Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00429

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
P6 &0 rspo


Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

Prepared by the C I IS 634-5131
S I-


For release April 3, 1964


ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON S.LFCTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STA
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDFD MARCH 28. 1964


INFLUENZA


Pneumonia and influenza deaths in 12 reporting cities
in the Pacific Coast region declined slightly during the
past week from apeak level of 90 deaths reached during the
week ended March 21. (See graph, p. 110). This figure
however, has remained above the epidemic threshold
for the past 6 consecutive weeks. Pneumonia and
influenza deaths in 108 cities representing the country as
a whole were below threshold during the past week. Re-
gions other than the Pacific Coast have shown no sus-
tained elevations.

California
An elevated incidence of influenza-like disease is


currently being observed in many widely separated areas
in the State. While the sharp, community wide outbreaks
which have characterized recent epidemics in Washington
and Oregon have not been noted in California, there has
been a distinct increase in the number of cases seen in
recent weeks, accompanied in some communities by signi-
ficant increases in school absenteeism. The number of
serologically confirmed cases of influenza A2 has risen
sharply) during the past several weeks (see MMWR, Vol. 13,
p. 101) as have pneumonia and influenza deaths in 8
reporting cities.

(Please turn the page)


Table I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
13th Week Ended Cumulative, First 13 Weeks
Disease March 28, March 30 Median Median
1964 1963 1959 1963 1964 1963 1959 1963
Aseptic meningitis ................ 30 15 --- 342 283 ---
Brucellosis ....................... 6 1 11 90 77 134
Diphtheria ...................... .. 2 4 6 46 85 201
Encephalitis, primary infectious .. 37 --- 400 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious ..... 19 39 143 310 ._
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ................ 821 845 845 12,104 13,805 13,805
Measles ............ ............. 14,621 15,679 15,679 122,667 144,796 151,176
Meningococcal infections .......... 64 69 54 744 760 739
Poliomyelitis, Total .............. I 4 16 38 103
Paralytic ............. ......... 1 4 13 33 60
Nonparalytic .................. --- 3 2 --
Unspecified ........... ...... --- .- 3
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ................. 11,668 9,700 --- 139,295 129.780 ---
Tetanus ........... .............. I I--- 45 43 ---
Tularemia ......................... 2 3 --- 70 51 ---
Typhoid fever ..................... 6 5 5 81 79 113
Rabies in Animals ................. 105 72 74 1,033 857 1,011


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY

Cum. Cum.
Anthrax- I Psittacosis: Ohio 1, Calif 1 12
Botulism: 6 Rabies in Man:
Leptospirosis; Ore. 1 6 Smallpox:
Malaria: N.Y. City 2, Pa. 1, Calif 1 25 Typhus-
Plague: Murine: 2
Rky Mt. Spotted: 3








Morbidily and Mortality Weekly Report


20 Pacific

too1 12 cities


.-- -


- -


7 21 5 19 2 16 3014 28 11 25 8 22 7 21 4 18 2 16 30 13 ?7 II 2
SDP OCT NOV DEC JAN F E MAR APR MAY JUN JUL
1963 1964


-- Epidemic Threshold
S"Expected" Number


Among the areas involved were San Joaquin and San
Mateo Counties where absenteeism reached levels of
20-25 percent in some schools during early and mid-March.
In the latter county, high school students appeared to be
more several. affected than those of elementary school
age. During the same period, Butte and Merced Counties
witnessed a distinct increase in the incidence of flu-like
disease, accompanied by elevated school and industrial
absenteeism in the latter country.
Cverall absenteeism in 9 school jurisdictions in which
continuous surveillance is maintained rose moderately in
early March and reached a mean level of about 10 percent
for the week ended March 14.


WEEKLY PNEUMONIA AND INFLUENZA DEATHS
IN EIGHT CALIFORNIA CITIES


Week ending
March 7
March 14
March 21
March 28
Four wek total
Four week meon


Observed
58
67
76
74
275
69


Expected
35
34
34
34
137
34


Percent Excess
65
96
124
118
101
103


Pneumonia-influenza deaths in 8 reporting cities first
exceeded the expected lvel in mid-February and have con-
tinued to rise since then. Reported deaths during the past
4 weeks compared with the expected incidence (mean for
the period Ir:'-:') are given in the table above.
(R prtfrd by P'hrrp K. r,,ndit. if D.. ChAr, Hurtr a, of
Comrrmunicable Disegse. tae Prpartmrrnt of Health,
fHrrktIri. California).


Oregon
A total of 3,515 cases of influenza-like disease were
reported to State health officials in Portland during the
past week, as compared to 4,224 cases during the previous
week. This represents the first interval in which a decline
in case reports was noted since the current epidemic began
in mid- February. Influenza A, has been confirmed serologi-
cally as the etiologic agent in 3 additional cases during
the past week, bringing to 11 the total number of laboratory
confirmed cases.
(Reported b) Dr. Grant USnnr,. DIrect'r. Epidemrolog)
Section, State Board of Hi, tlil1. 'Portland. Oregon).




RABIES Canal Zone

The first case of canine rabies to be reported in the
Canal Zone since 1910 occurred in Balboa in August 1963.
A 10-year-old male dog died 30 days following inoculation
with chick embryo rabies vaccine. The dog had been
vaccinated 3 years previously. The diagnosis was estab-
lished both by fluorescein antibody and mouse inoculation
tests.
The dog had resided in the Canal Zone all its life-
he had never traveled outside the Zone.
The mode of transmission remains in doubt. Six
months earlier, a bat found near the dog's home, had been
proved rabid. It cannot be determined whether the dog was
bitten by some unidentified rabid animal or whether the
disease was due to vaccine virus infection.
(Reported b) Pr. Robert G. Mathenev, C hbef, DIarsion of
Vererinar Medicine, Canal Zone Department of Health.)


110


80

60

40

20








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


TULAREMIA New York

Tularemia was diagnosed retrospectively in a 51-year
old Suffolk County man who skinned and ate a rabbit
which his dog had killed and brought home in early
November.
Three days after the skinning, the patient experi-
enced chills and fever; four days later a pustule devel-
oped between his fingers, but was not noticed by his
physician. Tetracycline was given and the patient ap-
peared improved. About 2 weeks later, an axillary lymph
node became render and a pulmonary infiltrate was seen
on X-ray. Culture of the node was negative for tubercu-
losis. The diagnosis remained in doubt.
Five weeks after onset, the patient mentioned the
pustule to the physician, who then suspected tularemia.
The agglutination titer was 1/640.
(Reported b) Max Backer, M.D., Suffolk County Health
Department and Robert M. Albrecht, M.D., Director, Office
of Epidemiology, New York State Health Department.)




ANTHRAX Arkansas

The case of human anthrax, reported in Arkansas for
the week ended February 29, involved a 23-year-old white
male dairy farm worker.


The patient began working on the farm January 27 at
a variety of chores including milking and preparing feed
for the cows. His work resulted in multiple and frequent
minor skin abrasions on both hands. He denied contact
with sick or dead animals.
A small papule and vesicle, painless but itchy,
developed between the thumb and first finger of his left
hand on Februar) 17. During the next 3 days, 3 additional
lesions appeared on his left hand and 4 on his ri.:hr hand.
Bilateral tender axillary lymphadenopathy was noted.
On February 26, when he had a temperature of 99.20F, he
received 600,000 units of penicillin, which was repeated
the following day. He became afebrile, and on February 28
each cutaneous lesion had developed into a black eschar;
axillary lymphadenopathy diminished.
Cultures of the lesion, taken after administration of
penicillin proved negative for Bacillus anthracis. The
diagnosis was made on clinical impression. This area of
the State is not known as an animal anthrax area.
(Reported by L. J. Strickland, M.D.; W. M. Taegel. D.V.M.,
and William J. Hatley, Little Rock City Health Depart-
ment; Dora Pickard, P.H.N., and Mrs. May Ferguson,
P.H.N., Lonoke County Health Department; Harvie R.
Ellis, D.V.M.. Director, Division of Veterinary Public
Health, William L. Bunch, Jr., M.D., Director, Communi-
cable Disease Control, and J. T. Herron, M.D., State
Health Officer, Arkansas State Board of Health.)


TOTAL DEATHS REPORTED IN 108 CITIES


The weekly average number of total deaths in 108
cities for the four-week period ending March 28 was
11.912 as compared with an expected weekly average of
12,151


Week Ending
4 Week Weekly
3.7 3/14 3/21 3/28 Total Average
Observed 12.223 12,052 11,949 11,425 47,649 11,912
Expected 12,217 12.179 12,132 12,076 48.604 12,151
Excess 6 -127 .183 -651 -955 -239


TOTAL DEATHS RECORDED IN IOB US. CITIES
Aw .tog m. p. W.k by F..u-Wk Pr.W


(See table, page 115)


111











112 AlM rlilili arinl Mortaill V eekl,, Report



I hblt ( As( OF SP( IFI I) NOTIFIABLE DI)IFAbS LINITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAR(H 2M. 196f. AND MAR( H 40. 1964 ( 13rh WEEK)


Encephai i-
A&ep li
Meningitis Primary P.st-lnf. Poliomyelitis, Total Cases Poliomyelltis, Paralytic
Ar ra
Cumulative Cumulative
1966 1 196 196' 196. 1964 1963 196. 1963 1964 1963 1964 1963
UNITED STATES... 30 15 37 19 1 16 38 1 13 33

NEW ENGLAND .......... 2 1 1 -
Maine.............. -
New Hampshir ...... -
Vermont ............ ---------
Massachusi I ....... 1
Rhode Island....... -
Connecticu ........ 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 3 18 3 4 5
Ne rk City ...... 6 -
New York, Up-State. 1 1 7 2 2 & 2 4
New Jrr 5ey ......... 4 -
Pennsylvan a ....... 2 2 1 1 I -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 5 2 7 7 I 9 1 7
Oh ............... I 2 -- 2 1
Indiana ............- -
Il linois........... 2 1 3 4 1 5 4
Michigan. ............ I 2 3 2 2
WUStonsin......... -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 1
Minnesoita ..... ... I. I 1 1
I owa...................
Miou .... .- -
NirSourh D ........... .
N_-,rth Dako ta .......
South Dakota....... -
Nrbraska ............ .
Kansas............. -

SOrTH ATLANTIC....... 2 1 3 1 9 3 6 2
Delaware...........- -
Maryland ........... 2 2
Dist. of Columbia.. .
Virginia....... ... ...
West Virginia ...... -
North Carolina..... 4 1 2
South Carolina** I 1 1 -
Georgia............ I I -
Florida............ ] I 3 -

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 2 2 1
kentucky........... -
Tenne see .......... 1 2
Alabama............ I 2 -
Mississippi........ -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 9 9
Arkansas........... -
Luu i s ana .......... .- 8
Ok ah.ma............ -
Texas.............. 2 1 I

MOLI NTAIIN.............. 3 1 1 1 1
HMotana............
Idaho.................. -
Wy.m n........... .
C., or ad .............. 3 -
NAr n ix ......... .
Arlz nd ............-
Pr .ah...............
Nevada............ .

PAC IFIC .............. 7 6 8 5 1 I 8 1 1 7
Washin,: tt n ......... I 2 -
're nr ......... I 1 -
C( li l.rnia......... 7 5 5 5 I I 6 1 I 5
Alia ka .............
r .t ......... -

Puertv ., il 2 2










Morbidilv and Mortality ~ eekly Reporl 113


Table 3 CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 28, 1964 AND MARCH 30. 196 ( 13th WEEK) Coniinucd


Infectious Hepatitis
Brucellosis Diphtheria including Serum Hepatitis Typhoid Fever

Area Under 20 years Age
Cum. Cum. Total 20 years and over Unknown Cumulative Cum.

1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 196 4 196 3 1964 1964

UNITED STATES... 6 90 2 46 821 388 391 42 12,104 13,805 6 81

NEW ENGLAND........... 1 83 41 39 3 1,381 1,741 6
Maine.............. 27 15 12 493 807
New Hampshire...... 1 I 118 116 -
Vermont............. 12 6 5 1 171 23 -
Massachusetts ...... 1 22 10 11 I 263 516 3
Rhode Island....... 4 2 1 1 60 41 3
Connecticut........ 17 7 10 276 238 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 2 4 205 105 100 2,712 2,704 11
New York City...... 1 19 5 14 382 308 2
New York, Up-Staee. I I 89 60 29 1,232 1,234 3
New Jersey......... 2 70 27 43 470 424
Pennsylvania....... 1 I 27 13 14 628 738 6

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 13 6 130 54 70 6 1,794 2,189 2 18
Ohio............... 25 8 16 1 482 653 1 14
Indiana............ 1 6 3 3 143 192 2
Illinois........... 10 6 23 8 14 1 281 455 1 2
Michigan........... 70 34 36 793 71 -
Wisconsin.......... 2 6 1 1 4 95 118

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 49 8 23 15 3 5 738 592 9
Minnesota.......... 2 1 52 107
Iowa............... 4 25 2 1 1 108 96 3
Missouri........... 4 7 6 1 186 254 2
North Dakota........ 1 32 11 -
South Dakota....... 8 3 2 1 81 15 1
Nebraska........... 8 1 1 18 43
Kansas............. 1 7 10 6 4 261 66 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 6 1 11 93 47 42 4 1,176 1,487 2 18
Delaware............ 10 2 8 24 23 -
Maryland........... 24 18 6 220 163
Dist. of Columbia.. 3 3 25 57 -
Virginia........... 2 11 3 7 1 173 331 2 4
West Virginia...... 9 6 3 213 219 -
North Carolina .... 8 6 2 212 397 9
South Carolina..... 3 1 I 37 66 I
Georgia............ 2 1 6 2 1 1 26 53 -
Florida............ 2 25 11 14 246 178 4

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 3 4 53 28 24 1 814 1,394 1 10
Kentucky............ 13 2 10 1 356 422 1 5
Tennessee.......... 1 28 15 13 282 523 4
Alabama............. 2 2 6 5 1 113 218 1
Mississippl........ 1 1 6 6 63 231

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 4 6 63 44 16 3 862 907 1 5
Arkansas........... 1 7 6 1 106 115 1 2
Louisiana.......... I 2 14 12 2 164 151
Oklahoma............ I 4 3 1 51 54 3
Texas.............. 4 38 23 12 3 5l1 587

MOUNTAIN.............. 7 1 1 46 13 13 20 810 1,015
Montana............ 7 4 2 1 73 161
Idaho.............. 4 4 62 151
Wyoming............. 1 1 32 10 -
Colorado........... 16 5 8 3 236 220 -
New Mexico......... 1 1 1 2 1 1 135 123
Arizona ........... 1 11 11 173 225
Utah................ 5 4 2 2 75 116 -
Nevada.............. 1 1 24 9

PACIFIC.............. 1 6 5 125 41 84 1,817 1,776 4
Washington......... 5 9 3 6 188 284
Oregon............. 1 I 13 5 8 189 265
California......... 5 100 33 67 1,339 1,177 4
Alaska............. 1 57 41
Hawaii............. 2 2 44 9

Puerto Rico 3 9 9 144 156 5


4










II IMlrblid ity and Morlalit % eeLkl Kh report


1Ihlc 3 (.AMS OF SPE( IFIED NOTIFIABLl DISEASES I UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

.MAR( II 2I. l196 AN) MAR(.H ll, 19,i ( liih W'FK) ontinucd


Sltreptico'cal
MniLng'oci' l a1 tre Thr .-at and Rabies In
MJsl,. M.ningpil. Starlte Fever Tetanus Tularemia Animals
Art I
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1964 19b; 196- 163 1964 1963 1964 1964 1961 1964 1964 1964

L;ITEn -TATE'... lib21 64 7.i 760 11,668 9,700 1 45 2 70 105 1.033

';El ENCLAND.......... 519 25 53 1.133 1,243 1 2
zi nt .............. 94 2 9 132 61
';, Ha p-h r ...... 7 2 8 -
V-rnm.nt ............ 56 1 38 11 1 1
t.ac.hu-. It- ... .. [184 3 13 23 187 183
Rh.d. I. l.ind ....... 60 2 6 85 11.
C.,nnecl il lUt ........ 118 [ 8 12 689 866

IIDDLE ATLANTIC ...... 2,377 4 72 101 700 618 1 1 20
Nt. Y'rk CIt ...... 625 10 12 35 63 -
S ..I .rk. Up-State. 590 3 28 33 500 292 19
Nt,. J.er ......... 619 14. 16 129 184 -
PL'nn.ylania ....... 543 1 20 -03 36 79 1 I

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... .,215 13 12 132 1,956 1,258 5 7 10 97
Ohiz ............... 808 40 35 367 232 1 1 4 48
Indiana............ 985 3 19 17 165 159 1 7
Illinoi s........... 565 3 27 22 258 173 2 4 3 15
Michigan .......... 1,121 2 31 L0 824 413 1 1 2 11
iscon,~in.......... 736 1 7 18 342 281 1 1 16

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 926 2 37 4 461 216 2 21 38 328
Minne ,sota.......... 3 8 9 59 27 1 8 95
I.,.a ............... 316 2 2 92 86 1 17 112
Nissouri............ 79 17 q19 6 4 2 13 6 68
North Dakota....... 215 3 1 148 96 1 16
S.'uth Dakota ....... 3 6 24
Nebraska........... 313 1 2 9 8
Kansis............ NN 1 5 I 116 3 6 5

O;nUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,.42 12 169 162 779 814 17 2 12 13 180
Delaware........... 21 2 I 20 10 -
'aryland........... 145 1 13 25 73 36 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 27 1 5 3 11 5-
Virginia........... 467 1 l' 37 235 268 I 3 9 130
West Virginia ..... 249 13 9 202 195 7
North Carolina..... 36 4 30 24 16 45 7 2 3 2
South Carolina..... 208 1 19 11 60 129 2 -
Georgia............ 2 1 15 10 7 I 6 2 18
Florida............ 287 3 58 42 155 125 6 2 23

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 2125 7 63 53 2,247 1,446 6 16 13 163
Kentuck ........... 683 II 17 498 245 1 3 23
Tennessee...... ..... 1,192 3 28 25 1,646 1,118 3 11 9 136
Alabama............. 114 3 13 7 20 24 3 3 1 4
Mississippi........ 136 I II 1 83 59 I- 1

WEdT SOUTH CENTRAL... 8' 9 62 8'. 1,374 794 7 10 16 163
Arkansas........... 54 5 4 2 1 1 2 40
Louisiana.......... I 9 55 36 12 I 3 4 19
Oklaho-ma.......... 29 3 15 93 18 9 14
Texas............... 28 1,265 773 3 10 90

MOUNTAIN............. 727 2 34 25 1,620 1,816 2 4 7 44
Montana............ 71 60 65 I
Idah, .............. 125 1 177 185 -
Wyoming............. 5 1 1 33 24 1 1
C 'lorad. .......... 85 7 6 674 709 -
New Mexico.......... I 16 2 307 422 1 3 23
Ariz.na.............. 390 2 5 151 194 4 21
Utah............... 6 1 10 210 215 2 -
Nevada.............. 4 2 6 I 8 2 -

PACIFIC .............. 2,206 11 158 106 1.398 1,495 5 7 36
Washingro;n.......... b80 1 14 11 449 500 -
Oregon............. 323 2 7 5 39 23 -
California........ 1,166 6 128 85 850 899 5 7 36
Alaska.............. 30 2 5 4 23 69 -
Hawai .... ........ 4 1 37 4 -

Puerto Rico 87 8 27 9 16 1 3


j











NMorlitil aindl Morliliily WeeIkly IliR,' ort





1.ablh t (.A) 1 )IAI I)IATH. IN RIPORIIN(, (ITIFS


115


(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o

For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area/1 3/21 Area 3/ 3/1 3/21

3/7 3/14 3/21 3/28 3/7 3/14 3/21 3/128


NEW ENGLAND*
Boston, Mass. ...........
Br dgepo t, Conn. .........
Cambridge, Mass ...........
Fall River, Mass. .........
Hartford, Conn. ...........
Lowell, Mass. ............
Lynn, Mass. ..............
New Bedford, Mass. ........
New Haven, Conn. ..........
Providence, R. ..........
Somerville, aiss. .........
Springfield, Miss .........
Waterbury, Conn .........
Worcester, Mass ..........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y. ...............
Allentown, Pa ...........
Buffalo, N.Y .............
Camden, N.J ..............
Elizabeth, N.J. ...........
Erie, Pa. .................
Jersey City, N.J. .........
Newark, N.J. ..............
New York City, N.Y. .......
Paterson, N.J. ............
Philadelphia, Pa. .........
Pittsburgh, Pa. ..........
Reading, Pa. .............
Rochester, N.Y ..........
Schenectady, N.Y. .........
Scranton, Pa ........... ..
Syracuse, N.Y ...........
Trenton, N.J. ............
Utica, N.Y. ..............
Yonkers, N.Y. ............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio ...............
Canton, Ohio ...............
Chicago, Ill. ............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio.............
Columbus, Ohio..............
Dayton, Ohio...............
Detroit, hlch. ...........
Evansville, Ind ..........
Flint, lich. .............
Fort Wayne, Ind. ..........
Gary, Ind. ................
Grand Rapids, Mich. .......
Indianapolis, Ind .........
Madison, Wis ............
Milwaukee, W s. ............
Peoria, Ill. .............
Rockford, Ill .............
South Bend, Ind. ..........
Toledo, Ohio ...............
Youngstown, Ohio............

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Duluth, Minn. ..............
Kansas City, Kans. ........
Kansas City, Mo. ..........
Lincoln, Nebr ...........
Minneapolis, Minn. ........
Omaha, Nebr. ..............
St. Louis, Mo. ............
St. Paul, Minn. ..........
Wichita, Kans. ............


274
42
31
28
46
29
22
26
43
67
12
43
24
61


46
28
150
45
41
49
81
98
1,801
45
537
184
57
102
19
48
64
27
31
27


71
49
800
167
256
137
86
361
32
56
32
26
50
141
30
114
27
28
43
113
54


56
26
44
137
35
124
86
239
68
66


254
39
25
29
51
29
33
29
44
66
11
51
21
64


36
33
161
52
20
38
70
101
1,757
32
585
185
46
110
25
54
65
54
31
22


67
40
755
172
190
107
97
336
36
46
39
36
58
148
32
155
39
32
34
89
46


59
24
34
121
25
116
86
241
72
60


274
50
27
33
53
20
28
22
54
54
17
47
25
54


71
38
152
42
23
41
80
97
1,726
37
508
201
42
112
25
37
56
45
27
34


50
29
701
16-
205
120
79
321
41
48
35
20
52
154
46
126
23
21
53
85
58


81
33
55
118
29
134
67
262
71
64


194
49
20
29
44
31
21
31
42
65
12
44
21
47


44
29
140
37
21
49
61
116
1,643
26
396
184
50
93
29
39
50
42
29
31


55
37
677
174
210
109
97
373
32
-6
24
24
46
152
24
110
27
31
24
105
46


50)
21
41*
132
24
120
78
267
68
44


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga. ............... 119 151 130 123
Baltimore, Md. ............ 277 270 238 237
Charlotte, N.C. ........... 58 41 38 39*
Jacksonville, Fla. ........ 96 67 64 68
Miami, Fla. ............... 95 88 88 84
Norfolk, Va ............... 68 55 48 58
Richmond, Va .............. 93 94 96 85
Savannah, Ca. ............. 53 40 32 35
St. Petersburg, Fla. ...... 95 87 85 83
Tampa, Fla. ................. 74 61 83 87
Washington, D.C. .......... 220 190 220 198
Wilmington, Del. .......... 34 40 40 26

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala. ........... 112 100 97 85
Chattanooga, Tenn. ........ 59 45 4. 60
Knoxville, Tenn. .......... 42 30 47 30
Louisville, Ky. ............ 112 145 119 126
Memphis, Tenn. ............. 137 142 129 113
Mobile, Ala. ............... 48 53 36 51
Montgomery, Ala. .......... 36 27 34 33
Nashville, Tenn. .......... 104 86 101 90

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex. .............. 39 28 55 36
Baton Rouge, La. .......... 16 33 30 30
Corpus Christi, Tex. ...... 34 20 22 22
Dallas, Tex. ............... 145 124 136 126
El Paso, Tex. .............. 51 29 49 27
Fort Uorth, Tcx. ..... .... 51 68 70 71
Houston, Tex. .............. 174 184 187 183
Little Rock, Ark. ........ .. 43 62 50 59
New Orleans, La ........... 189 169 197 189
Oklahoma City, Okla....... 90 74 69 68
San Antoni., Ter. .......... 124 103 113 82
Shreveport, La. ........... 12 47 59 58
Tulsa, 0i3. ............... 78 62 26 59

MOLrNTA III
Albuquerque, N. Me\. ....... 42 42 30 38
Colorado Springs, Col.. ... 23 16 20 26
Denver, Col.. .............. 12 126 115 118
Ogden, Lrah ................ 16 21 15 13
Phoenix, Art ............. 93 104 118 119
Pueblo, Colo. ............. 16 15 27 20
Salt Lake Citv, Utah....... 49 59 56 57
Tucson, Ariz. ............. 50 45 43 58

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif. .......... 21 18 25 19
Fresno, Calif ............ 49 29 49 41
Glendale, Calif. .......... 46 53 24 35
Honolulu, Hawaii........... 39 37 40 29
Long Beach, Calif. ........ 74 74 74 74
Los Angeles, Calif. ....... 533 593 593 584
Oakland, Calif. ........... 78 135 103 112
Pasadena, Calif. ........ 29 29 38 29
Portland, Oreg. ........... 106 154 94 121
Sacranento, Calif. ........ 70 79 78 94
San Diego, Calif. ......... 103 100 98 104*
San FranciscC, Calif. ..... 210 223 251 218
San Jose, Calif. .......... 51 55 46 54
Seattle, Wash. ............ 153 144 156 167
Spokane, Wash ............ 59 59 50 62
Tacoma, Wash. ............. 50 38 50 51

San Juan, P.R. .............. 17 27 28 (---)


Current Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................ .
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all iges........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


11,425
479
712
6,449


NOTF- 1lI deaths by place il occurrenc e.


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES
Immunization Information for International Travel
1061-64 edition Public Health Service Publicarton No. 384


Please make the following change in the list of Yellow
Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:

Delete:


San Pedro, California


Center:



Clinic Hours:

Fee:


Insert:

City:


Clinic Hours:


San Pedro Ourpatient Clinic
825 South Beacon Street
Telephone TE 2-0213

Monday Friday, 1-3 p.m.


San Pedro, California

U.S. Public Health Service
Outpatient Clinic

Monday Friday, 1-3 p.m.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08164 3175


In addiron to the established procedures for reporting morbidity
and mortality, the Communicable Disease Center welcomes
accounts of interesting outbreaks or cases. Such accounts should
be addressed to:

Lawrence K. Airman, M.D., Editor
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Communicoble Disease Center
Atlanta, Georgia 30333



Nores These provisional data are boaed on weooly telgrame lt rho Commeit.
cable D.eaeie Cinter hr eke individual Slae health department.
Symbill -. Daio nof available
O uanity zero
Procedures for conrffucfion of various mo rlliy curve. may be obfelted frw
Siartsflcs Section. Communicable Dirwase Conte., Public Health Semrlc,
U. S. Deparfnmnt of Heatlh, Education, and Welare, Arlan. CGlsas 30.U33.


QN IVr -eL LORIB
UYCUML N S PTr ,





U SEPOSITORY


Fee:


The following information should be added to the list of
Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:


Houston, Texas


The Methodist Hospital
Texas Medical Center


Clinic Hours:


Fee:


Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
By appointment

Yes


The Morbidity and Morraliry Weekly Report, with a circulation
of 10,800 is published by the Communicable Disease Center,
Atlanta. Georgia.


Chief, Commun.cable Disease Center
Chief. Epidemiology Branch
Chief. Statistics Section
Asst. Chief, Statistics Section
Chief, Surveillance Section
Ed.ror. MMWR


James L, Goddard, M.D.
A. D. Longmuir, M.D.
R. E. Serfling, Ph.D.
I. L. Sherman, M.S.
D. A. Henderson, M.D.
L. K. Altman, M.D.


116


City:


Page 77

City:


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