Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00444

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
3.. 0.,/


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER n '7


^ /vs'Se?^.L


Vol. 14, No. 42


Week Ending
October 23, 1965


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION,


AN OUTBREAK OF SHIGELLOSIS IN KANSAS
STATE UNIVERSITY Manhattan, Kansas


Between May 1 and May 14, 1965, there were 110
cases of gastroenteritis reported from the Kan-as .Statr
tini~erziti Student Health Center. Male students were
predominantly) affected and a later post-epidemic ques-
tionnaire survey indicated that a total of some 230 male
students re-iding in the same dormitory complex had been
involved. Shigella sonnei was isolated from a number of
the students admitted to the University Health Center
Infirmary. Although the source of the outbreak was believed
to be the male dormitory dining room facility, no specific
food item could be incriminated.


PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


CONTENTS


i'i -


Th pe5 o hf the ,pidJmic occurred %,n \I:i 7 and %..
The illnesses, which had a duration of 24 to 48 hours,
were generally characterized by abrupt onset, abdominal
cramps, watery diarrhea, fever, nausea and vomiting. The
majority of the patients had fever greater than 101 F and
many had elevated leukocyte counts.
\ngr~n the 110 students attending the Health Center,
. G were males of whom 60 lived in three dormitories


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
42nd WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 42 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE OCTOBER 23, OCTOBER 17, 1960 1964 MEDIAN
1965 1964 1965 1964 1960-1964
Aseptic meningitis ......... 58 61 65 1,701 1,693 2,097
Brucellosis ...... ............... 4 2 8 202 336 337
Diphtherla ..... ........... 2 12 11 120 213 348
Encephalitis, primary infectious 67 91 1,518 2,685 -
Encephalitis. post-infectious 2 5 -- 574 712 -
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis .... ....... 672 629 876 27,421 31,083 35,061
Measles ................. .. 782 961 1,325 243,772 465,411 400,500
Meningococcal infections 39 60 43 2,501 2,251 1,781
Poliomyelitis, Total ......... 1 2 27 46 94 702
Paralytic ............... _- 1 21 35 77 554
Nonparalytic ............ 1 --- 7 10 ---
Unspecified .............* 1 --- 4 7 -

Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ......... 6,149 5,395 4,752 316,934 320,599 258,816
Tetanus ... * 4 10 214 230
Tularemia ................ 3 11 --- 208 275 ---
Typhoid fever ..... '. 16 6 14 353 351 510
Rabies in Animals .......... ..1 71 58 57 3,565 3,714 3,077

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ..... ............................... 7 Rabies in Man: ............................. 1
Botulism: ...... ............................ 13 Smallpox: .................... ... ....... -
Leptospirosis: Mich.-l, Tenn.-l .... .. ........... 42 Trichinosis: 11.-1, N.Y.Up State-3 .............. .. 96
Malaria: Md.-2, N.Y.Up-State-1, Calif.-1 ............ 68 Typhus-
Plague: ........... ..................... 6 Murine: ...... ........... ............ 22
Psittacosis: ................................. 36 Rky. Mt. Spotted: N.J.-l, Tenn.- 1............... 244
Cholera: ... ......... ......... ..... ... 2







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


OCTOBER 23, 1965


AN OUTBREAK OF SHIGELLOSIS IN KANSAS
STATE UNIVERSITY Manhattan, Kansas
(Continued from front page)


served by a common dining facility. The 24 female patients
resided in six different dormitories each with itsown
dining facility. From 17 rectal cultures obtained from
male patients in the hospital on May 7 and 8, Shigella
sonnei was isolated from 13.
Epidemiological investigations included a survey of
food histories, with particular reference to meals eaten
on May 4, 5, and 6, and a post-epidemic questionnaire
survey. The latter survey was of a stratified sample of
961 students representing 10 percent of the University
enrollment. Only those individuals who had diarrhea as


Figure I.

STUDENTS WITH GASTROENTERITIS*
KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY-MAY 1965


4- ALL STUDENTS

2
OI l,, iih ^^


STUDENTS RESIDING
OFF CAMPUS
(MALE AND FEMALE)


I I I I I I I I I I I I I


FEMALE STUDENTS
RESIDING ON CAMPUS


MALE STUDENTS
RESIDING ON CAMPUS


0 1 1 7 9IAYI I 1 i I 17 I 1
1 3 5 7 9 II 13 15 17 19
MAY


*DATA OBTAINED FROM QUESTIONNAIRE FULLY COMPLETED BY 36 STUDENTS.
CASES OF GASTROENTERITIS DETERMINED BY THE CRITERIA*
DIARRHEA PLUS TWO OF THE FOLLOWING SYMPTOMS;
TENESMUS, CRAMPS, FEVER AND VOMITING.


well as at least two of the four symptoms of tenesmus,
vomiting, abdominal cramps and fever, were regarded as
having shigellosis. The epidemic curve (Figure 1) con-
structed from these data suggests that the outbreak
began on May 7 among male dormitory students. The
illnesses in nonresident males and in female students


were more diffusely scattered than in the male population
il ing in dormitories. Table I shows the estimated attack
rate by the type of eating establishment. The questionnaire
gale no evidence which suggested that any one meal or
food item was the common source of the infection.
Laboratory investigation subsequent to the ques-
tionnaire entailed a rectal culture survey of 276 students,
177 of whom were men. Among the men, 10.2 percent had
stool cultures positive for Shigella sonnei; only 2.2
percent of the cultures from the 99 women students were
positive. In addition, specimens from 195 employees in
the Uni\ersity Food Service v ere examined, but only one
culture %as positive for shigella. The woman concerned
had no history of illness and had not worked in the male
dining hall.


Table 1
Outbreak of Shigellosis Kansas State University
Estimated Attack Rates

Responding
Attack
A. By Tipe of Residence to III Rate
Questionnaire

Mlen's Residence Halls 205 23 11.2
oomen's Residence Halls 240 10 4.2
Scholarship Houses 79 2 2.5
Fraternity Houses 44 0 0.0
Sorority Houses 94 3 3.2
Married Student
Apartments 52 1 1.9
Off Campus 247 2 0.8

Total 961 41* 4.3


Responding
B. By Type of Eating to Ill Attack
Establishment Questionnaire Rate


Resident Dining Halls -
(men's and women's) 389 30 7.2
Student Union Building 77 1 1.3
Fraternity Houses 43 0 0.0
Sorority Houses 71 3 4.1
Other 2S6 4 1.5

Total 846 38* 4.5

*Only 36 ill students completed satisfactorily all sections of
the questionnaire.
(Reported by Dr. Hilbert P. Jubelt, Student Health Director,
Kansas State Lniversity; Dr. Donald E. l'ilcox, State Epi-
demiologist. Kansas State Department of Health; and Dr.
Norman W. Anderson, Director, Medical Health Services,
Kansas State Department of Health; and a team of EIS
Officers.)


362


3 o
o 0
U.-
0
i


DATE OF
ONSET,


n1 .. .. .


r>'y VIAA/uA


I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I l I ;








OCr IOt R 23. 1965


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
SHIGELLA SECOND QUARTER, 1965


In ie\. ini niii current -hi ,>Il., morbidity trends, the
factors of seasonal distribution, .i-'. sex, and family
associations have been considered. Human -Irii\ .p
frequent ie- gIogpr.llhii l distribution patterns and non-
human isolations are also summarized. A total of 1,515
human -hil.lla isolations was notified from 46 States
and three other r'iorinl' centers dIurin. the second
quarter of 19tI'. Thii represents a decline from the 1,7:12_
isolations reported in the first quarter of 1';:,. which was
itself a decrease from the 2,101 isolations reported in
the fourth quarter of 1Il;t1. The totals during these latter
two quarters are based on figures submitted from 47
reporting centers.
The numbers of shigella isolations nuoificd from the
reporting centers indicate a seasonal pattern of low activ-
ity in the late .-pring with a marked increase in July and
a peak in September, a trend which is characteristic of
that of previous years. However, since there is usually a
delay of 1 to 2 months in reporting, this -ugge t-l that the
lowest clinical incidence is actually during late winter,
which would be consistent with the classical concepts
of an enteropathy.
Shigella isolations during the second quarter of 1965
demonstrate an age di-.trinution similar to that of previous
quarters. Approximately 73 percent of isolations were
reported from children under 10 '.earq of age. However,



Table 2
SHIGELLA ISOLATIONS BY AGE AND SEX
Second Quarter, 1965

Percent of
Age Group Male Female Unknown Total Known Age
Known Age

0-6 months 31 : 1 57 6.0
7-12 months 32 21 0 53 5.6
1-4 years 188 177 1 366 38.4
5-9 years 130 89 0 219 23.0
10-19 years 58 46 0 104 10.9
20-29 years 27 33 0 60 6.3
30-39 years 10 24 0 34 3.6
40-49 years 4 7 0 11 1.2
50-59 years 8 9 0 17 1.8
60-69 years 3 9 0 12 1.3
70-79 years 6 6 0 12 1.3
80+ years 3 3 0 6 0.6

Subtotal 500 449 2 951

Unknown 267 2.16 41 564

TOTAL 767 705 43 1,515


the sex distribution ldiffer- slightly with data from pre-
codiri., quarters. Out of 1,515 isolations reported, the
1,472 which specified the sex indicated that 52.1 percent
were from males; on the other hand, data from previous
quarters indicated that male isolations have been -lighily
less than 50 percent. Both the age and sex distribution
of s.hiigll.i isolations are summarized in Tal'le 2.
During the second quarter of 1965, 19.5 percent of
the isolations were from families in which -higlla was
isolated from more than one member. In pri' (-ding quarters
there has been a 1rnr.ally similar per en clge of family-
associated infections and in the first quarter of 1965 this
fiLure was 22.5 percent. As these percentages represent
only laboratory confirmed infections, it is probable that
the intrafamilial infection rates are somewhat higher.
There were 14 different serotypes reported from the
49 reporting centers; no single t.erot\pe was common to
all. The six most frequently isolated serotypes have been
consistently the same since shigella reporting was
started. They account for over 80 percent of all isolations.

Second Quarter Previous Quarter

Rank Serotype Number Percent Percent

1 S.sonnei 516 34.1 41.2
2 S. flexneri 2 391 25.8 21.4
3 S. flexneri 3 165 11.0 9.1
4 S. fleneri 94 6.3 5.5
5 S. fleneri1 88 5.7 3.1
6 S. flexneri 6 54 3.6 4.8

Shigella sonnei and S. flexneri 2 have always proved
to be the two most common serotypes; positions three
through six have been occupied by S. flexneri 1, 3, 4, 6,
in varying order. As all States do not perform final
serotyping, the S. flexneri subgroups have been combined
into the major numbered subgroups.
A regional difference has been found to exist with a
significantly higher percentage of S. flexneri isolations
in the South as compared to the North. In the southern
states 75 percent of isolations have been S. flexneri,
while in the northern states 40 to 50 percent of the
isolations have yielded this serotype. During the second
quarter the figures were 78.7 percent and 48.3 percent
respectively.
There were 15 shigella isolations reported from non-
human sources in the second quarter. These include 11
S. flexneri 3 from monkeys in Maryland, 1 S. dysenteriae
3573-50 in a monkey from Illinois, 1 S. flexneri 2b from
slurries of checked eggs in Colorado, 1 S. sonnei II from
turkey droppings in Colorado; and 1 S. flexneri 2a from
the "environment" on a farm in Texas. The shigellae


(Continued on back page)


3 6 3










364 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 23, 1965 AND OCTOBER 17, 1964 (42nd WEEK)


SEncephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 58 61 67 2 1 46 94 35 77 2 120

NEW ENGLAND.......... 5 1 2 2 2
Maine............... 1 -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont.............. -
Massachusetts...... 2 1 2
Rhode Island....... 2 -
Connecticut........ 1 1 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 8 7 9 1 4 14 3 13 5
New York City...... 4 3 1 2 2 3
New York, Up-State. 1 2 1 10 9 -
New Jersey.......... 3 5 3 3 2 3 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 2 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 9 6 12. 2 20 2 15 1 6
Ohio................ 1 1 5 2 2 1
Indiana............ 1I 4 7 5 2
Illinois........... 5 3 1 1 6 1 5 1 2
Michigan............. 1 2 2 1 3 1 2 -
Wisconsin.......... 1 2 1 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 5 11 1 11 9 7 7 19
Minnesota.......... 3 4 1 3 1 2 7
Iowa................ 4 1 5 2 1
Missouri............ 1 4 3 1
North Dakota....... 1 1 -
South Dakota....... 2 7
Nebraska........... 1 3 3 2
Kansas............. 1 3 1 1 1 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 6 8 2 1 25 1 20 1 31
Delaware........... 1 -
Maryland ........... 1 1 1 1 1 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 3
Virginia........... 2 1 3 3 -
West Virginia. ..... 1 1 i -
North Carolina..... 10 6 1 3
South Carolina..... 1 1 1
Georgia ........... 1 I 15
Florida............ 1 7 8 7 9

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 5 4 1 6 1 5 18
Kentucky........... 3 -
Tennessee.......... 1 1 3 1 2 1
Alabama............ 4 1 2 2 15
Mississippi........ I 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 3 16 8 14 8 30
Arkansas........... 2
Louisiana........... 1 7
Oklahoma............ 1 2 1 2 -
Texas.............. 2 2 14 6 12 6 21

MOUNTAIN ............. 2 1 26 5 7 3 4
Montana............ -
Idaho............... 1 1 -
Wyoming.............. 2 2
Colorado............. 1 26 1 I -
New Mexico.......... 2 1 3 1
Arizona............ 4 2
Utah................ -
Nevada. ............ -

PACIFIC.............. 18 27 6 1 6 3 4 3 9
Washington......... 1 2 2 3
Oregon............. 1 2 1 1 1 1 1
California......... 16 26 4 1 3 2 1 2 5
Alaska............. -
awaii ............. -

Puerto kico 12










365


orbirdity and Mortality H eekly Report


(CASES OF .'PI ( II I) NOTIFI AIIl I DISlASi S: INITI) STATES

FOR CH 1 Ik INI M)IDI

(OCT H1i R 23, 1965 \ 1) O("'TO( )I IR 1964 (12nd \\ I IK) (Coninitd


Area




UNITED STATES...

NEW ENGLAND ..........
Maine..............
New Hampshire......
Vermont............
Massachusetts......
Rhode Island.......
Connecticut........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC......
New York City......
New York, Up-State.
New Jersey.........
Pennsylvania.......

EAST NORTH CENTRAL...
Ohio................
Indiana.............
Illinois............
Michigan...........
Wisconsin..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL...
Minnesota..........
Iowa ... ...........
Missouri...........
North Dakota.......
South Dakota.......
Nebraska...........
Kansas.............

SOUTH ATLANTIC.......
Delaware............
Maryland...........
Dist. of Columbia..
Virginia...........
West Virginia......
North Carolina.....
South Carolina.....
Georgia............
Florida............

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Kentucky............
Tennessee..........
Alabama............
Mississippi........

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL...
Arkansas...........
Louisiana..........
Oklahoma...........
Texas..............

MOUNTAIN.............
Montana............
Idaho...............
Wyoming............
Colorado............
New Mexico.........
Arizona.............
Utah................
Nevada............

PACIFIC..............
Washington..........
Oregon............
California.........
Alaska..............
Hawaii..............


Brucel-





1965

4


Total


Infectious Hepatitis
including Serum Hepatitis


Under


incl. unk.l 20 years


41 '


5
1
6

42
9
12
12
9

45
16
3
3
23


13
1








42
4
10

7
5
13
2

1

32
11
10
8
3

17
1
7
1
8

14
4


3
4

3


20 years
and over


Cumulative
Totals


27,421

1,598
280
158
87
627
174
272

4,853
989
1,807
922
1,135

5,301
1,475
452
998
2,040
336

1,555
175
531
332
29
20
78
390"

2,847
74
498
41
679
395
275
128
98
659

1,958
698
660
351
249


2,364
301
394
50
1,619

1,515
127
185
40
321
322
324
187
9

5,430
418
460
4,291
196
65


1964

31,083

2,846
895
219
349
638
165
580

6,865
1,061
2,983
1,168
1,653

4,881
1,283
419
909
1,920
350

1,679
196
267
413
60
129
45
569

2,928
65
539
60
463
419
489
113
86
694

2,144
771
751
407
215


2,423
228
593
117
1,485

1,874
165
263
65
493
261
419
157
51

5,443
550
570
3,977
240
106


Meaning ococc.
Infect ions


Cumulat ive


1965

39

3





2

4


1
3

6
I
1
1

2
1

2
2








7

1


1
1
2
1
1

1
1




5
1
3

1

1







1


1965

2,501

128
16
7
7
46
14
38

321
54
92
82
93

364
97
47
100
78
42

128
29
12
52
11
3
10
11

471
9
45
9
57
25
96
62
58
110

194
76
61
35
22


Puerto Rico 22 14 8 1,177 859 9 31 3 48


4 4


2,251

70
6
1
4
29
10
20

285
38
82
94
71

303
77
48
78
69
31

130
29
7
58
19
3
6
8

439
6
32
14
50
33
75
53
64
112

177
57
56
40
24

260
23
124
11
102


214

5


1
3

1

13

5
1
7

32
2
9
15
3
3

19
8
4
2
1

2
2

47

1

7
1
7
6
5
20

28
6
10
10
2

46
11
5
1
29

3



2

1


Tetanus









366 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES. UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 23, 1965 AND OCTOBER 17, 1964 (42nd WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 782 243,772 465,411 6,149 3 208 16 353 71 3,565

NEW ENGLAND.......... 25 36,932 17,296 357 1 1 7 3 44
Maine.............. 7 2,828 3,068 15 4
New Hampshire...... 1 382 260 11 3
Vermont.......... 1,301 2,346 10 3L
Massachusetts...... 10 19,315 5,461 73 1 3 2
Rhode Island....... 3 3,943 1,974 34 1 -
Connecticut........ 4 9,163 4,187 214 1 3 3 4

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 127 15,162 52,368 360 3 63 9 164
New York City...... 19 2,488 15,382 9 29 -
New York, up-State. 31 4,195 12,773 188 15 9 151
New Jersey......... 57 2,714 12,234 144 7 -
Pennsylvania....... 20 5,765 11,979 19 3 12 13

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 214 56,581 103,347 385 13 1 42 2 538
Ohio............... 10 8,921 19,669 42 11 277
Indiana............. 38 1,998 22,884 66 5 1 9 1 65
Illinois........... 23 2,827 16,653 82 5 10 83
Michigan........... 52 26,695 29,038 114 2 7 53
Wisconsin.......... 91 16,140 15,103 81 1 5 1 60

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 37 16,714 30,343 233 26 11 18 728
Minnesota.......... 7 705 335 13 1 1 6 149
Iowa................ 16 9,068 23,338 65 2 3 206
Missouri........... 5 2,600 1,025 19 7 6 104
North Dakota....... 8 3,773 4,796 125 45
South Dakota....... 115 35 6 2 3 56
Nebraska........... 1 453 814 1 36
Kansas............. NN NN NN 24 4 132

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 98 25,230 38,657 651 2 33 2 68 5 474
Delaware........... 506 412 18 4 -
Maryland........... 1,170 3,413 58 20 23
Dist. of Columbia.. 78 354 16 -
Virginia........... 13 3,913 12,724 188 8 8 3 289
West Virginia...... 60 14,020 8,835 191 3 21
North Carolina..... 1 396 1,169 32 2 8 15 3
South Carolina..... 1,058 4,269 9 3 8 2
Georgia............ 617 199 5 14 2 6 1 63
Florida............. 24 3,472 7,282 134 4 1 73

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 69 14,205 68,111 1,129 21 5 38 13 753
Kentucky........... 24 2,714 18,585 40 3 1 10 1 81
Tennessee.......... 35 8,026 24,440 982 17 12 8 615
Alabama............ 4 2,339 18,397 86 1 2 9 16
Mississippi........ 6 1,126 6,689 21 2 7 4 41

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 59 31,164 72,338 643 1 88 50 6 568
Arkansas........... 1,085 1,134 3 1 61 13 1 82
Louisiana.......... 1 110 117 20 5 9 72
Oklahoma............ 210 1,021 16 11 6 1 126
Texas.............. 58 29,759 70,066 604 11 22 4 288

MOUNTAIN.............. 84 19,982 19,048 1,200 16 28 3 80
Montana............ 18 3,764 3,238 57 4 1 5
Idaho.............. 28 2,832 1,952 47 -
Wyoming............ 1 852 265 28 4 1 -
Colorado............ 19 5,715 3,263 485 9
New Mexico.......... 2 679 507 356 11 14
Arizona............ 7 1,357 6,702 79 12 3 49
Utah................ 9 4,577 2,129 148 8 1 2
Nevada............. 206 992 2 1

PACIFIC.............. 69 27,802 63,903 1,191 10 4 46 12 216
Washington.......... 12 7,295 20,167 295 4 7
Oregon............. 12 3,315 8,718 22 5 8 9
California......... 26 13,106 33,276 792 5 4 33 12 198
Alaska.............. 3 190 1,124 14 2
Hawaii.............. 16 3,896 618 68 1 -

Puerto Rico 27 2,531 6,632 26 1 13 13









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report






DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES FOR WFEK ENDED OCTUOIII 23, 1965

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


:1307


All Causes Pneumonia Under All Causes Pneumonia Under
and 1 year
Area All 65 years and 1 year Area All 65 years anfl a All
Ages and over Influenza All Ages and over InAluens Aus
All Ages Causes All Ages Causes


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


703
257
35
27
19
54
21
30
36
44
69
5
46
23
37

3,340
52
33
137
53
41
39
90
99
1,688
41
476
221
33
103
31
39
60
43
26
35

2,570
60
33
720
167
237
142
93
321
40
50
43
49
42
154
38
117
43
25
36
90
70

818
57
29
43
118
21
125
69
232
75
49


429
148
23
17
10
28
16
24
28
24
48
5
28
11
19

1,946
33
24
84
33
25
28
50
41
1,004
24
268
100
21
61
18
26
43
22
21
20

1,427
34
23
372
106
118
85
51
181
29
25
23
19
26
82
19
70
23
21
21
60
39

503
33
22
24
72
14
84
36
136
50
32


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.------------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.---------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colc.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.---------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


Total 12,137 6,825 475 750

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 516,209
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 291,190
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- -20,829
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 30,659


Week No.


1,139
130
268
47
58
71
55
95
29
63
74
207
42

593
102
53
34
126
112
58
27
81

1,084
34
37
25
150
36
53
195
71
165
79
117
71
51

376
27
16
109
18
102
22
44
38

1,514
30
59
38
39
70
407
113
32
110
63
98
216
32
129
50
28








368


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


SURVEILLANCE SUMMARY
SHIGELLA SECOND QUARTER, 1965
(Continued from page 363)


isolated in Colorado were found during a routine culturing
of checked eggs and cattle feed, which was initiated to
determine if enteric pathogens, particularly salmonella,
were present. No report of animal or human disease asso-
ciated with any of these isolations was received.

(Reported by the Shigella Surveillance Unit, CDC.)


EPIDEMIOLOGIC NOTES AND REPORTS

MEASLES Newark, New Jersey


An analysis of 84 cases of measles reported from
Newark, New Jersey, during the period from September 1
through October 19 revealed that 64 cases were concen-
trated in the central and the south wards of the city's five
wards. Altogether, 63 families were affected, of which 17
families had more than one reported case of measles. There
were 8 instances of presumed co-primary infections and 7
instances of a primary case in a school-age child with
subsequent spread to siblings of preschool age. In two
families spread from a child of preschool age occurred.
The age distribution is listed below:


Age <1 year 1-4 years 5-9 years >10 years

Number of Cases 4 48 32 0

An immunization survey was conducted by the New
Jersey State Health Department in February 1965. This
indicated that 6 percent of the children of 1-4 years of
age in the lower socioeconomic areas of Newark had been
vaccinated against measles, whereas 19 percent was the
average figure for the same age group in the city as a
whole. The State Health Department has since made
available, to private physicians, measles vaccine for
children in the lower socioeconomic areas and the Newark
Health Department is also sponsoring measles vaccina-
tion of young children at the public well-baby clinics.
(Reported by Dr. Pascal J. Baiocchi, Director, Health and
Welfare Department. City of Newark; Dr. Aaron H. Haskin,
Health Officer, City of Newark; Dr. W. J. Dougherty,
Director, Epidemiology, New Jersey State Health Depart-
ment; and an EIS Officer.)


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULAR
TION OF 14 000. IS PUBLISHED AT T.-E COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER ATLANTA GEORGIA.
C-IEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
CHIEF EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
ACTING CHIEF STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
CHIEF F SUR EILL ANCE SECTION D A. HENDERSON. M.D.
EDITOR MMRR D.J M. MACKENZIE, M.B..
F.R.C.P.E.

N ADDITION TO T-IE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORI8DITY AND MORTALITY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE IN-
% E TIGA TIONE AHICIH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OFFIC IALS AND W".IC n ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
C MMUNI CABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNIC A TIONS SHOULD BE AD-
DRESSED TO
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30' ;33
'NOTE THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE BASED
ON "EE~KI- TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE
-,EAtLTH- OEPARTMENT5 THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SAT
JR A COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS APE RELEASED ON
Ti E uCCEEDING FRIDAY.


UNIV OF FL Ld
DOCUMENTS DEPT.


Sil I



US U REPOSITORY
-


OCTOBER 23, 1965


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