Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00418

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


Fs C.


COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER


Vol. 14, No. 5


""d7Lrf


Al.. i .


Week Ending


S i .. .. = February 6, 1965




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, CATION D WELFARE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


INFLUENZA AND INFLUENZA-LIKE I ETSSFE16 "COTE rO\ lE\
\ r l ll-,, I,,, L- 'i ,rk r r t
MMARY: United States rV II imp. h. \l-- uri Mi-- '- *Ii ........... -,
Group A influenza infection- h \a e been co mefd '.n rn.mii.,r, .. . . .
oratory methods in 7 State~ since early Janu ......... . ... .
ito to o rIns. ..ple.vui-oh irllp- . .. .. .
ton to outbreaks previously reported n Mane, New Deaths in 122 United States Cities. . 47


Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and
Missouri (MMWhR, Vol. 14, Nos. 3 and 4), additional lab-
oratory confirmed influenza has occurred in New York
Sta(e and Vermont. Influenza-like illness has been observed
in focal outbreaks in Mississippi and New Hampshire.
Laboratory confirmation of these outbreaks is in process.


At present, A2 influenza virus isolates have been
obtained only in Pennsylvania and New York State. The
outbreaks continue to be scattered and focal within the
involved States. With the exception of Mississippi and
Missouri, all States reporting outbreaks thus far are
(Continued on page JS)


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)

5th Week Ended Cumulative, First 5 Weeks
Disease Median
February 6, February 1, 10 1 Median
1965 1964 1965 1964 1960 1964

Aseptic meningitis .......... 17 19 23 143 136 130
Brucellosis ................ 8 8 21 27 27
Diphtheria ................ 2 4 13 15 22 73
Encephalitis, primary infectious.. 24 29 147 139 --
Encephalitis, post.infectious. .... 16 8 68 31 .
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis .......... 891 983 1,225 3,995 4,465 5,321
Measles .. .. . 7,994 7,123 9,793 34,387 29,002 40,656
Meningococcal infections ... 61 67 59 319 272 269
Poliomyelitis, Total ......... 8 1 5 46
Paralytic ............... 3 1 3 29
Nonparalytic ............ -.. 2
Unspecified ...... .- -
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever . ... 11,713 10,212 9,590 51,299 44,074 42,349
Tetanus ................. 5 4 ... 17 24
Tularemia ................ 2 3 ... 31 39 *-
Typhoid fever ........ ... .6 17 9 32 35 35
Rabies in Animals .... .... .90 74 73 458 318 301

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 1 Rabies in Man:
Botulism: Smallpox: -
Leptospirosis: Ohio 1 3 Trichinosis: R.I. 1 18
Malaria: Conn. 1 1 Typhus -
Plague: Murine: Conn. -1 1
Psittacosis: 2 Rky. Mt. Spotted: Pa. 2, Tenn. 1 6


14-


SUl

lab
add


S.. .


,h.r
. ... .: .. ... .: /
-., .." ". ,.. '" ,'


o/q:.' ,/A








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


INFLUENZA AND INFLUENZA-LIKE ILLNESS
Summary: United States Continued

located in the New England and Middle Atlantic areas.
Attention is again called to the charted influenza and
pneumonia mortality data reported to CDC from 122 United
States cities. It is apparent that the reported influenza
and pneumonia deaths in the New England cities, barely
below the epidemic threshold last week, is clearly elevated
above the threshold this week. This elevation most likely
reflects the increased influenza activity already observed
in this area.
In addition, a rise and subsequent fall in influenza and
pneumonia deaths occurred in the Middle Atlantic States
during January.


EPIDEMIOLOGIC REPORTS
INFLUENZA State Reports

New York
Upper respiratory illness has been prevalent throughout
the State during the past weeks. There has, however,
been no significant absenteeism in schools or industry to
date. Well localized, sharply defined outbreaks of febrile
upper respiratory illness have not been observed. Three
A2 influenza viruses have been isolated from sporadic
cases during mid-January in Albany and Columbia Counties.
(Reported by Dr. Robert M. Albrecht, Director, Epi-
demiology Division, New York State Departmentof Health).

Vermont
Since mid-January, outbreaks of acute febrile res-
piratory disease with systemic symptoms have been
noticed in Windsor, Windham, and Orange Counties. This
illness is reflected in school absenteeism varying from
17 to 41 percent.
Serologic confirmation of influenza A has been
reported from Addison and Windsor Counties. Virus iso-
lation attempts are pending.
(Reported by Dr. Linus J. Leavens, Director, Division
of Communicable Disease Control, Vermont Department
of Health).


New Hampshire
A general increase of influenza-like illness has been
noticed in New Hampshire during the past few weeks.
School Absenteeism has been increased in Concord, with
some school closures in Manchester. Pediatricians in the
Keene area have noticed increased numbers of "flu-like"
illnesses and have obtained laboratory specimens which
are now being processed.
(Reported by Dr. Mary Atchison, Director, Division of
Public Health, New Hampshire State Department of Health).


Missouri
A2 influenza has been identified in two patients
by means of hemagglutination inhibition tests. These
cases of febrile upper respiratory infection occurred in
Princeton, Missouri.
(Reported by CDC Kansas City Field Station)



Mississippi
A focal outbreak of acute febrile respiratory disease
was reported from the rural area of Rankin County on
January 25. The illness was characterized by rapid onset,
fever, chills, headache, arthralgias and upper respiratory
symptoms. School absenteeism ranged from 15 percent to
20 percent. The first appearance of disease was noticed
in school age children, however, sizable numbers of
secondary cases in families are now being observed.
Serologic confirmation of this outbreak is in process.
The remainder of the State has not experienced an
excess occurrence of respiratory illness.
(Reported by Durward L. Blakey, M.D., Director, Division
of Preventable Disease Control, Mississippi State Board
of Health).



INTERNATIONAL NOTES

INFLUENZA

EUROPE

Eastern Germany
(Information on January 29, 1965). The WHO Re-
gional Virus Reference Laboratory, Prague, has reported
by telephone to the WHO that outbreaks of influenza-like
illness occurred early in January in Eastern Germany,
mainly in the North towards the Baltic coast. Many scat-
tered outbreaks have been observed. Serological evidence
of infection with virus A2 has been obtained and4 strains
of virus A2 have been isolated by laboratories in Eastern
Germany.

France
(Information on January 25, 1965). Serological
evidence of infection with virus A2 was obtained in Paris
and the Paris region, and also in the East, West and Cen-
ter of the country. Serological evidence of infection with
virus B was obtained in Paris and its suburbs, and in the
North-East of the country (Aisne department).

(Reported in the Weekly Epidemiological Record of the
World Health Organization, February 5, 1965)


(Continued on page 46)










Morbidity and Mortality W weekly Report



PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES


ALL
CITIES


40 44 48 52 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 53 4 8 12 16
6 3 1 29 26 23 23 20 18 15 13 10 7 5 2 30 28 25 22 21 18 16 13 11 8 5 3 31 28 2 30 27 27 24
O N D J F M A M J J A SO N DJ F M A M J A S 0 ND J F MA
1962 11963 196311964 1964 1965


20 24 28 32 36
22 19 17 14 11
M J A S


125-
W.N. 200-
1oo- CENTRAL
10 CITIES 15o
75-

---5 100


25- 5 50


WK. NO 40 44 48 3 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32
1964 1965
150"
100- MOUNTAIN

8 CITIES 125-

75-
100-


50 75-

250-

25- 25-


WK. NO


200-



150-



100-



50-


E.S.
CENTRAL
8 CITIES


250"


200

150

00"

p50-


40 44 4853 4 812 620 2 28 32 40 44 48 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32
1964 1965 1964 1965


PACI F IC
16 CITIES


W.S.
CENTRAL
13 CITIES


NEW
ENGLAND
14 CITIES


MIDDLE
ATLANTIC
20 CITIES


40 44 48 53 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36
1964 1965


SOUTH
ATLANTIC
12 CITIES


0 L I I ....I .I ..I ... I. .. 1111 1
40 44 48 53 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36
1964 1965


i,
AEEK NO
AK ENDED
MONTH


i 1 I I I i I I I I I I I t I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ( I I I I I I I I I II I I ) I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II





I~L~I A 1~L \


1 i 1 1 1 i I i









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


RUBELLA IN CONTACTS OF INFANTS WITH
RUBELLA-ASSOCIATED ANOMALIES


Nine cases of rubella among medical personnel
caring for infants with rubella-associated anomalies have
recently been documented by a group at the New York
University School of Medicine. Demonstration further that
a large proportion of children with rubella-associated
anomalies excrete rubella virus, sometimes for long
periods following birth, indicates that the risk of acquired
infection from these children may be high indeed.
The group at the New York University School of
Medicine has recently studied more than 100 infants with
congenital defects thought to be caused by rubella infec-
tion acquired in utero. An interfering agent with properties
characteristic of rubella virus has been isolated from
throat swabs, urine specimens and/or rectal swabs ob-
tained from 60-70% of these patients. Although the well-
recognized "classical" defects such as congenital heart
disease and cataracts have been seen most frequently,
more obscure conditions such as thrombocytopenic pur-
pura and/or splenomegaly without any detectable anomaly
have also been associated with viral excretion.
In questioning some of the nursery and pediatric ward
personnel who have cared for these infants at hospitals
throughout New York City, they encountered 8 nurses and
1 resident physician who developed an illness typical of
rubella with an onset of symptoms approximately two to
three weeks after close and prolonged physical contact
with these babies (see table).
In two nurses, the diagnosis of rubella was confirmed
by isolation of virus from throat swabs obtained at the
time of rash (cases 1 & 9). Rubella in another nurse (case
4) was followed by a similar illness in her room-mate 14
and 18 days later. The resident physician's illness pre-
ceded rubella in his wife and small child by 16 days.
Of particular significance is the fact that certain of
the infants excreted virus for a number of months. In Case
3 for example, the defective infant was almost 9 months
old at the time of contact with nurse Day.

Typical cases are summarized:

Case 1. Bar., a 30-year-old married nurse, was
exposed to many pregnant patients with rubella
in the spring of 1964 when she worked in the
Obstetrics Clinic. In August 1964, she was
transferred to the Premature Nursery. On Novem-
ber 23, she admitted a newborn infant with typical
rubella-associated defects and cared for this
infant daily thereafter. On December 16, she
developed typical rubella manifested by a mac-
ulopapular rash, occipital, post-auricular, cer-
vical, axillary and inguinal adenopathy, and low
grade fever. The diagnosis was confirmed by


isolation of virus from her throat swab on the
third day of rash. Rubella virus had previously
been detected in throat and rectal swabs ob-
tained from the infant.

Case 4. Dow., a 33-year-old single nurse, cared
for a newborn infant with severe rubella embry-
opathy on October 25 and 26, 1964 prior to leaving
for vacation. On November 16, while still on
vacation, she developed rubella characterized by
a rash which persisted for 3 days, occipital and
post-auricular lymph adenopathy, and painful
swelling of her interphalangeal joints and wrists.
The arthritis cleared after 48 hours. Her room-
mate, a nurse who worked in another unit at the
same hospital, developed a similar illness with
rash, adenopathy and joint manifestations 14 to
16 days later. The newborn infant was shown to
be excreting rubella virus in throat swab and
urine specimens.

Case 8. Sha., a 28-year-old pediatric resident,
was exposed on November 10, 1964, to a one
month old infant with "rubella syndrome", char-
acterized by congenital heart disease and cata-
racts. He examined this infant regularly until
November 29, when he developed rubella mani-
fested by rash, adenopathy and back pain. Six-
teen days later, his wife and child also developed
typical rubella. The defective infant was still a
virus-excretor when last studied at the age of
2% months. No attempt was made to isolate virus
from the pediatric resident or his family.

Two features common to the 9 cases described pro-
vide strong circumstantial evidence implicating these
virus-excreting infants as the source of rubella infection.
One is the incubation period, an appropriate 2 to 3 weeks
after intimate contact. The second is the low incidence
of rubella in the general community at the present time.
In view of these observations, it is recommended that
infants born with rubella-associated anomalies be managed
with the same precautions employed for patients with
rubella. It obviously is most important for women in the
first trimester of pregnancy to avoid exposure to these
infants.

(Report submitted by Louis Z. Cooper, M.D., Robert H.
Green, M.D., Saul Krugman, M.D., Joan P. Giles, M.D.
and George S. Mirick, M.D. Departments of Medicine and
Pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine,
New York, N.Y.)








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


HOSPITAL PERSONNEL DEVELOPING RUBELLA AFTER CARING FOR
INFANTS WITH "RUBELLA SYNDROME"


Name Occuation Sex Time of Intimate Contact with Time of Onset
Name Occupation .\' Sex
Possible Virus-Extrl ing Irinfnl- of Rash

1. Bar* Nurse 30 F November 23 December 15 December 16

2. Col. Nurse 21 F December 7 December 24 December 2-.

3. Dav. Nurse -'in F September 10 October 2! November 2

4. Dow. Nurse F October 25 October 26 November 9

4. Edw. Nurse F October 2. December 4 December 5
6. Fie. Nurse 21 F Augu-t 22 November 5 November 6
7. Gre. Nurse 2.1 F December 18 January 8 January 9

8. Sha. Physician 2_ M November 10 November 28 November 29

9. Woi.* Nurse 26 F December 15 January 10** January 18


* Rubella virus isolated from throat swab at time of illness.

** Infant with multiple, classical rubella anomalies and history of maternal
rubella during first trimester of pregnancy.


INTERNATIONAL NOTES

INFLUENZA


(Continued from page 4,)


U.S.S.R.
(Information on January 29, 1965). Outbreaks of
influenza have been reported by telephone to the WHO by
the WHO Virus Reference Center in Moscow. The prelimi-
nary reports from Moscow indicate that an epidemic began
in Leningrad about January 9, reached its peak about
January 18 and is now declining. Some thousands of cases
occurred but the incidence was less than in the epidemic
there 3 years ago. Many of the cases were in children.
The disease was not severe.
Within the past few days, a sharp increase in influenza-
like illness has also been reported from Archangelsk in
the North, Khabarovsk in the East, and from Tallin, Riga
and Moscow.
Influenza virus A2 was isolated from cases in Lenin-
grad and Moscow. The primary isolations were made with
some difficulty. The strains have been sent to the 2 Inter-
national Influenza Centers (London and Atlanta) for further
study.


Since December about 4 million people in the USSR
have been vaccinated with live influenza vaccine. Because
of the low incidence of influenza in the past 2 or 3 years
in the USSR, it was thought that an epidemic might occur
this year and clinics and hospitals increased their sup-
plies of antibiotics and other drugs as a precaution.




ASIA

Japan
(Information on February 1, 1965). Sporadic out-
breaks of influenza-like illness are being reported. A
strain of influenza virus A2 has been isolated from a case
in a Tokyo suburb.

(Reported in the Weekly Epidemiological Record of the
World Health Organization, February 5, 1965)









SUMMARY OF REPORTED CASES OF INFECTIOUS SYPHILIS JANUARY 1965 JANUARY 1964


CASES OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SYPHILIS:


BY REPORTING AREA, JANUARY 1965 AND JANUARY 1964 PROVISIONAL DATA


Cumulative Cumulative
Reporting Area January January Reporting Area January January
1965 1964 1965 1964 1965 1964 1965 1964


NEW ENGLAND..............
Maine....................
New Hampshire............
Vermont .................
Massachusetts............
Rhode Island.............
Connecticut .............

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...........
Upstate New York........
New York City.............
Pa. (Excl. Phila.).......
Philadelphia............
New Jersey...............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL........
Ohio .....................
Indiana..................
Downstate Illinois.......
Chicago..................
Michigan.................
Wisconsin................

WEST NORTH CENTRAL........
Minnesota ............
Iowa.... .................
Missouri.................
North Dakota.............
South Dakota.............
Nebraska ................
Kansas ...................


SOUTH ATLANTIC............
Delaware.................
Maryland ................
District of Columbia.....
Virginia.................
West Virginia...........
North Carolina...........
South Carolina...........
Georgia............ ......
Florida..................


391
57
210
12
21
91

197
52
12
10
68
52
3

51
7
5
20

9
6
4

547
12
38
46
36
1
67
48
87
212


394
31
252
16
12
83

227
39
3
20
87
74
4

40
7
4
18

4
5
2

567
5
37
44
37
4
65
77
95
203


391
57
210
12
21
91

197
52
12
10
68
52
3

51
7
5
20

9
6
4

547
12
38
46
36
1
67
48
87
212


EAST SOUTH CENTRAL........
Kentucky.................
Tennessee................
Alabama...............
Mississippi..............

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL.........
Arkansas.................
Louisiana...............
Oklahoma...............
Texas....................

MOUNTAIN ................
Montana.................
Idaho ...................
Wyoming ................
Colorado...............
New Mexico...............
Arizona ...............
Utah.....................
Nevada...................

PACIFIC...................
Washington ..............
Oregon...................
California..............
Alaska.................
Hawaii ..............

U. S. TOTAL..............


191
12
63
14
102

44
1
1

2
9
20
6
5

172
9
4
157
1
1


1,897


179
14
49
9
107

49

2

1
24
13
4
5

243
8
8
223
2
2


1.823


1.897


179
14
49
9
107

49

2

1
24
13
4
5

243
8
8
223
2
2

1.823


TERRITORIES............... 63 65 63 65
Puerto Rico.............. 62 63 62 63
Virgin Islands........... 1 2 1 2




Note: Cumulative Totals include revised and delayed reports
through previous months.








Morbidity and Mortality N weekly Report


DEATHS IN 122 UNITED STATES CITIES THROUGH THE WEEK ENDING FEBRUARY 6, 1965


ALL CAUSES
ALL AGES


ALL CAUSES
AGE 65 AND OVER


PNEUMONIA-INFLUENZA
ALL AGES I


WEEK NO 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 53 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52
WK.ENDED 26 23 23 20 18 15 13 10 7 5 2 30 28 25 22 21 18 16 13 11 8 5 3 31 28 2 30 27 27 24 22 19 17 14 11 9 6 4 I
MONTH J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A ND J F M A M J J A S O N D J
1963 1964 1965










48 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report



Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 6, 1965 AND FEBRUARY 1, 1964 (5TH WEEK)


SEncephalitis Poliomyelitis Diphtheria
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Total Cases Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative Cum.
1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 17 19 24 16 1 5 1 3 2 15

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 2 1 -
Maine.............. -. .
New Hampshire...... .
Vermont.............. -
Massachusetts ..... 1 1 -
Rhode Island....... -
Connecticut........ 1 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 3 2 2 2 1
New York City...... 2 1 -
New York, Up-State. 1 1 2 -
New Jersey ......... 1 -
Pennsylvania...... 1 -

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 2 9 3 1
Ohio................ 2
Indiana ............ 1
Illinois........... 2 -
Michigan............ 1 1 5 1 .
Wisconsin.......... 1 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 1 1 2 3
Minnesota.......... -
Iowa................ .. .
Missouri............ .- -
North Dakota....... 1 -
South Dakota....... .
Nebraska............. -
Kansas ............. 1 1 -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 3 4 3 3 2 4
Delaware.......... 2 -
Maryland........... -
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 -
Virginia........... 1 -
West Virginia...... -
North Carolina..... 1 1
South Carolina..... -
Georgia............. .
Florida............ 1 2 1 2 2 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 1 1 1 2
Kentucky............ -i .
Tennessee.......... 1 -
Alabama............ 1 1 1
Mississippi........ -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 2 2 1 1 -1 4
Arkansas............ 1
Louisiana.......... I I
Oklahoma...........
Texas................ 1 2 3

MOUNTAIN............. 4 1 -
Montana............
Idaho...............
Wyoming..............
Colorado............. 4 1
New Mexico..........
Arizona............ -
Utah................ .- -
Nevada.............

PACIFIC................ 7 1 4 10 1 -
Washington ......... 1 -
Oregon.............. 1 -
California.......... 6 1 2 9 1 1 -
Alaska............. -
Hawaii.............. 1 -

Puerto Rico 1 1











Morbidity and Mortality weekly Report 49


Table J. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIAIII DISEASES: UNITED STATES

()R I I kll ENDED

HHBRUARY 6, 1965 AND FEBRUARY 1, 1964 (5TH W~I K) CONTINUEDD


Brucel- Infectious Hepatitis Meningooccal
loss including Setum Hepatitis Infections Tett1nu
Area Total Under 20 years Cumulative
incl. unk. 20 years and over Totals Cumulative Cum.
1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1964 1965 1965

UNITED STATES... 891 516 333 3,995 4,465 61 319 272 5 17

NEW ENGLAND.......... 64 30 30 252 560 1 16 8 1
Maine.............. 15 12 3 59 226 4 -
New Hampshire...... 5 1 4 20 63 1
Vermont............. 9 2 4 29 59 -
Massachusetts...... 15 9 5 72 105 1 8 1
Rhode Island....... 11 1 10 29 22 1 2
Connecticut ....... 9 5 4 43 85 3 5 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC..... 164 105 59 794 1,012 8 44 37 1
New York City...... 23 5 18 128 139 1 10 7
New York, Up-State. 86 70 16 380 504 1 9 13 1
New Jersey......... 15 3 12 97 144 5 17 5
Pennsylvania....... 40 27 13 189 225 1 8 12

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 183 117 58 741 631 7 40 36
Ohio............... 58 33 23 248 185 2 15 13
Indiana............ 15 8 7 44 44 1 6 4 -
Illinois........... 55 40 11 146 76 1 9 8
Michigan........... 47 30 17 257 299 2 6 10 -
Wisconsin.......... 8 6 46 27 1 4 1 -

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 60 33 22 293 263 3 17 10 2
Minnesota......... 6 4 24 15 3 3 1
Iowa................ 29 17 11 145 40 -
Missouri........... 8 5 1 48 55 3 9 5 1
North Dakota....... 2 17 3 1 -
South Dakota....... 1 1 5 17 -
Nebraska........... 1 1 6 / -
Kansas............. 15 11 4 63 112 2 1

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 61 33 23 385 429 9 70 66 1 6
Delaware........... 2 2 7 3 2 -
Maryland............ 13 8 5 71 79 3 9 1 1
Dist. of Columbia.. 1 1 4 8 1 2 -
Virginia............... 11 3 4 70 49 3 12 6 1
West Virginia...... 17 16 1 91 67 6 4
North Carolina..... 9 3 6 49 102 4 13 8 -
South Carolina..... 2 2 13 14 5 12
Georgia............. 20 9 1 13 6 3
Florida............ 6 1 4 60 98 14 21 1

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 76 51 22 248 326 6 21 22 1
Kentucky........... 29 19 7 90 168 7 5 -
Tennessee.......... 22 16 6 87 100 3 7 10 1
Alabama............ 16 9 7 44 40 3 7 6 -
Mississippi........ 9 7 2 27 18 1 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL .. 84 39 37 406 275 8 37 38 2 3
Arkansas........... 15 8 7 51 45 1 3 4 1 1
Louisiana.......... 12 6 6 59 43 5 11 13
Oklahoma........... 2 1 23 15 6 2 -
Texas.............. 55 25 23 273 172 2 17 19 1 2

MOUNTAIN............. 39 22 8 205 299 2 10 15 1 1
Montana............. 9 6 3 24 30 -
Idaho............... 1 37 22 1
Wyoming............ 2 2 16 3 1 -
Colorado........... 11 6 4 20 66 1 6 1 1
New Mexico......... 4 4 35 68 5 5 -
Arizona............ 6 47 62 2 -
Utah............... 5 4 1 24 42 1 1 1 -
Nevada............. 1 2 6 1 1 1

PACIFIC.............. 160 86 74 671 670 17 64 40 1 2
Washington......... 11 4 7 59 82 3 -
Oregon.............. 10 7 3 63 60 1 3 -
California......... 122 66 56 491 484 16 60 34 1 2
Alaska............. 17 9 8 53 31 1 1
Hawaii ............. 5 13 2 -

Puerto Rico 19 15 4 46 30 2 4 4











50 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

FEBRUARY 6, 1965 AND FEBRUARY 1, 1964 (5TH WEEK) CONTINUED


Strept.
Measles Sore Th. & Tularemia Typhoid Fever Rabies in
Scarlet Fev. Animals
Area
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1965 1965 1964 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965 1965
UNITED STATES... 7,994 34,387 29,002 11,713 2 31 6 32 90 458

NEW ENGLAND........... 1,751 8,860 1,762 973 1 7
Maine............... 163 1,067 173 39 -
New Hampshire...... 21 156 11 5 -
Vermont............. 73 101 478 42 1 6
Massachusetts...... 1,083 5,192 312 141 -
Rhode Island....... 196 1,027 107 30 -
Connecticut........ 215 1,317 681 716 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 211 1,170 5,756 546 2 3 16
New York City...... 18 138 2,231 24 1 -
New York, up-State. 40 382 1,242 337 1 3 14
New Jersey......... 36 202 1,047 74 -
Pennsylvania....... 117 448 1,236 111 2

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 1,446 5,993 5,782 1,278 2 3 5 22
Ohio................ 156 1,157 864 222 -
Indiana............ 57 266 1,248 245 4
Illinois........... 50 197 1,824 208 1 1 1 3
Michigan........... 895 3,199 1,356 407 1 1 3 7
Wisconsin.......... 288 1,174 490 196 1 1 8

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 554 2,481 711 477 2 1 15 85
Minnesota.......... 18 51 9 5 7 26
Iowa................ 119 1,198 222 99 24
Missouri............ 81 256 86 49 1 1 11
North Dakota....... 321 863 385 207 1 7
South Dakota....... 3 23 3 37 3 6
Nebraska........... 12 90 6 -4
Kansas............. NN NN NN 80 I 4 7

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 1,189 5,068 3,303 1,671 1 12 2 11 16 70
Delaware........... 8 74 32 9 1 -
Maryland............ 21 76 554 373 1 4 2
Dist. of Columbia.. 6 9 55 14 -
Virginia........... 136 721 693 295 3 1 1 15 57
West Virginia...... 965 3,783 1,067 648 1 1
North Carolina..... 19 89 102 10 2 4 -
South Carolina..... 2 40 528 38 2 -
Georgia............. 94 89 2 1 5 4
Florida............. 32 182 183 282 1 6

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 426 1,797 3,803 1,583 1 8 2 30 167
Kentucky............ 59 143 2,005 128 1 6
Tennessee.......... 252 1,188 1,586 1,304 1 6 1 30 156
Alabama............ 109 332 103 41 1 1 5
Mississippi........ 6 134 109 110 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 929 3,053 1,984 1,181 6 8 13 62
Arkansas........... 15 40 84 10 3 3 3 10
Louisiana.......... 2 7 4 1 2 19
Oklahoma............ 8 29 18 139 3 1 3 11
Texas............... 904 2,977 1,878 1,032 3 5 22

MOUNTAIN............. 694 3,000 1,267 1,616 3 1 3 7 14
Montana............. 292 1,117 336 84 1 2
Idaho............... 73 433 193 218 -
Wyoming............. 35 91 12 56 1
Colorado............ 55 357 146 552 -
New Mexico......... 7 60 53 253 1 -
Arizona............. 16 73 365 199 1 1 6 12
Utah............... 213 863 109 253 3 -
Nevada............... 3 6 53 1 -

PACIFIC.............. 794 2,965 4,634 2,388 1 2 15
Washington.......... 209 832 1,619 430 -
Oregon.............. 113 586 559 29 -
California......... 398 1,206 2,021 1,731 1 1 15
Alaska.............. 8 33 404 83 -
Hawaii............ 66 308 31 115 1 -

Puerto Rico 22 127 323 10 1 1

















Week No. Table 4. I. ATHS IN 122 I'NI' ED STATES ( I'll H)R WEEK INI)1I) FEBRUARY 6. 1965


(By place of occurrence


and week of filing cert ificate. Excludes etal deaths)


Area


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass. --------
Bridgeport, Conn.-----
Cambridge, Mass.------
Fall River, Mass.-----
Hartford, Conn.-------
Lowell, Mass.---------
Lynn, Mass.-----------
New Bedford, Mass.----
New Haven, Conn.------
Providence, R. I.----
Somerville, Mass.-----
Springfield, Mass.----
Waterbury, Conn.------
Worcester, Mass.------

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N. Y.---------
Allentown, Pa.--------
Buffalo, N. Y.--------
Camden, N. J.----------
Elizabeth, N. J.------
Erie, Pa.-------------
Jersey City, N. J.----
Newark, N. J.---------
New York City, N. Y.--
Paterson, N. J.-------
Philadelphia, Pa.-----
PFittburgh, Pa.--------
Reading, Pa.----------
Rochester, N. Y.------
Schenectady, N. Y.----
Scranton, Pa.---------
Syracuse, N. Y.-------
Trenton, N. J.---------
Utica, N. Y.----------
Yonkers, N. Y.--------

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio-----------
Canton, Ohio----------
Chicago, Ill.---------
Cincinnati, Ohio------
Cleveland, Ohio--------
Columbus, Ohio--------
Dayton, Ohio----------
Detroit, Mich.---------
Evansville, Ind.------
Flint, Mich.----------
Fort Wayne, Ind.------.
Gary, Ind.------------
Grand Rapids, Mich.---
Indianapolis, Ind.----
Madison, Wis.---------
Milwaukee, Wis.-------
Peoria, Ill.----------
Rockford, Ill.--------
South Bend, Ind.------
Toledo, Ohio----------
Youngstown, Ohio------

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa------
Duluth, Minn.---------
Kansas City, Kans.----
Kansas City, Mo.------
Lincoln, Nebr.--------
Minneapolis, Minn.----
Omaha, Nebr.----------
St. Louis, Mo.--------
St. Paul, Minn.-------
Wichita, Kans.--------


Al -,- I[


All
Ages


65 years
and over


and
Influenza
All Ages


1 year
All
Causes


All
Ages


65 years
and over


r I 1 1 1 II .


933
317
57
29
33
63
44
28
30
62
73
15
65
42
75

3,646
53
48
168
38
46
41
94
125
1,821
52
500
236
70
93
26
48
72
47
45
23

2,725
66
38
825
151
201
128
81
404
48
62
57
22
51
166
26
122
36
19
48
104
70

928
64
36
48
149
34
128
68
274
88
39


626
199
37
24
22
36
28
20
22
44
49
13
47
32
53

2,172
31
30
106
23
33
28
48
67
1,056
30
304
133
41
69
19
31
44
26
34
19

1,537
35
20
456
91
107
78
53
221
32
35
36
7
32
84
10
77
18
7
28
63
47

573
47
26
25
101
22
81
38
155
52
26


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.-----------
Baltimore, Md.---------
Charlotte, N. C.-------
Jacksonville, Fla.-----
Miami, Fla.------------
Norfolk, Va.-----------
Richmond, Va.----------
Savannah, Ga.----------
St. Petersburg, Fla.---
Tampa, Fla.------------
-l.ibr t. i,, D. C.------
Wilmington, Del.-------

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala.-------
Chattanooga, Tenn.-----
Knoxville, Tenn.-------
Louisville, Ky.--------
Memphis, Tenn.---------
Mobile, Ala.-----------
Montgomery, Ala.-------
Nashville, Tenn.-------

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.-----------
Baton Rouge, La.-------
Corpus Christi, Tex.---
Dallas, Tex.-----------
El Paso, Tex.*---------
Fort Worth, Tex.-------
Houston, Tex.----------
Little Rock, Ark.------
New Orleans, La.-------
Oklahoma City, Okla.---
San Antonio, Tex.------
Shreveport, La.--------
Tulsa, Okla.-----------

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex.---
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Denver, Colo.----------
Ogden, Utah------------
Phoenix, Ariz.---------
Pueblo, Colo.----------
Salt Lake City, Utah---
Tucson, Ariz.----------

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.-------
Fresno, Calif.---------
Glendale, Calif.-------
Honolulu, Hawaii-------
Long Beach, Calif.-----
Los Angeles, Calif.----
Oakland, Calif.--------
Pasadena, Calif.-------
Portland, Oreg.--------
Sacramento, Calif ..----
San Diego, Calif.------
San Francisco, Calif.--
San Jose, Calif.-------
Seattle, Wash.---------
Spokane, Wash.---------
Tacoma, Wash.----------


1,284
145
298
38
83
107
57
87
34
85
78
226
46

599
77
55
34
111
157
48
33
84

1,120
42
34
23
160
39
83
189
66
200
62
131
47
44

366
28
15
119
15
95
16
35
43

1,727
21
47
36
46
71
704
105
20
99
69
84
192
33
129
39
32


663
62
169
19
39
58
22
49
15
65
35
103
27

312
42
35
25
57
77
17
13
46

563
26
19
13
84
19
49
86
28
91
22
76
21
29

190
15
11
58
9
50
10
18
19

1,024
14
20
28
25
44
409
68
12
64
42
43
105
22
73
31
24


and
Influenza
All Ages


I-


Total 13,328 7,660 630 822

Cumulative Totals
including reported corrections for previous weeks

All Causes, All Ages -------------------------68,703
All Causes, Age 65 and over------------------- 39,190
Pneumonia and Influenza, All Ages------------- 3,226
All Causes, Under 1 Year of Age--------------- 4,094


I year
All
Causes

93
20
13
6
4
6
6
5

1
3
28
1

44
1
6
1
3
20
5
5
3

107
4
4
2
14
6
13
10
8
26
6
8
5
1

23
4

8

7

2
2

108
2
9
1
4
5
52
3
1
5
5
1
9
3
5
2
1


Mlorbidity amil Mortalilt 1ee kl Relport









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

B 1 2 ill 111111111llll ll 1ill lll1 lit lli l1
3 1262 08864 2649


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES


Immunization Information for International Travel
1963-64 edition Public Health Service Publication No. 384


Section 5


ASIA
Saudi Arabia, page 53


Delete NOTE and insert:

During the period 5 November 1964 to 30 April 1965 (sea-
son of periodic mass congregations):

Cholera All arrivals are required to possess a certifi-
cate showing 2 injections at one week's interval;
one injection given before the expiry of the validity
of the certificate extends the validity for a further
period of 6 months. All arrivals from infected areas
must further possess a certificate showing that prior
to arrival they have spent 5 days in an area free of
cholera (time spent on board a vessel may be con-
sidered as a period spent in a cholera-free area).



The following information should be added to the list of
Yellow Fever Vaccination Centers in Section 6:


Page 76


City:

Center:


Clinic Hours:


Erie, Pennsylvania

Erie County Department of Health
2101 Peach Street
Tel: GL 2-3950

2:00 3:30 p.m.
1st & 3rd Wed. of each month


Fee:


THE MIORBIDITY AND MORTALITY AEERL Y REPORT. WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 3 0,.,` 15 'PUBLli-IED BY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER ATLANTA. CEORCIA 3033
CHIEF COMMUNICA&L.E DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARD. M.D.
CHI-EF EPIDEMIOLOCY BRANCH- A. D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
CHIEF STATI5TICE EEC TiON R. E. SERFLING. PH.D.
AST. C-IEF ST 4TIT ICS SECTION IDA L. SHERMAN, M.S.
C I'EF SU R.EILL .NCE EEC TION D. A. HENDER5ON. M.D.
ASSISTANT TEO TOR MMA.R PAUL D. STOLLEY. M.D.
IN ADDITION TO TH-E ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
IMORBIDITV AND MORTALITY. Tr-E COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
V.ELCOMET ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASES. SUCH
ACCOUNTS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO
THE EDITOR
MORBtDIT'i AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEA-E CENTER
ATLANTA. GEORCIA 'j033J:
NOTE THI-iEE R'ROr'IONAL DATA ARE BASED ON WEEKLY TELE-
GR.hI TO T. E CDC BY THE INDIVIDUAL STATE HEALTH DEPART-
MIENT-. Ti -E REPORTING AEEK CONCLUDES ON SATURDAY. COMPILED
DATA ON A NATIONAL BASIS ARE RELEASED ON THE SUCCEEDING
FRIC;A A .
SYMBOLS *--DATA NOT AVAILABLE
SQUAN TTY ZERO
TI-E CONSTRUCTION OF THE MORTALITY CURVES IS DESCRIBED IN
.OL 4. NO 1.


n
a X

an

5
n



*

an<


S UNIV OF FL LIB
DOCUMENTS DEPT


*US DEPOSITOR


US DEPOSITORY




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EQGYA9J5M_M67EB0 INGEST_TIME 2013-02-07T19:24:06Z PACKAGE AA00010654_00418
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES