Morbidity and mortality

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Morbidity and mortality
Uniform Title:
Morbidity and mortality (Washington, D.C. : 1952)
Running title:
Weekly mortality report
Weekly morbidity report
Morbidity and mortality weekly report
Abbreviated Title:
Morb. mortal.
Physical Description:
25 v. : ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- National Office of Vital Statistics
Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
National Communicable Disease Center (U.S.)
Center for Disease Control
Publisher:
The Office
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Communicable diseases -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Morbidity -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Mortality -- Periodicals -- United States   ( mesh )
Statistics, Medical -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Statistics, Vital -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also issued online.
Statement of Responsibility:
Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Office of Vital Statistics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 11, 1952)-v. 25, no. 9 (Mar. 6, 1976).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: U.S. National Office of Vital Statistics, 1952-Jan. 6, 1961; Communicable Disease Center, 1961- ; National Communicable Disease Center, ; Center for Disease Control, -Mar. 6, 1976.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02246644
lccn - 74648956
issn - 0091-0031
ocm02246644
Classification:
lcc - RA407.3 .A37
ddc - 312/.3/0973
nlm - W2 A N25M
System ID:
AA00010654:00414

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly mortality index
Preceded by:
Weekly morbidity report
Succeeded by:
Morbidity and mortality weekly report


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text





Morbidity and Mortalit



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE


Prepared by the


I COMMUNICABLEDISEASECENTR: ]


ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333


PROVISIONAL INFORMATION ON SELECTED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES IN THE UNITE
DEATHS IN SELECTED CITIES FOR WEEK ENDED AUGUST 29, 1964


ENCEPHALITIS


A total of 355 cases of primary encephalitis was re-
ported for the week ended August 29. This brings to
1,813 the cumulative total thus far in 1964. A compari-
son of this year's sum with that of comparable periods
for previous years is not possible because reporting of
primary encephalitis, as a separate category, did not
begin until January 1, 1964.
Of the cases reported during the past week, 321 were
from Texas; these reports were based on clinical diag-


noses. The remainder were scattered throughout the coun-
try. In Texas, the cases were reported from 2 known
epidemic areas (see MMWR Vol. 13, pp. 289-292). There
were 293 cases in Harris County (Houston) and 28 in the
South Plains area (centered around Plainview).

Further epidemiologic reports on these 2 epidemics,
and outbreaks in Illinois and Colorado are included in
this issue on pages 302-305.


Table 1. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES
(Cumulative totals include revised and delayed reports through previous weeks)
35th Week Ended Cumulative, First 35 Weeks
Disease August 29, August 31, Median Median
1964 1963 1959 1963 1964 1963 1959 1963
Aseptic meningitis ................ 57 53 --- 1,233 1,071
Brucellosis ....................... 6 5 8 291 248 413
Diphtheria .......................- 2 8 174 158 374
Encephalitis, primary infectious.. 355 --- 1,813 ---
Encephalitis, post-infectious ..... 10 39 --- 674 1,066 -
Hepatitis, infectious including
serum hepatitis ................ 536 675 689 26,544 29,714 29,714
Measles ........................... 704 663 871 433,292 357,005 385,628
Meningococcal infections .......... 24 32 26 1,849 1,720 1,535
Poliomyelitis, Total .............. 2 33 58 72 237 617
Paralytic ...................... 2 28 35 60 202 417
Nonparalytic ................... 5 --- 9 24 ---
Unspecified .....................- --- 3 11---
Streptococcal Sore Throat and
Scarlet fever .................. 3,877 2,994 --- 287,363 244,813 ---
Tetanus ........................... 4 10 --- 181 167 ---
Tularemia ......................... 6 9 --- 229 195 ---
Typhoid fever ..................... 10 17 18 273 318 510
Rabies in Animals ................. 101 46 46 3,163 2,614 2,614

Table 2. NOTIFIABLE DISEASES OF LOW FREQUENCY
Cum. Cum.
Anthrax: 3 Psittacosis: Calif 2 30
Botulism: 11 Rabies in Man:
Leptospirosis: 29 Smallpox:
Malaria: NJ 1, Ky 1 59 Typhus-
Plague: HMrine: 19
SRky Mt. Spotted:Mo-l, NC-2, Kans-1, Va-1 162


5n. mlne P~rmn A 1OAA1


c .5 arb ^. /r, I I/ .I






REPORTED CASES OF SUSPECT ENCEPHALITIS BY WEEK OF ONSET
HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS-1964


FATAL CASES


01 I I "II inL- m m al I


16 23 30 6 13 20 27 4


II 18 25 1


JULY


15 22


AUG


I | I i
29 5 12 19 26

SEPT


* 425 Cases with known date of onset.
** Through August 31


140.


120.




100.


40.




20.


MAY


JUNE








303


Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

EPIDEMIOLOGIC REPORTS

ENCEPHALITIS


TEXAS
Harris County
Through August 31, a total of 445 cases of clinical
encephalitis, including 19 deaths, was reported in Harris
County (Houston), Texas. Serologic evidence of infection
by the virus of St. Louis encephalitis is definite in 7
cases, and presumptive in 30 additional cases. Virus
isolations have not been made from any human cases.
A histogram of the 425 cases with known dates of
onset is shown ( left ); fatal cases with known dates
of onset are so identified. The earliest case had onset
during the week ended June 6 and 4 cases became ill the
following week. Cases resumed with 6 during the week
ended July 4 and gradually increased to 27 for the week
ended August 8. Then an abrupt increase to 52 cases
occurred in the week ended August 15, and continued with
115 and 121 cases for the weeks ended August 22 and 29,
respectively.
The 19 deaths mentioned above are 3 fewer than the
total previously reported (see MMWR Vol. 13, page 290).
While 3 additional deaths have been reported, in 6 others
previously included the cause of death has been changed
from encephalitis. These 19 deaths constitute a 4 per-
cent case fatality rate. With one exception, the deaths
for which ages are known have occurred in persons over
50 years.
Fourteen of the deaths have been in males.
Early in the epidemic, the cases were chiefly from
a single lower socioeconomic area of Houston; since,
cases have occurred throughout Houston and a few else-
where in Harris County.


Of the 419 cases, for which sex and race are known,
243 are in males, 176 in females.
Totals of 317 have occurred in whites and 102 in
non-whites, as seen in the following table:



M F Total


White

Non-White


186 131 317


102

419


The overall attack rate is 35.8 per 100,000. The
age specific attack rates are of similar magnitude for
all age groups under 50. After 50 years, a progressive
rise in incidence with advancing age is found. The age
and sex distribution of the cases are presented in the
table above.
Culex quinquefasciatus has been identified as the
predominant mosquito in collections made in Harris
County. No virus isolations have been obtained from
mosquitoes as yet. Vector control operations, including
larvaciding and fogging, are being continued.
(Reported by Charles A. P.,'f.rr.!. M.D., Director of Public
Health, Houston, Van C. 7I ,',r,. M. D., Director, Com-
municable Disease Division, Texas State Department of
Health, and a team from the Communicable Disease
Center.)


AGE AND SEX DISTRIBUTION OF REPORTED VIRAL ENCEPHALITIS
HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS
1964

Sex
Age Group Male Female Unknown Total Cases Rate per 100,000*
0.9 55 26 5 86 28.2
10.19 37 22 7 66 32.9
20.29 39 39 3 81 48.3
30.39 27 21 1 49 24.8
40.49 19 13 0 32 20.4
50.59 19 19 1 39 34.7
60.69 21 16 1 38 60.3
70+ 25 19 0 44 111.3
Unknown 1 1 8 10 -
Total 243 176 26 445 35.8

*1960 Census







REPORTED CASES OF ENCEPHALITIS BY WEEK OF ONSET

HALE COUNTY, TEXAS-1964


FATAL CASES


Rn,."


SRFF


.

... :-: :1

- -: 1,

-.. -::: -.:


- :: : :l .


~'*1 U-.-


16 23 30 6 13 20


MAY


27 4


JUNE


18 25


JULY


----

,aiiii
L;IL~
: :r~:::


:::::::..

:: :

:i~):~~'
*I...t~
jj~js:::::
. ':.:'
~~iitli
ii::: .:::::t

~ii-----
..:...:..
~jil
:::::;


I8 I I I I 1 I
8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26


AUG


SEPT


* 51 Cases with known date of onset.
** Through August 31


:.:-: ':` :
: :
:::''-
.....:
:
... ...:


:


:.~:11:
:.:

.:
`'

:...:


0
9
0
0Z



0e






0
** 9








Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


South Plains Area
A total of 51 cases with 3 deaths of clinical enceph-
alitis in humans has been reported through August 31 in
the South Plains area of Texas. Hale County reported 48
of these cases; the remainder were from surrounding
counties (see MMWR Vol. 13, p. 291).
The histogram (left) depicts the cases in Hale
County by week on onset of symptoms. The onset of the
first case was May 21. Single cases occurred in 5 of the
following 8 weeks. For the subsequent week ended
August 1, 2 persons became ill then 6 the following week.
The cases totalled 13, 10, and 13 for the weeks ended
August 15, 22, and 29, respectively. The 3 fatalities, all
infants, had onsets in August.
As seen from the table below, the over-all attack
rate is 130 per 100,000, with the highest rate in the
0-4 age group.

Age Specific Attack Rates for Reported Viral Encephalitis
Hale County, Texas, 1964
Age Group No. Cases Attack Rote 100,000
0-4 17 361
5-9 7 156
10.19 4 58
20.29 8 167
30.39 7 154
40.59 5 67
60+ 0 0
Total 48 130

The 3 cases which occurred outside of Hale County
involved children in the 0-4 year age group.
Hemagglutination inhibition tests against Western
and St. Louis Encephalitis viruses were performed on
convalescent phase serum specimens from 10 patients in
the South Plains area. Titers against Western Encepha-
litis ranging from 1:80 to 1:2560 were obtained in 7
cases. The serum of one reacted to St. Louis Encepha-
litis antigen in a titer of 1:80. Sera from the remaining 2
were negative to both agents.
About 80 percent of the more than 3,000 adult mos-
quitoes collected in the outbreak areas August 20-22
were Culex tarsalis, a known vector of Western En-
cephalitis.
The State laboratory at Austin has isolated the virus
of Western Encephalitis from pools of mosquitoes col-
lected in Hale County. Of 47 additional pools collected
and tested by CDC Disease Ecology Section, Greeley,
Colorado, 26 have yielded the same agent, with 2 other
isolates yet unidentified. The mosquitoes were caught
during the period July 27 through August 17.
(Reported by Dr. Van C. Tipton, Director, Division of
Communicable Disease Control, Texas State Department
of Health, and a team from the Communicable Disease
Center)

Editor's Note: The age distribution of cases in the South
Plains area is markedly different from that of the cases
reported in Houston. One half the South Plains cases are
in children under 10; no illnesses have occurred in
patients aged 60 or older.


ILLINOIS

Eight cases of clinical encephalitis, including 2
deaths, were reported in Illinois. The dates of onset
ranged from July 29 to this past week. The 2 fatalities
occurred on August 11 and 30. All cases involved resi-
dents of one community in Hamilton County in south-
central Illinois. All but one of the patients were over
the age of 70; the oldest was 83 years, the youngest 39.
The patients symptoms have included headache,
lethargy, coma, pronounced nuchal rigidity, and fevers
to 104 F. Gastrointestinal symptoms have not been
noted. The clinical illnesses were more severe than that
seen in the 4 patients with encephalitis-like illness
reported from the Pekin area (see MMWR Vol. 13, page
292).
Laboratory studies are in progress.
(Reported by Norman J. Rose, M.D., Chief, Bureau of
Epidem.,Jlogy, Illinois Department of Public Health, and
a team from CDC)



COLORADO

Eleven cases of clinical encephalitis were reported
from widely separate areas of Colorado; 4 were from Fort
Collins, 4 from the Denver area, 2 from Durango and one
from Greeley. All cases have occurred since August 10.
Results of laboratory studies are not yet available.
The symptoms, experienced were headache, lethargy,
and coma. Some patients were noted to be hyperactive
prior to becoming comatose; several victims experienced
transient paralysis of the facial muscles and/or ex-
tremities. Two patients had ocular weakness and con-
stricted pupils. Cerebral spinal fluid examination of 8
patients revealed the presence of an abnormal number of
cells; in 6, these were predominantly lymphocytes.
The 4 patients in the Denver area resided near a
fish hatchery, where the mosquito population has been
unusually large. The patients were males, aged 9, 11, 18
and 24 years. Dates of onset ranged from August 15
through 27.
The patients in Fort Collins included a 59-year-old
male and 3 females aged 8, 36 and 49. Onset dates were
from August 10 through 20. Since August 5, there have
been several horse deaths in Fort Collins; these were
attributed clinically, to encephalitis.
The 2 patients in Durango were 3 and 5 year old
boys who became ill August 21 and 25, respectively.
The Greeley case involved an 8 year old boy who
became ill on August 27.
(Reported by Dr. C. S. Mollohan, Chief, Section of Epi-
demiology, Division of Preventive Medical Services,
Colorado State Department of Hearl and a team from
CDC).


305







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


RABIES Michigan


Six persons are receiving prophylactic treatment for
rabies as the result of bites from a confirmed rabid dog,
which developed clinical signs of the illness after ship-
ment from Haiti to Detroit.
On July 29 the dog, a miniature male pinscher, left
Port-au-Prince, Haiti via a commercial airline. Upon
arrival in Detroit on July 31 the dog was placed in a
boarding kennel until its new master, the father-in-law
of its owner in Haiti, claimed it on August 2.
Prior to leaving, the dog bit the kennel owner and an
attendant. In its new home, the dog bit 2 children, aged
11 and 8, and 2 adult women; the dog was returned to the
kennel later the same day.
On August 3 the dog appeared sick and was brought
to a veterinary hospital. During a physical examination
the dog stopped breathing, but was revived. The dog
lapsed into coma again August 4 and died in the hospital.
Post-mortem examination of the dog's head was positive
for rabies.
Epidemiologic investigation indicated that the rabid
dog was attacked and severely mauled by another dog in
Haiti. The pinscher had been vaccinated against rabies


with modified live virus vaccine in Michigan on August
17, 1962.
All persons who were bitten by the dog are under
treatment.

(Reported by C. P. Anderson, M.D., Health Commissioner,
and Robert F. Willson, D.V.M., Director, Burezu of Food
Sanitation Inspection, Detroit Health Department; and
Donald Coohon, D.V.M., Public Health Veterinarian, and
George H. Agate, M.D., Director, Division of Epidemi-
ology, Michigin Department of Health.)

Editor's Note: The modified live virus vaccine used to
immunize this animal has been shown to provide pro-
tection for a 3-year period. Vaccines prepared from in-
activated rabies virus suspensions offer protection for
one year.
This case of rabies in a vaccinated dog appears to
be the result of an immunologic failure. Documented
vaccination failures occur infrequently; they are most
common in young animals which have been vaccinated
but once.


CHEMICAL FOOD POISONING New York


Eleven caddies experienced nausea, severe vomiting
and severe abdominal cramps within 15 minutes after
consuming a "soft drink" at a Nassau County golf club
on April 3. No diarrhea, or systemic symptoms were
reported. None required hospitalization; all recovered
without known sequelae. The beverage was commercially
prepared by the mixture of syrup with carbonated water in
a vending machine.
Epidemiologic investigation revealed that a pipe
carrying water into the machine was connected to the
recirculating hot water heating system instead of the
drinking water system. Although the wrong connection had
been present for one year, there had been no incidents


reported previously. The day prior to this incident, 2
gallons of a rust and corrosive preventive were added to
the hot water heating system; the product contained
sodium bichromate, trisodium phosphate, and a 50 percent
solution of sodium hydroxide.
Laboratory analysis revealed 440 ppm of hexavalent
chromium in the water (pH 12.39) and 420 ppm in the
carbonated water of the vending machine (pH 6.28).

(Reported by I.J. Tartakow, M.D., Deputy Commissioner,
Nassau County Health Department, and Julia L. Freitag,
M.D., Assistant Director, Office of Epidemiology, New
York State Health Department.)


SALMONELLOSIS Utah


Forty-four cases of gastroenteritis occurred follow-
ing a college sorority alumnae luncheon held on April 11
in Salt Lake County, Utah. A total of 700 women con-
sumed the meal. Eight of the 44 cases were culturally
confirmed, and in all of these, S. heidelberg was the
etiologic agent.
Epidemiologic investigation implication bulk, un-'


pasteurized, frozen whole eggs used in the preparation
of banana cream pie as the probable source of contamination.

(Reported by Dr. Elton Newman, Director of Division of
Preventive Medicine and Medical Facilities, Utah State
Health Department; and Dr. A. A. Jenkins, Director,
Communicable Diseases Section, Utah State Health
Department, and a team from CDC.)


306







Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


OUTBREAK OF SALMONELLOSIS-WADSWORTH VA HOSPITAL
JULY 7 12, 1964


7/9


7/10 7/ 11


TIME OF ONSET (6 HOUR INTERVALS)

SALMONELLOSIS California


An outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in the James
Wadsworth Veterans Administration Hospital, Los Angeles,
during July. At least 121 patients and 7 kitchen employees
in the intermediary care unit of the hospital were affected.
The symptoms included fever, diarrhea, cramps, nausea.
and vomiting. The epidemic curve (see accompanying
graph) suggested a common source outbreak. Fifty-two of
the illpatients had stool cultures positive for S.heidelberg.
Although bacteriologic confirmation of the suspected
vehicle of infection could not be made, epidemiologic
data suggested that tapioca pudding was responsible for
the outbreak.
The ingredients used in making tapioca pudding con-
sisted of milk, tapioca, cornstarch, sugar, egg yolks, and
egg whites. The day before the pudding was prepared,
shell eggs were cracked by hand and the yolks and'whites
placed in separate containers. These were refrigerated
overnight. Between 10:00 and 11:00 a.m. the following
morning the pudding was prepared. Milk, sugar, tapioca


and cornstarch were boiled and allowed to cool slightly.
The egg yolks were then added and the mixture was
brought to the "breaking point" (just before boiling).
After allowing the mixture to cool, the refrigerated egg
whites were added into the pudding. The pudding was not
reheated and was allowed to stand for two to three hours
before being served during the evening meal.

(Reported by Dr. Philip Condit, Director, Division of
Communicable Diseases, California State Department of
Health, Dr. 9 lliam, Davis, Director, James Wadsworth VA
Hospital, Los Angeles, and a team from CDC).

Editor's Note: S. heidelberg accounts for about 8 percent
of the total isolations of Salmonella from humans in the
United States as reported to the Salmonella Surveillance
Unit, CDC. The greatest number of S. heidelberg isola-
tions are reported from California; that State accounts for
20 percent of the nation's total of this serotype.


307


7/7


mF n r-l


I 7/12


V _


F-1


Fe










308 Ilorbidity and Mortalit Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED

AUGUST 29, 1964 AND AUGUST 31, 1963 (35TH WEEK)


Aseptic Encephalitis
Aseptic
Meningitis Primary Post-Inf. Poliomyelitis, Total Cases Poliomyelitis, Paralytic
Area
Cumulative Cumulative
1964 1963 1964 1964 1964 1963 1964 1963 1964 1963 1964 1963
UNITED STATES... 57 53 355 10 2 33 72 237 2 28 60 202

NEW ENGLAND.......... 1 7 2 1 4 2 1 4
Maine............... 1 1 -1
New Hampshire...... -
Vermont............. 4 1 1 1 1
Massachusetts...... 1 1 2 1 2
Rhode Island....... 1 1 -
Connecticut........ 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 13 7 8 2 26 12 80 21 11 62
New York City...... 6 1 1 1
New York, Up-State. 1 5 1 2 9 7 8 5
New Jersey......... 2 6 2 1 2 1
Pennsylvania....... 4 2 26 72 21 56

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 5 16 11 1 1 1 11 31 1 1 10 23
Ohio................ 2 7 2 8 2 4
Indiana............ 1 2 2 2 2 1
Illinois.......... 1 5 1 1 4 12 1 4 11
Michigan........... 2 10 2 1 2 5 1 1 5
Wisconsin ......... 1 4 1 2

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 7 2 3 1 4 5 1 3 4
Minnesota........... 6 2 2 3 3
Iowa............... -
Missouri............ 1 3 1 2
North Dakota....... -
South Dakota....... .
Nebraska........... 1
Kansas........... ... -

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 6 5 2 1 2 23 30 2 18 27
Delaware........... 1 1 1 1
Maryland............ 1 -
Dist. of Columbia.. -
Virginia ............ -1 2 I
West Virginia..... 1 1 2 1 2
North Carolina..... 9 3 5 3
South Carolina..... 3 2 5 2 4
Georgia............ 2 1 10 2 1 9
Florida............ 1 4 2 9 7 8 7

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 5 1 2 5 45 2 4 43
Kentucky........... 5 -
Tennessee......... 2 3 7 2 2 7
Alabama............. 2 35 2 33
Mississippi ........ 1 3 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 5 323 1 6 21 6 21
Arkansas ........... 1 1 3 3
Louisiana.......... 1 13 13
Oklahoma............ 2 2 -
Texas.............. 5 321 4 5 4 5

MOUNTAIN............. 1 2 2 7 2 4 1
Montana............. 1
Idaho............... 1 1
Wyoming............ 2- 2
Colorado ........... 2 1
New Mexico......... 3 1 -
Arizona............ 1 -
Utah.....................
Nevada............. .

PACIFIC ............. 14 14 5 5 3 19 3 17
Washington.......... 1 2 2 2
Oregon.............. 1 1 2 1 1
California.......... 14 13 3 4 2 15 2 14
Alaska.............. .
Hawaii.............. .

Puerto Rico 4 4









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 309


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
AUGUST 29, 1964 AND AUGUST 31, 1963 (35TH WEEK) CONTINUED


Infectious Hepatitis
Brucellosis Diphtheria including Serum Hepatitis Typhoid Fever
Area Under 20 years Age
Cum. Cum. Total 20 years and over Unknown Cumulative Cum.
1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1963 1964 1964

UNITED STATES... 6 291 174 536 229 276 31 26,544 29,714 10 273

NEW ENGLAND.......... 2 44 35 12 20 3 2,504 3,163 13
Maine .............. 39 7 4 3 804 1,433
New Hampshire...... 5 3 2 189 284
Vermont............ 1 1 315 51
Massachusetts...... 2 5 10 4 6 537 905 6
Rhode Island....... 3 1 2 130 74 6
Connecticut......... 9 6 3 529 416 1

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 5 7 114 50 64 5,933 5,846 1 41
New York City...... 3 12 6 6 899 881 1 16
New York, Up-State. 2 48 21 27 2,637 2,583 9
New Jersey......... 2 12 4 8 1,030 863 1
Pennsylvania....... 3 2 42 19 23 1,367 1,519 15

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 3 41 8 102 40 52 10 4,144 4,854 3 64
Ohio............... 2 30 11 14 5 1,095 1,337 23
Indiana............ 1 1 4 1 3 357 435 1 13
Illinois........... 2 26 6 25 9 14 2 748 1,055 2 16
Michigan........... 1 6 1 39 18 21 1,637 1,810 9
Wisconsin.......... 6 4 1 3 307 217 3

WEST NORTH CENTRAL.. 127 26 25 8 16 1 1,428 1,344 26
Minnesota.......... 7 11 8 3 5 155 203 3
Iowa............... 82 6 1 4 1 211 244 4
Missouri........... 9 1 2 2 352 499 9
North Dakota...... 2 2 2 2 55 44 2
South Dakota....... 14 1 -- 116 89 1
Nebraska............ 11 4 35 94 3
Kansas............. 2 7 7 2 5 504 171 4

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 27 40 49 23 24 2 2,500 3,031 3 59
Delaware............ 48 44 -
Maryland............ 16 7 9 476 376 1 4
Dist. of Columbia.. 2 2 43 83 -
Virginia............. 13 9 4 4 1 390 624 10
West Virganis....... 4 1 3 374 468 -
North Carolina..... 3 6 3 3 433 774 1 17
South Carolina..... 7 92 127 1 11
Georgia............ 8 20 3 3 65 123 3
Florida............ 3 13 9 3 5 1 579 412 14

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 15 6 25 12 13 1,826 2,854 2 27
Kentucky........... 4 3 2 1 699 811 7
Tennessee........ ... 1 5 1 13 6 7 626 1,111 2 13
Alabama............. .. 4 3 7 4 3 329 451 5
Mississippi........ 2 2 2 2 172 481 2

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 1 31 27 47 30 17 2,027 2,099 20
Arkansas........... 5 5 2 3 200 241 10
Louisiana.......... 4 5 11 7 4 472 415 3
Oklahoma............ 4 1 1 101 96 4
Texas ............. 1 18 22 30 20 10 1,254 1,347 3

MOUNTAIN............. 25 2 26 11 2 13 1,616 1,925 7
Montana............. 1 1 141 241 -
Idaho............... 7 7 208 314
Wyoming............. 50 25 1
Colorado............. 3 1 2 436 398 -
New Mexico......... 1 1 5 5 232 226 2
Arizona............ 2 1 4 4 362 446 4
Utah............... 21 6 5 1 137 259 -
Nevada............. 1 I 50 16 -

PACIFIC.............. 1 18 14 113 43 68 2 4,566 4,598 1 16
Washington......... 13 7 3 4 486 793 2
Oregon.............. 2 18 6 10 2 505 564 -
California......... 1 16 1 79 30 49 3,339 3,094 1 14
Alaska............. 3 2 1 141 114 -
Hawaii............. 6 2 4 95 33

Puerto Rico 9 20 19 1 616 574 9








310 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report


Table 3. CASES OF SPECIFIED NOTIFIABLE DISEASES: UNITED STATES

FOR WEEKS ENDED
AUGUST 29, 1964 AND AUGUST 31, 1963 (35TH WEEK) CONTINUED


Streptococcal
Meningococcal Sore Throat and Rabies in
Measles Meningitis Scarlet Fever Tetanus Tularemia Animals
Area ---
Cumulative Cum. Cum. Cum.
1964 1964 1964 1963 1964 1963 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964 1964
UNITED STATES... 704 24 1,849 1,720 3,877 2,994 4 181 6 229 101 3,163

NEW ENGLAND.......... 79 2 52 109 309 144 8 1 1 29
Maine.............. 31 5 17 55 6 1 25
New Hampshire...... 1 4 -
Vermont............. 5 1 4 2 2
Massachusetts...... 30 1 21 51 17 7 8 1 I
Rhode Island....... 8 10 4 6 -
Connecticut........ 13 1 16 23 231 125 -

MIDDLE ATLANTIC...... 49 1 251 240 97 89 2 19 2 88
New York City...... 22 35 37 1 2 -
New York, Up-State. 5 71 75 80 62 1 7 2 84
New Jersey.......... 15 1 85 33 1 10 1 6 -
Pennsylvania....... 7 60 95 15 15 6 4

EAST NORTH CENTRAL... 84 6 264 265 304 175 32 2 19 17 440
Ohio............... 10 1 69 75 24 17 9 1 9 229
Indiana............. 15 1 41 31 37 43 5 2 21
Illinois........... 9 2 67 51 28 39 11 2 12 4 87
Michigan........... 19 1 59 81 154 41 6 1 1 44
Wisconsin.............. 31 1 28 27 61 35 1 3 3 59

WEST NORTH CENTRAL... 20 1 118 109 95 106 9 1 48 26 1,010
Minnesota.......... 1 27 22 5 4 1 2 11 310
Iowa............... 8 6 6 16 16 3 1 6 363
Missouri........... 2 55 33 12 4 3 24 2 153
North Dakota....... 6 1 16 10 56 20 3 53
South Dakota....... 3 5 6 1 1 1 13 74
Nebraska........... 6 22 31
Kansas............. NN 8 11 61 1 8 4 26

SOUTH ATLANTIC....... 71 3 394 318 540 258 2 53 21 11 432
Delaware........... 5 6 2 8 7 -
Maryland............ 2 1 26 49 78 5 3 -
Dist. of Columbia.. 12 6 2 1 1 -
Virginia............ 7 46 72 89 47 1 6 4 6 228
West Virginia...... 18 1 30 16 242 78 1 1 26
North Carolina..... 1 1 69 55 9 4 13 5 5
South Carolina..... 1 50 15 10 13 4 2
Georgia............ 55 24 15 1 1 4 11 4 97
Florida............ 37 100 79 89 101 21 74

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL... 78 2 158 126 769 760 19 25 6 375
Kentucky........... 11 1 52 27 35 4 5 1 1 51
Tennessee.......... 61 1 54 56 684 719 9 17 5 308
Alabama............ 6 34 21 36 4 3 16
Mississippi........ 18 22 14 37 1 4 -

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL... 109 2 169 163 478 436 18 1 75 18 459
Arkansas........... 18 20 11 1 6 41 1 113
Louisiana.......... 2 1 111 66 6 2 3 3 5 40
Oklahoma............ 3 1 8 29 9 19 6 81
Texas.............. 86 30 57 463 433 9 1 12 6 225

MOUNTAIN............. 75 1 66 59 757 720 5 2 37 8 113
Montana........... 10 3 14 24 18 -
Idaho............... 12 3 6 11 46 -
Wyoming............ 5 4 19 8 2 2 7 -
Colorado........... 10 11 16 279 233 -- 8
New Mexico......... 8 1 27 4 289 268 1 47
Arizona............ 11 5 9 74 51 1 2 48
Utah................ 23 7 14 71 90 1 12 1
Nevada.............. 8 3 6 9

PACIFIC .............. 139 6 377 331 528 306 18 3 12 217
Washington.......... 1 29 26 54 1 -
Oregon............... 16 21 25 11 5 1 8
California......... 101 6 308 260 410 278 16 2 12 209
Alaska............. 4 7 12 21 -
Hawaii............. 17 12 8 32 23 1 -

Puerto Rico 73 29 7 7 4 2 52 1 18









Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report





Table 4 (C). TOTAL DEATHS I UNDER 1 YEAR OF AGE IN REPORTING (.ITIEs



(Tables 4(A), 4(B), 4(C), and 4(D) will be published in sequence covering a four-week period.)o


311


For weeks ending For weeks ending
Area Area
8/8 8/15 8/22 8/29 8/8 8/15 8/22 8/29


NEW ENGLAND:
Boston, Mass..............
Bridgeport, Conn..........
Cambridge, Mass............
Fall River, Mass..........
Hartford, Conn............
Lowell, Mass..............
Lynn, Mass................
New Bedford, Mass.........
New Haven, Conn...........
Providence, R.I...........
Somerville, Mass..........
Springfield, Mass.........
Waterbury, Conn...........
Worcester, Mass...........

MIDDLE ATLANTIC:
Albany, N.Y...............
Allentown, Pa............
Buffalo, N.Y...............
Camden, N.J...............
Elizabeth, N.J............
Erie, Pa.................
Jersey City, N.J..........
Newark, N.J................
New York City, N.Y........
Paterson, N.J.............
Philadelphia, Pa..........
Pittsburgh, Pa............
Reading, Pa...............
Rochester, N.Y.............
Schenectady, N.Y...........
Scranton, Pa,.............
Syracuse, N.Y.............
Trenton, N.J..............
Utica, N.Y.................
Yonkers, N.Y..............

EAST NORTH CENTRAL:
Akron, Ohio...............
Canton, Ohio...............
Chicago, Ill..............
Cincinnati, Ohio..........
Cleveland, Ohio............
Columbus, Ohio............
Dayton, Ohio..............
Detroit, Mich.............
Evansville, Ind...........
Flint, Mich...............
Fort Wayne, Ind..........
Gary, Ind................
Grand Rapids, Mich........
Indianapolis, Ind.........
Madison, Wis.............
Milwaukee, Wis............
Peoria, Ill...............
Rockford, Ill.............
South Bend, Ind...........
Toledo, Ohio..............
Youngstown, Ohio...........

WEST NORTH CENTRAL:
Des Moines, Iowa...........
Duluth, Minn...............
Kansas City, Kans.........
Kansas City, Mo............
Lincoln, Nebr.............
Minneapolis, Minn.........
Omaha, Nebr................
St. Louis, Mo.............
St. Paul, Minn............
Wichita, Kans.............


10
I
1

5


2
1
4
1
2
1
3


4
1
14
5
2
3
6
7
81
1
21
13
2
6
1
2
4
4
2
1


7
2
60
7
12
10
9
14

4
3
3
2
14

7
2
1
1
2



5
2
4
10

2
4
11
9
8


SOUTH ATLANTIC:
Atlanta, Ga.............. 10 20 10 11
Baltimore, Md ............ 14 31 23 16
Charlotte, N.C............ 4 4 5 3
Jacksonville, Fla........ 5 6 2 4
Miami, Fla................ 5 5 7 6
Norfolk, Va.............. 4 7 3 3
Richmond, Va............. 7 6 4 7
Savannah, Ga............. I 4 3
St. Petersburg, Fla...... 3 3 1
Tampa, Fla............... 9 9 6 5
Washington, D.C.......... 19 14 12 22
Wilmington, Del.......... 3 3 1 2

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Birmingham, Ala .......... 5 5 9 3
Chattanooga, Tenn........ 8 2 2 -
Knoxville, Tenn.......... 2 3 1 3
Louisville, Ky........... 6 6 3 4
Memphis, Tenn............ 17 11 12 6
Mobile, Ala.............. 5 5 7 3
Montgomery, Ala........... 1 4 3
Nashville, Tenn.......... 4 6 7 3

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL:
Austin, Tex.............. 5 4 -
Baton Rouge, La.......... 2 3 2
Corpus Christi, Tex...... 4 1 4 1
Dallas, Tex.............. 15 10 11 14
El Paso, Tex............. 7 2 2 5
Fort Worth, Tex.......... 4 6 11 7
Houston, Tex............. 21 21 19 19
Little Rock, Ark......... 3 1 7 5
New Orleans, La.......... 20 36 25 16
Oklahoma City, Okla...... 10 2 4 7
San Antonio, Tex......... 8 6 7 9
Shreveport, La........... 4 8 3 3
Tulsa, Okla.............. 6 5 2 2

MOUNTAIN:
Albuquerque, N. Mex...... 3 3 7 4
Colorado Springs, Colo... 2 2 3 1
Denver, Colo............. 6 6 11 7
Ogden, Utah.............. 2 6 1
Phoenix, Ariz............ 6 8 3 7
Pueblo, Colo............. 1 1 1 1
Salt Lake City, Utah..... 6 2 5 3
Tucson, Ariz............. 3 2 1 2

PACIFIC:
Berkeley, Calif.......... 2 -
Fresno, Calif............ 3 2 1 4
Glendale, Calif.......... 2 1 2 2
Honolulu, Hawaii......... 4 6 6 6
Long Beach, Calif........ 3 2 2 6
Los Angeles, Calif........ 38 40 26 25
Oakland, Calif........... 4 4 1 6
Pasadena, Calif.......... 2 1
Portland, Oreg........... 5 8 4 6
Sacramento, Calif........ 3 4 6 5
San Diego, Calif......... 13 5 10 2
San Francisco, Calif..... 6 7 9 15
San Jose, Calif.......... 1 3 3 3
Seattle, Wash............ 9 7 9 5
Spokane, Wash............ 2 4 1 3
Tacoma, Wash.............. 2 3 1 2


oCurrent Week Mortality for 108 Selected Cities

4(A) Total Mortality, all ages...................
4(B) Pneumonia-Influenza Deaths, all ages........
4(C) Total Deaths under 1 Year of Age............
4(D) Total Deaths, Persons 65 years and over.....


10,917
328
724
5,905


*Estimate based on average percent of divisional total.
Totals for previous weeks include reported corrections.

NOTE: All deaths by place of occurrence.










312 Morbidity and Moi





INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES

The weekly average number of infant deaths in 108
cities for the four-week period ending August 29 was 728
as compared with an expected 727 weekly average.


reality Weekly


OF
DGATt


**uni***
550












I. 1 .. ...
k


UNIVECnII T UP FLUKIUA


IIllllllllIUllIllllllIlIRllll1
3 1262 08864 2847

Report





DE7ATS INDER ONE YEAR OFAGE IN 10 US. CITIES
Aver0 Numbe, a WI9 b by Fow. WIk Prloadf


INFANT DEATHS IN 108 CITIES

Week Ending 4 Week Weekly

8/8 8/15 8/22 8/29 Total Average

Observed 739 777 671 724 2,911 728
Expected 723 726 728 731 2,908 727

Excess 16 51 -57 -7 3 1


INTERNATIONAL NOTES QUARANTINE MEASURES

Cholera Japan
A non-imported fatal case of cholera El Tor, Ogawa

Type, was reported on August 26 at Narashino, Chiba
Prefecture. The patient was a 23-year-old plumber who
was hospitalized August 23 and who died on the fol-
lowing day.
The patient stayed at a hotel where a healthy car-
rier was discovered among the boarders on August 26.
Further epidemiological investigation is in progress.
This is the first non-imported case of cholera in

Japan since 1946.
(Reported in Weekly Epidemiological Record, World
Health Organization, August 28, 1964).


THE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT, WITH A CIRCULA-
TION OF 12,000 IS PUBLISHED BY THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
CENTER. ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
CHIEF, COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER JAMES L. GODDARDM.D.
CHIEF, EPIDEMIOLOGY BRANCH A. D. LANGMUIR. M.D.
CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION R. E. SERFLING, PH.D.
ASST. CHIEF, STATISTICS SECTION 1. L. SHERMAN, M.S.
CHIEF, SURVEILLANCE SECTION D. A. HENDERSON, M.D.
DEPUTY CHIEF, SURV. SECTION J. D. MILLER, M.D.
EDITOR. MMWR L. K. ALTMAN, M.D.
ASSISTANT EDITOR, MMWR P. D. STOLLEY, M.D.

IN ADDITION TO THE ESTABLISHED PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY, THE COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
WELCOMES ACCOUNTS OF INTERESTING OUTBREAKS OR CASES. SUCH
ACCOUNTS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO:
LAWRENCE K. ALTMAN, M.D., EDITOR
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333
NOTES: THESE PROVISIONAL DATA ARE BASED ON WEEKLY TELE-
GRAMS TO THE.COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CENTER BY THE INDIVIDUAL
STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENTS.
SYMBOLS: DATA NOT AVAILABLE
QUANTITY ZERO
PROCEDURES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF VARIOUS MORTALITY CURVES
MAY BE OBTAINED FROM STATISTICS SECTION, COMMUNICABLE
DISEASE CENTER, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF
HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30333.


UNIV OF FL LIB
SDCUJMF NTS DEFPT





L S?
E P 1


(See table, page 311)


9

o 3
on



0 5


In
W in M
C3"


rn

-4
I



c
m
C.
no


t>


ZZ




m
r-

















.C




ma

Om

-m


M


V*" .- S CU m,


(See table,I pag~ m~ e 31




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EVE91ZQ7T_BBD1I0 INGEST_TIME 2013-02-07T17:57:55Z PACKAGE AA00010654_00414
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES