18 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 63 39 22 1,779 1,757 4 296 211 2 27
Arkansas........... 4 1 3 233 180 14 19 6
Louisiana.......... 9 4 5 302 401 2 165 103 4
Oklahoma............ 2 1 42 94 18 7 1
Texas............... 48 34 13 1,202 1,082 2 99 82 2 16

MOUNTAIN............. 41 15 8 1,196 1,444 3 65 62 3
Montana............ 1 1 87 127 2 -
Idaho............... 2 162 169 8 3 -
Wyoming............ 1 1 34 45 4 3 -
Colorado........... 14 8 6 253 394 13 11 2
New Mexico......... 11 7 257 202 10 26 -
Arizona............. 11 237 338 16 5 1
Utah............... 1 159 127 3 10 6 -
Nevada............. 7 42 2 8 -

PACIFIC.............. 1 122 59 63 3,862 4,006 11 397 342 13
Washington......... 8 5 3 305 450 1 32 25
Oregon............. 16 9 7 325 451 28 20 3
California.......... 1 97 44 53 3,035 2,899 8 315 279 10
Alaska............. 1 1 165 126 2 15 7 -
Hawaii............. 32 80 7 11 -

Puerto Rico 15 12 3 786 591 5 30 24








262 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

JULY 31, 1965 AND JULY 25, 1964 (30th WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965


UNITED STATES... 1,171 235,133 455,168 3,876 8 145 6 215 77 2,771

NEW ENGLAND.......... 40 36,586 16,241 320 3 2 32
Maine.............. 2,764 2,840 30 3
New Hampshire...... 381 240 I
Vermont............. 1 1,245 2,267 2 2 26
Massachusetts...... 21 19,184 4,997 34 2 1
Rhode Island....... 3 3,888 1,893 18 1 -
Connecticut........ 15 9,124 4,004 236 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 149 14,203 51,509 112 1 36 4 113
New York City...... 49 2,156 15,159 4 1 18 -
New York, Up-State. 27 3,990 12,392 80 10 3 101
New Jersey.......... 48 2,437 12,082 24 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 25 5,620 11,876 4 6 1 12

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 472 54,025 101,531 340 11 32 11 418
Ohio................. 29 8,770 19,409 11 7 6 216
Indiana............ 19 1,734 22,506 65 4 9 1 40
Illinois........... 28 2,500 16,467 40 5 7 1 73
Michigan........... 124 25,928 28,528 181 1 4 1 41
Wisconsin.......... 272 15,093 14,621 43 1 5 2 48

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 18 16,278 30,014 110 15 6 23 573
Minnesota.......... 619 329 1 1 8 119
Iowa............... 2 8,940 23,195 27 1 3 163
Missouri........... 3 2,555 1,006 5 10 4 3 77
North Dakota....... 11 3,604 4,663 57 5 38
South Dakota....... 2 111 9 2 2 2 41
Nebraska.............. 449 812 1 31
Kansas.............. NN NN NN 18 2 2 104

SOUTH ATLANTIC........ 117 24,145 37,784 292 1 28 1 45 18 386
Delaware........... 1 499 404 4 4 -
Maryland............ 13 1,107 3,386 11 14 2 11
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 72 353 5 -- -
Virginia........... 19 3,785 12,645 124 5 3 5 262
West Virginia ..... 79 13,365 8,434 127 1 2 1 18
North Carolina..... 3 375 1,147 8 1 6 13 2
South Carolina..... 1 1,005 4,219 12 3 4 2
Georgia............ 612 177 1 14 2 4 40
Florida............ 3,325 7,019 3 6 51

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 51 13,485 67,062 874 2 18 2 23 10 620
Kentucky............ 6 2,400 18,366 21 3 6 1 61
Tennessee.......... 25 7,711 23,742 809 2 14 1 8 4 541
Alabama............... 5 2,280 18,277 36 1 1 5 2 12
Mississippi........ 15 1,094 6,677 8 4 3 6

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 114 30,252 71,129 542 3 53 30 5 434
Arkansas............ 1 1,081 1,105 2 35 10 2 61
Louisiana.......... 5 99 97 1 2 5 65
Oklahoma ........... 201 993 23 8 2 1 77
Texas............. 108 28,871 68,934 519 8 13 2 231

MOUNTAIN............. 112 19,316 17,814 814 1 14 1 15 55
Montana............ 4 3,651 2,891 16 1 3 3
Idaho.............. 32 2,722 1,833 55 -
Wyoming............ 1 840 242 9 3 1 -
Colorado........... 38 5,562 3,091 332 7
New Mexico......... 7 670 420 223 1 9 11
Arizona............ 17 1,216 6,445 92 5 33
Utah................ 13 4,453 1,912 87 8 1
Nevada............. 202 980 -

PACIFIC.............. 98 26,843 62,084 472 1 6 1 25 4 140
Washington......... 10 7,205 19,938 2 6
Oregon............. 13 3,146 8,403 11 2 3 3
California......... 54 12,667 32,221 394 1 4 1 19 4 129
Alaska............. 7 149 1,077 39 2
awaii ............. 14 3,676 445 28 l -


Puerto Rico 33 2,213 5,449 3 3 1 12










Morbidity and Mortality V weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED JULY 31, 1965


263


30th Weak


(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)

All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years and 1 year
S a Influenza All Influenza Al
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.--------
Lynn, Mass.----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.--------
Allentown, Pa.-------
Buffalo, N. Y.-------
Camden, N. J.--------
Elizabeth, N. J.-----
Erie, Pa.------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.--------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.--------
Reading, Pa.-------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.--------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.---------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.t-----------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.--------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.---------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa-----
Duluth, Minn.--------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Ho.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


691
236
35
26
25
54
28
16
29
49
54
11
38
28
62

3,110
58
30
140
42
31
38
76
85
1,578
31
428
167
89
93
30
36
60
38
31
29

2,548
61
33
828
140
198
106
81
325
44
50
37
31
42
139
46
116
32
38
45
98
58

813
59
24
53
125
16
122
69
231
60
54


415
133
22
16
16
34
15
11
22
27
35
8
19
16
41

1,794
30
19
79
25
22
28
41
49
915
14
233
82
55
52
18
26
38
24
25
19

1,409
37
21
435
85
103
54
46
161
25
29
18
14
30
77
27
75
20
23
30
64
35

497
42
16
25
81
12
72
45
133
43
28


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


1
2
3
1
1

6
3

4
3
3

158
4

7
1
1
1
7
5
78
4
23
9
3
5
1
2
5
1

1

134

3
55

14
5
4
20
1
1
2
3
2
7
3
9
1
1
2
1


45
1

5
6

12
4
9
2
6


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.-----------
Norfolk, Va.----------
Richmond, Va.---------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.*-------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.----------
El Paso, Tex.*---------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.---------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.*----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.---------
Ogden, Utah-----------
Phoenix, Ariz.--------
Pueblo, Colo.---------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.---------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.--------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.A----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.--------
Spokane, Wash.--------
Tacoma, Wash.---------


1,136
133
237
33
61
86
49
95
30
80
62
220
50

637
102
68
43
126
142
39
24
93

1,024
39
33
19
145
36
79
104
66
173
102
99
73
56

395
41
20
112
13
94
9
51
55

1,714
15
42
50
45
70
612
128
27
101
69
102
194
29
152
45
33


Total 112,068 1 6,726 430 688

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 378,160
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------. 214,315
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 16,118
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 22,423


541
60
107
19
26
40
23
51
13
62
37
79
24

336
40
31
29
72
83
10
17
54

507
25
17
9
71
17
45
37
28
91
50
58
28
31

227
21
15
65
8
53
5
28
32

1,000
12
21
33
22
38
350
80
21
58
41
57
109
21
89
24
24









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIIIIllllllllllllllll llllillllIIIIIIIIII I lll
3 1262 08864 2284

July 31. 1965


ENCEPHALITIS IN HORSES North Carolina


Preliminary Note


An increasing incidence of encephalitis in horses
has been reported from North Carolina. In the area in-
volved there have been heavy rains, with some flooding,
followed by abundant mosquito breeding. During a 10-day
period at the end of July there have been about 100 deaths
in horses due to equine encephalitis. Of these deaths,
80 occurred during the last 7 days of the month. To date
no human cases have been reported.
Autopsy specimens of CNS tissue from two horses
dying of encephalitis are currently under study at the
State Health Department Laboratories.


(Reported by Dr. Ronald Levine, Chief, Communicable
Disease Control Section, Division of Epidemiology,
North Carolina State Board of Health.)





INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES


Immunization Information for International Travel
1963-64 edition-Public Health Service Publication No. 384


The following change should be made in the list of
Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:


Page 70
DELETE


City:


Center:






Clinic Hours:


Fee:


ADD


City:


Center:






Clinic Hours:


Miami, Florida


Pan American World Airways, Inc.
Medical Dept.
5300 N.W. 36 Street
Telephone 637-2802


Friday, 8-9 a.m.


No


Miami, Florida


Pan American World Airways, Inc.
Medical Dept.
5300 N.W. 36 Street
Telephone 637-2802


Friday, 9-10 a.m.


Fee: Yes


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 14000 1. PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER ATLANTA GEORGIA.
CH-IEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
CHIEF EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
ACTING CHIEF STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
CHIEF SURVEILLANCE SEC TION D. A. HENDERSON. M.D.
EDITOR MMWR O.J.M. MACKENZIE. M.B..
F.R.C.P.E.

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISH-IED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOME.. ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE IN-
VESTICA TION WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFF ICALS AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUC" COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE AD-
DRESSED TO
TZE EDI TOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA GEORGIA 30333
NOTE THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE BASED
ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE
HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SAT-
URDAV. COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON
THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAY.


UNIV OF FL LIB.
DOCUMENTS DEPT.






.U.S. DEPOSITORY


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