Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00435

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




COMMU CABLE DISEASE CENTER








4f'd oZ 1J (
IrlW ^ ^*^ ** ^ .**-v


aw 1111001 100 ^--'-* : ***'*" ::*"* ". v


Vol. 14, No. 12







Week Ending
March 27, 1965


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL NOTES

Paralytic Poliomyelitis Arizona
Two cases of paralytic poliomyelitis and 3 addi- EPIDEMIOLO
tional suspect cases are currently under epidemiological Paralytic I
investigation in Arizona. Four of the 5 cases have oc- EPIDEMIOLO
curred in Pinal County (1960 population 62,673) since Human Rat
Salmonella
November 1964. The fifth case occurred in Cochise Salm
Typhoid F
County in November 1964. As shown in the table on page
106, all cases are under 4 years of age and 4 of the cases
with known vaccination history were unvaccinated.


GICA L (TES
'olio 4elit -
GICAL
bies Deat in L
Report -
ever New Yor


izona .. .105

rr' m n's Aprs.-e .... 106
., 107
-T-77 .. ..... 112


Type I poliovirus has been isolated from the most
recent case. All 5 cases are from lower socioeconomic
areas in their respective communities.


Three cases of paralytic poliomyelitis were reported
in Arizona in both 1962 and 1963. All six cases occurred
in Maricopa County (Phoenix) with type I poliovirus being
(Continued on page 106)


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
12th Week Ended Cumulative, First 12 Weeks
Disease March 27, March 21, Median Median
1965 1964 1960 1964 1965 1964 1960 1964
Aseptic meningitis ................ 27 29 16 334 315 268
Brucellosis ........................... 2 6 10 51 85 85
Diphtheria ........................ 6 6 53 48 129
Encephalitis, primary infectious .. 25 28 --- 350 366 --
Encephalitis, post-infectious ..... 18 16 --- 168 129
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ................ 753 933 933 9,471 11,290 12,960
Measles ........................... 11,264 21,502 16,500 105,702 125,918 129,117
Meningococcal infections .......... 111 79 57 1,016 746 662
Poliomyelitis, Total .............. 1 3 4 2 16 72
Paralytic ...................... 1 3 3 2 12 45
Nonparalytic ................... --- 4---
Unspecified ...................... --
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever .................. 11,974 11,118 9,828 134,516 127,714 115,827
Tetanus ........................... 4 1 --" 40 44
Tularemia ......................... 3 2 --- 51 68 ---
Typhoid fever ..................... 2 5 7 79 75 98
Rabies in Animals ................. 96 110 108 1,142 926 923


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 2 Rabies in Man:
Botulism: 1 Smallpox:
Leptospirosis: 10 Trichinosis: Calif. 1 33
Malaria: 8 Typhus-
Plague: Murine: 4
Psittacosis: 6 Rky Mt. Spotted: 6








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




EPIDEMIOLOGICAL NOTES (Continued)


County City Age Sex Onset Vaccine Status Remarks
Date IPV OPV

Pinal** Eloy 3 mo. F 11-12-64 0 0 Died
11-13-64
Cochise* Douglas 4 mo. M 11-19-64 0 0 Died
11-21-64
Pinal** Casa Grande 2 yrs. F 12-27-64 0 0
Pinal** Eloy 3 yrs. F 2-17-65 Unk. Unk.
Pinal* Maricopa 17 mo. F 2-19-65 1 0 Type I
isolated

Case
** Suspect Case


isolated from 5 cases, all either unvaccinated or inade-
quately vaccinated. The Pinal County case in November
1964 was the first case since October 1963.
(Reported by Dr. William J. Moore, Commissioner of


Health, Dr. Philip Hotchkiss, Acting Director, Division
of Acute Communicable Disease Control, Arizona Slate
Department of Health and Mr. Frank R. Williams, M.S.P.H.,
Director, Pinal County Health Department.)


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

HUMAN RABIES DEATHS


U.S. Citizens Overseas

During 1964 two human rabies deaths in U.S. military
personnel, including dependents, overseas have been
reported.
An 8-year-old boy, the son of a U.S. Air Force man,
was bitten several times on the face by a rabid dog on
May 8, 1964. The dog was his own pet and probably had
never been immunized against rabies.
The boy was brought to the Station Hospital, USNAF,
Kenitra, Morocco, within 3 hours after the incident. His
wounds were cleansed with a hexachlorophene preparation.
He received antirabies hyperimmune serum and 14 daily
doses of duck embryo rabies vaccine followed by booster
doses of duck embryo vaccine given 10 and 20 days after
completion of the 14-day course. He was admitted to the
hospital in Kenitra on August 5 having muscular spasms
and mild salivation, which increased in the next 24 hours.
Symptomatic treatment was administered while the child
was in the hospital, but his condition became progree-
sively worse. He died on August 8, 1964.
Portions of the brain were sent to the U.S. Air Force
Hospital, Wiesbaden, Germany, and Pasteur In-titute.
Casablanca, Morocco, for examination. Negri bodies were
demonstrated in the histologic examination.
The second death occurred on October 17, 1964 in
Spain.


The victim, a 28-year-old Naval officer, was bitten
on the right hand by his dog approximately. 30 days prior
to onset of illness. The animal had been sick for 5 days
before the biting incident and died 4 days later under
suspicious circumstances. Before death, the animal
exhibited signs of malaise, excitability, and personality
changes. Post-mortem examination b\ Spanish health
authorities was negative for rabies.
The patient entered the U.S. Naval Station Hospital
in Rota, Spain, on September 30, 1964. Two days prior to
admission, the patient noted onset of a moderate severe
pain in his right arm, most marked in his right hand where
the bite occurred, and extending from his hand to the
shoulder. During the course of his illness, which lasted
19 da%;, he showed typical signs of hydrophobia; he could
bring water to his mouth only by extreme effort and was
terrified at attempts to swallow.
No antirabies serum or vaccine was administered to
the patient at any time following exposure. A diagnosis of
rabies was made by the Naval Medicnl Laboratory following
examination of the brain. Diagnosis was confirmed by
demonstration of Negri bodies in brain material, and by
fluorescent antihody examination of the original brain
sections, and by mouse inoculation studies. The %alter
Reed Army Medical Center also confirmed the diagnosis
of rabies by FA and mouse inoculation tests.
(Continued on page 11 )


106








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


SALMONELLOSIS IN THE UNITED STATES

MONTHLY REPORT


During January 10'.;, there were 1.:,.l, human isola-
tions of salmonella organisms reported to the Communi-
cable Disease Center Salmonella Surveillance Unit by the
State Health Departments and other participating labora-
tories. The avieraig number of isolations per week (385)
represented an increase of 41 isolations over December
1964 and an increase of 65 isolations over January 1,I9;I
(see Figure below).
The 7 -erolt.pe reported most frequently during
January are shown in the table oppo-it,.
A total of 64 serotypes were reported during January,
but the 7 listed in the table accounted for almost two-
thirds of all isolations from man.
Salmonella derby did not appear on the list this
month, but accounted for 3.8 percent of total isolates re-
ported. Salmonella saint-paul appeared on the list for the
first time since October 1964.


Rank Serotype Number Percent Hank Last Month

1 S. .'. i'/,' :- .:..' '. 1 1

var. ,
2 S. heidelberg 126 8.2 2
3 S. enteritidis 103 6.7 4
4 S. infants 87 5.7 3
5 S. saint-paul 6 72 4.7 12
5 S. typhi 7.- 4.7
7 S. newport 65 4.2 5
(thtr, 581 37.8 -

TOTAL 1538 100.0

(Reported by the Salmonella Surveillance Unit, C)C)


Figure I


REPORTED HUMAN ISOLATIONS OF SALMONELLA
IN THE UNITED STATES


650-

600-

550-

500-

450-

400,

350-

300-

250-

200.

150.

100.


.650

-600

-550

-500

-450

-400

-350

-300

-250

-200

-150

-100

-50

0


JFMAMJ JASONDIJ F MAM J JASO NDJ FMAMJ J ASON
1963 1964 1965


11 1 1 1j1 1 1 1 I 1 ..


V*",./A


y ..a '''


v .


ffI


-I


-


1()7










108 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 27, 1965 AND MARCH 21, 1964 (12th Week)


SEncephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 27 29 25 18 1 2 16 1 2 12 53

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 1 1 1 1
Maine............... -
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont ............ -
Massachusetts..... 1- 1
Rhode Island.......- -
Connecticut........ 1 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 1 3 3 4 4 3
New York City...... 2 1 1 2
New York, Up-State. 1 I 2 2 -
New Jersey......... 1 1 -
Pennsylvania....... 1 2 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 5 6 2 1 1 3
Ohio............... 4 -
Indiana............. 1 2
Illinois........... 1 1 1 1 1 -
Michigan............ 1 3 1 -
Wisconsin.......... -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 1 1 1 1 1 10
Minnesota........... 2 1 1 1 1 4
Iowa.............. -
Missouri......... .. 1
North Dakota...... -
South Dakota....... 1 4
Nebraska............ 1
Kansas............. -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 3 1 6 1 8 5 11
Delaware........... 1 -
Maryland............. 1 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 3
Virginia............ 2 -
West Virginia...... 1 -
North Carolina..... 4 1 1
South Carolina..... -
Georgia.............. 1 I 5
Florida............. 2 2 1 3 3 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 8 8 2 1 5
Kentucky........... 7 5 -
Tennessee.......... 1 2 1 -
Alabama............. 1 4
Mississippi........ 2 I

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 3 1 1 1 1 16
Arkansas........... 1
Louisiana........... -. 2
Oklahoma........... .- -
Texas.............. 2 3 1 1 1 1 13

MOUNTAIN............. 1 2 1 1 -
Montana............. -
Idaho............... .
Wyoming............ .- -
Colorado........... 1 1 1 -
New Mexico.......... .
Arizona............ .
Utah............... -
Nevada............. -

PACIFIC .............. 11 6 5 10 I 1 4
Washington......... 1 1 -
Oregon............. I
California......... 11 6 4 9 1 i 3
Alaska.............. .
Hawaii.............. .

Puerto Rico 5










Mlorliidily and Mortality Weekly Report 109


Table 3. CASES OF SPI(II H11 NO IIHAIII I DIMI A.I UNITED STATEiS

F)R II Ks INI)ED

MARCH 27, 1965 AND MARCH 21, 1964 (12th Week) ONTINL'FU


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis Meningococcal
losis including Serum Hepatitis Infections Tetanus
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
incl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 2 753 342 362 9,471 11,290 111 1,016 746 4 40

NEW ENGLAND........... 47 22 24 567 1,298 7 49 21 2
Maine.............. 3 2 1 121 466 7 2
New Hampshire...... 6 3 3 49 117 2 1
Vermont............. 1 1 35 159 -
Massachusetts...... 24 14 10 204 241 2 19 10 1
Rhode Island....... 8 3 5 66 56 2 7 2
Connecticut........ 5 4 92 259 3 14 7 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 124 50 74 1,679 2,521 9 142 73 1 2
New York City...... 30 8 22 298 363 1 21 10 -
New York, Up-State. 28 16 12 769 1,162 1 33 25 -
New Jersey......... 35 12 23 226 400 3 47 19
Pennsylvania....... 31 14 17 386 596 4 41 19 1 1

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 132 65 63 1,855 1,669 20 120 110 1 2
Ohio............... 27 11 16 575 456 2 30 35 -
Indiana............. 13 9 4 149 137 2 16 16 1 2
Illinois........... 31 13 16 349 264 9 30 24 -
Michigan........... 51 26 24 675 723 3 23 29
Wisconsin........... 10 6 3 107 89 4 21 6 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 1 45 13 22 607 715 8 57 35 2
Minnesota.......... 6 1 4 53 52 2 13 8 I
Iowa............... 20 8 11 244 106 1 2 -
Missouri........... 8 116 179 5 32 17 1
North Dakota ....... 9 32 3 3 -
South Dakota ...... 8 78 2 -
Nebraska........... 1 1 15 17 1 2 1 -
Kansas............. 10 4 6 162 251 4 4

SOUTH ATLANTIC ....... 96 48 38 975 1,082 23 205 159 2 12
Delaware............ 7 3 4 45 14 3 2
Maryland........... 8 4 4 209 196 5 19 12 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 3 1 2 12 22 3 4 -
Virginia........... 35 18 8 205 162 2 23 12 1 2
West Virginia...... 12 10 2 176 204 1 13 13 -
North Carolina..... 6 5 1 90 203 2 33 26 1
South Carolina..... 28 36 25 18 -
Georgia............ 4 2 2 41 24 2 31 14 3
Florida............. 21 5 15 169 221 11 55 58 1 5

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL ... 72 46 21 770 770 4 56 64 8
Kentucky........... 33 25 3 279 352 3 25 19 1
Tennessee.......... 25 16 9 309 254 1 18 25 3
Alabama.............. 5 1 4 107 107 9 10 3
Mississippi ....... 9 4 5 75 57 4 10 1

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 55 28 23 867 799 17 158 105 7
Arkansas........... 10 5 5 134 99 9 4 2
Louisiana.......... 10 2 7 156 150 9 77 46 2
Oklahoma............ 1 30 47 1 15 3 -
Texas .............. 34 21 10 547 503 7 57 52 3

MOUNTAIN ............. 30 6 11 554 744 3 50 32 1
Montana............ 1 1 48 66 -
Idaho............... 1 79 58 5 1 -
Wyoming............. 24 31 2 1 -
Colorado............ 7 3 3 88 200 1 9 7 1
New Mexico.......... 13 2 6 111 133 1 16 16 -
Arizona............. 6 114 162 11 2
Utah............... 2 1 1 85 71 1 5 1
Nevada............. 5 23 2 4

PACIFIC.............. 1 152 64 86 1,597 1,692 20 179 147 4
Washington......... 15 8 6 131 179 4 13 13 -
Oregon.............. 1 8 3 4 140 176 1 14 5 -
California......... 128 53 75 1,209 1,239 12 147 122 4
Alaska............. 105 56 2 3 3 -
Hawaii............. 1 1 12 42 1 2 4 -

Puerto Rico 35 27 8 270 193 3 12 8










110 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 27, 1965 AND MARCH 21, 1964 (12th Week) CONTINUED


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 11,264 105,702 125,918 11,974 3 51 2 79 96 1,142

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1,930 22,171 5,888 1,195 1 1 14
Maine............... 37 1,824 705 165 -
New Hampshire...... 23 300 112 2- -
Vermont............. 58 304 1,262 16 1 13
Massachusetts...... 1,044 12,415 1,722 162 1 -
Rhode Island....... 159 2,450 418 43 -
Connecticut........ 609 4,878 1,669 807 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 501 3,949 19,254 722 9 6 36
New York City...... 29 275 6,478 36 5 -
New York, Up-State. 172 1,367 4,372 493 3 6 34
New Jersey......... 61 695 4,358 76 -
Pennsylvania....... 239 1,512 4,046 117 1 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 2,230 18,599 28,393 1,354 1 10 5 65
Ohio............... 655 4,099 5,439 328 3 -
Indiana............. 44 735 6,850 126 2 7
Illinois........... 59 580 5,764 232 1 1 3 22
Michigan........... 1,069 9,754 7,067 417 3 12
Wisconsin.......... 403 3,431 3,273 251 1 2 24

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 799 8,538 3,388 669 5 3 12 188
Minnesota.......... 23 226 108 9 47
Iowa................ 392 4,850 1,612 117 5 60
Missouri........... 145 1,126 351 135 3 3 3 29
North Dakota....... 189 2,090 1,224 333 8
South Dakota....... 51 3 30 1 1 13
Nebraska........... 50 195 90 1 2 11
Kansas............. NN NN NN 44 1 1 20

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,303 13,419 11,941 1,437 3 19 20 14 185
Delaware............ 21 238 144 60 2 -
Maryland........... 33 446 1,502 159 6 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 12 239 15 -
Virginia........... 239 1,978 3,103 444 3 2 11 153
West Virginia...... 632 8,716 2,927 464 1 5
North Carolina..... 4 156 455 16 3 7 -
South Carolina..... 78 341 1,682 70 3 2 -
Georgia............ 57 392 121 39 3 10 1 14
Florida............ 239 1,140 1,768 170 2 11

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 696 6,008 15,814 1,876 13 9 31 385
Kentucky........... 225 772 6,767 225 3 5 2 25
Tennessee.......... 336 3,605 7,129 1,478 9 3 29 353
Alabama............. 88 1,214 322 37 1 1 7
Mississippi........ 47 417 1,596 136 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1,753 14,248 18,377 915 8 2 13 23 194
Arkansas............ 125 780 305 2 4 5 3 29
Louisiana.......... 4 30 43 3 1 2 3 40
Oklahoma........... 17 88 233 91 3 1 4 34
Texas.............. 1,607 13,350 17,796 819 2 5 13 91

MOUNTAIN............. 812 8,342 5,490 2,109 5 10 20
Montana............ 135 2,316 1,155 25 1 3
Idaho............... 101 1,267 685 151 -
Wyoming............ 84 311 22 23 1 -
Colorado........... 237 1,419 859 1,079 -
New Mexico......... 68 294 126 334 6 -
Arizona............ 35 287 1,953 172 3 17
Utah............... 147 2,377 329 325 4 -
Nevada............. 5 71 361 -

PACIFIC............. 1,240 10,428 17,373 1,697 4 4 55
Washington......... 383 3,233 6,554 331 -
Oregon............. 176 1,571 1,875 29 1
California......... 547 4,555 8,005 1,269 3 4 54
Alaska............. 10 88 837 16 -
Hawaii............. 124 981 102 52 1

Puerto Rico 88 631 1,737 13 1










Mlorbiditl and Mortalit~y Wceklh Keport






Table 4. DEATHS IN 122 UINITi) STATES CITIES ()R WI'IK ENDED MARCH 27, 1965

(By place of occurrence and week of filing certificate. Excludes fetal deaths)


Al I I I" Tr n um. r.1


Area


All
Ages


65 years
and over


and
Influenza
All Ages


liI, r
1 year
All
Causes


A ll 1 t ,u .., ,

All 65 years and
Ages and over Ifluenza
All Ages


I 1 1 1*t I I I I


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass.---------
BrdgJ port, Conn.- ---
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.-----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.--------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
Pittsburgh, Pa.-------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio-------
Columbus, Ohio---------
Dayton, Ohio-----------
Detroit, Mich.---------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio---------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.------


691
242
39
28
25
47
25
23
25
41
50
11
39
42
54

3,479
48
36
148
45
27
35
81
110
1,730
26
637
174
48
113
23
43
58
45
26
26

2,789
56
36
755
166
247
137
82
413
51
50
58
44
60
162
53
135
53
23
36
113
59

930
64
25
42
141
26
149
81
290
72
40


426
136
24
20
20
27
16
19
15
20
33
7
22
30
37

2,047
29
25
84
27
16
22
46
52
1,036
18
346
104
-30
73
11
28
39
29
16
16

1,589
27
18
417
102
141
83
34
236
28
23
35
16
40
93
29
84
37
13
22
73
38

597
49
18
19
91
17
95
50
185
53
20


32
10
3



2
1
3

1

3
1
8

165
3
4
7
3

3
5
4
82

21
6
3
8
3
1
2
4
4
2

128
1
7
40
2
11
1
4
21
2
2
6
5
9
8

2

3
2
1
1

40
5

3
6

1
1
15
1
8


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ca.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
Washington, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.----------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.----
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif.-*---
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,295
156
247
60
101
83
53
117
38
95
83
215
47

600
106
47
52
114
123
28
27
103

1,050
47
35
16
127
30
72
179
60
203
86
95
56
44

416
30
13
127
14
100
18
52
62

1,652
23
41
40
40
66
532
117
33
138
66
86
198
44
140
48
40


1 year
All
Causes


Total 112,902 7,348 627 791

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages ------------------------- 161,885
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 92,669
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 8,085
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 9,453


Week No.
12


III









112


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS (Continued)


HUMAN RABIES DEATHS

Because of their close contact with the patient
during his illness, 17 persons on the hospital staff received
rabies vaccine.
(Reported by Dr. Jack W. Millar, Captain, M.C., USN,
Director, Preventive Medicine Division, Bureau of Medicine
and Surgery. U.S. Navy, Washington, D.C., Dr. Anthony
Rush, Captain, M.C., USN, Senior Medical Officer, U.S.
Naval Station, Rota, Spain, and John A. Anderson, Lt.,
M.C., USN, U.S. Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland).


TYPHOID FEVER New York City


An outbreak of typhoid fever occurred among children
in the lower Bronx in August 1964. Salmonella typhi,
phage type T, was isolated from 8 cases. Two additional
children were considered highly suspicious and probable
cases because of the clinical history and high typhoid O
and H agglutinations. Among the 8 bacteriologically con-
firmed cases, S. typhi, phage type T, was recovered
from the blood in 7 and from the stool in one. Several of
the children were hospitalized but there were no deaths.
The ages of the children ranged from 4 to 19 years. The
dates of onset of the illness ranged from August 11 to
August 31, 1964 with 7 cases falling within a 7-day period
from August 11 to August 17.
All of the cases occurred in 4 apartment buildings
which were in close proximity and all of the patients
involved knew one another and played together frequently.
An intensive search was made for a possible typhoid
carrier in the neighborhood but none was found.
It was subsequently learned that all of the ill children
had eaten watermelon which had been fished out of the
Hudson River sometime in the later part of July 1964.
One adult and 7 additional children had eaten the same
watermelon but did not become ill. One observer noted
that the watermelon contained a soft spot and the possi-
bility that river water entered the melon could not be
excluded. The melon was brought home, rinsed off, divided
up and eaten. The specific area of the river in which the
watermelon was floating was the 125th Street pier. The
Bureau of Sanitary Engineering indicated that this area
was polluted with raw sewage. It was felt that this was a
common source outbreak and the watermelon was the
likely vehicle of infection. Members of the involved
families were visited by Public Health nurses and field
epidemiologi-ts and instructed in personal hygiene. All
family contacts were immunized with typhoid vaccine.
(Reported by F.N. Tilly. M.D., Epidemiologist, and Tibor
Fodor, M.D., Acting Chief, Bureau of Preventable Dis-
eases, New York City Health Department).


IIIIIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

I 3lli ll ll llII I II08864 2474ill
3 1262 08864 2474


TIE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 13.000 IS PUBLISHED By THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER. ATLANTA GEORGIA 30333.
CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
C.IEF EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION R. E. SERFLING. PH.D.
ASST. CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
CHIEF, SUR dEILLANCE SECTION D A HENDERSON. M.D.
ASSISTANT EDITOR. MMWR PAUL D. STOLLEY. M.D.
IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY. THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASES. SUCH
ACCOUNTS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO
THE EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333
NOTE TMESE PROVISIONAL DATA ARE BASED ON WEEKLY TELE-
GRAMS TO THE CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE HEALTH DEPART-
MENTS. THE REPORTING WEEK CONCLUDES ON SATURDAY: COMPILED
DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON THE SUCCEEDING
FRIDAY.
SYMBOLS ---OATA NOT AVAILABLE
QUANTITY ZERO
THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE MORTALITY CURVES IS DESCRIBED IN
'.OL. 14 NO. 1,


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