Morbidity and mortality

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Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00421

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text






Morbidity and Mortality -



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by thel


I COMMUNICABL DIEAECNT


For release March 20, 1964 ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30333 Vol. 13, No. 11

PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITED STATES AND ON
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED MARCH 14, 1964


BOTULISM

Washington reported 4 cases of botulism, one fatal, All cases occurred in one family of 6. A 40-year-old
for the week ended March 14, which brings the national mother and her 3-year-old daughter apparently ate the
total to 6 cases thus far in 1964. For the comparable beans March 10, the 40-year-old father and "-year-old son
in 1961, 2 cases were reported. ale the beans later the same day. All 4 became ill within
24 hours after eating the beans. The mother died. The
The 4 Washington cases occurred in Camas (Clark daughter is in critical condition in a Vancouver hospital;
County). They are believed due to the ingestion of home the father and son are in serious condition. Two other
processed green beans, according to Ernest A. Ager, M.D., sons did not eat the beans, they remained asymptomatic.
Chief, Division of Epidemiology, Washington State Depart- Further epidemiologic invest n tory studies
ment of Health and Donald A. Champaign, M.D., District are in progress.
Health Officer, Clark-Scamania Health Department, Van- All 6 cases report are r home
cover, Washington. processed foods. .

ZZ APR 1964

Table I. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UN E STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through pre weeks)
llth Week Ended Cu active E[rst J ee
Disease March 14, March 16, Median ian
1964 1963 1959 1963 1964 OW- 1959 1963
Aseptic meningitis ................ 27 25 --- 285 254 ---
Brucellosis ...................... 6 9 12 78 65 104
Diphtheria ........................ 3 8 10 41 71 187
Encephalitis, primary infectious .. 33 -34 337 43
Encephalitis, post-infectious ..... 10 --- 110 J-
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ... ............ 903 948 948 10,349 12,052 12,052
Measles .............. ............. 15,530 13,558 15,508 91,094 114,371 121,126
Meningococcal infections .......... 75 71 51 613 634 613
Poliomyelitis, Total .............. 3 4 5 13 36 91
Paralytic ..................... 3 3 9 10 31 52
Nonparalytic ................... --- 3 2 --
Unspecif ed .................... --- 3
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever .................. 13,336 11,099 --- 116,447 108,881 ---
Tetanus ............ .......... .... 1 2 --- 42 37
Tularemia .................. ...... 3 4 --- 66 47
Typhoid fever ........................ 6 5 9 69 63 93
Rabies in Animals ................ 94 89 89 816 695 798


Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY

Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: I Psittacosis: Calif. 1 7
Botulism: Wash. 4 6 Rabies in Man:
Leptospirosis: 5 Smallpox:
Malaria: 19 Typhus-
Plague: Murine: 2
Rky Mt. Spotted: 3


634-5131









Morlidily and Mortality Weekly Report


EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REPORTS


INFLUENZA


I'nrumin 1.1 -milu i n.' deaths in the Pa'cifiL geographic
division have increased --r..a 1 il above the epidemic thres-
hold for the past four successive weeks. For the entire
United States, however, the number of pneumonia-influtnzia
deaths is within normal r.inre Reporting cities along the
entire P 1r4ii. Coast have experienced an increase in
rpn. um n'ni I-Irluj'-n.r deaths as compared with inland
l'.i.ii, cities. In all other grcgrphic divisions, with the
i \., i .ro of the West South Central States, pneumonia-
Iniluin/a deaths are at expected levels. The best South
Central 'tat.ies have reported increased numbers of
pfinunnmni.i-in-lluena deaths during the past 4 weeks,
and barely exceeded the threshold during the past week.


1oo 12 cities

6 c -- Epidenic ThreshoMd

40 -
"Expected" Number
20

7 fi 5 19 2 16 30 14 n II 8 7 I1 4 I E I 30 13 17
SaP OCT NOv DEC JAN PEm MAR APR MAY JLN







Washington

Outbreak, of inilut na-like disease continued to be
reporrJt from many communities is eastern %'ashington
During the pat week. Among the areas most se.erel\ in-
volved was lpokane County, on the Idaho border. Increased
absenteeism resulted in the closure of 28 schools in the
mount' (exclusive of the city of Spokane) during the week
ended March 14. EHeatied absence rates rapidly. returned
toward normal however, and all schools in the county have
reopened this week.
Additional -erologic data have been obtained during
the past week imrlicaring influenza A2 virus as etiologic
agent in the current epidemic. Acutr and convalescent
sera were obtained from 8 itpical cases seen during an
earlier outbreak in Thurton County. iSec MMIR, Vol. 13,
page 4.'-. Serologic studies performed at the Respirovirus


Laboratory. CDC, revealed 4-fold or greater titer rises to
influenza A2 antigens in all 8 serum pairs.

(Reported by Frnrst A. Ager, M.D., Chief. Di vision of
Epideriology, State Department at Health. 0) mpia
,4./ Irngton, and F. O. PI',,r er. M.D.. Health O/ricer,
Spokane County, u asiingtuon.)



Oregon

A total of 3,858 cases of influenza-like disease were
reported to State health officials in Portland during the
week ended March 14. The epidemic clearly has spread
from its original focus in northwestern Oregon to involve
many communities in the central and eastern sections of
the Stare.
SReported by Dr. Grant Skinner. Director. Eprderniology
ircrion. State Board of Health. Portland, Oregon.)




California
Serologic data obtained during the past week have
implicated influenza A, virus as the etiologic agent in
two recent institutional outbreaks in California. The first
occurred in mid-February at a probation camp for delin-
quent boys near Los Angeles. (See MMWR, Vol. 13, page
68.1 Paired sera were obtained from 15 typical cases and
were submitted to the virus laboratory of the Los Angeles
County General Hospital, 13 of the 15 serum pairs demon-
strated 4-fold or greater H.I. antibody titer rises to influ-
enza A, antigens.
The second outbreak occurred at a 5,000 bed Stare
mental hospital in Napa County, norrh of San Francisco.
Earliest cases were recognized in mid-February among
patients on a female geriatric ward. The illness was
characterized by fever, reaching 1040 F., in some cases,
and nonproductive cough. Headache, myalgia, and malaise
were not part of the clinical picture. The disease spread
fairly rapidly% in the ensuing weeks, producing attack rates
approaching 100% on some wards. Serologic studies per-
formed at the State laboratories in Berkeley revealed
greater than 4-fold titer rises to influenza A, antigen in
9 of I) serum pairs submitted.

(Reported by Phtlip K. Condit, M.D.. Chief. Bureau of
Communicable Disrase, State Department of Health.
fl rrk le .. California.)








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





DIPHTHERIA Kentucky


Two related cases of diphtheria, from which cultures
grew both B hemolyric streptococci and Corynebacterium
diphtberiae. were reported in Louisville in November.
Although both patients were treated with antitoxin, one
died.
After the other members of his family had experienced
an "upper respiratory infection" for a week, an 11-year-
old white boy experienced generalized malaise, nausea,
vomiting and a temperature elevation to 1040. The follow-
ing day he complained of a sore throat and choking on
swallowing. Two days later, he was admitted to a chil-
dren's hospital because a physician suspected diphtheria
after noting a grey membrane on the boy's posterior
pharynx, tonsils, and uvula. An X-ray revealed a retro-
pharyngeal abscess. Erythromycin and 80,000 units of
diphtheria antitoxin were given. The culture revealed B
hemolytic Group A streptococci; subcultures by the
Kentucky State Laboratories demonstrated the presence of
C. diphthervae. The patient improved symptomatically ex-
cept for the persistence of difficulty in swallowing.
Ten days after onset, while still on bed rest in the
hospital, he suddenly appeared agitated and pale; X-ray
demonstrated an enlarged heart and an electrocardiogram
revealed a complete bundle branch block. He died 5 hours


later. Autopsy demonstrated myocarditis, bronchopneu-
monia and toxic nephrosis. The boy had been inadequately
immunized against diphtheria.
On the day of the ll-year-old's death, a 12-year-old
white classmate, who lived in the same apartment build-
ing, experienced a headache, sore throat and temperature
elevation to 1020. The following day, he consulted a
physician, who admitted the patient to the same hospital
with a clinical diagnosis of diphtheria because of bilat-
eral cervical adenopathy and exudative tonsillitis. Peni-
cillin and antitoxin were given immediately. Both C.
diphtheria and B hemolytic streptococci were reportedly
isolated from the throat culture. An electrocardiogram on
admission was negative. On December 4, a heart murmur
was heard; electrocardiogram revealed non-specific S-T
changes. One week later, the electrocardiogram tracing
was normal. The boy, who recovered, had never been
immunized against diphtheria.
The diphtheria cultures were not typed.
Cultures of all members of the families and the
classroom revealed no positive cultures for C. diphtheria.

(Reported by J. Clifford Todd, M.P.H., State Epidemi-
ologist, Kentucky Department of Health.)


DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE IN 10 U S. CITIES
Averaoe Number per Week by Four-Wek Perfods


INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES

The weekly average number of infant deaths in 108
cities for the foy-week period ending March 14 was 746
as compared with an expected 1 "-1 weekly average.


MJMBE
OF
orin


TOTAL DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR OF AGE RECORDED
IN 108 CITIES

Week EndnQ I
2 22 2 29 3 7 3 14 4 Week Total Weekly Average
Observed 759 737 750 736 2,982 746
Expeced 747 743 739 735 2,964 741
Excess 12 -6 11 1 18 5


g0o
'R R CPEdA


Numtw









1 m ..., r. ,
|g, PcE oplcnEW IM S__ca._fl IMS_-MI *fIcC


(See Table, page 91)


pomwD











88 Mlorbiiditl and Mlortalilt % cekll Report


hlbic 4 ( ASES OF SP(.IFIFI) NOTIFIABLF DISEASES I NITED STATES

FOR WX'EKs ENDED

MAR(H I. 1964 AND MARCH 16. 1963 ( Ilih WEEK)


( A ept EnLephalitii
A'eptic
Meningitis Primary Post-lnf. Poliomyelitis, Total Cases Poll omvelitls, Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative

196. 1963 1964 1964 196- 1Q63 1964 1963 196. 1963 1964 1963

UNITED STATES... 27 25 33 10 3 4 13 36 3 3 10 31

NTM ENGLAND.......... 1 3
Maine..............
NeW Hampshre ...... -
Vermont .............
Massachuse ...... -
Rhode Island....... 1 2
Connec cu ........ -- -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... I 4 9 3 3 5 3 5
New York City ...... 2 -
New York, Up-State. 4 1 2 2 2 4
New Jersey......... 1 1 -
Pennsylvania....... 5 1 I -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 5 6 4 6 1 9 1 7
Ohio ............... 1 3 2 -
Indiana............ -
Illinois........... 2 3 1 5 1 4
Michigan........... 2 5 2 2 2
Wisconsin.......... 1 1 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 2 1 2 1
Minnesota.......... 2 1 1
Iowa ............... -
Missouri .......... -
North Dakota...... -
South Dakota....... -
Nebraska............ -
Kansas ............... -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 2 7 2 1 8 3 2 5 2
Delaware.......... -
Maryland ...........
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia........... .. -
West Virginia...... 1 -
North Carolina..... 3 2 2
South Carolina..... -
Georgia............. 1 1 1 I 1 1 -
Florida............ I 1 5 1 3 1 3 -

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 2 2 -
Kentucky............ -
Tennessee..........
Alabama ............ 2 1
Mississippi .. .... -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 1 1 9 1 9
Arkansas............. -
Louisiana .......... 1 8 I 8
Oklahoma .......... -
Texas.............. 1 -

MOUNTAIN............. I 1 1 1 1
Montana............ .
Idaho.............. 1
Wyoming............. -
Colorado........... .
New Mexico.......... ..
Arizona..............
Utah.................
Nevada. ............

PACIFIC.............. 13 9 7 II 1 I 6 1 1 1 5
Washington......... I 2 1 I I -1
Oregon ..... ....... I -
California......... 13 8 5 1 I 1 4 1 1 3
Alaska ............. -
Hawaii .............. -

Puerto Rico -










Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 89


Tabic 3 CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MARCH 14. 1964 AND MARCH 16. 1963 ( Ilih WEEK) Coniinurd

Infectious Hepatitis
Brucellosts Diphtheria including Serum Hepatitil Typhoid Fever

Area Under 20 years Age
Cum. Cum. Total 20 years and over Unknown Cumulative Cum.

1964 1964 1964 1964 196. 1964 1964 196. 1964 1963 1964 196.

UNITED STATES... 6 78 3 41 903 451 385 67 10,349 12,052 6 69

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 86 37 46 3 1,215 1,564 1 6
Maine ............ 28 10 17 I 439 716
New Hampshire...... 5 2 3 114 106
Vermont............. 7 4 3 140 21
Massachusetts........ 1 24 13 10 1 230 472 3
Rhode Island ....... -- 47 35 1 3
Connecticut ........ 22 8 13 1 245 214 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 1 4 191 87 104 2,295 2,314 10
New York City...... 1 23 8 15 311 260 2
New York, Up-Stae. 73 48 25 1,059 1,080 3
New Jersey......... 2 46 15 31 364 354
Pennsylvania....... I 1 .9 16 33 561 620 5

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 12 6 142 88 51 3 1,507 1,927 1 13
Ohio................ 32 16 14 2 421 568 11
Indiana............ 1 17 14 2 1 128 157 1 1
Illinois........... 10 6 10 6 4 218 408 -
Michigan........... 67 38 29 660 690
Wisconsin.......... 1 6 1 4 2 80 104 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 44 8 53 23 22 8 653 519 2 7
Minnesota.......... 2 2 I 6 5 1 41 98
Iowa............... 20 14 3 9 2 104 85 2
Missouri........... 4 7 4 3 154 217 I
North Dakota....... I I 32 11 -
South Dakota....... 1 8 8 4 4 75 15 I
Nebraska........... 8 16 37
Kansas............. I I 7 17 12 5 231 56 2 3

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 4 1 9 103 60 40 3 1,001 1,298 16
Delaware............ 14 21
Maryland............ 28 20 8 181 124
Dist. of Columbia.. I 19 47 -
Virginia........... 2 13 5 5 3 152 303 2
West Virginia...... 16 12 4 181 185 -
North Carolina..... 1 21 16 5 193 357 9
South Carolina..... 1 2 4 2 2 34 59 I
Georgia............ 5 6 2 4 20 46 -
Florida............ 1 2 14 3 11 207 156 4

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 2 2 3 71 39 28 4 705 1,213 1 9
Kentucky............ 31 19 8 4 326 376 4
Tennessee.......... 1 18 11 7 235 464 1 4
Alabama............. 1 2 2 9 3 6 95 183 I
Mississippi........ I I 13 6 7 49 190 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 4 5 62 35 24 3 712 790 1 4
Arkansas............ 5 4 1 89 107 1
Louisiana.......... 1 2 25 15 9 1 140 126
Oklahoma........... I 3 1 2 43 49 1 3
Texas............... I I 3 29 15 12 2 440 508 -

HOUNTAIN ............. 7 74 22 10 42 716 917
Montana ............ 4 2 1 1 63 141 -
Idaho............... 5 5 55 140 -
Wyoming............. 3 1 1 1 29 9 -
Colorado............. 20 6 3 11 201 192 -
New Mexico........ 1 15 10 4 1 124 113 -
Arizona............ I 21 21 151 205 -
Utah............... 5 4 3 1 70 108 -
Nevada............. 2 2 23 9 -

PACIFIC.............. 4 5 121 60 60 1 1,545 1,510 4
Washington........... 5 11 5 6 165 263 -
Oregon............. 10 6 3 1 170 228 -
California......... 4 96 46 50 1,116 973 4
Alaska............. -4 3 1 55 38 -
Hawaii.............. 39 8

Puerto Rico 1 22 17 5 116 124 5










90 Morbidity and Morlalili Weekly Report


Tahlr CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

MAR( H 14. 1J64 AND MARCH 16. 1961 ( llih WEEK) Continucd


Streptococcal
MeninguL'ccca] Sore Throat and Rabies in
MAreil Meningitis Scarlet Fever Tetanus Tularemia Animals
Ar c---- ------------ .---- ---- ----,---- ---__ ________ __________
Cumulative Cum. Cam. Cum.
1964 1964 196' 1963 1964 1963 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964

INITED STATES.. 15.530 75 613 634 13.336 11,099 I 42 3 66 94 816

EW FN.LAND ......... 467 3 18 6 1.712 1.333 1
Maine .............. 73 I 9 373 1 1 -
New Hampshlr ...... 1 14 5 1
Vermont ............ 61 1 16 8 -
Massachusetts...... 152 1 8 18 296 232 -
Rhode Island....... 39 2 6 113 105 -
Connecticut........ 138 2 7 11 [00 872 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 2,178 3 63 83 695 733 19
New 'r*rk C ...... 665 9 10 3 7 -
New YorL Lip-State. 512 I 21 28 358 367 18
New Jersey......... 568 14 12 130 139
Pennsylvania....... -33 2 19 33 164 157 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... ,527 10 102 106 2,051 1.405 7 8 80
Ohio ............... 1,144 4 33 27 540 255 1 1 -39
Indiana............ 1,002 1 13 15 115 207 6
Illinois........... 813 2 22 15 264 235 2 4 4 11
Michigan ........... 890 2 28 34 715 '16 1 I 9
Wisconsin.......... 678 1 6 15 417 292 I 4 15

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 684 2 26 35 .10 293 2 2 21 28 251
Minnesota .......... 7 2 7 7 34 47 I 12 76
Iowa............... 360 2 180 109 9 81
Missour ........... 22 9 17 2 8 2 2 13 5 50
North Dakota....... 220 3 1 99 120 15
South Dakota ....... 2 17 2 1 16
Nebraska........... 75 I 8 -
Kansas.............. N 74 7 6 1 5

SOUTH ATLANTIC...... 1,612 21 145 138 1,35. 951 17 10 20 150
Delaware............ 8 2 25 -
Maryland........... 149 12 22 129 58 -
Dist. ol Columbia.. 36 I 3 3 7 -
Virginia........... 512 1 12 35 4 312 I 3 13 109
West Virginia...... 426 2 13 '9 62 234 1 7
North Carolina ..... 89 II 26 21 62 91 7 1 2
South Carolina..... 130 I 15 10 5. 25 -
Georgia............ 5 4 14 7 !4 6 3 15
Florida .............. 257 I 48 30 182 206 6 3 17

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2,540 6 48 49 2,433 2,105 5 15 18 138
Kentucky........... 763 1 8 16 717 207 -- 1 19
Tennessee.......... 1,110 2 24 22 1,613 1.564 2 10 17 116
Alabama............. 60 2 9 7 19 77 3 3 3
Missu ssipp .......... 607 1 7 4 8- 257 I

9EST SOUTH CENTRAL... 168 9 49 67 952 958 1 7 10 17 123
Arkansas........... .. 8 5- 5 27 I I 4 35
Louisiana.......... 2 9 42 22 9 q 3 1 11
Oklahoma............ 118 3 15 92 32 9 10
Texas.............. 25 824 913 1 3 12 67

MOUNTAIN.............. 765 3 29 20 1.770 1,780 2 1 3 1 28
Montana ............ 101 113 38 -
Idaho......... ...... Il 1 200 142 -
lyoming............ -I I 33 128 -
Colorado........... 86 1 7 3 560 720 -
New Mexico......... II 1 13 2 401 297 I 1 17
Arizona ......... ... 301 2 187 286 11
Utah...............*- I 33 I 9 276 163 1 -
Nevada ............ ... 122 1 6 -

PACIFIC .............. 2.589 18 133 90 1,959 1,541 -5 2 26
Washington......... 975 2 13 9 636 u60 -
Oregon ............. 222 1 5 4 53 27 -
California......... 1.358 15 110 73 1.134 835 5 2 26
Alaska............. 24 2 4 43 104 -- -
Hawaii............... 10 3 193 115 -

Puerto Rico 385 3 7 24 21 14 1 2











Mlorlidily and Mortality Weekly Report 91





TahkI 4 (() TOTAL DEATHS L NDER I YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING CITIES



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)0


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area I 2/29 I Area 2/22 2 37
2/22 2/29 3/7 3/14 __2/22 2/29 3/7 3/14


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass............... 15 13 14 15
Bridgeport, Conn.......... 2 4 3 3
Cambridge, Mass............ -
Fall River, Mass.......... 3 1 1
Hartford, Conn............. 2 2 5 5
Lowell, Mass.............. 2 2 2
Lynn, Mass................ 1 3
New Bedford, Mass.......... 2 3 1
New Haven, Conn........... 2 2 3 1
Providence, R.I........... 5 4 7 2
Somerville, Mass........... 1 -
Springfield, Mass......... 1 7 1 4
Waterbury, Conn............ 1 I
Worcester, Mass ........... 2 4 3

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y............... 2 3 2 2
Allentown, Pa............. 2 -
Buffalo, N.Y............... 8 8 6 9
Camden, N.J............... 5 2 2
Elizabeth, N.J............. 1 2 2
Erie, Pa.................. 2 3 1 1
Jersey City, N.J.......... 6 3 4 4
Newark, N.J............... 5 3 4 4
New York City, N.Y......... 93 106 85 91
Paterson, N.J............. 4 1 2 2
Philadelphia, Pa.......... 21 35 22 38
Pittsburgh, Pa............ 14 8 13 8
Reading, Pa............... I 2 1
Rochester, N.Y............. 5 8 6 10
Schenectady, N.Y......... -
Scranton, Pa.............. I 1 3 1
Syracuse, N.Y .............. 3 3 6 1
Trenton, N.J.............. 2 2 3 2
Utica, N.Y............... 2 1
Yonkers, N.Y............... 1 3

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio............... 3 3 2 6
Canton, Ohio.............. 1 I 3 -
Chicago, Il1............... 46 61 57 48*
Cincinnati, Ohio........... 10 6 II II
Cleveland, Ohio............ II 6 22 20
Columbus, Ohio............ 12 8 6 4
Dayton, Ohio.............. 6 3 8 7
Detroit, Mich............. 28 9 27 20
Evansville, Ind........... 2 7 1 4
Flint, Mich.......... ..... 5 3 8 7
Fort Wayne, Ind............ 1 1 3
Gary, Ind.................. 2 3 1 3*
Grand Rapids, Mich........ 3 2 4 5
Indianapolis, Ind......... 11 8 8 11
Madison, Wis............. 6 4 2 2
Milwaukee, Wis............ 10 16 7 13
Peoria, Ill............... 4 1 2
Rockford, 111............. 1 4 4 3
South Bend, Ind........... 6 2 2 1
Toledo, Ohio............... 4 4 6 3
Youngstown, Ohio........... 2 2 4 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa........... 4 7 1 4
Duluth, Minn.............. 1 3 1
Kansas City, Kans......... 4 7 6 5
Kansas City, Mo............ 8 3 10 3
Lincoln, Nebr............. 2 2 2
Minneapolis, Minn......... 6 4 7 3
Omaha, Nebr............... 9 3 3 9
St. Louis, Mo.............. 15 15 21 15
St. Paul, Minn............ 7 4 4 3
Wichita, Kans.............. 2 4 4 3

*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total,
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occnrrence.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.............. 8 15 8 19
Baltimore, Md............ 24 17 21 13
Charlotte, N.C........... 4 1 5 4
Jacksonville, Fla........ 4 2 6 2
Miami, Fla............... 3 7 5 1
Norfolk, Va.............. 2 4 8 7
Richmond, Va............. 11 9 6 8
Savannah, Ga.............. 6 9 -
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 3 1 2
Tampa, Fla............... 6 7 1 1
Washington, D.C.......... 18 21 25 4
Wilmington, Del.......... 3 2 5

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.......... 4 7 4 6
Chattanooga, Tenn ........ 4 2 6 4
Knoxville, Tent.......... 3 2 2 3
Louisville, Ky............ 15 8 6 5
Memphis, Tennm............ 13 11 15 8
Mobile, Ala.............. 5 2 4 1
Montgomery, Ala.......... 2 4 1 3
Nashville, Tenn.......... 4 3 4 6

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 2 1 4 1
Baton Rouge, La.......... 3 2 2
Corpus Christi, Tex ...... 3 6 1
Dallas, Tex.............. 9 14 9 7
El Paso, Tex ............. 5 1 7 6
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 6 9 2 11
Houston, Tex............. 17 21 10 8
Little Rock, Ark......... 3 6 1 4
New Orleans, La.......... 16 14 17 11
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 6 4 7 9
San Antonio, Tex......... 4 8 5 7
Shreveport, La........... 4 2 3 3
Tulsa, Okla.............. 6 7 3 2

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 2 1 6 3
Colorado Springs, Colo... 2 1 2 2
Denver, Colo............. 7 6 11 8
Ogden, Utah.............. 2 2 2
Phoenix, Ariz ............ 8 5 4 8
Pueblo, Colo............. 2 1 1 -
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 3 1 7 8
Tucson, Ariz............. 5 4 3 1

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 1 2
Fresno, Calif............ 3 5 2 -
Clendale, Calif.......... 1 2
Honolulu, Hawaii......... 2 2 6 1
Long Beach, Calif........ 5 5 5 4
Los Angeles, Calif....... 44 46 29 33
Oakland, Calif........... 9 3 9
Pasadena, Calif........... 1 2 2
Portland, Oreg........... 4 6 10 11
Sacramento, Calif........ 4 7 5 2
San Diego, Calif......... 5 5 11 14
San Francisco, Calif..... 8 7 7 9
San Jose, Calif.......... 3 2 5
Seattle, Wash............. 6 5 7 7
Spokane, Wash............ 2 3 2 4
Tacoma, Wash.............. 2 2 3 1

San Juan, P.R............... 1 2 4 (---)


oCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages...................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age.............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


12,041
575
736
6,844




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

II111111 lH111111111l H111111
3 1262 08864 3183


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

PLAGUE Tonganyiko
A total of IS cases of plague were reported in
February in the DiLrrict of Pare 'Tanga Province). All
but one of the cases were bubonic; the one pneumonic case
was fatal. The outbreak was confirmed by laboratory
studies.
The firs,, alleged cases occurred in Octoher 1961.
none was confirmed. Thereafter, a rat die-off was observed.
A sudden increase in human morbidiri began in late
January. Preventive measures, consisting of a quarantine
of the affected area, establishment of emergency treat-
ment centers, mass human prophylaxis with sulphonamides,
and insecticide dusting of every house, have been taken.
(Reported in Weekly Epidemiological Record, World Health
Organrizatirn. March 1 3).


In addition to the established procedures for reporting morbidity
and mortality, the Communicable Disease Center welcomes
accounts of interesting outbreaks or cases. Such accounts should
be addressed to.

Lawrence K. Altman, M D Editor
Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Communicable Disease Center
Atlanta. Georgia 30333



Notea These provi sonal data are baoed on weekly telegrams to the Communi-
coble Dimease Conter by the individual iate health departments.
Symbals -- Draa nor available
OQuanriy zero
Procedures for consnuctron of waorous morality curves mayh beob alned ftiom
Soatrrie Secrion. Communicoble Dinease Center, Public Healh Service,
U S. Depoalrnt of Health. Education. and Welfare. Atlanta. CGorgia 03311.


UNIV or PL LIB
DOCLMEkA13 DEPT.





US DEPOS;TORY


The Morbidity and Morrolriy Weekly Report, with a circulation
of 10,500 is published by the Communicable Disease Center,
Atlanta, Georgia.


Chief, Communicable Disease Center
Chief, Ep.demiology Branch
Chief, Statistics Section
Asst. Chief, Statistics Section
Chief, Surveillance Section
Editor, MMWR


James L. Goddard, M.D.
A. D. Langmuir, M.D.
R. E. Seril.ng, Ph.D.
I. L. Sherman, M.S.
D. A. Henderson, M.D
L. K. Airman. M D.


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