Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00424

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


',.7S


Morbidity and Mortality



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


0 *:MMUNlABL DISE SE*C N


For release August 15. 1964 ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333 Vol. 13 No. 32
PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATiS AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED AUGUST 8, 1964 ___

DIPHTHERIA


No cases of diphtheria were reported for the week
ended August 8. This is the third week this year for which
no cases of diphtheria were reported.Thus, the cumulative
total for 1964 remains at 160 cases. For the comparable
period of 1963, 152 cases were reported. The cumulative
cases through the 32nd week and the annual totals for the
past 5 years are shown in the accompanying table.
The New England region has reported 43 cases (2'
percent of the national total); of these, 39 cases were
associated with an outbreak in adults at a State hospital
in Maine.
Maine's total is the largest of any State. Texas has
reported 21 cases, Georgia 20 cases, thus making theirs
the second and third largest State totals.


Disease


To dare, cases have been reported from 24 States and
New York City.





DIPHTHERIA United States

Cumulative Cases through 32nd Week

1964 1963 1962 1961 1960
160 152 240 339 378

Annual Totals
298* 444 617 918

*Provisional total


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
32nd Week Ended Cumulative. Firs


Aseptic meningitis ................
Brucellosis .......................
Diphtheria ........................
Encephalitis, primary infectious ..
Encephalitis, post-infectious .....

Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ................
Measles ...........................
Heningococcal infections ..........
Poliomyelitis, Total ..............
Paralytic ......................
Nonparalytic ...............
Unspecified ....................

Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever ...............
Tetanus ...........................
Tularemia ........................
Typhoid fever .....................

Rabies in Animals .................


August 8,
1964


August 10,
1963


808
1,568
22
13
11



3,439
7
5
16

-9


Median
1959 1I


734
1,660
29
51
35


1959 1963


378
340


27,610
382,274
1,53
413
278


421


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FRE(


Anthrax:
Botulism: Ala-I
Leptospirosis:
Malaria:
Plague:


Psittacosis: N.C.-1
Rabies in Man:
Smallpox:
Typhus-
Murine: Ark-I


7 -,4'


6345131









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS

MILKER'S NODULES Tennessee


On April 15 a I- year old, white farmer received 8
.uperrfiial abrasions on 2 lingers of his right hand while
he attempted to introduce 2 sulfa tablets into the mouth
of an 8-month-old calf. Only one of the lesions bled.
The patient immediately. washed his hand under a faucet
in the barn and then milked one of his 2 cows. On return-
ing to the house 3t minutes later, he washed the hand
again with soap and water. The abrasions crusted over
and healed complete\ within 5 days.

On April 23. the patient noticed a small, red papule
appearing in the area of each bite on the index and ring
fingers. These uniformly progressed to pea-sized "warts"
which became semi-fluid in consistency within 3-4 days;
the patient treated himself with merthiolate. On April 28,
(13 days after the bite) he noticed a bluish coloration
over the surface of each of the non-tender nodules. There
was no swelling, erythema, or drainage, systemic symp-
toms were absent. The fingers became so pruritic that
he found it difficult to resist excoriating the lesions.

Because of the persistence of the nodules and the
pruritus the patient consulted a physician on April 29.
The physician noted that the lesions were all in the
same stage and he confirmed the above description. There
was no cellulitis or lymphangitis, although the epitroch-
lear and axillary lymph nodes were moderately enlarged
and tender. The patient was treated with 600,000 units of
penicillin intramuscularly. On return visit, April 30, the
physician incised one of the nodules which contained a
small amount of thick, clear fluid. A gram strain revealed
a number of single gram positive rods with rounded, blunt
ends; anthrax was considered a differential diagnosis.
The patient was admitted to a local hospital where a
physical examination was unremarkable, with the exception
of the lesions on his hand; he was afebrile, his hematocrit
was 49 percent, his white blood cell count was 7,000 with
a normal differential. Urinalysis was negative. The patient
was treated with penicillin and broad spectrum antibiotics.
By May 6, the lesions were approximately 8-10 mm
in diameter, and those which had been surgically opened
had a red, granulating base with sharp demarcation from
the surrounding normal skin. One lesion remained umbili-
cared with a dwvl. red center and smooth, rolled edges.
It contained' ro fluid. Sensation was intact in and around
the lesions and -rhere was no tenderness. Epirrochlear
or axillan nodes were not enlarged. The patient was
discharged Ma\ 1U; the- lesions healed completel- by
May 20.
One of the cultures taken of the incised nodule
yielded Har, itlu rcrculans: this was believed to be a
laboratory contaminant. Scrapings for fungi were negative.
virus studies were not performed.


The diagnosis of Milker's nodules was made clinical-
Iv. Tennessee health officials believe the patient began
to experience the symptoms of milker's nodules 8 days
after the bite as a result of direct inoculation of virus
in the calf's saliva. This type of transmission has been
noted previously.

The calf which bit the patientwas one of 20 purchased
on April 10. This calf and 8 others were transported by
open truck '0 miles to his farm that day, the remaining
11 calves were transported the following day. On April 12
the suspect calf appeared listless, are poorly, and was
believed to have "shipping fever." The calf was treated
with million units of penicillin, 5 grams of strepromycin,
and 4 240-gram sulfa capsules for 2 days without benefit
of improvement. On April 15, the patient was bitten while
trying to administer 2 of these sulfa capsules. Despite
additional treatment, the calf expired on April 17. During
its terminal course, the calf appeared lethargic, anorectic
and experienced diarrhea and respiratory difficulty. The
animal was dumped into a secluded, wooded area on the
farm; samples of the carcass were negative for Bacillus
anthracis.

No lesions were noted in the oral mucosa of the
suspect calf or other animals purchased at the same time.
No lesions were present on the teats or udder of the
patient's one milk cow prior to the biting; none developed
thereafter despite the fact that the patient continued to
milk his cow when his lesions were active.

(Reported by Cecil B. Tucker, D.D., Director, Divi.ipon of
Preventable Disease., Tennessee Department of Public
Health, and an EIS Officer.)





Editor's Note: Milker's nodules (pseudocowpox or para-
vaccinia) is caused by a virus 23, recently isolated, which
belongs to the pox group, and which is immunologically
distinct from cowpox, vaccinia and variola.



References:
1. Garrison, S.C., and Adams, C.E.: Milker's Nodules,
J. Tenn. Med. Assn., 46:420, 1953.
2. Friedman-Kien, A.E., Rowe, W.P., and Banfield, W.G.:
Milker's Nodules: Isolation of a poivirus from a
human case, Science 140:1335, 1965.
3. Moscovia, C., Cohen, E.P., Sanders, J., and DeLong,
S.S.: Isolation of a viral agent from pseudocowpox
disease, Science 141:91, 1963.


271


AI









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report




CAT RABIES-TUCSON, ARIZONA 1964


Ti. HIL


28 29 I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8


9 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 17


MARCH


FELINE RABIES Arizona


Eight cases of cat rabies were reported in Tucson
from February 28 to March 20 (See epidemic curve above);
7 occurred within a 4-day period, beginning 17 days after
the first case. Most of the cats were strays. Five of the
cases occurred in one neighborhood, the remainder in
nearby areas. Approximately 6,000 cats were given
phenolized rabies vaccine (1,200 in 8 hours in a public
clinic) since this outbreak began.
No cases of dog rabies developed. A total of 10
humans were exposed to rabid cats. All received anti-
rabies treatment. No human cases developed.


No source for the cat epidemic could be found. Since
the recognition of the cat epidemic, the disease has been
confirmed in 3 coyotes, one bobcat, and one bat. Because
of the existence of rabies in wild animals, officials
speculate that the feline outbreak may have started when
a rabid wild animal attacked a cat.
(Reported by Philip M. Hotchkiss, DVM, MPH, Acting
Director, Division of Acute Communicable Disease Con-
trol, Arizona State Department of Health.)
Editor's Note: This is an unusual outbreak because cat
rabies is usually secondary to outbreaks in other hosts.


TUBERCULOSIS
Reported new active tuberculosis cases and tuberculosis deaths by size of community during 1962 are presented in the
tables below. The highest attack rates in both categories occurred in cities with greater than one-half million population.
This pattern probably reflects the factor of crowded living conditions in the spread of this disease.
TUBERCULOSIS DEATHS BY SIZE OF COMMUNITY, 1962
Tuberculosis Deaths
Rate Per
AREA* Number 100,000 Percent
Population
Cities with 500,000 or more population 2,673 9.3 28.1
Cities with 250,000 to 500,000 population 751 6.8 7.9
Cities with 100,000 to 250,000 population 665 5.4 7.0
Other areas exclusive of large cities 5,417 4.1 57.0
United States 9,506 5.1 100.0

NEW ACTIVE TUBERCULOSIS CASES BY SIZE OF COMMUNITY, 1962
New Active Cases
Rate Per
AREA* Number 100,000 Percent
Population
Cities with 500,000 or more population 16,326 56.0 30.6
Cities with 250,000 to 500,000 population 4,430 36.9 8.3
Cities with 100,000 to 250,000 population 4,040 30.6 7.6
Other areas exclusive of large cities 28,519 21.7 53.5
United States 53,315 28.7 100.0
*Size of cities oa time of 1960 census. Includes county data where information was not avalloble separately for principal city.
**lnludes 672 counties with no new -cas reported in 1962.


275


-'1-


FEB.


18 19 20











276 lMorbidity and Morlalit V

Tablc 3. ( ASIr OF SPE( IIFD NOTIFIABLE DISEASE. 1 NITID STATES

FOR WLEKS ENDED

AUGUST 8, 1964 AND AUGUST 10. 1963 (32ND WEEK)


eptic Encephalitis
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Pol lomyel iti,. Total Cases P. i myelitis, ParalyLic
Area
Cumulative Cumulalive
196. 1963 196. 1964 1964 19b3 1964 1963 1964 1963 1964 1963
UNITED STATES... 27 60 49 15 3 13 65 159 3 11 53 132

EW ENGLAD........... 1 3 1 1 2 1 2
Maine .............. -I 1 -
New Hamphire ...... -
Vermont............. -
Massachusettss..... 1 1 1 1 -
Rhode Island -
Connecticut........ 1 1

IDDLE ATLANTIC...... 2 3 10 3 2 10 37 2 10 27
New York City ..... 4 I -
New York, Up-State. 2 2 2 2 7 7 2 7 5
New Jersey........ 1 3 2 1 2 1
Pennsylvania ...... 1 1 1 1 29 21

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 4 12 4 3 9 24 2 7 16
Ohio ............... 2 2 7 2 3
Indiana........... 4 1 2 1
Illinois........... 1 5 2 4 9 2 4 8
Michigan ........... 3 3 2 1 3 3
Wisconsin .......... 1 1 3 1 1

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 3 1 3 3 5 2
Minnesota .......... 2 1 3 3
issour............. 2 1
North Dakota.......- 1 -
South Dakota.......
Nebraska ............ 1 I
Kansas.............. 1 -1 -- 1 1 -

SOUTH AANTIC...... 1 10 9 3 22 23 3 17 20
Delaware........... .
Maryland.....- 1 1
Dist. of Columbia.. .
Virginia........... -. 2 2 1
West Virginia...... 1 2 1 2
North Carolina ..... 9 3 5 3
South Carolina..... 2 2 5 2 2 4
Georgia ............ 1 1 5 1 1 4
Florida............ 1 7 9 8 6 7 6

EAST SOUTH CENTAL... 1 5 15 1 5 5 29 1 5 4 27
Kentucky........... 3 15 -
Tennessee............ 1 3 4 1 2 4
Alabama ............ 1 2 5 2 23 5 2 21
Mississippi........ 2 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 12 1 1 6 20 1 6 20
Arkansas ........... 2 3 -1 3
Louisiana........... 13 13
Oklahoma........... 2 2
Texas.............. 1 10 1 4 4 4 4

MOUNTAIN............ 1 2 l 6 2 3 1
Montana............ ..
Idaho.............. 1 -
Wyoming............ 2 -- 2
Colorado............ 1 1 I 1 -
New Mexico......... 1 3 1 -
Arizona............ .
Utah................ 1 -
Nevada...........

PACIFIC............. 13 12 6 12 3 17 3 15
Washington......... 2 1 2 1 -
Oregon............ 1 2 1 1
California......... 11 11 6 10 2 14 2 13
Alaska.............
Hawaii ............

Puerto Rico











Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 277


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 8, 1964 AND AUGUST 10, 1963 (32ND WEEK) Continued


Infectious Hepatitis
Brucellosis Diphtheria including Serum Hepatitis Typhoid Fever
Area Under 20 years Age
Cum. Cum. Total 20 years and over Unknown Cumulative Cum.
1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1963 1964 1964

UNITED STATES... 15 256 160 586 247 277 62 24,809 27,608 9 251

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2 43 39 12 23 4 2,385 2,998 1 13
Maine.............. 39 14 7 4 3 777 1,369
New Hampshire...... 3 3 173 260 -
Vermont............ 1 1 302 49 -
Massachusetts...... 2 4 12 2 10 500 855 1 6
Rhode Island....... 125 71 6
Connecticut........ 9 3 6 508 394 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC ..... 1 4 7 122 55 67 5,558 5,346 2 37
New York City..... 3 34 15 19 848 780 1 15
New York, Up-State. 1 2 46 19 27 2,463 2,359 1 8
New Jersey......... 2 13 5 8 985 819 1
Pennsylvania....... 2 2 29 16 13 1,262 1,388 13

EAST NORTH CENTRAL.. 2 33 8 101 59 31 11 3,837 4,493 2 62
Ohio............... 2 28 15 6 7 1,014 1,233 1 24
Indiana........... 1 1 7 5 2 342 410 12
Illinois........... 2 21 6 20 11 9 672 962 1 14
Michigan........... 5 1 40 27 13 1,515 1,688 9
Wisconsin.......... 4 6 1 1 4 294 200 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 8 120 22 17 5 12 1,342 1,253 2 22
Minnesota.......... 6 11 2 2 138 191 2
Iowa................ 8 78 187 233 3
Missouri ........... 8 1 8 3 5 339 471 1 8
North Dakota....... 2 2 52 37 2
South Dakota....... 13 1 3 3 111 73 1
Nebraska........... 11 1 1 34 91 1 2
Kansas............. 2 7 3 1 2 481 157 4

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 2 25 31 58 26 29 3 2,334 2,813 1 54
Delaware........... 1 1 44 39 -
Maryland........... 8 3 5 442 340 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 2 39 80 -
Virginia........... 11 9 7 2 365 594 10
West Virginia...... 5 3 2 360 436 -
North Carolina..... 3 11 2 9 416 712 1 15
South Carolina..... 7 7 2 5 85 118 10
Georgia............ 2 8 20 5 4 1 60 119 2
Florida............ 3 4 10 4 5 1 523 375 14

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 12 6 45 19 25 1 1,744 2,707 25
Kentucky........... 3 10 4 5 1 679 783 7
Tennessee.......... 4 1 12 8 4 586 1,054 11
Alabama............. 3 3 17 3 14 318 422 5
Mississippi........ 2 2 6 4 2 161 448 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.. 24 27 47 27 20 1,859 1,929 1 17
Arkansas.......... 4 5 3 2 190 211 1 8
Louisiana......... 2 5 9 6 3 425 383 3
Oklahoma........... 3 4 2 2 98 94 4
Texas.............. 15 22 29 16 13 1,146 1,241 2

MOUNTAIN............. 2 21 2 53 9 4 40 1,530 1,806 7
Montana............ 3 1 2 137 240 -
Idaho.............. 2 2 183 282 -
Wyoming............ 2 1 1 47 24 1
Colorado........... 23 23 423 370 -
New Mexico......... I 1 8 7 1 216 211 2
Arizona............ 2 1 7 7 347 424 4
Utah............... 2 17 127 242 -
Nevada............ 1 8 8 50 13 -

PACIFIC.............. 15 14 104 35 66 3 4,220 4,263 14
Washington........ 13 11 2 7 2 469 729 2
Oregon............. 2 11 4 6 1 473 535 -
California......... 13 1 80 27 53 3,066 2,861 12
Alaska............. 2 2 131 107 -
Hawaii.............. 81 31 -

Puerto Rico











278 Morbidily and Mlortalitl WeekLIN Report



Tabic 3 CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES. UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 8. 1964 AND AUGUST 10, 1963 (32ND WEEK) Continued


S reptococcal
Mentngococcal Sore Throat and Rabies in
Measles Meningitis Scarlet Fever Tetanus Tularemia Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1964 1964 1964 1963 1964 1963 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964

UNITED STATES... 1,412 37 1,771 1,640 3,855 3,439 7 158 9 207 62 2,883

NEW ENILAND.......... 152 49 103 281 247 1 8 I 28
Maine.............. 40 5 17 50 63 24
New Hampshire...... 1 4 1
Vermont............ 9 1 33 2- 2
Massachusetts....... 80 20 50 7 30 1 8 1 1
Rhode Island ....... 3 7 9 12 19 -
Connecticut........ 16 15 20 209 126 -

KIDDLE ATLANTIC ..... 149 8 232 228 99 83 15 3 84
New York City...... 56 32 35 8 2 -
New York. Up-State. 66 2 67 72 79 66 5 3 80
New Jersey......... 20 4 80 32 9 9 5 -
Pennsylvania....... 7 2 53 89 3 6 5 4

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 271 8 253 255 401 195 3 30 16 11 403
Ohio................ 51 4 68 73 27 15 8 1 7 215
Indiana............. 57 1 39 31 93 50 2 5 2 19
Illinois........... 65 1 63 45 63 46 1 10 10 3 81
Michigan........... 49 2 56 79 138 55 6 1 1 40
Wisconsin.......... 49 27 27 80 29 1 2 48

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 89 2 114 100 143 124 9 2 44 27 935
Minnesota.......... 26 21 3 9 1 2 13 284
lova................ 71 6 5 35 29 3 1 9 337
Missouri........... 1 53 33 3 22 1 145
North Dakota...... 13 2 15 5 105 79 48
South Dakota ...... 4 5 6 1 2 11 1 73
Nebraska ........... 6 21 2 26
Kansas............. NN 8 10 1 1 8 1 22

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 93 4 380 310 419 421 2 47 20 9 387
Delaware........... 6 2 3 -
Maryland........... 5 25 48 30 9 3
Dist. of Columbia.. 12 6 2 -- -
Virginia........... 20 2 45 72 176 62 5 4 4 209
West Virginia...... 19 1 27 16 81 112 1 24
North Carolina..... 65 52 5 3 1 13 4 5
South Carolina..... 5 49 15 37 33 4 1 2
Georgia............ 4 1 53 23 8 2 3 11 4 82
Florida............ 40 98 76 77 200 1 18 65

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 102 1 155 123 742 657 15 3 25 2 347
Kentucky........... 11 51 27 31 46 2 1 47
Tennessee.......... 85 1 52 53 591 567 8 2 17 2 285
Alabama............. 6 34 21 85 7 4 3 15
Mississipp ........ 18 22 35 37 1 1 4 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 146 5 161 159 421 474 1 16 2 71 6 406
Arkansas........... 19 11 5 1 38 2 101
Louisiana.......... 1 2 107 65 3 3 32
Oklahoma........... 2 7 29 2 19 1 19 1 70
Texas.............. 143 3 28 54 419 -51 1 8 11 3 203

MOUNTAIN ............. 178 1 65 55 803 797 4 2 30 2 103
Montana............ 44 3 26 33 2 18 -
Idaho... ........... 23 3 4 39 27 -
Wyoming............. 3 5 4 1 7 1 4 -
Colorado........... 14 11 14 288 303 8
New Mexico......... 13 26 4 267 211 47
Arizona............ 52 5 9 112 41 1 1 45
Utah.............. 23 1 7 14 66 119 1 8 1 1
Nevada.............. 6 8 3 4 56 2

PACIFIC.............. 232 8 362 307 546 441 14 2 190
Washington......... 9 1 27 25 49 51 1 -
Oregon............. 65 1 21 22 16 4 6
California.......... 142 6 295 241 430 320 12 2 184
Alaska............. 2 7 11 7 20 -
Hawaii ............. 14 12 8 44 46 1 -

Puerto Rico 85 28 6 9 17 48 15











Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





Table 4 (D). TOTAL DEATHS AMONG PERSONS 65 YEARS AND OVER IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


279


Area For weeks ending Area For weeks ending

7/18 7/25 8/1 8/8 7/18 7/25 8/1 8/8


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass..............
Bridgeport, Conn.........
Cambridge, Mass............
Fall River, Mass...........
Hartford, Conn............
Lowell, Mass...............
Lynn, Mass................
New Bedford, Mass........
New Haven, Conn...........
Providence, R.I...........
Somerville, Mass.........,
Springfield, Mass........
Waterbury, Conn..........
Worcester, Mass...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y..............
Allentown, Pa............
Buffalo, N.Y..............
Camden, N.J..............
Elizabeth, N.J............
Erie, Pa.................
Jersey City, N.J..........
Newark, N.J..............
New York City, N.Y........
Paterson, N.J.............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Reading, Pa...............
Rochester, N.Y............
Schenectady, N.Y.,........
Scranton, Pa..............
Syracuse, N.Y.............
Trenton, N.J..............
Utica, N.Y................
Yonkers, N.Y..............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio..............
Canton, Ohio..............
Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, Ohio...........
Cleveland, Ohio............
Columbus, Ohio.............
Dayton, Ohio..............
Detroit, Mich.............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, Mich...............
Fort Wayne, Ind...........
Gary, Ind.................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis...............
Milwaukee, Wis............
Peoria, I11l...............
Rockford, Ill.............
South Bend, Ind...........
Toledo, Ohio..............
Youngstown, Ohio..........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa..........
Duluth, Minn..............
Kansas City, Kans........
Kansas City, Mo...........
Lincoln, Nebr............
Minneapolis, Minn........
Omaha, Nebr...............
St. Louis, Mo.............
St. Paul, Minn...........
Wichita, Kans............


103
21
14
13
23
13
12
13
23
36
5
16
28
22


23
17
61
19
22
19
44
36
797
15
204
116
26
54
12
19
41
18
28
23


36
22
361
119
98
66
57
228
30
20
21
16 *
36
99
16
79
21
17
19
61
36


45
10
23
65
11
72
31
163
47
24


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga............... 47 41 49 38
Baltimore, Md........... 127 134 115 126
Charlotte, N.C........... 9 11 12 19
Jacksonville, Fla........ 22 33 20 31
Miami, Fla............... 50 34 44 47
Norfolk, Va............... 13 21 28 33
Richmond, Va............. 31 35 25 34
Savannah, Ga............. 21 17 10 14
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 62 49 43 56
Tampa, Fla............... 30 40 27 41
Washington, D.C.......... 83 89 83 95
Wilmington, Del.......... 29 21 19 14

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.......... 50 35 41 55
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 24 28 14 17
Knoxville, Tenn........... 16 20 22 18
Louisville, Ky........... 60 72 72 75
Memphis, Tenn............ 66 58 69 59
Mobile, Ala............... 24 12 17 23
Montgomery, Ala.......... 19 17 14 12
Nashville, Tenn.......... 44 49 59 39

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex............... 16 23 12 17
Baton Rouge, La.......... 21 8 10 11
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 18 8 14 12
Dallas, Tex............... 63 60 63 57
El Paso, Tex.............. 19 20 13 21
Fort Worth, Tex........... 37 40 40 33
Houston, Tex............. 95 79 95 84
Little Rock, Ark.......... 30 24 34 26
New Orleans, La.......... 94 75 88 101
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 39 40 57 56
San Antonio, Tex......... 61 57 45 49
Shreveport, La........... 29 38 20 35
Tulsa, Okla.............. 35 25 33 29

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 18 7 12 13
Colorado Springs, Colo... 17 12 10 8
Denver, Colo.............. 76 61 67 78
Ogden, Utah............... 8 8 5 13
Phoenix, Ariz............ 43 43 51 37
Pueblo, Colo............. 7 9 6 7
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 29 30 31 30
Tucson, Ariz.............. 21 17 20 27

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 9 9 10 11
Fresno, Calif............ 24 32 22 24
Glendale, Calif.......... 26 24 27 23
Honolulu, Hawaii......... 17 17 21 16
Long Beach, Calif........ 50 34 38 29
Los Angeles, Calif....... 299 281 285 252
Oakland, Calif........... 73 52 79 69
Pasadena, Calif........... 37 19 24 21
Portland, Oreg............ 58 60 57 71
Sacramento, Calif........ 29 36 34 32
San Diego, Calif......... 47 54 47 51
San Francisco, Calif..... 90 102 92 88
San Jose, Calif.......... 17 32 16 19
Seattle, Wash............. 63 60 78 67
Spokane, Wash............. 35 26 40 36
Tacoma, Wash............. 1 22 24 24*




oCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages................. 11,024
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........ 399
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age........... 739
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over..... 6,003


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.


NOTE: All deaths by place of ocacrrece.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1IIII l l IIII II l
3 1262 08864 2961


Morbidity and Mortalilv Weekly Report


SUMMARY OF DEATHS AMONG PERSONS 65 YEARS AND
OVER IN 108 U.S. CITIES


The weekly average number of deaths among persons
(i \e-ars and over in 108 cities for the Iour-week period
-nding August 8 was 6,102 as compared with an expected
week. average of 6.116.



Week Ending 4 Week Weekly

7 18 7 25 8.-1 8 8 Total Average

Observed 5,990 6,212 6,563 6.003 24,768 6,192
Expected 6,143 6,120 6,105 6,098 24,466 6,116

Excess -153 92 458 95 302 76


DEATHS aof AM 65 and OVER rn IO1 U.S. CITIES
Ar.- rmnD p. aM*M D r ro w *> PlIsn


or MOO'
OF4 rl4
.LOW


*rLUfl A.


(See table, p. 179)


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

No changes.


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riE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
rnoN OP 1 ,000 is PUBLISHED BY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER, ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
CHIEF. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L.GODDARD M.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D. LANGMUIR, M.D.
CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION R. E. SERFLING. PRD.
ASST. CHIEF. STATISTICS SECTION I. L. SHERMAN, M.S.
CHIEF. SURVEILLANCE SECTION 0, A. ONDERSON, M.D.
DEPUTY CHIEF. SURV, SECTION J. 0. MILLER, MD.
EDITOR. MMWR L. K. ALTMAN, M.D,
ASSISTANT EDITOR, MMWR P. D. STOLLEY, M.D.

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASES. SUCH
ACCOUNTS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
LAWRENCE K, ALTMAN, M.D., EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA SS033
NOTES THESE PROVISIONAL DATA ARE BASED ON WEEKLY TELE-
GRAMS TO THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER B THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS.
SYMBOLS DATA NOT AVAILABLE
QUANTITY ZERO
PROCEDURES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF VARIOUS MORTALITY CURVES
MAY BE OBTAINED FROM STATISTICS SECTION. COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE. U.S, DEPARTMENT OF
HEALTH.T EDUCATION. AND WELFARE, ATLANTA. GEORGIA SOs3.


NIV OF FL Li
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