Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00438

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER








Caci .


Vol. 14, No. 41


Week Ending
October 16, 1965


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


AN EPIDEMIC OF FOOD-ASSOCIATED PHARYNGITIS
AND DIARRHEA
Buffalo, Erie County, New York


A common source epidemic of febrile pharyngiti. and
diarrhea invol ing over 250 college students and cafeteria
employees has been reported by the Erie County Health
Department, Buffalo, New York. Two pathogens, beta
hemolytic streptococci and Shigella flexneri, appear to
have been principally responsible.
The outbreak was reported on Sunday, September 26,
to the Health Department by the Student Health Service
of the State University of New York. Immediate epide-
miological investigation of the first 69 cases indicated a


A n I`.prl.mrmic 1-1,..1I-1-
Pharnvml .- .mnd lihrrh
Huh, l,t ( urr-.'nt I r-ni.
Arbo\ ru- EInn,'.ph. lli- -


probable common source pid ic related ~p/nef con-
sumed at one university cana. e pointed
to shrimp salad served at i. on Friday,
September 24, as the responsible vehicle.
The initial cases began late in the day on September
24, the peak in the epidemic occurring on the following
day (Figure 1). Scattered cases continued to occur through
September 18. In all, 193 students required care in the


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
41st WEEK ENDED CUMULATIVE, FIRST 41 WEEKS
MEDIAN
DISEASE OCTOBER 16, OCTOBER 10, 1960-1964 MEDIAN
1965 1964 9194 1960-1964
Aseptic meningitis .......... 68 68 84 1,643 1,632 2,032
Brucellosis .......... ..... 1 8 9 198 334 334
Diphtheria ................ 2 9 10 118 201 340
Encephalitis, primary infectious* 41 134 --- 1,451 2,594 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious 5 4 --- 572 707 ---
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ........... 645 681 798 26,751 30,454 34,317
Measles .................... 872 800 911 242,989 464,450 399,169
Meningococcal infections ..* 37 42 42 2.464 2,191 1,730
Poliomyelitis. Total ......... 5 30 45 92 675
Paralytic ........... .. 5 20 35 76 533
Nonparalytic ............. -- 6 10 ---
Unspecified ............ 4 6 ---
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ............. 6,266 5,093 4,187 310,713 315,204 254,064
Tetanus ................. 4 6 --- 210 220 --
Tularemia ............... 8 2 --- 205 264 ---
Typhoid fever ........ 5 17 17 337 345 501
Rabies in Animals .......... ** 65 65 65 3,494 3,656 3,024

NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: ........ .............................. 7 Rabies in Man: ............................ 1
Botulism: ......................... ....... 13 Smallpox: .............................. .
Leptospirosis: I11.-1 .............. ....... ... 40 Trichinosis: N.J.-l, Calif.-2 ................... 92*
Malaria: Calif.-l .......................... 64 Typhus-
Plague: ................................. 6 Murine: ............. ................. 22
Psittacosis: ......................... ...... 36 Rky. Mt. Spotted: N.J.-1, Va.-1................. 242
Cholera: .......................... ....... 2
*Includes 11 delayed reports from N.J., Period: May-Aug.







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


AN EPIDEMIC OF FOOD-ASSOCIATED PHARYNGITIS AND DIARRHEA
Buffalo, Erie County, New York
(Continued from front page)


Student Infirmary and about two thirds of 123 cafeteria
employees who had also eaten the shrimp salad became
ill about the same time with sore throats and diarrhea.



Figure I
ONSET OF ILLNESS BY FOUR-HOUR INTERVALS
FOOD-ASSOCIATED EPIDEMIC
STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK, BUFFALO
35,


5- -4E`4E -

12AM 12PM 12AM 12PM 12AM 12PM 12AM 12PM 12AM 12PM
SEPT 24 I SEPT 25 SEPT 26 1 SEPT 27 1 SEPT 28



The predominant symptoms were sore throat, fever,
diarrhea, headache, prostration, and nausea or vomiting.
Sore throat and headache were most frequent among the
earlier cases and diarrhea was more prominent among
those affected later.
Of the first 69 cases, all among students, 93 percent
had sore throats, 65 percent had fever and 42 percent,
diarrhea. Blood counts carried out on the first group
of 20 students to be admitted to the Infirmary showed that


over half had a leucocytosis of more than 15,000 with a
shift to the left. Thirty-one of 45 throat swabs yielded
beta hemolytic streptococci. Shigella flezneri was isolated
from 16 of 46 specimens from patients with diarrhea.
Because of the symptomatology, all students and others
known to have consumed the suspect meal were given
prophylactic oral penicillin.
The salad was prepared from frozen shrimp thawed
in warm water the night before it was served. On the next
morning, September 24, the shrimp was mixed by hand
with salad dressing and celery. It was then put in a
large refrigerated vat until it was served at the noon
meal when some 390 servings were distributed. On each
of the following 2 days, an additional 80 servings were
made of the same salad. The brand of frozen shrimp
used at the University cafeteria was also served at about
the same time in two other cafeterias without any asso-
ciated illness.
At the Erie County Laboratory, bacteriological
examination of the shrimp salad has yielded isolates of
fecal and beta hemolytic streptococci, coagulase positive
staphlococci, and enteric organisms not yet identified.
Investigation of the working of the refrigeration vat
has shown that when the contents were treated similarly
to those in the incriminated shrimp salad, the temperature
just underneath the surface layers was recorded at 65"F
or higher.
The cafeteria was closed for complete disinfection
and all food handlers were prohibited from returning to
work until two successive rectal swabs negative for
shigella had been obtained. So far the source of the
contamination of the salad has not, been specifically
defined.

(Reported by Dr. William E. Mosher, Commissioner, Erie
County Health Department; Dr. I illeam R. Elsea, Deputy
Commissioner, Erie County Health Department; Dr.
Victoria Markellin, Director, Communicable Disease
Control, Erie County Health Department. New York; and
an EIS Officer.)


RUBELLA CURRENT TRENDS


(Although rubella is not a nationally reportable
disease, the Biennial Conference of State and Territorial
Epidemiologists has recommended that it be placed on the
list of nationally reported diseases, effective January 1,
1966. Nearly half of the States have reported rubella
monthly for the past decade, and these records form the
basis of this report.)
During the winter and spring of 1963- 64, extensive
outbreaks of rubella occurred in most sections of the


United States with the exception of the far west (MMWR,
Vol. 14, No. 16). This past winter and spring rubella
occurred in epidemic proportions in the Pacific States
(Figures 2 and 3). The number of cases in the Mountain
States for the winter and spring of 1964-65 was slightly
greater than average for 1955-63. The incidence of rubella
dropped to a seasonal low for all regions in August 1965.


(Reported by the Childhood Virus Unit, CDC.)


354


OCTOBER 16, 1965







O(C' OBI K 16, 196


Morbidity and Mortality \ weekly Report


/-.,lyu'e 2
RUBELLA BY MONTH OF REPORT
FOR SELECTED STATES
SEPTEMtBER 1963 AUGUST 1965 COMPARE TO0
AVERAGE MONTHLY REPORT, 1955-1963


50000


20000.

15000,

10000

5000




250001


A
I \
I \
SOUTH I
I
/ \

I \


S O N D J FM AM J J A
MONTH


Figure 3

RUBELLA BY MONTH OF REPORT
FOR SELECTED STATES
1955-1965*
3000(
9000
2400(
3000 MOUNTAIN
1800(


12000- 1200(
(j)
g PACIFIC
Q 6000- I 600


|.J ---- ,--A A^J A JI II
'I-


S24000 2400(
0

5 18000 18001
I


SOUTH


N TH 1 1


I
I \



-/ ~


/ \


I \



/

S N DJ F M A M J J A
MONTH


YEAR


*THROUGH AUGUST, 1965.


M~ ,,(,, asi liu I


20000

15000

10000

5000.

0-


' f 1
y^


NORTH CENTRAL


NORTHEAST


355


A00o0


MOUNTAIN /








356 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 16, 1965 AND OCTOBER 10. 1964 (41st WEEK)


SEncephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 68 68 41 5 45 92 35 76 2 118

NEW ENGLAND.......... 6 3 4 2 -- 2 2
Maine.............. 1 -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont............. -
Massachusetts...... 6 1 4 -- 2
Rhode Island....... 2 -
Connecticut ........ --

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 11 12 4 13 3 12 5
New York City...... 2 2 6 1 1 1 3
New York, Up-State. 10 9- -
New Jersey......... 3 4 3 2 3 2 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 2 2 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 12 11 8 1 2 19 2 15 5
Ohio................ 4 4 4 2 2 1
Indiana............. 1 1 6 5 2
Illinois........... 4 4 2 1 6 1 5 1
Michigan........... 4 1 1 1 3 1 2 -
Wisconsin.......... 1 1 2 1 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 9 9 4 10 9 7 7 1 19
Minnesota........... 3 1 1 1 3 1 2 7
Iowa............... 6 4 2 1
Missouri........... 1 4 3 1
North Dakota...... 1 -
South Dakota....... 7
Nebraska............ 3 3 1 2
Kansas............. 8 2 1 1 1 1 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1 3 8 1 1 25 1 20 30
Delaware............ -
Maryland............ 1 1 1 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 3
Virginia........... 1 5 3 3-
West Virginia...... I 1 -
North Carolina..... 10 6 2
South Carolina..... 1
Georgia............ 1 1 15
Florida............ 1 2 1 8 7 9

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 13 3 1 6 1 5 18
Kentucky.......... ,. 12 -
Tennessee.......... I 1 3 1 2 I
Alabama............ 2 2 2 15
Mississippi........ 1 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 8 6 1 16 8 14 8 1 30
Arkansas.......... 2
Louisiana........... 1 1 1 1 1 1 7
Oklahoma............ 2 1 2 1 2 -
Texas.............. 7 3 14 6 12 6 21

MOUNTAIN.............. 1- 5 7 3 4 -
Montana............. 1 -
Idaho............... I 1 1
Wyoming............ 2 2
Colorado............ 1 -
New Mexico......... 1 3 1-
Arizona............ 4 2 -- -
Utah................. -
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC .............. 16 22 3 3 6 3 4 3 9
Washington......... 1 1 2 2 3
Oregon ............. 1 1 1 1 1
California......... 15 21 2 3 3 2 1 2 5
Alaska............... -
Hawaii .............* I

Puerto Rico 12








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 357


CASES OF II'll IFIED N0i11 IAHlI DISiA.SIS: I'NITIl) STATES

O)R WEEKS I NI)D)

OCTO( 1R 16. 1965 AND OCTOlilR 10, 196- (i \t I 1 k) ( Couinucd


Brucel- Infectious hepatitis M ningtococal
lsi including Setum Hepatitis Intections T tiunus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
incl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulat iv< (uom.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

.' l T E D i I l EI. 1 I5 I '.. 7 1 ti .L 3 -' .b .* ', 1 .' I I

NEW ENGLAND.......... 29 14 15 1,555 2,789 2 125 64 5
Maine............... 6 5 1 275 881 16 6
New Hampshire...... 1 1 158 217 7 1 1
Vermont ............ 3 1 2 86 346 7 4
Massachusetts...... 8 3 5 609 622 2 45 24 3
Rhode Island....... -- 171 153 14 10
Connecticut........ 11 5 6 256 570 36 19 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 104 45 59 4,752 6,743 3 317 279 13
New York City...... 39 15 24 964 1,029 54 37
New York, Up-State. 13 8 5 1,787 2,948 1 92 79 5
New Jersey......... 16 5 11 893 1,151 81 93 I
Pennsylvania....... 36 17 19 1,108 1,615 2 90 70 7

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 154 92 56 5,177 4,784 9 358 297 30
Ohio............... 46 26 20 1,425 1,259 3 96 75 2
Indiana............ 4 2 2 444 411 1 46 47 7
Illinois........... 30 19 8 988 900 3 99 77 15
Michigan........... 67 41 26 1,990 1,870 76 68 3
Wisconsin.......... 7 4 330 344 2 41 30 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 30 11 15 1,527 1,645 3 126 129 18
Minnesota.......... 1 9 5 2 164 188 27 29 8
Iowa ............. 4 3 1 529 266 3 12 7 4
Missouri........... 5 1 3 323 401 52 57 2
North Dakota....... 2 1 1 29 59 11 19 -
South Dakota....... 20 129 3 3 -
Nebraska........... 6 1 4 75 45 10 6 2
Kansas............. 4 4 387 557 11 8 2

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 72 39 30 2,770 2,868 4 466 428 47
Delaware............ 1 1 66 62 1 9 6 -
Maryland............ 10 7 3 483 533 44 32 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 39 57 9 13 -
Virginia........... 20 14 6 662 452 2 58 50 7
West Virginia...... 10 3 4 386 413 25 33 I
North Carolina..... 4 1 3 260 477 1 95 73 7
South Carolina..... 4 2 2 126 109 60 52 6
Georgia............. 5 2 3 98 86 57 63 5
Florida............ 18 9 9 650 679 109 106 20

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 57 21 30 1,906 2,092 2 193 176 1 28
Kentucky........... 21 11 4 680 757 1 75 57 6
Tennessee.......... 19 7 12 640 735 1 61 56 1 10
Alabama............. 4 1 3 340 390 35 39 10
Mississippi........ 13 2 11 246 210 22 24 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 45 23 20 2,320 2,378 4 319 253 1 46
Arkansas............ 4 2 2 297 225 15 23 11
Louisiana........... 14 7 6 382 581 3 177 122 5
Oklahoma........... 49 117 20 10 1
Texas............... 27 14 12 1,592 1,455 1 107 98 1 29

MOUNTAIN.............. 23 8 5 1,480 1,833 86 73 3
Montana............ 4 4 122 163 2 -
Idaho.............. 1 184 259 9 3 -
Wyoming............. 40 58 5 5 -
Colorado............ 2 1 1 313 490 24 12 2
New Mexico......... 7 3 3 316 256 11 29 -
Arizona............ 8 315 409 16 7 I
Utah................ 1 1 181 147 16 7 -
Nevada............. 9 51 3 10 -

PACIFIC.............. 131 68 62 5,264 5,322 10 474 492 2 20
Washington.......... 5 2 2 402 545 1 35 35 -
Oregon.............. 5 2 3 441 560 33 21 4
California.......... 119 63 56 4,180 3,900 9 380 417 2 16
Alaska.............. 1 1 193 213 18 7 -
Hawaii.............. 1 1 48 104 8 12 -

Puerto Rico 37 27 10 1,155 827 9 31 1 45








358 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

OCTOBER 16, 1965 AND OCTOBER 10, 1964 (41st WEEK) Continued


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 872 242,989 464,450 6,266 8 205 5 337 65 3,494

NEW ENGLAND.......... 31 36,907 17,167 390 1 6 1 41
Maine.............. 5 2,821 3,035 56 4
New Hampshire...... 381 256 1 3
Vermont............ 18 1,301 2,335 31
Massachusetts...... 2 19,305 5,403 64 1 3 2
Rhode Island....... 2 3,940 1,966 16 1 -
Connecticut........ 4 9,159 4,172 254 2 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 90 15,035 52,322 131 60 12 155
New York City...... 30 2,469 15,374 7 29 --
New York, Up-State. 7 4,164 12,752 45 15 12 142
New Jersey......... 35 2,657 12,232 64 7 -
Pennsylvania....... 18 5,745 11,964 15 9 13

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 263 56,367 103,270 545 13 2 41 7 536
Ohio............... 9 8,911 19,661 24 2 11 5 277
Indiana............. 72 1,960 22,852 201 5 8 64
Illinois........... 27 2,804 16,652 86 5 10 1 83
Michigan........... 64 26,643 29,037 154 2 7 53
Wisconsin.......... 91 16,049 15,068 80 1 5 1 59

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 31 16,677 30,316 300 1 26 11 15 710
Minnesota.......... 8 698 335 8 I 1 3 143
Iowa............... 2 9,052 23,337 65 2 5 203
Missouri........... 1 2,595 1,022 2 1 19 7 1 98
North Dakota....... 20 3,765 4,775 118 1 45
South Dakota....... 115 35 12 2 1 53
Nebraska........... 452 812 1 36
Kansas............. NN NN NN 95 4 4 132

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 103 25,131 38,584 628 31 66 5 469
Delaware........... 1 506 411 26 4 -
Maryland............ 4 1,170 3,410 30 20 1 23
Dist. of Columbia.. 78 354 4 -
Virginia........... 5 3,900 12,719 108 8 8 1 286
West Virginia...... 63 13,960 8,801 196 3 21
North Carolina..... 4 394 1,164 11 6 15 3
South Carolina..... 6 1,058 4,266 40 3 8 2
Georgia............ 617 198 10 14 4 3 62
Florida............. 20 3,448 7,261 203 4 72

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 158 14,136 67,948 1,598 21 33 6 740
Kentucky........... 104 2,690 18,480 153 3 9 2 80
Tennessee.......... 54 7,991 24,403 1,223 17 12 4 607
Alabama............ 2,335 18,376 71 1 7 16
Mississippi........ 1,120 6,689 151 5 37

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 79 31,105 72,237 782 5 87 2 50 13 562
Arkansas........... 1 1,085 1,124 1 4 60 13 1 81
Louisiana.......... 1 109 117 2 5 2 9 2 72
Oklahoma........... 4 210 1,019 51 1 11 6 5 125
Texas.............. 73 29,701 69,977 728 11 22 5 284

MOUNTAIN ............. 46 19,898 18,888 951 1 16 28 2 77
Montana............ 7 3,746 3,160 36 4 1 5
Idaho............... 6 2,804 1,948 102 -
Wyoming............. 2 851 262 39 1 4 -
Colorado........... 6 5,696 3,259 277 9
New Mexico......... 677 472 184 11 14
Arizona............ 11 1,350 6,695 91 12 1 46
Utah............... 12 4,568 2,100 220 8 1 1 2
Nevada............. 2 206 992 2 2 1

PACIFIC .............. 71 27,733 63,718 941 1 10 1 42 4 204
Washington.......... 17 7,283 20,116 190 4 7
Oregon............. 26 3,303 8,699 15 5 8 2 9
California.......... 25 13,080 33,184 609 1 5 1 29 2 186
Alaska............. 1 187 1,117 18 2
Hawaii............. 2 3,880 602 109 1 -

Puerto Rico 41 2,504 6,544 5 2 12 13









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Week No. Table 4. 1)1 Al I1 IN 122 INII II) STATES CITIES HR WI'I K ENDED ()( 10111 H 16 165


hs, place of occurrence and week of filing certify cate. Excludes Ietal deaths)
a 1 & It-


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mss.-.--------
Bridgeport, Conn.----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.---..
Hartford, Conn.-.....
Lowell, Mass---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.---..
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.---------
Camden, N. J.---------
Elizabeth, N. J.-------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.--------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Y.-n'krs, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio--------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayt,.n, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.--------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.*-------
South Bend, Ind.------
T.:.ldn, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


All I I,

All 65 years
Akes and over


I- $---~ .


743
226
39
30
23
62
27
19
27
56
71
11
57
31
64

3,189
49
41
126
49
32
47
62
96
1,669
45
401
164
62
115
30
38
54
58
22
29

2,539
62
39
810
181
170
92
82
336
29
45
52
20
52
130
45
107
34
28
57
118
50

827
67
25
40
122
22
122
68
251
63
47


467
127
28
16
19
35
18
13
22
34
48
8
40
16
43

1,875
22
22
72
26
16
30
33
46
985
26
236
82
42
81
24
27
33
33
17
22

1,420
37
28
429
100
92
53
48
173
20
26
35
11
33
70
20
69
16
17
40
74
29

528
51
16
24
77
17
87
41
149
41
25


'111 LI-l 11 1
and
Influenza
All Ages


II.iI, r
1 year
All
Causes


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


* I Il ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.----------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.------------
Richmond, Va.-----------
Savannah, Ga.-----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
.'h it ,a r .. ., Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.----------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.------------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.------------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.*------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Haw-ii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.---------


A I I ..l,,l


All
Ages


1,127
139
245
47
56
74
62
94
32
82
65
185
46

594
97
37
39
106
121
34
52
108

1,079
31
45
25
137
24
79
158
70
203
78
122
48
59

371
39
24
93
24
99
11
40
41


1,365
15
37
34
42
64
362
58
37
124
52
99
177
33
139
51
41


I,


65 y'ar. an
65 ye Influenza


595
73
129
20
32
43
28
50
13
66
32
91
18

304
40
22
26
48
61
18
25
64

532
15
15
12
63
13
43
64
37
97
42
77
24
30

201
16
16
54
11
51
6
22
25


All Ages

34
7


3

2

1
5
5
9
1

26
1
3

14
2
1
3
2

21
1
1

2
3

3
3
1
1

3
3

18
3
1
3
4
4
3


I ,1,. 1
i year
All
Caused

59
9
9
1
4
4
3
5
2

4
15
3

31
3
2
1
5
11
1
1
7

88
3
8
3
8
3
4
15
7
20
4
4
3
6

23
5
3
4
1
3
1
5
1


Total 11,834 6,728 417 654

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 504,065
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 284,362
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 20,352
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 29,909








360


ARBOVIRUS ENCEPHALITIS 1965


Further reports have been received of laboratory
confirmed or presumptive human cases of Arbovirus
encephalitis since the situation as of September 30 was
summarized (MMWR, Vol. 14, No. 39). There are now 95
confirmed and presumptive cases of Western equine en-
cephalitis (WEE) with two deaths and 21 cases of St.
Louis encephalitis (SLE). The figures for Eastern equine
encephalitis (EEE) and California encephalitis (CE)
remain unchanged.
In Kansas there have been eight human cases of
WEE, the ages of the patients ranging from 4 years to 86
years; there were no deaths. The date of onset of the first
case was July 20 and that of the last case reported was
September 13. These cases have been concentrated along
the Arkansas River basin in the south-central and south-
western parts of the state where spring flooding gave rise
to unusually large mosquito populations.
The only confirmed case of WEE to be reported so
far in Wisconsin was in a 15-year-old male who became
ill on August 18. The patient had travelled in South
Dakota 2 weeks before he fell ill. However, serologically
proven cases of WEE in horses were found in the vicinity
of the patient's home in Wisconsin.
From Missouri there are reports of three confirmed or
presumptive cases of SLE, one each in the St. Louis
area, in Kansas City and in Boone County. One case of
WEE has also been notified from the Kansas City area.
In Colorado, although no new cases have been re-
ported since mid-September, laboratory examinations
have now given a total of 40 confirmed and presumptive
cases of WEE and 10 cases of SLE. There was one fatal-
ity in a 17-year-old male who became ill on August 20
with what was later serologically confirmed as WEE.

(Reported by Dr. Don E. Wilcox, Director of Epidemiology,
Kansas State Department of Health; Dr. Josef Preizler,
Deputy Director of Preventable Diseases, Wisconsin
State Board of Health; Dr. E. A. Belden, Consultant for
Communicable Disease Control, Missouri Department of
Public Health and Welfare; Dr. Cecil S. Mollohan, Chief
of Epidemiology Section, Colorado State Department of
Public Health.)


OCTOBER 16, 1965


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 14 000. IS PUBLISHED AT THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER ATLANTA. GEORGIA.
CHIEF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
CHIEF EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A.D L ANGMUIR. M.O.
AC TING CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN. M.S.
CHIEF. SURN EILL ANCE SECTION D. A. HENDERSON. M.D.
EDITOR MMF WR D.J.M. MACKENZIE. AM.B..
F.R.C.P.E.

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASE IN-
VESTIGA TIONS WHICH ARE OF CURRENT INTEREST TO HEALTH
OF FICIAL. AND WHICH ARE DIRECTLY RELATED TO THE CONTROL OF
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. SUCH COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE AD-
DRESSED TO
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA j0333
NOTE THE DATA IN THIS REPORT ARE PROVISIONAL AND ARE BASED
ON WEEKLY TELEGRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE
HEALTH DEPARTMENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SAT-
URDAY. COMPILED DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS APE RELEASED ON
THE SUCCEEDING FRIDAf.


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